Science.gov

Sample records for analytic energy level

  1. Saturation of Energy Levels in Analytical Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. II. Experimental.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-30

    RESEARCH Contract N14-76-C-0838 Task Ao. NR 051-622 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 34 SATURATION OF ENERGY LEVELS IN ANALYTICAL ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY II...an assumption which is valid only if the daral o’l of 111, cxcilIatio n pulse is mucl ) longer than the fluorescence life- time of the tjaii!,ition

  2. Accuracy of analytic energy level formulas applied to hadronic spectroscopy of heavy mesons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Forooz F.; Norbury, John W.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Linear and harmonic potential models are used in the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation to obtain article mass spectra for mesons as bound states of quarks. The main emphasis is on the linear potential where exact solutions of the S-state eigenvalues and eigenfunctions and the asymptotic solution for the higher order partial wave are obtained. A study of the accuracy of two analytical energy level formulas as applied to heavy mesons is also included. Cornwall's formula is found to be particularly accurate and useful as a predictor of heavy quarkonium states. Exact solution for all partial waves of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a harmonic potential is also obtained and compared with the calculated discrete spectra of the linear potential. Detailed derivations of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the linear and harmonic potentials are presented in appendixes.

  3. Vibrational Energy Levels via Finite-Basis Calculations Using a Quasi-Analytic Form of the Kinetic Energy.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Juana; Harding, Michael E; Stanton, John F; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-05-10

    A variational method for the calculation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules with small amplitude vibrations is presented. The approach is based on the Watson Hamiltonian in rectilinear normal coordinates and characterized by a quasi-analytic integration over the kinetic energy operator (KEO). The KEO beyond the harmonic approximation is represented by a Taylor series in terms of the rectilinear normal coordinates around the equilibrium configuration. This formulation of the KEO enables its extension to arbitrary order until numerical convergence is reached for those states describing small amplitude motions and suitably represented with a rectilinear system of coordinates. A Gauss-Hermite quadrature grid representation of the anharmonic potential is used for all the benchmark examples presented. Results for a set of molecules with linear and nonlinear configurations, i.e., CO2, H2O, and formyl fluoride (HFCO), illustrate the performance of the method and the versatility of our implementation.

  4. Multi-Level Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Two Composite Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45 deg/-45 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg] with respect to the vertical, or crush, direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soil, which is characterized as a sand/clay mixture. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  5. Analytic example of a free energy functional

    PubMed

    Tutschka; Kahl

    2000-09-01

    We use the ideas of Percus for the construction of classical density functionals for two model interactions: simple hard spheres and adhesive hard spheres (AHSs). The required input, the properties of the uniform fluid, is taken from the analytic mean spherical solution for these two systems. For hard spheres we derive-via a bilinear decomposition of the direct correlation functions-a set of basis functions, which is the same as the one presented by Rosenfeld in his fundamental measure theory framework. For AHSs additional basis functions have to be considered to ensure the bilinear decomposition of the direct correlation functions; we present an expression for the free energy functional for the one-component case.

  6. Analytic computation of average energy of neutrons inducing fission

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Alexander Rich

    2016-08-12

    The objective of this report is to describe how I analytically computed the average energy of neutrons that induce fission in the bare BeRP ball. The motivation of this report is to resolve a discrepancy between the average energy computed via the FMULT and F4/FM cards in MCNP6 by comparison to the analytic results.

  7. High-Dimensional Topological Insulators with Quaternionic Analytic Landau Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Wu, Congjun

    2013-05-01

    We study the three-dimensional topological insulators in the continuum by coupling spin-1/2 fermions to the Aharonov-Casher SU(2) gauge field. They exhibit flat Landau levels in which orbital angular momentum and spin are coupled with a fixed helicity. The three-dimensional lowest Landau level wave functions exhibit the quaternionic analyticity as a generalization of the complex analyticity of the two-dimensional case. Each Landau level contributes one branch of gapless helical Dirac modes to the surface spectra, whose topological properties belong to the Z2 class. The flat Landau levels can be generalized to an arbitrary dimension. Interaction effects and experimental realizations are also studied.

  8. Analytical model for nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvesting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiss, S.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Kroener, M.; Woias, P.

    2014-10-01

    In this work we propose analytical expressions for the jump-up and jump-down point of a nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester. In addition, analytical expressions for the maximum power output at optimal resistive load and the 3 dB-bandwidth are derived. So far, only numerical models have been used to describe the physics of a piezoelectric energy harvester. However, this approach is not suitable to quickly evaluate different geometrical designs or piezoelectric materials in the harvester design process. In addition, the analytical expressions could be used to predict the jump-frequencies of a harvester during operation. In combination with a tuning mechanism, this would allow the design of an efficient control algorithm to ensure that the harvester is always working on the oscillator's high energy attractor.

  9. Data and Analytics to Inform Energy Retrofit of High Performance Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Yang, Le; Hill, David; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-25

    Buildings consume more than one-third of the world?s primary energy. Reducing energy use in buildings with energy efficient technologies is feasible and also driven by energy policies such as energy benchmarking, disclosure, rating, and labeling in both the developed and developing countries. Current energy retrofits focus on the existing building stocks, especially older buildings, but the growing number of new high performance buildings built around the world raises a question that how these buildings perform and whether there are retrofit opportunities to further reduce their energy use. This is a new and unique problem for the building industry. Traditional energy audit or analysis methods are inadequate to look deep into the energy use of the high performance buildings. This study aims to tackle this problem with a new holistic approach powered by building performance data and analytics. First, three types of measured data are introduced, including the time series energy use, building systems operating conditions, and indoor and outdoor environmental parameters. An energy data model based on the ISO Standard 12655 is used to represent the energy use in buildings in a three-level hierarchy. Secondly, a suite of analytics were proposed to analyze energy use and to identify retrofit measures for high performance buildings. The data-driven analytics are based on monitored data at short time intervals, and cover three levels of analysis ? energy profiling, benchmarking and diagnostics. Thirdly, the analytics were applied to a high performance building in California to analyze its energy use and identify retrofit opportunities, including: (1) analyzing patterns of major energy end-use categories at various time scales, (2) benchmarking the whole building total energy use as well as major end-uses against its peers, (3) benchmarking the power usage effectiveness for the data center, which is the largest electricity consumer in this building, and (4) diagnosing HVAC

  10. Roll levelling semi-analytical model for process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, E.; Garcia, D.; Galdos, L.; Saenz de Argandoña, E.; Mendiguren, J.

    2016-08-01

    Roll levelling is a primary manufacturing process used to remove residual stresses and imperfections of metal strips in order to make them suitable for subsequent forming operations. In the last years the importance of this process has been evidenced with the apparition of Ultra High Strength Steels with strength > 900 MPa. The optimal setting of the machine as well as a robust machine design has become critical for the correct processing of these materials. Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis is the widely used technique for both aspects. However, in this case, the FEM simulation times are above the admissible ones in both machine development and process optimization. In the present work, a semi-analytical model based on a discrete bending theory is presented. This model is able to calculate the critical levelling parameters i.e. force, plastification rate, residual stresses in a few seconds. First the semi-analytical model is presented. Next, some experimental industrial cases are analyzed by both the semi-analytical model and the conventional FEM model. Finally, results and computation times of both methods are compared.

  11. Use of groundwater levels with the PULSE analytical model.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Albert T

    2014-01-01

    The PULSE analytical model, which calculates daily groundwater discharge on the basis of user-specified recharge, was originally developed for calibration using streamflow data. This article describes a model application in which groundwater level data constitute the primary control on model input. As a test case, data were analyzed from a small basin in central Pennsylvania in which extensive groundwater level data are available. The timing and intensity of daily water-level rises are used to ascertain temporal distribution of recharge, and the simulated groundwater discharge hydrograph has shape features that are similar to the streamflow hydrograph. This article does not include details about calibration, but some steps are illustrated and general procedures are described for calibration in specific hydrologic studies. The PULSE model can be used to assess results of fully automated base flow methods and can be used to define groundwater recharge and discharge at a relatively small time scale.

  12. Two-level laser: Analytical results and the laser transition

    SciTech Connect

    Gartner, Paul

    2011-11-15

    The problem of the two-level laser is studied analytically. The steady-state solution is expressed as a continued fraction and allows for accurate approximation by rational functions. Moreover, we show that the abrupt change observed in the pump dependence of the steady-state population is directly connected to the transition to the lasing regime. The condition for a sharp transition to Poissonian statistics is expressed as a scaling limit of vanishing cavity loss and light-matter coupling, {kappa}{yields}0, g{yields}0, such that g{sup 2}/{kappa} stays finite and g{sup 2}/{kappa}>2{gamma}, where {gamma} is the rate of nonradiative losses. The same scaling procedure is also shown to describe a similar change to the Poisson distribution in the Scully-Lamb laser model, suggesting that the low-{kappa}, low-g asymptotics is of more general significance for the laser transition.

  13. CoNNECT: Data Analytics for Energy Efficient Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Energy efficiency is the lowest cost option being promoted for achieving a sustainable energy policy. Thus, there have been some innovations to reduce residential and commercial energy usage. There have also been calls to the utility companies to give customers access to timely, useful, and actionable information about their energy use, in order to unleash additional innovations in homes and businesses. Hence, some web-based tools have been developed for the public to access and compare energy usage data. In order to advance on these efforts, we propose a data analytics framework called Citizen Engagement for Energy Efficient Communities (CoNNECT). On the one hand, CoNNECT will help households to understand (i) the patterns in their energy consumption over time and how those patterns correlate with weather data, (ii) how their monthly consumption compares to other households living in houses of similar size and age within the same geographic areas, and (iii) what other customers are doing to reduce their energy consumption. We hope that the availability of such data and analysis to the public will facilitate energy efficiency efforts in residential buildings. These capabilities formed the public portal of the CoNNECT framework. On the other hand, CoNNECT will help the utility companies to better understand their customers by making available to the utilities additional datasets that they naturally do not have access to, which could help them develop focused services for their customers. These additional capabilities are parts of the utility portal of the CoNNECT framework. In this paper, we describe the CoNNECT framework, the sources of the data used in its development, the functionalities of both the public and utility portals, and the application of empirical mode decomposition for decomposing usage signals into mode functions with the hope that such mode functions could help in clustering customers into unique groups and in developing guidelines for energy

  14. Trace level detection of analytes using artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for detecting the presence of an analyte, such as for example, a lightweight device, including: a sample chamber having a fluid inlet port for the influx of the analyte; a fluid concentrator in flow communication with the sample chamber wherein the fluid concentrator has an absorbent material capable of absorbing the analyte and capable of desorbing a concentrated analyte; and an array of sensors in fluid communication with the concentrated analyte to be released from the fluid concentrator.

