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Sample records for analysis structural evolution

  1. Structure and sequence based analysis of alpha-amylase evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    α-Amylases hydrolyze α- 1,4-glycosidic bonds during assimilation of biological macromolecules. The amino acid sequences of these enzymes in thousands of diverse organisms are known and the 3D structures of several proteins have been solved. The 3D structure analysis of these universal enzymes from diverse organisms has been studied by the generation of phylogenetic trees and structure based sequence analysis to generate a metric for the degree of conservation that is responsible for individual speciation. Greater similarities are observed between reference NCBI tree and structure based phylogenetic tree compared to sequence based phylogenetic tree indicating that structures truly represent the functional aspects of proteins than from the sequence information alone. We report differences in the profile specific conserved and insertion/deletion regions, factors responsible for the Ca(2+) and Cl(-) ion binding and the disulfide connectivity pattern that discriminate the enzymes over evolution.

  2. Structural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1993-03-01

    In this special report, financial executives discuss key trends in power project finance, new funding sources and evolving project structures. Industry wide, financial firms and developers are striving to improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of project financing, for projects in both greenfield development and the growing secondary market.

  3. Large-scale co-evolution analysis of protein structural interlogues using the global protein structural interactome map (PSIMAP).

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan K; Bolser, Dan M; Park, Jong H

    2004-05-01

    Interacting pairs of proteins should co-evolve to maintain functional and structural complementarity. Consequently, such a pair of protein families shows similarity between their phylogenetic trees. Although the tendency of co-evolution has been known for various ligand-receptor pairs, it has not been studied systematically in the widest possible scope. We investigated the degree of co-evolution for more than 900 family pairs in a global protein structural interactome map (PSIMAP--a map of all the structural domain-domain interactions in the PDB). There was significant correlation in 45% of the total SCOPs Family level pairs, rising to 78% in 454 reliable family interactions. Expectedly, the intra-molecular interactions between protein families showed stronger co-evolution than inter-molecular interactions. However, both types of interaction have a fundamentally similar pattern of co-evolution except for cases where different interfaces are involved. These results validate the use of co-evolution analysis with predictive methods such as PSIMAP to improve the accuracy of prediction based on "homologous interaction". The tendency of co-evolution enabled a nearly 5-fold enrichment in the identification of true interactions among the potential interlogues in PSIMAP. The estimated sensitivity was 79.2%, and the specificity was 78.6%. The results of co-evolution analysis are available online at http://www.biointeraction.org

  4. An Analysis of the Structure and Evolution of Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Guangying

    2011-01-01

    As network research receives more and more attention from both academic researchers and practitioners, network analysis has become a fast growing field attracting many researchers from diverse fields such as physics, computer science, and sociology. This dissertation provides a review of theory and research on different real data sets from the…

  5. An Analysis of the Structure and Evolution of Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Guangying

    2011-01-01

    As network research receives more and more attention from both academic researchers and practitioners, network analysis has become a fast growing field attracting many researchers from diverse fields such as physics, computer science, and sociology. This dissertation provides a review of theory and research on different real data sets from the…

  6. Convergent evolution in structural elements of proteins investigated using cross profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evolutionary relations of similar segments shared by different protein folds remain controversial, even though many examples of such segments have been found. To date, several methods such as those based on the results of structure comparisons, sequence-based classifications, and sequence-based profile-profile comparisons have been applied to identify such protein segments that possess local similarities in both sequence and structure across protein folds. However, to capture more precise sequence-structure relations, no method reported to date combines structure-based profiles, and sequence-based profiles based on evolutionary information. The former are generally regarded as representing the amino acid preferences at each position of a specific conformation of protein segment. They might reflect the nature of ancient short peptide ancestors, using the results of structural classifications of protein segments. Results This report describes the development and use of "Cross Profile Analysis" to compare sequence-based profiles and structure-based profiles based on amino acid occurrences at each position within a protein segment cluster. Using systematic cross profile analysis, we found structural clusters of 9-residue and 15-residue segments showing remarkably strong correlation with particular sequence profiles. These correlations reflect structural similarities among constituent segments of both sequence-based and structure-based profiles. We also report previously undetectable sequence-structure patterns that transcend protein family and fold boundaries, and present results of the conformational analysis of the deduced peptide of a segment cluster. These results suggest the existence of ancient short-peptide ancestors. Conclusions Cross profile analysis reveals the polyphyletic and convergent evolution of β-hairpin-like structures, which were verified both experimentally and computationally. The results presented here give us new insights into the

  7. Differential evolution: Global search problem in LEED-IV surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, V.B.; Plummer, E.W.

    2015-02-15

    The search process associated with the quantitative theory–experiment comparison in Low Energy Electron Diffraction surface structural analysis can be very time consuming, especially in the case of complex materials with many atoms in the unit cell. Global search algorithms need to be employed to locate the global minimum of the reliability factor in the multi-dimensional structural parameter space. In this study we investigate the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm in Low Energy Electron Diffraction structural analysis. Despite the simplicity of its mechanism the Differential Evolution algorithm presents an impressive performance when applied to ultra-thin films of BaTiO{sub 3}(001) in a theory–theory comparison. A scaling relation of N{sup (1.47} {sup ±} {sup 0.08)} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) for the LEED search problem. • The DE method was applied to the optimization of the surface structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}(001) ultra-thin films. • A very favorable scaling relation of N{sup 1.47} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized.

  8. Structure and evolution of a European Parliament via a network and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccio, Elena; Pajala, Antti; Piilo, Jyrki; Tumminello, Michele

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the network of relationships among elected members of the Finnish parliament, based on a quantitative analysis of initiative co-signatures, and its evolution over 16 years. To understand the structure of the parliament, we constructed a statistically validated network of members, based on the similarity between the patterns of initiatives they signed. We looked for communities within the network and characterized them in terms of members' attributes, such as electoral district and party. To gain insight on the nested structure of communities, we constructed a hierarchical tree of members from the correlation matrix. Afterwards, we studied parliament dynamics yearly, with a focus on correlations within and between parties, by also distinguishing between government and opposition. Finally, we investigated the role played by specific individuals, at a local level. In particular, whether they act as proponents who gather consensus, or as signers. Our results provide a quantitative background to current theories in political science. From a methodological point of view, our network approach has proven able to highlight both local and global features of a complex social system.

  9. Structure and evolution analysis of pollen receptor-like kinase in Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxu; Wang, He; Irfan, Muhammad; Fan, Mingxia; Lin, Feng

    2014-08-01

    Receptor-like kinase (RLKs) is an important member in protein kinase family which is widely involved in plant growth, development and defense responses. It is significant to analyze the kinase structure and evolution of pollen RLKs in order to study their mechanisms. In our study, 64 and 73 putative pollen RLKs were chosen from maize and Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the pollen RLKs were conservative and might had existed before divergence between monocot and dicot which were mainly concentrated in RLCK-VII and LRR-III two subfamilies. Chromosomal localization and gene duplication analysis showed the expansion of pollen RLKs were mainly caused by segmental duplication. By calculating Ka/Ks value of extracellular domain, intracellular domain and kinase domain in pollen RLKs, we found that the pollen RLKs duplicated genes had mainly experienced the purifying selection, while maize might have experienced weaker purifying selection. Meanwhile, extracellular domain might have experienced stronger diversifying selection than intracellular domain in both species. Estimation of duplication time showed that the duplication events of Arabidopsis have occurred approximately between 18 and 69 million years ago, compared to 0.67-170 million years ago of maize. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genre Analysis: Structural and Linguistic Evolution of the English-Medium Medical Research Article (1985-2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Li-Juan; Ge, Guang-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a corpus-based genre analysis of the structural and linguistic evolution of medical research articles (RAs) written in English. Towards that end, we analyzed the frequency of occurrence of the 11 moves identified by Nwogu (1997), of the three most frequently used verb tenses (simple past, simple present and present perfect) and…

  11. Genre Analysis: Structural and Linguistic Evolution of the English-Medium Medical Research Article (1985-2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Li-Juan; Ge, Guang-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a corpus-based genre analysis of the structural and linguistic evolution of medical research articles (RAs) written in English. Towards that end, we analyzed the frequency of occurrence of the 11 moves identified by Nwogu (1997), of the three most frequently used verb tenses (simple past, simple present and present perfect) and…

  12. Structural analysis of the evolution of steroid specificity in the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Ollikainen, Noah

    2007-02-16

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) evolved from a common ancestor. Still not completely understood is how specificity for glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol) and mineralocorticoids (e.g. aldosterone) evolved in these receptors. Our analysis of several vertebrate GRs and MRs in the context of 3D structures of human GR and MR indicates that with the exception of skate GR, a cartilaginous fish, there is a deletion in all GRs, at the position corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. This deletion occurs in a loop before helix 12, which contains the activation function 2 (AF2) domain, which binds coactivator proteins and influences transcriptional activity of steroids. Unexpectedly, we find that His-950 in human MR, which is conserved in the MR in chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque, is glutamine in all teleost and land vertebrate MRs, including New World monkeys and prosimians. Evolution of differences in the responses of the GR and MR to corticosteroids involved deletion in the GR of a residue corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. A mutation corresponding to His-950 in human MR may have been important in physiological changes associated with emergence of Old World monkeys from prosimians.

  13. Analysis of evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, Igor B; Sverdlov, Alexander V; Babenko, Vladimir N; Koonin, Eugene V

    2005-06-01

    The availability of multiple, complete eukaryotic genome sequences allows one to address many fundamental evolutionary questions on genome scale. One such important, long-standing problem is evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes. Analysis of orthologous genes from completely sequenced genomes revealed numerous shared intron positions in orthologous genes from animals and plants and even between animals, plants and protists. The data on shared and lineage-specific intron positions were used as the starting point for evolutionary reconstruction with parsimony and maximum-likelihood approaches. Parsimony methods produce reconstructions with intron-rich ancestors but also infer lineage-specific, in many cases, high levels of intron loss and gain. Different probabilistic models gave opposite results, apparently depending on model parameters and assumptions, from domination of intron loss, with extremely intron-rich ancestors, to dramatic excess of gains, to the point of denying any true conservation of intron positions among deep eukaryotic lineages. Development of models with adequate, realistic parameters and assumptions seems to be crucial for obtaining more definitive estimates of intron gain and loss in different eukaryotic lineages. Many shared intron positions were detected in ancestral eukaryotic paralogues which evolved by duplication prior to the divergence of extant eukaryotic lineages. These findings indicate that numerous introns were present in eukaryotic genes already at the earliest stages of evolution of eukaryotes and are compatible with the hypothesis that the original, catastrophic intron invasion accompanied the emergence of the eukaryotic cells. Comparison of various features of old and younger introns starts shedding light on probable mechanisms of intron insertion, indicating that propagation of old introns is unlikely to be a major mechanism for origin of new ones. The existence and structure of ancestral protosplice sites were

  14. Characteristic analysis on temporal evolution of floc size and structure in low-shear flow.

    PubMed

    He, Weipeng; Nan, Jun; Li, Haoyu; Li, Shengnan

    2012-02-01

    A series of flocculation tests were performed to investigate the effect of low-shear rates (G = 3-16 s(-1)) on flocculation of kaolin suspension by polyaluminum chloride (PACl), with the goal of understanding floc growth mechanisms. Results were reported in terms of floc average size (d(p)) and boundary fractal dimension (D(pf)), derived from a non-intrusive optical sampling and digital image analysis technique. As expected, the rate of floc aggregation increased with increasing G, resulting in faster changes in aggregate size and structure in the initial stage of flocculation. Nevertheless, steady state was attained faster for D(pf) than for d(p) at the same shear rates, possibly due to the self-similarity of fractal aggregates. An interesting finding was that at G = 3 s(-1), an obvious plateau was observed for the average-size evolution at steady state; for shear rates of 6 and 7 s(-1), the flocs exhibited some decrease after reaching the peak of size, mainly as a result of floc settling at steady state; and for G = 11-16 s(-1), a decrease in floc size was possibly attributed to the irreversibility of PACl-floc breakage. The process of floc growth was described using a fractal growth model, which defined flocculation as the result of the combined processes of aggregation and restructuring. The conceptual model could effectively characterize temporal changes in floc size and structure, and found that fragmentation followed by reformation seemed to be more effective in forming larger and more compact aggregates than the restructuring process due to erosion and reformation, which may provide useful insights for the design of flocculation reactors.

  15. Analysis of the secondary structure of ITS1 in Pectinidae: implications for phylogenetic reconstruction and structural evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin; Li, Ning; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Jingjie

    2007-01-01

    It is at present difficult to accurately position gaps in sequence alignment and to determine substructural homology in structure alignment when reconstructing phylogenies based on highly divergent sequences. Therefore, we have developed a new strategy for inferring phylogenies based on highly divergent sequences. In this new strategy, the whole secondary structure presented as a string in bracket notation is used as phylogenetic characters to infer phylogenetic relationships. It is no longer necessary to decompose the secondary structure into homologous substructural components. In this study, reliable phylogenetic relationships of eight species in Pectinidae were inferred from the structure alignment, but not from sequence alignment, even with the aid of structural information. The results suggest that this new strategy should be useful for inferring phylogenetic relationships based on highly divergent sequences. Moreover, the structural evolution of ITS1 in Pectinidae was also investigated. The whole ITS1 structure could be divided into four structural domains. Compensatory changes were found in all four structural domains. Structural motifs in these domains were identified further. These motifs, especially those in D2 and D3, may have important functions in the maturation of rRNAs.

  16. Evolution: functional evolution of nuclear structure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine L; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-10-17

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis.

  17. Insights into function, catalytic mechanism, and fold evolution of selenoprotein methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 through structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Aachmann, Finn L; Sal, Lena S; Kim, Hwa-Young; Marino, Stefano M; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Dikiy, Alexander

    2010-10-22

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases protect cells by repairing oxidatively damaged methionine residues in proteins. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure of the mammalian selenoprotein methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1), determined by high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Heteronuclear multidimensional spectra yielded NMR spectral assignments for the reduced form of MsrB1 in which catalytic selenocysteine (Sec) was replaced with cysteine (Cys). MsrB1 consists of a central structured core of two β-sheets and a highly flexible, disordered N-terminal region. Analysis of pH dependence of NMR signals of catalytically relevant residues, comparison with the data for bacterial MsrBs, and NMR-based structural analysis of methionine sulfoxide (substrate) and methionine sulfone (inhibitor) binding to MsrB1 at the atomic level reveal a mechanism involving catalytic Sec(95) and resolving Cys(4) residues in catalysis. The MsrB1 structure differs from the structures of Cys-containing MsrBs in the use of distal selenenylsulfide, residues needed for catalysis, and the mode in which the active form of the enzyme is regenerated. In addition, this is the first structure of a eukaryotic zinc-containing MsrB, which highlights the structural role of this metal ion bound to four conserved Cys. We integrated this information into a structural model of evolution of MsrB superfamily.

  18. Fractal parameterization analysis of ferroelectric domain structure evolution induced by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslovskaya, A. G.; Barabash, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents some results of fractal analysis of ferroelectric domain structure images visualized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The fractal and multifractal characteristics were estimated to demonstrate self-similar organization of ferroelectric domain structure registered with static and dynamic contrast modes of SEM. Fractal methods as sensitive analytical tools were used to indicate degree of domain structure and domain boundary imperfections. The electron irradiation-induced erosion effect of ferroelectric domain boundaries in electron beam-stimulated polarization current mode of SEM is characterized by considerable raising of fractal dimension. For dynamic contrast mode of SEM there was revealed that complication of domain structure during its dynamics is specified by increase in fractal dimension of images and slight raising of boundary fractal dimension.

  19. Lagrangian analysis of formation, structure, evolution and splitting of anticyclonic Kuril eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Lobanov, V. B.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    We studied in detail a mesoscale anticylonic eddy that has been sampled in the R/V Professor Gagarinskiy cruise (June-July 2012) in the area east of the Kuril Islands in the northwestern subarctic Pacific. Lagrangian approach was applied to study formation, structure and evolution of this feature called the eddy A and of its parent eddy B using a simulation with synthetic tracers advected by the AVISO velocity field. We used different Lagrangian methods and techniques to identify those eddies and their boundaries, to know their structure and to document their deformation, metamorphoses and splitting. It has been found that the eddy A was born as a result of splitting of the eddy B with the core water to be borrowed from the eddy B which, in turn, was influenced by the Okhotsk Sea water flowing into the ocean through the Kuril straits. The periphery of the eddy A was formed mainly by East Kamchatka Current water in the process of its winding onto the eddy A core by portions. All these processes have been documented in detail with the help of drift and tracking Lagrangian maps computed forward and backward in time with a large number of synthetic tracers distributed over the studied area. We have found a Lagrangian structure of those eddies and the ways how they have gained and released water. Simulated and measured locations of the center of the eddy A and its boundary have been be estimated to coincide with the accuracy of ≈ 7-10 and ≈ 15-20 km, respectively. Our simulations were validated in part by tracks of available surface drifters and Argo floats. We presented CTD hydrographic observations of the Kuril eddy A from the surface to deep waters and compared observed and simulated results in order to establish origin and properties of water masses constituting that eddy.

  20. Structure-function evolution of the Transforming acidic coiled coil genes revealed by analysis of phylogenetically diverse organisms

    PubMed Central

    Still, Ivan H; Vettaikkorumakankauv, Ananthalakshmy K; DiMatteo, Anthony; Liang, Ping

    2004-01-01

    Background Examination of ancient gene families can provide an insight into how the evolution of gene structure can relate to function. Functional homologs of the evolutionarily conserved transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) gene family are present in organisms from yeast to man. However, correlations between functional interactions and the evolution of these proteins have yet to be determined. Results We have performed an extensive database analysis to determine the genomic and cDNA sequences of the TACCs from phylogenetically diverse organisms. This analysis has determined the phylogenetic relationship of the TACC proteins to other coiled coil proteins, the resolution of the placement of the rabbit TACC4 as the orthologue of human TACC3, and RHAMM as a distinct family of coiled coil proteins. We have also extended the analysis of the TACCs to the interaction databases of C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify potentially novel TACC interactions. The validity of this modeling was confirmed independently by the demonstration of direct binding of human TACC2 to the nuclear hormone receptor RXRβ. Conclusion The data so far suggest that the ancestral TACC protein played a role in centrosomal/mitotic spindle dynamics. TACC proteins were then recruited to complexes involved in protein translation, RNA processing and transcription by interactions with specific bridging proteins. However, during evolution, the TACC proteins have now acquired the ability to directly interact with components of these complexes (such as the LSm proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, GAS41, and transcription factors). This suggests that the function of the TACC proteins may have evolved from performing assembly or coordination functions in the centrosome to include a more intimate role in the functional evolution of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranscriptional complexes in the cell. PMID:15207008

  1. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously.

  2. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously. PMID:27819352

  3. Typhoon Structural Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherford, Candis Lee

    1987-09-01

    Typhoon flight data from 750 aircraft reconnaissance missions into 101 named tropical cyclones of the northwestern Pacific Ocean basin are examined in order to study its changing life cycle structure. Flights were conducted at 700 mb. Life cycle changes are typified by three phases: (1) the entire vortex wind field builds as the cyclone intensifies to maximum intensity, (2) cyclone central pressure fills and maximum winds decrease in association with an expanding cyclone size and strengthening of the outer core (1^circ to 2.5^ circ radius) winds, and (3) the wind field of the entire vortex decays. Aircraft radar reports of the eyewall diameter (668 in number) are used to augment the analysis of the typhoon's life cycle. The eye's character and diameter appear to reflect the ease with which the maximum wind field intensifies. On average, the eye first appears with intensifying cyclones at 980 nb central pressure. Cyclones which obtain an eye at a pressure higher than 980 mb are observed to intensify more rapidly, while those whose eye initially appears at lower pressures deepen at slower rates and typically do not achieve as deep a central pressure. The eye generally contracts with intensification and expands as the cyclone fills. There are frequent exceptions to this general rule, however, due to the variable nature of eyewall size. There are expanding eyes with central pressure fall and contracting eyes with filling. Eye disappearance coincides, on average, with the filling of the central pressure to 955 mb. Concentric eyes were observed nearly as often in the deepening as in the filling stage for central pressures below 945 mb. By removing the symmetric portion of the tangential wind field of the vortex and the cyclone motion vector, the residual asymmetric wind flow in the cyclone's interior region (0.2.5^circ radius) can be studied for many different cyclone behavioral stratifications. Tropical cyclones are observed to move faster and to the left of the mean

  4. Structure and Evolution of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Weber, R. C.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Keane, J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Matsuyama, I.; Siegler, M.; Warren, P.

    2017-01-01

    Early in its evolution, the Moon underwent a magma ocean phase leading to its differentiation into a feldspathic crust, cumulate mantle, and iron core. However, far from the simplest view of a uniform plagioclase flotation crust, the present-day crust of the Moon varies greatly in thickness, composition, and physical properties. Recent significant improvements in both data and analysis techniques have yielded fundamental advances in our understanding of the structure and evolution of the lunar interior. The structure of the crust is revealed by gravity, topography, magnetics, seismic, radar, electromagnetic, and VNIR remote sensing data. The mantle structure of the Moon is revealed primarily by seismic and laser ranging data. Together, this data paints a picture of a Moon that is heterogeneous in all directions and across all scales, whose structure is a result of its unique formation, differentiation, and subsequent evolution. This brief review highlights a small number of recent advances in our understanding of lunar structure.

  5. Wavelet Analysis of DNA Bending Profiles reveals Structural Constraints on the Evolution of Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cédric; Arnéodo, Alain; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2004-03-01

    Analyses of genomic DNA sequences have shown in previous works that base pairs are correlated at large distances with scale-invariant statistical properties. We show in the present study that these correlations between nucleotides (letters) result in fact from long-range correlations (LRC) between sequence-dependent DNA structural elements (words) involved in the packaging of DNA in chromatin. Using the wavelet transform technique, we perform a comparative analysis of the DNA text and of the corresponding bending profiles generated with curvature tables based on nucleosome positioning data. This exploration through the optics of the so-called `wavelet transform microscope' reveals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two regimes of different LRC. We focus here on the existence of LRC in the small-scale regime (≲ 200 bp). Analysis of genomes in the three kingdoms reveals that this regime is specifically associated to the presence of nucleosomes. Indeed, small scale LRC are observed in eukaryotic genomes and to a less extent in archaeal genomes, in contrast with their absence in eubacterial genomes. Similarly, this regime is observed in eukaryotic but not in bacterial viral DNA genomes. There is one exception for genomes of Poxviruses, the only animal DNA viruses that do not replicate in the cell nucleus and do not present small scale LRC. Furthermore, no small scale LRC are detected in the genomes of all examined RNA viruses, with one exception in the case of retroviruses. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that small-scale LRC are a signature of the nucleosomal structure. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of these small-scale LRC in terms of the mechanisms that govern the positioning, the stability and the dynamics of the nucleosomes along the DNA chain. This paper is maily devoted to a pedagogical presentation of the theoretical concepts and physical methods which are well suited to perform a statistical analysis of genomic

  6. Metagenomic analysis of microbiota structure evolution in phytoremediation of a swine lagoon wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianfeng; Song, Zhaofeng; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Pytoremediation was studied in this project to treat swine manure lagoon wastewater characteristic of high concentrations of organic carbon, ammonium (N) and phosphorus (P). The impacts of introducing exogenous microalgae Chlorella into the lagoon wastewater on the removal of major nutrients and the transformation of the native wastewater microbiota structure were explored under two phytoremediation modes (shake flask and CO2-air bubbling). The results showed that the inoculation of microalgae could significantly enhance N and P removal. Metagenomic analysis of the native microbiota composition in the wastewater affected by algae inoculation revealed that a substantial population of algicidal bacteria was developed in the shake flask system, while in the CO2-air bubbling system, a niche for more mutualistic bacteria was created, which benefited the maximal algal growth with the simultaneous optimal N and P removal. To our knowledge, this study presents, the first reported case of applying metagenomic approach to a phytoremediation system treating real swine lagoon wastewater.

  7. Morphotectonic analysis, structural evolution/pattern of a contractional ridge: Giouchtas Mt., Central Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni, Kokinou; D, Skilodimou Hariklia; D, Bathrellos George; Assimina, Antonarakou; Evangelos, Kamberis

    2015-04-01

    The Giouchtas Mountain is situated south of Heraklion, Central Crete. It is a N-S trending morphological asymmetric ridge with a steep western slope, whilst its eastern slope is characterized by a smoother relief, composed of Mesozoic limestone and Eocene-lower Oligocene flysch of the Gavrovo-Tripolis zone. The present study focusses on the structural pattern and development of Giouchtas Mountain. Morphotectonic analyses in combination with field mapping and tectonic analysis were performed for this purpose. GIS techniques were used for mapping the spatial distribution of the geological features on the topographic relief of the area. Geomorphic indices, used in the present study, are the mountain front sinuosity index (Smf) and the valley floor/width ratio index (Vf). Based on Smf and Vf values, it is implied that this area can be assigned to a tectonic class I, corresponding to higher tectonic activity. However, spatial variations of the tectonic activity along the segmented fronts point to a general trend of increasing activity towards the north and especially, northeast. The model of this possibly active structural feature corresponds to a compressional mechanism followed by an earliest Mid. Miocene to Holocene late-stage deformation related to extensional faulting.

  8. Structural analysis of chloroplast DNA in Prunus (Rosaceae): evolution, genetic diversity and unequal mutations.

    PubMed

    Katayama, H; Uematsu, C

    2005-11-01

    In order to understand the evolutionary aspects of the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) structures in Rosaceous plants, a physical map of peach (Prunus persica cv. Hakuhou) cpDNA was constructed. Fourteen lambda phage clones which covered the entire sequence of the peach cpDNA were digested by restriction enzymes (SalI, XhoI, BamHI, SacI, and PstI) used singly or in combination. The molecular size of peach cpDNA was estimated to be about 152 kb. The gene order and contents were revealed to be equivalent to those of standard type of angiosperms by the localization of 31 genes on the physical map. Eighteen accessions from 14 Prunus species (P. persica, P. mira, P. davidiana, P. cerasis, P. cerasifera, P. domestica, P. insititia, P. spinosa, P. salicina, P. maritima, P. armeniaca, P. mume, P. tomentosa, P. zippeliana, and P. salicifolia) and one interspecific hybrid were used for the structural analysis of cpDNAs. Seventeen mutations (16 recognition site changes and one length mutation) were found in the cpDNA of these 18 accessions by RFLP analysis allowing a classification into 11 genome types. Although the base substitution rate in the recognition site (100p = 0.72) of cpDNA in Prunus was similar to that of other plants, i.e., Triticum-Aegilops, Brassica, and Pisum, it differed from Pyrus (100p = 0.15) in Rosaceae. Seven mutations including one length mutation were densely located within a region of about 9.1 kb which includes psbA and atpA in the left border of a large single-copy region of Prunus cpDNAs. The length mutation was detected only in P. persica and consisted of a 277 bp deletion which occurred in a spacer region between the trnS and trnG genes within the 9.1 kb region. Additional fragment length mutations (insertion/deletion), which were not detected by RFLP analysis, were revealed by PCR and sequence analyses in P. zippeliana and P. salicifolia. All of these length mutations occurred within the 9.1 kb region between psbA and atpA. This region could be an intra

  9. The Impact of Tides on Transiting Planet Structure and Evolution and Light Curve Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We examine two key consequences of tidal forces on the transiting planet observed and theoretical properties. First, based on consistent calculations coupling gravothermal evolution with complete tidal equations, we revisit the viability of the tidal heating hypothesis to explain the anomalously large radius of some transiting planets. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that calculations based on tidal models truncated at second order in eccentricity, as done in all previous studies, lead to severely erroneous tidal evolutions. Such truncated calculations yield characteristic timescales for dynamical evolution that can be wrong by orders of magnitude, leading accordingly to completely erroneous tidal energy dissipation rates during the planet's evolution. We demontrate that these results do not stem from uncertainties in the tidal quality factor, as often (erroneously) suggested, but from the exact calculations of the tidal equations. We show that, although tidal heating provides a substantial contribution to the planet's heat budget, this mechanism can not explain alone all the anomalously inflated planets. We examine alternative mechanisms to explain these puzzling properties. Furthermore, due to strong tidal forces, transiting planets exhibit a non-spherical shape. Such a departure from sphericity has a measurable impact on the observed transit depth and leads to a bias in the derivation of the transit radius from the light curve. As the tidally deformed planet projects its smallest cross section area during the transit, the measured effective radius is smaller than the one of the unperturbed genuine spherical planet. To correct this bias, we present analytical expressions that can easily be used to calculate the shape of observed planets (and Love number) and its impact on the transit lightcurve. These expressions enable us to convert the planet’s measured cross section into its real equilibrium radius, the one to be used when comparing

  10. Structural analysis and evolution of specificity of the SUMO UFD E1-E2 interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Lois, L Maria; Reverter, David

    2017-02-06

    SUMO belongs to the ubiquitin-like family (UbL) of protein modifiers. SUMO is conserved among eukaryotes and is essential for the regulation of processes such as DNA damage repair, transcription, DNA replication and mitosis. UbL modification of proteins occurs via a specific enzymatic cascade formed by the crosstalk between the E1-activating enzyme, the E2-conjugating enzyme and the E3-ligase. An essential discrimination step in all UbL modifiers corresponds to the interaction between E1 and E2 enzymes, which is mediated by the recruitment of the E2 to the UFD domain (Ubiquitin-Fold Domain) of the E1 enzyme. To gain insights in the properties of this interface, we have compared the structures of the complexes between E1 UFD domain and E2 in human and yeast, revealing two alternative UFD platforms that interact with a conserved E2. Comparative sequence analysis of the E1 UFD domain indicates that the E2 binding region has been conserved across phylogenetic closely related species, in which higher sequence conservation can be found in the E2 binding region than in the entire UFD domain. These distinctive strategies for E1-E2 interactions through the UFD domain might be the consequence of a high selective pressure to ensure specificity of each modifier conjugation system.

  11. Structural analysis and evolution of specificity of the SUMO UFD E1-E2 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Lois, L. Maria; Reverter, David

    2017-01-01

    SUMO belongs to the ubiquitin-like family (UbL) of protein modifiers. SUMO is conserved among eukaryotes and is essential for the regulation of processes such as DNA damage repair, transcription, DNA replication and mitosis. UbL modification of proteins occurs via a specific enzymatic cascade formed by the crosstalk between the E1-activating enzyme, the E2-conjugating enzyme and the E3-ligase. An essential discrimination step in all UbL modifiers corresponds to the interaction between E1 and E2 enzymes, which is mediated by the recruitment of the E2 to the UFD domain (Ubiquitin-Fold Domain) of the E1 enzyme. To gain insights in the properties of this interface, we have compared the structures of the complexes between E1 UFD domain and E2 in human and yeast, revealing two alternative UFD platforms that interact with a conserved E2. Comparative sequence analysis of the E1 UFD domain indicates that the E2 binding region has been conserved across phylogenetic closely related species, in which higher sequence conservation can be found in the E2 binding region than in the entire UFD domain. These distinctive strategies for E1-E2 interactions through the UFD domain might be the consequence of a high selective pressure to ensure specificity of each modifier conjugation system. PMID:28165030

  12. Planetary Origin Evolution and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This wide-ranging grant supported theoretical modeling on many aspects of the formation, evolution and structure of planets and satellites. Many topics were studied during this grant period, including the evolution of icy bodies; the origin of magnetic fields in Ganymede; the thermal histories of terrestrial planets; the nature of flow inside giant planets (especially the coupling to the magnetic field) and the dynamics of silicate/iron mixing during giant impacts and terrestrial planet core formation. Many of these activities are ongoing and have not reached completion. This is the nature of this kind of research.

  13. Imprint of evolution on protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, Guido; Shakhnovich, Boris E.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-03-01

    We attempt to understand the evolutionary origin of protein folds by simulating their divergent evolution with a three-dimensional lattice model. Starting from an initial seed lattice structure, evolution of model proteins progresses by sequence duplication and subsequent point mutations. A new gene's ability to fold into a stable and unique structure is tested each time through direct kinetic folding simulations. Where possible, the algorithm accepts the new sequence and structure and thus a "new protein structure" is born. During the course of each run, this model evolutionary algorithm provides several thousand new proteins with diverse structures. Analysis of evolved structures shows that later evolved structures are more designable than seed structures as judged by recently developed structural determinant of protein designability, as well as direct estimate of designability for selected structures by thermodynamic sampling of their sequence space. We test the significance of this trend predicted on lattice models on real proteins and show that protein domains that are found in eukaryotic organisms only feature statistically significant higher designability than their prokaryotic counterparts. These results present a fundamental view on protein evolution highlighting the relative roles of structural selection and evolutionary dynamics on genesis of modern proteins.

  14. Evolution of molluscan hemocyanin structures.

    PubMed

    Markl, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    Hemocyanin transports oxygen in the hemolymph of many molluscs and arthropods and is therefore a central physiological factor in these animals. Molluscan hemocyanin molecules are oligomers composed of many protein subunits that in turn encompass subsets of distinct functional units. The structure and evolution of molluscan hemocyanin have been studied for decades, but it required the recent progress in DNA sequencing, X-ray crystallography and 3D electron microscopy to produce a detailed view of their structure and evolution. The basic quaternary structure is a cylindrical decamer 35nm in diameter, consisting of wall and collar (typically at one end of the cylinder). Depending on the animal species, decamers, didecamers and multidecamers occur in the hemolymph. Whereas the wall architecture of the decamer seems to be invariant, four different types of collar have been identified in different molluscan taxa. Correspondingly, there exist four subunit types that differ in their collar functional units and range from 350 to 550kDa. Thus, molluscan hemocyanin subunits are among the largest polypeptides in nature. In this report, recent 3D reconstructions are used to explain and visualize the different functional units, subunits and quaternary structures of molluscan hemocyanins. Moreover, on the basis of DNA analyses and structural considerations, their possible evolution is traced. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional evolution of nuclear structure

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the nucleus, the defining feature of eukaryotic cells, was long shrouded in speculation and mystery. There is now strong evidence that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nuclear membranes coevolved with the endomembrane system, and that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had fully functional NPCs. Recent studies have identified many components of the nuclear envelope in living Opisthokonts, the eukaryotic supergroup that includes fungi and metazoan animals. These components include diverse chromatin-binding membrane proteins, and membrane proteins with adhesive lumenal domains that may have contributed to the evolution of nuclear membrane architecture. Further discoveries about the nucleoskeleton suggest that the evolution of nuclear structure was tightly coupled to genome partitioning during mitosis. PMID:22006947

  16. Analysis of grain structure evolution based on optical measurements of mc Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Theresa; Demant, Matthias; Krenckel, Patricia; Riepe, Stephan; Rein, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Grain structure and grain competition have a strong impact on bulk lifetime in multicrystalline (mc) silicon. A fast and thorough characterization of grain structure is crucial in order to improve industrial crystal growth. This work introduces key parameters of grain structure, extracted with a newly developed image processing tool. Four bricks grown with different concepts were chosen to investigate the value of the identified key parameters and to identify characteristic developments along the brick. Optical measurements on as-cut wafers from these bricks serve as a basis to extract grain structure properties, i.e., size, shape, homogeneity and distribution of grain size. By connecting the 2D-information over brick height, a statistical insight into the entire brick is gained. Weighted percentiles of grain area offer a robust measure to characterize grain size distribution. As twinning has a large impact on grain competition, twinned grains are detected via grain shape. Additionally, regions with strong grain competition are highlighted for investigations on grain overgrowth. It is found that the share of twin grains increases with brick height in high-performance mc (HPM) silicon with fine-granular seeds from almost zero up to about 15% whereas it remains rather constant over the whole brick height in standard mc-Si. The results of the investigated bricks show clearly that towards the brick top, the material differences in grain size decrease. This suggests that an energetically favorable state may exist for grain structure development.

  17. Comparative analysis of mammalian Y chromosomes illuminates ancestral structure and lineage-specific evolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Davis, Brian W.; Raudsepp, Terje; Pearks Wilkerson, Alison J.; Mason, Victor C.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; O'Brien, Patricia C.; Waters, Paul D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Although more than thirty mammalian genomes have been sequenced to draft quality, very few of these include the Y chromosome. This has limited our understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of gene persistence and loss, our ability to identify conserved regulatory elements, as well our knowledge of the extent to which different types of selection act to maintain genes within this unique genomic environment. Here, we present the first MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) sequences from two carnivores, the domestic dog and cat. By combining these with other available MSY data, our multiordinal comparison allows for the first accounting of levels of selection constraining the evolution of eutherian Y chromosomes. Despite gene gain and loss across the phylogeny, we show the eutherian ancestor retained a core set of 17 MSY genes, most being constrained by negative selection for nearly 100 million years. The X-degenerate and ampliconic gene classes are partitioned into distinct chromosomal domains in most mammals, but were radically restructured on the human lineage. We identified multiple conserved noncoding elements that potentially regulate eutherian MSY genes. The acquisition of novel ampliconic gene families was accompanied by signatures of positive selection and has differentially impacted the degeneration and expansion of MSY gene repertoires in different species. PMID:23788650

  18. Evolution of the Mount Woods Inlier, northern Gawler Craton, Southern Australia: an integrated structural and aeromagnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Peter G.; Valenta, Rick K.; Finlay, Jim

    2003-05-01

    Structural mapping integrated with interpretation and forward modelling of aeromagnetic data form complimentary and powerful tools for regional structural analysis because both techniques focus on architecture and overprinting relationships. This approach is used to constrain the geometry and evolution of the sparsely exposed Mount Woods Inlier in the northern Gawler Craton. The Mount Woods Inlier records a history of poly-phase deformation, high-temperature metamorphism, and syn- and post-orogenic magmatism between ca. 1736 and 1584 Ma. The earliest deformation involved isoclinal folding, and the development of bedding parallel and axial planar gneissic foliation (S 1). This was accompanied by high-temperature, upper amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism at ca. 1736 Ma. During subsequent north-south shortening (D 2), open to isoclinal south-southeast-oriented F 2 folds developed as the Palaeoproterozoic successions of the inlier were thrust over the Archaean nuclei of the Gawler Craton. The syn-D 2 Engenina Adamellite was emplaced at ca. 1692 Ma. The post-D 2 history involved shear zone development and localised folding, exhumation of metamorphic rocks, and deposition of clastic sediments prior to the emplacement of the ca. 1584 Ma Granite Balta Suite. The Mount Woods Inlier is interpreted as the northern continuation of the Kimban Orogen.

  19. Graph Structured Program Evolution: Evolution of Loop Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Shinichi; Nagao, Tomoharu

    Recently, numerous automatic programming techniques have been developed and applied in various fields. A typical example is genetic programming (GP), and various extensions and representations of GP have been proposed thus far. Complex programs and hand-written programs, however, may contain several loops and handle multiple data types. In this chapter, we propose a new method called Graph Structured Program Evolution (GRAPE). The representation of GRAPE is a graph structure; therefore, it can represent branches and loops using this structure. Each programis constructed as an arbitrary directed graph of nodes and a data set. The GRAPE program handles multiple data types using the data set for each type, and the genotype of GRAPE takes the form of a linear string of integers. We apply GRAPE to three test problems, factorial, exponentiation, and list sorting, and demonstrate that the optimum solution in each problem is obtained by the GRAPE system.

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of the Indian Ocean Picocyanobacterial Community: Structure, Potential Function and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Beatriz; Nylander, Johan A. A.; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Yooseph, Shibu; Rusch, Douglas B.; Bergman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are ubiquitous photoautotrophic microbes that contribute substantially to global primary production. Picocyanobacteria such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus depend on chlorophyll a-binding protein complexes to capture light energy. In addition, Synechococcus has accessory pigments organized into phycobilisomes, and Prochlorococcus contains chlorophyll b. Across a surface water transect spanning the sparsely studied tropical Indian Ocean, we examined Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus occurrence, taxonomy and habitat preference in an evolutionary context. Shotgun sequencing of size fractionated microbial communities from 0.1 μm to 20 μm and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated that cyanobacteria account for up to 15% of annotated reads, with the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus comprising 90% of the cyanobacterial reads, even in the largest size fraction (3.0–20 mm). Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial light-harvesting genes (chl-binding pcb/isiA, allophycocyanin (apcAB), phycocyanin (cpcAB) and phycoerythin (cpeAB)) mostly identified picocyanobacteria clades comprised of overlapping sequences obtained from Indian Ocean, Atlantic and/or Pacific Oceans samples. Habitat reconstructions coupled with phylogenetic analysis of the Indian Ocean samples suggested that large Synechococcus-like ancestors in coastal waters expanded their ecological niche towards open oligotrophic waters in the Indian Ocean through lineage diversification and associated streamlining of genomes (e.g. loss of phycobilisomes and acquisition of Chl b); resulting in contemporary small celled Prochlorococcus. Comparative metagenomic analysis with picocyanobacteria populations in other oceans suggests that this evolutionary scenario may be globally important. PMID:27196065

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of the Indian Ocean Picocyanobacterial Community: Structure, Potential Function and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Díez, Beatriz; Nylander, Johan A A; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L; Allen, Andrew E; Yooseph, Shibu; Rusch, Douglas B; Bergman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are ubiquitous photoautotrophic microbes that contribute substantially to global primary production. Picocyanobacteria such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus depend on chlorophyll a-binding protein complexes to capture light energy. In addition, Synechococcus has accessory pigments organized into phycobilisomes, and Prochlorococcus contains chlorophyll b. Across a surface water transect spanning the sparsely studied tropical Indian Ocean, we examined Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus occurrence, taxonomy and habitat preference in an evolutionary context. Shotgun sequencing of size fractionated microbial communities from 0.1 μm to 20 μm and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated that cyanobacteria account for up to 15% of annotated reads, with the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus comprising 90% of the cyanobacterial reads, even in the largest size fraction (3.0-20 mm). Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial light-harvesting genes (chl-binding pcb/isiA, allophycocyanin (apcAB), phycocyanin (cpcAB) and phycoerythin (cpeAB)) mostly identified picocyanobacteria clades comprised of overlapping sequences obtained from Indian Ocean, Atlantic and/or Pacific Oceans samples. Habitat reconstructions coupled with phylogenetic analysis of the Indian Ocean samples suggested that large Synechococcus-like ancestors in coastal waters expanded their ecological niche towards open oligotrophic waters in the Indian Ocean through lineage diversification and associated streamlining of genomes (e.g. loss of phycobilisomes and acquisition of Chl b); resulting in contemporary small celled Prochlorococcus. Comparative metagenomic analysis with picocyanobacteria populations in other oceans suggests that this evolutionary scenario may be globally important.

  2. Shallow structure and recent evolution of the Aegean Sea deduced from the seismic reflection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laure, M.; Mascle, J.

    1988-08-01

    Together with the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Aegean Sea represents one of two marine basins still developing as a consequence of the subduction of the African lithosphere beneath Europe. Despite many geophysical similarities with the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Aegean displays a specific structural segmentation characterized by two distinct domains separated by the central Aegean. To the north of the basin, the so-called North Aegean trough likely represents the western marine extension of the transtensive Anatolian transform fault zone. The northern margin of this area contains a series of disconnected, often thickly sedimented small basins that probably initiated during the late Miocene as a consequence of a dominantly north-south extension; typical uppermost Miocene (Messinian) formations can be observed on seismic grounds. To the south, the Cretan Sea shows clear evidence of important distensive events occurring during two main episodes and following two main trends; a dominantly north-south-directed extension is responsibile for most of the structural features detected along both the Cretan and southern Cyclades margins.

  3. Metagenomic Analysis of the Indian Ocean Picocyanobacterial Community: Structure, Potential Function and Evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Diez, Beatriz; Nylander, Johan A. A.; Ininbergs, Karolina; ...

    2016-05-19

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are ubiquitous photoautotrophic microbes that contribute substantially to global primary production. Picocyanobacteria such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus depend on chlorophyll a-binding protein complexes to capture light energy. In addition, Synechococcus has accessory pigments organized into phycobilisomes, and Prochlorococcus contains chlorophyll b. Across a surface water transect spanning the sparsely studied tropical Indian Ocean, we examined Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus occurrence, taxonomy and habitat preference in an evolutionary context. Shotgun sequencing of size fractionated microbial communities from 0.1 μm to 20 μm and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated that cyanobacteria account for up to 15% of annotated reads, with the generamore » Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus comprising 90% of the cyanobacterial reads, even in the largest size fraction (3.0–20 mm). Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial light-harvesting genes (chl-binding pcb/isiA, allophycocyanin (apcAB), phycocyanin (cpcAB) and phycoerythin (cpeAB)) mostly identified picocyanobacteria clades comprised of overlapping sequences obtained from Indian Ocean, Atlantic and/or Pacific Oceans samples. Habitat reconstructions coupled with phylogenetic analysis of the Indian Ocean samples suggested that large Synechococcus-like ancestors in coastal waters expanded their ecological niche towards open oligotrophic waters in the Indian Ocean through lineage diversification and associated streamlining of genomes (e.g. loss of phycobilisomes and acquisition of Chl b); resulting in contemporary small celled Prochlorococcus. As a result, comparative metagenomic analysis with picocyanobacteria populations in other oceans suggests that this evolutionary scenario may be globally important.« less

  4. Metagenomic Analysis of the Indian Ocean Picocyanobacterial Community: Structure, Potential Function and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, Beatriz; Nylander, Johan A. A.; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Yooseph, Shibu; Rusch, Douglas B.; Bergman, Birgitta; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2016-05-19

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are ubiquitous photoautotrophic microbes that contribute substantially to global primary production. Picocyanobacteria such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus depend on chlorophyll a-binding protein complexes to capture light energy. In addition, Synechococcus has accessory pigments organized into phycobilisomes, and Prochlorococcus contains chlorophyll b. Across a surface water transect spanning the sparsely studied tropical Indian Ocean, we examined Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus occurrence, taxonomy and habitat preference in an evolutionary context. Shotgun sequencing of size fractionated microbial communities from 0.1 μm to 20 μm and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated that cyanobacteria account for up to 15% of annotated reads, with the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus comprising 90% of the cyanobacterial reads, even in the largest size fraction (3.0–20 mm). Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial light-harvesting genes (chl-binding pcb/isiA, allophycocyanin (apcAB), phycocyanin (cpcAB) and phycoerythin (cpeAB)) mostly identified picocyanobacteria clades comprised of overlapping sequences obtained from Indian Ocean, Atlantic and/or Pacific Oceans samples. Habitat reconstructions coupled with phylogenetic analysis of the Indian Ocean samples suggested that large Synechococcus-like ancestors in coastal waters expanded their ecological niche towards open oligotrophic waters in the Indian Ocean through lineage diversification and associated streamlining of genomes (e.g. loss of phycobilisomes and acquisition of Chl b); resulting in contemporary small celled Prochlorococcus. As a result, comparative metagenomic analysis with picocyanobacteria populations in other oceans suggests that this evolutionary scenario may be globally important.

  5. Kin structure, ecology and the evolution of social organization in shrimp: a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, J. Emmett; Macdonald, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    Eusocial societies present a Darwinian paradox, yet they have evolved independently in insects, mole-rats and symbiotic shrimp. Historically, eusociality has been thought to arise as a response to ecological challenges, mediated by kin selection, but the role of kin selection has recently been questioned. Here we use phylogenetically independent contrasts to test the association of eusociality with ecological performance and genetic structure (via life history) among 20 species of sponge-dwelling shrimp (Synalpheus) in Belize. Consistent with hypotheses that cooperative groups enjoy an advantage in challenging habitats, we show that eusocial species are more abundant, occupy more sponges and have broader host ranges than non-social sister species, and that these patterns are robust to correction for the generally smaller body sizes of eusocial species. In contrast, body size explains less or no variation after accounting for sociality. Despite strong ecological pressures on most sponge-dwellers, however, eusociality arose only in species with non-dispersing larvae, which form family groups subject to kin selection. Thus, superior ability to hold valuable resources may favour eusociality in shrimp but close genetic relatedness is nevertheless key to its origin, as in other eusocial animals. PMID:19889706

  6. An analysis of the structure and evolution of the scientific collaboration network of computer intelligence in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cabrera, R.; Cotta, C.; Fernández-Leiva, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Games constitute a research domain that is attracting the interest of scientists from numerous disciplines. This is particularly true from the perspective of computational intelligence. In order to examine the growing importance of this area in the gaming domain, we present an analysis of the scientific collaboration network of researchers working on computational intelligence in games (CIG). This network has been constructed from bibliographical data obtained from the Digital Bibliography & Library Project (DBLP). We have analyzed from a temporal perspective several properties of the CIG network at the macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic levels, studying the large-scale structure, the growth mechanics, and collaboration patterns among other features. Overall, computational intelligence in games exhibits similarities with other collaboration networks such as for example a log-normal degree distribution and sub-linear preferential attachment for new authors. It also has distinctive features, e.g. the number of papers co-authored is exponentially distributed, the internal preferential attachment (new collaborations among existing authors) is linear, and fidelity rates (measured as the relative preference for publishing with previous collaborators) grow super-linearly. The macroscopic and mesoscopic evolution of the network indicates the field is very active and vibrant, but it is still at an early developmental stage. We have also analyzed communities and central nodes and how these are reflected in research topics, thus identifying active research subareas.