  15. Analytic energy gradients in closed-shell coupled-cluster theory with spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2008-11-07

    Gradients in closed-shell coupled-cluster (CC) theory with spin-orbit coupling included in the post Hartree-Fock treatment have been implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level and at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The additional computational effort required in analytic energy-gradient calculations is roughly the same as that for ground-state energy calculations in the case of CCSD, and it is about twice in the case of CCSD(T) calculations. The structures, harmonic frequencies, and dipole moments of some heavy-element compounds have been calculated using the present analytic energy-gradient techniques including spin-orbit coupling. The results show that spin-orbit coupling can have a significant influence on both the equilibrium structure and the harmonic vibrational frequencies and that its inclusion is essential to obtain reliable and accurate estimates for geometrical parameters of heavy-element compounds.

  16. 21 CFR 530.22 - Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Safe levels and analytical methods for food... § 530.22 Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals. (a) FDA may establish a safe... analytical method; or (3) Establish a safe level based on other appropriate scientific, technical,...

  17. 21 CFR 530.22 - Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe levels and analytical methods for food... § 530.22 Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals. (a) FDA may establish a safe... analytical method; or (3) Establish a safe level based on other appropriate scientific, technical,...

  18. 21 CFR 530.22 - Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe levels and analytical methods for food... § 530.22 Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals. (a) FDA may establish a safe... analytical method; or (3) Establish a safe level based on other appropriate scientific, technical,...

  19. 21 CFR 530.22 - Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... analytical method; or (3) Establish a safe level based on other appropriate scientific, technical, or... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe levels and analytical methods for food... § 530.22 Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals. (a) FDA may establish a...

  20. Trace level detection of analytes using artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  1. Variation of analytical results for peanuts in energy bars and milk chocolate.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, Mary W; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Williams, Kristina M; Brewer, Vickery A; Whittaker, Paul; Heeres, James T

    2004-01-01

    Peanuts contain proteins that can cause severe allergic reactions in some sensitized individuals. Studies were conducted to determine the percentage of recovery by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in the analysis for peanuts in energy bars and milk chocolate and to determine the sampling, subsampling, and analytical variances associated with testing energy bars and milk chocolate for peanuts. Food products containing chocolate were selected because their composition makes sample preparation for subsampling difficult. Peanut-contaminated energy bars, noncontaminated energy bars, incurred milk chocolate containing known levels of peanuts, and peanut-free milk chocolate were used. A commercially available ELISA kit was used for analysis. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances associated with each step of the test procedure to measure peanut protein were determined for energy bars. The sample preparation and analytical variances were determined for milk chocolate. Variances were found to be functions of peanut concentration. Sampling and subsampling variability associated with energy bars accounted for 96.6% of the total testing variability. Subsampling variability associated with powdered milk chocolate accounted for >60% of the total testing variability. The variability among peanut test results can be reduced by increasing sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses. For energy bars the effect of increasing sample size from 1 to 4 bars, subsample size from 5 to 20 g, and number of aliquots quantified from 1 to 2 on reducing the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance was demonstrated. For powdered milk chocolate, the effects of increasing subsample size from 5 to 20 g and number of aliquots quantified from 1 to 2 on reducing sample preparation and analytical variances were demonstrated. This study serves as a template for application to other foods, and for extrapolation to different sizes of samples and

  2. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  3. 21 CFR 530.40 - Safe levels and availability of analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe levels and availability of analytical methods... Safe levels and availability of analytical methods. (a) In accordance with § 530.22, the following safe... accordance with § 530.22, the following analytical methods have been accepted by FDA:...

  4. 21 CFR 530.40 - Safe levels and availability of analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Safe levels and availability of analytical methods... Safe levels and availability of analytical methods. (a) In accordance with § 530.22, the following safe... accordance with § 530.22, the following analytical methods have been accepted by FDA:...

  5. 21 CFR 530.40 - Safe levels and availability of analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe levels and availability of analytical methods... Safe levels and availability of analytical methods. (a) In accordance with § 530.22, the following safe... accordance with § 530.22, the following analytical methods have been accepted by FDA:...

  6. 21 CFR 530.40 - Safe levels and availability of analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe levels and availability of analytical methods... Safe levels and availability of analytical methods. (a) In accordance with § 530.22, the following safe... accordance with § 530.22, the following analytical methods have been accepted by FDA:...

  7. 21 CFR 530.40 - Safe levels and availability of analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe levels and availability of analytical methods... Safe levels and availability of analytical methods. (a) In accordance with § 530.22, the following safe... accordance with § 530.22, the following analytical methods have been accepted by FDA:...

  8. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  9. Trace level detection of analytes using artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for detecting the presence of an analyte, wherein said analyte is a microorganism marker gas. The device comprises a sample chamber having a fluid inlet port for the influx of the microorganism marker gas; a fluid concentrator in flow communication with the sample chamber, wherein the fluid concentrator has an absorbent material capable of absorbing the microorganism marker gas and thereafter releasing a concentrated microorganism marker gas; and an array of sensors in fluid communication with the concentrated microorganism marker gas. The sensor array detects and identifies the marker gas upon its release from fluid concentrate.

  10. Energy levels of bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, D. R.; Zarenia, M.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Within a tight binding approach we investigate the energy levels of hexagonal and triangular bilayer graphene (BLG) quantum dots (QDs) with zigzag and armchair edges. We study AA- and AB- (Bernal) stacked BLG QDs and obtain the energy levels in both the absence and the presence of a perpendicular electric field (i.e., biased BLG QDs). Our results show that the size dependence of the energy levels is different from that of monolayer graphene QDs. The energy spectrum of AB-stacked BLG QDs with zigzag edges exhibits edge states which spread out into the opened energy gap in the presence of a perpendicular electric field. We found that the behavior of these edges states is different for the hexagonal and triangular geometries. In the case of AA-stacked BLG QDs, the electron and hole energy levels cross each other in both cases of armchair and zigzag edges as the dot size or the applied bias increases.

  11. State-Level Benefits of Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2007-02-01

    This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency. Standard residential and industrial programs typically identify between 20 to 30% energy savings in homes and plants, respectively. Over a 20 year period of time, an average state that aggressively pursues even a limited array of energy efficiency programs can potentially reduce total state energy use by as much as 20%. Benefit-cost ratios of effective energy efficiency programs typically exceed 3 to 1 and are much higher when non-energy and macroeconomic benefits are included. Indeed, energy efficiency and associated programs and investments can create significant numbers of new jobs and enhance state tax revenues. Several states have incorporated energy efficiency into their economic development programs. It should also be noted that increasing amounts of venture capital are being invested in the energy sector in general and in specific technologies like solar power in particular. Well-designed energy efficiency programs can be expected to help overcome numerous barriers to the market penetration of energy efficient technologies and accelerate the market penetration of the technologies.

  12. A Global Analytical Representation of the Potential Energy Surface of the FHF(-) Anion.

    PubMed

    Cornaton, Yann; Marquardt, Roberto

    2016-08-04

    A global analytical representation of the potential energy hypersurface of the lowest adiabatic electronic state of the FHF(-) anion is derived from ab initio calculations at the coupled cluster level of theory with full single and double and perturbative triple excitations using explicitly correlated atomic basis functions. The new compact function of interatomic distances combines covalent short-range and long-range electrostatic interaction forms and assesses accurately both the lowest reaction channels between the F(-) and HF fragments, with reaction enthalpies to within 1 kJ mol(-1), as well as vibrational terms to within 1.5 cm(-1) deviation from experimental values.

  13. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  14. Matching renewable energy systems to village-level energy needs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, J.H.; Neuendorffer, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    This report provides a five step process for matching alternative renewable energy technologies with energy needs in rural villages of developing countries. Analytic tools are given for each of the five steps as well as information that can be expected. Twelve characterization criteria are developed to assist in the matching process. Three of these criteria, called discrimination criteria, are used for preliminary screening of technology possibilities for each need. The other criteria address site-specific temporal, climatic, social, cultural, and environmental characteristics of the energy need, technology, and cost considerations. To illustrate the matching process, seven basic human needs for energy are matched with seven potential renewable energy technologies. The final portion of the paper discusses the advantages of such a matching process and the resources required to initiate such an effort within a development project. Specific recommendations are given for field-testing this process and actions that could be taken immediately in basic research and development, applied research and technology modification, demonstrations, and commercialization to assist in the future diffusion of renewable energy technologies to rural areas of developing countries.

  15. Soft mean spherical approximation for dusty plasma liquids: Level of accuracy and analytic expressions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Angelis, U. de

    2015-08-15

    The soft mean spherical approximation is employed for the study of the thermodynamics of dusty plasma liquids, the latter treated as Yukawa one-component plasmas. Within this integral theory method, the only input necessary for the calculation of the reduced excess energy stems from the solution of a single non-linear algebraic equation. Consequently, thermodynamic quantities can be routinely computed without the need to determine the pair correlation function or the structure factor. The level of accuracy of the approach is quantified after an extensive comparison with numerical simulation results. The approach is solved over a million times with input spanning the whole parameter space and reliable analytic expressions are obtained for the basic thermodynamic quantities.

  16. Energy levels of hybrid monolayer-bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Ketabi, S. A.; da Costa, D. R.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-04-01

    Often real samples of graphene consist of islands of both monolayer and bilayer graphene. Bound states in such hybrid quantum dots are investigated for (i) a circular single-layer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite bilayer graphene sheet and (ii) a circular bilayer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite single-layer graphene. Using the continuum model and applying zigzag boundary conditions at the single-layer-bilayer graphene interface, we obtain analytical results for the energy levels and the corresponding wave spinors. Their dependence on perpendicular magnetic and electric fields are studied for both types of quantum dots. The energy levels exhibit characteristics of interface states, and we find anticrossings and closing of the energy gap in the presence of a bias potential.

  17. An Integrated Geovisual Analytics Framework for Analysis of Energy Consumption Data and Renewable Energy Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Kramer, Ian S; Kodysh, Jeffrey B; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Steed, Chad A; Karthik, Rajasekar; Nugent, Philip J; Myers, Aaron T

    2012-01-01

    We present an integrated geovisual analytics framework for utility consumers to interactively analyze and benchmark their energy consumption. The framework uses energy and property data already available with the utility companies and county governments respectively. The motivation for the developed framework is the need for citizens to go beyond the conventional utility bills in understanding the patterns in their energy consumption. There is also a need for citizens to go beyond one-time improvements that are often not monitored and measured over time. Some of the features of the framework include the ability for citizens to visualize their historical energy consumption data along with weather data in their location. The quantity of historical energy data available is significantly more than what is available from utility bills. An overlay of the weather data provides users with a visual correlation between weather patterns and their energy consumption patterns. Another feature of the framework is the ability for citizens to compare their consumption on an aggregated basis to that of their peers other citizens living in houses of similar size and age and within the same or different geographical boundaries, such as subdivision, zip code, or county. The users could also compare their consumption to others based on the size of their family and other attributes. This feature could help citizens determine if they are among the best in class . The framework can also be used by the utility companies to better understand their customers and to plan their services. To make the framework easily accessible, it is developed to be compatible with mobile consumer electronics devices.

  18. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  19. Process models: analytical tools for managing industrial energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Balzer, C; Sparrow, F T

    1980-01-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy systems is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for managing industrial energy systems.

  20. Vibrational energies and full analytic potential energy functions of PbI and InI from pure microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Ji Ho; Köckert, Hansjochen; Mullaney, John C.; Stephens, Susanna L.; Evans, Corey J.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Le Roy, Robert. J.

    2016-12-01

    Pure rotational spectra of PbI and InI are interpreted to yield a full analytic potential energy function for each molecule. Rotational spectra for PbI have been retrieved from literature sources to perform the analysis. Rotational transition frequencies for excited vibrational states of InI (0 < v < 11) are measured during this work. Ignoring hyperfine splittings, Bv and Dv values are used to generate a set of "synthetic" pure R (0) transitions for each vibrational level. These are then fitted to an "Expanded Morse Oscillator" (EMO) potential using the direct-potential-fit program, dPOTFIT. The well-depth parameter, De , is fixed at a literature value, while values of the equilibrium distance re and EMO exponent-coefficient expansion (potential-shape) parameters are determined from the fits. Comparison with potential functions determined after including older mid-IR and visible electronic transition data shows that our analysis of the pure microwave data alone yields potential energy functions that accurately predict (to better than 1%) the overtone vibrational energies far beyond the range spanned by the levels for which the microwave data is available.

  1. Analytical expressions for partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices at ground-state energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Leaning upon the Fock method of the stereographic projection of the three-dimensional momentum space onto the four-dimensional unit sphere the possibility of the analytical solving of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation for the partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrix at the ground bound state energy has been studied. In this case new expressions for the partial p-, d- and f-wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices have been obtained in the simple analytical form. The developed approach can also be extended to determine analytically the partial wave Coulomb transition matrices at the energies of excited bound states.

  2. Vibrational energy levels of CH5+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2008-12-01

    We present a parallelized contracted basis-iterative method for calculating numerically exact vibrational energy levels of CH5+ (a 12-dimensional calculation). We use Radau polyspherical coordinates and basis functions that are products of eigenfunctions of bend and stretch Hamiltonians. The bend eigenfunctions are computed in a nondirect product basis with more than 200×106 functions and the stretch functions are computed in a product potential optimized discrete variable basis. The basis functions have amplitude in all of the 120 equivalent minima. Many low-lying levels are well converged. We find that the energy level pattern is determined in part by the curvature and width of the valley connecting the minima and in part by the slope of the walls of this valley but does not depend on the height or shape of the barriers separating the minima.

  3. Developing an Analytical Framework for Argumentation on Energy Consumption Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Mehl, Cathy E.; Lan, Deborah H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to develop a framework for analyzing the argumentation practice of high school students and high school graduates. We developed the framework in a specific context--how energy consumption activities such as changing diet, converting forests into farmlands, and choosing transportation modes affect the carbon cycle. The…

  4. Analytic function for the H + CH/sub 3/ in equilibrium CH/sub 4/ potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Duchovic, R.J.; Hase, W.L.; Schlegel, H.B.

    1984-03-29

    An analytic function for the ground electronic state CH/sub 4/ in equilibrium CH/sub 3/ + H potential energy surface is proposed. This model makes use of a switching-function formalism and is based on both spectroscopic data and ab initio calculations at the MP4/6-31G** level. The proposed general symmetric analytic potential is suitable for use in quasiclassical trajectory studies of the CH/sub 4/ in equilibrium CH/sub 3/ + H reaction. 9 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Fermi level stabilization energy in cadmium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D. T.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Mao, S. S.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-04-08

    We have studied the effects of high concentrations of native point defects on the electrical and optical properties of CdO. The defects were introduced by irradiation with high energy He+, Ne+, Ar+ and C+ ions. Increasing the irradiation damage with particles heavier than He+ increases the electron concentration until a saturation level of 5x1020 cm-3 is reached. In contrast, due to the ionic character and hence strong dynamic annealing of CdO, irradiation with much lighter He+ stabilizes the electron concentration at a much lower level of 1.7x1020 cm-3. A large shift of the optical absorption edge with increasing electron concentration in irradiated samples is explained by the Burstein-Moss shift corrected for electron-electron and electron-ion interactions. The saturation of the electron concentration and the optical absorption edge energy are consistent with a defect induced stabilization of the Fermi energy at 1 eV above the conduction band edge. The result is in a good agreement with previously determined Fermi level pinning energies on CdO surfaces. The results indicate that CdO shares many similarities with InN, as both materials exhibit extremely large electron affinities and an unprecedented propensity for n-type conductivity.

  6. A Bayesian Multi-Level Factor Analytic Model of Consumer Price Sensitivities across Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvvuri, Sri Devi; Gruca, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying price sensitive consumers is an important problem in marketing. We develop a Bayesian multi-level factor analytic model of the covariation among household-level price sensitivities across product categories that are substitutes. Based on a multivariate probit model of category incidence, this framework also allows the researcher to…

  7. Analytical energy gradient based on spin-free infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess method with local unitary transformation.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-28

    In this study, the analytical energy gradient for the spin-free infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) method at the levels of the Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT), and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) is developed. Furthermore, adopting the local unitary transformation (LUT) scheme for the IODKH method improves the efficiency in computation of the analytical energy gradient. Numerical assessments of the present gradient method are performed at the HF, DFT, and MP2 levels for the IODKH with and without the LUT scheme. The accuracies are examined for diatomic molecules such as hydrogen halides, halogen dimers, coinage metal (Cu, Ag, and Au) halides, and coinage metal dimers, and 20 metal complexes, including the fourth-sixth row transition metals. In addition, the efficiencies are investigated for one-, two-, and three-dimensional silver clusters. The numerical results confirm the accuracy and efficiency of the present method.

  8. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  9. Steering quantum transitions between three crossing energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, S. S.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2008-02-15

    We calculate the propagator and the transition probabilities for a coherently driven three-state quantum system. The energies of the three states change linearly in time, whereas the interactions between them are pulse shaped. We derive a highly accurate analytic approximation by assuming independent pairwise Landau-Zener transitions occurring instantly at the relevant avoided crossings, and adiabatic evolution elsewhere. Quantum interferences are identified, which occur due to different possible evolution paths in Hilbert space between an initial and a final state. A detailed comparison with numerical results for Gaussian-shaped pulses demonstrates a remarkable accuracy of the analytic approximation. We use the analytic results to derive estimates for the half-width of the excitation profile, and for the parameters required for creation of a maximally coherent superposition of the three states. These results are of potential interest in ladder climbing in alkali-metal atoms by chirped laser pulses, in quantum rotors, in transitions between Zeeman sublevels of a J=1 level in a magnetic field, and in control of entanglement of a pair of spin-1/2 particles. The results for the three-state system can be generalized, without essential difficulties, to higher dimensions.

  10. Spectrum and energy levels of Mo VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph

    1998-05-01

    We have photographed the spectrum of the Rb-like ion Mo VI from 200 to 5300 Å with a sliding-spark discharge on our 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs and have observed most of the yrast transitions given by Romanov et al.(N. P. Romanov and A. R. Striganov, Opt. Spectrosc. 27), 8 (1969). from a Penning discharge. We have obtained improved values for all of the energy levels. We confirm the odd levels of Kancerevicius et al.,(A. Kancerevicius et al.), Lithuanian Phys. J. 31, 143 (1991). but have revised a number of the even levels of Edlén et al.(B. Edlén et al.), Phys. Scr. 32, 215 (1985). The ionization energy of Edlén et al.,footnotemark[4] which had been called into question by Kancerevicius et al.footnotemark[3] as a result of their revision of the odd levels,footnotemark[4] is confirmed.

  11. The molecular potential energy surface and vibrational energy levels of methyl fluoride. Part II.

    PubMed

    Manson, Steven A; Law, Mark M; Atkinson, Ian A; Thomson, Grant A

    2006-06-28

    New analytical bending and stretching, ground electronic state, potential energy surfaces for CH(3)F are reported. The surfaces are expressed in bond-length, bond-angle internal coordinates. The four-dimensional stretching surface is an accurate, least squares fit to over 2000 symmetrically unique ab initio points calculated at the CCSD(T) level. Similarly, the five-dimensional bending surface is a fit to over 1200 symmetrically unique ab initio points. This is an important first stage towards a full nine-dimensional potential energy surface for the prototype CH(3)F molecule. Using these surfaces, highly excited stretching and (separately) bending vibrational energy levels of CH(3)F are calculated variationally using a finite basis representation method. The method uses the exact vibrational kinetic energy operator derived for XY(3)Z systems by Manson and Law (preceding paper, Part I, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, DOI: 10.1039/b603106d). We use the full C(3v) symmetry and the computer codes are designed to use an arbitrary potential energy function. Ultimately, these results will be used to design a compact basis for fully coupled stretch-bend calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the CH(3)F system.

  12. Potential energy surface and rovibrational energy levels of the H2-CS van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Halvick, Philippe; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2012-12-21

    Owing to its large dipole, astrophysicists use carbon monosulfide (CS) as a tracer of molecular gas in the interstellar medium, often in regions where H(2) is the most abundant collider. Predictions of the rovibrational energy levels of the weakly bound complex CS-H(2) (not yet observed) and also of rate coefficients for rotational transitions of CS in collision with H(2) should help to interpret the observed spectra. This paper deals with the first goal, i.e., the calculation of the rovibrational energy levels. A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for the H(2)-CS complex is presented. Ab initio potential energy calculations were carried out at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, using a quadruple-zeta basis set and midbond functions. The potential energy surface was obtained by an analytic fit of the ab initio data. The equilibrium structure of the H(2)-CS complex is found to be linear with the carbon pointing toward H(2) at the intermolecular separation of 8.6 a(o). The corresponding well depth is -173 cm(-1). The potential was used to calculate the rovibrational energy levels of the para-H(2)-CS and ortho-H(2)-CS complexes. The present work provides the first theoretical predictions of these levels. The calculated dissociation energies are found to be 35.9 cm(-1) and 49.9 cm(-1), respectively, for the para and ortho complexes. The second virial coefficient for the H(2)-CS pair has also been calculated for a large range of temperature. These results could be used to assign future experimental spectra and to check the accuracy of the potential energy surface.