  7. Structural-energetic regularities of tribocontact evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S.

    2017-02-01

    The contact of friction lives with its own very interesting life. It gets evolved. This evolution of contact changes the states and properties of it. How can we describe the tribocontact evolution? Any nature systems are very well described by thermodynamic method. The contact of friction has the system properties and therefore one may use thermodynamic approach. From thermodynamic point of view friction is a competition of two simultaneous, interconnected and opposite tendencies of accumulating latent (potential) energy of various kinds of defects and damages of contact volumes structures and releasing (dissipation) energy due to various relaxation processes. This friction adaptive-dissipative model for analysis of evolution of tribocontact as elementary tribosystem is examined. This paper was accepted for publication in Proceedings after double peer reviewing process but was not presented at the Conference ROTRIB’16

  8. Substorm evolution of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Juusola, L.; Whiter, D.; Kauristie, K.

    2015-07-01

    Auroral arcs are often associated with magnetically quiet time and substorm growth phases. We have studied the evolution of auroral structures during global and local magnetic activity to investigate the occurrence rate of auroral arcs during different levels of magnetic activity. The ground-magnetic and auroral conditions are described by the magnetometer and auroral camera data from five Magnetometers — Ionospheric radars — All-sky cameras Large Experiment stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland. We identified substorm growth, expansion, and recovery phases from the local electrojet index (IL) in 1996-2007 and analyzed the auroral structures during the different phases. Auroral structures were also analyzed during different global magnetic activity levels, as described by the planetary Kp index. The distribution of auroral structures for all substorm phases and Kp levels is of similar shape. About one third of all detected structures are auroral arcs. This suggests that auroral arcs occur in all conditions as the main element of the aurora. The most arc-dominated substorm phases occur in the premidnight sector, while the least arc-dominated substorm phases take place in the dawn sector. Arc event lifetimes and expectation times calculated for different substorm phases show that the longest arc-dominated periods are found during growth phases, while the longest arc waiting times occur during expansion phases. Most of the arc events end when arcs evolve to more complex structures. This is true for all substorm phases. Based on the number of images of auroral arcs and the durations of substorm phases, we conclude that a randomly selected auroral arc most likely belongs to a substorm expansion phase. A small time delay, of the order of a minute, is observed between the magnetic signature of the substorm onset (i.e., the beginning of the negative bay) and the auroral breakup (i.e., the growth phase arc changing into a dynamic display). The magnetic onset was

  9. Structural evolution of proteinlike heteropolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2014-12-01

    The biological function of a protein often depends on the formation of an ordered structure in order to support a smaller, chemically active configuration of amino acids against thermal fluctuations. Here we explore the development of proteins evolving to satisfy this requirement using an off-lattice polymer model in which monomers interact as low resolution amino acids. To evolve the model, we construct a Markov process in which sequences are subjected to random replacements, insertions, and deletions and are selected to recover a predefined minimum number of solid-ordered monomers using the Lindemann melting criterion. We show that polymers generated by this process consistently fold into soluble, ordered globules of similar length and complexity to small protein motifs. To compare the evolution of the globules with proteins, we analyze the statistics of amino acid replacements, the dependence of site mutation rates on solvent exposure, and the dependence of structural distance on sequence distance for homologous alignments. Despite the simplicity of the model, the results display a surprisingly close correspondence with protein data.

  10. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  11. Analysis on the Filament Structure Evolution in Reset Transition of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    The resistive switching (RS) process of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is dynamically correlated with the evolution process of conductive path or conductive filament (CF) during its breakdown (rupture) and recovery (reformation). In this study, a statistical evaluation method is developed to analyze the filament structure evolution process in the reset operation of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM device. This method is based on a specific functional relationship between the Weibull slopes of reset parameters' distributions and the CF resistance (R on). The CF of the Cu/HfO2/Pt device is demonstrated to be ruptured abruptly, and the CF structure of the device has completely degraded in the reset point. Since no intermediate states are generated in the abrupt reset process, it is quite favorable for the reliable and stable one-bit operation in RRAM device. Finally, on the basis of the cell-based analytical thermal dissolution model, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is implemented to further verify the experimental results. This work provides inspiration for RRAM reliability and performance design to put RRAM into practical application.

  12. Analysis on the Filament Structure Evolution in Reset Transition of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The resistive switching (RS) process of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is dynamically correlated with the evolution process of conductive path or conductive filament (CF) during its breakdown (rupture) and recovery (reformation). In this study, a statistical evaluation method is developed to analyze the filament structure evolution process in the reset operation of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM device. This method is based on a specific functional relationship between the Weibull slopes of reset parameters' distributions and the CF resistance ( R on). The CF of the Cu/HfO2/Pt device is demonstrated to be ruptured abruptly, and the CF structure of the device has completely degraded in the reset point. Since no intermediate states are generated in the abrupt reset process, it is quite favorable for the reliable and stable one-bit operation in RRAM device. Finally, on the basis of the cell-based analytical thermal dissolution model, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is implemented to further verify the experimental results. This work provides inspiration for RRAM reliability and performance design to put RRAM into practical application.

  13. Structural Evolution of Carbon During Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Adel F. Sarofim; Angelo Kandas

    1998-10-28

    The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs iOn the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and rnicroporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, C02 and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be "hidden" or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and C02 surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM studies has confined that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering,. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

  14. Microrheology: Structural evolution under static and dynamic conditions by simultaneous analysis of confocal microscopy and diffusing wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Yves; Paques, Marcel; Knaebel, Alexandra; Steyer, Alain; Munch, Jean-Pierre; Blijdenstein, Theo B. J.; van Aken, George A.

    2003-08-01

    An oscillatory shear configuration was developed to improve understanding of structural evolution during deformation. It combines an inverted confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and a special sample holder that can apply to the sample specific deformation: oscillatory shear or steady strain. In this configuration, a zero-velocity plane is created in the sample by moving two plates in opposite directions, thereby providing stable observation conditions of the structural behavior under deformation. The configuration also includes diffusion wave spectroscopy (DWS) to monitor the network properties via particle mobility under static and dynamic conditions. CSLM and DWS can be performed simultaneously and three-dimensional images can be obtained under static conditions. This configuration is mainly used to study mechanistic phenomena like particle interaction, aggregation, gelation and network disintegration, interactions at interfaces under static and dynamic conditions in semisolid food materials (desserts, dressings, sauces, dairy products) and in nonfood materials (mineral emulsions, etc.). Preliminary data obtained with this new oscillatory shear configuration are described that demonstrate their capabilities and the potential contribution to other areas of application also.

  15. Phylogeny and evolution of RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Tanja; Schuster, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Darwin's conviction that all living beings on Earth are related and the graph of relatedness is tree-shaped has been essentially confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction first from morphology and later from data obtained by molecular sequencing. Limitations of the phylogenetic tree concept were recognized as more and more sequence information became available. The other path-breaking idea of Darwin, natural selection of fitter variants in populations, is cast into simple mathematical form and extended to mutation-selection dynamics. In this form the theory is directly applicable to RNA evolution in vitro and to virus evolution. Phylogeny and population dynamics of RNA provide complementary insights into evolution and the interplay between the two concepts will be pursued throughout this chapter. The two strategies for understanding evolution are ultimately related through the central paradigm of structural biology: sequence ⇒ structure ⇒ function. We elaborate on the state of the art in modeling both phylogeny and evolution of RNA driven by reproduction and mutation. Thereby the focus will be laid on models for phylogenetic sequence evolution as well as evolution and design of RNA structures with selected examples and notes on simulation methods. In the perspectives an attempt is made to combine molecular structure, population dynamics, and phylogeny in modeling evolution.

  16. The structure and evolution of story networks.

    PubMed

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-06-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. 'young' story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time.

  17. The structure and evolution of story networks

    PubMed Central

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-01-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. ‘young’ story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time. PMID:27429767

  18. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  19. Structure analysis of two Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum satellite DNA families and evolution of their common monomeric sequence.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Marina; de Miguel, Natalia; Lia, Veronica V; Matrajt, Mariana; Angel, Sergio O

    2004-05-01

    A family of repetitive DNA elements of approximately 350 bp-Sat350-that are members of Toxoplasma gondii satellite DNA was further analyzed. Sequence analysis identified at least three distinct repeat types within this family, called types A, B, and C. B repeats were divided into the subtypes B1 and B2. A search for internal repetitions within this family permitted the identification of conserved regions and the design of PCR primers that amplify almost all these repetitive elements. These primers amplified the expected 350-bp repeats and a novel 680-bp repetitive element (Sat680) related to this family. Two additional tandemly repeated high-order structures corresponding to this satellite DNA family were found by searching the Toxoplasma genome database with these sequences. These studies were confirmed by sequence analysis and identified: (1). an arrangement of AB1CB2 350-bp repeats and (2). an arrangement of two 350-bp-like repeats, resulting in a 680-bp monomer. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that both high-order structures may have originated from the same ancestral 350-bp repeat. PCR amplification, sequence analysis and Southern blot showed that similar high-order structures were also found in the Toxoplasma-sister taxon Neospora caninum. The Toxoplasma genome database (http://ToxoDB.org ) permitted the assembly of a contig harboring Sat350 elements at one end and a long nonrepetitive DNA sequence flanking this satellite DNA. The region bordering the Sat350 repeats contained two differentially expressed sequence-related regions and interstitial telomeric sequences.

  20. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; ...

    2011-08-29

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing δ. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-δ. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (δ=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (δ=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reducedmore » BaTiO3-δ is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.« less

  1. Morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): new insights into the structure and evolution of an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Capra, Lucia; De Beni, Emanuela

    2004-09-01

    We present a morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano located 80 km WSW of Mexico City based on digital elevation model study, where slope and aspect maps have been generated and analysed. Aerial photograph and satellite image observations improve the morphological analysis. The synoptic view which is offered by this analysis allowed for recognition and localization of the main volcanic and tectonic features of the area. On the basis of digital elevation model value distribution and surface textures, five morphological domains were defined. The most interesting domain, south of the crater, reflects the occurrence of an ancient complex volcano distinct from the adjacent areas. Interaction between the volcanic and volcano-tectonic evolution and the basement produced the other domains. Single volcanic edifices, like lava domes and scoria cones, and eruptive fractures were recognized. Finally, flank collapse scarps opened to the east and to the north were identified and four relevant morphostructural lineaments and their possible role in the Nevado de Toluca geological and structural evolution are discussed.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Sucrose Synthase Gene Family in Grape (Vitis vinifera): Structure, Evolution, and Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Mengqi; Li, Xiaopeng; Jiu, Songtao; Wang, Chen; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-03-28

    Sucrose synthase (SS) is widely considered as the key enzyme involved in the plant sugar metabolism that is critical to plant growth and development, especially quality of the fruit. The members of SS gene family have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes. However, detailed information about this gene family is lacking in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of the grape (V. vinifera) genome and reported that there are five SS genes (VvSS1-5) in the grape genome. Comparison of the structures of grape SS genes showed high structural conservation of grape SS genes, resulting from the selection pressures during the evolutionary process. The segmental duplication of grape SS genes contributed to this gene family expansion. The syntenic analyses between grape and soybean (Glycine max) demonstrated that these genes located in corresponding syntenic blocks arose before the divergence of grape and soybean. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct evolutionary paths for the grape SS genes. VvSS1/VvSS5, VvSS2/VvSS3 and VvSS4 originated from three ancient SS genes, which were generated by duplication events before the split of monocots and eudicots. Bioinformatics analysis of publicly available microarray data, which was validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), revealed distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of VvSS genes in various tissues, organs and developmental stages, as well as in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Taken together, our results will be beneficial for further investigations into the functions of SS gene in the processes of grape resistance to environmental stresses.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Sucrose Synthase Gene Family in Grape (Vitis vinifera): Structure, Evolution, and Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Mengqi; Li, Xiaopeng; Jiu, Songtao; Wang, Chen; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SS) is widely considered as the key enzyme involved in the plant sugar metabolism that is critical to plant growth and development, especially quality of the fruit. The members of SS gene family have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes. However, detailed information about this gene family is lacking in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of the grape (V. vinifera) genome and reported that there are five SS genes (VvSS1–5) in the grape genome. Comparison of the structures of grape SS genes showed high structural conservation of grape SS genes, resulting from the selection pressures during the evolutionary process. The segmental duplication of grape SS genes contributed to this gene family expansion. The syntenic analyses between grape and soybean (Glycine max) demonstrated that these genes located in corresponding syntenic blocks arose before the divergence of grape and soybean. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct evolutionary paths for the grape SS genes. VvSS1/VvSS5, VvSS2/VvSS3 and VvSS4 originated from three ancient SS genes, which were generated by duplication events before the split of monocots and eudicots. Bioinformatics analysis of publicly available microarray data, which was validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), revealed distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of VvSS genes in various tissues, organs and developmental stages, as well as in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Taken together, our results will be beneficial for further investigations into the functions of SS gene in the processes of grape resistance to environmental stresses. PMID:28350372

  4. Gene structure, immune response and evolution: comparative analysis of three 2-Cys peroxiredoxin members of miiuy croaker, Miichthys miiuy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liping; Sun, Yuena; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2014-02-01

    Peroxiredoxin family was a superfamily of selenium independent peroxidases. It was divided into six subtypes: Prx1-4 (typical 2-Cys), Prx5 (atypical 2-Cys) and Prx6 (1-Cys). This study reports the isolation and characterization three 2-Cys peroxiredoxin members of full cDNA and genomic clones from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy). The genetic structure analysis showed that the C-terminal catalytic Cys positioned within GEVCPAXW. This sequence was different between Prx3 and Prx4, but was conservative in different species of the same gene, the X base was S in Prx3 but G in Prx4. Tissues expression analysis showed that the expressions of Prx3 in liver and brain were much higher than other tissues; the values of Prx4 in spleen, intestine and kidney were significantly higher than others; and the expression of Prx5 in muscle was higher than that of other tissues. Real-time PCR results showed that there were highest values of these three Prxs emerging with the time post challenge of Vibrio anguillarum in liver, spleen and kidney although the highest value time differed from each other and the expression of these three genes also changed with the change of infection time. These results indicated that expression analysis of these three genes play some positive function against pathogenic bacteria infection in miiuy croaker. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers.

  6. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul M.; Evans, David C.; Campione, Nicolás E.

    2015-01-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. PMID:26041865

  7. Evolution of Coextruded Structures in Static Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollogoub, C.; Guinault, A.; Pedros, M.

    2007-04-01

    Coextrusion allows to combine two thermoplastics in different ways, creating structures with different cross-sectional geometries (side-by-side structure or concentric ring structure). We use static mixers after the feedblock, in order to homogenise these initial structures and obtain different blend morphologies. The control of these morphologies is of prime importance in order to predict the final properties of the polymer blends. The aim of this paper is to study the evolution of some initial coextruded structures in different static mixers. Different static mixers, with adjustable number of mixing elements, are tested. The experimental observations are confronted with numerical simulation results.

  8. Evolution of the Himalayan structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Sedimentologically, the Himalayan sediments were deposited in the Tethyan Sea and represent rocks from the Paleozoic to the Holocene. During the early Paleozoic, localized movements divided the Tethyan Sea into two geosynclines separated by a geoanticline of Precambrian central crystallines. The northern deep basin which contains euogeosynclinal sediments, is known as the Tethyan zone, and the southern shallow basin which has miogeosynclinal sediments, represents the rocks of the Himalayan zone. Structurally, three major zones of tectonic movement have been recognized, all of which show similar structural trend: (1) along the Indus suture zone (ISZ), (2) along the Main Central thrust (MCT), and (3) along the Main Boundary thrust (MBT). The ISZ represents the subduction zone between the Indian and Asian plate. The origin of the MCT is related to initial subduction along the trench area and may have been formed during the Late Cretaceous-early Paleocene due to offscrapping of sediments in the subduction zone. Further compression between the two plates caused southward migration of the subduction zone and formed the MBT, during or after the Pliocene, which brought old Paleozoic rocks of lesser Himalaya in contact with younger Tertiary rocks (Siwaliks) of Sub-Himalaya. Both the MCT and MBT are parts of an imbricated system formed in the subduction zone representing different geological time periods. The present position of the subduction zone indicates that future subduction of Indian plate into the Asian plate and will cause tectonic activation of the MBT and movement along the MCT will diminish.

  9. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  10. Evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations

    PubMed

    Brauchli; Killingback; Doebeli

    1999-10-21

    Using a spatial lattice model of the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma we studied the evolution of cooperation within the strategy space of all stochastic strategies with a memory of one round. Comparing the spatial model with a randomly mixed model showed that (1) there is more cooperative behaviour in a spatially structured population, (2) PAVLOV and generous variants of it are very successful strategies in the spatial context and (3) in spatially structured populations evolution is much less chaotic than in unstructured populations. In spatially structured populations, generous variants of PAVLOV are found to be very successful strategies in playing the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. The main weakness of PAVLOV is that it is exploitable by defective strategies. In a spatial context this disadvantage is much less important than the good error correction of PAVLOV, and especially of generous PAVLOV, because in a spatially structured population successful strategies always build clusters. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  12. Evolution of the rheological structure of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Shintaro; Katayama, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of Mars has been greatly influenced by temporal changes in its rheological structure, which may explain the difference in tectonics between Mars and Earth. Some previous studies have shown the rheological structures of Mars calculated from the flow law of rocks and the predicted thermal structure. However, the Peierls mechanism, which is the dominant deformation mechanism at relatively low temperature, and the evolution of water reservoirs on Mars were not considered in such studies. In this paper, we apply the Peierls mechanism to refine the rheological structure of Mars to show a new history of the planet that considers the most recent reports on its evolution of water reservoirs. Considering the Peierls creep and the evolution of water reservoirs, we attempt to explain why the tectonics of Mars is inactive compared with that of Earth. On early Mars, the lithospheric thickness inferred from the brittle-ductile transition was small, and the lithospheric strength was low ( 200-300 MPa) under wet conditions at 4 Gya. This suggests that plate boundaries could have developed on the early "wet" Mars, which is a prerequisite for the operation of plate tectonics. Our results also imply that the lithospheric strength had significantly increased in the Noachian owing to water loss. Therefore, plate tectonics may have ceased or could no longer be initiated on Mars. At the least, the tectonic style of Mars would have dramatically changed during the Noachian.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2014-03-01

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  14. Cosmic evolution of Quasar radio structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the results of a survey of Quasar radio structures over redshifts from 0.6 to 3.7. There are clear evolutionary trends in size and luminosity, which suggest that the duty cycle of individual Quasars has increased over cosmic time. This affects source count statistics and gives clues on the evolution of Quasar environments.

  15. Object Recognition and Random Image Structure Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadr, Jvid; Sinha, Pawan

    2004-01-01

    We present a technique called Random Image Structure Evolution (RISE) for use in experimental investigations of high-level visual perception. Potential applications of RISE include the quantitative measurement of perceptual hysteresis and priming, the study of the neural substrates of object perception, and the assessment and detection of subtle…

  16. Object Recognition and Random Image Structure Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadr, Jvid; Sinha, Pawan

    2004-01-01

    We present a technique called Random Image Structure Evolution (RISE) for use in experimental investigations of high-level visual perception. Potential applications of RISE include the quantitative measurement of perceptual hysteresis and priming, the study of the neural substrates of object perception, and the assessment and detection of subtle…

  17. The Structure of Scientific Evolution.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Science is the construction and testing of systems that bind symbols to sensations according to rules. Material implication is the primary rule, providing the structure of definition, elaboration, delimitation, prediction, explanation, and control. The goal of science is not to secure truth, which is a binary function of accuracy, but rather to increase the information about data communicated by theory. This process is symmetric and thus entails an increase in the information about theory communicated by data. Important components in this communication are the elevation of data to the status of facts, the descent of models under the guidance of theory, and their close alignment through the evolving retroductive process. The information mutual to theory and data may be measured as the reduction in the entropy, or complexity, of the field of data given the model. It may also be measured as the reduction in the entropy of the field of models given the data. This symmetry explains the important status of parsimony (how thoroughly the data exploit what the model can say) alongside accuracy (how thoroughly the model represents what can be said about the data). Mutual information is increased by increasing model accuracy and parsimony, and by enlarging and refining the data field under purview.

  18. The Structure of Scientific Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Science is the construction and testing of systems that bind symbols to sensations according to rules. Material implication is the primary rule, providing the structure of definition, elaboration, delimitation, prediction, explanation, and control. The goal of science is not to secure truth, which is a binary function of accuracy, but rather to increase the information about data communicated by theory. This process is symmetric and thus entails an increase in the information about theory communicated by data. Important components in this communication are the elevation of data to the status of facts, the descent of models under the guidance of theory, and their close alignment through the evolving retroductive process. The information mutual to theory and data may be measured as the reduction in the entropy, or complexity, of the field of data given the model. It may also be measured as the reduction in the entropy of the field of models given the data. This symmetry explains the important status of parsimony (how thoroughly the data exploit what the model can say) alongside accuracy (how thoroughly the model represents what can be said about the data). Mutual information is increased by increasing model accuracy and parsimony, and by enlarging and refining the data field under purview. PMID:28018043

  19. The evolution of trophic structure.

    PubMed

    Bell, G

    2007-11-01

    The trophic relationships of an ecological community were represented by digital individuals consuming resources or prey within a simulated ecosystem and producing offspring that may differ from their parents. When individuals meet, a few simple rules are used to decide the outcome of their interaction. Trophically complex systems persist for long periods of time even in finite communities, provided that the strength of predator-prey interaction is sufficient to repay the cost of maintenance. The topology of the food web and important system-level attributes such as overall productivity follow from the rules of engagement: that is, the macroscopic properties of the ecosystem follow from the microscopic attributes of individuals, without the need to invoke the emergence of novel processes at the level of the whole system. Evolutionarily stable webs exist only when the pool of available species is small. If the pool is large, or speciation is allowed, species composition changes continually, while overall community properties are maintained. Ecologically separate and topologically different source webs based on the same pool of resources usually coexist for long periods of time, through negative frequency-dependent selection at the level of the source web as a whole. Thus, the evolved food web of species-rich communities is a highly dynamic structure with continual species turnover. It both imposes selection on each species and itself responds to selection, but selection does not necessarily maximize stability, productivity or any other community property.

  20. Directed evolution and structural analysis of NADPH-dependent Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A (Acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase from Ralstonia eutropha reveals two mutations responsible for enhanced kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Motohashi, Ren; Ikeda, Koji; Tobitani, Kota; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase (PhaB) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)], along with β-ketothiolase (PhaA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC). In this study, PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha was engineered by means of directed evolution consisting of an error-prone PCR-mediated mutagenesis and a P(3HB) accumulation-based in vivo screening system using Escherichia coli. From approximately 20,000 mutants, we obtained two mutant candidates bearing Gln47Leu (Q47L) and Thr173Ser (T173S) substitutions. The mutants exhibited kcat values that were 2.4-fold and 3.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. In fact, the PhaB mutants did exhibit enhanced activity and P(3HB) accumulation when expressed in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum. Comparative three-dimensional structural analysis of wild-type PhaB and highly active PhaB mutants revealed that the beneficial mutations affected the flexibility around the active site, which in turn played an important role in substrate recognition. Furthermore, both the kinetic analysis and crystal structure data supported the conclusion that PhaB forms a ternary complex with NADPH and acetoacetyl-CoA. These results suggest that the mutations affected the interaction with substrates, resulting in the acquirement of enhanced activity.

  1. Sequence, Structure and Ligand Binding Evolution of Rhodopsin-Like G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Crystal Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Steffen; Grünewald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest family of membrane receptors in the human genome. Advances in membrane protein crystallization so far resulted in the determination of 24 receptors available as high-resolution atomic structures. We performed the first phylogenetic analysis of GPCRs based on the available set of GPCR structures. We present a new phylogenetic tree of known human rhodopsin-like GPCR sequences based on this structure set. We can distinguish the three separate classes of small-ligand binding GPCRs, peptide binding GPCRs, and olfactory receptors. Analyzing different structural subdomains, we found that small molecule binding receptors most likely have evolved from peptide receptor precursors, with a rhodopsin/S1PR1 ancestor, most likely an ancestral opsin, forming the link between both classes. A light-activated receptor therefore seems to be the origin of the small molecule hormone receptors of the central nervous system. We find hints for a common evolutionary path of both ligand binding site and central sodium/water binding site. Surprisingly, opioid receptors exhibit both a binding cavity and a central sodium/water binding site similar to the one of biogenic amine receptors instead of peptide receptors, making them seemingly prone to bind small molecule ligands, e.g. opiates. Our results give new insights into the relationship and the pharmacological properties of rhodopsin-like GPCRs. PMID:25881057

  2. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  3. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-25

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  4. Interior Structure and Evolution of the Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    Basic Concepts Presumed initial composition Comparison with stellar structure Structure of Cold Bodies T=O thermodynamics The P--> infinity limit (white dwarfs) Finite pressure theories Experimental data at high pressure The radius-mass diagram Heat Flow Review of data The Kelvin mechanism Differentiation Radioactivity Tidal Heating Other Diagnostics of Interior Structure Response to rotation Tidal response Magnetic field The Terrestrial Planets The earth and the moon Mercury Venus Mars Summary The Jovian Planets Jupiter A fundamental solar composition reference? Thermal structure and heat flow Evolution of Jupiter Saturn Differences with Jupiter Heat flow Uranus and Neptune Key differences with Jupiter and with each other Thermal structure and heat flow Jovian Planet Satellites Io's heat flow and its relation to Jupiter's structure The Galilean satellites and their relation to Jupiter's origin Conclusion References

  5. The nonsinglet structure function evolution by Laplace method

    SciTech Connect

    Boroun, G. R. E-mail: boroun@razi.ac.ir; Zarrin, S.

    2015-12-15

    We derive a general scheme for the evolution of the nonsinglet structure function at the leadingorder (LO) and next-to-leading-order (NLO) by using the Laplace-transform technique. Results for the nonsinglet structure function are compared with MSTW2008, GRV, and CKMT parameterizations and also EMC experimental data in the LO and NLO analysis. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data and other parameterizations in the low- and large-x regions.

  6. Evolution of salt-related structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Several types of structures (piercements, turtles, and nonpiercements) are caused by salt movement. Reconstructions show that the emplacement process is basically the same for many geometrically dissimilar structures, but that the great differences of shape originated from different patterns of sediment loading, salt thickness, and basin evolution. The reconstructions are generalizations derived from numerous real examples to show timing, evolution of dip, origin of thickness changes and overchanges, how the salt-sediment volume exchange occurs, and diagnostic criteria to interpret these events. Such reconstructions help to discriminate between turtles and nonpiercements, to interpret lithofacies, and to unravel the role of sedimentary events on the structural evolution. In addition, they illustrate the mechanism of diapirism, using criteria to help distinguish diapirism in an overburden having strength (the mechanism assumed here) from diapirism in a viscous overburden (the classical buoyancy theory). In general, many piercements may start quite early (even before a density inversion exists) and move primarily by extrusion or may alternate between extrusion and intrusion beneath a thin overburden. The pattern of sedimentation largely determines the pattern of diapirism. In contrast, nonpiercements and turtle structures are passive features and may form whenever salt migrates away from them to an adjacent ''escape hatch.'' For example, nonpiercements may not form by salt rising vertically, but rather by salt moving away horizontally to some point of escape. In other words, the dome remains static while the overburden collapses into the rim syncline.

  7. Evolution on folding landscapes in combinatorial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of molecular structures by random point mutations. They will consider two types of molecular structures: (a) (RNA) secondary structures, and (b) random structures. In both cases structure consists of: (1) a contact graph, and (2) a family of relations imposed on its adjacent vertices. The vertex set of the contact graph is simply the set of all indices of a sequence, and its edges are the bonds. The corresponding relations associated with the edges are viewed as secondary base pairing rules and tertiary interaction rules respectively. Mapping of sequences into secondary and random structures are modeled and analyzed. Here, the set of all sequences that map into a particular structure is modeled as a random graph in the sequence space, the so called neutral network and they study how neutral networks are embedded in sequence space. A basic replication of deletion experiment reveals how effective secondary and random structures can be searched by random point mutations and to what extent the structure effects the dynamics of this optimization process. In particular the authors can report a nonlinear relation between the fraction of tertiary interactions in random structures, and the times taken for a population of sequences to find a high fitness target random structure.

  8. Evolution of structure during phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Anderson, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Nanostructured materials can be synthesized by utilizing the domain growth that accompanies first-order phase separation. Structural control can be achieved by appropriately selecting the quench depth and the quench time, but in order to do this in a mindful fashion one must understand the kinetics of domain growth. The authors have completed detailed light scattering studies of the evolution of structure in both temperature- and field-quenched phase transitions in two and three dimensional systems. They have studied these systems in the quiescent state and in shear and have developed theoretical models that account for the experimental results.

  9. Are the topsoil structures relevant indicators of alluvial soil evolution ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Clémence; Le Bayon, Renée.-Claire; Guenat, Claire; Hallaire, Vincent; Bullinger Weber, Géraldine; Verrecchia, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Floodplains contain a wide range of all steps of soil evolution, which are relevant in order to study the initial steps of soil structuring. Alluvial soils exhibit characteristics of both sediment and / or inherited soil deposition, and in situ soil formation resulting in different types of soil structure, especially in the topsoil layers. In calcareous alluvium deposits, the structuration processes of the topsoil are fast resulting in different structures. In this context, our aim is to verify if these topsoil structures, at macroscopic and microscopic scales, are relevant indicators of in situ soil evolution in a carbonate-rich and calcium saturated environment. We hypothesise that along a soil-vegetation stabilisation gradient both macroscopic and microscopic structures of topsoil reflect this in situ soil evolution. Along this evolutionary gradient the type of structure changes and becomes more stable and widespread within the topsoil. We characterize the topsoil structure in three different vegetation types from the pioneer stage (willow vegetation) on new sediment deposits (carbonate-rich FLUVIOSOLS BRUTS according to the Sound Reference base for soils, 1998) to mature forests (beech, ash, spruce) on stable soils (carbonate-rich FLUVIOSOLS TYPIQUES) at three different altitudes (subalpine to hill levels). In order to evaluate the heterogeneity within each site and between them three replicates are made resulting in a total of 27 soil samples. At the macroscopic scale, topsoil structure is described based on morphological and macroscopic descriptions (humus form, type and size of structure) as well as structure stability (Mean Weight Diameter, MWD) and water stable macro aggregates (WSA%) according to Kemper and Rossenau (1986). At the microscopic scale, polished slabs (dimension of 7cm X 10 cm and 0.5 cm in thickness) are used to quantify pore space using a morphological approach and 2D image analysis. After binarization of the image, leading to the detection

  10. The GENCODE v7 catalog of human long noncoding RNAs: analysis of their gene structure, evolution, and expression.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Thomas; Johnson, Rory; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Djebali, Sarah; Tilgner, Hagen; Guernec, Gregory; Martin, David; Merkel, Angelika; Knowles, David G; Lagarde, Julien; Veeravalli, Lavanya; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ruan, Yijun; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Brown, James B; Lipovich, Leonard; Gonzalez, Jose M; Thomas, Mark; Davis, Carrie A; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hubbard, Tim J; Notredame, Cedric; Harrow, Jennifer; Guigó, Roderic

    2012-09-01

    The human genome contains many thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). While several studies have demonstrated compelling biological and disease roles for individual examples, analytical and experimental approaches to investigate these genes have been hampered by the lack of comprehensive lncRNA annotation. Here, we present and analyze the most complete human lncRNA annotation to date, produced by the GENCODE consortium within the framework of the ENCODE project and comprising 9277 manually annotated genes producing 14,880 transcripts. Our analyses indicate that lncRNAs are generated through pathways similar to that of protein-coding genes, with similar histone-modification profiles, splicing signals, and exon/intron lengths. In contrast to protein-coding genes, however, lncRNAs display a striking bias toward two-exon transcripts, they are predominantly localized in the chromatin and nucleus, and a fraction appear to be preferentially processed into small RNAs. They are under stronger selective pressure than neutrally evolving sequences-particularly in their promoter regions, which display levels of selection comparable to protein-coding genes. Importantly, about one-third seem to have arisen within the primate lineage. Comprehensive analysis of their expression in multiple human organs and brain regions shows that lncRNAs are generally lower expressed than protein-coding genes, and display more tissue-specific expression patterns, with a large fraction of tissue-specific lncRNAs expressed in the brain. Expression correlation analysis indicates that lncRNAs show particularly striking positive correlation with the expression of antisense coding genes. This GENCODE annotation represents a valuable resource for future studies of lncRNAs.

  11. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: First comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by most phylogenetic methods. Information about secondary structure also supports the process of aligning rRNA sequences across taxa. Both aspects have been shown to increase the accuracy of phylogenetic reconstructions within various taxa. Here, we explore SSU rRNA secondary structures from the three extant classes of Phylum Porifera (Grant, 1836), a pivotal, but largely unresolved taxon of early branching Metazoa. This is the first phylogenetic study of poriferan SSU rRNA data to date that includes detailed comparative secondary structure information for all three sponge classes. Results We found base compositional and structural differences in SSU rRNA among Demospongiae, Hexactinellida (glass sponges) and Calcarea (calcareous sponges). We showed that analyses of primary rRNA sequences, including secondary structure-specific evolutionary models, in combination with reconstruction of the evolution of unusual structural features, reveal a substantial amount of additional information. Of special note was the finding that the gene tree topologies of marine haplosclerid demosponges, which are inconsistent with the current morphology-based classification, are supported by our reconstructed evolution of secondary structure features. Therefore, these features can provide alternative support for sequence-based topologies and give insights into the evolution of the molecule itself. To encourage and facilitate the application of rRNA models in phylogenetics of early metazoans, we present 52 SSU r

  12. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: first comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Oliver; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Wörheide, Gert

    2008-02-27

    The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by most phylogenetic methods. Information about secondary structure also supports the process of aligning rRNA sequences across taxa. Both aspects have been shown to increase the accuracy of phylogenetic reconstructions within various taxa.Here, we explore SSU rRNA secondary structures from the three extant classes of Phylum Porifera (Grant, 1836), a pivotal, but largely unresolved taxon of early branching Metazoa. This is the first phylogenetic study of poriferan SSU rRNA data to date that includes detailed comparative secondary structure information for all three sponge classes. We found base compositional and structural differences in SSU rRNA among Demospongiae, Hexactinellida (glass sponges) and Calcarea (calcareous sponges). We showed that analyses of primary rRNA sequences, including secondary structure-specific evolutionary models, in combination with reconstruction of the evolution of unusual structural features, reveal a substantial amount of additional information. Of special note was the finding that the gene tree topologies of marine haplosclerid demosponges, which are inconsistent with the current morphology-based classification, are supported by our reconstructed evolution of secondary structure features. Therefore, these features can provide alternative support for sequence-based topologies and give insights into the evolution of the molecule itself. To encourage and facilitate the application of rRNA models in phylogenetics of early metazoans, we present 52 SSU rRNA secondary

  13. Evolution Process and Structural Analysis of Precambrian Jirisan Metamorphic and Sancheong Anorthosite Complexes in the Jirisan Province, Yeongnam Massif, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J. H.; Lee, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Jirisan metamorphic complex consists mainly of schist, blastoporphyritic granite gneiss, granitic gneiss, leucocratic gneiss, biotite gneiss, banded gneiss, migmatitic gneiss and granite gneiss. The Paleoproterozoic (1.87 1.79 Ga) Sancheong anorthosite complex, which intrude it, is classified into massive-type and foliation-type Sancheong anorthosite, Fe-Ti ore body, and mafic granulite which were formed from the multiple fractionation and polybaric crystallization of the coeval and cogenetic magma. These complexes went at least through three times of ductile deformation during Early Proterozoic Late Paleozoic. The D1 deformation formed sheath or "A" type folds and its characteristic orientation was uncertain due to the intensive multi-deformation superimposed after that. The D2 deformation occurred under the EW- or WNW-directed tectonic compression, and formed a regional NS or NNE trend of isoclinal and intrafolial folds and an extensive ductile shear zone accompanied by mylonitization. The D3 deformation occurred under the NS- or NNW-directed tectonic compression environment, and formed an EW or ENE trend of open and tight folds and a partial semibrittle shear zone accompanied by mylonitization, and rearranged the NS-trend pre-D3 structural elements into (E)NE or (W)NW direction. The D2 deformation generally increases from the center toward the margin of Sancheong anorthosite complex but is more intensive in the eastern than western parts of Sancheong anorthosite complex. While the D3 deformation is inversely more intensive in the its western than eastern parts. The D2 and D3 deformations are closely related to the distribution features of Sancheong anorthosite complex. These three tectonic events are expected to give important information in understanding and reconstructing the tectonic movement after the formation of Columbia Supercontinent as well as the present NS-trend tectonic frame of the Jirisan province of the Yeongnam massif, the Korean Peninsula.

  14. Heme oxygenase: evolution, structure, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Angela

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase has evolved to carry out the oxidative cleavage of heme, a reaction essential in physiological processes as diverse as iron reutilization and cellular signaling in mammals, synthesis of essential light-harvesting pigments in cyanobacteria and higher plants, and the acquisition of iron by bacterial pathogens. In all of these processes, heme oxygenase has evolved a similar structural and mechanistic scaffold to function within seemingly diverse physiological pathways. The heme oxygenase reaction is catalytically distinct from that of other hemoproteins such as the cytochromes P450, peroxidases, and catalases, but shares a hemoprotein scaffold that has evolved to generate a distinct activated oxygen species. In the following review we discuss the evolution of the structural and functional properties of heme oxygenase in light of the recent crystal structures of the mammalian and bacterial enzymes.

  15. Crystallography, Evolution, and the Structure of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    My undergraduate education in mathematics and physics was a good grounding for graduate studies in crystallographic studies of small organic molecules. As a postdoctoral fellow in Minnesota, I learned how to program an early electronic computer for crystallographic calculations. I then joined Max Perutz, excited to use my skills in the determination of the first protein structures. The results were even more fascinating than the development of techniques and provided inspiration for starting my own laboratory at Purdue University. My first studies on dehydrogenases established the conservation of nucleotide-binding structures. Having thus established myself as an independent scientist, I could start on my most cherished ambition of studying the structure of viruses. About a decade later, my laboratory had produced the structure of a small RNA plant virus and then, in another six years, the first structure of a human common cold virus. Many more virus structures followed, but soon it became essential to supplement crystallography with electron microscopy to investigate viral assembly, viral infection of cells, and neutralization of viruses by antibodies. A major guide in all these studies was the discovery of evolution at the molecular level. The conservation of three-dimensional structure has been a recurring theme, from my experiences with Max Perutz in the study of hemoglobin to the recognition of the conserved nucleotide-binding fold and to the recognition of the jelly roll fold in the capsid protein of a large variety of viruses. PMID:22318719

  16. Crystallography, evolution, and the structure of viruses.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-03-16

    My undergraduate education in mathematics and physics was a good grounding for graduate studies in crystallographic studies of small organic molecules. As a postdoctoral fellow in Minnesota, I learned how to program an early electronic computer for crystallographic calculations. I then joined Max Perutz, excited to use my skills in the determination of the first protein structures. The results were even more fascinating than the development of techniques and provided inspiration for starting my own laboratory at Purdue University. My first studies on dehydrogenases established the conservation of nucleotide-binding structures. Having thus established myself as an independent scientist, I could start on my most cherished ambition of studying the structure of viruses. About a decade later, my laboratory had produced the structure of a small RNA plant virus and then, in another six years, the first structure of a human common cold virus. Many more virus structures followed, but soon it became essential to supplement crystallography with electron microscopy to investigate viral assembly, viral infection of cells, and neutralization of viruses by antibodies. A major guide in all these studies was the discovery of evolution at the molecular level. The conservation of three-dimensional structure has been a recurring theme, from my experiences with Max Perutz in the study of hemoglobin to the recognition of the conserved nucleotide-binding fold and to the recognition of the jelly roll fold in the capsid protein of a large variety of viruses.

  17. Acetohydroxyacid synthases: evolution, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadi; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase, a thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme, can condense either two pyruvate molecules to form acetolactate for synthesizing L-valine and L-leucine or pyruvate with 2-ketobutyrate to form acetohydroxybutyrate for synthesizing L-isoleucine. Because the key reaction catalyzed by acetohydroxyacid synthase in the biosynthetic pathways of branched-chain amino acids exists in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria, but not in animals, acetohydroxyacid synthase becomes a potential target for developing novel herbicides and antimicrobial compounds. In this article, the evolution, structure, and catalytic mechanism of acetohydroxyacid synthase are summarized.

  18. Structural evolution of ball-milled permalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzózka, K.; Olekšáková, D.; Kollár, P.; Szumiata, T.; Górka, B.; Gawroński, M.

    Two series of Fe19.8sNi80.2 samples obtained by ball milling and differing in the form of starting material were investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy. In the case of milled elemental powder, strong structural evolution was stated: both α and Γ phases arise and a small amount of pure iron is present as well. The annealing of as-milled powder at 490°C causes faster forming of Γ-(Ni-Fe) phase. Only slight changes in atomic order were stated in the series of milled polycrystalline ribbon.

  19. Structural evolution of ball-milled permalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzózka, K.; Olekšáková, D.; Kollár, P.; Szumiata, T.; Górka, B.; Gawroński, M.

    2006-02-01

    Two series of Fe19.8Ni80.2 samples obtained by ball milling and differing in the form of starting material were investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy. In the case of milled elemental powder, strong structural evolution was stated: both α and γ phases arise and a small amount of pure iron is present as well. The annealing of as-milled powder at 490°C causes faster forming of γ-(Ni Fe) phase. Only slight changes in atomic order were stated in the series of milled polycrystalline ribbon.

  20. PIECE: a database for plant gene structure comparison and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; You, Frank M.; Lazo, Gerard R.; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Thilmony, Roger; Gordon, Sean; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Gu, Yong Q.

    2013-01-01

    Gene families often show degrees of differences in terms of exon–intron structures depending on their distinct evolutionary histories. Comparative analysis of gene structures is important for understanding their evolutionary and functional relationships within plant species. Here, we present a comparative genomics database named PIECE (http://wheat.pw.usda.gov/piece) for Plant Intron and Exon Comparison and Evolution studies. The database contains all the annotated genes extracted from 25 sequenced plant genomes. These genes were classified based on Pfam motifs. Phylogenetic trees were pre-constructed for each gene category. PIECE provides a user-friendly interface for different types of searches and a graphical viewer for displaying a gene structure pattern diagram linked to the resulting bootstrapped dendrogram for each gene family. The gene structure evolution of orthologous gene groups was determined using the GLOOME, Exalign and GECA software programs that can be accessed within the database. PIECE also provides a web server version of the software, GSDraw, for drawing schematic diagrams of gene structures. PIECE is a powerful tool for comparing gene sequences and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in plant genomes. PMID:23180792

  1. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  2. Directed Evolution and Structural Analysis of Alkaline Pectate Lyase from the Alkaliphilic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain N16-5 To Improve Its Thermostability for Efficient Ramie Degumming.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Ye, Jintong; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-09-01

    Thermostable alkaline pectate lyases have potential applications in the textile industry as an alternative to chemical-based ramie degumming processes. In particular, the alkaline pectate lyase from Bacillus sp. strain N16-5 (BspPelA) has potential for enzymatic ramie degumming because of its high specific activity under extremely alkaline conditions without the requirement for additional Ca(2+). However, BspPelA displays poor thermostability and is inactive after incubation at 50°C for only 30 min. Here, directed evolution was used to improve the thermostability of BspPelA for efficient and stable degumming. After two rounds of error-prone PCR and screening of >12,000 mutants, 10 mutants with improved thermostability were obtained. Sequence analysis and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that single E124I, T178A, and S271G substitutions were responsible for improving thermostability. Structural and molecular dynamic simulation analysis indicated that the formation of a hydrophobic cluster and new H-bond networks was the key factor contributing to the improvement in thermostability with these three substitutions. The most thermostable combined mutant, EAET, exhibited a 140-fold increase in the t50 (time at which the enzyme loses 50% of its initial activity) value at 50°C, accompanied by an 84.3% decrease in activity compared with that of wild-type BspPelA, while the most advantageous combined mutant, EA, exhibited a 24-fold increase in the t50 value at 50°C, with a 23.3% increase in activity. Ramie degumming with the EA mutant was more efficient than that with wild-type BspPelA. Collectively, our results suggest that the EA mutant, exhibiting remarkable improvements in thermostability and activity, has the potential for applications in ramie degumming in the textile industry. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Directed Evolution and Structural Analysis of Alkaline Pectate Lyase from the Alkaliphilic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain N16-5 To Improve Its Thermostability for Efficient Ramie Degumming

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng; Ye, Jintong; Xue, Yanfen

    2015-01-01

    Thermostable alkaline pectate lyases have potential applications in the textile industry as an alternative to chemical-based ramie degumming processes. In particular, the alkaline pectate lyase from Bacillus sp. strain N16-5 (BspPelA) has potential for enzymatic ramie degumming because of its high specific activity under extremely alkaline conditions without the requirement for additional Ca2+. However, BspPelA displays poor thermostability and is inactive after incubation at 50°C for only 30 min. Here, directed evolution was used to improve the thermostability of BspPelA for efficient and stable degumming. After two rounds of error-prone PCR and screening of >12,000 mutants, 10 mutants with improved thermostability were obtained. Sequence analysis and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that single E124I, T178A, and S271G substitutions were responsible for improving thermostability. Structural and molecular dynamic simulation analysis indicated that the formation of a hydrophobic cluster and new H-bond networks was the key factor contributing to the improvement in thermostability with these three substitutions. The most thermostable combined mutant, EAET, exhibited a 140-fold increase in the t50 (time at which the enzyme loses 50% of its initial activity) value at 50°C, accompanied by an 84.3% decrease in activity compared with that of wild-type BspPelA, while the most advantageous combined mutant, EA, exhibited a 24-fold increase in the t50 value at 50°C, with a 23.3% increase in activity. Ramie degumming with the EA mutant was more efficient than that with wild-type BspPelA. Collectively, our results suggest that the EA mutant, exhibiting remarkable improvements in thermostability and activity, has the potential for applications in ramie degumming in the textile industry. PMID:26070675

  4. The structure and evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Paul

    I present a study of the structure and evolution of galaxies from their central, supermassive black holes to their global evolution over the lifetime of the universe. These observations, models, and theoretical predictions illustrate the current power and future potential of multiwavelength sky surveys for cosmological studies. The structure of our Galaxy provides one important constraint on any theory of galaxy formation. These theories must be able to reproduce our Galaxy's structure and stellar population. I have used a 6-filter, visible-wavelength imaging survey to analyze the structure, luminosity function, and mass function of the oldest stars in our Galactic disk. The vertical distribution of these stars is best fit by a thin + thick disk model. This result supports the current model for the gradual collapse of our Galaxy from a spherical, protogalactic cloud. The study also showed that the Salpeter mass function does not hold for stars less massive than 0.6 times our Sun and therefore low mass stars can not be the dominant mass constituent of the Galactic disk. I obtained additional near-infrared data to expand the existing visible-wavelength database and test current models of galaxy formation and evolution. The question of whether galaxies assembled relatively early and passively evolved as single units, or if galaxies hierarchically assembled through interactions over the lifetime of the universe, is a major area of current research. A vital component of studies such as this is accurate measurement of the total, integrated light of each galaxy. I compared several galaxy photometry techniques with simulations and determine that aperture photometry is the most reliable method for this study. I used the near-infrared sample to study the surface density of galaxies as a function of integrated brightness to test these galaxy formation models. The results favor simple passive galaxy evolution, although they are also consistent with some merging. These near

  5. Planetary surface structure and evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franck, Siegfried

    1991-01-01

    The surface of the planet Mars is characterized by two different hemispheres: old densely cratered structures in the Southern Uplands, and sparsely cratered younger topographically lower regions covering approximately the northern third of the planet's surface. The model for explaining these global surface structures is characterized by the following features: (1) homogeneous accretion of Mars; (2) formation of a metal melt layer; (3) northward translation of the undifferentiated core due to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability; (4) vigorous convection in the southern parts and formation of the Southern Uplands' crust; (5) fragmentation of the primordial core, slowly dissolving rockbergs, beginning of Tharsis uplift and volcanism; (6) formation of the Northern Lowlands' crust from only weakly differentiated silicatic material; and (7) reaching of the present state with symmetrically placed core and further thermal evolution.

  6. Secondary structure switching in Cro protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Newlove, Tracey; Konieczka, Jay H; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2004-04-01

    We report the solution structure of the Cro protein from bacteriophage P22. Comparisons of its sequence and structure to those of lambda Cro strongly suggest an alpha-to-beta secondary structure switching event during Cro evolution. The folds of P22 Cro and lambda Cro share a three alpha helix fragment comprising the N-terminal half of the domain. However, P22 Cro's C terminus folds as two helices, while lambda Cro's folds as a beta hairpin. The all-alpha fold found for P22 Cro appears to be ancestral, since it also occurs in cI proteins, which are anciently duplicated paralogues of Cro. PSI-BLAST and transitive homology analyses strongly suggest that the sequences of P22 Cro and lambda Cro are globally homologous despite encoding different folds. The alpha+beta fold of lambda Cro therefore likely evolved from its all-alpha ancestor by homologous secondary structure switching, rather than by nonhomologous replacement of both sequence and structure.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of honey bee behavioral evolution.

    PubMed

    Raffiudin, Rika; Crozier, Ross H

    2007-05-01

    DNA sequences from three mitochondrial (rrnL, cox2, nad2) and one nuclear gene (itpr) from all 9 known honey bee species (Apis), a 10th possible species, Apis dorsata binghami, and three outgroup species (Bombus terrestris, Melipona bicolor and Trigona fimbriata) were used to infer Apis phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian analysis. The dwarf honey bees were confirmed as basal, and the giant and cavity-nesting species to be monophyletic. All nodes were strongly supported except that grouping Apis cerana with A. nigrocincta. Two thousand post-burnin trees from the phylogenetic analysis were used in a Bayesian comparative analysis to explore the evolution of dance type, nest structure, comb structure and dance sound within Apis. The ancestral honey bee species was inferred with high support to have nested in the open, and to have more likely than not had a silent vertical waggle dance and a single comb. The common ancestor of the giant and cavity-dwelling bees is strongly inferred to have had a buzzing vertical directional dance. All pairwise combinations of characters showed strong association, but the multiple comparisons problem reduces the ability to infer associations between states between characters. Nevertheless, a buzzing dance is significantly associated with cavity-nesting, several vertical combs, and dancing vertically, a horizontal dance is significantly associated with a nest with a single comb wrapped around the support, and open nesting with a single pendant comb and a silent waggle dance.