  13. Energy-level alignment at organic heterointerfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Akaike, Kouki; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Today’s champion organic (opto-)electronic devices comprise an ever-increasing number of different organic-semiconductor layers. The functionality of these complex heterostructures largely derives from the relative alignment of the frontier molecular-orbital energies in each layer with respect to those in all others. Despite the technological relevance of the energy-level alignment at organic heterointerfaces, and despite continued scientific interest, a reliable model that can quantitatively predict the full range of phenomena observed at such interfaces is notably absent. We identify the limitations of previous attempts to formulate such a model and highlight inconsistencies in the interpretation of the experimental data they were based on. We then develop a theoretical framework, which we demonstrate to accurately reproduce experiment. Applying this theory, a comprehensive overview of all possible energy-level alignment scenarios that can be encountered at organic heterojunctions is finally given. These results will help focus future efforts on developing functional organic interfaces for superior device performance. PMID:26702447

  14. Review of Analytes of Concern and Sample Methods for Closure of DOE High Level Waste Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.R.

    2002-05-06

    Sampling residual waste after tank cleaning and analysis for analytes of concern to support closure and cleaning targets of large underground tanks used for storage of legacy high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites has been underway since about 1995. The DOE Tanks Focus Area (TFA) has been working with DOE tank sites to develop new sampling plans, and sampling methods for assessment of residual waste inventories. This paper discusses regulatory analytes of concern, sampling plans, and sampling methods that support closure and cleaning target activities for large storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP).

  15. Review of Analytes of Concern and Sample Methods for Closure of DOE High Level Waste Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Thomas Russell

    2002-08-01

    Sampling residual waste after tank cleaning and analysis for analytes of concern to support closure and cleaning targets of large underground tanks used for storage of legacy high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites has been underway since about 1995. The DOE Tanks Focus Area (TFA) has been working with DOE tank sites to develop new sampling plans, and sampling methods for assessment of residual waste inventories. This paper discusses regulatory analytes of concern, sampling plans, and sampling methods that support closure and cleaning target activities for large storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP).

  16. Analytic second derivatives of the energy in the fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2013-04-01

    We developed the analytic second derivatives of the energy for the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. First we derived the analytic expressions and then introduced some approximations related to the first and second order coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock equations. We developed a parallel program for the FMO Hessian with approximations in GAMESS and used it to calculate infrared (IR) spectra and Gibbs free energies and to locate the transition states in SN2 reactions. The accuracy of the Hessian is demonstrated in comparison to ab initio results for polypeptides and a water cluster. By using the two residues per fragment division, we achieved the accuracy of 3 cm-1 in the reduced mean square deviation of vibrational frequencies from ab initio for all three polyalanine isomers, while the zero point energy had the error not exceeding 0.3 kcal/mol. The role of the secondary structure on IR spectra, zero point energies, and Gibbs free energies is discussed.

  17. Analytic second derivatives of the energy in the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2013-04-28

    We developed the analytic second derivatives of the energy for the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. First we derived the analytic expressions and then introduced some approximations related to the first and second order coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock equations. We developed a parallel program for the FMO Hessian with approximations in GAMESS and used it to calculate infrared (IR) spectra and Gibbs free energies and to locate the transition states in SN2 reactions. The accuracy of the Hessian is demonstrated in comparison to ab initio results for polypeptides and a water cluster. By using the two residues per fragment division, we achieved the accuracy of 3 cm(-1) in the reduced mean square deviation of vibrational frequencies from ab initio for all three polyalanine isomers, while the zero point energy had the error not exceeding 0.3 kcal/mol. The role of the secondary structure on IR spectra, zero point energies, and Gibbs free energies is discussed.

  18. Analytical methodology for determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements. [pilot workload and acceptance level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic analytical approach to the determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements is formulated. The approach is based upon the hypothesis that pilot acceptance level or opinion rating of a given system is inversely related to the degree of pilot involvement in the control task. A nonlinear simulation of the helicopter approach to landing task incorporating appropriate models for UH-1H aircraft, the environmental disturbances and the human pilot was developed as a tool for evaluating the pilot acceptance hypothesis. The simulated pilot model is generic in nature and includes analytical representation of the human information acquisition, processing, and control strategies. Simulation analyses in the flight director mode indicate that the pilot model used is reasonable. Results of the simulation are used to identify candidate pilot workload metrics and to test the well known performance-work-load relationship. A pilot acceptance analytical methodology is formulated as a basis for further investigation, development and validation.

  19. Analytical model of ionization and energy deposition by proton beams in subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical model to evaluate in a fast, simple and effective manner the energy delivered by proton beams moving through a cell model made of nucleus and cytoplasm, taking into account the energy carried by the secondary electrons generated along the proton tracks. The electronic excitation spectra of these subcellular compartments have been modelled by means of an empirical parameterization of their dielectric properties. The energy loss rate and target ionization probability induced by swift protons are evaluated by means of the dielectric formalism. With the present model we have quantified the energy delivered, the specific energy, and the number of ionizations produced per incoming ion in a typical human cell by a typical hadrontherapy proton beam having energies usually reached around the Bragg peak (below 20 MeV). We find that the specific energy per incoming ion delivered in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm are rather similar for all the proton energy range analyzed.

  20. An Experiential Research-Focused Approach: Implementation in a Nonlaboratory-Based Graduate-Level Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Chee-Seng

    2007-01-01

    A project is described which incorporates nonlaboratory research skills in a graduate level course on analytical chemistry. This project will help students to grasp the basic principles and concepts of modern analytical techniques and also help them develop relevant research skills in analytical chemistry.

  1. Analytical solution and optimal design for galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T.; Yan, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of the galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvester is usually investigated numerically. Instead of performing case studies by numerical simulations, analytical solutions of the nonlinear distributed parameter model are derived to capture the intrinsic effects of the physical parameters on the performance of such energy harvesters. The analytical solutions are confirmed with the numerical solutions. Optimal performance of such energy harvesters is therefore revealed theoretically. The electric damping due to the electromechanical coupling is defined. The design at the optimal electrical damping with smaller onset speed to galloping, higher harvested power, and acceptable tip displacement is superior than the design at the maximal electrical damping, as long as the optimal electrical damping can be achieved. Otherwise, the design at the maximal electrical damping should be then adopted. As the wind speed and aerodynamic empirical coefficients increase, the tip displacement and harvested power increase. This study provides a theoretical design and optimization procedure for galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvesters.

  2. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal-neutron-capture gamma rays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffey, D.; El-Kady, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal-neutron-capture gamma ray spectrum has been compiled for most of the elements. In addition a second table of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has been compiled according to energy for all significant lines above 3 MeV. Lines that contrast well with adjacent lines are noted as prominent. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1970.

  3. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal neutron capture gamma rays II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moore, H.D.; Leep, D.B.; El-Kady, A.; Duffey, D.

    1971-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectrum from 0 to 3 MeV has been compiled for most of the elements. A tabulation of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has also been made according to energy. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1971.

  4. Analytic model of energy-absorption response functions in compound X-ray detector materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    The absorbed energy distribution (AED) in X-ray imaging detectors is an important factor that affects both energy resolution and image quality through the Swank factor and detective quantum efficiency. In the diagnostic energy range (20-140 keV), escape of characteristic photons following photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter photons are primary sources of absorbed-energy dispersion in X-ray detectors. In this paper, we describe the development of an analytic model of the AED in compound X-ray detector materials, based on the cascaded-systems approach, that includes the effects of escape and reabsorption of characteristic and Compton-scatter photons. We derive analytic expressions for both semi-infinite slab and pixel geometries and validate our approach by Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic model provides the energy-dependent X-ray response function of arbitrary compound materials without time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. We believe this model will be useful for correcting spectral distortion artifacts commonly observed in photon-counting applications and optimal design and development of novel X-ray detectors.

  5. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  6. Alternative analytically calculation procedure of two-center kinetic energy integral in molecular coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar Akber; Copuroglu, Ebru

    2017-02-01

    By using the Löwdin-α function method, we have analytically calculated the two-center kinetic energy integrals over Slater type orbitals (STOs). The two-center kinetic energy integrals are presented in terms of the two-center overlap integrals. A new approach is applicable to accurate calculations of two-center kinetic energy integral over STOs for arbitrary values of scaling parameters and interatomic distances. Obtained results show that the proposed method is easy to apply to the real systems, and has better calculation CPU time with compared to the existing approximations.

  7. An analytic solution to the Förster energy transfer problem in two dimensions.

    PubMed Central

    Wolber, P K; Hudson, B S

    1979-01-01

    An analytic solution of the Förster energy transfer problem in two dimensions is presented for the case in which the orientation factor is independent of the donor-acceptor distance, and both the donors and acceptors are randomly distributed in a plane. A general solution based on the method of Förster is possible since all distances are measured in units of R0. The analytic solution is extended to the cases of donors embedded in structures that exclude acceptors, and donors that bind acceptors. The validity of the analytic solutions is demonstrated by comparison with numerical simulation calculations. Numerical approximations to the exact solutions are given for ease of computation. Specific applications to the case of fluorescence quenching of a membrane-bound donor by membrane-bound acceptors are presented. PMID:262548

  8. A potential energy surface for the process H2 + H2O yielding H + H + H2O - Ab initio calculations and analytical representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations on the ground state potential energy surface of H2 + H2O were performed using a large contracted Gaussian basis set and a high level of correlation treatment. An analytical representation of the potential energy surface was then obtained which reproduces the calculated energies with an overall root-mean-square error of only 0.64 mEh. The analytic representation explicitly includes all nine internal degrees of freedom and is also well behaved as the H2 dissociates; it thus can be used to study collision-induced dissociation or recombination of H2. The strategy used to minimize the number of energy calculations is discussed, as well as other advantages of the present method for determining the analytical representation.

  9. Electron-Vibrational Energy Exchange in Nitrogen-Containing Plasma: a Comparison Between an Analytical Approach and a Kinetic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the electron-vibrational (e-V) energy exchange in nitrogen-containing plasma, which is very efficient in the case of gas discharge and high speed flow. Based on Harmonic oscillator approximation and the assumption of the e-V relaxation through a continuous series of Boltzmann distributions over the vibrational states, an analytic approach is derived from the proposed scaling relation of e-V transition rates. A full kinetic model is then investigated by numerically solving the state-to-state master equation for all vibrational levels. The analytical approach leads to a Landau-Teller (LT)-type equation for relaxation of vibrational energy, and predicts the relaxation time on the right order of magnitude. By comparison with the kinetic model, the LT-type equation is valid in typical electron temperatures in gas discharge. However, the analytical approach is not capable of describing the vibrational distribution function during the e-V process in which a full kinetic model is required. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11505015) and the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)

  10. Communication: a simple analytical formula for the free energy of ligand-receptor-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Varilly, Patrick; Mognetti, Bortolo M; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Frenkel, Daan

    2013-01-14

    Recently [P. Varilly, S. Angioletti-Uberti, B. M. Mognetti, and D. Frenkel, "A general theory of DNA-mediated and other valence-limited colloidal interactions," J. Chem. Phys. 137, 094108 (2012)], we presented a general theory for calculating the strength and properties of colloidal interactions mediated by ligand-receptor bonds (such as those that bind DNA-coated colloids). In this Communication, we derive a surprisingly simple analytical form for the interaction free energy, which was previously obtainable only via a costly numerical thermodynamic integration. As a result, the computational effort to obtain potentials of interaction is significantly reduced. Moreover, we can gain insight from this analytic expression for the free energy in limiting cases. In particular, the connection of our general theory to other previous specialised approaches is now made transparent. This important simplification will significantly broaden the scope of our theory.

  11. Measuring Energy Metabolism in the Mouse – Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors. PMID:23504620

  12. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse - theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R

    2013-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available - one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  13. An analytical hierarchy process for decision making of high-level-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.H.C.; Jang, W.

    1995-12-01

    To prove the existence value of nuclear technology for the world of post cold war, demonstration of safe rad-waste disposal is essential. High-level-waste (HLW) certainly is the key issue to be resolved. To assist a rational and persuasive process on various disposal options, an Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for the decision making of HLW management is presented. The basic theory and rationale are discussed, and applications are shown to illustrate the usefulness of the AHP. The authors wish that the AHP can provide a better direction for the current doomed situations of Taiwan nuclear industry, and to exchange with other countries for sharing experiences on the HLW management.

  14. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Dolney, D; Kondrla, M; Fager, M; Carabe, A

    2016-02-21

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm(-1)) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  15. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Dolney, D.; Kondrla, M.; Fager, M.; Carabe, A.

    2016-02-01

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm-1) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  16. Analytical modeling of a hydraulically-compensated compressed-air energy-storage system

    SciTech Connect

    McMonagle, C.A.; Rowe, D.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate the dynamic response of a hydraulically-compensated compressed air energy storage (CAES) system, including the compressor, air pipe, cavern, and hydraulic compensation pipe. The model is theoretically based on the two-fluid model in which the dynamics of each phase are presented by its set of conservation equations for mass and momentum. The conservation equations define the space and time distribution of pressure, void fraction, air saturation, and phase velocities. The phases are coupled by two interface equations. The first defines the rate of generation (or dissolution) of gaseous air in water and can include the effects of supersaturation. The second defines the frictional shear coupling (drag) between the gaseous air and water as they move relative to each other. The relative motion of the air and water is, therefore, calculated and not specified by a slip or drift-velocity correlation. The total CASE system is represented by a nodal arrangement. The conservation equations are written for each nodal volume and are solved numerically. System boundary conditions include the air flow rate, atmospheric pressure at the top of the compensation pipe, and air saturation in the reservoir. Initial conditions are selected for velocity and air saturation. Uniform and constant temperature (60/sup 0/F) is assumed. The analytical model was used to investigate the dynamic response of a proposed system.Investigative calculations considered high and low water levels, and a variety of charging and operating conditions. For all cases investigated, the cavern response to air-charging, was a damped oscillation of pressure and flow. Detailed results are presented. These calculations indicate that the Champagne Effect is unlikely to cause blowout for a properly designed CAES system.

  17. Analytical energy gradients for second-order multireference perturbation theory using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Győrffy, Werner; Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-14

    We present algorithms for computing analytical energy gradients for multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and partially internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using density fitting (DF). Our implementation is applicable to both single-state and multi-state CASPT2 analytical gradients. The accuracy of the new methods is demonstrated for structures and excitation energies of valence and Rydberg states of pyrrole, as well as for structures and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings for the hydro-, the O,O(')-formato-, and the N,N(')-diiminato-copper-dioxygen complexes. It is shown that the effects of density fitting on optimized structures and relative energies are negligible. For cases in which the total cost is dominated by the integral evaluations and transformations, the DF-CASPT2 gradient calculations are found to be faster than the corresponding conventional calculations by typically a factor of three to five using triple-ζ basis sets, and by about a factor of ten using quadruple-ζ basis sets.

  18. A Visual Analytics Based Decision Support Methodology For Evaluating Low Energy Building Design Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Ranojoy

    The ability to design high performance buildings has acquired great importance in recent years due to numerous federal, societal and environmental initiatives. However, this endeavor is much more demanding in terms of designer expertise and time. It requires a whole new level of synergy between automated performance prediction with the human capabilities to perceive, evaluate and ultimately select a suitable solution. While performance prediction can be highly automated through the use of computers, performance evaluation cannot, unless it is with respect to a single criterion. The need to address multi-criteria requirements makes it more valuable for a designer to know the "latitude" or "degrees of freedom" he has in changing certain design variables while achieving preset criteria such as energy performance, life cycle cost, environmental impacts etc. This requirement can be met by a decision support framework based on near-optimal "satisficing" as opposed to purely optimal decision making techniques. Currently, such a comprehensive design framework is lacking, which is the basis for undertaking this research. The primary objective of this research is to facilitate a complementary relationship between designers and computers for Multi-Criterion Decision Making (MCDM) during high performance building design. It is based on the application of Monte Carlo approaches to create a database of solutions using deterministic whole building energy simulations, along with data mining methods to rank variable importance and reduce the multi-dimensionality of the problem. A novel interactive visualization approach is then proposed which uses regression based models to create dynamic interplays of how varying these important variables affect the multiple criteria, while providing a visual range or band of variation of the different design parameters. The MCDM process has been incorporated into an alternative methodology for high performance building design referred to as

  19. Amine basicity (pKb) controls the analyte binding energy on single walled carbon nanotube electronic sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S

    2008-02-06

    A wide range of analytes adsorb irreversibly to the surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube electronic networks typically used as sensors or thin-film transistors, although to date, the mechanism is not understood. Using thionyl chloride as a model electron-withdrawing adsorbate, we show that reversible adsorption sites can be created on the nanotube array via noncovalent functionalization with amine-terminated molecules of pKa < 8.8. A nanotube network comprising single, largely unbundled nanotubes, near the electronic percolation threshold is required for the effective conversion to a reversibly binding array. By examining 11 types of amine-containing molecules, we show that analyte adsorption is largely affected by the basicity (pKb) of surface groups. The binding energy of the analyte is apparently reduced by its adsorption on the surface chemical groups instead of directly on the SWNT array itself. This mediated adsorption mechanism is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and molecular potential calculations. Reversible detection with no active regeneration at the parts-per-trillion level is demonstrated for the first time by creating a higher adsorption site density with a polymer amine, such as polyethyleneimine (PEI). Last, we demonstrate that this transition to reversibility upon surface functionalization is a general phenomenon.

  20. Automated computer-analytical system for ensuring reliability and safety of energy projects

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilevskii, A.G.; Serkov, V.S.; Dobrynin, S.N.; Tikhonova, T.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article discusses the development of a data bank system at the B. E. Vedeneev VNIIG Institute. The system consists of as many as 10 interacting data banks, most of which have been tested under field conditions. A brief discription is provided for each of the following data bases: (1) Certified parameters of Hydroelectric Plants of the world, (2) Certified parameters for thermoelectric plants in Russia, (3) Technical parameters of cooler-reservoirs of thermoelectric plants of Russia, (4) Equipment data bank for hydroelctric plants, (5) Information-analytical system of collection, storage, and processing of field observations, (6) World-wide data bank for the failure of hydroelectric plants, (7) Data bank for normative-technical documentation, (8) Data bank for normative-technical documentation of the operation of both hydro and thermal energy projects, (9) Data bank for documentation on anticorrosion protection of energy equipment, and (10) Data bank for scientific-technical achievements in the energy branch.

  1. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  2. A Big Data and Learning Analytics Approach to Process-Level Feedback in Cognitive Simulations.

    PubMed

    Pecaric, Martin; Boutis, Kathy; Beckstead, Jason; Pusic, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Collecting and analyzing large amounts of process data for the purposes of education can be considered a big data/learning analytics (BD/LA) approach to improving learning. However, in the education of health care professionals, the application of BD/LA is limited to date. The authors discuss the potential advantages of the BD/LA approach for the process of learning via cognitive simulations. Using the lens of a cognitive model of radiograph interpretation with four phases (orientation, searching/scanning, feature detection, and decision making), they reanalyzed process data from a cognitive simulation of pediatric ankle radiography where 46 practitioners from three expertise levels classified 234 cases online. To illustrate the big data component, they highlight the data available in a digital environment (time-stamped, click-level process data). Learning analytics were illustrated using algorithmic computer-enabled approaches to process-level feedback.For each phase, the authors were able to identify examples of potentially useful BD/LA measures. For orientation, the trackable behavior of re-reviewing the clinical history was associated with increased diagnostic accuracy. For searching/scanning, evidence of skipping views was associated with an increased false-negative rate. For feature detection, heat maps overlaid on the radiograph can provide a metacognitive visualization of common novice errors. For decision making, the measured influence of sequence effects can reflect susceptibility to bias, whereas computer-generated path maps can provide insights into learners' diagnostic strategies.In conclusion, the augmented collection and dynamic analysis of learning process data within a cognitive simulation can improve feedback and prompt more precise reflection on a novice clinician's skill development.

  3. Analytic functions for potential energy curves, dipole moments, and transition dipole moments of LiRb molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yang; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Wen-Wang; Wang, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The analytic potential energy functions (APEFs) of the X1Σ+, 21Σ+, a3Σ+, and 23Σ+ states of the LiRb molecule are obtained using Morse long-range potential energy function with damping function and nonlinear least-squares method. These calculations were based on the potential energy curves (PECs) calculated using the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. The reliability of the APEFs is confirmed using the curves of their first and second derivatives. By using the obtained APEFs, the rotational and vibrational energy levels of the states are determined by solving the Schrödinger equation of nuclear movement. The spectroscopic parameters, which are deduced using Dunham expansion, and the obtained rotational and vibrational levels are compared with the reported theoretical and experimental values. The correlation effect of the electrons of the inner shell remarkably improves the results compared with the experimental spectroscopic parameters. For the first time, the APEFs for the dipole moments and transition dipole moments of the states have been determined based on the curves obtained from the MRCI calculations.