  8. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Phylogenomic and structural analyses of 18 complete plastomes across nearly all families of early-diverging eudicots, including an angiosperm-wide analysis of IR gene content evolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanxia; Moore, Michael J; Zhang, Shoujun; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Zhao, Tingting; Meng, Aiping; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Jianqiang; Wang, Hengchang

    2016-03-01

    The grade of early-diverging eudicots includes five major lineages: Ranunculales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Proteales and Sabiaceae. To examine the evolution of plastome structure in early-diverging eudicots, we determined the complete plastome sequences of eight previously unsequenced early-diverging eudicot taxa, Pachysandra terminalis (Buxaceae), Meliosma aff. cuneifolia (Sabiaceae), Sabia yunnanensis (Sabiaceae), Epimedium sagittatum (Berberidaceae), Euptelea pleiosperma (Eupteleaceae), Akebia trifoliata (Lardizabalaceae), Stephania japonica (Menispermaceae) and Papaver somniferum (Papaveraceae), and compared them to previously published plastomes of the early-diverging eudicots Buxus, Tetracentron, Trochodendron, Nelumbo, Platanus, Nandina, Megaleranthis, Ranunculus, Mahonia and Macadamia. All of the newly sequenced plastomes share the same 79 protein-coding genes, 4 rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes, except for that of Epimedium, in which infA is pseudogenized and clpP is highly divergent and possibly a pseudogene. The boundaries of the plastid Inverted Repeat (IR) were found to vary significantly across early-diverging eudicots; IRs ranged from 24.3 to 36.4kb in length and contained from 18 to 33 genes. Based on gene content, the IR was classified into six types, with shifts among types characterized by high levels of homoplasy. Reconstruction of ancestral IR gene content suggested that 18 genes were likely present in the IR region of the ancestor of eudicots. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of a 79-gene, 97-taxon data set that included all available early-diverging eudicots and representative sampling of remaining angiosperm diversity largely agreed with previous estimates of early-diverging eudicot relationships, but resolved Trochodendrales rather than Buxales as sister to Gunneridae, albeit with relatively weak bootstrap support, conflicting with what has been found for these three clades in most previous analyses. In addition, Proteales was

  10. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Daniel A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms.The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps

  11. Evolution of spatially structured host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Lion, S; Gandon, S

    2015-01-01

    Spatial structure has dramatic effects on the demography and the evolution of species. A large variety of theoretical models have attempted to understand how local dispersal may shape the coevolution of interacting species such as host-parasite interactions. The lack of a unifying framework is a serious impediment for anyone willing to understand current theory. Here, we review previous theoretical studies in the light of a single epidemiological model that allows us to explore the effects of both host and parasite migration rates on the evolution and coevolution of various life-history traits. We discuss the impact of local dispersal on parasite virulence, various host defence strategies and local adaptation. Our analysis shows that evolutionary and coevolutionary outcomes crucially depend on the details of the host-parasite life cycle and on which life-history trait is involved in the interaction. We also discuss experimental studies that support the effects of spatial structure on the evolution of host-parasite interactions. This review highlights major similarities between some theoretical results, but it also reveals an important gap between evolutionary and coevolutionary models. We discuss possible ways to bridge this gap within a more unified framework that would reconcile spatial epidemiology, evolution and coevolution. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  12. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding, of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Mercury - Internal structure and thermal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, R. W., II; Solomon, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    Mercury's thermal evolution and internal structure are modeled based on the planet's gross physical properties (which imply a high metallic iron content) and predictions for its chemistry made from the Lewis-Cameron model of condensation of the primitive solar nebula (which implies that Mercury may be composed only of those materials that condensed at temperatures near that of metallic iron condensation in the cooling nebula). Various heat sources, initial temperatures, and thermal conductivities are considered for a homogeneous model and a differentiated two-layer model. Density distributions are calculated from the mean density and estimates of the present-day temperature. The moment of inertia and the hydrostatic value of the second degree harmonic coefficient of Mercury's gravity field are found for the differentiated and undifferentiated models. These results should be useful for preliminary interpretation of the Mariner 10 measurements of Mercury's gravitational field.

  14. Sensitivity of flow evolution on turbulence structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Aashwin A.; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2016-09-01

    Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes models represent the workhorse for studying turbulent flows in academia and in industry. Such single-point turbulence models have limitations in accounting for the influence of the nonlocal physics and flow history on turbulence evolution. In this context, we investigate the sensitivity inherent in such single-point models due to their characterization of the internal structure of homogeneous turbulent flows solely by the means of the Reynolds stresses. For a wide variety of mean flows under diverse conditions, we study the prediction intervals engendered due to this coarse-grained description. The nature of this variability and its dependence on parameters such as the mean flow topology, the initial Reynolds stress tensor, and the relative influence of linear contra nonlinear physics is identified, analyzed, and explicated.

  15. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding, of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction.

  16. Evolution of groups with a hierarchical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    2012-12-01

    The universal occurrence of a hierarchical structure and its dynamic behavior in various types of group, living or abstract, are discussed. Here the word “group” refers not only to tangible aggregation but also to invisible aggregation of social psychological and of geopolitical meaning. The evolution of these groups is simulated using a model of agents distributed on the lattices of cellular grids. It is assumed that agents, fearing isolation, interact asymmetrically with each other with regard to exchange of “power”. As an indicator of hierarchy, the Gini coefficient is introduced. Example calculations are made for the aggregation, fusion and fission of animal groups, and for the appearance of a powerful empire and the rise and fall of supremacy. It is shown that such abstract objects evolve with time in accordance with the universal rules of groups common to birds and fish.

  17. The earth tectonosphere, its structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, V. V.

    Endogenic geological regimes, which include the tectonic, magmatic, and metamorphic processes, responsible for the structure of the tectonosphere and its evolution are discussed. Heat flow is considered to be the major factor controlling the type of the endogenic regime, with other factors being the temperature distribution in the tectonosphere and the degree and properties of the penetrability of the tectonosphere to melts and fluids. The development of the tectonosphere proceeds on the basis of geochemical impoverishment of the upper mantle by gradual fractionation of its matter. At initial stages of earth development the fractionation occurred by way of degassing; the continental crust thus evolving was rich in incompatible elements and contained large amounts of calc-alkalic magmas. As the upper mantle lost its volatiles, the mechanism of fractionation changed gradually; degassing was being substituted by selective melting, and the composition of magmas became increasingly widespread. These changes were coupled with the destruction of continental crust and the formation of oceanic crust.

  18. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. A.; Dong, K. J.; Yu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald's rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid-solid phase transition.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Syntenic Genes in Grass Genomes Reveals Accelerated Rates of Gene Structure and Coding Sequence Evolution in Polyploid Wheat1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Akhunov, Eduard D.; Sehgal, Sunish; Liang, Hanquan; Wang, Shichen; Akhunova, Alina R.; Kaur, Gaganpreet; Li, Wanlong; Forrest, Kerrie L.; See, Deven; Šimková, Hana; Ma, Yaqin; Hayden, Matthew J.; Luo, Mingcheng; Faris, Justin D.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Gill, Bikram S.

    2013-01-01

    Cycles of whole-genome duplication (WGD) and diploidization are hallmarks of eukaryotic genome evolution and speciation. Polyploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) has had a massive increase in genome size largely due to recent WGDs. How these processes may impact the dynamics of gene evolution was studied by comparing the patterns of gene structure changes, alternative splicing (AS), and codon substitution rates among wheat and model grass genomes. In orthologous gene sets, significantly more acquired and lost exonic sequences were detected in wheat than in model grasses. In wheat, 35% of these gene structure rearrangements resulted in frame-shift mutations and premature termination codons. An increased codon mutation rate in the wheat lineage compared with Brachypodium distachyon was found for 17% of orthologs. The discovery of premature termination codons in 38% of expressed genes was consistent with ongoing pseudogenization of the wheat genome. The rates of AS within the individual wheat subgenomes (21%–25%) were similar to diploid plants. However, we uncovered a high level of AS pattern divergence between the duplicated homeologous copies of genes. Our results are consistent with the accelerated accumulation of AS isoforms, nonsynonymous mutations, and gene structure rearrangements in the wheat lineage, likely due to genetic redundancy created by WGDs. Whereas these processes mostly contribute to the degeneration of a duplicated genome and its diploidization, they have the potential to facilitate the origin of new functional variations, which, upon selection in the evolutionary lineage, may play an important role in the origin of novel traits. PMID:23124323

  20. Structural evolution of maize stalk/char particles during pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peng; Hu, Song; Sun, Lushi; Xiang, Jun; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Anchao; Zhang, Junying

    2009-10-01

    The structural evolution characteristics of maize stalk/char particles during pyrolysis were investigated. The char was prepared by pyrolyzing at temperatures ranging from 200 to 900 degrees C. Maize stalk and chars were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, ultimate analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), helium density measurement and N(2) adsorption/desorption method. The char yield decreased rapidly with increasing temperature until 400 degrees C. As temperature increased, the char became progressively more aromatic and carbonaceous. The hydroxyl, aliphatic C-H, carbonyl and olefinic C=C groups were lost at high temperatures. Below 500 degrees C, the removal of volatile matter made pore opening. High temperatures led to the occurrence of softening, melting, fusing and carbon structural ordering. The aromatization process started at approximately 350 degrees C and continued to higher temperatures. The shrinkage of carbon structure occurred above 500 degrees C, which was concurrent with the aromatization process.

  1. Parallel structural evolution of auxin response factors in the angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Finet, Cédric; Fourquin, Chloé; Vinauger, Marion; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Chambrier, Pierre; Paindavoine, Sandrine; Scutt, Charles P

    2010-09-01

    Here we analyze the structural evolution of the paralogous transcription factors ETTIN (ETT/ARF3) and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4 (ARF4), which control the development of floral organs and leaves in the model angiosperm Arabidopsis. ETT is truncated at its C terminus, and consequently lacks two regulatory domains present in most other ARFs, including ARF4. Our analysis indicates ETT and ARF4 to have been generated by the duplication of a non-truncated ARF gene prior to the radiation of the extant angiosperms. We furthermore show that either ETT or ARF4 orthologs have become modified to encode truncated ARF proteins, lacking C-terminal regulatory domains, in representatives of three groups that separated early in angiosperm evolution: Amborellales, Nymphaeales and the remaining angiosperm clade. Interestingly, the production of truncated ARF4 transcripts in Amborellales occurs through an alternative splicing mechanism, rather than through a permanent truncation, as in the other groups studied. To gain insight into the potential functional significance of truncations to ETT and ARF4, we tested the capacity of native, truncated and chimeric coding sequences of these genes to restore a wild-type phenotype to Arabidopsis ett mutants. We discuss the results of this analysis in the context of the structural evolution of ARF genes in the angiosperms.

  2. Tracing primordial protein evolution through structurally guided stepwise segment elongation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideki; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shinya

    2014-02-07

    The understanding of how primordial proteins emerged has been a fundamental and longstanding issue in biology and biochemistry. For a better understanding of primordial protein evolution, we synthesized an artificial protein on the basis of an evolutionary hypothesis, segment-based elongation starting from an autonomously foldable short peptide. A 10-residue protein, chignolin, the smallest foldable polypeptide ever reported, was used as a structural support to facilitate higher structural organization and gain-of-function in the development of an artificial protein. Repetitive cycles of segment elongation and subsequent phage display selection successfully produced a 25-residue protein, termed AF.2A1, with nanomolar affinity against the Fc region of immunoglobulin G. AF.2A1 shows exquisite molecular recognition ability such that it can distinguish conformational differences of the same molecule. The structure determined by NMR measurements demonstrated that AF.2A1 forms a globular protein-like conformation with the chignolin-derived β-hairpin and a tryptophan-mediated hydrophobic core. Using sequence analysis and a mutation study, we discovered that the structural organization and gain-of-function emerged from the vicinity of the chignolin segment, revealing that the structural support served as the core in both structural and functional development. Here, we propose an evolutionary model for primordial proteins in which a foldable segment serves as the evolving core to facilitate structural and functional evolution. This study provides insights into primordial protein evolution and also presents a novel methodology for designing small sized proteins useful for industrial and pharmaceutical applications.

  3. Evolution of tertiary structure of viral RNA dependent polymerases.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylogram of vRdPs demonstrates that RNA-dependent DNA polymerases (RdDPs) of viruses within Retroviridae family cluster in a clearly separated group of vRdPs, while RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) of dsRNA and +ssRNA viruses are mixed together. This evidence supports the hypothesis that RdRPs replicating +ssRNA viruses evolved multiple times from RdRPs replicating +dsRNA viruses, and vice versa. Moreover, our phylogram may be presented as a scheme for RNA virus evolution. The results are in concordance with the actual concept of RNA virus evolution. Finally, the methods used in our work provide a new direction for studying ancient virus evolution.

  4. Fabric Analysis in the Koppal Granitoid (Southern India) using AMS and its significance in understanding the structural evolution of Dharwar Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sandeep; Mamtani, Manish A.; Rana, Virendra

    2016-04-01

    fabric recorded in the gneisses is having an orientation varying from NW-NNW. In some parts of the Koppal Granitoid, a foliation with NE-NNE orientation is recorded; however several parts of this granitoid do not show a clear foliation. Therefore, to analyse the fabric in the granitoid, the authors have carried out AMS analysis, and it is found that the mean orientation of the magnetic foliation is NNE (20° /64° /110°). These initial results indicate that whilst the host rock (gneiss) has NW-SE fabric, the Koppal granitoid is dominated by NE-SW planar fabric. This indicates that the granitoid fabric developed during regional D3 deformation that was on account of NW-SE compression, which is in contrast to the granitoids of WDC (Mulgund Granitoid). It is envisaged that further integration of microstructural studies with the above information will enhance the existing knowledge of the accretionary processes and kinematic evolution of Dharwar craton. References Chadwick et al., 2003 B. Chadwick, V.N. Vasudev, G.V. Hedge The Chitradurga schist belt and its adjacent plutonic rocks NW of Tungabhadra: Karnataka: a duplex in the late Archean convergent setting of the Dharwar craton Journal of the Geological Society of India, v.61, pp. 611-613. Mondal, T.K., Mamtani, M.A. (2013). 3-D Mohr circle construction using vein orientation data from Gadag (southern India) Implications to recognize fluid pressure fluctuation. Journal of Structural Geology, v. 56, pp.45-56. Mondal, T.K. and Mamtani, M.A., 2014. Fabric analysis in rocks of the Gadag region (southern India) - Implications for time relationship between regional deformation and gold mineralization. Tectonophysics, v. 629, pp.238-249. Mondal, T.K. and Mamtani, M.A., 2016. Palaeostress analysis of normal faults in granite-implications for interpreting Riedel shearing related to regional deformation. Journal of the Geological Society, v.173 (1), pp.216-227.

  5. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.A.; Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B.

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  6. Models of protocellular structures, functions and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The central step in the origin of life was the emergence of organized structures from organic molecules available on the early earth. These predecessors to modern cells, called 'proto-cells,' were simple, membrane bounded structures able to maintain themselves, grow, divide, and evolve. Since there is no fossil record of these earliest of life forms, it is a scientific challenge to discover plausible mechanisms for how these entities formed and functioned. To meet this challenge, it is essential to create laboratory models of protocells that capture the main attributes associated with living systems, while remaining consistent with known, or inferred, protobiological conditions. This report provides an overview of a project which has focused on protocellular metabolism and the coupling of metabolism to energy transduction. We have assumed that the emergence of systems endowed with genomes and capable of Darwinian evolution was preceded by a pre-genomic phase, in which protocells functioned and evolved using mostly proteins, without self-replicating nucleic acids such as RNA.

  7. The proteome: structure, function and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Keiran; Kelley, Lawrence A; Islam, Suhail A; MacCallum, Robert M; Muller, Arne; Pazos, Florencio; Sternberg, Michael J.E

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports two studies to model the inter-relationships between protein sequence, structure and function. First, an automated pipeline to provide a structural annotation of proteomes in the major genomes is described. The results are stored in a database at Imperial College, London (3D-GENOMICS) that can be accessed at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk. Analysis of the assignments to structural superfamilies provides evolutionary insights. 3D-GENOMICS is being integrated with related proteome annotation data at University College London and the European Bioinformatics Institute in a project known as e-protein (http://www.e-protein.org/). The second topic is motivated by the developments in structural genomics projects in which the structure of a protein is determined prior to knowledge of its function. We have developed a new approach PHUNCTIONER that uses the gene ontology (GO) classification to supervise the extraction of the sequence signal responsible for protein function from a structure-based sequence alignment. Using GO we can obtain profiles for a range of specificities described in the ontology. In the region of low sequence similarity (around 15%), our method is more accurate than assignment from the closest structural homologue. The method is also able to identify the specific residues associated with the function of the protein family. PMID:16524832

  8. Clouds on Neptune: Motions, Evolution, and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, Larry A.; Morgan, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The aims of our original proposal were these: (1) improving measurements of Neptune's circulation, (2) understanding the spatial distribution of cloud features, (3) discovery of new cloud features and understanding their evolutionary process, (4) understanding the vertical structure of zonal cloud patterns, (5) defining the structure of discrete cloud features, and (6) defining the near IR albedo and light curve of Triton. Towards these aims we proposed analysis of existing 1996 groundbased NSFCAM/IRTF observations and nearly simultaneous WFPC2 observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We also proposed to acquire new observations from both HST and the IRTF.

  9. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Background Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs) are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. Results We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs) is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. Conclusion A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License. PMID:15790387

  10. Micro-structure evolution in sheared granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, H.; Hori, T.; Yoshioka, N.; Kaneda, Y.

    2005-12-01

    In order to study the relationship between microstructure evolutions and shear resisting mechanisms in granular materials, computer simulations of a gouge layer under shearing condition were performed using the three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). The details of the simulation conditions follow the laboratory experiment presented by Yoshioka and Sakaguchi in this meeting. Monitoring inter particles forces for all contacts indicates that there is a significant increase in heterogeneity in contact force distribution_@with increase in shear loading. Large compression forces make contacts more rigid, and rigid contacts can resist to larger forces. As a result, rigid column-like microstructures are formed in the direction of the major principal stress which is the direction of superimpose of the normal force and the shear force on the upper block. Those columnar structures resist to shearing locally. However, we found that there is a life-time limitation in such columnar structures formed in sheared granular materials. When a rigid columnar structure rotates or deflects due to couple stress induced from shear load, it loses the resistant strength to shearing, because its direction is no longer equal to the direction of the major principal stress. Consequently, the columnar structure starts to collapse. The rigid columnar structure rotation is accompanied by two cases. One is the case when a larger number of particles are involved in one columnar structure. In this case, larger moment acts on a constant couple force due to shearing. The other case is that a purely larger couple force acts on a columnar structure. From this microstructural analysis, we can conclude that the behavior of sheared granular materials is profoundly controlled by the evolution in forming and collapsing of the columnar structures. In addition, the thickness of shearing layer is also controlled by the length of the columnar structures which have a certain upper limit.

  11. Structural controls on Eocene to Pliocene tectonic and metallogenic evolution of the southernmost Lesser Caucasus, Armenia: paleostress field reconstruction and fault-slip analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Samvel; Moritz, Robert; Tayan, Rodrik

    2017-04-01

    The Cenozoic evolution of the central segment of the Tethyan belt is dominated by oblique convergence and final collision of Gondwana-derived terranes and the Arabian plate with Eurasia, which created a favorable setting for the formation of the highly mineralized Meghri-Ordubad pluton in the southernmost Lesser Caucasus. Regional strike-slip faults played an important role in the control of the porphyry Cu-Mo and epithermal systems hosted by the Meghri-Ordubad pluton. In this contribution we discuss the paleostress and the kinematic environment of the major strike-slip and oblique-slip ore-controlling faults throughout the Eocene subduction to Mio-Pliocene post-collisional tectonic evolution of the Meghri-Ordubad pluton based on detailed structural field mapping of the ore districts, stereonet compilation of ore-bearing fractures and vein orientations in the major porphyry and epithermal deposits, and the paleostress reconstructions. Paleostress reconstructions indicate that during the Eocene and Early Oligocene, the main paleostress axe orientations reveal a dominant NE-SW-oriented compression, which is compatible with the subduction geometry of the Neotethys along Eurasia. This tectonic setting was favorable for dextral displacements along the two major, regional NNW-oriented Khustup-Giratakh and Salvard-Ordubad strike-slip faults. This resulted in the formation of a NS-oriented transrotational basin, known as the Central magma and ore- controlling zone (Tayan, 1998). It caused a horizontal clockwise rotation of blocks. The EW-oriented faults separating the blocks formed as en-échelon antithetic faults (Voghji, Meghrasar, Bughakyar and Meghriget-Cav faults). The Central zone consists of a network of EW-oriented sinistral and NS-oriented subparallel strike-slip faults (Tashtun, Spetry, Tey, Meghriget and Terterasar faults). They are active since the Eocene and were reactivated during the entire tectonic evolution of the pluton, but with different behaviors

  12. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  13. Evolution in a spatially structured population subject to rare epidemics.

    PubMed

    Socolar, J E; Richards, S; Wilson, W G

    2001-04-01

    We study a model that gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous population densities in a system of host individuals subject to rare, randomly distributed disease events. For stationary hosts that disperse offspring over short distances, evolutionary dynamics can lead to persistent populations with a variety of spatial structures. A mean-field analysis is shown to account for the behavior observed in simulations of a one-dimensional system, where the evolutionarily stable state corresponds to the solution of a straightforward optimization problem. In two dimensions, evolution drives the system to a stable critical state that is less well understood.

  14. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Evolution and structure of sustainability science.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Luís M A; Kaur, Jasleen

    2011-12-06

    The concepts of sustainable development have experienced extraordinary success since their advent in the 1980s. They are now an integral part of the agenda of governments and corporations, and their goals have become central to the mission of research laboratories and universities worldwide. However, it remains unclear how far the field has progressed as a scientific discipline, especially given its ambitious agenda of integrating theory, applied science, and policy, making it relevant for development globally and generating a new interdisciplinary synthesis across fields. To address these questions, we assembled a corpus of scholarly publications in the field and analyzed its temporal evolution, geographic distribution, disciplinary composition, and collaboration structure. We show that sustainability science has been growing explosively since the late 1980s when foundational publications in the field increased its pull on new authors and intensified their interactions. The field has an unusual geographic footprint combining contributions and connecting through collaboration cities and nations at very different levels of development. Its decomposition into traditional disciplines reveals its emphasis on the management of human, social, and ecological systems seen primarily from an engineering and policy perspective. Finally, we show that the integration of these perspectives has created a new field only in recent years as judged by the emergence of a giant component of scientific collaboration. These developments demonstrate the existence of a growing scientific field of sustainability science as an unusual, inclusive and ubiquitous scientific practice and bode well for its continued impact and longevity.

  17. Evolution and structure of sustainability science

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Kaur, Jasleen

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of sustainable development have experienced extraordinary success since their advent in the 1980s. They are now an integral part of the agenda of governments and corporations, and their goals have become central to the mission of research laboratories and universities worldwide. However, it remains unclear how far the field has progressed as a scientific discipline, especially given its ambitious agenda of integrating theory, applied science, and policy, making it relevant for development globally and generating a new interdisciplinary synthesis across fields. To address these questions, we assembled a corpus of scholarly publications in the field and analyzed its temporal evolution, geographic distribution, disciplinary composition, and collaboration structure. We show that sustainability science has been growing explosively since the late 1980s when foundational publications in the field increased its pull on new authors and intensified their interactions. The field has an unusual geographic footprint combining contributions and connecting through collaboration cities and nations at very different levels of development. Its decomposition into traditional disciplines reveals its emphasis on the management of human, social, and ecological systems seen primarily from an engineering and policy perspective. Finally, we show that the integration of these perspectives has created a new field only in recent years as judged by the emergence of a giant component of scientific collaboration. These developments demonstrate the existence of a growing scientific field of sustainability science as an unusual, inclusive and ubiquitous scientific practice and bode well for its continued impact and longevity. PMID:22114186

  18. Community evolution mining and analysis in social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongtao; Tian, Yuan; Liu, Xueyan; Jian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    With the development of digital and network technology, various social platforms emerge. These social platforms have greatly facilitated access to information, attracting more and more users. They use these social platforms every day to work, study and communicate, so every moment social platforms are generating massive amounts of data. These data can often be modeled as complex networks, making large-scale social network analysis possible. In this paper, the existing evolution classification model of community has been improved based on community evolution relationship over time in dynamic social network, and the Evolution-Tree structure is proposed which can show the whole life cycle of the community more clearly. The comparative test result shows that the improved model can excavate the evolution relationship of the community well.

  19. Crustal structure of Northern Latium (central Italy) from receiver functions analysis: New evidences of a post-collisional back-arc margin evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinelli, Mauro; Chiarabba, Claudio; Anselmi, Mario; Bianchi, Irene; De Rita, Donatella; Quattrocchi, Fedora

    2014-05-01

    The crustal velocity structure in a region of central Apennines of Italy at the hinge between the highly stretched portion of the Monte Argentario promontory and the magmatic province of the Tolfa Domes Complex (Northern Latium) is discussed in this study. S-wave velocities at depth have been constrained by the modeling of P-wave receiver functions (RF) from both temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations. The computer 3D Vs models show a thin crust (19-25 km) made of a shallow and thin sedimentary cover, a very high velocity and anisotropic layer related to a metamorphic basement, and a low Vs anisotropic layer in the middle-lower crust above a shallow Moho discontinuity modeled at about 20 km depth. The volcano-tectonic evolution of this portion of Tyrrhenian back-arc margin has been strongly influenced by its peculiar crustal architecture. The low-Vs layer acted as a shear zone in the middle-lower crust during the Tyrrhenian extension, also helping the development of Plio-Quaternary magmatism. Our findings potentially give new constraints on the evolution of the area and to the general comprehension of back-arc development in collisional regions.

  20. Structural evolution of carbon during oxidation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, A.F.

    1998-04-01

    The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs in the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and microporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, CO{sub 2} and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be {open_quotes}hidden{close_quotes} or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and CO{sub 2} surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM. Studies has confirmed that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

  1. Analysis of the geological structure and tectonic evolution of Xingning-Jinghai sag in deep water area, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoying; Ren, Jianye; Lin, Zi; Yang, Linlong

    2015-04-01

    Recent years, oil and gas exploration of the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the northern margin of South China Sea continuously achieved historic breakthroughs. The Xingning-Jinghai sag, which is located in southeast of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, is a deep-water sag with a great exploration potential. Its tectonic evolution is extremely complex. It experienced Mesozoic subduction to Cenozoic intra-continental rifting background, and finally evolved into a deep-water sag of the northern continental margin of South China Sea. The geological characteristics and the tectonic evolution of Xingning-Jinghai sag was closely related to the process of formation and evolution of the passive continental margin of the northern South China Sea. It is confirmed by many geophysical data that compared with adjacent Chaoshan depression, the crustal thickness of Xingning-Jinghai sag was rapidly thinning, and it developed detachment faults with later magmatic intrusion. The development of detachment faults have dynamic significance for the spreading of the South China Sea. Based on the seismic geological interpretation of 2D seismic data in the study area, the characteristics of detachment fault and supra-detachment basin have been proposed in this study. The characteristics of the detachment fault are low angle and high ratio between heave and throw. The geometry of the detachment fault is a typical lisric shape, with the dip of fault decreasing generally from the seismic profile. The detachment basin where sediments are not deposited over a tilting hanging-wall block but onto a tectonically exhumed footwall which is different from the typical half graben basin. Seismic profiles indicate two different structural styles in the east and west part of Xingning-Jinghai sag. In the west of the sag, there developed two large detachment faults, which control their detachment basin systems and the typical H block, and the two detachment faults are dipping landward and seaward, respectively. In

  2. Analysis of the karyotype structure in Ricolla quadrispinosa (Linneus, 1767): inferences about the chromosomal evolution of the tribes of Harpactorinae (Heteroptera, Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tiepo, Angélica Nunes; Pezenti, Larissa Forim; Ferraz Lopes, Thayná Bisson; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Dionisio, Jaqueline Fernanda; Fernandes, José Antônio Marin; Da Rosa, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The subfamily Harpactorinae is composed of six tribes. Phylogenetic studies bring together some of Harpactorinae tribes, but by and large the data on evolutionary relationships of the subfamily are scarce. Chromosome studies are of great importance for understanding the systematics of different groups of insects. For Harpactorinae, these studies are restricted to some subfamilies and involved only conventional chromosome analysis. This work analyzed cytogenetically Ricolla quadrispinosa (Linneus, 1767). The chromosome number was determined as 2n = 24 + X1X2Y in males. In metaphase II the autosomal chromosomes were organized in a ring with the pseudo-trivalent of sex chromosomes in its center. After C-banding followed by staining with DAPI, AT-rich blocks in autosomes were observed and the negatively heteropycnotic sex chromosomes. The data obtained, together with existing data for other species of the group, indicated that different chromosomal rearrangements are involved in the evolution of the species. In addition, a proposal of karyotype evolution for the subfamily, based on existing phylogenetic studies for the group is presented. PMID:28123690

  3. Evolution of groundwater chemistry along fault structures in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dausse, A.; Guiheneuf, N.; Pierce, A. A.; Cherry, J. A.; Parker, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-rock interaction across geological structures plays a major role on evolution of groundwater chemistry and physical properties of reservoirs. In particular, groundwater chemistry evolve on different facies according to residence times which can be linked to hydraulic properties of the geological unit. In this study, we analyze groundwater samples collected at an 11 km² site located in southern California (USA) to evaluate the evolution of groundwater chemistry according to different geological structures. Major and minor elements were sampled at the same period of time from 40 wells located along the main structures in the northeast of the site, where major NE-SW trending faults and other oriented ESE-WNW are present in sandstone Chatsworth formation. By analyzing the spatial distribution of ions concentration at the site scale, several hydrochemical compartments (main- and sub-compartments) can be distinguished and are in agreement with structural and hydrological information. In particular, as previously observed from piezometric informations, the shear zone fault serves as a barrier for groundwater flow and separates the site on two mains compartments. In addition, the analysis along major faults oriented orthogonal to this shear zone (ESE-WNW) in the eastern part of the site, shows an increase in mineralization following the hydraulic gradient. This salinization has been confirmed by ionic ratio and Gibbs plots and is attributed to fluid-rock interaction processes. In particular, groundwater chemistry seems to evolve from bicarbonate to sodium facies. Moreover, the gradient of concentrations vary depending on fault locations and can be related to their hydraulic properties and hence to different characteristic times from point to point. To conclude, major faults across the site display different degrees of groundwater chemistry evolution, linked to their physical properties, which may in turn have a large impact on contaminant transport and attenuation.

  4. The Coevolution of Phycobilisomes: Molecular Structure Adapting to Functional Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fei; Qin, Song; Wang, Yin-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Phycobilisome is the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria and red alga. It consists of phycobiliproteins and their associated linker peptides which play key role in absorption and unidirectional transfer of light energy and the stability of the whole complex system, respectively. Former researches on the evolution among PBPs and linker peptides had mainly focused on the phylogenetic analysis and selective evolution. Coevolution is the change that the conformation of one residue is interrupted by mutation and a compensatory change selected for in its interacting partner. Here, coevolutionary analysis of allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin and covariation analysis of linker peptides were performed. Coevolution analyses reveal that these sites are significantly correlated, showing strong evidence of the functional and structural importance of interactions among these residues. According to interprotein coevolution analysis, less interaction was found between PBPs and linker peptides. Our results also revealed the correlations between the coevolution and adaptive selection in PBS were not directly related, but probably demonstrated by the sites coupled under physical-chemical interactions. PMID:21904470

  5. Effects of Rock Type and Geologic Process on the Structure and Evolution of Nano, Meso and Micro-Scale Porosity: A (U)SANS, SEM/BSE Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anovitz, L.; Wang, H.; Cole, D. R.; Rother, G.

    2012-12-01

    The microstructure and evolution of porosity in time and space play a critical role in many geologic processes, including the migration and retention of water, gas and hydrocarbons, the evolution of hydrothermal systems, weathering, diagenesis and metamorphism, as well as technological processes such as CO2 sequestration, shale gas and secondary oil recovery. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries collectively dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nanoenvironments, wet and react with mineral surfaces. (Ultra)small-angle neutron scattering and autocorrelations derived from SEM/BSE imaging provide a method of quantifying pore structures in a statistically significant manner from the nanometer to the centimeter scale. Data from this approach suggests that there are significant primary and evolutionary differences between the multiscale pore structures of carbonate and clastic rocks. Our work on the St. Peter sandstone shows total porosity correlates with changes in pores structure including pore size ratios, surface fractal dimensions, and lacunarity. There is no evidence of mass-fractal scattering and while previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, our data show both fractal and pseudo-fractals. Larger pores fill at a faster rate than small pores as overgrowths form, leading to an increase in the small/large pore ratio. Overall, therefore, the relative importance of fluid reactions in confined geometries is likely to increase with increased silcrete formation. The changes observed with overgrowth formation in sandstones contrast with available data for metamorphism of chemical sediments (limestones) in both the Marble Canyon contact aureole, TX (Anovitz et al., 2009), and the Hatrurim Fm. (the Mottled Zone), Israel. The unmetamorphosed limestones both show distinct multifractal scattering patterns at larger scales, and true

  6. Triadic conceptual structure of the maximum entropy approach to evolution.

    PubMed

    Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten; Salthe, Stanley N

    2011-03-01

    Many problems in evolutionary theory are cast in dyadic terms, such as the polar oppositions of organism and environment. We argue that a triadic conceptual structure offers an alternative perspective under which the information generating role of evolution as a physical process can be analyzed, and propose a new diagrammatic approach. Peirce's natural philosophy was deeply influenced by his reception of both Darwin's theory and thermodynamics. Thus, we elaborate on a new synthesis which puts together his theory of signs and modern Maximum Entropy approaches to evolution in a process discourse. Following recent contributions to the naturalization of Peircean semiosis, pointing towards 'physiosemiosis' or 'pansemiosis', we show that triadic structures involve the conjunction of three different kinds of causality, efficient, formal and final. In this, we accommodate the state-centered thermodynamic framework to a process approach. We apply this on Ulanowicz's analysis of autocatalytic cycles as primordial patterns of life. This paves the way for a semiotic view of thermodynamics which is built on the idea that Peircean interpretants are systems of physical inference devices evolving under natural selection. In this view, the principles of Maximum Entropy, Maximum Power, and Maximum Entropy Production work together to drive the emergence of information carrying structures, which at the same time maximize information capacity as well as the gradients of energy flows, such that ultimately, contrary to Schrödinger's seminal contribution, the evolutionary process is seen to be a physical expression of the Second Law.

  7. Shape and evolution of thermostable protein structure

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Organisms evolved at high temperatures must maintain their proteins’ structures in the face of increased thermal disorder. This challenge results in differences in residue utilization and overall structure. Focusing on thermostable/mesostable pairs of homologous structures, we have examined these differences using novel geometric measures: specifically burial depth (distance from the molecular surface to each atom) and travel depth (distance from the convex hull to the molecular surface that avoids the protein interior). These along with common metrics like packing and Wadell Sphericity are used to gain insight into the constraints experienced by thermophiles. Mean travel depth of hyperthermostable proteins is significantly less than that of their mesostable counterparts, indicating smaller, less numerous and less deep pockets. The mean burial depth of hyperthermostable proteins is significantly higher than that of mesostable proteins indicating that they bury more atoms further from the surface. The burial depth can also be tracked on the individual residue level, adding a finer level of detail to the standard exposed surface area analysis. Hyperthermostable proteins for the first time are shown to be more spherical than their mesostable homologues, regardless of when and how they adapted to extreme temperature. Additionally, residue specific burial depth examinations reveal that charged residues stay unburied, most other residues are slightly more buried and Alanine is more significantly buried in hyperthermostable proteins. PMID:19731381

  8. Data Management System (DMS) Evolution Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Katherine

    1990-01-01

    The all encompassing goal for the Data Management System (DMS) Evolution Analysis task is to develop an advocacy for ensuring that growth and technology insertion issues are properly and adequately addressed during DMS requirements specification, design, and development. The most efficient methods of addressing those issues are via planned and graceful evolution, technology transparency, and system growth margins. It is necessary that provisions, such as those previously mentioned, are made to accommodate advanced missions requirements (e.g., Human Space Exploration Programs) in addition to evolving Space Station Freedom operations and user requirements .

  9. Evolution and development of mammalian limb integumentary structures.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W

    2003-08-15

    The adaptive radiation of mammalian clades has involved marked changes in limb morphology that have affected not only the skeleton but also the integumentary structures. For example, didelphid marsupials show distinct differences in nail and claw morphology that are functionally related to the evolution of arboreal, terrestrial, and aquatic foraging behaviors. Vespertilionoid bats have evolved different volar pad structures such as adhesive discs, scales, and skin folds, whereas didelphid marsupials have apical pads covered either with scales, ridges, or small cones. Comparative analysis of pad and claw development reveals subtle differences in mesenchymal and ectodermal patterning underlying interspecific variation in morphology. Analysis of gene expression during pad and claw development reveals that signaling molecules such as Msx1 and Hoxc13 play important roles in the morphogenesis of these integumentary structures. These findings suggest that evolutionary change in the expression of these molecules, and in the response of mesenchymal and ectodermal cells to these signaling factors, may underlie interspecific differences in nail, claw, and volar pad morphology. Evidence from comparative morphology, development, and functional genomics therefore sheds new light on both the patterns and mechanisms of evolutionary change in mammalian limb integumentary structures. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. PROFESS: a PROtein Function, Evolution, Structure and Sequence database

    PubMed Central

    Triplet, Thomas; Shortridge, Matthew D.; Griep, Mark A.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert; Revesz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of biological databases and the easy access enabled by the Internet is having a beneficial impact on biological sciences and transforming the way research is conducted. There are ∼1100 molecular biology databases dispersed throughout the Internet. To assist in the functional, structural and evolutionary analysis of the abundant number of novel proteins continually identified from whole-genome sequencing, we introduce the PROFESS (PROtein Function, Evolution, Structure and Sequence) database. Our database is designed to be versatile and expandable and will not confine analysis to a pre-existing set of data relationships. A fundamental component of this approach is the development of an intuitive query system that incorporates a variety of similarity functions capable of generating data relationships not conceived during the creation of the database. The utility of PROFESS is demonstrated by the analysis of the structural drift of homologous proteins and the identification of potential pancreatic cancer therapeutic targets based on the observation of protein–protein interaction networks. Database URL: http://cse.unl.edu/∼profess/ PMID:20624718

  11. The relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1977-01-01

    The general-relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution are reformulated in a notation which makes easy contact with Newtonian theory. Also, a general-relativistic version of the mixing-length formalism for convection is presented.

  12. 67 FR 12587 - NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-03-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee... Science Enterprise --Structure and Evolution of the Universe Overview: --Budget, Ongoing Programs, Future...

  13. Evolution of structural and functional diversification among plant Argonautes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi K; Pandey, Shree P

    2015-01-01

    Argonautes (AGOs) are the effector proteins of the RNA-induced silencing (RISC) complex, formed during the phenomena of small-RNA mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing. AGOs are a large family of proteins; their number varies from a few (4 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) to many (18 in Oryza sativa) in plants. Genetics-guided analysis have demonstrated the roles of some of the AGOs during growth and development of plants. Biochemical studies have further revealed differences in functional specificities among AGOs. How the AGO family expanded in different plant species during the course of evolution is starting to emerge. We hypothesized that 4 classes of AGOs evolved after divergence of unicellular green algae when an ancestral AGO underwent duplication events. Evolution of multicellularity may have coincided with the diversification of AGOs. A comparative sequence and structure analysis of the plant AGOs, including those from the mosses and the unicellular algae, show not only conformational differences between those from lower and higher plants, but also functional divergence of important sites.

  14. Preliminary analysis of Venusian tectonics and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishin, A. M.

    1990-11-01

    Five stages in the evolution of Venus are discussed: accretion, segregation of early crust from magma ocean; volcanic reworking of early crust, development of tectonics of soft plastic plates with formation of tesserae in compression zones and plains in dilatation zones; formation of weakened planetary zones of dilatation saturated by mantel hot-spot structures against a backdrop of dispersed mantel hot-spot tectonics and plateau volcanism. The following subjects are discussed: types of structures and structural regions of Venus; tectonic structure of Venus and its interpretation; thickness and composition of Venusian crust; model of geological evolution of Venus; asymmetry of tectonic structure of Venus; and reasons for the great differences in the tectonics of the Earth and Venus. The tectonics of Venus differ from those of the Earth because Venus was always impoverished in terms of water, a highly important agent of magmatism and the main fluid involved in the fusion fo sialic rocks. Venusian volcanism therefore was less intense and a sialic crust is largely absent. The greenhouse effect on Venus causes increased plasticity of its lithosphere.

  15. Comparative analysis of syntenic genes in grass genomes reveals accelerated rates of gene structure and coding sequence evolution in polyploid wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cycles of whole genome duplication (WGD) and diploidization are hallmarks of eukaryotic genome evolution and speciation. Polyploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) has had a massive increase in genome size largely due to recent WGDs. How these processes may impact the dynamics of gene evolution was studied...

  16. Analysis of methods. [information systems evolution environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J. (Editor); Ackley, Keith A.; Wells, M. Sue; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Decker, Louis P.; Toland, Joel A.; Crump, J. Wesley; Menzel, Christopher P.; Bodenmiller, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    Information is one of an organization's most important assets. For this reason the development and maintenance of an integrated information system environment is one of the most important functions within a large organization. The Integrated Information Systems Evolution Environment (IISEE) project has as one of its primary goals a computerized solution to the difficulties involved in the development of integrated information systems. To develop such an environment a thorough understanding of the enterprise's information needs and requirements is of paramount importance. This document is the current release of the research performed by the Integrated Development Support Environment (IDSE) Research Team in support of the IISEE project. Research indicates that an integral part of any information system environment would be multiple modeling methods to support the management of the organization's information. Automated tool support for these methods is necessary to facilitate their use in an integrated environment. An integrated environment makes it necessary to maintain an integrated database which contains the different kinds of models developed under the various methodologies. In addition, to speed the process of development of models, a procedure or technique is needed to allow automatic translation from one methodology's representation to another while maintaining the integrity of both. The purpose for the analysis of the modeling methods included in this document is to examine these methods with the goal being to include them in an integrated development support environment. To accomplish this and to develop a method for allowing intra-methodology and inter-methodology model element reuse, a thorough understanding of multiple modeling methodologies is necessary. Currently the IDSE Research Team is investigating the family of Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) DEFinition (IDEF) languages IDEF(0), IDEF(1), and IDEF(1x), as well as ENALIM, Entity

  17. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  18. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors—Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level. PMID:27790225

  19. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors-Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers.

    PubMed

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level.

  20. A teaching module about stellar structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Arturo; Galano, Silvia; Leccia, Silvio; Puddu, Emanuella; Testa, Italo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching module about stellar structure, functioning and evolution. Drawing from literature in astronomy education, we designed the activities around three key ideas: spectral analysis, mechanical and thermal equilibrium, energy and nuclear reactions. The module is divided into four phases, in which the key ideas for describing stars' functioning and physical mechanisms are gradually introduced. The activities (20 hours) build on previously learned laws in mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism and help students combine them meaningfully in order to get a complete picture of processes that happens in stars. The module was piloted with two intact classes of secondary school students (N = 59 students, 17-18 years old), using a ten-question multiple-choice questionnaire as research instrument. Results support the effectiveness of the proposed activities. Implications for the teaching of advanced physics topics using stars as fruitful context are briefly discussed.

  1. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

    2011-08-29

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing δ. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-δ. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (δ=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (δ=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reduced BaTiO3-δ is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.

  2. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Waldt, Eugen; Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  3. Structure and evolution of the hAT transposon superfamily.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E; Lithwick, G; Levy, A A

    2001-07-01

    The maize transposon Activator (Ac) was the first mobile DNA element to be discovered. Since then, other elements were found that share similarity to Ac, suggesting that it belongs to a transposon superfamily named hAT after hobo from Drosophila, Ac from maize, and Tam3 from snapdragon. We addressed the structure and evolution of hAT elements by developing new tools for transposon mining and searching the public sequence databases for the hallmarks of hAT elements, namely the transposase and short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) flanked by 8-bp host duplications. We found 147 hAT-related sequences in plants, animals, and fungi. Six conserved blocks could be identified in the transposase of most hAT elements. A total of 41 hAT sequences were flanked by TIRs and 8-bp host duplications and, out of these, 34 sequences had TIRs similar to the consensus determined in this work, suggesting that they are active or recently active transposons. Phylogenetic analysis and clustering of hAT sequences suggest that the hAT superfamily is very ancient, probably predating the plant-fungi-animal separation, and that, unlike previously proposed, there is no evidence that horizontal gene transfer was involved in the evolution of hAT elements.

  4. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  5. Trichome structure and evolution in Neotropical lianas

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Anselmo; El Ottra, Juliana Hanna Leite; Guimarães, Elza; Machado, Silvia Rodrigues; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Trichomes are epidermal outgrowths generally associated with protection against herbivores and/or desiccation that are widely distributed from ferns to angiosperms. Patterns of topological variation and morphological evolution of trichomes are still scarce in the literature, preventing valid comparisons across taxa. This study integrates detailed morphoanatomical data and the evolutionary history of the tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae) in order to gain a better understanding of current diversity and evolution of trichome types. Methods Two sampling schemes were used to characterize trichome types: (1) macromorphological characterization of all 105 species currently included in Bignonieae; and (2) micromorphological characterization of 16 selected species. Individual trichome morphotypes were coded as binary in each vegetative plant part, and trichome density and size were coded as multistate. Ancestral character state reconstructions were conducted using maximum likelihood (ML) assumptions. Key Results Two main functional trichome categories were found: non-glandular and glandular. In glandular trichomes, three morphotypes were recognized: peltate (Pg), stipitate (Sg) and patelliform/cupular (P/Cg) trichomes. Non-glandular trichomes were uniseriate, uni- or multicellular and simple or branched. Pg and P/Cg trichomes were multicellular and non-vascularized with three clearly distinct cell layers. Sg trichomes were multicellular, uniseriate and long-stalked. ML ancestral character state reconstructions suggested that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Bignonieae probably had non-glandular, Pg and P/Cg trichomes, with each trichome type presenting alternative histories of appearance on the different plant parts. For example, the MRCA of Bignonieae probably had non-glandular trichomes on the stems, prophylls, petiole, petiolule and leaflet veins while P/Cg trichomes were restricted to leaflet blades. Sg trichomes were not present in the MRCA

  6. Trichome structure and evolution in Neotropical lianas.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Anselmo; Ottra, Juliana Hanna Leite El; Guimarães, Elza; Machado, Silvia Rodrigues; Lohmann, Lúcia G

    2013-11-01

    Trichomes are epidermal outgrowths generally associated with protection against herbivores and/or desiccation that are widely distributed from ferns to angiosperms. Patterns of topological variation and morphological evolution of trichomes are still scarce in the literature, preventing valid comparisons across taxa. This study integrates detailed morphoanatomical data and the evolutionary history of the tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae) in order to gain a better understanding of current diversity and evolution of trichome types. Two sampling schemes were used to characterize trichome types: (1) macromorphological characterization of all 105 species currently included in Bignonieae; and (2) micromorphological characterization of 16 selected species. Individual trichome morphotypes were coded as binary in each vegetative plant part, and trichome density and size were coded as multistate. Ancestral character state reconstructions were conducted using maximum likelihood (ML) assumptions. Two main functional trichome categories were found: non-glandular and glandular. In glandular trichomes, three morphotypes were recognized: peltate (Pg), stipitate (Sg) and patelliform/cupular (P/Cg) trichomes. Non-glandular trichomes were uniseriate, uni- or multicellular and simple or branched. Pg and P/Cg trichomes were multicellular and non-vascularized with three clearly distinct cell layers. Sg trichomes were multicellular, uniseriate and long-stalked. ML ancestral character state reconstructions suggested that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Bignonieae probably had non-glandular, Pg and P/Cg trichomes, with each trichome type presenting alternative histories of appearance on the different plant parts. For example, the MRCA of Bignonieae probably had non-glandular trichomes on the stems, prophylls, petiole, petiolule and leaflet veins while P/Cg trichomes were restricted to leaflet blades. Sg trichomes were not present in the MRCA of Bignonieae independently of the

  7. Voltammetry as a tool for monitoring micellar structural evolution?

    PubMed

    Charlton; Doherty

    2000-02-15

    Self-assembled systems such as micelles and liquid crystals are currently of interest as templates for the controlled formation of nanoscale structures. Knowledge of the mesophase structure, structural evolution, and interparticle interaction is of great importance in understanding the behavior of such systems especially for applications such as nanoreactors. Here, we compare the use of cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and the rotating disk electrode (RDE) for the determination of micellar hydrodynamic radii and show that only the steady-state RDE yields values directly comparable with nonelectrochemical techniques. The RDE is applied for the determination of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride micellar structure and observing micellar structural evolution as well as evaluating the usual intermicellar interactions. The results clearly show (a) the collapse of the micellar shear plane toward the hard-sphere surface with increasing electrolyte concentration, (b) the electrolyte-dependent spherical expansion of the micellar hard-spheres due to increasing aggregation (N) number, (c) the structural transition from spherical to rodlike micelles, and (d) micellar elongation. As well as structural evolution, the evolutionary changes in interaction processes are also observed, i.e. the transition from Coulombic interactions to excluded volume interaction. This paper describes in detail the voltammetric measurement of these processes and explicates the necessary experimental conditions for successful observation of micellar structural evolution.

  8. Evolution of extortion in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-02-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionarily stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importance of coarsening, checkerboard ordering, and best response updating in evolutionary games.

  9. Joint evolution of specialization and dispersal in structured metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2011-04-21

    We study the joint evolution of dispersal and specialization concerning resource usage in a mechanistically underpinned structured discrete-time metapopulation model. We show that dispersal significantly affects the evolution of specialization and that specialization is a key factor that determines the possibility of evolutionary branching in dispersal propensity. Allowing both dispersal propensity and specialization to evolve as a consequence of natural selection is necessary in order to understand the evolutionary dynamics. The joint evolution of dispersal and specialization forms a natural evolutionary path leading to the coexistence of generalists and specialists. We show that in this process, the number of different patch types and the resource distribution are essential.

  10. Effect of local structures on structural evolution during crystallization in undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Li, M Z; Wang, W H; Song, W J; Liu, K X

    2013-02-21

    The effect of local structures on structural evolution during the crystallization of undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquid was studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that body-centered-cubic (bcc)-like clusters play a key role in structural evolution during crystallization. In contrast to previous speculations, the number of bcc-like crystal nuclei does not change much before the onset of crystallization. Instead, the development of a bcc-like critical nucleus during annealing leads to a strong spatial correlation with other nuclei in its surroundings, forming a crystalline structure template. It is also found that the size distribution of bcc-like nuclei follows a power-law form with an exponential cutoff in the early stage of annealing, but changes to a pure power-law behavior just before the onset of crystallization. This implies that the crystalline structure template has fractal feature and the undercooled liquids evolve to a self-organized critical state before the onset of crystallization, which might trigger the subsequent rapid crystallization. According to the graph theory analysis, it is also found that the observed large scatter of the onset time of crystallization in different liquid samples results from the connectivity of the bcc-like clusters.