  4. Analytic functions for potential energy curves, dipole moments, and transition dipole moments of LiRb molecule.

    PubMed

    You, Yang; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Wen-Wang; Wang, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-15

    The analytic potential energy functions (APEFs) of the X(1)Σ(+), 2(1)Σ(+), a(3)Σ(+), and 2(3)Σ(+) states of the LiRb molecule are obtained using Morse long-range potential energy function with damping function and nonlinear least-squares method. These calculations were based on the potential energy curves (PECs) calculated using the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. The reliability of the APEFs is confirmed using the curves of their first and second derivatives. By using the obtained APEFs, the rotational and vibrational energy levels of the states are determined by solving the Schrödinger equation of nuclear movement. The spectroscopic parameters, which are deduced using Dunham expansion, and the obtained rotational and vibrational levels are compared with the reported theoretical and experimental values. The correlation effect of the electrons of the inner shell remarkably improves the results compared with the experimental spectroscopic parameters. For the first time, the APEFs for the dipole moments and transition dipole moments of the states have been determined based on the curves obtained from the MRCI calculations.

  5. Leveraging Smart Meter Data through Advanced Analytics: Applications to Building Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalori, Saurabh

    The poor energy efficiency of buildings is a major barrier to alleviating the energy dilemma. Historically, monthly utility billing data was widely available and analytical methods for identifying building energy efficiency improvements, performing building Monitoring and Verification (M&V) and continuous commissioning (CCx) were based on them. Although robust, these methods were not sensitive enough to detect a number of common causes for increased energy use. In recent years, prevalence of short-term building energy consumption data, also known as Energy Interval Data (EID), made available through the Smart Meters, along with data mining techniques presents the potential of knowledge discovery inherent in this data. This allows more sophisticated analytical tools to be developed resulting in greater sensitivities due to higher prediction accuracies; leading to deep energy savings and highly efficient building system operations. The research explores enhancements to Inverse Statistical Modeling techniques due to the availability of EID. Inverse statistical modeling is the process of identification of prediction model structure and estimates of model parameters. The methodology is based on several common statistical and data mining techniques: cluster analysis for day typing, outlier detection and removal, and generation of building scheduling. Inverse methods are simpler to develop and require fewer inputs for model identification. They can model changes in energy consumption based on changes in climatic variables and up to a certain extent, occupancy. This makes them easy-to-use and appealing to building managers for evaluating any general retrofits, building condition monitoring, continuous commissioning and short-term load forecasting (STLF). After evaluating several model structures, an elegant model form was derived which can be used to model daily energy consumption; which can be extended to model energy consumption for any specific hour by adding corrective

  6. Analytical studies on a traveling wave direct energy converter for D-{sup 3}He fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Syu, L.Y.; Tomita, Yukihiro; Momota, Hiromu; Miley, G.H.

    1995-04-01

    Analytical studies on a traveling wave direct energy converter (TWDEC) for D-{sup 3}He fueled fusion are carried out. The energy of 15 MeV carried by fusion protons is too high to handle with an electrostatic device. The TWDEC controls these high energy particles on the base of the principle of a Linac. This traveling wave method is discussed and the details of proton dynamics and excitation mechanism of electric power are clarified. The TWEDC consists of a modulator and decelerator. The applied traveling wave potential to the modulator modulates the velocity of fusion proton beams. This modulation makes a form of bunched protons at a down stream of the modulator. The decelerator has a set of meshed grids, each of which is connected to a transmission circuit. The phase velocity of excited wave on the transmission circuit is controlled the same way as that of decelerated protons. The kinetic energy 15 MeV of proton beams changes into an oscillating electromagnetic energy on the transmission circuit. This highly efficient direct energy converter of fusion protons brings a fusion reactor with a high plant efficiency. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Revisiting the four-level inverted-Y system under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Islam, Khairul; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    We report the occurrence of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the simulated probe response signal for a four-level inverted-Y type system that is being acted upon by a weak coherent probe field, a strong coherent pump field and a coherent repump field. There are two ground energy levels, one intermediate energy level and one uppermost energy level. The weak probe field couples the lowest ground level to the intermediate level whereas the repump field connects the other ground level with the intermediate level. The strong control field couples the intermediate level with the uppermost energy level, thereby forming an inverted-Y type system. The density matrix based theoretical model has been developed and solved analytically for this four-level system and the probe response signal has been simulated at different values of the control and repump Rabi frequencies, control and repump frequency detunings and under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions using the parameters of 87Rb D2 transition. Extremely low line width (few tens of kHz) for the EIT signal has been noticed under thermal averaging for copropagating probe, control and repump field configuration. The EIT signal is found to be immune to the variation in the control Rabi frequency.

  8. Magnetic levitation-based electromagnetic energy harvesting: a semi-analytical non-linear model for energy transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.; Simões, José A. O.; Pascoal, Ricardo; Torrão, João; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been used to implement low-cost and maintenance-free electromagnetic energy harvesting. The ability of levitation-based harvesting systems to operate autonomously for long periods of time makes them well-suited for self-powering a broad range of technologies. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is presented of a harvester configuration that utilizes the motion of a levitated hard-magnetic element to generate electrical power. A semi-analytical, non-linear model is introduced that enables accurate and efficient analysis of energy transduction. The model predicts the transient and steady-state response of the harvester a function of its motion (amplitude and frequency) and load impedance. Very good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment with energy errors lower than 14.15% (mean absolute percentage error of 6.02%) and cross-correlations higher than 86%. The model provides unique insight into fundamental mechanisms of energy transduction and enables the geometric optimization of harvesters prior to fabrication and the rational design of intelligent energy harvesters.

  9. Magnetic levitation-based electromagnetic energy harvesting: a semi-analytical non-linear model for energy transduction

    PubMed Central

    Soares dos Santos, Marco P.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.; Simões, José A. O.; Pascoal, Ricardo; Torrão, João; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been used to implement low-cost and maintenance-free electromagnetic energy harvesting. The ability of levitation-based harvesting systems to operate autonomously for long periods of time makes them well-suited for self-powering a broad range of technologies. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is presented of a harvester configuration that utilizes the motion of a levitated hard-magnetic element to generate electrical power. A semi-analytical, non-linear model is introduced that enables accurate and efficient analysis of energy transduction. The model predicts the transient and steady-state response of the harvester a function of its motion (amplitude and frequency) and load impedance. Very good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment with energy errors lower than 14.15% (mean absolute percentage error of 6.02%) and cross-correlations higher than 86%. The model provides unique insight into fundamental mechanisms of energy transduction and enables the geometric optimization of harvesters prior to fabrication and the rational design of intelligent energy harvesters. PMID:26725842

  10. Magnetic levitation-based electromagnetic energy harvesting: a semi-analytical non-linear model for energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P; Ferreira, Jorge A F; Simões, José A O; Pascoal, Ricardo; Torrão, João; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P

    2016-01-04

    Magnetic levitation has been used to implement low-cost and maintenance-free electromagnetic energy harvesting. The ability of levitation-based harvesting systems to operate autonomously for long periods of time makes them well-suited for self-powering a broad range of technologies. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is presented of a harvester configuration that utilizes the motion of a levitated hard-magnetic element to generate electrical power. A semi-analytical, non-linear model is introduced that enables accurate and efficient analysis of energy transduction. The model predicts the transient and steady-state response of the harvester a function of its motion (amplitude and frequency) and load impedance. Very good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment with energy errors lower than 14.15% (mean absolute percentage error of 6.02%) and cross-correlations higher than 86%. The model provides unique insight into fundamental mechanisms of energy transduction and enables the geometric optimization of harvesters prior to fabrication and the rational design of intelligent energy harvesters.

  11. Secondary Data Analytics of Aquaporin Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Graham, Barbara E; Pacurari, Maricica; Sims, Jennifer N; Udensi, Udensi K; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults in which recurrence has been attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. On the basis of tumor formation in vivo and growth type in vitro, two published microarray gene expression profiling studies grouped nine glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cell lines into one of two groups: full (GSf) or restricted (GSr) stem-like phenotypes. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are water transport proteins that are highly expressed in primary glial-derived tumors. However, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 have not been previously described in a panel of 92 glioma samples. Therefore, we designed secondary data analytics methods to determine the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in GS cell lines and glioblastoma neurospheres. Our investigation also included a total of 2,566 expression levels from 28 Affymetrix microarray probe sets encoding 13 human aquaporins (AQP0–AQP12); CXCR4 (the receptor for stromal cell derived factor-1 [SDF-1], a potential glioma stem cell therapeutic target]); and PROM1 (gene encoding CD133, the widely used glioma stem cell marker). Interactive visual representation designs for integrating phenotypic features and expression levels revealed that inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 correlate with distinct phenotypes in a set of cell lines grouped into full and restricted stem-like phenotypes. Discriminant function analysis further revealed that AQP1 and AQP4 expression are better predictors for tumor formation and growth types in glioblastoma stem-like cells than are CXCR4 and PROM1. Future investigations are needed to characterize the molecular mechanisms for inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in the glioblastoma stem-like neurospheres. PMID:26279619

  12. The Analytic Onion: Examining Training Issues from Different Levels of Analysis. Interim Technical Paper for Period July 1989-June 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Theodore A.; Chin, Keric B. O.

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework based on different levels of analysis using the metaphor of the layers of an onion to help organize and structure thinking on research issues concerning training. It discusses the core of the "analytic onion," the biological level, and seven levels of analysis that surround that core: the individual, the…

  13. Analytic study of the effect of dark energy-dark matter interaction on the growth of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Rafael J. F.; Landim, Ricardo C. G.; Costa, André A.; Wang, Bin; Abdalla, Elcio

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale structure has been shown as a promising cosmic probe for distinguishing and constraining dark energy models. Using the growth index parametrization, we obtain an analytic formula for the growth rate of structures in a coupled dark energy model in which the exchange of energy-momentum is proportional to the dark energy density. We find that the evolution of fσ8 can be determined analytically once we know the coupling, the dark energy equation of state, the present value of the dark energy density parameter and the current mean amplitude of dark matter fluctuations. After correcting the growth function for the correspondence with the velocity field through the continuity equation in the interacting model, we use our analytic result to compare the model's predictions with large-scale structure observations.

  14. Taste clusters of music and drugs: evidence from three analytic levels.

    PubMed

    Vuolo, Mike; Uggen, Christopher; Lageson, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    This article examines taste clusters of musical preferences and substance use among adolescents and young adults. Three analytic levels are considered: fixed effects analyses of aggregate listening patterns and substance use in US radio markets, logistic regressions of individual genre preferences and drug use from a nationally representative survey of US youth, and arrest and seizure data from a large American concert venue. A consistent picture emerges from all three levels: rock music is positively associated with substance use, with some substance-specific variability across rock sub-genres. Hip hop music is also associated with higher use, while pop and religious music are associated with lower use. These results are robust to fixed effects models that account for changes over time in radio markets, a comprehensive battery of controls in the individual-level survey, and concert data establishing the co-occurrence of substance use and music listening in the same place and time. The results affirm a rich tradition of qualitative and experimental studies, demonstrating how symbolic boundaries are simultaneously drawn around music and drugs.

  15. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program sponsored the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, which is designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar honeycomb structure to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed flat until needed for deployment. A variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid methods can be used. Experimental evaluation of the DEA utilized a building block approach that included material characterization testing of its constituent, Kevlar -129 fabric/epoxy, and flexural testing of single hexagonal cells. In addition, the energy attenuation capabilities of the DEA were demonstrated through multi-cell component dynamic crush tests, and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto concrete, water, and soft soil. During each stage of the DEA evaluation process, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. This report documents the results of the experimental evaluation that was conducted to assess the energy absorption capabilities of the DEA.

  16. Sound energy decay in coupled spaces using a parametric analytical solution of a diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Luizard, Paul; Polack, Jean-Dominique; Katz, Brian F G

    2014-05-01

    Sound field behavior in performance spaces is a complex phenomenon. Issues regarding coupled spaces present additional concerns due to sound energy exchanges. Coupled volume concert halls have been of increasing interest in recent decades because this architectural principle offers the possibility to modify the hall's acoustical environment in a passive way by modifying the coupling area. Under specific conditions, the use of coupled reverberation chambers can provide non-exponential sound energy decay in the main room, resulting in both high clarity and long reverberation which are antagonistic parameters in a single volume room. Previous studies have proposed various sound energy decay models based on statistical acoustics and diffusion theory. Statistical acoustics assumes a perfectly uniform sound field within a given room whereas measurements show an attenuation of energy with increasing source-receiver distance. While previously proposed models based on diffusion theory use numerical solvers, the present study proposes a heuristic model of sound energy behavior based on an analytical solution of the commonly used diffusion equation and physically justified approximations. This model is validated by means of comparisons to scale model measurements and numerical geometrical acoustics simulations, both applied to the same simple concert hall geometry.

  17. Accurate ab initio potential energy computations for the H sub 4 system: Tests of some analytic potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boothroyd, A.I. ); Dove, J.E.; Keogh, W.J. ); Martin, P.G. ); Peterson, M.R. )

    1991-09-15

    The interaction potential energy surface (PES) of H{sub 4} is of great importance for quantum chemistry, as a test case for molecule--molecule interactions. It is also required for a detailed understanding of certain astrophysical processes, namely, collisional excitation and dissociation of H{sub 2} in molecular clouds, at densities too low to be accessible experimentally. Accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} energies were computed for 6046 conformations of H{sub 4}, using a multiple reference (single and) double excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) program. Both systematic and random'' errors were estimated to have an rms size of 0.6 mhartree, for a total rms error of about 0.9 mhartree (or 0.55 kcal/mol) in the final {ital ab} {ital initio} energy values. It proved possible to include in a self-consistent way {ital ab} {ital initio} energies calculated by Schwenke, bringing the number of H{sub 4} conformations to 6101. {ital Ab} {ital initio} energies were also computed for 404 conformations of H{sub 3}; adding {ital ab} {ital initio} energies calculated by other authors yielded a total of 772 conformations of H{sub 3}. (The H{sub 3} results, and an improved analytic PES for H{sub 3}, are reported elsewhere.) {ital Ab} {ital initio} energies are tabulated in this paper only for a sample of H{sub 4} conformations; a full list of all 6101 conformations of H{sub 4} (and 772 conformations of H{sub 3} ) is available from Physics Auxiliary Publication Service (PAPS), or from the authors.

  18. Precise analytical description of the Earth matter effect on oscillations of low energy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ioannisian, A.N.; Kazarian, N.A.; Smirnov, A.Yu.; Wyler, D.

    2005-02-01

    We present a formalism for the matter effects in the Earth on low energy neutrino fluxes which is both accurate and has all the advantages of a full analytic treatment. The oscillation probabilities are calculated up to the second order term in {epsilon}(x){identical_to}2V(x)E/{delta}m{sup 2}, where V(x) is the neutrino potential at position x. We show the absence of large undamped phases which makes the expansion in {epsilon} well behaved. An improved expansion is presented in terms of the variation of V(x) around a suitable mean value which allows one to treat energies up to those relevant for supernova neutrinos. We discuss also the case of three-neutrino mixing.

  19. A new analytical potential energy surface for the singlet state of He2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing-Juan; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Li-Zhi; Zhang, Qing-Gang

    2012-03-01

    The analytic potential energy surface (APES) for the exchange reaction of HeH+ (X1Σ+) + He at the lowest singlet state 11A/ has been built. The APES is expressed as Aguado-Paniagua function based on the many-body expansion. Using the adaptive non-linear least-squares algorithm, the APES is fitted from 15 682 ab initio energy points calculated with the multireference configuration interaction calculation with a large d-aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. To testify the new APES, we calculate the integral cross sections for He + H+He (v = 0, 1, 2, j = 0) → HeH+ + He by means of quasi-classical trajectory and compare them with the previous result in literature.

  20. ORNL takes energy-efficient housing to a new level

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-19

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TVA and the Department of Energy are taking energy-saving research into a West Knox County neighborhood. In the Campbell Creek subdivision, ORNL researchers have helped builders to construct three homes with three different levels of energy-saving features.

  1. ORNL takes energy-efficient housing to a new level

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TVA and the Department of Energy are taking energy-saving research into a West Knox County neighborhood. In the Campbell Creek subdivision, ORNL researchers have helped builders to construct three homes with three different levels of energy-saving features.

  2. An analytical ab initio potential surface and the calculated tunneling energies for the HCl dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, P. R.; Epa, V. C.; Jensen, Per; Karpfen, Alfred

    1991-03-01

    The six-dimensional potential energy surface of the HCl dimer has been calculated ab initio at 1654 nuclear geometries [A. Karpfen, P. R. Bunker and P. Jensen, Chem. Phys., in press]. In the present paper we have fitted an analytical function to these points; the analytical function is similar to that used previously by us for the potential surface of the HF dimer. The fitted function has 38 adjustable parameters and the standard deviation of the weighted fit is 19.0 cm -1. We have determined the minimum energy path for the trans-bending tunneling motion on this surface, and have calculated the tunneling and K-rotation energies and wavefunctions. Around equilibrium the path is qualitatively similar to that for the HF dimer in that there are two equivalent hydrogen-bonded structures of Cs symmetry (which are approximately L-shaped with a "bound" and a "free" H-atom) that can tunnel through a C2 h saddle point (the "closed" C2 h saddle point). However, away from equilibrium the path is qualitatively different from that found for the HF dimer since the HCl dimer never becomes linear along the path; in fact it passes through a second C2 h saddle point (the "open" C2 h saddle point). As a result the A-rotational constant only varies slightly along the path, and this explains the experimental observation that the tunneling splitting varies little with K-type rotation for the HCl dimer, in contrast to the situation for the HF dimer. Quantitatively it is clear that errors in the ab initio calculation, errors in the fitting of an analytic function to the points, the correction to the path that is caused by the zero point motion in the other vibrations, and the coupling between the four low-frequency modes, will all be relatively more significant than they were for the HF dimer because the full six-dimensional potential is much flatter; the ab initio dissociation energy is only ˜600 cm -1, and the ab initio tunneling barrier is only ˜70 cm -1. Therefore, we modify the

  3. Salivary metal levels of orthodontic patients: a novel methodological and analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Eliades, Theodore; Trapalis, Christos; Eliades, George; Katsavrias, Elias

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the nickel, chromium, and ferrous levels in a population of 17 orthodontic patients undergoing treatment, compared with seven untreated individuals, employing a novel methodological approach and a new analytical technique. Salivary samples obtained from patients before and after rinsing with double distilled water were processed for Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for simultaneous estimation of the concentration of the metallic elements. No statistically significant difference was detected between control and patient groups with respect to salivary metal content, regardless of element. The range of salivary metal levels found did not exceed those of daily intake through food and air. The lack of a continuous monitoring scheme for salivary metal concentrations in real time may impose substantial obstacles to defining the release rate of metals in vivo. The results of this study emphasize the necessity of incorporating the dimension of time in assessing the release potential of orthodontic alloys.

  4. Analytical characterization and experimental validation of performances of piezoelectric vibration energy scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, E.; Zelenika, S.; Moro, L.; Benasciutti, D.

    2009-05-01

    One of the main requirements in wireless sensor operation is the availability of autonomous power sources sufficiently compact to be embedded in the same housing and, when the application involves living people, wearable. A possible technological solution satisfying these needs is energy harvesting from the environment. Vibration energy scavenging is one of the most studied approaches in this frame. In this work the conversion of kinetic into electric energy via piezoelectric coupling in resonant beams is studied. Various design approaches are analyzed and relevant parameters are identified. Numerical methods are applied to stress and strain analyses as well as to evaluate the voltage and charge generated by electromechanical coupling. The aim of the work is increasing the specific power generated per unit of scavenger volume by optimizing its shape. Besides the conventional rectangular geometry proposed in literature, two trapezoidal shapes, namely the direct and the reversed trapezoidal configuration, are analyzed. They are modeled to predict their dynamic behavior and energy conversion performance. Analytical and FEM models are compared and resulting figures of merit are drawn. Results of a preliminary experimental validation are also given. A systematic validation of characteristic specimens via an experimental campaign is ongoing.