  11. Prolongation structures of nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlquist, H. D.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    A technique is developed for systematically deriving a 'prolongation structure' - a set of interrelated potentials and pseudopotentials - for nonlinear partial differential equations in two independent variables. When this is applied to the Korteweg-de Vries equation, a new infinite set of conserved quantities is obtained. Known solution techniques are shown to result from the discovery of such a structure: related partial differential equations for the potential functions, linear 'inverse scattering' equations for auxiliary functions, Backlund transformations. Generalizations of these techniques will result from the use of irreducible matrix representations of the prolongation structure.

  12. Nucleolar Methyltransferase Fibrillarin: Evolution of Structure and Functions.

    PubMed

    Shubina, M Y; Musinova, Y R; Sheval, E V

    2016-09-01

    Fibrillarin is one of the most studied nucleolar proteins. Its main functions are methylation and processing of pre-rRNA. Fibrillarin is a highly conserved protein; however, in the course of evolution from archaea to eukaryotes, it acquired an additional N-terminal glycine and arginine-rich (GAR) domain. In this review, we discuss the evolution of fibrillarin structure and its relation to the functions of the protein in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  13. Spectral phasor analysis of LAURDAN fluorescence in live A549 lung cells to study the hydration and time evolution of intracellular lamellar body-like structures.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Leonel; Astrada, Soledad; Briva, Arturo; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Gratton, Enrico; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2016-11-01

    Using LAURDAN spectral imaging and spectral phasor analysis we concurrently studied the growth and hydration state of subcellular organelles (lamellar body-like, LB-like) from live A549 lung cancer cells at different post-confluence days. Our results reveal a time dependent two-step process governing the size and hydration of these intracellular LB-like structures. Specifically, a first step (days 1 to 7) is characterized by an increase in their size, followed by a second one (days 7 to 14) where the organelles display a decrease in their global hydration properties. Interestingly, our results also show that their hydration properties significantly differ from those observed in well-characterized artificial lamellar model membranes, challenging the notion that a pure lamellar membrane organization is present in these organelles at intracellular conditions. Finally, these LB-like structures show a significant increase in their hydration state upon secretion, suggesting a relevant role of entropy during this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  15. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  16. Structural stages and evolution of the Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. N.

    2013-02-01

    Five main structural and historical stages are established in the territory of the Urals: 1) Archean-Paleoproterozoic, a time of formation of the Volgo-Uralia subcontinent and its amalgamation with the other blocks of the craton of Baltica; 2) Riphean-Vendian (Meso- and Neoproterozoic), а stage that was finished with formation of Timanides; 3) Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic stage, corresponding to the development of the Uralides; 4) Mid-Jurassic-to Miocene platform stage; 5) Pliocene-Quaternary neo-orogenic stage. In this paper stratigraphic data are discussed, schemes of the structural zonation are presented, and the problems of the structural geology and geodynamics of sedimentary and magmatic complexes are discussed in a chronological order. Ideologically, the paper is based on plate and plume tectonics, in their modern versions.

  17. Structure and evolution of Uranus and Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; MacFarlane, J.J.

    1980-01-10

    We present three-layer interior models of Uranus and Neptune with central rocky cores, mantles of water, methane, and ammonia (the 'ices'), and outer envelopes primarily composed of hydrogen and helium. The models incorporate a new H/sub 2/O equation of state based on experimental data which is considerably 'softer' than previous H/sub 2/O equations of state. Corrections for interior temperature approx.5000 /sup 0/K are included in the models, and the thermal evolution of both planets is investigated using recent heat flow measurements. We find that evolutionary considerations are consistent with gravitational field data in supporting models with approximately solar abundances of 'ice' and 'rock.' Models with very low abundances of water, methane, and ammonia can be excluded. Evolutionary considerations indicate that initial temperatures and luminosities for Uranus and Neptune were not substantially higher than the present value. Both planets apparently have relatively small (approx.1--2 earth masses) hydrogen-helium envelopes, with Neptune's envelope smaller than Uranus'. A monotonic trend is evident among the Jovian planets: all have central rock-ice cores of approx.15 earth masses, but with hydrogen-helium envelopes which decrease in mass from Jupiter to Saturn to Uranus to Neptune.

  18. The structure and evolution of interstellar grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. M.

    1984-06-01

    A mixture of water, methane, ammonia, and additional simple molecules are introduced into an experimental chamber, and the evolution of interstellar grains and the gaseous clouds in which they are found is consequently proposed. A grain begins in a diffuse cloud and already has a mantle of yellow stuff. The cloud becomes denser, and the grains accrete a layer of ices. Ultraviolet irradiation generates radicals in the grains' icy mantle, and subsequent collisions among the grains heat the mantle enough for radicals to recombine. The mantle may explode and repopulate the gaseous phase of the cloud. In the densest areas of the cloud, gravitational collapse of gas and dust effects star formation; the icy grain mantle is evaporated and the yellow stuff remains. Grains not included in the star formation return to the diffuse cloud environment. Consideration is also given to the extinction of starlight by interstellar grains, the spectrum of the Becklin-Neugebauer object, the infrared spectrum of the yellow stuff, and the spectrum of an infrared source designated W33.

  19. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; Christensen, Mogens; Bøjesen, Espen D.; Emerich, Hermann; Vaughan, Gavin; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structure is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries. PMID:25075335

  20. The high temperature structural evolution of hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, Ryan Paul

    The transformations of HfO2 are often described as analogous with the transformations in ZrO2 because of the similar crystal structures; however the phase transformations in HfO2 occur at higher temperatures. Even though this phase transformation has been extensively studied in ZrO2, the respective transformation in HfO2 is relatively unstudied and the properties that are reported are inconsistent. Much of the difficulty associated with studying HfO2 is related to the high temperatures needed and the sensitivity of the crystal to the environmental partial pressure of O2. HfO2 is expected to be capable of producing the same level of transformation toughening as ZrO2 at temperatures beyond 1000°C, the thermodynamic limit for toughened ZrO2. Despite significant effort the toughening acquired has not met with expectation. By providing information on the structure of HfO2 as it undergoes transformation, this study makes a significant step towards solving this problem. Significant advancements in experimentation have enabled a systematic study of the structure of HfO2 in its monoclinic and tetragonal phases in air. Using a quadrupole lamp furnace and a novel curved image plate detector the structure of HfO2 and ZrO 2 have been characterized by high temperature x-ray diffraction. The structural information provided by these experiments allows the properties of the transformation to be further investigated. Using phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography, the strain associated with the transformation from the tetragonal to the monoclinic phase has been described and provides insight into the lack of transformation toughening found in HfO2. Further characterization includes determination of the transformation temperature in air, the change in volume associated with the transformation and the temperature hysteresis of the transformation. In addition to transformation properties, the thermal expansion of HfO2 and ZrO2 has been thoroughly described as a function

  1. Model of evolution of surface grain structure under ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazeva, Anna G.; Kryukova, Olga N.

    2014-11-14

    Diffusion and chemical reactions in multicomponent systems play an important role in numerous technology applications. For example, surface treatment of materials and coatings by particle beam leads to chemical composition and grain structure change. To investigate the thermal-diffusion and chemical processes affecting the evolution of surface structure, the mathematical modeling is efficient addition to experiment. In this paper two-dimensional model is discussed to describe the evolution of titanium nitride coating on the iron substrate under implantation of boron and carbon. The equation for diffusion fluxes and reaction rate are obtained using Gibbs energy expansion into series with respect to concentration and their gradients.

  2. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  3. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    DOE PAGES

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; ...

    2014-04-14

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structuremore » is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries.« less

  4. Modelling the Evolution of Social Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, A. G.; Dunbar, R. I. M.; Wang, D.

    2016-01-01

    Although simple social structures are more common in animal societies, some taxa (mainly mammals) have complex, multi-level social systems, in which the levels reflect differential association. We develop a simulation model to explore the conditions under which multi-level social systems of this kind evolve. Our model focuses on the evolutionary trade-offs between foraging and social interaction, and explores the impact of alternative strategies for distributing social interaction, with fitness criteria for wellbeing, alliance formation, risk, stress and access to food resources that reward social strategies differentially. The results suggest that multi-level social structures characterised by a few strong relationships, more medium ties and large numbers of weak ties emerge only in a small part of the overall fitness landscape, namely where there are significant fitness benefits from wellbeing and alliance formation and there are high levels of social interaction. In contrast, ‘favour-the-few’ strategies are more competitive under a wide range of fitness conditions, including those producing homogeneous, single-level societies of the kind found in many birds and mammals. The simulations suggest that the development of complex, multi-level social structures of the kind found in many primates (including humans) depends on a capacity for high investment in social time, preferential social interaction strategies, high mortality risk and/or differential reproduction. These conditions are characteristic of only a few mammalian taxa. PMID:27427758

  5. Retirement and the Evolution of Pension Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedberg, Leora; Webb, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis of defined benefit pension plans that were more common before 1980s and the defined contribution plans is presented. It is observed that defined benefit pension plans offered age related incentives thereby encouraging people to retire earlier. In contrast, defined contribution plans encourage people to continue with jobs…

  6. Retirement and the Evolution of Pension Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedberg, Leora; Webb, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis of defined benefit pension plans that were more common before 1980s and the defined contribution plans is presented. It is observed that defined benefit pension plans offered age related incentives thereby encouraging people to retire earlier. In contrast, defined contribution plans encourage people to continue with jobs…

  7. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  8. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Keppens, R. E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere.

  9. Structure, diversity and evolution of myriapod hemocyanins.

    PubMed

    Pick, Christian; Scherbaum, Samantha; Hegedüs, Elöd; Meyer, Andreas; Saur, Michael; Neumann, Ruben; Markl, Jürgen; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen transport in the hemolymph of many arthropods is mediated by hemocyanins, large copper-containing proteins that are well-studied in Chelicerata and Crustacea, but had long been considered unnecessary in the subphylum of Myriapoda. Only recently has it become evident that hemocyanins are present in Scutigeromorpha (Chilopoda) and Spirostreptida (Diplopoda). Here we present evidence for a more widespread occurrence of hemocyanin in the myriapods. By means of RT-PCR, western blotting and database searches, hemocyanins were identified in the symphylans Hanseniella audax and Symphylella vulgaris, the chilopod Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani and the diplopod Polydesmus angustus. No hemocyanins were found in the diplopods Polyxenus lagurus, Cylindroiulus punctatus, Glomeris marginata, Glomeris pustulata and Arthrosphaera brandtii, or the chilopods Lithobius forficatus, Geophilus flavus and Strigamia maritima. This suggests multiple independent losses in myriapod taxa. Two independent hemocyanin subunits were found that were already present in the myriapod stem line. We specifically investigated the structure of the hemocyanin of P. angustus, which consists of three distinct subunits that occur in an approximately equimolar ratio. As deduced by 3D electron microscopy, the quaternary structure is a 3 × 6-mer that resembles the half structure of the 6 × 6-mer hemocyanin from Scutigera coleoptrata. It was analyzed more closely by homology modeling of 1 × 6-mers and their rigid-body fitting to the electron density map of the 3 × 6-mer. In addition, we obtained the cDNA sequence of a putative myriapod phenoloxidase. Phenoloxidases are related to the arthropod hemocyanins, but diverged before radiation of the arthropod subphyla.

  10. Earth's interdependent thermal, structural, and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The popular view that 30-55% of Earth's global power is primordial, with deep layers emanating significant power, rests on misunderstandings and models that omit magmatism and outgassing. These processes link Earth's chemical and thermal evolution, while creating layers, mainly because magmas transport latent heat and radioactive isotopes rapidly upwards. We link chemistry to heat flow, measured and theoretical, to understand the interior layering and workings. Quasi-steady state conditions describe most of Earth's history: (1) Accretion was cold and was not a source of deep heat. (2) Friction during core formation cannot have greatly heated the interior (thermodynamics plus buoyancy). (3) Conduction is the governing microscopic mechanism in the deep Earth. (4) Using well-constrained values of thermal conductivity (k), we find that homogeneously distributed radionuclides provide extremely high internal temperature (T) under radial symmetry. Moreover, for any given global power, sequestering heat producing elements into the upper mantle reduces Earth's central temperature by a factor of 10 from a homogeneous distribution. Hence, (5) core formation was a major cooling event. From modern determinations of k(T) we provide a reference conductive geotherm. Present-day global power of 30 TW from heat flux measurements and sequestering of heat producing elements in the upper mantle and transition zone, produces nearly isothermal T = 5300 K below 670 km, which equals experimentally determined freezing of pure Fe0 at the inner core boundary. Core freezing buffers the interior temperatures, while the Sun constrains the surface temperature, providing steady state conditions: Earth's deep interior is isothermal due to these constraints, low flux and high k. Our geotherms point to a stagnant lower mantle and convection above 670 km. Rotational flattening cracks the brittle lithosphere, providing paths for buoyant magmas to ascend. Release of latent heat augments the conductive

  11. Analysis of planetary evolution with emphasis on differentiation and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, William M.; Newman, William I.

    1987-01-01

    In order to address the early stages of nebula evolution, a three-dimensional collapse code which includes not only hydrodynamics and radiative transfer, but also the effects of ionization and, possibly, magnetic fields is being addressed. As part of the examination of solar system evolution, an N-body code was developed which describes the latter stages of planet formation from the accretion of planetesimals. To test the code for accuracy and run-time efficiency, and to develop a stronger theoretical foundation, problems were studied in orbital dynamics. A regional analysis of the correlation in the gravity and topography fields of Venus was performed in order to determine the small and intermediate scale subsurface structure.

  12. [Petrological Analysis of Astrophysical Dust Analog Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This project "Petrological analysis of astrophysical dust analog evolution" was initiated to try to understand the vapor phase condensation, and the nature of the reaction products, in circumstellar environments, such as the solar nebula 4,500 Myrs ago, and in the interstellar medium. Telescope-based infrared [IR] spectroscopy offers a broad-scale inventory of the various types of dust in these environments but no details on small-scale variations in terms of chemistry and morphology and petrological phase relationships. Vapor phase condensation in these environments is almost certainly a non-equilibrium process. The main challenge to this research was to document the nature of this process that, based on astrophysical observations, seems to yield compositionally consistent materials. This observation may suggest a predictable character during non-equilibrium condensation. These astrophysical environments include two chemically distinct, that is, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich environments. The former is characterized by silicates the latter by carbon-bearing solids. According to cosmological models of stellar evolution circumstellar dust accreted into protoplanets wherein thermal and/or aqueous processes will alter the dust under initially, non-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Rapid Modeling and Analysis Tools: Evolution, Status, Needs and Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Stone, Thomas J.; Ransom, Jonathan B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems are becoming increasingly more complex, and customers are demanding lower cost, higher performance, and high reliability. Increased demands are placed on the design engineers to collaborate and integrate design needs and objectives early in the design process to minimize risks that may occur later in the design development stage. High performance systems require better understanding of system sensitivities much earlier in the design process to meet these goals. The knowledge, skills, intuition, and experience of an individual design engineer will need to be extended significantly for the next generation of aerospace system designs. Then a collaborative effort involving the designer, rapid and reliable analysis tools and virtual experts will result in advanced aerospace systems that are safe, reliable, and efficient. This paper discusses the evolution, status, needs and directions for rapid modeling and analysis tools for structural analysis. First, the evolution of computerized design and analysis tools is briefly described. Next, the status of representative design and analysis tools is described along with a brief statement on their functionality. Then technology advancements to achieve rapid modeling and analysis are identified. Finally, potential future directions including possible prototype configurations are proposed.

  14. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in invertebrates: structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-San

    2006-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is central to the initiation and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. GnRH is found in all major groups of Phylum Chordata, including the protochordates. Studies on functional and structural evolution of GnRH have, in the past, focused exclusively on chordates. However, the recent structural elucidation of an octopus GnRH-like molecule and increasing evidence that GnRH-like substances are present in multiple invertebrate phyla suggest GnRH is an ancient peptide that arose prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes. The extraordinary conservation of GnRH structure and function raises interesting questions regarding the functional role assumed by GnRH over the course of evolution. This review will focus on the current understanding of GnRH structure and function in non-chordate invertebrates. Special emphasis will be placed upon the possible and speculated functions of GnRH in mollusks.

  15. The relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1975-01-01

    The general relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution are reformulated in a notation which makes easy contact with Newtonian theory. A general relativistic version of the mixing-length formalism for convection is presented. It is argued that in work on spherical systems, general relativity theorists have identified the wrong quantity as total mass-energy inside radius r.

  16. Rehabilitation Counselor Education Accreditation: History, Structure, and Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Linda R.; Kuehn, Marvin D.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines some of the critical factors that influenced the evolution of rehabilitation counselor education accreditation. The article discusses the history and structure of the accreditation process and the activities that have occurred to maintain the relevancy and viability of the process. Major issues that the Council on…

  17. Velocity structure and evolution of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Dainty, A. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Anderson, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic data from the Apollo Passive Seismic Network stations are analyzed to determine the velocity structure and to infer the composition and physical properties of the lunar interior. Data from artificial impacts (SIBV booster and LM-ascent stage) cover a distance range of 9 to 1750 km. Travel times and amplitudes, as well as theoretical seismograms, are used to derive a velocity model for the outer 150 km of the moon. The P-wave velocity model confirms an earlier report of a lunar crust in the eastern part of Oceanus Procellarum. The crust is about 60 km thick and may consist of two layers in the mare regions. Possible values for the P-wave velocity in the uppermost mantle are between 7.6 and 9.0 km/sec. The 9 km/sec velocity represents either a localized heterogeneous unit, or a thin layer less than about 40 km in thickness. The elastic properties of the deep interior, as inferred from the seismograms of natural events (meteoroid impacts and moonquakes) occurring at great distances, indicate that there is an increase in attenuation and a possible decrease of velocity at depths below about 1000 km.

  18. Molecular Evolution, Structure, and Function of Peroxidasins

    PubMed Central

    Soudi, Monika; Zamocky, Marcel; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Peroxidasins represent the subfamily 2 of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and are closely related to chordata peroxidases (subfamily 1) and peroxinectins (subfamily 3). They are multidomain proteins containing a heme peroxidase domain with high homology to human lactoperoxidase that mediates one- and two-electron oxidation reactions. Additional domains of the secreted and glycosylated metalloproteins are type C-like immunoglobulin domains, typical leucine-rich repeats, as well as a von Willebrand factor C module. These are typical motifs of extracellular proteins that mediate protein–protein interactions. We have reconstructed the phylogeny of this new family of oxidoreductases and show the presence of four invertebrate clades as well as one vertebrate clade that includes also two different human representatives. The variability of domain assembly in the various clades was analyzed, as was the occurrence of relevant catalytic residues in the peroxidase domain based on the knowledge of catalysis of the mammalian homologues. Finally, the few reports on expression, localization, enzymatic activity, and physiological roles in the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Homo sapiens are critically reviewed. Roles attributed to peroxidasins include antimicrobial defense, extracellular matrix formation, and consolidation at various developmental stages. Many research questions need to be solved in future, including detailed biochemical/physical studies and elucidation of the three dimensional structure of a model peroxidasin as well as the relation and interplay of the domains and the in vivo functions in various organisms including man. PMID:22976969

  19. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  20. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  1. Design Evolution and Analysis of the ITER Cryostat Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Han; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke

    2015-12-01

    The cryostat is a vacuum tight container enveloping the entire basic systems of the ITER tokamak machine, including a vacuum vessel, a superconducting magnet and thermal shield etc. It is evacuated to a pressure of 10-4 Pa to limit the heat transfer via gas conduction and convection to the cryogenically cooled components. Another important function of cryostat is to support all the loads from the tokamak to the concrete floor of the pit by its support system during different operational regimes and accident scenarios. This paper briefly presents the design evolution and associated analysis of the cryostat support system and the structural interface with the building.

  2. The structure and evolution of plankton communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhurst, Alan R.

    New understanding of the circulation of ancient oceans is not yet matched by progress in our understanding of their pelagic ecology, though it was the planktonic ecosystems that generated our offshore oil and gas reserves. Can we assume that present-day models of ecosystem function are also valid for ancient seas? This question is addressed by a study of over 4000 plankton samples to derive a comprehensive, global description of zooplankton community structure in modern oceans: this shows that copepods form only 50% of the biomass of all plankton, ranging from 70% in polar to 35% in tropical seas. Comparable figures are derived from 14 other taxonomic categories of zooplankton. For trophic groupings, the data indicate globally: geletinous predators - 14%; gelatinous herbivores - 4%; raptorial predators - 33%; macrofiltering herbivores - 20%; macrofiltering omnivores - 25%; and detritivores - 3%. A simple, idealized model for the modern pelagic ecosystem is derived from these percentages which indicates that metazooplankton are not the most important consumers of pico- and nano-plankton production which itself probably constitutes 90% of primary production in warm oceans. This model is then compared with candidate life-forms available in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic oceans to determine to what extent it is also valid for ancient ecosystems: it is concluded that it is probably unnecessary to postulate models fundamentally differing from it in order to accommodate the life-forms, both protozoic and metazoic, known to have populated ancient seas. Remarkably few life-forms have existed which cannot be paralleled in the modern ocean, which contains remarkably few life-forms which cannot be paralleled in the Palaeozoic ocean. As a first assumption, then, it is reasonable to assume that energy pathways were similar in ancient oceans to those we study today.

  3. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  4. An analysis of synteny of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago sheds new light on the structure, stability and evolution of legume genomes.

    PubMed

    Bertioli, David J; Moretzsohn, Marcio C; Madsen, Lene H; Sandal, Niels; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Guimarães, Patricia M; Hougaard, Birgit K; Fredslund, Jakob; Schauser, Leif; Nielsen, Anna M; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Cannon, Steven B; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-01-23

    Most agriculturally important legumes fall within two sub-clades of the Papilionoid legumes: the Phaseoloids and Galegoids, which diverged about 50 Mya. The Phaseoloids are mostly tropical and include crops such as common bean and soybean. The Galegoids are mostly temperate and include clover, fava bean and the model legumes Lotus and Medicago (both with substantially sequenced genomes). In contrast, peanut (Arachis hypogaea) falls in the Dalbergioid clade which is more basal in its divergence within the Papilionoids. The aim of this work was to integrate the genetic map of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago and improve our understanding of the Arachis genome and legume genomes in general. To do this we placed on the Arachis map, comparative anchor markers defined using a previously described bioinformatics pipeline. Also we investigated the possible role of transposons in the patterns of synteny that were observed. The Arachis genetic map was substantially aligned with Lotus and Medicago with most synteny blocks presenting a single main affinity to each genome. This indicates that the last common whole genome duplication within the Papilionoid legumes predated the divergence of Arachis from the Galegoids and Phaseoloids sufficiently that the common ancestral genome was substantially diploidized. The Arachis and model legume genomes comparison made here, together with a previously published comparison of Lotus and Medicago allowed all possible Arachis-Lotus-Medicago species by species comparisons to be made and genome syntenies observed. Distinct conserved synteny blocks and non-conserved regions were present in all genome comparisons, implying that certain legume genomic regions are consistently more stable during evolution than others. We found that in Medicago and possibly also in Lotus, retrotransposons tend to be more frequent in the variable regions. Furthermore, while these variable regions generally have lower densities of single copy genes than the more

  5. An analysis of synteny of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago sheds new light on the structure, stability and evolution of legume genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bertioli, David J; Moretzsohn, Marcio C; Madsen, Lene H; Sandal, Niels; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya CM; Guimarães, Patricia M; Hougaard, Birgit K; Fredslund, Jakob; Schauser, Leif; Nielsen, Anna M; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Cannon, Steven B; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background Most agriculturally important legumes fall within two sub-clades of the Papilionoid legumes: the Phaseoloids and Galegoids, which diverged about 50 Mya. The Phaseoloids are mostly tropical and include crops such as common bean and soybean. The Galegoids are mostly temperate and include clover, fava bean and the model legumes Lotus and Medicago (both with substantially sequenced genomes). In contrast, peanut (Arachis hypogaea) falls in the Dalbergioid clade which is more basal in its divergence within the Papilionoids. The aim of this work was to integrate the genetic map of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago and improve our understanding of the Arachis genome and legume genomes in general. To do this we placed on the Arachis map, comparative anchor markers defined using a previously described bioinformatics pipeline. Also we investigated the possible role of transposons in the patterns of synteny that were observed. Results The Arachis genetic map was substantially aligned with Lotus and Medicago with most synteny blocks presenting a single main affinity to each genome. This indicates that the last common whole genome duplication within the Papilionoid legumes predated the divergence of Arachis from the Galegoids and Phaseoloids sufficiently that the common ancestral genome was substantially diploidized. The Arachis and model legume genomes comparison made here, together with a previously published comparison of Lotus and Medicago allowed all possible Arachis-Lotus-Medicago species by species comparisons to be made and genome syntenies observed. Distinct conserved synteny blocks and non-conserved regions were present in all genome comparisons, implying that certain legume genomic regions are consistently more stable during evolution than others. We found that in Medicago and possibly also in Lotus, retrotransposons tend to be more frequent in the variable regions. Furthermore, while these variable regions generally have lower densities of single copy genes

  6. Formation and evolution of structure in loop cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Kagan, Mikhail; Singh, Parampreet; Hernández, Hector H; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-19

    Inhomogeneous cosmological perturbation equations are derived in loop quantum gravity, taking into account corrections, in particular, in gravitational parts. This provides a framework for calculating the evolution of modes in structure formation scenarios related to inflationary or bouncing models. Applications here are corrections to the Newton potential and to the evolution of large scale modes which imply nonconservation of curvature perturbations possibly noticeable in a running spectral index. These effects are sensitive to quantization procedures and test the characteristic behavior of correction terms derived from quantum gravity.

  7. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  8. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  9. Structural evolution of zirconium carbide under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, D.; Dollé, M.; Simeone, D.; Baldinozzi, G.; Thomé, L.

    2008-02-01

    Zirconium carbide is one of the candidate materials to be used for some fuel components of the high temperature nuclear reactors planned in the frame of the Gen-IV project. Few data exist regarding its behaviour under irradiation. We have irradiated ZrC samples at room temperature with slow heavy ions (4 MeV Au, fluence from 10 11 to 5 × 10 15 cm -2) in order to simulate neutron irradiations. Grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis have been performed in order to study the microstructural evolution of the material versus ion fluence. A high sensitivity to oxidation is observed with the formation of zirconia precipitates during the ion irradiations. Three damage stages are observed. At low fluence (<10 12 cm -2), low modifications are observed. At intermediate fluence, high micro-strains appear together with small faulted dislocation loops. At the highest fluence (>10 14 cm -2), the micro-strains saturate and the loops coalesce to form a dense dislocation network. No other structural modification is observed. The material shows a moderate cell parameter increase, corresponding to a 0.6 vol.% swelling, which saturates around 10 14 ions/cm 2, i.e., a few Zr dpa. As a result, in spite of a strong covalent bonding component, ZrC seems to have a behaviour under irradiation close to cubic metals.

  10. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-04-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  11. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  12. Parallel Structural Evolution of Mitochondrial Ribosomes and OXPHOS Complexes

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluis, Eli O.; Bauerschmitt, Heike; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Frauenfeld, Jens; Berninghausen, Otto; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The five macromolecular complexes that jointly mediate oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria consist of many more subunits than those of bacteria, yet, it remains unclear by which evolutionary mechanism(s) these novel subunits were recruited. Even less well understood is the structural evolution of mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes): while it was long thought that their exceptionally high protein content would physically compensate for their uniquely low amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), this hypothesis has been refuted by structural studies. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 73S mitoribosome from Neurospora crassa, together with genomic and proteomic analyses of mitoribosome composition across the eukaryotic domain. Surprisingly, our findings reveal that both structurally and compositionally, mitoribosomes have evolved very similarly to mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes via two distinct phases: A constructive phase that mainly acted early in eukaryote evolution, resulting in the recruitment of altogether approximately 75 novel subunits, and a reductive phase that acted during metazoan evolution, resulting in gradual length-reduction of mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. Both phases can be well explained by the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations and deletions, respectively, in mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. We argue that the main role of the newly recruited (nuclear encoded) ribosomal- and OXPHOS proteins is to provide structural compensation to the mutationally destabilized mitochondrially encoded components. While the newly recruited proteins probably provide a selective advantage owing to their compensatory nature, and while their presence may have opened evolutionary pathways toward novel mitochondrion-specific functions, we emphasize that the initial events that resulted in their recruitment was nonadaptive in nature. Our framework is supported by population genetic

  13. Parallel Structural Evolution of Mitochondrial Ribosomes and OXPHOS Complexes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Eli O; Bauerschmitt, Heike; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Frauenfeld, Jens; Berninghausen, Otto; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-04-09

    The five macromolecular complexes that jointly mediate oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria consist of many more subunits than those of bacteria, yet, it remains unclear by which evolutionary mechanism(s) these novel subunits were recruited. Even less well understood is the structural evolution of mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes): while it was long thought that their exceptionally high protein content would physically compensate for their uniquely low amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), this hypothesis has been refuted by structural studies. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 73S mitoribosome from Neurospora crassa, together with genomic and proteomic analyses of mitoribosome composition across the eukaryotic domain. Surprisingly, our findings reveal that both structurally and compositionally, mitoribosomes have evolved very similarly to mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes via two distinct phases: A constructive phase that mainly acted early in eukaryote evolution, resulting in the recruitment of altogether approximately 75 novel subunits, and a reductive phase that acted during metazoan evolution, resulting in gradual length-reduction of mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. Both phases can be well explained by the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations and deletions, respectively, in mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. We argue that the main role of the newly recruited (nuclear encoded) ribosomal- and OXPHOS proteins is to provide structural compensation to the mutationally destabilized mitochondrially encoded components. While the newly recruited proteins probably provide a selective advantage owing to their compensatory nature, and while their presence may have opened evolutionary pathways toward novel mitochondrion-specific functions, we emphasize that the initial events that resulted in their recruitment was nonadaptive in nature. Our framework is supported by population genetic

  14. Evolution of specialization in resource utilization in structured metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Geritz, Stefan; Parvinen, Kalle; Gyllenberg, Mats

    2008-07-01

    We study the evolution of resource utilization in a structured discrete-time metapopulation model with an infinite number of patches, prone to local catastrophes. The consumer faces a trade-off in the abilities to consume two resources available in different amounts in each patch. We analyse how the evolution of specialization in the utilization of the resources is affected by different ecological factors: migration, local growth, local catastrophes, forms of the trade-off and distribution of the resources in the patches. Our modelling approach offers a natural way to include more than two patch types into the models. This has not been usually possible in the previous spatially heterogeneous models focusing on the evolution of specialization.

  15. Structure and Evolution of the Foreign Exchange Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, J.; Gworek, S.; Drożdż, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate topology and temporal evolution of the foreign currency exchange market viewed from a weighted network perspective. Based on exchange rates for a set of 46 currencies (including precious metals), we construct different representations of the FX network depending on a choice of the base currency. Our results show that the network structure is not stable in time, but there are main clusters of currencies, which persist for a long period of time despite the fact that their size and content are variable. We find a long-term trend in the network's evolution which affects the USD and EUR nodes. In all the network representations, the USD node gradually loses its centrality, while, on contrary, the EUR node has become slightly more central than it used to be in its early years. Despite this directional trend, the overall evolution of the network is noisy.

  16. Modeling the mesozoic-cenozoic structural evolution of east texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Ofori N.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Miller, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources within Jurassic and Cretaceous strata of the onshore coastal plain and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Regional 2D seismic lines for key parts of the Gulf Coast basin were interpreted in order to examine the evolution of structural traps and the burial history of petroleum source rocks. Interpretation and structural modeling of seismic lines from eastern Texas provide insights into the structural evolution of this part of the Gulf of Mexico basin. Since completing the assessment, the USGS has acquired additional regional seismic lines in east Texas; interpretation of these new lines, which extend from the Texas-Oklahoma state line to the Gulf Coast shoreline, show how some of the region's prominent structural elements (e.g., the Talco and Mount Enterprise fault zones, the East Texas salt basin, and the Houston diapir province) vary along strike. The interpretations also indicate that unexplored structures may lie beneath the current drilling floor. Structural restorations based upon interpretation of these lines illustrate the evolution of key structures and show the genetic relation between structural growth and movement of the Jurassic Louann Salt. 1D thermal models that integrate kinetics and burial histories were also created for the region's two primary petroleum source rocks, the Oxfordian Smackover Formation and the Cenomanian-Turonian Eagle Ford Shale. Integrating results from the thermal models with the structural restorations provides insights into the distribution and timing of petroleum expulsion from the Smackover Formation and Eagle Ford Shale in eastern Texas.

  17. The evolution of protein structures and structural ensembles under functional constraint.

    PubMed

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Grahnen, Johan A; Liberles, David A

    2011-10-28

    Protein sequence, structure, and function are inherently linked through evolution and population genetics. Our knowledge of protein structure comes from solved structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), our knowledge of sequence through sequences found in the NCBI sequence databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), and our knowledge of function through a limited set of in-vitro biochemical studies. How these intersect through evolution is described in the first part of the review. In the second part, our understanding of a series of questions is addressed. This includes how sequences evolve within structures, how evolutionary processes enable structural transitions, how the folding process can change through evolution and what the fitness impacts of this might be. Moving beyond static structures, the evolution of protein kinetics (including normal modes) is discussed, as is the evolution of conformational ensembles and structurally disordered proteins. This ties back to a question of the role of neostructuralization and how it relates to selection on sequences for functions. The relationship between metastability, the fitness landscape, sequence divergence, and organismal effective population size is explored. Lastly, a brief discussion of modeling the evolution of sequences of ordered and disordered proteins is entertained.

  18. The Evolution of Galaxy Structure Over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.

    2014-08-01

    I present a comprehensive review of the evolution of galaxy structure in the Universe from the first galaxies currently observable at z ˜ 6 down to galaxies observable in the local Universe. Observed changes in galaxy structures reveal formation processes that only galaxy structural analyses can provide. This pedagogical review provides a detailed discussion of the major methods used to study galaxies morphologically and structurally, including the well-established visual method for morphology; Sérsic fitting to measure galaxy sizes and surface brightness profile shapes; and nonparametric structural methods [such as the concentration (C), asymmetry (A), clumpiness (S) (CAS) method and the Gini/M20 parameters, as well as newer structural indices]. These structural indices measure fundamental properties of galaxies, such as their scale, star-formation rate, and ongoing merger activity. Extensive observational results demonstrate how broad galaxy morphologies and structures change with time up to z ˜ 3, from small, compact and peculiar systems in the distant Universe to the formation of the Hubble sequence, dominated by spirals and ellipticals. Structural methods accurately identify galaxies in mergers and allow measurements of the merger history out to z ˜ 3. I depict properties and evolution of internal structures of galaxies, such as bulges, disks, bars, and at z>1 large star-forming clumps. I describe the structure and morphologies of host galaxies of active galactic nuclei and starbursts/submillimeter galaxies, along with how morphological galaxy quenching occurs. The role of environment in producing structural changes in galaxies over cosmic time is also discussed. Galaxy sizes can also change with time, with measured sizes up to a factor of 2-5 smaller at high redshift at a given stellar mass. I conclude with a discussion of how the evolving trends, in sizes, structures, and morphologies, reveal the formation mechanisms behind galaxies and provides a new

  19. Structural analysis and evolution of the Hadong-Sancheong-Hwagae area in the Yeongnam massif, Korea: a NS-trend tectonic frame in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deok-Seon, Lee; Ji-Hoon, Kang

    2016-04-01

    The Hadong-Sancheong-Hwagae area in the Jirisan province of the Yeongnam massif, Korea, is mainly composed of Precambrian Hadong anorthosite complex (HAC), Precambrian Jirisan metamorphic rock complex (JMRC), Jurassic˜Triassic granitoids which intrude them, and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks which unconformably cover them. Lithofacies distribution and tectonic frame of the Precambrian constituent rocks mainly show a NS trend, unlike a general NE trend of those in the Korean Peninsula. To unravel the geological structures associated with the NS-trend tectonic frame which was built in the HAC and JMRC, we researched the structural characteristics of each deformation phase based on the geometric and kinematic features and the forming sequence of rock structures of the multi-deformed HAC and JMRC. The results indicate that the pre-Late Paleozoic geological structures of this area were formed at least through the following three times of ductile deformation phases. The D1 deformation happened due to the large-scale top-to-the SE shearing, and formed sheath or A-type folds and a regional NE trend of tectonic frame in the HAC and JMRC. The D2 deformation occurred under the EW-directed tectonic compression, and formed a regional NS trend of active and passive folds and Hadong ductile shear zone over 2.3˜1.4 km width, and transposed most of D1 tectonic frame into D1-2 composite tectonic frame. The extensive Hadong shear zone, which was formed in the mylonitization process accompanying the passive folding, was persistently developed along the eastern boundary of HAC and JMRC which corresponds to a limb of passive fold on a geological map scale. It produced a very strong mylonitic structure and stretching lineation. The NE-trend D1 structural elements were mainly reoriented into NS trend by the powerful active and passive folding. The D3 deformation occurred under the NS-trend tectonic compression environment, and formed EW-trend kink or open folds, and partially rearranged

  20. Discovering structure and evolution within the coronae of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Daniel; Gallo, Luigi C.; Silva, Catia; Costantini, Elisa

    2017-08-01

    Detailed analysis of the reflection and reverberation of X-rays from the innermost regions of AGN accretion discs reveals the structure and processes that produce the intense continuum emission and the extreme variability we see, right down to the innermost stable orbit and event horizon of the black hole. Observations of Seyfert galaxies spanning more than a decade have enabled measurement of the geometry of the corona and how it evolves, leading to orders of magnitude in variability. They reveal processes the corona undergoes during transient events, notably the collimation and ejection of the corona during X-ray flares, reminiscent of the aborted launching of a jet.Recent reverberation studies, of the Seyfert galaxy I Zwicky 1 with XMM-Newton, are revealing structures within the corona for the very first time. A persistent collimated core is discovered, akin to the base of a jet embedded in the innermost regions alongside an extended corona related to the accretion disc. The detection of the flare in the X-ray emission enables the evolution of both the collimated and extended portions of the corona to be tracked. The flare is seen originating as an increase in activity above the accretion disc before propagating inwards, energising the collimated core at a later time, leading to a second sharp increase in the X-ray luminosity.This gives us important constraints on the processes by which energy is liberated from black hole accretion flows, how they are governed over time and how jets are launched, giving us the deepest insight to date of how these extreme objects are powered.

  1. Structural evolution of Mesozoic complexes in Western Chukotka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golionko, B. G.; Vatrushkina, E. V.; Verzhbitsky, V. E.; Degtiarev, K. E.

    2017-07-01

    Detailed structural investigations were carried out in the Pevek area in order to verify the tectonic evolution of the Mesozoic thrust and fold belt in Chukotka. South-vergent F1 folds in Triassic rocks were proved to be the earliest structures formed during the first deformation stage DI. These structures were deformed by north-vergent folds F2 that were formed during the second deformation stage DII. North-vergent folds are the main structures of the Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous complex. The fold structures of the first two stages are deformed by shear folds F3 finishing the stage DII. All these structures are deformed by submeridionally trending normal faults referred to the deformation stage DIII.

  2. Structural evolution and optoelectronic applications of multilayer silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Yue-Yu; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xin-Gao; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Despite the recent progress on two-dimensional multilayer materials (2DMMs) with weak interlayer interactions, the investigation of 2DMMs with strong interlayer interactions is far from sufficient. Here, we report on first-principles calculations that clarify the structural evolution and optoelectronic properties of such a 2DMM, multilayer silicene. With our global optimization algorithm, we discover the existence of rich dynamically stable multilayer silicene phases, whose stability is closely related to the extent of s p3 hybridization that can be evaluated by average bonds and effective bond angles. Stable Si(111) surface structures are obtained when the silicene thickness gets up to four, showing the critical thickness for a structural evolution. We also find that multilayer silicene with π -bonded surfaces presents outstanding optoelectronic properties for solar cells and optical fiber communications due to the incorporation of s p2 -type bonds in the s p3 -type bond dominated system. This study helps to complete the picture of the structure and related property evolution of 2DMMs with strong interlayer interactions.

  3. Structuring evolution: biochemical networks and metabolic diversification in birds.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Erin S; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2016-08-25

    Recurrence and predictability of evolution are thought to reflect the correspondence between genomic and phenotypic dimensions of organisms, and the connectivity in deterministic networks within these dimensions. Direct examination of the correspondence between opportunities for diversification imbedded in such networks and realized diversity is illuminating, but is empirically challenging because both the deterministic networks and phenotypic diversity are modified in the course of evolution. Here we overcome this problem by directly comparing the structure of a "global" carotenoid network - comprising of all known enzymatic reactions among naturally occurring carotenoids - with the patterns of evolutionary diversification in carotenoid-producing metabolic networks utilized by birds. We found that phenotypic diversification in carotenoid networks across 250 species was closely associated with enzymatic connectivity of the underlying biochemical network - compounds with greater connectivity occurred the most frequently across species and were the hotspots of metabolic pathway diversification. In contrast, we found no evidence for diversification along the metabolic pathways, corroborating findings that the utilization of the global carotenoid network was not strongly influenced by history in avian evolution. The finding that the diversification in species-specific carotenoid networks is qualitatively predictable from the connectivity of the underlying enzymatic network points to significant structural determinism in phenotypic evolution.

  4. Structural analysis of the CD11b gene and phylogenetic analysis of the [alpha]-integrin gene family demonstrate remarkable conservation of genomic organization and suggest early diversification during evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.C.; Gonzalez, D.A.; Tenen, D.G. ); Pahl, H.L. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Smith, T.F. )

    1993-01-15

    CD11b is a member of the [beta]2 subfamily of the human leukocyte integrins. Its expression is limited to mature myeloid and NK cells and is up-regulated during the course of granulocytic and monocytic differentiation. The CD11b/CD18 (Mo1) heterodimer promotes adhesion of granulocytes and monocytes to C3bi-coated bacteria and endothelial cells. In an attempt to relate the exon structure to the known functional domains, as well as to identify and study cis-acting elements that are involved in its tissue-specific expression, the authors have isolated genomic clones encoding CD11b, deduced the exon/intron organization, and determined the transcriptional start site. The CD11b gene spans 55 kb and is encoded by 30 exons. Its structure closely resembles that of CD11c, another of the three leukocyte integrin [alpha]-chains, and suggests that these two genes arose by a gene duplication event. Furthermore, comparison of the CD11b gene structure with that of platelet glycoprotein llb and Drosophila PS2 suggest how the human leukocyte integrins evolved and dispersed during the course of evolution. 67 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Evolution in vitro: analysis of a lineage of ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, N.; Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    Background: Catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, possessing both a genotype and a phenotype, are ideal molecules for evolution experiments in vitro. A large, heterogeneous pool of RNAs can be subjected to multiple rounds of selection, amplification and mutation, leading to the development of variants that have some desired phenotype. Such experiments allow the investigator to correlate specific genetic changes with quantifiable alterations of the catalytic properties of the RNA. In addition, patterns of evolutionary change can be discerned through a detailed examination of the genotypic composition of the evolving RNA population. Results: Beginning with a pool of 10(13) variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme, we carried out in vitro evolution experiments that led to the generation of ribozymes with the ability to cleave an RNA substrate in the presence of Ca2+ ions, an activity that does not exist for the wild-type molecule. Over the course of 12 generations, a seven-error variant emerged that has substantial Ca(2+)-dependent RNA-cleavage activity. Advantageous mutations increased in frequency in the population according to three distinct dynamics--logarithmic, linear and transient. Through a comparative analysis of 31 individual variants, we infer how certain mutations influence the catalytic properties of the ribozyme. Conclusions: In vitro evolution experiments make it possible to elucidate important aspects of both evolutionary biology and structural biochemistry on a reasonable short time scale.

  6. Evolution in vitro: analysis of a lineage of ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, N.; Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    Background: Catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, possessing both a genotype and a phenotype, are ideal molecules for evolution experiments in vitro. A large, heterogeneous pool of RNAs can be subjected to multiple rounds of selection, amplification and mutation, leading to the development of variants that have some desired phenotype. Such experiments allow the investigator to correlate specific genetic changes with quantifiable alterations of the catalytic properties of the RNA. In addition, patterns of evolutionary change can be discerned through a detailed examination of the genotypic composition of the evolving RNA population. Results: Beginning with a pool of 10(13) variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme, we carried out in vitro evolution experiments that led to the generation of ribozymes with the ability to cleave an RNA substrate in the presence of Ca2+ ions, an activity that does not exist for the wild-type molecule. Over the course of 12 generations, a seven-error variant emerged that has substantial Ca(2+)-dependent RNA-cleavage activity. Advantageous mutations increased in frequency in the population according to three distinct dynamics--logarithmic, linear and transient. Through a comparative analysis of 31 individual variants, we infer how certain mutations influence the catalytic properties of the ribozyme. Conclusions: In vitro evolution experiments make it possible to elucidate important aspects of both evolutionary biology and structural biochemistry on a reasonable short time scale.

  7. Paleostress maps and structural evolution of the Pontides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippolyte, Jean-Claude; Espurt, Nicolas; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Sangu, Ercan; Müller, Carla

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of DARIUS programme we worked from 2010 to 2012 in the central and eastern Pontides. We aimed at understanding the timing and the characteristics of the extensional and compressional episodes that occurred along the southern margin of the Black Sea (Pontides belt). We used stress inversion technique (Angelier's softwares) for analyzing fault kinematics and characterizing the successive tectonic episodes in terms of paleostresses. The age of the tectonic episodes was constrained by combining structural analysis with nannoplankton dating of the sedimentary units. 1) In the central Pontides, structural analysis shows that deposition of the Barremian-Albian terrigenous sediments of the "syn-rift" Çaglayan Group was controlled by large normal faults under an ESE-WNW extension probably related to the SE-directed opening of the western Black Sea Basin. In contrast, the Coniacian-Santonian and the Paleocene "post-rift" sequences were deposited under NE-SW extension probably related to the SW-directed opening of the eastern Black Sea Basin. At the beginning of Eocene the stress regime changed from extensional to compressional which resulted in the formation of syn-compressional basins. In order to illustrate the two-dimensional structural evolution of the central Pontides we built a NNE-trending 75 km long balanced and restored cross section between Boyabat and Sinop cities. The section is constrained by 183 sites of field data, 5 seismic lines and 8 wells. We model the Pontides as a bi-vergent structure resulting from the structural inversion of Cretaceous normal faults of the southern Black Sea margin. Apatite fission track data along this section suggest that inversion started in the earliest Eocene (~55 Ma). Eocene-Miocene shortening reached ~28 km. 2) In the eastern Pontides, an early Campanian to late Paleocene NW-SE extension was followed by three successive compressional events. A Paleocene to early Eocene NW-SE compression resulted in the formation of

  8. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  9. Evolution of a colloidal soap-froth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Rosales, S. J.; Gámez-Corrales, R.; Ivlev, B. I.; Ruiz-García, J.

    2000-01-01

    We report the evolution of a quasi-two-dimensional cellular structure. This soap-froth-like structure is formed by 2.24 μm colloidal particles trapped at the air/water interface. The froth evolves mainly through one of the modes of the T2 mechanism, the inverse mitosis process, and in minor proportion through the T1 or side switching mechanism. In addition, particle rearrangements can also be observed during the evolution. Eventually, the colloidal soap-froth evolves towards the formation of colloidal clusters, which detach from the edges of the colloidal froth. The cell side distribution is similar to distributions from other froth-forming systems and follows the Aboav-Weaire law. Other statistical comparisons are also made with other froth-forming systems and, in general, we found similar behaviour.

  10. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    -body' structure that acts to lubricate the fault (Reches & Lockner, 2010). The steady-state stage is characterized by (1) relatively low wear-rate (approximately 10% of running-in wear-rate) and (2) quasi-constant friction coefficient. These observations suggest only small changes in the gouge layer in term of thickness (100 to 200 microns) and strength in this final stage. The present study indicates that (1) wear by plowing and asperity failure initiate early, during the first few millimeters of slip; and (2) wear and associated gouge formation appear as the controlling factors of friction evolution and fault weakening.

  11. New insight on the recent tectonic evolution and uplift of the southern Ecuadorian Andes from gravity and structural analysis of the Neogene-Quaternary intramontane basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamay, J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Ruano, P.; Soto, J.; Lamas, F.; Azañón, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    The sedimentary basins of Loja, Malacatos-Vilcabamba and Catamayo belong to the Neogene-Quaternary synorogenic intramontane basins of South Ecuador. They were formed during uplift of the Andes since Middle-Late Miocene as a result of the Nazca plate subduction beneath the South American continental margin. This E-W compressional tectonic event allowed for the development of NNE-SSW oriented folds and faults, determining the pattern and thickness of sedimentary infill. New gravity measurements in the sedimentary basins indicate negative Bouguer anomalies reaching up to -292 mGal related to thick continental crust and sedimentary infill. 2D gravity models along profiles orthogonal to N-S elongated basins determine their deep structure. Loja Basin is asymmetrical, with a thickness of sedimentary infill reaching more than 1200 m in the eastern part, which coincides with a zone of most intense compressive deformation. The tectonic structures include N-S, NW-SE and NE-SW oriented folds and associated east-facing reverse faults. The presence of liquefaction structures strongly suggests the occurrence of large earthquakes just after the sedimentation. The basin of Malacatos-Vilcabamba has some folds with N-S orientation. However, both Catamayo and Malacatos-Vilcabamba basins are essentially dominated by N-S to NW-SE normal faults, producing a strong asymmetry in the Catamayo Basin area. The initial stages of compression developed folds, reverse faults and the relief uplift determining the high altitude of the Loja Basin. As a consequence of the crustal thickening and in association with the dismantling of the top of the Andes Cordillera, extensional events favored the development of normal faults that mainly affect the basins of Catamayo and Malacatos-Vilcabamba. Gravity research helps to constrain the geometry of the Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary infill, shedding some light on its relationship with tectonic events and geodynamic processes during intramontane basin

  12. Simulating the Universe: Nonlinear Formation and Evolution of Cosmic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey David Emberson

    In this thesis, we harness the power of modern scientic computing to explore the formation and evolution of cosmological structure in a wide variety of astrophysical scenarios. We explore the nonlinear dynamics associated with the interplay between cold dark matter (CDM), baryons, ionizing radiation, and cosmic neutrinos, within regimes where analytic calculations necessarily fail. We begin by providing an overview of structure formation and its connections to the fields of study considered here: the epoch of reionization, galactic substructure evolution, and cosmic neutrinos. We then present a rigorous numerical convergence study of cosmological hydrodynamics simulations post-possessed with radiative transfer to study the impact of small-scale absorption systems within the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the onset of reionization. We present converged statistics of the IGM on smaller scales and earlier times than previously considered. Moreover, we provide strict resolution limits for hydrodynamic simulations to properly resolve the unheated IGM. Next we study the infall and dynamical evolution of CDM halos in a galactic host. We find the behaviour of low-mass subhalos is qualitatively different than previously described for high-mass subhalos. In particular, the evolution of low-mass subhalos, with masses less than 0.1 per cent that of the host, is mainly driven by their concentration. This presents an opportunity to use concentration as a predictive indicator of substructure evolution. We finish this thesis with an investigation of a recently proposed method for constraining individual neutrino mass from cosmological observations. Such a detection depends on the ability to reconstruct the CDM-neutrino relative velocity, which we show can be accomplished using linear transformations of an observed galaxy field. Based on this, we perform the world's largest cosmological N-body simulation and present preliminary results for the observational prospects of cosmic

  13. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T. E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de E-mail: henning@mpia.de E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  14. Protoplanetary Disk Structure with Grain Evolution: The ANDES Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimkin, V.; Zhukovska, S.; Wiebe, D.; Semenov, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T.; Henning, Th.

    2013-03-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: "ANDES" ("AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation"). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R <~ 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R >~ 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO2, NH2CN, HNO, H2O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  15. Independent Effects of Protein Core Size and Expression on Residue-Level Structure-Evolution Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Xia, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that yeast protein evolutionary rate at the level of individual amino acid residues scales linearly with degree of solvent accessibility. This residue-level structure-evolution relationship is sensitive to protein core size: surface residues from large-core proteins evolve much faster than those from small-core proteins, while buried residues are equally constrained independent of protein core size. In this work, we investigate the joint effects of protein core size and expression on the residue-level structure-evolution relationship. At the whole-protein level, protein expression is a much more dominant determinant of protein evolutionary rate than protein core size. In contrast, at the residue level, protein core size and expression both have major impacts on protein structure-evolution relationships. In addition, protein core size and expression influence residue-level structure-evolution relationships in qualitatively different ways. Protein core size preferentially affects the non-synonymous substitution rates of surface residues compared to buried residues, and has little influence on synonymous substitution rates. In comparison, protein expression uniformly affects all residues independent of degree of solvent accessibility, and affects both non-synonymous and synonymous substitution rates. Protein core size and expression exert largely independent effects on protein evolution at the residue level, and can combine to produce dramatic changes in the slope of the linear relationship between residue evolutionary rate and solvent accessibility. Our residue-level findings demonstrate that protein core size and expression are both important, yet qualitatively different, determinants of protein evolution. These results underscore the complementary nature of residue-level and whole-protein analysis of protein evolution. PMID:23056364

  16. Structure and evolution of fossil H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Schwarz, J.

    1971-01-01

    The structure and evolution of a fossil H II region created by a burst of ionizing radiation from a supernova is considered. The cooling time scale for the shell is about 10 to the 6th power years. Superposition of million-year-old fossil H II regions may account for the temperature and ionization of the interstellar medium. Fossil H II regions are unstable to growth of thermal condensations. Highly ionized filamentary structures form and dissipate in about 10,000 years. Partially ionized clouds form and dissipate in about 10 to the 6th power years.

  17. Structure scalars and evolution equations in f( G) cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Fatima, H. Ismat

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of self-gravitating fluid using structure scalars for spherical geometry in the context of f( G) cosmology. We construct structure scalars through orthogonal splitting of the Riemann tensor and deduce a complete set of equations governing the evolution of dissipative anisotropic fluid in terms of these scalars. We explore different causes of density inhomogeneity which turns out to be a necessary condition for viable models. It is explicitly shown that anisotropic inhomogeneous static spherically symmetric solutions can be expressed in terms of these scalar functions.

  18. Structure of the scientific community modelling the evolution of resistance.

    PubMed

    2007-12-05

    Faced with the recurrent evolution of resistance to pesticides and drugs, the scientific community has developed theoretical models aimed at identifying the main factors of this evolution and predicting the efficiency of resistance management strategies. The evolutionary forces considered by these models are generally similar for viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants or arthropods facing drugs or pesticides, so interaction between scientists working on different biological organisms would be expected. We tested this by analysing co-authorship and co-citation networks using a database of 187 articles published from 1977 to 2006 concerning models of resistance evolution to all major classes of pesticides and drugs. These analyses identified two main groups. One group, led by ecologists or agronomists, is interested in agricultural crop or stock pests and diseases. It mainly uses a population genetics approach to model the evolution of resistance to insecticidal proteins, insecticides, herbicides, antihelminthic drugs and miticides. By contrast, the other group, led by medical scientists, is interested in human parasites and mostly uses epidemiological models to study the evolution of resistance to antibiotic and antiviral drugs. Our analyses suggested that there is also a small scientific group focusing on resistance to antimalaria drugs, and which is only poorly connected with the two larger groups. The analysis of cited references indicates that each of the two large communities publishes its research in a different set of literature and has its own keystone references: citations with a large impact in one group are almost never cited by the other. We fear the lack of exchange between the two communities might slow progress concerning resistance evolution which is currently a major issue for society.

  19. Structure of the Scientific Community Modelling the Evolution of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Faced with the recurrent evolution of resistance to pesticides and drugs, the scientific community has developed theoretical models aimed at identifying the main factors of this evolution and predicting the efficiency of resistance management strategies. The evolutionary forces considered by these models are generally similar for viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants or arthropods facing drugs or pesticides, so interaction between scientists working on different biological organisms would be expected. We tested this by analysing co-authorship and co-citation networks using a database of 187 articles published from 1977 to 2006 concerning models of resistance evolution to all major classes of pesticides and drugs. These analyses identified two main groups. One group, led by ecologists or agronomists, is interested in agricultural crop or stock pests and diseases. It mainly uses a population genetics approach to model the evolution of resistance to insecticidal proteins, insecticides, herbicides, antihelminthic drugs and miticides. By contrast, the other group, led by medical scientists, is interested in human parasites and mostly uses epidemiological models to study the evolution of resistance to antibiotic and antiviral drugs. Our analyses suggested that there is also a small scientific group focusing on resistance to antimalaria drugs, and which is only poorly connected with the two larger groups. The analysis of cited references indicates that each of the two large communities publishes its research in a different set of literature and has its own keystone references: citations with a large impact in one group are almost never cited by the other. We fear the lack of exchange between the two communities might slow progress concerning resistance evolution which is currently a major issue for society. PMID:18060069

  20. Structural Measures to Track the Evolution of SNOMED CT Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Duo; Gu, Huanying (Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) is an extensive reference terminology with an attendant amount of complexity. It has been updated continuously and revisions have been released semi-annually to meet users’ needs and to reflect the results of quality assurance (QA) activities. Two measures based on structural features are proposed to track the effects of both natural terminology growth and QA activities based on aspects of the complexity of SNOMED CT. These two measures, called the structural density measure and accumulated structural measure, are derived based on two abstraction networks, the area taxonomy and the partial-area taxonomy. The measures derive from attribute relationship distributions and various concept groupings that are associated with the abstraction networks. They are used to track the trends in the complexity of structures as SNOMED CT changes over time. The measures were calculated for consecutive releases of five SNOMED CT hierarchies, including the Specimen hierarchy. The structural density measure shows that natural growth tends to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a more complex state, whereas the accumulated structural measure shows that QA processes tend to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a less complex state. It is also observed that both the structural density and accumulated structural measures are useful tools to track the evolution of an entire SNOMED CT hierarchy and reveal internal concept migration within it. PMID:26260003

  1. Structural measures to track the evolution of SNOMED CT hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Duo; Helen Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan

    2015-10-01

    The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) is an extensive reference terminology with an attendant amount of complexity. It has been updated continuously and revisions have been released semi-annually to meet users' needs and to reflect the results of quality assurance (QA) activities. Two measures based on structural features are proposed to track the effects of both natural terminology growth and QA activities based on aspects of the complexity of SNOMED CT. These two measures, called the structural density measure and accumulated structural measure, are derived based on two abstraction networks, the area taxonomy and the partial-area taxonomy. The measures derive from attribute relationship distributions and various concept groupings that are associated with the abstraction networks. They are used to track the trends in the complexity of structures as SNOMED CT changes over time. The measures were calculated for consecutive releases of five SNOMED CT hierarchies, including the Specimen hierarchy. The structural density measure shows that natural growth tends to move a hierarchy's structure toward a more complex state, whereas the accumulated structural measure shows that QA processes tend to move a hierarchy's structure toward a less complex state. It is also observed that both the structural density and accumulated structural measures are useful tools to track the evolution of an entire SNOMED CT hierarchy and reveal internal concept migration within it.

  2. Evolution of baryons in cosmic large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali

    We introduce a new self-consistent structure finding algorithm that parses large scale cosmological structure into clusters, filaments and voids. This algorithm probes the structure at multiple scales and classifies the appropriate regions with the most probable structure type and size. We use this structure finding algorithm to parse and follow the evolution of poor clusters, filaments and voids in large scale simulations. We trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find the majority of star formation occurs in cold condensed gas in filaments at all redshifts and that it peaks at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to high contrast regions or the inner parts of filaments. Since filaments bridge between void and cluster regions, this suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion onto poor clusters. We find that at the present epoch, the gas phase distribution is 43.1%, 30.0%, 24.7% and 2.2% in the diffuse, WHIM, hot halo and condensed phases, respectively. Most of the WHIM is found to be in filamentary structures. Moreover 8.77%, 79.1%, 2.11% and 9.98% of the gas is located in poor clusters, filaments, voids and unassigned regions respectively. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments at redshift z = 0.

  3. Structure and Age Jointly Influence Rates of Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Bostick, David; Albà, M. Mar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    What factors determine a protein's rate of evolution are actively debated. Especially unclear is the relative role of intrinsic factors of present-day proteins versus historical factors such as protein age. Here we study the interplay of structural properties and evolutionary age, as determinants of protein evolutionary rate. We use a large set of one-to-one orthologs between human and mouse proteins, with mapped PDB structures. We report that previously observed structural correlations also hold within each age group – including relationships between solvent accessibility, designabililty, and evolutionary rates. However, age also plays a crucial role: age modulates the relationship between solvent accessibility and rate. Additionally, younger proteins, despite being less designable, tend to evolve faster than older proteins. We show that previously reported relationships between age and rate cannot be explained by structural biases among age groups. Finally, we introduce a knowledge-based potential function to study the stability of proteins through large-scale computation. We find that older proteins are more stable for their native structure, and more robust to mutations, than younger ones. Our results underscore that several determinants, both intrinsic and historical, can interact to determine rates of protein evolution. PMID:22693443

  4. Polyhedra structures and the evolution of the insect viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoyun; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin; Evans, Gwyndaf; Ginn, Helen M.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Polyhedra represent an ancient system used by a number of insect viruses to protect virions during long periods of environmental exposure. We present high resolution crystal structures of polyhedra for seven previously uncharacterised types of cypoviruses, four using ab initio selenomethionine phasing (two of these required over 100 selenomethionine crystals each). Approximately 80% of residues are structurally equivalent between all polyhedrins (pairwise rmsd ⩽1.5 Å), whilst pairwise sequence identities, based on structural alignment, are as little as 12%. These structures illustrate the effect of 400 million years of evolution on a system where the crystal lattice is the functionally conserved feature in the face of massive sequence variability. The conservation of crystal contacts is maintained across most of the molecular surface, except for a dispensable virus recognition domain. By spreading the contacts over so much of the protein surface the lattice remains robust in the face of many individual changes. Overall these unusual structural constraints seem to have skewed the molecule’s evolution so that surface residues are almost as conserved as the internal residues. PMID:26291392

  5. Population structure and evolution of pathogenicity of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Shear Lane; Octavia, Sophie; Xia, Qiuyu; Duong, An; Tanaka, Mark M; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Lan, Ruiting

    2011-02-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteric human pathogen but is widespread in the environment. Pathogenicity is determined by a number of virulence factors, including the virulence plasmid pYV, the high-pathogenicity island (HPI), and the Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen (YPM), a superantigen. The presence of the 3 virulence factors varies among Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates. We developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme to address the population structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the evolution of its pathogenicity. The seven housekeeping genes selected for MLST were mdh, recA, sucA, fumC, aroC, pgi, and gyrB. An MLST analysis of 83 isolates of Y. pseudotuberculosis, representing 19 different serotypes and six different genetic groups, identified 61 sequence types (STs) and 12 clonal complexes. Out of 26 allelic changes that occurred in the 12 clonal complexes, 13 were mutational events while 13 were recombinational events, indicating that recombination and mutation contributed equally to the diversification of the clonal complexes. The isolates were separated into 2 distinctive clusters, A and B. Cluster A is the major cluster, with 53 STs (including Y. pestis strains), and is distributed worldwide, while cluster B is restricted to the Far East. The YPM gene is widely distributed on the phylogenetic tree, with ypmA in cluster A and ypmB in cluster B. pYV is present in cluster A only but is sporadically absent in some cluster A isolates. In contrast, an HPI is present only in a limited number of lineages and must be gained by lateral transfer. Three STs carry all 3 virulence factors and can be regarded as high-pathogenicity clones. Isolates from the same ST may not carry all 3 virulence factors, indicating frequent gain or loss of these factors. The differences in pathogenicity among Y. pseudotuberculosis strains are likely due to the variable presence and instability of the virulence factors.

  6. Protein structure comparison using the markov transition model of evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, T; Nishikawa, K

    2000-10-01

    A number of automatic protein structure comparison methods have been proposed; however, their similarity score functions are often decided by the researchers' intuition and trial-and-error, and not by theoretical background. We propose a novel theory to evaluate protein structure similarity, which is based on the Markov transition model of evolution. Our similarity score between structures i and j is defined as log P(j --> i)/P(i), where P(j --> i) is the probability that structure j changes to structure i during the evolutionary process, and P(i) is the probability that structure i appears by chance. This is a reasonable definition of structure similarity, especially for finding evolutionarily related (homologous) similarity. The probability P(j --> i) is estimated by the Markov transition model, which is similar to the Dayhoff's substitution model between amino acids. To estimate the parameters of the model, homologous protein structure pairs are collected using sequence similarity, and the numbers of structure transitions within the pairs are counted. Next these numbers are transformed to a transition probability matrix of the Markov transition. Transition probabilities for longer time are obtained by multiplying the probability matrix by itself several times. In this study, we generated three types of structure similarity scores: an environment score, a residue-residue distance score, and a secondary structure elements (SSE) score. Using these scores, we developed the structure comparison program, Matras (MArkovian TRAnsition of protein Structure). It employs a hierarchical alignment algorithm, in which a rough alignment is first obtained by SSEs, and then is improved with more detailed functions. We attempted an all-versus-all comparison of the SCOP database, and evaluated its ability to recognize a superfamily relationship, which was manually assigned to be homologous in the SCOP database. A comparison with the FSSP database shows that our program can

  7. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  8. Structural analysis of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y; Zhang, Yu

    2010-02-24

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17,000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11,000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity.

  9. 68 FR 7148 - NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-02-12

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee Structure and Evolution of... Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe... following topics: --Status of Astronomy and Physics Programs. --Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

  10. 69 FR 42464 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS). DATES: Monday... meeting is as follows: Astronomy and Physics Update Explorer Program Update Structure and Evolution of the...

  11. Structure and evolution of the northern Barents-Kara Sea continental margin from integrated analysis of potential fields, bathymetry and sparse seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, A.; Faleide, J. I.; Glebovsky, V. Yu.; Mjelde, R.

    2012-01-01

    The northern Barents-Kara Sea continental margin is a poorly investigated area because of a permanent ice cover hampering seismic exploration. The available geological and geophysical data show that the magma-poor margin developed in response to early Cenozoic break-up and subsequent opening of the Arctic Eurasia Basin. In this study, a series of crustal-scale geotransects illustrating the architecture of the continental margin are constructed using sparse seismic reflection profiles and a gravity inversion method incorporating a thermal model of rifting. The continental side of the northern Barents Sea margin is underlain by Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic deep sedimentary basins separated from the oceanic side by the marginal uplift. A bathymetry analysis complements low-resolution seismic data to predict the sedimentary depocenters beyond the shelf break. These depocenters are associated with troughs, perpendicular to the shelf edge. The depocenter in front of the St. Anna Trough may contain a sedimentary section more than 4 km thick. The gravity correction for the effect of sedimentary cover was added to the inversion. This correction used an exponential density-depth function. The inversion supports a narrow and steep continent-ocean transition (COT; ca. 100 km). The conjugate Lomonosov Ridge margin is modelled using the same technique. Palaeoreconstructions were made to predict the break-up setting. The northern Barents Sea-Lomonosov Ridge rift system can be described as an initially narrow symmetric rift. A transitional zone of extreme thinning is assumed between the oldest spreading magnetic anomaly and the stretched continental crust. The free-air gravity anomaly in the western part of the margin can be predicted by the upwelling divergent flow model implying the exhumation of the lower crust and the continental upper mantle within the COT. It is suggested that an episode of shear or oblique extension before breakup is required to explain the observed narrow

  12. Structural insights into the evolution of the adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lu; Luo, Ming; Velikovsky, Alejandro; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immune system, which is based on highly diverse antigen receptors that are generated by somatic recombination, arose approximately 500 Mya at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. In jawed vertebrates, adaptive immunity is mediated by antibodies and T cell receptors (TCRs), which are composed of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains containing hypervariable loops that bind antigen. In striking contrast, the adaptive immune receptors of jawless vertebrates, termed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs), are constructed from leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules. Structural studies of VLRs have shown that these LRR-based receptors bind antigens though their concave surface, in addition to a unique hypervariable loop in the C-terminal LRR capping module. These studies have revealed a remarkable example of convergent evolution in which jawless vertebrates adopted the LRR scaffold to recognize as broad a spectrum of antigens as the Ig-based antibodies and TCRs of jawed vertebrates, with altogether comparable affinity and specificity.

  13. Pelvic fins in teleosts: structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamanoue, Y; Setiamarga, D H E; Matsuura, K

    2010-10-01

    The pelvic fins of teleosts are paired appendages that are considered to be homologous to the hind limbs of tetrapods. Because they are less important for swimming, their morphology and function can be flexibly modified, and such modifications have probably facilitated the adaptations of teleosts to various environments. Recently, among these modifications, pelvic-fin loss has gained attention in evolutionary developmental biology. Pelvic-fin loss, however, has only been investigated in a few model species, and various biological aspects of pelvic fins in teleosts in general remain poorly understood. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding pelvic fins, such as their structure, function and evolution, to elucidate their contribution to the considerable diversity of teleosts. This information could be invaluable for future investigations into various aspects of pelvic fins, which will provide clues to understanding the evolution, diversity and adaptations of teleosts.

  14. NASA Structure and Evolution of the Universe Theme: Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Margon, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) theme covers a wide variety of scientific investigations, from the nearest bodies to the farthest observable distances just after the time of the Big Bang. SEU supports experiments that sense radiation of all wavelengths, together with particle and gravitational wave detection. Recently completed road mapping and strategic planning exercises have identified a number of near- and medium-term space initiatives for the 2003-2023 time frame. Each of these experiments pushes the state of the art technically, but will return incredible new insights on the formation and evolution of the universe, as well as probe fundamental laws of physics in regimes never before tested. The scientific goals and technological highlights of each mission are described.

  15. Geometry and kinematic evolution of Riedel shear structures, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Yoram; Weinberger, Ram; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-03-01

    Riedel shear structures are common fault patterns identified within shear zones and related to the embryonic stages of fault formation. This study focuses on the geometry of outcrop-scale natural shear zones consisting of different generations of Riedel structures, exposed in the Jurassic Navajo sandstone, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. Geometric analysis of different structures shows that the spacing of synthetic R-deformation bands increases with the spacing of antithetic R'-deformation bands. Systematic correlation is found between the R-band spacing and the angles formed between R- and R'-bands. Examination of young Riedel structures shows their tendency to localize along narrow, elongated domains sub-parallel to the shear direction and create denser Riedel networks. We suggest that the evolution of Riedel structures is dominated by two mechanisms: (1) discrete faulting in the form of conjugate deformation bands, generally complying with the Mohr-Coulomb criteria, and (2) granular flow, which rotates mainly the R'-deformation bands. Both mechanisms are intensified with progressive strain, decreasing the deformation-band spacing and increasing the R- to R'-angles. The tendency of young Riedel structures to organize in dense elongated networks is related to strain localization during the shear-zone evolution. We suggest a kinematic explanation for the evolution of Riedel-structure networks, which relates the network geometry to the progressive accumulation and localization of shear strain.

  16. Structure trees and species trees: what they say about morphological development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Geeta, R

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary history of morphological structures generally is equated with that of the taxa that carry them. It is argued here that, analogous to genes, developmental genetic pathways underlying morphological structures may be subject to developmental evolutionary changes that result, for instance, in duplication (serial homology analogous to gene duplication and paralogy). Entities that undergo evolution are expected to be related to each other as a tree. Just as with molecular evolution, "structure trees" and species trees sometimes may be incongruent, with implications for morphological homology concepts. Detection of structure trees through morphological evolutionary analyses may point to an entity that is maintained through evolution, possibly in part because it is a developmentally integrated structure ("individualized"). This idea is illustrated in a morphological evolutionary analysis of leaf primordia. These analyses suggest that leaf primordia in monocots and close relatives are related to each other as a tree and, therefore, are developmentally integrated, evolving entities. Among monocot primordia this tree structure breaks down, and it is concluded that there is no entity, the "monocot leaf primordium." However, one group of primordia is identified within monocots that have uniform characteristics and that are well represented by model species maize and rice. Such analyses of structure trees can facilitate the extrapolation and interpretation of results from molecular developmental and other comparative studies.

  17. Structural evolution of fold-thrust structures in analog models deformed in a large geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Todd E.; Dixon, John M.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the structural evolution of fault-propagation folds and fold-thrust systems with scaled analog modeling carried out using the 5.5 m radius geotechnical centrifuge at C-CORE, St. John's NL. The experiments presented here are the first of their kind, scaled ten times larger than predecessors and deformed using a custom rig with load monitoring and displacement control. Plane-layered models approximately 1 m long and representing 50 km sections are shortened horizontally under an enhanced gravity field of 160 g. The large model scale allows for a proportionally large number of bedding laminations that act as strain markers. This allows detailed analysis of strain partitioning and interplay, both at the scale of a fold-thrust system and the individual fold-thrust structure. Layer-parallel shortening ("LPS") and rotation of fault-bounded blocks are revealed by mapping contraction fault populations and bedding-contraction fault intersection angles. Low-angle contraction faulting and LPS are found to be dominant at early stages of development and rotation of fault-bounded blocks occurs during progressive folding of the hanging-wall panel during fault-propagation folding. Displacement-distance data obtained from major thrusts in the model show relative stretch values, and consequently fault slip/propagation ratios, that are similar to natural structures.

  18. Hypomutable regions of yeast TFIIB in a unigenic evolution test represent structural domains.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao; Zhang, Dongyi; Dorsey, Michael; Ma, Jun

    2003-04-24

    As genome sequences of many organisms - including humans - are being decoded, there is a great need for genetic tools to analyze newly discovered genes/proteins. A 'unigenic evolution' approach has been previously proposed for dissecting protein domains, which is based on the assumption that functionally important regions of a protein may tolerate missense mutations less well than other regions. We describe a unigenic evolution analysis of general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) - a protein that is well characterized both structurally and functionally - to better understand the molecular basis of this genetic approach. The overall distribution profile of hypomutable regions within yeast TFIIB correlates extremely well with the known compact structural domains, suggesting that the unigenic evolution approach can help reveal structural properties of a protein. We further show that a small region located immediately carboxyl-terminal to the zinc ribbon motif is functionally important despite its strong hypermutability. Our study further demonstrates the usefulness of the unigenic evolution approach in dissecting protein domains, but suggests that the mutability of different regions of a protein in such a test is determined primarily by their structural properties.

  19. Understanding the Evolution of Mammalian Brain Structures; the Need for a (New) Cerebrotype Approach

    PubMed Central

    Willemet, Romain

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain varies in size by a factor of 100,000 and is composed of anatomically and functionally distinct structures. Theoretically, the manner in which brain composition can evolve is limited, ranging from highly modular (“mosaic evolution”) to coordinated changes in brain structure size (“concerted evolution”) or anything between these two extremes. There is a debate about the relative importance of these distinct evolutionary trends. It is shown here that the presence of taxa-specific allometric relationships between brain structures makes a taxa-specific approach obligatory. In some taxa, the evolution of the size of brain structures follows a unique, coordinated pattern, which, in addition to other characteristics at different anatomical levels, defines what has been called here a “taxon cerebrotype”. In other taxa, no clear pattern is found, reflecting heterogeneity of the species’ lifestyles. These results suggest that the evolution of brain size and composition depends on the complex interplay between selection pressures and constraints that have changed constantly during mammalian evolution. Therefore the variability in brain composition between species should not be considered as deviations from the normal, concerted mammalian trend, but in taxa and species-specific versions of the mammalian brain. Because it forms homogenous groups of species within this complex “space” of constraints and selection pressures, the cerebrotype approach developed here could constitute an adequate level of analysis for evo-devo studies, and by extension, for a wide range of disciplines related to brain evolution. PMID:24962772

  20. Habitat structure and the evolution of diffusible siderophores in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, Rolf; Schiessl, Konstanze T; Waldvogel, Tuija; McNeill, Kristopher; Ackermann, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria typically rely on secreted metabolites, potentially shareable at the community level, to scavenge resources from the environment. The evolution of diffusible, shareable metabolites is, however, difficult to explain because molecules can get lost, or be exploited by cheating mutants. A key question is whether natural selection can act on molecule structure to control loss and shareability. We tested this possibility by collating information on diffusivity properties of 189 secreted iron-scavenging siderophores and the natural habitats occupied by the siderophore-producing species. In line with evolutionary theory, we found that highly diffusible siderophores have preferentially evolved in species living in structured habitats, such as soil and hosts, because structuring can keep producers and their shareable goods together. Poorly diffusible siderophores, meanwhile, have preferentially evolved in species living in unstructured habitats, such as seawater, indicating that these metabolites are less shareable and more likely provide direct benefits to the producers.

  1. The thermal structure and thermal evolution of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal structure and evolution of the continental lithosphere are examined. Surface heat flow data and the factors which modify them are addressed, and the diversity of thermal phenomena in the lithosphere is discussed in the framework of plate interactions. The lithosphere is divided into three sections for the purposes of discussion. In the upper, near-surface zone, temperatures can be strongly affected by near-surface processes, which must be taken into account in the measurement and evaluation of surface heat flow. The thermal structure of the middle, internal zone of the lithosphere responds to the heat balance and thermal properties of the lithosphere, which define its steady state thermal structure. Internal deformation and magmatic intrusion within this zone, and interaction between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere in the lower boundary zone of the lithosphere cause transient thermal disturbances in the lithosphere. The criteria for defining the base of the thermal lithosphere are briefly discussed.

  2. Structure evolution and phase transition in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of level structures due to the unique parity orbitals g9 /2, h11 /2, and i13 /2 in odd-mass nuclei from Zn to Am is studied within a unified framework, by correlations between ratios of excitation energies in both odd-mass nuclei and their even-even core nuclei. These plots reveal regularities that can be understood in terms of the particle-plus-rotor model, as evolutions along its three limiting coupling schemes: weak coupling, decoupling, and strong coupling, and transitions between them. Peculiar transitions between the decoupling and strong coupling schemes are found in both i13 /2 structures of neutron-odd nuclei and h11 /2 structures of proton-odd nuclei, at neutron numbers around 90 and 70, respectively. These are correlated with the critical shape phase transitions from vibrator to rotor from the even-even nuclei in the same regions and are characterized as critical phase transitions too. This behavior is corroborated with a nonmonotonic behavior of the differential variation of the two-neutron separation energies in the same nuclear regions.

  3. Astrocladistics: a phylogenetic analysis of galaxy evolution I. Character evolutions and galaxy histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Choler, Philippe; Douzery, Emmanuel J. P.; Verhamme, Anne

    2006-06-01

    This series of papers is intended to present astrocladistics in some detail and evaluate this methodology in reconstructing phylogenies of galaxies. Being based on the evolution of all the characters describing galaxies, it is an objective way of understanding galaxy diversity through evolutionary relationships. In this first paper, we present the basic steps of a cladistic analysis and show both theoretically and practically that it can be applied to galaxies. For illustration, we use a sample of 50 simulated galaxies taken from the GALICS database, which are described by 91 observables (dynamics, masses and luminosities). These 50 simulated galaxies are indeed 10 different galaxies taken at 5 cosmological epochs, and they are free of merger events. The astrocladistic analysis easily reconstructs the true chronology of evolution relationships within this sample. It also demonstrates that burst characters are not relevant for galaxy evolution as a whole. A companion paper is devoted to the formalization of the concepts of formation and diversification in galaxy evolution.

  4. Evolution of community structure in the world trade web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzekina, I.; Danthi, K.; Rockmore, D. N.

    2008-06-01

    In this note we study the bilateral merchandise trade flows between 186 countries over the 1948 2005 period using data from the International Monetary Fund. We use the network visualization package Pajek to identify network structure and behavior across thresholds and over time. In particular, we focus on the evolution of trade “islands” in a world trade network in which countries are linked with directed edges weighted according to the fraction of total dollars sent from one country to another. We find mixed evidence for globalization.

  5. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xun; Peng Tianyou; Yao Jinchun; Lv Hongjin; Huang Cheng

    2010-06-15

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous {gamma}-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl{sup -} in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} even after calcinations at 1173 K. - Graphical abstract: Co-existing Cl{sup -} is beneficial for the formation of {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles with mesostructures during the precipitation process. Interparticle and intraparticle mesopores can be derived from acidic solution and near neutral solution, respectively.

  6. Evolution and structure of Mercury's interior from MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    During the past four years, the MESSENGER mission (MErcury Surface, Space Environment, GEochemistry and Ranging) has delivered a wealth of information that has been dramatically advancing the understanding of the geological, chemical, and physical state of Mercury. Taking into account the latest constraints on the interior structure, surface composition, volcanic and tectonic history, we employed numerical models to simulate the thermo-chemical evolution of the planet's interior [1]. Typical evolution scenarios that allow the observational constraints to be satisfied consist of an initial phase of mantle heating accompanied by planetary expansion and the production of a substantial amount of partial melt. The evolution subsequent to 2 Ga is characterised by secular cooling that proceeds approximately at a constant rate and implies that contraction should be still ongoing. Most of the models also predict mantle convection to cease after 3-4 Ga, indicating that Mercury may be no longer dynamically active. In addition, the topography, measured by laser altimetry and the gravity field, obtained from radio-tracking, represent fundamental observations that can be interpreted in terms of the chemical and mechanical structure of the interior. The observed geoid-to-topography ratios at intermediate wavelengths are well explained by the isostatic compensation of the topography associated with lateral variations of the crustal thickness, whose mean value can be estimated to be ~35 km, broadly confirming the predictions of the evolution simulations [2]. Finally, we will show that the degree-2 and 4 of the topography and geoid spectra can be explained in terms of the long-wavelength deformation of the lithosphere resulting from deep thermal anomalies caused by the large latitudinal and longitudinal variations in temperature experienced by Mercury's surface. [1] Tosi N., M. Grott, A.-C. Plesa and D. Breuer (2013). Thermo-chemical evolution of Mercury's interior. Journal of

  7. Structural evolution of carbon dioxide under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Miao, Maosheng; Ma, Yanming

    2013-09-25

    Using an efficient structure search method based on a particle swarm optimization algorithm, we study the structural evolution of solid carbon dioxide (CO2) under high pressure. Our results show that, although it undertakes many structural transitions under pressure, CO2 is quite resistive to structures with C beyond 4-fold coordination. For the first time, we are able to identify two 6-fold structures of solid CO2 with Pbcn and Pa3 symmetries that become stable at pressures close to 1 TPa. Both structures consist of a network of C-O octahedra, showing hypervalence of the central C atoms. The C-O bond length varies from 1.30 to 1.34 Å at the 4-fold to 6-fold transition, close to the C-O distance in the transition state of a corresponding S(N)2 reaction. It has been a longstanding and challenging objective to stabilize C in a hypervalent state, particularly when it is bonded with nonmetallic elements. Most of the work so far has focused on synthesizing organic molecules with a high coordination number of C. Our results provide a good measure of the resistivity of C toward forming hypervalent compounds with nonmetallic elements and of the barrier of reaction involving C-O bonds.

  8. A global analysis of adaptive evolution of operons in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Memon, Danish; Singh, Abhay K; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-02-01

    Operons are an important feature of prokaryotic genomes. Evolution of operons is hypothesized to be adaptive and has contributed significantly towards coordinated optimization of functions. Two conflicting theories, based on (i) in situ formation to achieve co-regulation and (ii) horizontal gene transfer of functionally linked gene clusters, are generally considered to explain why and how operons have evolved. Furthermore, effects of operon evolution on genomic traits such as intergenic spacing, operon size and co-regulation are relatively less explored. Based on the conservation level in a set of diverse prokaryotes, we categorize the operonic gene pair associations and in turn the operons as ancient and recently formed. This allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of operonic structure in cyanobacteria, a morphologically and physiologically diverse group of photoautotrophs. Clustering based on operon conservation showed significant similarity with the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny, which groups the cyanobacterial strains into three clades. Clade C, dominated by strains that are believed to have undergone genome reduction, shows a larger fraction of operonic genes that are tightly packed in larger sized operons. Ancient operons are in general larger, more tightly packed, better optimized for co-regulation and part of key cellular processes. A sub-clade within Clade B, which includes Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, shows a reverse trend in intergenic spacing. Our results suggest that while in situ formation and vertical descent may be a dominant mechanism of operon evolution in cyanobacteria, optimization of intergenic spacing and co-regulation are part of an ongoing process in the life-cycle of operons.

  9. Subtype-specific structural constraints in the evolution of influenza A virus hemagglutinin genes

    PubMed Central

    Gultyaev, Alexander P.; Spronken, Monique I.; Richard, Mathilde; Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Olsthoorn, René C. L.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus genome consists of eight RNA segments. RNA structures within these segments and complementary (cRNA) and protein-coding mRNAs may play a role in virus replication. Here, conserved putative secondary structures that impose significant evolutionary constraints on the gene segment encoding the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) were investigated using available sequence data on tens of thousands of virus strains. Structural constraints were identified by analysis of covariations of nucleotides suggested to be paired by structure prediction algorithms. The significance of covariations was estimated by mutual information calculations and tracing multiple covariation events during virus evolution. Covariation patterns demonstrated that structured domains in HA RNAs were mostly subtype-specific, whereas some structures were conserved in several subtypes. The influence of RNA folding on virus replication was studied by plaque assays of mutant viruses with disrupted structures. The results suggest that over the whole length of the HA segment there are local structured domains which contribute to the virus fitness but individually are not essential for the virus. Existence of subtype-specific structured regions in the segments of the influenza A virus genome is apparently an important factor in virus evolution and reassortment of its genes. PMID:27966593

  10. Evolution of deep collapse caldera: from structural to gravitational process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, N.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the evolution of deep-subsiding caldera mainly controlled by gravitational process. Progress of caldera subsidence increases its subsidence/diameter ratio (S/D ratio). We investigate the surface features of calderas undergoing significant subsidence with regard to their diameter. First, we consider the evolution of the 2000 Miyakejima caldera, from double-concentric ring faults at earlier collapsing stages, to a gravitational-erosion dominant stage at a mature stage. When the topographic S/D approaches 0.33, the topographic S/D (hereafter S/Dt) becomes significantly different from the structural S/D (hereafter S/Ds), owing to the gravitational erosion on the caldera wall and accumulation of the debris on the floor. As collapse progresses, the peripheral block bounded by the inner reverse fault and outer normal fault extends and tilts towards the caldera center; it finally collapses towards the caldera floor and the double-ring faults disappeares. Subsidence of the caldera floor induces the gravitational erosion of the wall. This process increases the topographic diameter and the filling of the floor decreases the topographic depth. Consequently, the S/Dt decreases, while the continuous caldera subsidence increases the S/Ds. This evolution finds close similarities with the caldera collapses of Krakatau (1883), Katmai (1912), Fernandina (1968), Tolbachik (1975-76), Pinatubo (1991) and Dolomieu (2007). Analogue experiments mimic the observed variation, evolving from a depression controlled by the activity of the double-ring faults to that controlled by the gravitational slumping of the wall and sedimentation at the floor. The transition occurs for S/Dt ~0.34. These results show that the control on the shape of mature calderas (S/Ds>0.07) and approaching S/Dt=0.3 passes from a mainly structural to a mainly gravitational type. Both S/Dt and S/Ds are needed to describe the evolution of a collapse and the processes accompanying it. Evaluating the S/Dt and S

  11. Study of grain structure evolution during annealing of a twin-roll-cast Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Samajdar, I.; Nie, J.F.; Tewari, A.

    2016-04-15

    The evolution of microstructure under static annealing was studied for mid-thickness section of a twin-roll-cast (TRC) magnesium alloy. Annealing was performed at 300 °C and 500 °C for different times. Microstructural evolution was quantitatively analyzed, from optical micrographs, using grain path envelope analysis. Additional information from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used for addressing the possible mechanism(s). It was found that the TRC structure had a bimodal grain size, which was preserved even after annealing at 300 °C. However, the annealing at 500 °C led to a unimodal grain size. This difference in the grain size distribution created a contrasting behavior in the normalized standard deviations. This was primarily attributed to a competition between recovery and recrystallization, and their respective dominance at 300° and 500 °C. A deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) model was proposed. The proposed model could successfully address the experimental microstructural evolution. - Highlights: • Annealing of twin roll cast (TRC) magnesium alloy was done at temperatures of 300 °C and 500 °C. • TRC had bimodal structure. Bimodality preserved for annealing at 300 °C. Annealing at 500 °C led to unimodal structure. • Grain evolution was described based on the competition between recovery and recrystallization. • Deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) mechanistic model was developed.

  12. Saturn layered structure and homogeneous evolution models with different EOSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettelmann, Nadine; Püstow, Robert; Redmer, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    The core mass of Saturn is commonly assumed to be 10-25M⊕ as predicted by interior models with various equations of state (EOSs) and the Voyager gravity data, and hence larger than that of Jupiter (0-10M⊕). We here re-analyze Saturn's internal structure and evolution by using more recent gravity data from the Cassini mission and different physical equations of state: the ab initio LM-REOS which is rather soft in Saturn's outer regions but stiff at high pressures, the standard Sesame-EOS which shows the opposite behavior, and the commonly used SCvH-i EOS. For all three EOS we find similar core mass ranges, i.e. of 0-20M⊕ for SCvH-i and Sesame EOS and of 0-17M⊕ for LM-REOS. Assuming an atmospheric helium mass abundance of 18%, we find maximum atmospheric metallicities, Zatm of 7× solar for SCvH-i and Sesame-based models and a total mass of heavy elements, MZ of 25-30M⊕. Some models are Jupiter-like. With LM-REOS, we find MZ = 16-20M⊕, less than for Jupiter, and Zatm ≲ 3× solar. For Saturn, we compute moment of inertia values λ = 0.2355(5). Furthermore, we confirm that homogeneous evolution leads to cooling times of only ˜2.5 Gyr, independent on the applied EOS. Our results demonstrate the need for accurately measured atmospheric helium and oxygen abundances, and of the moment of inertia for a better understanding of Saturn's structure and evolution.

  13. The structural and property evolution of cellulose during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Yo-Rhin

    The understanding of the structure and related property evolution during carbonization is imperative in engineering carbon materials for specific functionalities. High purity cellulose was used as a model precursor to help understand the conversion of organic compounds to hard carbons. Several characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural, compositional and property changes during the thermal transformation of microcrystalline cellulose to carbon over the temperature range of 250°C to 2000°C. These studies revealed several stages of composition and microstructure evolution during carbonization supported by the observation of five distinct regions of electrical and thermal properties. In Region I, from 250°C to 400°C, depolymerisation of cellulose molecules caused the evolution of volatile gases and decrease in dipole polarization. This also led to the reduction of overall AC electrical conductivity and specific heat. In Region II, from 450°C to 500°C, the formation and growth of conducting sp 2 carbon clusters resulted in increases in overall AC electrical conductivity and thermal diffusivity with rising temperature. For heat treatment temperatures of 550°C and 600°C, Region III, carbon clusters grew into aggregates of curved carbon layers leading to interfacial polarization and onset of percolation. AC electrical and thermal conductivities are enhanced due to electron hopping and improved phonon transport among carbon clusters. With temperatures rising from 650°C to 1000°C, Region IV, DC conductivity began to emerge and increased sharply along with thermal conductivity with further percolation of carbon clusters as lateral growth of carbon layers continued. Lastly, from 1200°C to 2000°C, Region V, DC electrical conductivity remained constant due to a fully percolated system.

  14. SINEs, evolution and genome structure in the opossum.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Ray, David A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Barnes, Erin W; Gentles, Andrew J; Samollow, Paul B; Jurka, Jerzy; Batzer, Mark A; Pollock, David D

    2007-07-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons, usually between 100 and 500 base pairs (bp) in length, which are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic genomes. Their activity, distribution, and evolution can be highly informative on genomic structure and evolutionary processes. To determine recent activity, we amplified more than one hundred SINE1 loci in a panel of 43 M. domestica individuals derived from five diverse geographic locations. The SINE1 family has expanded recently enough that many loci were polymorphic, and the SINE1 insertion-based genetic distances among populations reflected geographic distance. Genome-wide comparisons of SINE1 densities and GC content revealed that high SINE1 density is associated with high GC content in a few long and many short spans. Young SINE1s, whether fixed or polymorphic, showed an unbiased GC content preference for insertion, indicating that the GC preference accumulates over long time periods, possibly in periodic bursts. SINE1 evolution is thus broadly similar to human Alu evolution, although it has an independent origin. High GC content adjacent to SINE1s is strongly correlated with bias towards higher AT to GC substitutions and lower GC to AT substitutions. This is consistent with biased gene conversion, and also indicates that like chickens, but unlike eutherian mammals, GC content heterogeneity (isochore structure) is reinforced by substitution processes in the M. domestica genome. Nevertheless, both high and low GC content regions are apparently headed towards lower GC content equilibria, possibly due to a relative shift to lower recombination rates in the recent Monodelphis ancestral lineage. Like eutherians, metatherian (marsupial) mammals have evolved high CpG substitution rates, but this is apparently a convergence in process rather than a shared ancestral state.

  15. PIECE: A database for plant gene structure comparison and evolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene families often show degrees of differences in terms of exon-intron structures depending on their distinct evolutionary histories. Comparative analysis of gene structures is important for understanding their evolutionary and functional relationships within plant species. Here, we present a com...

  16. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  17. Evolution of Anabaenopeptin Peptide Structural Variability in the Cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    PubMed Central

    Entfellner, Elisabeth; Frei, Mark; Christiansen, Guntram; Deng, Li; Blom, Jochen; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    , Tyrosine, and Lysine in the exocyclic position of the AP-molecule. The increased structural diversity resulted from the evolution of apnA A1 genotypes through a small number of positively selected point mutations that occurred repeatedly and independently from phylogenetic association. PMID:28261178

  18. Structure evolution in layers of polymer blend nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Joanna; Montenegro, Rivelino; Budkowski, Andrzej; Landfester, Katharina; Bernasik, Andrzej; Rysz, Jakub; Czuba, Paweł

    2007-06-19

    The early stages of phase evolution, not available for nanometer polymer blend films spin-cast from solutions of incompatible mixtures, have been examined for films prepared from nanoparticles of deuterated polystyrene/ poly(methyl methacrylate) blends (1:1 mass fraction of dPS/PMMA) with PS-PMMA diblock copolymer additives. The initial phase arrangement, confined to the size of nanoparticles, has provided the homogeneity of the initial film composition. The early stages of structure formation, promoted by annealing and traced with atomic and lateral force microscopy (AFM, LFM) as well as secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), resulted in bilayers, observed commonly for as-prepared solvent-cast blends. The initiated capillary instability of the upper dPS-rich layer depended on copolymer additives, which enhanced the lateral structures pinning the dewetting process.

  19. Dynamic structural network evolution in compressed granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Lia; Puckett, James; Daniels, Karen; Bassett, Danielle

    The heterogeneous dynamic behavior of granular packings under shear or compression is not well-understood. In this study, we use novel techniques from network science to investigate the structural evolution that occurs in compressed granular systems. Specifically, we treat particles as network nodes, and pressure-dependent forces between particles as layer-specific network edges. Then, we use a generalization of community detection methods to multilayer networks, and develop quantitative measures that characterize changes in the architecture of the force network as a function of pressure. We observe that branchlike domains reminiscent of force chains evolve differentially as pressure is applied: topological characteristics of these domains at rest predict their coalescence or dispersion under pressure. Our methods allow us to study the dynamics of mesoscale structure in granular systems, and provide a direct way to compare data from systems under different external conditions or with different physical makeup.

  20. Coronal Mass Ejections : A Study of Structural Evolution and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowder, Chris; Habbal, S. R.; Morgan, H.

    2007-05-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (or CMEs) are known for their majestic, yet explosive, outflow from the Sun. Although different criteria are often used for their classification, this paper seeks to classify them based on the following factors: (1) The velocity of the CME; (2) the structure of the CME itself, and (3) the angular separation of the "legs" of the CME as it expands. Given that the outer edge and the inner core of the CME move at different velocities, this difference can track the structural evolution of the outburst. Using data from solar minimum and maximum, CMEs will be analyzed and a new classification scheme will be developed based on the characteristics outlined above. This research was conducted as part of an NSF funded REU program at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii.

  1. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Coronavirus Spike Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang

    2017-01-01

    The coronavirus spike protein is a multifunctional molecular machine that mediates coronavirus entry into host cells. It first binds to a receptor on the host cell surface through its S1 subunit and then fuses viral and host membranes through its S2 subunit. Two domains in S1 from different coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, leading to viral attachment. The spike protein exists in two structurally distinct conformations, prefusion and postfusion. The transition from prefusion to postfusion conformation of the spike protein must be triggered, leading to membrane fusion. This article reviews current knowledge about the structures and functions of coronavirus spike proteins, illustrating how the two S1 domains recognize different receptors and how the spike proteins are regulated to undergo conformational transitions. I further discuss the evolution of these two critical functions of coronavirus spike proteins, receptor recognition and membrane fusion, in the context of the corresponding functions from other viruses and host cells. PMID:27578435

  2. Radial evolution of density structure in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    White-light measurements made by the SOHO coronagraphs (LASCO for Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph) and the HAO Mauna Loa Mk III K-coronameter are combined to follow the evolution of path-integrated density structure in the solar corona overlying both coronal hole and quiet Sun regions from 1.15 to 5.5 Ro. The global imaging provided by these two instruments confirms and strengthens earlier results discovered by spacecraft radio ranging measurements [Woo and Habbal, 1999], that the imprint of density structure at the Sun — as manifested in the background latitudinal density profile closest to the Sun at 1.15 Ro — is carried essentially radially into interplanetary space with the same density gradient. The only exceptions are coronal streamers that evolve into the heliospheric current sheet within a few solar radii of the Sun.

  3. The Structure and Evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2010-01-01

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the central engines, and the long-term fate of the energetic particles produced in these systems. Such observations reveal the presence of jets and wind termination shocks, time-varying compact emission structures, shocked supernova ejecta, and newly formed dust. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples from observations extending from the radio band to very high energy gamma-rays that demonstrate our ability to constrain the history and ultimate fate of the energy released in the spin-down of young pulsars.

  4. The structure and evolution of X-ray clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Mandel, E.; Schwarz, J.; Forman, W.; Murray, S. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of the structure of the X-ray emission from 12 nearby rich clusters of galaxies are presented and interpreted in terms of dynamic cluster evolution. X-ray structures revealed by the Einstein Observatory imaging proportional counter in the range 0.25 to 3.0 keV were analyzed and used to classify the clusters based on their X-ray morphologies. Four categories are observed, consisting of spiral-rich clusters with low X-ray temperatures and velocity dispersions with broad and highly clumped emission, spiral-poor clusters with high X-ray temperatures and velocity dispersions with smoothly varying emission broadly or sharply peaked around a dominant galaxy, and clusters with emission typical of a cD galaxy in a poor cluster or group. The broad, highly clumped cluster emission is interpreted as a result of an early evolutionary stage, while the cD and centrally enhanced emissions represent successive later stages in X-ray galactic cluster evolution.

  5. Structural Biology and Evolution of the TGF-β Family

    PubMed Central

    Hinck, Andrew P.; Mueller, Thomas D.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2017-01-01

    We review the evolution and structure of members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family, antagonistic or agonistic modulators, and receptors that regulate TGF-β signaling in extracellular environments. The growth factor (GF) domain common to all family members and many of their antagonists evolved from a common cystine knot growth factor (CKGF) domain. The CKGF superfamily comprises six distinct families in primitive metazoans, including the TGF-β and Dan families. Compared with Wnt/Frizzled and Notch/Delta families that also specify body axes, cell fate, tissues, and other families that contain CKGF domains that evolved in parallel, the TGF-β family was the most fruitful in evolution. Complexes between the prodomains and GFs of the TGF-β family suggest a new paradigm for regulating GF release by conversion from closed- to open-arm procomplex conformations. Ternary complexes of the final step in extracellular signaling show how TGF-β GF dimers bind type I and type II receptors on the cell surface, and enable understanding of much of the specificity and promiscuity in extracellular signaling. However, structures suggest that when GFs bind repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family coreceptors, type I receptors do not bind until reaching an intracellular, membrane-enveloped compartment, blurring the line between extra- and intracellular signaling. Modulator protein structures show how structurally diverse antagonists including follistatins, noggin, and members of the chordin family bind GFs to regulate signaling; complexes with the Dan family remain elusive. Much work is needed to understand how these molecular components assemble to form signaling hubs in extracellular environments in vivo. PMID:27638177

  6. PIECE 2.0: an update for the plant gene structure comparison and evolution database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Ling; Thilmony, Roger; You, Frank M.; Gu, Yong Q.; Coleman-Derr, Devin

    2017-01-01

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparison and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron–exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in plant genomes. Recently, we updated PIECE to a new version, PIECE 2.0 (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/piece or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/piece). PIECE 2.0 contains annotated genes from 49 sequenced plant species as compared to 25 species in the previous version. In the current version, we also added several new features: (i) a new viewer was developed to show phylogenetic trees displayed along with the structure of individual genes; (ii) genes in the phylogenetic tree can now be also grouped according to KOG (The annotation of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups) and KO (KEGG Orthology) in addition to Pfam domains; (iii) information on intronless genes are now included in the database; (iv) a statistical summary of global gene structure information for each species and its comparison with other species was added; and (v) an improved GSDraw tool was implemented in the web server to enhance the analysis and display of gene structure. The updated PIECE 2.0 database will be a valuable resource for the plant research community for the study of gene structure and evolution. PMID:27742820

  7. PIECE 2.0: an update for the plant gene structure comparison and evolution database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Ling; Thilmony, Roger; You, Frank M; Gu, Yong Q; Coleman-Derr, Devin

    2017-01-04

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparison and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron-exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in plant genomes. Recently, we updated PIECE to a new version, PIECE 2.0 (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/piece or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/piece). PIECE 2.0 contains annotated genes from 49 sequenced plant species as compared to 25 species in the previous version. In the current version, we also added several new features: (i) a new viewer was developed to show phylogenetic trees displayed along with the structure of individual genes; (ii) genes in the phylogenetic tree can now be also grouped according to KOG (The annotation of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups) and KO (KEGG Orthology) in addition to Pfam domains; (iii) information on intronless genes are now included in the database; (iv) a statistical summary of global gene structure information for each species and its comparison with other species was added; and (v) an improved GSDraw tool was implemented in the web server to enhance the analysis and display of gene structure. The updated PIECE 2.0 database will be a valuable resource for the plant research community for the study of gene structure and evolution. © Crown copyright 2016.

  8. A Dynamic Model for the Evolution of Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tal, Guy; Boca, Simina Maria; Mittenthal, Jay; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    Domains are folded structures and evolutionary building blocks of protein molecules. Their three-dimensional atomic conformations, which define biological functions, can be coarse-grained into levels of a hierarchy. Here we build global dynamical models for the evolution of domains at fold and fold superfamily (FSF) levels. We fit the models with data from phylogenomic trees of domain structures and evaluate the distributions of the resulting parameters and their implications. The trees were inferred from a census of domain structures in hundreds of genomes from all three superkingdoms of life. The models used birth-death differential equations with the global abundances of structures as state variables, with one set of equations for folds and another for FSFs. Only the transitions present in the tree are assumed possible. Each fold or FSF diversifies in variants, eventually producing a new fold or FSF. The parameters specify rates of generation of variants and of new folds or FSFs. The equations were solved for the parameters by simplifying the trees to a comb-like topology, treating branches as emerging directly from a trunk. We found that the rate constants for folds and FSFs evolved similarly. These parameters showed a sharp transient change at about 1.5 Gyrs ago. This time coincides with a period in which domains massively combined in proteins and their arrangements distributed in novel lineages during the rise of organismal diversification. Our simulations suggest that exploration of protein structure space occurs through coarse-grained discoveries that undergo fine-grained elaboration.

  9. Structure of the Mu transpososome illuminates evolution of DDE recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Sherwin P.; Pigli, Ying Z.; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of bacteriophage Mu transposition paved the way for understanding retroviral integration and V(D)J recombination as well as many other DNA transposition reactions. Here we report the structure of Mu transposase (MuA) in complex with bacteriophage DNA ends and target DNA, determined from data that extend anisotropically to 5.2/5.2/3.7Å resolution, in conjunction with previously-determined structures of individual domains. The highly intertwined structure illustrates why chemical activity depends on formation of the synaptic complex, and reveals that individual domains play different roles when bound to different sites. It also suggests explanations for the increased stability of the final product complex and for its preferential recognition by the ATP-dependent unfoldase ClpX. Although MuA and many other recombinases share a structurally conserved “DDE” catalytic domain, comparisons among the limited set of available complex structures suggest that some conserved features, such as catalysis in trans and target DNA bending, arose through convergent evolution because they are important for function. PMID:23135398

  10. Structural framework, stratigraphy, and evolution of Brazilian marginal basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, H.A.O.

    1982-06-01

    The structural framework of the Brazilian continental margin is basically composed of eight structural types: antithetic tilted step-fault blocks, synthetic untilted step-fault blocks, structural inversion axes, hinges with compensation grabens, homoclinal structures, growth faults with rollovers, diapirs, and igneous structures. The antithetic tilted and synthetic untilted step-fault blocks are considered as synchronous, complementary structural systems, separated by an inversion axis. Two evaporitic cycles (Paripueira and Ibura) were differentiated in the Sergipe-Alagoas type basin and tentatively correlated to the evaporitic section of other Brazilian marginal basis. Four phases are considered in the evolution of the Brazilian marginal basins: pre-rift, rift, transitional, and drift. During the pre-rift phase (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), continental sediments were deposited in peripheral intracratonic basins. In the rift phase (Early Cretaceous), the breakup of the continental crust of the Gondwana continent gave rise to a central graben and rift valleys where lacustrine sediments were deposited. The transitional phase (Aptian) developed under relative tectonic stability, when evaporitic and clastic lacustrine sequences were being deposited. In the drift phase (Albian to Holocene), a regionl homoclinal structure developed, consisting of two distinct sedimentary sequences, a lower clastic-carbonate and an upper clastic. From the Albian to the Holocene Epoch, structures associated to plastic displacement of salt or shale developed in many Brazilian marginal basins. Two phases of major igneous activity occurred: one in the Early Cretaceous associated with the rift phase of the Gondwana continent, and the other in the Tertiary during the migration phase of the South American and African plates.

  11. Studying the Thermal and Structural Evolution of Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Mohammadali

    The focus of this research is to study the thermal and structural evolution of three planetary bodies, Mars, Venus and the asteroid Vesta. The almost uniform spatial distribution of craters on the surfaces of planets makes them excellent candidates to examine the evolution of planets as a whole. By modeling the viscoelastic deformation of craters at the surface and subsurface with the Finite Element Method (FEM), this study investigated the role of lower crustal flow in crater relaxation, and since lower crustal flow is sensitive to the thermal state, it serves as a probe into the thermal evolution of planets. The thermal history of Mars was explored by modeling the evolution of large craters and Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) in the Southern Highlands and Northern Lowlands, respectively. Because of the spatial distribution of craters, this study yielded a thermal map for Mars that is more complete and less biased regionally relative to other studies. The results revealed a higher background heat flux for the Northern Lowlands relative to the Southern Highlands during the most ancient Noachian epoch, which suggests a thermal fingerprint to whatever process that formed the hemispherical crustal dichotomy, the oldest and most prominent geomorphic feature on Mars. Next, the largest crater on the surface of Venus, Mead, also appears to have undergone significant lower crustal flow. Modeling the viscoelastic deformation of Mead puts constraints on the thermal state of our sister planet in the vicinity of the basin. The background heat flux of Venus estimated here is higher than globally average values predicted by previous thermal models. Moreover, this study showed that Venus's crust and mantle seem to be dry relative to those of the Earth. Last, modeling the evolution of two large craters in the south polar region of Vesta (Rheasilvia and Veneneia) showed that the shallow topography and large central peak of these craters are likely the products of a planetary

  12. 62 FR 9455 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-03-03

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the... following topics: --Status of Ongoing Missions --Structure and Evolution of Universe (SEU) Strategic...

  13. 65 FR 54320 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-09-07

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure of Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee...: Structure and Evolution of the Universe in Decadal Survey and Enterprise Strategic Plan Supernova...

  14. Convergent evolution of modularity in metabolic networks through different community structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wanding; Nakhleh, Luay

    2012-09-14

    It has been reported that the modularity of metabolic networks of bacteria is closely related to the variability of their living habitats. However, given the dependency of the modularity score on the community structure, it remains unknown whether organisms achieve certain modularity via similar or different community structures. In this work, we studied the relationship between similarities in modularity scores and similarities in community structures of the metabolic networks of 1021 species. Both similarities are then compared against the genetic distances. We revisited the association between modularity and variability of the microbial living environments and extended the analysis to other aspects of their life style such as temperature and oxygen requirements. We also tested both topological and biological intuition of the community structures identified and investigated the extent of their conservation with respect to the taxonomy. We find that similar modularities are realized by different community structures. We find that such convergent evolution of modularity is closely associated with the number of (distinct) enzymes in the organism's metabolome, a consequence of different life styles of the species. We find that the order of modularity is the same as the order of the number of the enzymes under the classification based on the temperature preference but not on the oxygen requirement. Besides, inspection of modularity-based communities reveals that these communities are graph-theoretically meaningful yet not reflective of specific biological functions. From an evolutionary perspective, we find that the community structures are conserved only at the level of kingdoms. Our results call for more investigation into the interplay between evolution and modularity: how evolution shapes modularity, and how modularity affects evolution (mainly in terms of fitness and evolvability). Further, our results call for exploring new measures of modularity and network

  15. egoSlider: Visual Analysis of Egocentric Network Evolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhong; Pitipornvivat, Naveen; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Sixiao; Huang, Guowei; Qu, Huamin

    2016-01-01

    Ego-network, which represents relationships between a specific individual, i.e., the ego, and people connected to it, i.e., alters, is a critical target to study in social network analysis. Evolutionary patterns of ego-networks along time provide huge insights to many domains such as sociology, anthropology, and psychology. However, the analysis of dynamic ego-networks remains challenging due to its complicated time-varying graph structures, for example: alters come and leave, ties grow stronger and fade away, and alter communities merge and split. Most of the existing dynamic graph visualization techniques mainly focus on topological changes of the entire network, which is not adequate for egocentric analytical tasks. In this paper, we present egoSlider, a visual analysis system for exploring and comparing dynamic ego-networks. egoSlider provides a holistic picture of the data through multiple interactively coordinated views, revealing ego-network evolutionary patterns at three different layers: a macroscopic level for summarizing the entire ego-network data, a mesoscopic level for overviewing specific individuals' ego-network evolutions, and a microscopic level for displaying detailed temporal information of egos and their alters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of egoSlider with a usage scenario with the DBLP publication records. Also, a controlled user study indicates that in general egoSlider outperforms a baseline visualization of dynamic networks for completing egocentric analytical tasks.

  16. Structural Evolution of Silica Gel and Silsesquioxane Using Thermal Curing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Rao, YuanQiao; Sun, Shengtong; Hou, Lei; Wu, Peiyi; Fan, Shaojuan; Ye, Bangjiao

    2016-08-01

    The curing of coatings of two types of siloxane containing materials, silica gel and silsesquioxane, at a modest temperature (<280℃) was studied with in situ heating Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in combination with perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analyses. The result revealed detailed structural evolution of these two different gels. When the silica gel was heated, (Si-O)6 rings appeared from the random Si-O-Si network formed after sol gel reaction, followed by condensation of silanol groups. Upon further heating, the existing (Si-O)4 rings were broken down and converted into (Si-O)6 structures, and finally isolated silanols appeared. The transition from (Si-O)4 rings to (Si-O)6 rings was observed by IR and further confirmed with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). In comparison, during the curing of hybrid silsesquioxane, the condensation of silanols happens immediately upon heating without the rearrangement of Si-O-Si network. Afterwards, the fraction of (Si-O)6 ring structure increased. (Si-O)4 structures exhibited higher stability in hybrid silsesquioxanes. In addition, the amount of silanols in silsesquioxane continued to reduce without the generation of isolated silanol in the end. The different curing behavior of silsesquioxanes from silica gel originates from the organic groups in silsesquioxanes, which lowers the cross-linking density and reduces the rigidity of siloxane network.

  17. Directed Evolution and Structural Characterization of a Simvastatin Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xue; Xie, Xinkai; Pashkov, Inna; Sawaya, Michael R.; Laidman, Janel; Zhang, Wenjun; Cacho, Ralph; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; UCLA

    2010-02-02

    Enzymes from natural product biosynthetic pathways are attractive candidates for creating tailored biocatalysts to produce semisynthetic pharmaceutical compounds. LovD is an acyltransferase that converts the inactive monacolin J acid (MJA) into the cholesterol-lowering lovastatin. LovD can also synthesize the blockbuster drug simvastatin using MJA and a synthetic {alpha}-dimethylbutyryl thioester, albeit with suboptimal properties as a biocatalyst. Here we used directed evolution to improve the properties of LovD toward semisynthesis of simvastatin. Mutants with improved catalytic efficiency, solubility, and thermal stability were obtained, with the best mutant displaying an {approx}11-fold increase in an Escherichia coli-based biocatalytic platform. To understand the structural basis of LovD enzymology, seven X-ray crystal structures were determined, including the parent LovD, an improved mutant G5, and G5 cocrystallized with ligands. Comparisons between the structures reveal that beneficial mutations stabilize the structure of G5 in a more compact conformation that is favorable for catalysis.

  18. Structural evolution of the methane cation in subfemtosecond photodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, T.; Varandas, A. J. C.

    2015-07-01

    An ab initio quantum dynamics study has been performed to explore the structural rearrangement of ground state CH 4+ in subfemtosecond resolved photodynamics. The method utilizes time-dependent wave-packet propagation on the X ˜ 2 T 2 electronic manifold of the title cation in full dimensionality, including nonadiabatic coupling of the three electronic sheets. Good agreement is obtained with recent experiments [Baker et al., Science 312, 424 (2006)] which use high-order harmonic generation to probe the attosecond proton dynamics. The novel results provide direct theoretical support of the observations while unravelling the underlying details. With the geometrical changes obtained by calculating the expectation values of the nuclear coordinates as a function of time, the structural evolution is predicted to begin through activation of the totally symmetric a1 and doubly degenerate e modes. While the former retains the original Td symmetry of the cation, the Jahn-Teller active e mode conducts it to a D2d structure. At ˜1.85 fs, the intermediate D2d structure is further predicted to rearrange to local C2v minimum geometry via Jahn-Teller active bending vibrations of t2 symmetry.

  19. The evolution of chloroplast genome structure in ferns.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Paul G; Roper, Jessie M; Duffy, Aaron M

    2010-09-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) is a rich source of phylogenetic and other comparative data in plants. Most land plants possess a plastome of similar structure. However, in a major group of plants, the ferns, a unique plastome structure has evolved. The gene order in ferns has been explained by a series of genomic inversions relative to the plastome organization of seed plants. Here, we examine for the first time the structure of the plastome across fern phylogeny. We used a PCR-based strategy to map and partially sequence plastomes. We found that a pair of partially overlapping inversions in the region of the inverted repeat occurred in the common ancestor of most ferns. However, the ancestral (seed plant) structure is still found in early diverging branches leading to the osmundoid and filmy fern lineages. We found that a second pair of overlapping inversions occurred on a branch leading to the core leptosporangiates. We also found that the unique placement of the gene matK in ferns (lacking a flanking intron) is not a result of a large-scale inversion, as previously thought. This is because the intron loss maps to an earlier point on the phylogeny than the nearby inversion. We speculate on why inversions may occur in pairs and what this may mean for the dynamics of plastome evolution.

  20. Logistic map analysis of biomolecular network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. R.; Isambert, H.

    2011-11-01

    We study the expansion of biomolecular networks from the view point of first evolutionary principles based on the duplication and divergence of ancestral genes. The expansion of gene families and subnetworks is analyzed in terms of logistic map compositions, which capture the varying functional constraints of individual genes in the course of evolution. Using a mean-field approach, we then demonstrate the existence of spontaneous growth-rate variations between gene families and discuss the relevance of such heterogeneous expansions for the emergent properties of actual biomolecular networks.

  1. Understanding the Global Structure and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made during the first six months of the second year of the NASA Living with a Star program contract Understanding the global structure and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period November 18, 2003 - May 17,2004. Under this contract SAIC has conducted numerical and data analysis related to fundamental issues concerning the origin, intrinsic properties, global structure, and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind. During this working period we have focused on a quantitative assessment of 5 flux rope fitting techniques. In the following sections we summarize the main aspects of this work and our proposed investigation plan for the next reporting period. Thus far, our investigation has resulted in 6 refereed scientific publications and we have presented the results at a number of scientific meetings and workshops.

  2. Structural and Electronic Evolution from SiC Sheet to Silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Wu, M. S.; Ouyang, C. Y.; Xu, B.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of the structural and electronic properties from SiC sheet to silicene is studied by using first-principles density functional theory. It is found that the planar configurations of the Si-C monolayer systems are basically kept except for the increase of the buckling of the planar structure when the substitution ratio of Si increases. Band gaps of the Si-C monolayer system decrease gradually when the substitution ratio of Si atoms ranges from 0% to 100%. The energy and type of the band gaps are closely related with the substitution ratio of Si atoms and the Si-C order. Further analysis of density of states reveals the orbital contribution of Si and C atoms near the Fermi level. The discussion of the electronic evolution from SiC sheet to silicene would widen the application of the Si-C monolayer systems in the optoelectronic field in the future nanotechnology.

  3. Rheological structure in Mars and its time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Katayama, I.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is one of the terrestrial planets which are composed of rock and metal such as the Earth. There is no water, no life, and no plate tectonics on Mars, suggesting that Mars and Earth followed different evolutionary paths. Rheological structure, which indicates the deformation behavior and the strength of planetary interior, plays an important role in the evolution of planets. The rheological behavior of planetary interiors is strongly sensitive to temperature, which may produce strong rheological layering. Rheological structure of Mars in past must be different from the current rheological structure. First, the evolutions of temperature profiles in Mars are inferred from the surface heat flow and the heat conduction equation. The surface heat flow of Mars every 1 billion years was calculated from present abundances of the radioactive isotopes (235U, 235U, 232Th, and 40K) and their half-lives (Hahn et al 2011). Based on the temperature profile, we calculate the rheological structure of Mars every 1 billion years using flow-law of plagioclase and olivine. Calculated rheological structure shows that the brittle-ductile transition of present Mars, which is transition of deformation behavior from brittle failure to viscous flow, is deeper as compared with that of past Mars, suggesting that current elastic thickness also becomes thicker than that of past Mars. Under water-saturated conditions, the rheological structure which simulates the northern lowlands shows the strength contrast between the crust and mantle, indicating that the decoupling might occur at the Moho from 4 Ga to present day. Under dry conditions, lithosphere of northern lowlands has no strength contrast at the Moho, implying that crust and mantle might be coupled from 3 Ga to present day. Viscosity contrast between the surface and planetary interior is key for the mantle convection style (Moresi and Solomatov 1995), and the calculated viscosity contrast at present Mars is ~10-5 (Pa), suggesting that

  4. Investigation impact of stressed state conditions and thermomechanical parameters on the texture and structure evolution in 1565ph aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashin, V. V.; Aryshensky, E. V.; Kawalla, R. F.; Serebryany, V. N.; Rushchits, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to study of the impact stress condition and thermomechanical treatment parameters on the structure and texture evolution of new 1565 ph aluminum alloy. For that purposes, we use test on Gleeble equipment, FM calculation, optical microscopy and x ray diffraction texture analysis. The dependency between the deformation texture components development and strain rate value was established. Differences in the texture evolution at uniaxial compression stress and plain strain mode were revealed.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure evolutions of Cu-Zr metallic glasses under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Lin; Tian, Zean; Xiao, Shifang; Deng, Huiqiu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng; Hu, Wangyu

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structural evolution of Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses under irradiation. The largest standard cluster analysis (LSCA) method was used to quantify the microstructure within the collision cascade regions. It is found that the majority of clusters within the collision cascade regions are full and defective icosahedrons. Not only the smaller structures (common neighbor subcluster) but also primary clusters greatly changed during the collision cascades; while most of these radiation damages self-recover quickly in the following quench states. These findings indicate the Cu-Zr metallic glasses have excellent irradiation-resistance properties.

  6. Nanoscale structural evolution of electrically driven insulator to metal transition in vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Eugene Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman; Stone, Greg; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Paik, Hanjong; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Cai, Zhonghou; Wen, Haidan; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2013-12-23

    The structural evolution of tensile strained vanadium dioxide thin films was examined across the electrically driven insulator-to-metal transition by nanoscale hard X-ray diffraction. A metallic filament with rutile (R) structure was found to be the dominant conduction pathway for an electrically driven transition, while the majority of the channel area remained in the monoclinic M1 phase. The filament dimensions were estimated using simultaneous electrical probing and nanoscale X-ray diffraction. Analysis revealed that the width of the conducting channel can be tuned externally using resistive loads in series, enabling the M1/R phase ratio in the phase coexistence regime to be tuned.

  7. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  8. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  9. Transverse zones controlling the structural evolution of the Zipaquira Anticline (Eastern Cordillera, Colombia): Regional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Helbert; Jiménez, Giovanny

    2016-08-01

    We report paleomagnetic, magnetic fabric and structural results from 21 sites collected in Cretaceous marine mudstones and Paleogene continental sandstones from the limbs, hinge and transverse zones of the Zipaquira Anticline (ZA). The ZA is an asymmetrical fold with one limb completely overturned by processes like gravity and salt tectonics, and marked by several axis curvatures. The ZA is controlled by at least two (2) transverse zones known as the Neusa and Zipaquira Transverse Zones (NTZ and ZTZ, respectively). Magnetic mineralogy methods were applied at different sites and the main carriers of the magnetic properties are paramagnetic components with some sites being controlled by hematite and magnetite. Magnetic fabric analysis shows rigid-body rotation for the back-limb in the ZA, while the forelimb is subjected to internal deformation. Structural and paleomagnetic data shows the influence of the NTZ and ZTZ in the evolution of the different structures like the ZA and the Zipaquira, Carupa, Rio Guandoque, Las Margaritas and Neusa faults, controlling several factors as vergence, extension, fold axis curvature and stratigraphic detatchment. Clockwise rotations unraveled a block segmentation following a discontinuos model caused by transverse zones and one site reported a counter clockwise rotation associated with a left-lateral strike slip component for transverse faults (e.g. the Neusa Fault). We propose that diverse transverse zones have been active since Paleogene times, playing an important role in the tectonic evolution of the Cundinamarca sub-basin and controlling the structural evolution of folds and faults with block segmentation and rotations.

  10. The spatial evolution of stellar structures in the LMC/SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Nate; Gieles, Mark; Ercolano, Barbara; Gutermuth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of various stellar populations within the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We use optically selected stellar samples with mean ages between ~9 and ~1000 Myr, and existing stellar cluster catalogues to investigate how stellar structures form and evolve within the LMC/SMC. We use two statistical techniques to study the evolution of structure within these galaxies, the Q-parameter and the two-point correlation function (TPCF). In both galaxies we find the stars are born with a high degree of substructure (i.e. are highly fractal) and that the stellar distribution approaches that of the “background” population on timescales similar to the crossing times of the galaxy (~ 80 Myr & ~ 150 Myr for the SMC/LMC respectively). By comparing our observations to simple models of structural evolution we find that “popping star clusters” do not significantly influence structural evolution in these galaxies. Instead we argue that general galactic dynamics are the main drivers, and that substructure will be erased in approximately the crossing time, regardless of spatial scale, from small clusters to whole galaxies. This can explain why many young Galactic clusters have high degrees of substructure, while others are smooth and centrally concentrated. We conclude with a general discussion on cluster “infant mortality”, in an attempt to clarify the time/spatial scales involved.

  11. Non-Dissipative Structural Evolutions in Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouragha, Mehdi; Wan, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The structure of the contact network in granular assemblies can evolve due to either dissipative mechanisms such as sliding at contact points, or non-dissipative mechanisms through the phenomenon of contact gain and loss. Being associated with negligible deformations, non-dissipative mechanisms is actually active even in the small strain range of 10-3, especially in the case of densely packed assemblies. Hence, from a constitutive modelling point of view, it is crucial to be able to estimate such non-dissipative evolutions since both elastic and plastic properties of granular assemblies highly depend on contact network characteristics. The current study proposes an analytical scheme that allows us to estimate the non-dissipative contact gain/loss regime in terms of directional changes in the average contact force. The probability distribution of contact forces is used to compute the number of lost contact for each direction. Similarly, the number of newly formed contacts is estimated by considering the probability distribution of the gap between neighbouring particles. Based on the directional contact gain/loss computed, the changes in coordination number and fabric anisotropy can be found which, together with statistical treatments of Love-Weber stress expression, form a complete system of equations describing the evolution of other controlling microvariables. Finally, the results of the calculations have been compared with DEM simulations which verify the accuracy of the proposed scheme.

  12. Green chemistry and the evolution of flow analysis. A review.

    PubMed

    Melchert, Wanessa R; Reis, Boaventura F; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2012-02-10

    Flow analysis has achieved its majority as a well-established tool to solve analytical problems. Evolution of flow-based approaches has been analyzed by diverse points of view, including historical aspects, the commutation concept and the impact on analytical methodologies. In this overview, the evolution of flow analysis towards green analytical chemistry is demonstrated by comparing classical procedures implemented with different flow approaches. The potential to minimize reagent consumption and waste generation and the ability to implement processes unreliable in batch to replace toxic chemicals are also emphasized. Successful applications of greener approaches in flow analysis are also discussed, focusing on the last 10 years.

  13. InterEvol database: exploring the structure and evolution of protein complex interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Guilhem; Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Capturing how the structures of interacting partners evolved at their binding interfaces is a fundamental issue for understanding interactomes evolution. In that scope, the InterEvol database was designed for exploring 3D structures of homologous interfaces of protein complexes. For every chain forming a complex in the protein data bank (PDB), close and remote structural interologs were identified providing essential snapshots for studying interfaces evolution. The database provides tools to retrieve and visualize these structures. In addition, pre-computed multiple sequence alignments of most likely interologs retrieved from a wide range of species can be downloaded to enrich the analysis. The database can be queried either directly by pdb code or keyword but also from the sequence of one or two partners. Interologs multiple sequence alignments can also be recomputed online with tailored parameters using the InterEvolAlign facility. Last, an InterEvol PyMol plugin was developed to improve interactive exploration of structures versus sequence alignments at the interfaces of complexes. Based on a series of automatic methods to extract structural and sequence data, the database will be monthly updated. Structures coordinates and sequence alignments can be queried and downloaded from the InterEvol web interface at http://biodev.cea.fr/interevol/. PMID:22053089

  14. Network analysis of metabolic enzyme evolution in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Light, Sara; Kraulis, Per

    2004-01-01

    Background The two most common models for the evolution of metabolism are the patchwork evolution model, where enzymes are thought to diverge from broad to narrow substrate specificity, and the retrograde evolution model, according to which enzymes evolve in response to substrate depletion. Analysis of the distribution of homologous enzyme pairs in the metabolic network can shed light on the respective importance of the two models. We here investigate the evolution of the metabolism in E. coli viewed as a single network using EcoCyc. Results Sequence comparison between all enzyme pairs was performed and the minimal path length (MPL) between all enzyme pairs was determined. We find a strong over-representation of homologous enzymes at MPL 1. We show that the functionally similar and functionally undetermined enzyme pairs are responsible for most of the over-representation of homologous enzyme pairs at MPL 1. Conclusions The retrograde evolution model predicts that homologous enzymes pairs are at short metabolic distances from each other. In general agreement with previous studies we find that homologous enzymes occur close to each other in the network more often than expected by chance, which lends some support to the retrograde evolution model. However, we show that the homologous enzyme pairs which may have evolved through retrograde evolution, namely the pairs that are functionally dissimilar, show a weaker over-representation at MPL 1 than the functionally similar enzyme pairs. Our study indicates that, while the retrograde evolution model may have played a small part, the patchwork evolution model is the predominant process of metabolic enzyme evolution. PMID:15113413

  15. Thermal and Structural Evolution of a Partially Differentiated Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2012-10-01

    Titan’s moment of inertia (C/MR2) has been measured by Cassini to be 0.34, indicating either partial differentiation, or full differentiation with a low-density (hydrated) silicate core. Fully differentiated models have been constructed [Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010], but require specific geochemical assumptions (e.g., rapid accretion, minimal core dehydration). In contrast, the alternative, partially differentiated models have not yet been fully vetted. Here we investigate the thermal stability of such partially differentiated internal structures by evaluating whether complete differentiation can be avoided. Our model assumes an initial three-layer internal structure consisting of a pure ice layer, mixed ice-rock layer, and silicate core, and calculates the temperature of each layer following the numerical approach in Bland et al. (2008, 2009). The model allows melting in the pure ice and mixed layer, and dehydration of the initially hydrated silicate core (leading to densification and absorption of latent heat). Melting of the mixed layer liberates silicate material, which is assumed to sink to the top of the silicate layer over time scales short relative to simulation time scales (in reality some may mx back into the convecting mixed ice-rock layer). Simulations so far indicate that melting of Titan’s pure ice shell is common early in Solar System history, and that melting frequently extends into Titan’s nominal mixed ice-rock layer. Such melting leads to irreversible unmixing of some of the mixed ice-rock layer. Nearly complete dehydration of the silicate core occurs when condritic K is retained in the rock component. The structural evolution decreases Titan’s initial moment of inertia; however, long-lived radiogenic species are generally incapable of completely melting and separating Titan’s mixed layer. To date, thermally stable structural models with C/MR2 as large as 0.33 have been achieved. We continue to investigate how realistic ocean and

  16. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R.; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B.; Erwin, Patrick M.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J.; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W.; Thacker, Robert W.; Montoya, Jose M.; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host–microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  17. Structural evolution of a two-component organogel.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohit; Tan, Grace; Agarwal, Vivek; Fritz, Gerhard; Maskos, Karol; Bose, Arijit; John, Vijay; McPherson, Gary

    2004-08-31

    Dry reverse micelles of AOT in isooctane spontaneously undergo a microstructural transition to an organogel upon the addition of a phenolic dopant, p-chlorophenol. This microstructural evolution has been studied through a combination of light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), NMR, and rheology. Several equilibrium stages between the system of dry reverse micelles of AOT and a 1:1 AOT/p-chlorophenol (molar ratio) gel in isooctane have been examined. To achieve this, p-chlorophenol is added progressively to the dilute solutions of AOT in isooctane, and this concentration series is then analyzed. The dry micelles of AOT in isooctane do not undergo any detectable structural change up to a certain p-chlorophenol concentration. Upon a very small increment in the concentration of p-chlorophenol beyond this "threshold" concentration, large strandlike aggregates are observed which then evolve to the three-dimensional gel network.

  18. Microscopic derivation of IBM and structural evolution in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke

    2011-05-06

    A Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model (IBM) is derived based on the mean-field calculations with nuclear energy density functionals (EDFs). The multi-nucleon dynamics of the surface deformation is simulated in terms of the boson degrees of freedom. The interaction strengths of the IBM Hamiltonian are determined by mapping the potential energy surfaces (PESs) of a given EDF with quadrupole degrees of freedom onto the corresponding PES of IBM. A fermion-to-boson mapping for a rotational nucleus is discussed in terms of the rotational response, which reflects a specific time-dependent feature. Ground-state correlation energy is evaluated as a signature of structural evolution. Some examples resulting from the present spectroscopic calculations are shown for neutron-rich Pt, Os and W isotopes including exotic ones.

  19. Constraints on Composition, Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Gianluca; Bonadiman, Costanza; Aulbach, Sonja; Schutt, Derek

    2015-05-01

    The idea for this special issue was triggered at the Goldschmidt Conference held in Florence (August 25-30, 2013), where we convened a session titled "Integrated Geophysical-Geochemical Constraints on Composition and Structure of the Lithosphere". The invitation to contribute was extended not only to the session participants but also to a wider spectrum of colleagues working on related topics. Consequently, a diverse group of Earth scientists encompassing geophysicists, geodynamicists, geochemists and petrologists contributed to this Volume, providing a comprehensive overview on the nature and evolution of lithospheric mantle by combining studies that exploit different types of data and interpretative approaches. The integration of geochemical and geodynamic datasets and their interpretation represents the state of the art in our knowledge of the lithosphere and beyond, and could serve as a blueprint for future strategies in concept and methodology to advance our knowledge of this and other terrestrial reservoirs.

  20. Evolution of the Human Nervous System Function, Structure, and Development.

    PubMed

    Sousa, André M M; Meyer, Kyle A; Santpere, Gabriel; Gulden, Forrest O; Sestan, Nenad

    2017-07-13

    The nervous system-in particular, the brain and its cognitive abilities-is among humans' most distinctive and impressive attributes. How the nervous system has changed in the human lineage and how it differs from that of closely related primates is not well understood. Here, we consider recent comparative analyses of extant species that are uncovering new evidence for evolutionary changes in the size and the number of neurons in the human nervous system, as well as the cellular and molecular reorganization of its neural circuits. We also discuss the developmental mechanisms and underlying genetic and molecular changes that generate these structural and functional differences. As relevant new information and tools materialize at an unprecedented pace, the field is now ripe for systematic and functionally relevant studies of the development and evolution of human nervous system specializations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolution of surface structure in laser-preheated perturbed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2017-02-01

    We report an experimental and computational study investigating the effects of laser preheat on the hydrodynamic behavior of a material layer. In particular, we find that perturbation of the surface of the layer results in a complex interaction, in which the bulk of the layer develops density, pressure, and temperature structure and in which the surface experiences instability-like behavior, including mode coupling. A uniform one-temperature preheat model is used to reproduce the experimentally observed behavior, and we find that this model can be used to capture the evolution of the layer, while also providing evidence of complexities in the preheat behavior. This result has important consequences for inertially confined fusion plasmas, which can be difficult to diagnose in detail, as well as for laser hydrodynamics experiments, which generally depend on assumptions about initial conditions in order to interpret their results.

  2. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  3. Structure Evolution of Metal Nanoparticles in Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Beien

    Metal nanoparticles have drawn extensive attentions in materials science due to their widespread applications in electronics, engineering and catalysis. A very fundamental question is their structure evolution and surface segregation. Many recent observations have shown that reactive gases or supports may have strong effects on the morphology change and surface segregation. However, the effect of water--the most common solvent and environment--has not received enough attention. Here, we will give two examples to show water adsorption could induce the morphology change and strong surface segregation tendencies for the metal nanoparticles. This finding not only prompts us to re-examine the potential effects of water on metal nanoparticles, but would be also very helpful as a guide for the further theoretical and experimental studies in this field.

  4. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B; Erwin, Patrick M; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W; Thacker, Robert W; Montoya, Jose M; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-06-16

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host-microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions.

  5. SPECS: The Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The idea for the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) was investigated through NASA Vision Missions Program. In the course of this study, a compelling need for high spatial-resolution far-infrared/submillimeter observations with high angular resolution (50 milliarcseconds) was identified. In order to achieve these scientific goals, a kilometer-baseline FIR/SMM Michelson stellar interferometer is required, operating in the 40-640 micron range with fully cryogenically cooled optics and photon-limited detectors. There are significant technological challenges to developing this mission, including controllable tethered flight, detector equipment, and large cryogenic mechanisms. We present here a concept for SPECS and discuss some of the relevant technical aspects of the mission.

  6. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS < 1 and gamma-distributed rates across sites. Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model. PMID:22171550

  7. Structure and Evolution of Internally Heated Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-11-01

    The transit radii of many close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," are systematically larger than those expected from models considering only cooling from an initial high-entropy state. Though these planets receive strong irradiation, with equilibrium temperatures of 1000-2500 Kelvin, the absorption of stellar incident flux in the upper atmosphere alone cannot explain these anomalous radii. More promising mechanisms involve irradiation-driven meteorological activity, which penetrates much deeper into the planet than direct stellar heating. This circulation can lead to large-scale mixing and downward transport of kinetic energy, both processes whereby a fraction of the stellar incident power is transported downwards to the interior of the planet. Here we consider how deposition of heat at different pressure levels or structural locations within a planet affects the resulting evolution. To do so, we run global gas giant evolutionary models with with the stellar structure code MESA including additional energy dissipation. We find that relatively shallow atmospheric heating alone can explain the transit radii of the hot Jupiter sample, but heating in the convective zone is an order of magnitude more efficient regardless of exact location. Additionally, a small difference in atmospheric heating location can have a significant effect on radius evolution, especially near the radiative-convective boundary. The most efficient location to heat the planet is at the radiative-convective boundary or deeper. We expect that shear instabilities at this interface may naturally explain energy dissipation at the radiative-convective boundary, which typically lies at a pressure of ~1 kilobar after 5 Gyr for a planet with the mass and incident stellar flux of HD 209458b. Hence, atmospheric processes are most efficient at explaining the bloated radii of hot Jupiters if they can transport incident stellar power downwards to the top of the inner convective zone.

  8. The Structure and Evolution of Cold Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben

    2011-02-01

    In the standard cosmological model a mysterious cold dark matter (CDM) component dominates the formation of structures. Numerical studies of the f ormation of CDM halos have produced several robust results that allow unique tests of the hierarchical clustering paradigm. Universal properties of halos, including their mass profiles and substructure properties are roughly consistent with observational data from the scales of dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. Resolving the fine grained structure of halos has enabled us to make predictions for ongoing and planned direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. While simulations of pure CDM halos are now very accurate and in good agreement (recently claimed discrepancies are addressed in detail in this review), we are still unable to make robust, quantitative predictions about galaxy formation and about how the dark matter distribution changes in the process. Whilst discrepancies between observations and simulations have been the subject of much debate in the literature, galaxy formation and evolution needs to be understood in more detail in order to fully test the CDM paradigm. Whatever the true nature of the dark matter particle is, its clustering properties must not be too different from a cold neutralino like particle to maintain all the successes of the model in matching large scale structure data and the global properties of halos which are mostly in good agreement with observations.

  9. Structural evolution of turbostratic carbon: Implications in H2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruz, Priyanka; Banerjee, Seemita; Pandey, M.; Sudarsan, V.; Sastry, P. U.; Kshirsagar, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Structural evolution of turbostratic carbon samples as a function of annealing temperature has been investigated in detail using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. From these studies, it is established that, samples heated at lower temperatures (700 °C and 800 °C) consist carbon particles with rough surfaces forming structure of surface fractal in nature. Whereas the sample heated at higher temperature (900 °C) consists of larger clusters with nearly smooth surface as well as smaller size particles forming dense mass fractal structure. For this sample, solid state NMR and Raman Spectroscopic studies indicate an increased extent of overlapping of 2pz orbital of carbon atoms due to improved long range ordering and clustering. Hydrogen adsorption studies further substantiated that energetically more homogeneous surface exists for particles of 900 °C heated sample as compared to those of 700 °C and 800 °C heated samples. A highest hydrogen storage capacity of 0.152 H/M has been observed at 123 K and 45 bar pressure for the sample heated at 900 °C.

  10. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, N.; Williams, S.; Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Bower, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate-mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ~22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ~1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year-1, indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps.

  11. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Flament, N.; Williams, S.; Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Bower, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate–mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ∼22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ∼1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year−1, indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps. PMID:28098137

  12. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Flament, N; Williams, S; Müller, R D; Gurnis, M; Bower, D J

    2017-01-18

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate-mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ∼22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ∼1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year(-1), indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps.

  13. The influence of halo evolution on galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon

    2015-03-01

    If Einstein-Newton gravity holds on galactic and larger scales, then current observations demonstrate that the stars and interstellar gas of a typical bright galaxy account for only a few percent of its total nonlinear mass. Dark matter makes up the rest and cannot be faint stars or any other baryonic form because it was already present and decoupled from the radiation plasma at z = 1000, long before any nonlinear object formed. The weak gravito-sonic waves so precisely measured by CMB observations are detected again at z = 4 as order unity fluctuations in intergalactic matter. These subsequently collapse to form today's galaxy/halo systems, whose mean mass profiles can be accurately determined through gravitational lensing. High-resolution simulations link the observed dark matter structures seen at all these epochs, demonstrating that they are consistent and providing detailed predictions for all aspects of halo structure and growth. Requiring consistency with the abundance and clustering of real galaxies strongly constrains the galaxy-halo relation, both today and at high redshift. This results in detailed predictions for galaxy assembly histories and for the gravitational arena in which galaxies live. Dark halos are not expected to be passive or symmetric but to have a rich and continually evolving structure which will drive evolution in the central galaxy over its full life, exciting warps, spiral patterns and tidal arms, thickening disks, producing rings, bars and bulges. Their growth is closely related to the provision of new gas for galaxy building.

  14. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  15. Evolution of Structural Empowerment: Moving From Shared to Professional Governance.

    PubMed

    Clavelle, Joanne T; Porter O'Grady, Tim; Weston, Marla J; Verran, Joyce A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the maturation of the concept of shared governance to professional governance as a framework for structural empowerment. An analysis of the literature and concept clarification of structural empowerment and shared governance demonstrate that the concept and attributes of shared governance have evolved toward professional governance. A comprehensive, deductive literature review and concept clarification of structural empowerment, shared governance, and related constructs was completed. The concept and practice of shared governance has matured to a concept of professional governance with the attributes of accountability, professional obligation, collateral relationships, and effective decision-making.

  16. Program for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    November 1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlineer Structural Analysis", Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell...1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlinear Structural Analysis," Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell

  17. Halo formation and evolution: unifying physical properties with structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    The assembly of matter in the universe proliferates a variety of structures with diverse properties. For example, massive halos of clusters of galaxies have temperatures often an order of magnitude or more higher than the individual galaxy halos within the cluster, or the temperatures of isolated galaxy halos. Giant spiral galaxies contain large quantities of both dark matter and hot gas while other structures like globular clusters appear to have little or no dark matter or gas. Still others, like the dwarf spheroidal galaxies have low gravity and little hot gas, but ironically contain some of the largest fractions of dark matter in the universe. Star forming rates (SFRs) also vary: compare for example the SFRs of giant elliptical galaxies, globular clusters, spiral and starburst galaxies. Furthermore there is evidence that the various structure types have existed over a large fraction of cosmic history. How can this array of variation in properties be reconciled with galaxy halo formation and evolution?We propose a model of halo formation [1] and evolution [2] that is consistent with both primordial nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the isotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The model uses two simple parameters, the total mass and size of a structure, to (1) explain why galaxies have the fractions of dark matter that they do (including why dwarf spheroidals are so dark matter dominated despite their weak gravity), (2) enable an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, (3) explain how fully formed massive galaxies can occur so early in cosmic history, (4) understand the connection between spiral and elliptical galaxies (5) unify the nature of globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges and (6) predict the temperatures of hot gas halos and understand how cool galaxy halos can remain stable in the hot environments of cluster-galaxy halos.[1] Ernest, A. D., 2012, in Prof. Ion Cotaescu (Ed) Advances in Quantum Theory, pp

  18. Evolution of aircraft/aerospace structures and materials symposium, Dayton, OH, April 24, 25, 1985, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Various papers on the evolution of aircraft and aerospace structures and materials are presented. The topics addressed include: XB-70 structures and materials advances, structural evolution from B-58 to F-16, advanced composites in construction of the Beech Starship, structural and material considerations for advanced fighters, the evolution of reciprocating engines at Lycoming, aircraft design from the myth of make-do to Mach 3, and the Wright Brothers' experience in the evolution of aircraft design, structures and materials. Also considered are: evolution of the turbofan aircraft engine, X-15 high-temperature advanced structure, X-20 structures overview, ASSET program for technology development, Shuttle Orbiter airframe, airframe design to achieve minimum cost, superplastically formed-diffusion bonded titanium technology transition case study, transition of advanced materials and structures in single crystal blades, and composites technology transfer and transition.

  19. Structural evolution of Fe{sub 80}C{sub 20} alloy with alloying times

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Yong-Goo; Paek, Mun-Cheol; Greneche, J.M.; Yang, Dong-Seok; Yu, Seong-Cho

    2005-05-15

    The structural evolution of mechanically alloyed Fe-C alloys was studied as a function of alloying times. The effect of alloying time on local structural changes of Fe-C has been investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectrometry, extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern from 24 h alloyed Fe-C powder indicates at least the mixture of bcc-Fe and Fe{sub 3}C phases. Moessbauer spectra analysis reveals that bcc-Fe decreases to the detriment of Fe{sub 3}C phase with increasing alloying time, while both carbon-containing bcc-Fe and amorphouslike phase assigned to Fe located in grain boundaries (estimated at two atomic layers) remain alloying time independent. The variation of Fe{sub 3}C phase content is in a good agreement with that observed by EXAFS analysis.

  20. Lithosphere structure and subsidence evolution of the conjugate S-African and Argentine margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Ingo; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Franke, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    The bathymetric evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margins is a matter of debate. Though it is commonly accepted that passive margins experience thermal subsidence as a result of lithospheric cooling as well as load induced subsidence in response to sediment deposition it is disputed if the South Atlantic passive margins were affected by additional processes affecting the subsidence history after continental breakup. We present a subsidence analysis along the SW African margin and offshore Argentina and restore paleobathymetries to assess the subsidence evolution of the margin. These results are discussed with respect to mechanisms behind margin evolution. Therefore, we use available information about the lithosphere-scale present-day structural configuration of these margins as a starting point for the subsidence analysis. A multi 1D backward modelling method is applied to separate individual subsidence components such as the thermal- as well as the load induced subsidence and to restore paleobathymetries for the conjugate margins. The comparison of the restored paleobathymetries shows that the conjugate margins evolve differently: Continuous subsidence is obtained offshore Argentina whereas the subsidence history of the SW African margin is interrupted by phases of uplift. This differing results for both margins correlate also with different structural configurations of the subcrustal mantle. In the light of these results we discuss possible implications for uplift mechanisms.

  1. Thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Charlotte A.L.; Kavanagh, Christopher M.; Knight, Kevin S.; Kockelmann, Winfried; Morrison, Finlay D.; Lightfoot, Philip

    2015-10-15

    The thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the prototypical orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO{sub 3} has been studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction in the temperature range 25analysis, combined with an analysis in terms of symmetry-adapted modes, allows key aspects of the thermal behavior to be understood. In particular, the largest-amplitude symmetry modes (viz. in-phase and out-of-phase octahedral tilts, and A-site cation displacements) are shown to display relatively ‘normal’ behavior, increasing with decreasing temperature, which contrasts with the anomalous behavior previously shown by the derivative Bi{sub 0.5}La{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3}. However, an unexpected behavior is seen in the nature of the intra-octahedral distortion, which is used to rationalize the unique occurrence of a temperature dependent crossover of the a and c unit cell metrics in this compound. - Graphical abstract: The unusual thermal evolution of lattice metrics in the perovskite LaFeO{sub 3} is rationalized from a detailed powder neutron diffraction study. - Highlights: • Crystal structure of the perovskite LaFeO{sub 3} studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction. • Unusual thermal evolution of lattice metrics rationalized. • Contrasting behavior to Bi-doped LaFeO{sub 3}. • Octahedral distortion/tilt parameters explain unusual a and c lattice parameter behavior.

  2. 81 FR 3927 - Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury Market Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-01-22

    ... January 22, 2016 Part III Department of the Treasury Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the... / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury...) Further study of the evolution of the U.S. Treasury market and the implications for market structure and...

  3. 81 FR 15607 - Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury Market Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-03-23

    ... Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury Market Structure AGENCY: Office of the...) published in the Federal Register a request for information (RFI) on the Evolution of the Treasury Market... January 22, 2016, Treasury published in the Federal Register a request for information on the Evolution of...

  4. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  5. Structure and Evolution of Kuiper Belt Objects and Dwarf Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Prialnik, D.; Stern, S. A.; Coradini, A.

    Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) accreted from a mélange of volatile ices, carbonaceous matter, and rock of mixed interstellar and solar nebular provenance. The transneptunian region, where this accretion took place, was likely more radially compact than today. This and the influence of gas drag during the solar nebula epoch argue for more rapid KBO accretion than usually considered. Early evolution of KBOs was largely the result of heating due to radioactive decay, the most important potential source being 26Al, whereas long-term evolution of large bodies is controlled by the decay of U, Th, and 40K. Several studies are reviewed dealing with the evolution of KBO models, calculated by means of one-dimensional numerical codes that solve the heat and mass balance equations. It is shown that, depending on parameters (principally rock content and porous conductivity), KBO interiors may have reached relatively high temperatures. The models suggest that KBOs likely lost ices of very volatile species during early evolution, whereas ices of less-volatile species should be retained in cold, less-altered subsurface layers. Initially amorphous ice may have crystallized in KBO interiors, releasing volatiles trapped in the amorphous ice, and some objects may have lost part of these volatiles as well. Generally, the outer layers are far less affected by internal evolution than the inner part, which in the absence of other effects (such as collisions) predicts a stratified composition and altered porosity distribution. Kuiper belt objects are thus unlikely to be "the most pristine objects in the solar system," but they do contain key information as to how the early solar system accreted and dynamically evolved. For large (dwarf planet) KBOs, long-term radiogenic heating alone may lead to differentiated structures -- rock cores, ice mantles, volatile-ice-rich "crusts," and even oceans. Persistence of oceans and (potential) volcanism to the present day depends strongly on body size and

  6. Dynamic analysis of evolutive conservative systems. Discussion of eigenmode crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morand, H. J. P.

    1984-01-01

    After an analysis of the close connection between the symmetries of a dynamical system and the multiplicity of its vibrational natural frequencies, it is proved by variational arguments that for a system of invariable symmetry the eigenfrequencies associated with the eigenmodes of a given symmetry type do not cross, in general, during the evolution of this system. The theory is implemented by some numerical calculations applied to the analysis of the evolution of the axisymmetric hydroelastic modes of the Ariane launch vehicle during burning of the first stage.

  7. Review: Structure, function and evolution of GnIH.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi

    2017-07-25

    Neuropeptides that possess the Arg-Phe-NH2 motif at their C-termini (i.e., RFamide peptides) have been characterized in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, RFamide peptides make a family and consist of the groups of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), kisspeptin (kiss1 and kiss2), and pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa). It now appears that these vertebrate RFamide peptides exert important neuroendocrine, behavioral, sensory, and autonomic functions. In 2000, GnIH was discovered as a novel hypothalamic RFamide peptide inhibiting gonadotropin release in quail. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that GnIH acts on the brain and pituitary to modulate reproductive physiology and behavior across vertebrates. To clarify the origin and evolution of GnIH, the existence of GnIH was investigated in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates, and basal chordates, such as tunicates and cephalochordates (represented by amphioxus). This review first summarizes the structure and function of GnIH and other RFamide peptides, in particular NPFF having a similar C-terminal structure of GnIH, in vertebrates. Then, this review describes the evolutionary origin of GnIH based on the studies in agnathans and basal chordates. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Evolution and Structural Analyses of Glossina morsitans (Diptera; Glossinidae) Tetraspanins.

    PubMed

    Murungi, Edwin K; Kariithi, Henry M; Adunga, Vincent; Obonyo, Meshack; Christoffels, Alan

    2014-11-12

    Tetraspanins are important conserved integral membrane proteins expressed in many organisms. Although there is limited knowledge about the full repertoire, evolution and structural characteristics of individual members in various organisms, data obtained so far show that tetraspanins play major roles in membrane biology, visual processing, memory, olfactory signal processing, and mechanosensory antennal inputs. Thus, these proteins are potential targets for control of insect pests. Here, we report that the genome of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans (Diptera: Glossinidae) encodes at least seventeen tetraspanins (GmTsps), all containing the signature features found in the tetraspanin superfamily members. Whereas six of the GmTsps have been previously reported, eleven could be classified as novel because their amino acid sequences do not map to characterized tetraspanins in the available protein data bases. We present a model of the GmTsps by using GmTsp42Ed, whose presence and expression has been recently detected by transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of G. morsitans. Phylogenetically, the identified GmTsps segregate into three major clusters. Structurally, the GmTsps are largely similar to vertebrate tetraspanins. In view of the exploitation of tetraspanins by organisms for survival, these proteins could be targeted using specific antibodies, recombinant large extracellular loop (LEL) domains, small-molecule mimetics and siRNAs as potential novel and efficacious putative targets to combat African trypanosomiasis by killing the tsetse fly vector.

  9. Effect of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Roca, Carlos P; Cuesta, José A; Sánchez, Angel

    2009-10-01

    Spatial structure is known to have an impact on the evolution of cooperation, and so it has been intensively studied during recent years. Previous work has shown the relevance of some features, such as the synchronicity of the updating, the clustering of the network, or the influence of the update rule. This has been done, however, for concrete settings with particular games, networks, and update rules, with the consequence that some contradictions have arisen and a general understanding of these topics is missing in the broader context of the space of 2x2 games. To address this issue, we have performed a systematic and exhaustive simulation in the different degrees of freedom of the problem. In some cases, we generalize previous knowledge to the broader context of our study and explain the apparent contradictions. In other cases, however, our conclusions refute what seems to be established opinions in the field, as for example the robustness of the effect of spatial structure against changes in the update rule, or offer new insights into the subject, e.g., the relation between the intensity of selection and the asymmetry between the effects on games with mixed equilibria.

  10. Towards Controlling the Structural Evolution and Kinetic Properties of Monolayer (Hydr)oxide-Metal Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Kubal, Joseph; Greeley, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Ultrathin (hydr)oxide films grown on transition metal surfaces have widespread applications in processes related to electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, coating and corrosion inhibition, and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. These hybrid systems with novel properties are often prepared and characterized under very specific conditions, such as ultrahigh vacuum. When subsequently used in various applications, however, significant structural evolution, which depends strongly on the reaction conditions in-situ, is expected and has been widely observed. Nevertheless, the atomic-level details of these structural changes are generally unknown, particularly in the case of electrocatalytic environments. In order to identify structure-property relationships and, ultimately, predict new materials with improved performance, the development of such understanding is essential. In the present study, on the basis of detailed density functional theory calculations, and using Ni (hydr)oxide films on Pt(111) and Au(111) electrodes as model systems, we describe a detailed structural analysis of film growth and electrocatalytic analysis of hydrogen evolution at three-phase boundaries under alkaline electrochemical conditions.

  11. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, David; Garmilla, José A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces—protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations ≲ 1 {{AU}}. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux {F}J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop an {F}J profile that is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the density waves driven by the binary and viscous dissipation dominates heating of the inner disk (within 1-2 AU), pushing the ice line beyond 3-5 AU, depending on disk mass and age. Irradiation by the binary governs disk thermodynamics beyond ˜10 AU. However, self-shadowing by the hot inner disk may render central illumination irrelevant out to ˜20 AU. Spectral energy distribution of a circumbinary disk exhibits a distinctive bump around 10 μm, which may facilitate identification of such disks around unresolved binaries. Efficient tidal coupling to the disk drives orbital inspiral of the binary and may cause low-mass and relatively compact binaries to merge into a single star within the disk lifetime. We generally find that circumbinary disks present favorable sites for planet formation (despite their wider zone of volatile depletion), in agreement with the statistics of Kepler circumbinary planets.

  12. 66 FR 56718 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2001-11-09

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS); Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee...

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    ... and Evolution of the Universe Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the...

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  20. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  1. Tectonic structure and evolution of the Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Schouten, H.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Atlantic continental margin developed across the boundary between continental and oceanic crust as rifting and then sea-floor spreading broke apart and separated the North American and African plates, forming the Atlantic Ocean Basin. Continental rifting began in Late Triassic with reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults as normal faults and with extension across a broad zone of subparallel rift basins. Extension became localized in Early to Middle Jurassic along the zone that now underlies the large marginal basins, and other rift zones, such as the Newark, Hartford, and Fundy basins, were abandoned. Rifting and crustal stretching between the two continents gave way to sea-floor spreading Middle Jurassic and the formation of oceanic crust. This tectonic evolution resulted in formation of distinctive structural features. The marginal basins are underlain by a thinner crust and contain a variety of fault-controlled structures, including half-grabens, seaward- and landward-tilted blocks, faults that die out within the crust, and faults that penetrate the entire crust. This variable structure probably resulted from the late Triassic-Early Jurassic pattern of normal, listric, and antithetic faults that evolved from the Paleozoic thrust fault geometry. The boundary between marginal basins and oceanic crust is marked approximately by the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA). A major basement fault is located in the Baltimore Canyon trough at the landward edge of the ECMA and a zone of seaward dipping reflectors is found just seaward of the ECMA off Georges Bank. The fracture zone pattern in Mesozoic oceanic crust can be traced landward to the ECMA.

  2. The structural evolution of the deep continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Miller, Meghan S.; Moresi, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Continental lithosphere houses the oldest and thickest regions of the Earth's surface. Locked within this deep and ancient rock record lies invaluable information about the dynamics that has shaped and continue to shape the planet. Much of that history has been dominated by the forces of plate tectonics which has repeatedly assembled super continents together and torn them apart - the Wilson Cycle. While the younger regions of continental lithosphere have been subject to deformation driven by plate tectonics, it is less clear whether the ancient, stable cores formed and evolved from similar processes. New insight into continental formation and evolution has come from remarkable views of deeper lithospheric structure using enhanced seismic imaging techniques and the increase in large volumes of broadband data. Some of the most compelling observations are that the continental lithosphere has a broad range in thicknesses (< 100 to > 300 km), has complex internal structure, and that the thickest portion appears to be riddled with seismic discontinuities at depths between 80 and 130 km. These internal structural features have been interpreted as remnants of lithospheric formation during Earth's early history. If they are remnants, then we can attempt to investigate the structure present in the deep lithosphere to piece together information about early Earth dynamics much as is done closer to the surface. This would help delineate between the differing models describing the dynamics of craton formation, particularly whether they formed in the era of modern plate tectonics, a transitional mobile-lid tectonic regime, or are the last fragments of an early, stagnant-lid planet. Our review paper (re)introduces readers to the conceptual definitions of the lithosphere and the complex nature of the upper boundary layer, then moves on to discuss techniques and recent seismological observations of the continental lithosphere. We then review geodynamic models and hypotheses for the

  3. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masera, D.; Bocca, P.; Grazzini, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a "damage-gauge" for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  4. Large-scale analysis of microRNA evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In animals, microRNAs (miRNA) are important genetic regulators. Animal miRNAs appear to have expanded in conjunction with an escalation in complexity during early bilaterian evolution. Their small size and high-degree of similarity makes them challenging for phylogenetic approaches. Furthermore, genomic locations encoding miRNAs are not clearly defined in many species. A number of studies have looked at the evolution of individual miRNA families. However, we currently lack resources for large-scale analysis of miRNA evolution. Results We addressed some of these issues in order to analyse the evolution of miRNAs. We perform syntenic and phylogenetic analysis for miRNAs from 80 animal species. We present synteny maps, phylogenies and functional data for miRNAs across these species. These data represent the basis of our analyses and also act as a resource for the community. Conclusions We use these data to explore the distribution of miRNAs across phylogenetic space, characterise their birth and death, and examine functional relationships between miRNAs and other genes. These data confirm a number of previously reported findings on a larger scale and also offer novel insights into the evolution of the miRNA repertoire in animals, and it’s genomic organization. PMID:22672736

  5. Deuterostome Evolution: Large Data Set Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janies, Daniel; Wheeler, Ward

    2004-01-01

    This award allowed us to develop novel hardware for phylogenetics, collect genomic data and produce several phylogenies of deuterostome organisms, communicate the results publicly, release software into the public domain, publish textbooks and papers, and prepare for the next research projects. There are no resulting subject inventions to report. We review these activities in three sections: 1) Hardware and software and development; 2) Evolutionary biology research; 3) Our proposed future direction, predictive analysis of pathogens in support of the NASA mission.

  6. Integrating Sequence Evolution into Probabilistic Orthology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Sjöstrand, Joel; Andersson, Peter; Sennblad, Bengt; Lagergren, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Orthology analysis, that is, finding out whether a pair of homologous genes are orthologs - stemming from a speciation - or paralogs - stemming from a gene duplication - is of central importance in computational biology, genome annotation, and phylogenetic inference. In particular, an orthologous relationship makes functional equivalence of the two genes highly likely. A major approach to orthology analysis is to reconcile a gene tree to the corresponding species tree, (most commonly performed using the most parsimonious reconciliation, MPR). However, most such phylogenetic orthology methods infer the gene tree without considering the constraints implied by the species tree and, perhaps even more importantly, only allow the gene sequences to influence the orthology analysis through the a priori reconstructed gene tree. We propose a sound, comprehensive Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, DLRSOrthology, to compute orthology probabilities. It efficiently sums over the possible gene trees and jointly takes into account the current gene tree, all possible reconciliations to the species tree, and the, typically strong, signal conveyed by the sequences. We compare our method with PrIME-GEM, a probabilistic orthology approach built on a probabilistic duplication-loss model, and MrBayesMPR, a probabilistic orthology approach that is based on conventional Bayesian inference coupled with MPR. We find that DLRSOrthology outperforms these competing approaches on synthetic data as well as on biological data sets and is robust to incomplete taxon sampling artifacts.

  7. Structural Evolution of BaTiO[subscript 3] Nanocrystals Synthesized at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rabuffetti, Federico A.; Brutchey, Richard L.

    2012-07-11

    Sub-10 nm BaTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were synthesized at room temperature via the vapor diffusion sol-gel method, and their structural evolution during nucleation and growth stages was followed using a series of techniques that probe the atomic structure on different length and time scales. Special emphasis was placed on assessing the evolution of the local symmetry and structural coherence of the resulting nanocrystals, as these are the structural bases for cooperative properties such as ferroelectricity. Although the room-temperature crystal structure of the fully grown nanocrystals appears cubic to Rietveld analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data, Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function analysis demonstrate the presence of non-centrosymmetric regions arising from the off-centering of the titanium atoms. This finding demonstrates that accounting for diffuse scattering is critical when attempting the structural characterization of nanocrystals with X-ray diffraction. The local symmetry of acentric regions present in BaTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals, particularly structural correlations within an individual unit cell and between two adjacent unit cells, is best described by a tetragonal P4mm space group. The orthorhombic Amm2 space group also provides an adequate description, suggesting both types of local symmetry can coexist at room temperature. The average magnitude of the local off-center displacements of the titanium atoms along the polar axis is comparable to that observed in bulk BaTiO{sub 3}, and their coherence length is on the order of 16 {angstrom}. The presence of local dipoles suggests that a large amount of macroscopic polarization can be achieved in nanocrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} if the coherence of their ferroelectric coupling is further increased.

  8. Structural evolution of BaTiO(3) nanocrystals synthesized at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Rabuffetti, Federico A; Brutchey, Richard L

    2012-06-06

    Sub-10 nm BaTiO(3) nanocrystals were synthesized at room temperature via the vapor diffusion sol-gel method, and their structural evolution during nucleation and growth stages was followed using a series of techniques that probe the atomic structure on different length and time scales. Special emphasis was placed on assessing the evolution of the local symmetry and structural coherence of the resulting nanocrystals, as these are the structural bases for cooperative properties such as ferroelectricity. Although the room-temperature crystal structure of the fully grown nanocrystals appears cubic to Rietveld analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data, Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function analysis demonstrate the presence of non-centrosymmetric regions arising from the off-centering of the titanium atoms. This finding demonstrates that accounting for diffuse scattering is critical when attempting the structural characterization of nanocrystals with X-ray diffraction. The local symmetry of acentric regions present in BaTiO(3) nanocrystals, particularly structural correlations within an individual unit cell and between two adjacent unit cells, is best described by a tetragonal P4mm space group. The orthorhombic Amm2 space group also provides an adequate description, suggesting both types of local symmetry can coexist at room temperature. The average magnitude of the local off-center displacements of the titanium atoms along the polar axis is comparable to that observed in bulk BaTiO(3), and their coherence length is on the order of 16 Å. The presence of local dipoles suggests that a large amount of macroscopic polarization can be achieved in nanocrystalline BaTiO(3) if the coherence of their ferroelectric coupling is further increased.

  9. SUBSIDENCE, CRUSTAL STRUCTURE, AND THERMAL EVOLUTION OF GEORGES BANK BASIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swift, B. Ann; Sawyer, D.S.; Grow, J.A.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    A geographical study of Georges Bank basin defines a deep crustal structure that is interpreted in terms of the basin's tectonic and thermal history. Gravity models along three basin cross sections delineate two zones of crustal thinning at the basement hinge zone and oceanic crustal margins. These two zones bound rift-stage crust (about 25 km thick) which underlies the central portion of the basin. Subsidence analysis of the basin, using data from multichannel seismic reflection lines and two COST wells, suggests a rifting and (uniform) extensional origin. Two-dimensional finite difference modeling of the basin defines a crustal structure that concurs with the gravity and subsidence studies. The resulting isotherms show no major changes in the thermal structure since the Late Jurassic. In some areas of the basin, temperature sufficient for oil generation are determined from maturation studies of Jurassic sediments. Hydrocarbon generation is questionable, however, because of the probable lack of proper and sufficient kerogen in the Jurassic deposits.

  10. Exploring Galaxy Formation and Evolution via Structural Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelvin, Lee; Driver, Simon; Robotham, Aaron; Hill, David; Cameron, Ewan

    2010-06-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) structural decomposition pipeline (GAMA-SIGMA Structural Investigation of Galaxies via Model Analysis) will provide multi-component information for a sample of ~12,000 galaxies across 9 bands ranging from near-UV to near-IR. This will allow the relationship between structural properties and broadband, optical-to-near-IR, spectral energy distributions of bulge, bar, and disk components to be explored, revealing clues as to the history of baryonic mass assembly within a hierarchical clustering framework. Data is initially taken from the SDSS & UKIDSS-LAS surveys to test the robustness of our automated decomposition pipeline. This will eventually be replaced with the forthcoming higher-resolution VST & VISTA surveys data, expanding the sample to ~30,000 galaxies.

  11. Evolution of Protein Quaternary Structure in Response to Selective Pressure for Increased Thermostability.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Nicholas J; Liu, Jian-Wei; Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Coppin, Chris W; Lethier, Mathilde; Perugini, Matthew A; Murphy, James M; Oakeshott, John G; Weik, Martin; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-06-05

    Oligomerization has been suggested to be an important mechanism for increasing or maintaining the thermostability of proteins. Although it is evident that protein-protein contacts can result in substantial stabilization in many extant proteins, evidence for evolutionary selection for oligomerization is largely indirect and little is understood of the early steps in the evolution of oligomers. A laboratory-directed evolution experiment that selected for increased thermostability in the αE7 carboxylesterase from the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, resulted in a thermostable variant, LcαE7-4a, that displayed increased levels of dimeric and tetrameric quaternary structure. A trade-off between activity and thermostability was made during the evolution of thermostability, with the higher-order oligomeric species displaying the greatest thermostability and lowest catalytic activity. Analysis of monomeric and dimeric LcαE7-4a crystal structures revealed that only one of the oligomerization-inducing mutations was located at a potential protein-protein interface. This work demonstrates that by imposing a selective pressure demanding greater thermostability, mutations can lead to increased oligomerization and stabilization, providing support for the hypothesis that oligomerization is a viable evolutionary strategy for protein stabilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Research of complex loading of polycrystals with consideration for internal structure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loevets, Dmitry A.; Volegov, Pavel S.

    2016-11-01

    The paper discusses some questions related to the description of inelastic deformation of the representative volume of polycrystals with consideration for the evolution of its internal structure as well as to the study of the stress "dive" effect occurring at the complex deformation trajectories with a kink. For research, we use a two-level model of inelastic deformation of the representative volume of polycrystals and the analysis of the results performed using the approach of the Ilyushin theory to elastoplastic processes. According to the results of numerical experiments, it is established the relation between hardening parameters of the two-level model and the degree of manifestation of the stress "dive" effect.

  13. Thermal structure and evolution of tidally-locked Super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, S.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Seager, S.

    2008-12-01

    Over 260 extrasolar planets have been discovered, many of which are massive (often many times the mass of Jupiter) and orbiting very close to their parent star. Of particular interest to researchers, however, are the handful of discovered planets that are within 20 Earth masses, due to their potential for habitability. We present a model of the internal temperature structure of such tidally-locked 'Super Earth' exoplanets. The planets of interest have a terrestrial, rocky composition, with a hot side facing its star at all times, and a cold side facing away. Heat circulation through an atmosphere is assumed to be negligible due to the planets' proximity to the star, which causes potential atmospheres to be evaporated; therefore, the primary modes of heat transfer within the planet are convection and conduction, with absorption on the hot side of the flux from the star, and black-body radiation to space in all directions. We have modified a spherical axisymmetric version of the finite element code ConMan (SSAXC), which was first created to model the internal thermal evolution of Earth's mantle. The results from this code are plotted and a thermal profile, with potentially molten rock on one side and very cool rock on the other with a temperature gradient connecting the two, allows us to determine where potentially habitable regions would exist on the planet. Finally, an approximation of what typical mantle rocks would be melted at predicted temperatures and pressures are compared with these plotted internal gradients.

  14. The Structure and Evolution of Buyer-Supplier Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Souma, Wataru; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the structure and evolution of customer-supplier networks in Japan using a unique dataset that contains information on customer and supplier linkages for more than 500,000 incorporated non-financial firms for the five years from 2008 to 2012. We find, first, that the number of customer links is unequal across firms; the customer link distribution has a power-law tail with an exponent of unity (i.e., it follows Zipf's law). We interpret this as implying that competition among firms to acquire new customers yields winners with a large number of customers, as well as losers with fewer customers. We also show that the shortest path length for any pair of firms is, on average, 4.3 links. Second, we find that link switching is relatively rare. Our estimates indicate that the survival rate per year for customer links is 92 percent and for supplier links 93 percent. Third and finally, we find that firm growth rates tend to be more highly correlated the closer two firms are to each other in a customer-supplier network (i.e., the smaller is the shortest path length for the two firms). This suggests that a non-negligible portion of fluctuations in firm growth stems from the propagation of microeconomic shocks – shocks affecting only a particular firm – through customer-supplier chains. PMID:25000368

  15. Evolution of sperm structure and energetics in passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Melissah; Laskemoen, Terje; Johnsen, Arild; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-02-22

    Spermatozoa exhibit considerable interspecific variability in size and shape. Our understanding of the adaptive significance of this diversity, however, remains limited. Determining how variation in sperm structure translates into variation in sperm performance will contribute to our understanding of the evolutionary diversification of sperm form. Here, using data from passerine birds, we test the hypothesis that longer sperm swim faster because they have more available energy. We found that sperm with longer midpieces have higher levels of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but that greater energy reserves do not translate into faster-swimming sperm. Additionally, we found that interspecific variation in sperm ATP concentration is not associated with the level of sperm competition faced by males. Finally, using Bayesian methods, we compared the evolutionary trajectories of sperm morphology and ATP content, and show that both traits have undergone directional evolutionary change. However, in contrast to recent suggestions in other taxa, we show that changes in ATP are unlikely to have preceded changes in morphology in passerine sperm. These results suggest that variable selective pressures are likely to have driven the evolution of sperm traits in different taxa, and highlight fundamental biological differences between taxa with internal and external fertilization, as well as those with and without sperm storage.

  16. Evolution of the macromolecular structure of sporopollenin during thermal degradation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S; Benzerara, K; Beyssac, O; Balan, E; Brown, G E

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the original biogeochemistry of organic microfossils requires quantifying the extent of the chemical transformations they experienced during burial and maturation processes. In the present study, fossilization experiments have been performed using modern sporopollenin chosen as an analogue for the resistant biocompounds possibly constituting the wall of many organic microfossils. Sporopollenin powder has been processed thermally under argon atmosphere at different temperatures (up to 1000 °C) for varying durations (up to 900 min). Solid residues of each experiment have been characterized using infrared, Raman and synchrotron-based XANES spectroscopies. Results indicate that significant defunctionalisation and aromatization affect the molecular structure of sporopollenin with increasing temperature. Two distinct stages of evolution with temperature are observed: in a first stage, sporopollenin experiences dehydrogenation and deoxygenation simultaneously (below 500 °C); in a second stage (above 500 °C) an increasing concentration in aromatic groups and a lateral growth of aromatic layers are observed. With increasing heating duration (up to 900 min) at a constant temperature (360 °C), oxygen is progressively lost and conjugated carbon-carbon chains or domains grow progressively, following a log-linear kinetic behavior. Based on the comparison with natural spores fossilized within metasediments which experienced intense metamorphism, we show that the present experimental simulations may not perfectly mimic natural diagenesis and metamorphism. Yet, performing such laboratory experiments provides key insights on the processes transforming biogenic molecules into molecular fossils.

  17. The structure and evolution of buyer-supplier networks.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Souma, Wataru; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the structure and evolution of customer-supplier networks in Japan using a unique dataset that contains information on customer and supplier linkages for more than 500,000 incorporated non-financial firms for the five years from 2008 to 2012. We find, first, that the number of customer links is unequal across firms; the customer link distribution has a power-law tail with an exponent of unity (i.e., it follows Zipf's law). We interpret this as implying that competition among firms to acquire new customers yields winners with a large number of customers, as well as losers with fewer customers. We also show that the shortest path length for any pair of firms is, on average, 4.3 links. Second, we find that link switching is relatively rare. Our estimates indicate that the survival rate per year for customer links is 92 percent and for supplier links 93 percent. Third and finally, we find that firm growth rates tend to be more highly correlated the closer two firms are to each other in a customer-supplier network (i.e., the smaller is the shortest path length for the two firms). This suggests that a non-negligible portion of fluctuations in firm growth stems from the propagation of microeconomic shocks - shocks affecting only a particular firm - through customer-supplier chains.

  18. Evolution of the macromolecular structure of sporopollenin during thermal degradation

    DOE PAGES

    Bernard, S.; Benzerara, K.; Beyssac, O.; ...

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the original biogeochemistry of organic microfossils requires quantifying the extent of the chemical transformations they experienced during burial and maturation processes. In the present study, fossilization experiments have been performed using modern sporopollenin chosen as an analogue for the resistant biocompounds possibly constituting the wall of many organic microfossils. Sporopollenin powder has been processed thermally under argon atmosphere at different temperatures (up to 1000 °C) for varying durations (up to 900 min). Solid residues of each experiment have been characterized using infrared, Raman and synchrotron-based XANES spectroscopies. Results indicate that significant defunctionalisation and aromatization affect the molecular structure ofmore » sporopollenin with increasing temperature. Two distinct stages of evolution with temperature are observed: in a first stage, sporopollenin experiences dehydrogenation and deoxygenation simultaneously (below 500 °C); in a second stage (above 500 °C) an increasing concentration in aromatic groups and a lateral growth of aromatic layers are observed. With increasing heating duration (up to 900 min) at a constant temperature (360 °C), oxygen is progressively lost and conjugated carbon–carbon chains or domains grow progressively, following a log-linear kinetic behavior. Based on the comparison with natural spores fossilized within metasediments which experienced intense metamorphism, we show that the present experimental simulations may not perfectly mimic natural diagenesis and metamorphism. Moreover, performing such laboratory experiments provides key insights on the processes transforming biogenic molecules into molecular fossils.« less

  19. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation.

  20. Mutation rates and the evolution of germline structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies of de novo mutations in humans have revealed surprising incongruities in our understanding of human germline mutation. In particular, the mutation rate observed in modern humans is substantially lower than that estimated from calibration against the fossil record, and the paternal age effect in mutations transmitted to offspring is much weaker than expected from our long-standing model of spermatogenesis. I consider possible explanations for these discrepancies, including evolutionary changes in life-history parameters such as generation time and the age of puberty, a possible contribution from undetected post-zygotic mutations early in embryo development, and changes in cellular mutation processes at different stages of the germline. I suggest a revised model of stem-cell state transitions during spermatogenesis, in which ‘dark’ gonial stem cells play a more active role than hitherto envisaged, with a long cycle time undetected in experimental observations. More generally, I argue that the mutation rate and its evolution depend intimately on the structure of the germline in humans and other primates. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325834

  1. Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmishek, G.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

  2. 65 FR 10832 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-02-29

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure of Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee... Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee Update from Headquarters --Strategic Plan Overview --Chandra Update...

  3. Evolution of the structure of tin bronze under dynamic channel-angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Stolbovsky, A. V.; Popova, E. N.; Falahutdinov, R. M.; Shorohov, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    The study of the evolution of the structure of tin bronze under dynamic channel-angular pressing (DCAP) has been performed. For comparison, the evolution of the structure of commercial copper subjected to the same treatment has been investigated. A comparison of the microhardness of copper and bronze has been carried out after one and two DCAP passes

  4. 68 FR 58725 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS). DATES: Thursday...

  5. 68 FR 35920 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS). DATES: Tuesday...

  6. 67 FR 68209 - NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee; Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee; Structure and Evolution of... Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

  7. 69 FR 64328 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS). DATES: Monday...

  8. 69 FR 4322 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee (SEUS). DATES: Tuesday...

  9. 70 FR 16309 - NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe... (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee and Astronomical Search for Origins and...

  10. 67 FR 46699 - NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee Structure and Evolution of... Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of the Universe...

  11. Structure and evolution of the global seafood trade network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.

    2015-12-01

    The food production system is increasingly global and seafood is among the most highly traded commodities. Global trade can improve food security by providing access to a greater variety of foods, increasing wealth, buffering against local supply shocks, and benefit the environment by increasing overall use efficiency for some resources. However, global trade can also expose countries to external supply shocks and degrade the environment by increasing resource demand and loosening feedbacks between consumers and the impacts of food production. As a result, changes in global food trade can have important implications for both food security and the environmental impacts of production. Measurements of globalization and the environmental impacts of food production require data on both total trade and the origin and destination of traded goods (the network structure). While the global trade network of agricultural and livestock products has previously been studied, seafood products have been excluded. This study describes the structure and evolution of the global seafood trade network, including metrics quantifying the globalization of seafood, shifts in bilateral trade flows, changes in centrality and comparisons of seafood to agricultural and industrial trade networks. From 1994 to 2012 the number of countries trading in the network remained relatively constant, while the number of trade partnerships increased by over 65%. Over this same period, the total quantity of seafood traded increased by 58% and the value increased 85% in real terms. These changes signify the increasing globalization of seafood products. Additionally, the trade patterns in the network indicate: increased influence of Thailand and China, strengthened intraregional trade, and increased exports from South America and Asia. In addition to characterizing these network changes, this study identifies data needs in order to connect seafood trade with environmental impacts and food security outcomes.

  12. Structures of two molluscan hemocyanin genes: Significance for gene evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Bernhard; Altenhein, Benjamin; Markl, Jürgen; Vincent, Alexandra; van Olden, Erin; van Holde, Kensal E.; Miller, Karen I.

    2001-01-01

    We present here the description of genes coding for molluscan hemocyanins. Two distantly related mollusks, Haliotis tuberculata and Octopus dofleini, were studied. The typical architecture of a molluscan hemocyanin subunit, which is a string of seven or eight globular functional units (FUs, designated a to h, about 50 kDa each), is reflected by the gene organization: a series of eight structurally related coding regions in Haliotis, corresponding to FU-a to FU-h, with seven highly variable linker introns of 174 to 3,198 bp length (all in phase 1). In Octopus seven coding regions (FU-a to FU-g) are found, separated by phase 1 introns varying in length from 100 bp to 910 bp. Both genes exhibit typical signal (export) sequences, and in both cases these are interrupted by an additional intron. Each gene also contains an intron between signal peptide and FU-a and in the 3′ untranslated region. Of special relevance for evolutionary considerations are introns interrupting those regions that encode a discrete functional unit. We found that five of the eight FUs in Haliotis each are encoded by a single exon, whereas FU-f, FU-g, and FU-a are encoded by two, three and four exons, respectively. Similarly, in Octopus four of the FUs each correspond to an uninterrupted exon, whereas FU-b, FU-e, and FU-f each contain a single intron. Although the positioning of the introns between FUs is highly conserved in the two mollusks, the introns within FUs show no relationship either in location nor phase. It is proposed that the introns between FUs were generated as the eight-unit polypeptide evolved from a monomeric precursor, and that the internal introns have been added later. A hypothesis for evolution of the ring-like quaternary structure of molluscan hemocyanins is presented. PMID:11287637

  13. Multistage structural evolution of Northern Karakorum (Hunza region, Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Gritti, Damiano

    1996-07-01

    Detailed mapping and structural work in Upper Hunza Valley, Pakistan, have enlightened the tectonics and the structural evolution of the sedimentary cover of Northern Karakorum. This includes the Northern Sedimentary Belt (NSB) with the Guhjal and Sost Units (Permian-Cretaceous), cropping out north of the Karakorum Axial Batholith (KAB); the NSB is bounded to the north by the Misgar Unit, consisting of slates of unknown age. In the Sost Unit a mid-Cretaceous deformed belt is sealed with a strong angular unconformity by the Late Cretaceous formations. Folds within the mid-Cretaceous belt possibly indicate north-vergent transport. Stacking of NE- to N-vergent thrusts sheets postdates the deposition of Cretaceous sediments, which are largely included within tectonic slices developed along the southern flank of the Sost stack. The southern part of the stack is in turn intruded by the Palaeogene Kuk pluton belonging to the Batura Unit of the KAB. S- to SSE-vergent thrusting was successively active, stacking steep north-dipping thrust sheets along the northern side of the Sost Unit, forming a complex antiformal stack, well exposed around Sost. High angle pure dip-slip reverse and oblique dextral motions are recorded by fault-slip data and calc-mylonites along major faults, forming a transpressive fault zone close to the contact between the Sost and Misgar Units. During this stage, the Misgar Unit was thrusted southward above the Sost Unit along the Northern Fault. Prosecution of dextral motion was also active afterwards along the boundary between the two units. The importance of wrench tectonics is also indicated by widespread activation of E-W sinistral strike-slip faults in the whole study area, generally moving along pre-existent fault planes.

  14. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  15. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  16. Structural Evolution of the Incipient Okavango Rift Zone, NW Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Kinabo, B. D.; Modisi, M. P.; Hogan, J. P.; Wheaton, D. D.

    2005-05-01

    strongly influenced by the position of these pre-existing faults. Evidence of fault linkage is seen along some of the faults. Linked segments of faults are well defined and some are > 200 km long. We suggest from this result that fault linkage and propagation occurred very early and prior to significant basin development. We conclude that basement fabric seems to be a controlling factor at least in the early stages of basin architecture and structural evolution of ORZ.

  17. Population Structure and Evolution after Speciation of the Hokkaido Salamander (Hynobius retardatus)

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Masatoshi; Igawa, Takeshi; Michimae, Hirofumi; Miura, Toru; Nishimura, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    The Hokkaido salamander (Hynobius retardatus) is endemic to Hokkaido Island, Japan, and shows intriguing flexible phenotypic plasticity and regional morphological diversity. However, to date, allozymes and partial mitochondria DNA sequences have provided only an outline of its demographic histories and the pattern of its genetic diversification. To understand the finer details of the population structure of this species and its evolution since speciation, we genotyped five regional populations by using 12 recently developed microsatellite polymorphic markers. We found a clear population structure with low gene flow among the five populations, but a close genetic relationship between the Teshio and Kitami populations. Our demographic analysis suggested that Teshio and Erimo had the largest effective population sizes among the five populations. These findings regarding the population structure and demography of H. retardatus improve our understanding of the faunal phylogeography on Hokkaido Island and also provide fundamental genetic information that will be useful for future studies. PMID:27257807

  18. The spatial-temporal evolution of coherent structures in log law region of turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Nan

    2015-02-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of coherent structures (CS) is significant for turbulence control and drag reduction. Among the CS, low and high speed streak structures show typical burst phenomena. The analysis was based on a time series of three-dimensional and three-component (3D-3C) velocity fields of the flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) measured by a Tomographic and Time-resolved PIV (Tomo TRPIV) system. Using multi-resolution wavelet transform and conditional sampling method, we extracted the intrinsic topologies and found that the streak structures appear in bar-like patterns. Furthermore, we seized locations and velocity information of transient CS, and then calculated the propagation velocity of CS based on spatial-temporal cross-correlation scanning. This laid a foundation for further studies on relevant dynamics properties.

  19. The Sustainment Force Structure Evolution from the Army of Excellence to the Modular Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-13

    THE SUSTAINMENT FORCE STRUCTURE EVOLUTION FROM THE ARMY OF EXCELLENCE TO THE MODULAR FORCE A thesis presented to the Faculty of the...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Sustainment Force Structure Evolution from the Army of Excellence to the Modular Force 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT As the Army transitioned from an Army of Excellence force structure to the modular force structure many changes were necessary

  20. Evolution of cosmic structures in different environments in the quasispherical Szekeres model

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2007-02-15

    This paper investigates evolution of cosmic structures in different environments. For this purpose the quasispherical Szekeres model is employed. The Szekeres model is an exact solution of the Einstein field equations within which it is possible to describe more than one structure. In this way investigations of the evolution of the cosmic structures presented here can be freed from such assumptions as a small value of the density contrast. Also, studying the evolution of two or three structures within one framework enables us to follow the interaction between these structures and their impact on the evolution. Main findings include a conclusion that small voids surrounded by large overdensities evolve slower than large, isolated voids do. On the other hand, large voids enhance the evolution of adjacent galaxy superclusters which evolve much faster than isolated superclusters.

  1. Spectral properties of the temporal evolution of brain network structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yong; Lin, Pan; Wu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution properties of the brain network are crucial for complex brain processes. In this paper, we investigate the differences in the dynamic brain network during resting and visual stimulation states in a task-positive subnetwork, task-negative subnetwork, and whole-brain network. The dynamic brain network is first constructed from human functional magnetic resonance imaging data based on the sliding window method, and then the eigenvalues corresponding to the network are calculated. We use eigenvalue analysis to analyze the global properties of eigenvalues and the random matrix theory (RMT) method to measure the local properties. For global properties, the shifting of the eigenvalue distribution and the decrease in the largest eigenvalue are linked to visual stimulation in all networks. For local properties, the short-range correlation in eigenvalues as measured by the nearest neighbor spacing distribution is not always sensitive to visual stimulation. However, the long-range correlation in eigenvalues as evaluated by spectral rigidity and number variance not only predicts the universal behavior of the dynamic brain network but also suggests non-consistent changes in different networks. These results demonstrate that the dynamic brain network is more random for the task-positive subnetwork and whole-brain network under visual stimulation but is more regular for the task-negative subnetwork. Our findings provide deeper insight into the importance of spectral properties in the functional brain network, especially the incomparable role of RMT in revealing the intrinsic properties of complex systems.

  2. Spectral properties of the temporal evolution of brain network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yong; Lin, Pan; Wu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution properties of the brain network are crucial for complex brain processes. In this paper, we investigate the differences in the dynamic brain network during resting and visual stimulation states in a task-positive subnetwork, task-negative subnetwork, and whole-brain network. The dynamic brain network is first constructed from human functional magnetic resonance imaging data based on the sliding window method, and then the eigenvalues corresponding to the network are calculated. We use eigenvalue analysis to analyze the global properties of eigenvalues and the random matrix theory (RMT) method to measure the local properties. For global properties, the shifting of the eigenvalue distribution and the decrease in the largest eigenvalue are linked to visual stimulation in all networks. For local properties, the short-range correlation in eigenvalues as measured by the nearest neighbor spacing distribution is not always sensitive to visual stimulation. However, the long-range correlation in eigenvalues as evaluated by spectral rigidity and number variance not only predicts the universal behavior of the dynamic brain network but also suggests non-consistent changes in different networks. These results demonstrate that the dynamic brain network is more random for the task-positive subnetwork and whole-brain network under visual stimulation but is more regular for the task-negative subnetwork. Our findings provide deeper insight into the importance of spectral properties in the functional brain network, especially the incomparable role of RMT in revealing the intrinsic properties of complex systems.

  3. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu

    2015-01-10

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, δ{sub ADP,} {sub N}. We find statistically significant correlation between δ{sub ADP,} {sub N} and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  4. Boundary elements for structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The intent here is to discuss the status of the boundary element method (BEM) for structural analysis, both in terms of the present and anticipated capabilities of the method and in terms of the incorporation of the method in the design/analysis process, particularly for gas turbine engine components.

  5. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Theory Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, O. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project is to develop analysis techniques and computer programs for predicting the probabilistic response of critical structural components for current and future space propulsion systems. This technology will play a central role in establishing system performance and durability. The first year's technical activity is concentrating on probabilistic finite element formulation strategy and code development. Work is also in progress to survey critical materials and space shuttle mian engine components. The probabilistic finite element computer program NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) is being developed. The final probabilistic code will have, in the general case, the capability of performing nonlinear dynamic of stochastic structures. It is the goal of the approximate methods effort to increase problem solving efficiency relative to finite element methods by using energy methods to generate trial solutions which satisfy the structural boundary conditions. These approximate methods will be less computer intensive relative to the finite element approach.

  6. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Theory Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, O. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project is to develop analysis techniques and computer programs for predicting the probabilistic response of critical structural components for current and future space propulsion systems. This technology will play a central role in establishing system performance and durability. The first year's technical activity is concentrating on probabilistic finite element formulation strategy and code development. Work is also in progress to survey critical materials and space shuttle mian engine components. The probabilistic finite element computer program NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) is being developed. The final probabilistic code will have, in the general case, the capability of performing nonlinear dynamic of stochastic structures. It is the goal of the approximate methods effort to increase problem solving efficiency relative to finite element methods by using energy methods to generate trial solutions which satisfy the structural boundary conditions. These approximate methods will be less computer intensive relative to the finite element approach.

  7. The evolution of the Piedemonte Llanero petroleum system, Cordillera Oriental, Colombia: (1) Structural evolution and play definition

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.; Howe, S.; O`Leary, J.

    1996-08-01

    The Piedemonte Llanero petroleum trend of the Cordillera Oriental in Colombia has proven to be one of the most prolific hydrocarbon provinces discovered in recent years. The Piedemonte Llanero is a fold and thrust belt of complex, multi-phase structuration and hydrocarbon generation. Following the discovery of the Cusiana and Cupiagua fields in the southern part of the trend, BP and its partners began exploration further to the northeast. Early seismic data showed the existence of two structural trends: the frontal (or basal) thrust trend, with structures similar to Cusiana; and the overthrust (or duplex) trend, with multiple imbricated structures. Improved quality seismic data defined the gross structures and allowed them to be successfully drilled, but did not give a constrained model for the kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust belt nor the petroleum play. This resulted in no clear predictive models for reservoir quality and hydrocarbon phase distribution in the undrilled parts of the trend. A wide variety of geological and geochemical analytical techniques including biostratigraphy, reservoir petrology, petroleum geochemistry, thermal maturity data, basin modelling and fluid inclusion studies were undertaken. These were iteratively integrated into the seismo-structural model to develop a constrained interpretation for the evolution of the Piedemonte Llanero petroleum system. This paper summarizes the current understanding of the structural evolution of the trend and the development of a major petroleum system. A companion paper details the reservoir petrography and petroleum geochemistry studies.

  8. Myosin MyTH4-FERM structures highlight important principles of convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Planelles-Herrero, Vicente José; Blanc, Florian; Sirigu, Serena; Sirkia, Helena; Clause, Jeffrey; Sourigues, Yannick; Johnsrud, Daniel O; Amigues, Beatrice; Cecchini, Marco; Gilbert, Susan P; Houdusse, Anne; Titus, Margaret A

    2016-05-24

    Myosins containing MyTH4-FERM (myosin tail homology 4-band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin, or MF) domains in their tails are found in a wide range of phylogenetically divergent organisms, such as humans and the social amoeba Dictyostelium (Dd). Interestingly, evolutionarily distant MF myosins have similar roles in the extension of actin-filled membrane protrusions such as filopodia and bind to microtubules (MT), suggesting that the core functions of these MF myosins have been highly conserved over evolution. The structures of two DdMyo7 signature MF domains have been determined and comparison with mammalian MF structures reveals that characteristic features of MF domains are conserved. However, across millions of years of evolution conserved class-specific insertions are seen to alter the surfaces and the orientation of subdomains with respect to each other, likely resulting in new sites for binding partners. The MyTH4 domains of Myo10 and DdMyo7 bind to MT with micromolar affinity but, surprisingly, their MT binding sites are on opposite surfaces of the MyTH4 domain. The structural analysis in combination with comparison of diverse MF myosin sequences provides evidence that myosin tail domain features can be maintained without strict conservation of motifs. The results illustrate how tuning of existing features can give rise to new structures while preserving the general properties necessary for myosin tails. Thus, tinkering with the MF domain enables it to serve as a multifunctional platform for cooperative recruitment of various partners, allowing common properties such as autoinhibition of the motor and microtubule binding to arise through convergent evolution.

  9. Population genomics of dengue virus serotype 4: insights into genetic structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Waman, Vaishali P; Kasibhatla, Sunitha Manjari; Kale, Mohan M; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2016-08-01

    The spread of dengue disease has become a global public health concern. Dengue is caused by dengue virus, which is a mosquito-borne arbovirus of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae. There are four dengue virus serotypes (1-4), each of which is known to trigger mild to severe disease. Dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) has four genotypes and is increasingly being reported to be re-emerging in various parts of the world. Therefore, the population structure and factors shaping the evolution of DENV-4 strains across the world were studied using genome-based population genetic, phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis methods. The population genomics study helped to reveal the spatiotemporal structure of the DENV-4 population and its primary division into two spatially distinct clusters: American and Asian. These spatial clusters show further time-dependent subdivisions within genotypes I and II. Thus, the DENV-4 population is observed to be stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, two of which are formed by American strains and six of which are formed by Asian strains. Episodic positive selection was observed in the structural (E) and non-structural (NS2A and NS3) genes, which appears to be responsible for diversification of Asian lineages in general and that of modern lineages of genotype I and II in particular. In summary, the global DENV-4 population is stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, in a spatiotemporal manner with limited recombination. The significant role of adaptive evolution in causing diversification of DENV-4 lineages is discussed. The evolution of DENV-4 appears to be governed by interplay between spatiotemporal distribution, episodic positive selection and intra/inter-genotype recombination.

  10. Protein Structure and Evolution: Are They Constrained Globally by a Principle Derived from Information Theory?

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein. PMID:25970335

  11. Myosin MyTH4-FERM structures highlight important principles of convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Florian; Sirigu, Serena; Sirkia, Helena; Clause, Jeffrey; Sourigues, Yannick; Johnsrud, Daniel O.; Amigues, Beatrice; Cecchini, Marco; Gilbert, Susan P.; Houdusse, Anne; Titus, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Myosins containing MyTH4-FERM (myosin tail homology 4-band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin, or MF) domains in their tails are found in a wide range of phylogenetically divergent organisms, such as humans and the social amoeba Dictyostelium (Dd). Interestingly, evolutionarily distant MF myosins have similar roles in the extension of actin-filled membrane protrusions such as filopodia and bind to microtubules (MT), suggesting that the core functions of these MF myosins have been highly conserved over evolution. The structures of two DdMyo7 signature MF domains have been determined and comparison with mammalian MF structures reveals that characteristic features of MF domains are conserved. However, across millions of years of evolution conserved class-specific insertions are seen to alter the surfaces and the orientation of subdomains with respect to each other, likely resulting in new sites for binding partners. The MyTH4 domains of Myo10 and DdMyo7 bind to MT with micromolar affinity but, surprisingly, their MT binding sites are on opposite surfaces of the MyTH4 domain. The structural analysis in combination with comparison of diverse MF myosin sequences provides evidence that myosin tail domain features can be maintained without strict conservation of motifs. The results illustrate how tuning of existing features can give rise to new structures while preserving the general properties necessary for myosin tails. Thus, tinkering with the MF domain enables it to serve as a multifunctional platform for cooperative recruitment of various partners, allowing common properties such as autoinhibition of the motor and microtubule binding to arise through convergent evolution. PMID:27166421

  12. Protein structure and evolution: are they constrained globally by a principle derived from information theory?

    PubMed

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein.

  13. Structure and evolution of high-mass stellar mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebbeek, Evert; Gaburov, Evghenii; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pols, Onno R.

    2013-10-01

    In young dense clusters repeated collisions between massive stars may lead to the formation of a very massive star (above 100 M⊙). In the past, the study of the long-term evolution of merger remnants has mostly focused on collisions between low-mass stars (up to about 2 M⊙) in the context of blue-straggler formation. The evolution of collision products of more massive stars has not been as thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we study the long-term evolution of a number of stellar mergers formed by the head-on collision of a primary star with a mass of 5-40 M⊙ with a lower mass star at three points in its evolution in order to better understand their evolution. We use smooth particle hydrodynamics calculations to model the collision between the stars. The outcome of this calculation is reduced to one dimension and imported into a stellar evolution code. We follow the subsequent evolution of the collision product through the main sequence at least until the onset of helium burning. We find that little hydrogen is mixed into the core of the collision products, in agreement with previous studies of collisions between low-mass stars. For collisions involving evolved stars, we find that during the merger the surface nitrogen abundance can be strongly enhanced. The evolution of most of the collision products proceeds analogously to that of normal stars with the same mass, but with a larger radius and luminosity. However, the evolution of collision products that form with a hydrogen-depleted core is markedly different from that of normal stars with the same mass. They undergo a long-lived period of hydrogen-shell burning close to the main-sequence band in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and spend the initial part of core-helium burning as compact blue supergiants.

  14. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  15. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  16. Food web structure and the evolution of ecological communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quince, Christopher; Higgs, Paul G.; McKane, Alan J.

    Simulations of the coevolution of many interacting species are performed using the Webworld model. The model has a realistic set of predator-prey equations that describe the population dynamics of the species for any structure of the food web. The equations account for competition between species for the same resources, and for the diet choice of predators between alternative prey according to an evolutionarily stable strategy. The set of species present undergoes long-term evolution d ue to speciation and extinction events. We summarize results obtained on the macro-evolutionary dynamics of speciations and extinctions, and on the statistical properties of the food webs that are generated by the model. Simulations begin from small numbers of species and build up to larger webs with relatively constant species number on average. The rate of origination and extinction of species are relatively high, but remain roughly balanced throughout the simulations. When a 'parent' species undergoes sp eciation, the 'child' species usually adds to the same trophic level as the parent. The chance of the child species surviving is significantly higher if the parent is on the second or third trophic level than if it is on the first level, most likely due to a wider choice of possible prey for species on higher levels. Addition of a new species sometimes causes extinction of existing species. The parent species has a high probability of extinction because it has strong competition with the new species. Non-pa rental competitors of the new species also have a significantly higher extinction probability than average, as do prey of the new species. Predators of the new species are less likely than average to become extinct.

  17. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35–120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  18. Critical temperature determination of detectable Cr diffusion enhancement by nanostructure through structural evolution analysis of the oxide films at 25-450 °C on 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Y.; Meng, X. B.; Zheng, Z. J.; Gao, Y.

    2017-10-01

    The structural evolution of the oxide films at 25-450 °C on nanocrystalline (NC) and coarse crystalline (CC) 304 stainless steels (SS) was investigated. The structure of the oxide film on both NC and CC SSs was observed to undergo transient processes from a bi-layer to a single-layer and then back to a bi-layer when the temperature changed from the low range (25-150 °C) to the medium range (150-300 °C) and subsequently to the high range (300-450 °C), respectively. These formation mechanisms of the oxide films on SS were attributed to the different diffusion properties of Cr and Fe in the three temperature ranges. The thickness of the oxide films was similar between the NC and CC SSs below 300 °C due to their similar Crox/Feox concentration ratios in their oxide films at this temperature. Above 300 °C, Cr diffusion enhancement in the NC matrix led to a higher Crox/Feox ratio and better compactness of the oxide film, which resulted in a slower atomic diffusion rate in the oxide film and a thinner oxide film. Therefore, the temperature of 300 °C was concluded to be the critical temperature of the detectable Cr diffusion enhancement in the NC SS compared to the CC SS.

  19. The Consilient Epistemology: Structuring Evolution of Our Logical Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    It is argued that the current principles of modern culture are not congruent with the demands for long-term sustainable evolution. Even our modern democracy is run by the "Golden Rule" favoring "Gold" owners. To assure our peaceful and sustainable evolution, we need to replace this "Golden Rule" by the true democratic rule, or "Knowledge & Debate Rule" through the development of an over-arching consilient epistemology, now enabled by the global internet system. Inseparable connection between the consilient epistemology and our successful evolution is justified from an understanding that, for many millennia, the rapid evolution of human minds is being driven dominantly by the cultural-selection (intra-cultural and inter-cultural conflicts and pressures) rather than by the Darwinian natural-selection.

  20. Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Mineral Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous carbonation of ultramafic rocks has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. While chemical kinetics data indicate that carbonation reaction in olivine is one of the fastest among the mg-bearing minerals, in practice, the factors that limit the extent and rate of carbonation in ultramafic rocks are fluid supply and flux. On the one hand, reaction products could produce passivating layer that prohibits further reactions. On the other hand, the increases in solid volume during carbonation could lead to cracking and create new fluid paths. Whether carbonation in ultramafic rocks is self-limiting or self-sustaining has been hotly debated. Experimental evidence of precipitation of reaction products during olivine carbonation was reported. To date, reaction-driven cracking has not been observed. In this paper, we present the first real-time pore structure evolution data using the x-ray synchrotron microtomography. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solution was injected into porous olivine aggregates and in-situ pore structure change during olivine carbonation at a constant confining pressure (12 MPa) and a temperature of 200oC was captured at 30 min. interval for ~160 hours. Shortly after the experiment started, filling-in of the existing pores by precipitation of reaction products was visible. The size of the in-fills kept increasing as reactions continued. After ~48 hours, cracking around the in-fill materials became visible. After ~60 hours, these cracks started to show a clear polygonal pattern, similar to the crack patterns usually seen on the surface of drying mud. After ~72 hours, some of the cracks coalesced into large fractures that cut-through the olivine aggregates. New fractures continued to develop and at the end of the experiment, the sample was completely disintegrated by these fractures. We also conducted nanotomography experiments on a sub-volume of the reacted olivine aggregate. Orthogonal sets of

  1. Application of Quasi-Separatrix Layer Maps to Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Sigmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, E.; Van Ballegooijen, A.

    2010-05-01

    We present some preliminary work in attempt to utilize Quasi-Separatrix Layer (QSL) maps for understanding the structure and evolution of sigmoids. We show sample QSL maps calculated at different heights above the photosphere and different times over the evolution of the quiescent sigmoid from February, 2007, observed with Hinode/XRT. The QSL maps use already existing static MHD models of the sigmoid, based on the flux rope insertion method. We give a short overview of the method used to set-up these maps. By comparing current distributions and the squashing factors at different height and cross sections over the sigmoid location we suggest the use of QSLs as tracers of surface and/or volumetric currents. We look at the distribution, structure, and concentration of QSLs in combination with the size and location of bald patches at different stages of the sigmoid development. We attempt to use this analysis to help us discriminate between the main scenarios for the formation and X-ray appearance of the S-like structure - flux emergence (or cancellation) and twisting foot point motions. This method may possibly shed some light on the pre-eruption configuration and eruption mechanism in sigmoids as well.

  2. Structural evolution of Halaban Area, Eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amri, Yousef; Kassem1, Osama M. K.

    2017-04-01

    Neoproterozoic basement complex comprises a metamorphic/igneous suite (Abt schist and sheared granitoids) with syn-accretionary transpressive structures, unconformably overlain by a post-amalgamation volcanosedimentary sequence. This study aims to attempt to exposed post-accretionary thrusting and thrust-related structures at Halaban area, Eastern Arabian Shield. The Rf/ϕ and Fry methods are utilized on quartz and feldspar porphyroclasts, as well as on mafic crystals, such as hornblende and biotite, in eighteen samples. The X/Z axial ratios range from 1.12 to 4.99 for Rf/ϕ method and from 1.65 to 4.00 for Fry method. The direction of finite strain for the long axes displays clustering along the WNW trend (occasionally N) with slight plunging. Finite strain accumulated without any significant volume change contemporaneously with syn-accretionary transpressive structures. It indicates that the contacts between various lithological units in the Halaban area were formed under brittle to semi-ductile deformation conditions. The penetrative subhorizontal foliation was concurrent with thrusting and shows nearly the same attitudes of tectonic contacts with the overlying nappes. Keywords: Finite strain analysis, volcanosedimentary sequence, Halaban area, Eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia.

  3. Social dilemmas in an online social network: The structure and evolution of cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Feng; Chen, Xiaojie; Liu, Lianghuan; Wang, Long

    2007-11-01

    We investigate two paradigms for studying the evolution of cooperation—Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift game in an online friendship network, obtained from a social networking site. By structural analysis, it is revealed that the empirical social network has small-world and scale-free properties. Besides, it exhibits assortative mixing pattern. Then, we study the evolutionary version of the two types of games on it. It is found that cooperation is substantially promoted with small values of game matrix parameters in both games. Whereas the competent cooperators induced by the underlying network of contacts will be dramatically inhibited with increasing values of the game parameters. Further, we explore the role of assortativity in evolution of cooperation by random edge rewiring. We find that increasing amount of assortativity will to a certain extent diminish the cooperation level. We also show that connected large hubs are capable of maintaining cooperation. The evolution of cooperation on empirical networks is influenced by various network effects in a combined manner, compared with that on model networks. Our results can help understand the cooperative behaviors in human groups and society.

  4. Concurrent Evolution of Structural Deformation and Carbonate Diagenesis within the Moab Fault, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, K. R.; Crider, J. G.; Huntington, K. W.; Luetkemeyer, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid-driven diagenetic processes within the fault damage zone drive direct feedbacks to mechanical and fluid-permeability properties of the host rock. Because these factors can be of great importance to fault seismicity and reservoir integrity, it is important to constrain their evolution over the lifespan of a fault zone. The Moab Fault, SE Utah, is a prime location to address these questions, representing an exhumed fault system offsetting a package of paleo-reservoir rocks. We return to a well-studied segment linkage zone, Courthouse Junction, building upon detailed earlier work. Here, the fault zone contains multiple phases of structural deformation, expressed as distinct structural elements. Associated carbonate mineralization provides a record of past fluid flow through the fault zone. Earlier bulk and clumped isotope measurements of the carbonate have demonstrated a range of isotopic compositions and precipitation temperatures. In this work, we apply new carbonate isotope and trace element geochemistry, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and fluid inclusion analysis to synthesize the structural and diagenetic histories of the Moab Fault. Carbonate trace element signatures and clumped isotope-based precipitation temperatures allow us to identify variability in parent fluid composition and characterize fluid sources, constraining migration pathways through the fault zone. Distinct phases of carbonate deposition display different cathodoluminescence, allowing us to observe their textural relationships to the host rock and each other, as well as constrain the relative timing of episodes of carbonate deposition and structural deformation. Taken together, these data provide new perspective into the co-evolution of permeability and structural deformation in the Moab Fault by connecting variability in fluid transmission and source to changes in the style of structural deformation.

  5. Analysis of structures causing instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple new method to systematically identify all topological structures (e.g., positive feedback loops) potentially leading to locally unstable steady states: ICSA-The instability causing structure analysis. Systems without any instability causing structure (i.e., not fulfilling the necessary topological condition for instabilities) cannot have unstable steady states. It follows that common bistability or multistability and Hopf bifurcations are excluded and sustained oscillations and deterministic chaos are most unlikely. The ICSA leads to new insights into the topological organization of chemical and biochemical systems, such as metabolic, gene regulatory, and signal transduction networks.

  6. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  7. Mathematical Methods for the Analysis of Polycrystal Phase Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlokazov, V. B.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Two methods for an automatic analysis of the temporal evolution of a multiphase polycrystalline sample are described: The Upeak method, analyzing the spectra formally, i.e., carrying the peak search in them, and so describing the evolution in terms of spectral peaks, or having made additionally the autoindexing of the found peaks, preparing the crystallographic information for the Rietveld analysis. The Rietveld method, using an already available crystallographic information about the phase reflections, and describing the unit cell and atomic characteristics of each phase, and the mutual phase contributions to the total intensity for each item of the analyzed sequence of neutron scattering spectra. The paper describes difficulties of an automatic analysis securing the convergence of a non-linear and at the same time non-stationary fitting. The evolution of the polycrystalline compound CuFe2O4 with the temperature T in the range from 300 to 500 degrees Celsius illustrates the performance of the methods.

  8. Earth's structure and evolution inferred from topography, gravity, and seismicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, A. J.; Menard, J.; Patton, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's wavelength-dependent response to loading, reflected in observed topography, gravity, and seismicity, can be interpreted in terms of a stack of layers under the assumption of transverse isotropy. The theory of plate tectonics holds that the outermost layers of this stack are mobile, produced at oceanic ridges, and consumed at subduction zones. Their toroidal motions are generally consistent with those of several rigid bodies, except in the world's active mountain belts where strains are partitioned and preserved in tectonite fabrics. Even portions of the oceanic lithosphere exhibit non-rigid behavior. Earth's gravity-topography cross-spectrum exhibits notable variations in signal amplitude and character at spherical harmonic degrees l=13, 116, 416, and 1389. Corresponding Cartesian wavelengths are approximately equal to the respective thicknesses of Earth's mantle, continental mantle lithosphere, oceanic thermal lithosphere, and continental crust, all known from seismology. Regional variations in seismic moment release with depth, derived from the global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog, are also evident in the crust and mantle lithosphere. Combined, these observations provide powerful constraints for the structure and evolution of the crust, mantle lithosphere, and mantle as a whole. All that is required is a dynamically consistent mechanism relating wavelength to layer thickness and shear-strain localization. A statistically-invariant 'diharmonic' relation exhibiting these properties appears as the leading order approximation to toroidal motions on a self-gravitating body of differential grade-2 material. We use this relation, specifically its predictions of weakness and rigidity, and of folding and shear banding response as a function of wavelength-to-thickness ratio, to interpret Earth's gravity, topography, and seismicity in four-dimensions. We find the mantle lithosphere to be about 255-km thick beneath the Himalaya and the Andes, and the long

  9. Models of the Protocellular Structures, Functions and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael; Keefe, Anthony; Szostak, Jack W.; Lanyi, Janos F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids: First, a very large population of candidate molecules is generated using a random synthetic approach. Next, the small numbers of molecules that can accomplish the desired task are selected. These molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. To date, we have obtained "a proof of concept" by evolving simple, novel proteins capable of selectively binding adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). Our next goal is to create an enzyme that can phosphorylate amino acids and another to catalyze the formation of peptide bonds in the absence of nucleic acid templates. This latter reaction does not take place in contemporary cells. once developed, these enzymes will be encapsulated in liposomes so that they will function in a simulated cellular

  10. Models of the Protocellular Structures, Functions and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael; Keefe, Anthony; Szostak, Jack W.; Lanyi, Janos F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids: First, a very large population of candidate molecules is generated using a random synthetic approach. Next, the small numbers of molecules that can accomplish the desired task are selected. These molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. To date, we have obtained "a proof of concept" by evolving simple, novel proteins capable of selectively binding adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). Our next goal is to create an enzyme that can phosphorylate amino acids and another to catalyze the formation of peptide bonds in the absence of nucleic acid templates. This latter reaction does not take place in contemporary cells. once developed, these enzymes will be encapsulated in liposomes so that they will function in a simulated cellular

  11. Nickel-doped nanobelt structured molybdenum oxides as electrocatalysts for electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalasapurayil Kunhiraman, Aruna; Ramasamy, Manoharan

    2017-06-01

    In this work, nickel has been doped into α-MoO3 and the resulting Ni x Mo1 - x O3 nanostructured materials was examined as electrocatalysts for the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the synthesized materials indicated that Ni go into the orthorhombic structure of α-MoO3 up to x = 0.2. Above x = 0.2, NiMoO4 (monoclinic) phase was formed along with the formation of trace quantities of MoO3. Nanobelt (NB) morphologies were observed for oxides with x ≤ 0.2 in transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis and with the increase in the Ni concentration above 0.2, presence of broken belts along with few spherical particles were observed. The hydrogen evolving rates for various concentrations of Ni in MoO3 has been compared from the linear sweep voltammograms (LSVs) recorded at 500th cycle.

  12. Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of rocks exposed in the underground science and engineering laboratory, Lead SD, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, M. P.; Redden, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The lab provides a unique 3-dimensional view of the crustal structure of the Precambrian core of the Black Hills that lies along the margin of the Wyoming Craton. The Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of these rocks controls the distribution of lithologies and rock fabric and thus the rheologic properties in the lab. These properties have potential to influence later formed structures such as fractures and a range of experiments from in the areas hydrology to rock mechanics. The rock at the lab is composed of metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks that include, from oldest to youngest, the Yates unit, Poorman Formation, Homestake Formation and Ellison Formation. The Yates unit is a hornblende- plagioclase schist. The Poorman Formation is a sericite-biotite carbonate-bearing phyllite. The Homestake Formation is a grunerite-siderite schist with interbedded chlorite or biotite phyllite. The Ellison Formation is a sericite-biotite phyllite or schist with interbedded impure quartzite (biotite-quartzschist). Compilation of available structural data and analysis indicate a complex evolution of folds and fabrics between 1780 and 1715 Ma. The lab is located on a late upright SE-plunging anticlinorium which is interpreted to deform the earliest folds (NE trending?). The earliest phase resulted in repetition is Homestake Formation and associated units. Overprinting during later deformation events caused tightening and local dismemberment of these early folds that led to the previous interpretation that multiple iron formations existed in the lab. The second phase of folding shallow to moderate upright SE-plunging folds and associated northwest striking, steeply dipping foliation. The third phase of folding overprints the previous phase to varying degrees and produced four structural domains that are recognized by changes in the orientation of structural fabrics. The third phase of folding is best developed in the western part of the lab and is represented by steeply

  13. Piece2.0: an update for the pant gene structure comparison and evolution database

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparison and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron–exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in pl...

  14. PIECE 2.0: an update for the plant gene structure comparison and evolution database

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparision and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron-exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in ...

  15. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  16. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  17. Structural Evolution of a Granular Pack under Manual Tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikawa, Naoki; Bandi, Mahesh M.; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally study a two-dimensional (2D) granular pack of photoelastic disks subject to vertical manual tapping. Using bright- and dark-field images, we employ gradient-based image analysis methods to analyze various structural quantities. These include the packing fraction (ϕ), force per disk (Fd), and force chain segment length (l) as functions of the tapping number (τ). The increase in the packing fraction with the tapping number is found to exponentially approach an asymptotic value. An exponential distribution is observed for the cumulative numbers of both the force per disk Fd:Ncum(Fd) = AFexp ( - Fd/F0), and the force chain segment length l:Ncum(l) = Alexp ( - l/l0). Whereas the coefficient AF varies with τ for Fd, l shows no dependence on τ. The τ dependences of Fd and ϕ allow us to posit a linear relationship between the total force of the granular pack Ftot*(τ ) and ϕ(τ).

  18. Structural Analysis and Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Collier Research and Development Corporation received a one-of-a-kind computer code for designing exotic hypersonic aircraft called ST-SIZE in the first ever Langley Research Center software copyright license agreement. Collier transformed the NASA computer code into a commercial software package called HyperSizer, which integrates with other Finite Element Modeling and Finite Analysis private-sector structural analysis program. ST-SIZE was chiefly conceived as a means to improve and speed the structural design of a future aerospace plane for Langley Hypersonic Vehicles Office. Including the NASA computer code into HyperSizer has enabled the company to also apply the software to applications other than aerospace, including improved design and construction for offices, marine structures, cargo containers, commercial and military aircraft, rail cars, and a host of everyday consumer products.

  19. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification.

    PubMed

    Chicote, Javier U; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins.

  20. The venus kinase receptor (VKR) family: structure and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) form a family of transmembrane proteins widely conserved in Metazoa, with key functions in cell-to-cell communication and control of multiple cellular processes. A new family of RTK named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR) has been described in invertebrates. The VKR receptor possesses a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) extracellular module, a bilobate structure that binds small ligands to induce receptor kinase activity. VKR was shown to be highly expressed in the larval stages and gonads of several invertebrates, suggesting that it could have functions in development and/or reproduction. Results Analysis of recent genomic data has allowed us to extend the presence of VKR to five bilaterian phyla (Platyhelminthes, Arthropoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Echinodermata) as well as to the Cnidaria phylum. The presence of NveVKR in the early-branching metazoan Nematostella vectensis suggested that VKR arose before the bilaterian radiation. Phylogenetic and gene structure analyses showed that the 40 receptors identified in 36 animal species grouped monophyletically, and likely evolved from a common ancestor. Multiple alignments of tyrosine kinase (TK) and VFT domains indicated their important level of conservation in all VKRs identified up to date. We showed that VKRs had inducible activity upon binding of extracellular amino-acids and molecular modeling of the VFT domain confirmed the structure of the conserved amino-acid binding site. Conclusions This study highlights the presence of VKR in a large number of invertebrates, including primitive metazoans like cnidarians, but also its absence from nematodes and chordates. This little-known RTK family deserves to be further explored in order to determine its evolutionary origin, its possible interest for the emergence and specialization of Metazoa, and to understand its function in invertebrate development and/or reproductive biology. PMID:23721482

  1. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chicote, Javier U.; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins. PMID:28257417

  2. Analysis of the Science and Technology Preservice Teachers' Opinions on Teaching Evolution and Theory of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Töman, Ufuk; Karatas, Faik Özgür; Çimer, Sabiha Odabasi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate of science and technology teachers' opinions about the theory of evolution and the evolution teaching. The aim of this study, we investigate of science and technology teachers' opinions about the theory of evolution and the evolution teaching. This study is a descriptive study. Open-ended questions were used to…

  3. QA system for structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiko, Heikki

    The activities to be addressed by an organization involved in structural analysis by numerical methods and/or development and maintenance of such computer codes or systems are described. The requirements are based on International Standard 9001. The interpretation of the requirements is done according to an application presented by a Quality Analysis (QA) working group. The purpose of a quality analysis system is to help anyone to do a better job. Emphasis on technical documentation to speed up operations is recommended. The first steps in implementing a finite element quality assurance system in an organization are as follows: constitute a technical body with responsibility and authority for the analysis quality system; agree on management responsibilities for each quality analysis activity; and review current practices against the quality system standard requirements. Experience shows that it is mainly a process of rationalizing, formalizing, and reinforcing existing practices.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults.

    PubMed

    Holden, C; Mace, R

    1997-10-01

    In most of the world's population the ability to digest lactose declines sharply after infancy. High lactose digestion capacity in adults is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin and is thought to be an evolutionary adaptation to millennia of drinking milk from domestic livestock. Milk can also be consumed in a processed form, such as cheese or soured milk, which has a reduced lactose content. Two other selective pressures for drinking fresh milk with a high lactose content have been proposed: promotion of calcium uptake in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin-D deficiency and maintainance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly and environments. These three hypotheses are all supported by the geographic distribution of high lactose digestion capacity in adults. However, the relationships between environmental variables and adult lactose digestion capacity are highly confounded by the shared ancestry of many populations whose lactose digestion capacity has been tested. The three hypotheses for the evolution of high adult lactose digestion capacity are tested here using a comparative method of analysis that takes the problem of phylogenetic confounding into account. This analysis supports the hypothesis that high adult lactose digestion capacity is an adaptation to dairying but does not support the hypotheses that lactose digestion capacity is additionally selected for either at high latitudes or in highly arid environments. Furthermore, methods using maximum likelihood are used to show that the evolution of milking preceded the evolution of high lactose digestion.

  5. Analysis on evolution and research focus in psychiatry field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-05-07

    With the dramatic rise in mental disorders and mental illnesses, psychiatry has become one of the fastest growing clinical medical disciplines. This has led to a rise in the number of scientific research papers being published in this field. We selected research papers in ten psychiatric journals that were published during 1983 to 2012. These ten journals were those with the top Impact Factor (IF) as indicated by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-Expanded). We utilized information visualization software (CiteSpace) to conduct co-citation and Hierarchal clustering analysis to map knowledge domains to determine the evolution and the foci of research in this field. In the evolution of the field of psychiatry, there were four stages identified. The result of hierarchal clustering analysis revealed that the research foci in the psychiatric field were primarily studies of child and adolescent psychiatry, diagnostic and classification criteria, brain imaging and molecular genetics. The results provide information about the evolution and the foci of the research in the field of psychiatry. This information can help researchers determine the direction of the research in the field of psychiatry; Moreover, this research provides reasonable suggestions to guide research in psychiatry field and provide scientific evidence to aid in the effective prevention and treatment of mental disorders.

  6. Properties and evolution of anisotropic structures in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2016-10-01

    A new class of exact electrostatic solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations based on the Jeans's theorem is proposed for studying the evolution and properties of two-dimensional anisotropic plasmas that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, the free expansion of a slab of electron-ion plasma into vacuum is investigated.

  7. Some Perspectives on the Structure and Evolution of the North American Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Randy

    2013-04-01

    Recent national programs in Canada (Lithoprobe) and the U.S. (EarthScope) are providing vast quantities of data and many new scientific insights concerning crustal and lithospheric mantle structure and evolution. More modest but significant results are also being produced in and about Mexico. An analysis of these new results along with a synthesis of 20th century results was undertaken, and a new map of the North American Moho was produced via manual and subjective contouring in which results from a variety of techniques were integrated. This map shows variations in crustal thickness for it is hard to generalize beyond the trivial observation that extension thins the crust and compression results in crustal thickening by a variety of complex processes. When integrated with geologic data from xenolith studies, some information about the evolution of the Moho through time is possible. It is clear that the Moho is seldom (if ever) static after it is initially formed during the production of new continental lithosphere. The lower crust in particular is often thickened via under plating and/or intraplating. On the other hand, the crust has been thickened from above by the accumulation of thick piles of sediments. Collisional tectonics occurs on a lithospheric scale, and the Lithoprobe project produced many impressive images of the interwedging of the crust in orogens of a variety of ages. Several examples of crustal structure resulting from a variety of processes derived from the integration of a variety of geophysical and geological data will be presented.

  8. Evolutions of fluctuation modes and inner structures of global stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Maoxin; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-09-01

    The paper uses empirical data, including 42 globally main stock indices in the period 1996-2014, to systematically study the evolution of fluctuation modes and inner structures of global stock markets. The data are large in scale considering both time and space. A covariance matrix-based principle fluctuation mode analysis (PFMA) is used to explore the properties of the global stock markets. It has been ignored by previous studies that covariance matrix is more suitable than the correlation matrix to be the basis of PFMA. It is found that the principle fluctuation modes of global stock markets are in the same directions, and global stock markets are divided into three clusters, which are found to be closely related to the countries’ locations with exceptions of China, Russia and Czech Republic. A time-stable correlation network constructing method is proposed to solve the problem of high-level statistical uncertainty when the estimated periods are very short, and the complex dynamic network (CDN) is constructed to investigate the evolution of inner structures. The results show when the clusters emerge and how long the clusters exist. When the 2008 financial crisis broke out, the indices form one cluster. After these crises, only the European cluster still exists. These findings complement the previous studies, and can help investors and regulators to understand the global stock markets.

  9. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  10. Application of integrated fluid-thermal structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods are not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  11. Differential evolution: crystal structure determination of a triclinic polymorph of adipamide from powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Seaton, Colin C; Tremayne, Maryjane

    2002-04-21

    The crystal structure of a previously unknown triclinic polymorph of adipamide has been solved from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data using a new direct space global optimisation method based on differential evolution.

  12. Time-dependent evolution of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure: Transition to steady state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. J.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Steady state solutions to the two-fluid equations of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure were investigated first by Drury and Volk (1981). Their analysis revealed, among other properties, that there exist regions of upstream parameter space where the equations possess three different downstream solutions for a given upstream state. In this paper we investigate whether or not all these solutions can occur as time-asymptotic states in a physically realistic evolution. To do this, we investigate the time-dependent evolution of the two-fluid cosmic-ray equations in going from a specified initial condition to a steady state. Our results indicate that the time-asymptotic solution is strictly single-valued, and it undergoes a transition from weakly to strongly cosmic-ray-modified at a critical value of the upstream cosmic ray energy density. The expansion of supernova remnant shocks is considered as an example, and it is shown that the strong to weak transition is in fact more likely. The third intermediate solution is shown to influence the time-dependent evolution of the shock, but it is not found to be a stable time-asymptotic state. Timescales for convergence to these states and their implications for the efficiency of shock acceleration are considered. We also investigate the effects of a recently introduced model for the injection of seed particles into the shock accelerated cosmic-ray population. The injection is found to result in a more strongly cosmic-ray-dominated shock, which supports our conclusion that for most classes of intermediate and strong cosmic-ray-modified shocks, the downstream cosmic-ray pressure component is at least as large as the thermal gas pressure, independent of the upstream state. As a result, cosmic rays almost always play a significant role in determining the shock structure and dissipation and they cannot be regarded as test particles.

  13. Structural evolution and paleostress pattern of the New Siberian Islands and De Long Islands, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Piepjohn, K.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades, different tectonic models were developed to explain the evolution of the arctic region (e.g. Jones, 1980; Miller et al., 2006). Many of these models are in some parts relatively unconstrained because of limited data from distinct areas. Only little was known so far about the structural evolution of the New Siberian Islands and De Long Islands, which are located in a key position on the east Russian arctic shelf between the Laptev and the East Siberian Sea. Current tectonic models largely depend on offshore reflection seismics (Franke et al., 2001). To enhance the knowledge of this area, a comprehensive structural analysis was carried out during the CASE 13 expedition in 2011. Paleostress directions were derived based on the orientation of faults, slickensides, intersection lineations and conjugate joints. Preliminary results indicate that there is evidence for at least one roughly north-south oriented contractional and one more or less northeast-southwest directed extensional deformation phase. Several outcrops in the southern part of Great Lyakhovsky Island give evidence for a horizontal compressional stress regime with a general north-south trending maximum principle stress that is perpendicular to the trend of the South Anyui suture zone in this area. This north-south contractional deformation is probably related to the closure of the Anyui Ocean. Contractional deformation is also exposed on Belkovsky Island and expressed by folding and the formation of a distinct cleavage. Normal faults, developed in relatively unconsolidated (Paleogene) sediments, imply that the extension is younger than the contraction and probably formed due to the evolution of the Laptev Sea Rift. Strike-slip movements along NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE trending faults are dominating the whole area.

  14. The concurrent evolution of cooperation and the population structures that support it.

    PubMed

    Powers, Simon T; Penn, Alexandra S; Watson, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of cooperation often depends upon population structure, yet nearly all models of cooperation implicitly assume that this structure remains static. This is a simplifying assumption, because most organisms possess genetic traits that affect their population structure to some degree. These traits, such as a group size preference, affect the relatedness of interacting individuals and hence the opportunity for kin or group selection. We argue that models that do not explicitly consider their evolution cannot provide a satisfactory account of the origin of cooperation, because they cannot explain how the prerequisite population structures arise. Here, we consider the concurrent evolution of genetic traits that affect population structure, with those that affect social behavior. We show that not only does population structure drive social evolution, as in previous models, but that the opportunity for cooperation can in turn drive the creation of population structures that support it. This occurs through the generation of linkage disequilibrium between socio-behavioral and population-structuring traits, such that direct kin selection on social behavior creates indirect selection pressure on population structure. We illustrate our argument with a model of the concurrent evolution of group size preference and social behavior.

  15. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  16. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  17. Structural analysis of vibroacoustical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromov, A. P.; Myasnikov, L. L.; Myasnikova, Y. N.; Finagin, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The method of automatic identification of acoustical signals, by means of the segmentation was used to investigate noises and vibrations in machines and mechanisms, for cybernetic diagnostics. The structural analysis consists of presentation of a noise or vibroacoustical signal as a sequence of segments, determined by the time quantization, in which each segment is characterized by specific spectral characteristics. The structural spectrum is plotted as a histogram of the segments, also as a relation of the probability density of appearance of a segment to the segment type. It is assumed that the conditions of ergodic processes are maintained.

  18. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  19. Structure, evolution and expression of collagen XXVIII: Lessons from the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Jan M; Kobbe, Birgit; Paulsson, Mats; Wagener, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Collagen XXVIII is the last discovered member of the collagen superfamily and thus has been only sparsely investigated. We studied collagen XXVIII in zebrafish to gain insight into its structure, evolution and expression. In contrast to human and mouse, the zebrafish genome contains four collagen XXVIII genes, col28a1a and -b, and col28a2a and -b. Genomic context and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the a2 branch was lost during evolution of mammals, whereas the duplication of the a1 and a2 branches results from the whole genome duplication in the teleost lineage. Sequence analysis revealed conservation of domain structure and the unique imperfections in the triple helical domain. Two major forms of collagen XXVIII were identified, Col28a1b in adult and Col28a2a in 3-5dpf zebrafish. Composite agarose/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that both these chains mainly form dimers of trimers, although Col28a1b appears to be more polydisperse. Homodimers are abundant, although it is possible that complexes consisting of Col28a2a and Col28a1a or -a2b occur. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed that the C-terminal Kunitz domain is often proteolytically processed. In contrast to murine collagen XXVIII, the zebrafish orthologs are widely expressed and not only present in the nervous system. They are differentially expressed in the liver, thymus, muscle, intestine and skin. Altogether our results point to a unique nature of collagen XXVIII within the collagen family.

  20. The structural evolution process and the electronic properties of armchair silicon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deng-Hui; Tang, Yu-Chao; Yao, Cheng-Peng; Zhu, Heng-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The structural evolution process of the capped armchair single- and double-walled SiNTs grown from silicon clusters was investigated using the DFT method. The evolution process was described quantitatively by monitoring change of the geometry structures. The initial structural configuration of the single- and double-walled SiNTs was determined by optimizing structure of the small silicon clusters. The evolution process of the SWSiNTs is through forming tubular clusters with a global reconstruction from structure of the double-rings. Then, it elongates through the layer-by-layer growth process with local reconstructions. Eventually, the infinite SiNTs can be constructed with corresponding repeat unit, designed by the periodic characteristics on the basis of tubular clusters. Eventually, All of the SiNTs have a narrow band gap. From calculation of band structure, the band gap which occurs oscillations and gradually decreases with increase of the diameter, length, and the number of walls.

  1. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  2. Evolution of human brain functions: the functional structure of human consciousness.

    PubMed

    Cloninger, C Robert

    2009-11-01

    The functional structure of self-aware consciousness in human beings is described based on the evolution of human brain functions. Prior work on heritable temperament and character traits is extended to account for the quantum-like and holographic properties (i.e. parts elicit wholes) of self-aware consciousness. Cladistic analysis is used to identify the succession of ancestors leading to human beings. The functional capacities that emerge along this lineage of ancestors are described. The ecological context in which each cladogenesis occurred is described to illustrate the shifting balance of evolution as a complex adaptive system. Comparative neuroanatomy is reviewed to identify the brain structures and networks that emerged coincident with the emergent brain functions. Individual differences in human temperament traits were well developed in the common ancestor shared by reptiles and humans. Neocortical development in mammals proceeded in five major transitions: from early reptiles to early mammals, early primates, simians, early Homo, and modern Homo sapiens. These transitions provide the foundation for human self-awareness related to sexuality, materiality, emotionality, intellectuality, and spirituality, respectively. The functional structure of human self-aware consciousness is concerned with the regulation of five planes of being: sexuality, materiality, emotionality, intellectuality, and spirituality. Each plane elaborates neocortical functions organized around one of the five special senses. The interactions among these five planes gives rise to a 5 x 5 matrix of subplanes, which are functions that coarsely describe the focus of neocortical regulation. Each of these 25 neocortical functions regulates each of five basic motives or drives that can be measured as temperaments or basic emotions related to fear, anger, disgust, surprise, and happiness/sadness. The resulting 5 x 5 x 5 matrix of human characteristics provides a general and testable model of the

  3. Structural and morphological evolution of thrust wedges above a ductile layer with different viscous behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerca, M.; Barrientos, B.; Garcia-Marquez, J.; Portillo-Pineda, R.; Hernandez-Bernal, C.

    2007-05-01

    photography. The use of these combined techniques permitted to obtain a full-field and high resolution map of the changes in elevation during deformation and the instantaneous displacement field of the particles in the surface. The detailed analysis of the instantaneous displacement field also suggests an intimate link of the surface strain with viscous flow of the ductile layer. The presence of displacement instabilities, such as small vortex-like structures and changes in displacement direction, suggests non-steady flow of granular material in the surface of models during the initial steps of deformation in both cases. However, quasi-steady displacement field is reached significantly earlier in the case B (ca. 6 mm of bulk shortening) than in the case A model (ca. 31 mm of bulk shortening). Finally, taking into account the limitations of modeling (e.g., no erosion and deposition, no thermal evolution) the comparative analysis of the models with natural examples can give insights into the structural evolution of thrust wedges developed above décollement layers. Some characteristics of the Laramide shortening and its kinematics reconstruction in southern Mexico can thus be constrained with these models.

  4. Structural limits for evolutive capacities in complex molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Bergareche, A M; Ostolaza, J F

    1990-01-01

    The possibilities of evolution for a system with and without a code of translation from nucleic acids into proteins are evaluated. Our interest is mainly centred on the enzymatic RNA case since this molecule has, at the same time, reproductive and functional properties. After scanning the evolutive capacities of the enzymatic RNAs, including the possibility to play the role of "synthetase" which would match nucleic acids with amino acids as a transition step towards a code, we will try to show that due to their own functional limitative factors, the matching system (code) is necessary. This would be the only way to transform the formal complexity--complexity which has not entered into action before the translation process--into functional information to drive the instructive self-reproductive process. Once this stage is reached, the system could evolve without a limit.

  5. Atmospheric chemical and thermal structure evolution after one Titan year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Bampasidis, Georgios; Achterberg, Richard; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Vinatier, Sandrine; Nixon, Conor; Jennings, Donald; Teanby, Nicolas; Flasar, F. Michael; Carlson, Ronald; Orton, Glenn; Romani, Paul; Guandique, Ever

    2013-04-01

    Our radiative transfer code (ARTT) was applied to Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) data taken during Titan flybys from 2004-2010 and to the 1980 Voyager 1 flyby values inferred from the re-analysis of the Infrared Radiometer Spectrometer (IRIS) spectra [1], as well as to the intervening ground- and space- based observations (such as with ISO, [2]), providing us with a new view of the stratospheric evolution over a Titanian year (V1 encounter Ls=9° was reached in mid-2010). CIRS nadir and limb spectral [3,4] show variations in temperature and chemical composition in the stratosphere during the Cassini mission, before and after the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE). We find indication for a weakening of the temperature gradient with warming of the stratosphere and cooling of the lower mesosphere. In addition, we infer precise concentrations for the trace gases and their main isotopologues and find that the chemical composition in Titan's stratosphere varied significantly with latitude during the 6 terrestrial years investigated here, with increased mixing ratios towards the northern latitudes. In particular, we find a maximum enhancement of several gases observed at northern latitudes up to 50°N around mid-2009, at the time of the NSE. We find that this raise is followed by a rapid decrease in chemical inventory in 2010 probably due to changes in the cross vortex mixing or northward migration of the vortex boundary [5,6,7] consistent with the weakening thermal gradient. The finding also ties into the location of the maximum temperature gradient, which appears to be moving northward over the winter/spring season. The return of today's abundances close to the Voyager values (at the same season) is an indication that, as for the Earth, the solar radiation dominates over the other energy sources even at 10AU [8]. Nevertheless, the differences observed for some complex hydrocarbons in the North pole indicate that the other processes could be at play as well

  6. Domain tree-based analysis of protein architecture evolution.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Henricson, Anna; Hollich, Volker; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics behind domain architecture evolution is of great importance to unravel the functions of proteins. Complex architectures have been created throughout evolution by rearrangement and duplication events. An interesting question is how many times a particular architecture has been created, a form of convergent evolution or domain architecture reinvention. Previous studies have approached this issue by comparing architectures found in different species. We wanted to achieve a finer-grained analysis by reconstructing protein architectures on complete domain trees. The prevalence of domain architecture reinvention in 96 genomes was investigated with a novel domain tree-based method that uses maximum parsimony for inferring ancestral protein architectures. Domain architectures were taken from Pfam. To ensure robustness, we applied the method to bootstrap trees and only considered results with strong statistical support. We detected multiple origins for 12.4% of the scored architectures. In a much smaller data set, the subset of completely domain-assigned proteins, the figure was 5.6%. These results indicate that domain architecture reinvention is a much more common phenomenon than previously thought. We also determined which domains are most frequent in multiply created architectures and assessed whether specific functions could be attributed to them. However, no strong functional bias was found in architectures with multiple origins.

  7. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  8. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Kochanek, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    During the first year of the project we completed five papers, each of which represents a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. In the first paper, The Importance of Einstein Rings, we developed the first theory for the formation and structure of the Einstein rings formed by lensing extended sources like the host galaxies of quasar and radio sources. In the second paper, Cusped Mass Models Of Gravitational Lenses, we introduced a new class of lens models. In the third paper, Global Probes of the Impact of Baryons on Dark Matter Halos, we made the first globally consistent models for the separation distribution of gravitational lenses including both galaxy and cluster lenses. The last two papers explore the properties of two lenses in detail. During the second year we have focused more closely on the relationship of baryons and dark matter. In the third year we have been further examining the relationship between baryons and dark matter. In the present year we extended our statistical analysis of lens mass distributions using a self-similar model for the halo mass distribution as compared to the luminous galaxy.

  9. [Genomic structure of the autotetraploid oat species Avena macrostachya inferred from comparative analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 sequences: on the oat karyotype evolution during the early stages of the Avena species divergence].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V; Tiupa, N B; Kim, E S; Machs, E M; Loskutov, I G

    2005-05-01

    To examine the genomic structure of Avena macrostachya, internal transcribed spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, as well as nuclear 5.8S tRNA genes from three oat species with AsAs karyotype (A. wiestii, A. hirtula, and A. atlantica), and those from A. longiglumis (AlAl), A. canariensis (AcAc), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. pilosa, and A. clauda (CpCp) were sequenced. All species of the genus Avena examined represented a monophyletic group (bootstrap index = 98), within which two branches, i.e., species with A- and C-genomes, were distinguished (bootstrap indices = 100). The subject of our study, A. macrostachya, albeit belonging to the phylogenetic branch of C-genome oat species (karyotype with submetacentic and subacrocentric chromosomes), has preserved an isobrachyal karyotype, (i.e., that containing metacentric chromosomes), probably typical of the common Avena ancestor. It was suggested to classify the A. macrostachya genome as a specific form of C-genome, Cm-genome. Among the species from other genera studied, Arrhenatherum elatius was found to be the closest to Avena in ITS1 and ITS structure. Phylogenetic relationships between Avena and Helictotrichon remain intriguingly uncertain. The HPR389153 sequence from H. pratense genome was closest to the ITS1 sequences specific to the Avena A-genomes (p-distance = 0.0237), while the differences of this sequence from the ITS1 of A. macrostachya reached 0.1221. On the other hand, HAD389117 from H. adsurgens was close to the ITS1 specific to Avena C-genomes (p-distance = 0.0189), while its differences from the A-genome specific ITS1 sequences reached 0.1221. It seems likely that the appearance of highly polyploid (2n = 12-21x) species of H. pratense and H. adsurgens could be associated with interspecific hybridization involving Mediterranean oat species carrying A- and C-genomes. A hypothesis on the pathways of Avena chromosomes evolution during the early stages the oat species divergence is proposed.

  10. Detection of structural damage in multiwire cables by monitoring the entropy evolution of wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito; Aranda, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important civil structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads, their structural health can be compromised. The cables can also be submitted to mechanical contact, tension and energy propagation in addition to changes in size and material within their wires. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single wires and multiwire cables. The propagated guided waves are composed by an infinite number of vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. A system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The feasibility of using the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a high correlation between the entropy value and damage level of the cable. The proposed method has low sensitivity to noise and reduces the computational complexity found in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  11. Evolution of plant δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases from phylogenetic and structural perspectives

    DOE PAGES

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Makarova, Kira S.; Ruszkowski, Milosz; ...

    2015-08-03

    Proline plays a crucial role in cell growth and stress responses, and its accumulation is essential for the tolerance of adverse environmental conditions in plants. Two routes are used to biosynthesize proline in plants. The main route uses glutamate as a precursor, while in the other route proline is derived from ornithine. The terminal step of both pathways, the conversion of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) to L-proline, is catalyzed by P5C reductase (P5CR) using NADH or NADPH as a cofactor. Since P5CRs are important housekeeping enzymes, they are conserved across all domains of life and appear to be relatively unaffected throughout evolution.more » However, global analysis of these enzymes unveiled significant functional diversity in the preference for cofactors (NADPH vs. NADH), variation in metal dependence and the differences in the oligomeric state. In our study we investigated evolutionary patterns through phylogenetic and structural analysis of P5CR representatives from all kingdoms of life, with emphasis on the plant species. We attempted to correlate local sequence/structure variation among the functionally and structurally characterized members of the family.« less

  12. Deep Structure and Evolution of the Cyprus Arc, With Implications for the Tectonic Evolution of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Spakman, W.; Govers, R.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2006-12-01

    This study addresses the easternmost segment of the convergent plate boundary in the Mediterranean, encompassing the Cyprus arc and its connection to the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone and the Dead Sea fault. Seismic activity along the arc is limited (certainly relative to the adjacent Hellenic arc). Although marine geophysical surveys have elucidated many pertinent features of the region, the plate boundary configuration is not well understood. Therefore, we use seismic tomography results to study the deep structure of this plate boundary segment. We find that the deep structure of the eastern part of the Cyprus arc, exhibiting a broad zone of sinistral deformation at the surface, is very similar to the eastern segment of the Hellenic subduction zone. A slab related anomaly is missing here in the upper mantle, and this part can be identified as a STEP fault zone (Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator; see Govers and Wortel, EPSL, v. 236, p. 505-523, 2005), allowing S-SW directed slab retreat. We propose that the inception of the STEP fault and the associated back-arc extension is triggered by the continental collision and subsequent slab detachment in the Bitlis suture to the east. From a quantitative analysis of tomographic anomalies in the mantle below the Bitlis suture zone (Hafkenscheid et al., JGR, v. 111, 2006) slab detachment is inferred to have taken place at 8-12 Ma, the younger end of this age range being more pertinent for the westernmost Bitlis segment. Slab detachment creates an edge to the subducting slab, which is a favourable condition for the inception of a STEP fault. The slab in the central part of the Cypus arc has become detached possibly resulting from the collision with the Eratosthenes Seamount in the (Late) Pliocene. Only in the northwestern segment of the arc below the Antalya Basin and the Isparta Angle the slab appears to be continuous. The short duration of the time window between inception of STEP faulting and collision with the

  13. Structural and functional evolution of chitinase-like proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Pooja; Patil, Dipak Narhari; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-05-01

    The plant genome contains a large number of sequences that encode catalytically inactive chitinases referred to as chitinase-like proteins (CLPs). Although CLPs share high sequence and structural homology with chitinases of glycosyl hydrolase 18 (TIM barrel domain) and 19 families, they may lack the binding/catalytic activity. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that gene duplication events followed by mutation in the existing chitinase gene have resulted in the loss of activity. The evidences show that adaptive functional diversification of the CLPs has been achieved through alterations in the flexible regions than in the rigid structural elements. The CLPs plays an important role in the defense response against pathogenic attack, biotic and abiotic stress. They are also involved in the growth and developmental processes of plants. Since the physiological roles of CLPs are similar to chitinase, such mutations have led to plurifunctional enzymes. The biochemical and structural characterization of the CLPs is essential for understanding their roles and to develop potential utility in biotechnological industries. This review sheds light on the structure-function evolution of CLPs from chitinases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The Role of Evolutionary Selection in the Dynamics of Protein Structure Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Amy I; Marshall-Christensen, Ahmee; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2017-04-11

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting a protein's structure. This approach is successful because proteins whose sequences are only 30% identical still adopt the same structure, while structure similarity rapidly deteriorates beyond the 30% threshold. By studying the divergence of protein structure as sequence evolves in real proteins and in evolutionary simulations, we show that this nonlinear sequence-structure relationship emerges as a result of selection for protein folding stability in divergent evolution. Fitness constraints prevent the emergence of unstable protein evolutionary intermediates, thereby enforcing evolutionary paths that preserve protein structure despite broad sequence divergence. However, on longer timescales, evolution is punctuated by rare events where the fitness barriers obstructing structure evolution are overcome and discovery of new structures occurs. We outline biophysical and evolutionary rationale for broad variation in protein family sizes, prevalence of compact structures among ancient proteins, and more rapid structure evolution of proteins with lower packing density. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Observations of the structure and evolution of solar flares with a soft X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.; Gibson, E. G.; Landecker, P. B.; Mckenzie, D. L.; Underwood, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Soft X ray flare events were observed with the S-056 X-ray telescope that was part of the ATM complement of instruments aboard SKYLAB. Analyses of these data are reported. The observations are summarized and a detailed discussion of the X-ray flare structures is presented. The data indicated that soft X-ray emitted by a flare come primarily from an intense well-defined core surrounded by a region of fainter, more diffuse emission. An analysis of flare evolution indicates evidence for preliminary heating and energy release prior to the main phase of the flare. Core features are found to be remarkably stable and retain their shape throughout a flare. Most changes in the overall configuration seem to be result of the appearance, disappearance or change in brightness of individual features, rather than the restructuring or reorientation of these features. Brief comparisons with several theories are presented.

  16. Structure and property evolutions of ECAPed 7075 Al alloy during annealing.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Liao, Xiaozhou; Zhu, Y. T.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2004-01-01

    Structure and microhardness evolutions of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) processed and coarse-grained (CG) 7075 A1 alloys during differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microhardness measurements. After one-month aging at room temperature, the microhardness of the ECAP processed sample is about 50% larger than that of the CG sample. During DSC annealing, the microhardness of the ECAP processed sample decreased gradually, while a hardening peak appeared for the CG sample. XRD and TEM show that the hardening peak of the CG sample was mainly caused by the precipitation hardening of the Guinier-Preston (GP) zone. For the ECAP processed sample, upon annealing the microstrain (dislocation density) decreased and the crystallites grew, which decreased the hardness and overcompensated the GP zone precipitation hardening. DSC analysis indicates ECAP process only promoted the phase precipitation, but did not change the sequence of phase precipitation.

  17. Evolution of technologies applied to space and aeronautic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiven, H.

    Advanced materials in aerospace structures and their use in reusable launch vehicles are discussed. It is found that composite materials can be used for structures with temperatures up to 400 C, and for most structures with heat shielding. For structures with temperatures up to 1000 C, metals such as Norsial, based on rene alloys could be used. It is concluded that a combination of silicon and carbon composites with Aerocoat/TH hydrotranspiration heat shielding give a heat flux resistant structure with no thermal dilation problems.

  18. Structure and Evolution of Internally Heated Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2017-08-01

    Hot Jupiters receive strong stellar irradiation, producing equilibrium temperatures of 1000{--}2500 {{K}}. Incoming irradiation directly heats just their thin outer layer, down to pressures of ∼0.1 bars. In standard irradiated evolution models of hot Jupiters, predicted transit radii are too small. Previous studies have shown that deeper heating—at a small fraction of the heating rate from irradiation—can explain observed radii. Here we present a suite of evolution models for HD 209458b, where we systematically vary both the depth and intensity of internal heating, without specifying the uncertain heating mechanism(s). Our models start with a hot, high-entropy planet whose radius decreases as the convective interior cools. The applied heating suppresses this cooling. We find that very shallow heating—at pressures of 1{--}10 {bars}—does not significantly suppress cooling, unless the total heating rate is ≳ 10 % of the incident stellar power. Deeper heating, at 100 bars, requires heating at only 1% of the stellar irradiation to explain the observed transit radius of 1.4{R}{Jup} after 5 Gyr of cooling. In general, more intense and deeper heating results in larger hot-Jupiter radii. Surprisingly, we find that heat deposited at {10}4 {bars}—which is exterior to ≈ 99 % of the planet’s mass—suppresses planetary cooling as effectively as heating at the center. In summary, we find that relatively shallow heating is required to explain the radii of most hot Jupiters, provided that this heat is applied early and persists throughout their evolution.

  19. Evolution of the structure and function of the vertebrate tongue.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2002-07-01

    Studies of the comparative morphology of the tongues of living vertebrates have revealed how variations in the morphology and function of the organ might be related to evolutional events. The tongue, which plays a very important role in food intake by vertebrates, exhibits significant morphological variations that appear to represent adaptation to the current environmental conditions of each respective habitat. This review examines the fundamental importance of morphology in the evolution of the vertebrate tongue, focusing on the origin of the tongue and on the relationship between morphology and environmental conditions. Tongues of various extant vertebrates, including those of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, were analysed in terms of gross anatomy and microanatomy by light microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Comparisons of tongue morphology revealed a relationship between changes in the appearance of the tongue and changes in habitat, from a freshwater environment to a terrestrial environment, as well as a relationship between the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium and the transition from a moist or wet environment to a dry environment. The lingual epithelium of amphibians is devoid of keratinization while that of reptilians is keratinized to different extents. Reptiles live in a variety of habitats, from seawater to regions of high temperature and very high or very low humidity. Keratinization of the lingual epithelium is considered to have been acquired concomitantly with the evolution of amniotes. The variations in the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium, which is observed between various amniotes, appear to be secondary, reflecting the environmental conditions of different species.

  20. Evolution of the structure and function of the vertebrate tongue

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Studies of the comparative morphology of the tongues of living vertebrates have revealed how variations in the morphology and function of the organ might be related to evolutional events. The tongue, which plays a very important role in food intake by vertebrates, exhibits significant morphological variations that appear to represent adaptation to the current environmental conditions of each respective habitat. This review examines the fundamental importance of morphology in the evolution of the vertebrate tongue, focusing on the origin of the tongue and on the relationship between morphology and environmental conditions. Tongues of various extant vertebrates, including those of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, were analysed in terms of gross anatomy and microanatomy by light microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Comparisons of tongue morphology revealed a relationship between changes in the appearance of the tongue and changes in habitat, from a freshwater environment to a terrestrial environment, as well as a relationship between the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium and the transition from a moist or wet environment to a dry environment. The lingual epithelium of amphibians is devoid of keratinization while that of reptilians is keratinized to different extents. Reptiles live in a variety of habitats, from seawater to regions of high temperature and very high or very low humidity. Keratinization of the lingual epithelium is considered to have been acquired concomitantly with the evolution of amniotes. The variations in the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium, which is observed between various amniotes, appear to be secondary, reflecting the environmental conditions of different species. PMID:12171472

  1. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0243 TITLE: Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1...reconstruct tumor cell evolution in tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NSCLC; tumor evolution ; whole exome sequencing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  2. 64 FR 50112 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-09-15

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Advisory Subcommittee AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee... Chandra Observatory --Report from the Structure and Evolution of the Universe Forum --Status of Office of...

  3. 61 FR 67576 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-12-23

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the... includes the following topics: --Status of Ongoing Missions --Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU...

  4. 66 FR 33715 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2001-06-25

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee... Administrator's Program Status Report --Report on the Structure and Evolution of the Universe Annual State of...

  5. 61 FR 20839 - NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), Structure and Evolution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-05-08

    ... and Evolution of the Universe Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the NASA Advisory Council, Space Science Advisory Committee, Structure and Evolution of the... topics: --Structure and Evolution of the Universe Strategic Planning --Status of Ongoing and Planned...

  6. Track structure: time evolution from physics to chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dingfelder, M

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses interaction cross sections of charged particles (electrons, protons, light ions) with atoms and molecules. The focus is on biological relevant targets like liquid water which serves as a substitute of soft tissue in most Monte Carlo codes. The spatial distribution of energy deposition patterns by different radiation qualities and their importance to the time evolution from the physical to the chemical stage or radiation response is discussed. The determination of inelastic interaction cross sections for charged particles in condensed matter is discussed within the relativistic plane-wave Born approximation and semi-empirical models. The dielectric-response-function of liquid water is discussed.

  7. Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  8. Bifurcation analysis of a model for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulelzai, M. A. K