  5. Analytical study of the energy rate balance equation for the magnetospheric storm-ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clúa de Gonzalez, A. L.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-11-01

    We present some results of the analytical integration of the energy rate balance equation, assuming that the input energy rate is proportional to the azimuthal interplanetary electric field, Ey, and can be described by simple rectangular or triangular functions, as approximations to the frequently observed shapes of Ey, especially during the passage of magnetic clouds. The input function is also parametrized by a reconnection-transfer efficiency factor (which is assumed to vary between 0.1 and 1). Our aim is to solve the balance equation and derive values for the decay parameter compatible with the observed Dst peak values. To facilitate the analytical integration we assume a constant value for through the main phase of the storm. The model is tested for two isolated and well-monitored intense storms. For these storms the analytical results are compared to those obtained by the numerical integration of the balance equation, based on the interplanetary data collected by the ISEE-3 satellite, with the values parametrized close to those obtained by the analytical study. From the best fit between this numerical integration and the observed Dst the most appropriate values of are then determined. Although we specifically focus on the main phase of the storms, this numerical integration has been also extended to the recovery phase by an independent adjust. The results of the best fit for the recovery phase show that the values of may differ drastically from those corresponding to the main phase. The values of the decay parameter for the main phase of each event, m, are found to be very sensitive to the adopted efficiency factor, , decreasing as this factor increases. For the recovery phase, which is characterized by very low values of the power input, the response function becomes almost independent of the value of and the resulting values for the decay time parameter, r, do not vary greatly as varies

  6. Energy-optimal path planning by stochastic dynamically orthogonal level-set optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramani, Deepak N.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2016-04-01

    A stochastic optimization methodology is formulated for computing energy-optimal paths from among time-optimal paths of autonomous vehicles navigating in a dynamic flow field. Based on partial differential equations, the methodology rigorously leverages the level-set equation that governs time-optimal reachability fronts for a given relative vehicle-speed function. To set up the energy optimization, the relative vehicle-speed and headings are considered to be stochastic and new stochastic Dynamically Orthogonal (DO) level-set equations are derived. Their solution provides the distribution of time-optimal reachability fronts and corresponding distribution of time-optimal paths. An optimization is then performed on the vehicle's energy-time joint distribution to select the energy-optimal paths for each arrival time, among all stochastic time-optimal paths for that arrival time. Numerical schemes to solve the reduced stochastic DO level-set equations are obtained, and accuracy and efficiency considerations are discussed. These reduced equations are first shown to be efficient at solving the governing stochastic level-sets, in part by comparisons with direct Monte Carlo simulations. To validate the methodology and illustrate its accuracy, comparisons with semi-analytical energy-optimal path solutions are then completed. In particular, we consider the energy-optimal crossing of a canonical steady front and set up its semi-analytical solution using a energy-time nested nonlinear double-optimization scheme. We then showcase the inner workings and nuances of the energy-optimal path planning, considering different mission scenarios. Finally, we study and discuss results of energy-optimal missions in a wind-driven barotropic quasi-geostrophic double-gyre ocean circulation.

  7. Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents average values of levelized costs for generating technologies entering service in 2018, 2022, and 2040 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) Reference case.

  8. Calculation of Rydberg energy levels for the francium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Jin-Min

    2010-06-01

    Based on the weakest bound electron potential model theory, the Rydberg energy levels and quantum defects of the np2Po1/2 (n = 7-50) and np2Po3/2 (n = 7-50) spectrum series for the francium atom are calculated. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with the 48 measured levels, and 40 energy levels for highly excited states are predicted.

  9. Caregiver's education level and child's dental caries in African Americans: a path analytic study.

    PubMed

    Heima, Masahiro; Lee, Wonik; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchita

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of caregiver education level on children's dental caries mediated by both caregiver and child oral health behaviors. Participants were 423 low-income African American kindergarteners and their caregivers who were part of a school-based randomized clinical trial. Path analysis tested the hypothesis that caregiver education level affected untreated dental caries and cumulative overall caries experience (decayed or filled teeth) through the mediating influence of frequency of dental visits, use of routine care, and frequency of toothbrushing for both the caregiver and the child. The results supported the hypothesis: caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit dentists compared with those who did not complete high school (e(0.56) = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.03-2.99), which in turn was associated with 5.78 times greater odds of dental visits among their children (e(1.76) = 5.78, 95% CI: 3.53-9.48). Children's dental visits, subsequently, were associated with 26% fewer untreated decayed teeth compared with children without dental visits (e(-0.31) = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91). However, this path was not present in the model with overall caries experience. Additionally, caregiver education level was directly associated with 34% less untreated decayed teeth (e(-0.42) = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.79) and 28% less decayed or filled teeth (e(-0.32) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.88) among the children. This study overcomes important conceptual and analytic limitations in the existing literature. The findings confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental caries and indicate that caregiver's behavioral factors are important mediators of child oral health.

  10. How to Draw Energy Level Diagrams in Excitonic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X-Y

    2014-07-03

    Emerging photovoltaic devices based on molecular and nanomaterials are mostly excitonic in nature. The initial absorption of a photon in these materials creates an exciton that can subsequently dissociate in each material or at their interfaces to give charge carriers. Any attempt at mechanistic understanding of excitonic solar cells must start with drawing energy level diagrams. This seemingly elementary exercise, which is described in textbooks for inorganic solar cells, has turned out to be a difficult subject in the literature. The problem stems from conceptual confusion of single-particle energy with quasi-particle energy and the misleading practice of mixing the two on the same energy level diagram. Here, I discuss how to draw physically accurate energy diagrams in excitonic solar cells using only single-particle energies (ionization potentials and electron affinities) of both ground and optically excited states. I will briefly discuss current understanding on the electronic energy landscape responsible for efficient charge separation in excitonic solar cells.

  11. Comparison of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Incomplete Analytic Hierarchy Process for identifying customer preferences in the Texas retail energy provider market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher

    The competitive market for retail energy providers in Texas has been in existence for 10 years. When the market opened in 2002, 5 energy providers existed, offering, on average, 20 residential product plans in total. As of January 2012, there are now 115 energy providers in Texas offering over 300 residential product plans for customers. With the increase in providers and product plans, customers can be bombarded with information and suffer from the "too much choice" effect. The goal of this praxis is to aid customers in the decision making process of identifying an energy provider and product plan. Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), a hierarchical decomposition decision making tool, and the Incomplete Analytic Hierarchy Process (IAHP), a modified version of AHP, customers can prioritize criteria such as price, rate type, customer service, and green energy products to identify the provider and plan that best meets their needs. To gather customer data, a survey tool has been developed for customers to complete the pairwise comparison process. Results are compared for the Incomplete AHP and AHP method to determine if the Incomplete AHP method is just as accurate, but more efficient, than the traditional AHP method.

  12. Analytic variational calculation of the ground-state binding energy of hydrogen in intermediate and intense magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work investigates analytically the effect of an intermediate or intense magnetic field, such as probably exist in white dwarfs and near pulsars, on the binding energy of the hydrogen ground state. A wave-function 'prescription' is given for an analytic variational calculation of the binding energy. The calculation still gives a smooth transition between intermediate and intense fields. An explicit calculation of the ground-state binding energy as B goes to infinity is provided for the Yafet et al. (1956) trial function.

  13. Full-dimensional (15-dimensional) ab initio analytical potential energy surface for the H7+ cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Patricia; Prosmiti, Rita; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2012-06-01

    Full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface is constructed for the H_7^+ cluster. The surface is a fit to roughly 160 000 interaction energies obtained with second-order MöllerPlesset perturbation theory and the cc-pVQZ basis set, using the invariant polynomial method [B. J. Braams and J. M. Bowman, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 28, 577 (2009), 10.1080/01442350903234923]. We employ permutationally invariant basis functions in Morse-type variables for all the internuclear distances to incorporate permutational symmetry with respect to interchange of H atoms into the representation of the surface. We describe how different configurations are selected in order to create the database of the interaction energies for the linear least squares fitting procedure. The root-mean-square error of the fit is 170 cm-1 for the entire data set. The surface dissociates correctly to the H_5^+ + H2 fragments. A detailed analysis of its topology, as well as comparison with additional ab initio calculations, including harmonic frequencies, verify the quality and accuracy of the parameterized potential. This is the first attempt to present an analytical representation of the 15-dimensional surface of the H_7^+ cluster for carrying out dynamics studies.

  14. Full-dimensional analytical ab initio potential energy surface of the ground state of HOI.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Aoto, Yuri A; Ornellas, Fernando R

    2011-07-28

    Extensive ab initio calculations using a complete active space second-order perturbation theory wavefunction, including scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects with a quadruple-zeta quality basis set were used to construct an analytical potential energy surface (PES) of the ground state of the [H, O, I] system. A total of 5344 points were fit to a three-dimensional function of the internuclear distances, with a global root-mean-square error of 1.26 kcal mol(-1). The resulting PES describes accurately the main features of this system: the HOI and HIO isomers, the transition state between them, and all dissociation asymptotes. After a small adjustment, using a scaling factor on the internal coordinates of HOI, the frequencies calculated in this work agree with the experimental data available within 10 cm(-1).

  15. Full-dimensional analytical ab initio potential energy surface of the ground state of HOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G. S.; Aoto, Yuri A.; Ornellas, Fernando R.

    2011-07-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations using a complete active space second-order perturbation theory wavefunction, including scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects with a quadruple-zeta quality basis set were used to construct an analytical potential energy surface (PES) of the ground state of the [H, O, I] system. A total of 5344 points were fit to a three-dimensional function of the internuclear distances, with a global root-mean-square error of 1.26 kcal mol-1. The resulting PES describes accurately the main features of this system: the HOI and HIO isomers, the transition state between them, and all dissociation asymptotes. After a small adjustment, using a scaling factor on the internal coordinates of HOI, the frequencies calculated in this work agree with the experimental data available within 10 cm-1.

  16. The Analytical Parametrization of Fusion Barrier by Using the Skyrme Energy-Density Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, V.; Mirzaei, M.; N., Wang

    2015-08-01

    Using the skyrme energy density formalism, a pocket formula is introduced for barrier heights and positions of 95 fusion reactions (48 ≤ ZP ZT ≤ 1520) with respect to the charge and mass numbers of the interacting nuclei. It is shown that the parameterized values of RB and VB are able to reproduce the corresponding experimental data with good accuracy. Moreover, the absolute errors of our formulas are less than those obtained using the analytical parametrization forms of the fusion barrier based on the proximity versions. The ability of the parameterized forms of the barrier heights and its positions to reproduce the experimental data of the fusion cross section have been analyzed using the Wong model.

  17. Bending energy of a vesicle to which a small spherical particle adhere: An analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Si-Qin; Wei, Guang-Hong; Chen, Jeff Z. Y.

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of Helfrich’s bending energy model, we show that the adsorption process of a small spherical particle to a closed vesicle can be analytically studied by retaining the leading terms in an expansion of the shape equation. Our general derivation predicts the optimal binding sites on a vesicle, where the local membrane shape of the binding site could be non-axisymmetric before the continuous adhesion transition takes place. Our derivation avoids directly solving the shape equation and depends on an integration of the contact-line condition. The results are verified by several examples of independent numerical solutions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074047 and 11274075), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. RFDP-20100071110006), and the Natural Science and Science Engineering Council of Canada.

  18. Analytical and experimental investigation of flexible longitudinal zigzag structures for enhanced multi-directional energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengxi; Hobeck, Jared D.; Cao, Junyi; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper makes a complete investigation of flexible longitudinal zigzag (FLZ) energy harvesters for the purpose of enhancing energy harvesting from low-frequency and low-amplitude excitation. A general theoretical model of the FLZ energy harvesters with large joint block mass is proposed. In order to verify the accuracy of the theoretical model, both experimental results and finite element analysis via ANSYS software are presented. Results show that the theoretical model can successfully predict the dynamic response and the output power of the FLZ energy harvesters. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed energy harvesters can effectively harvest vibration energy even when the direction of excitation relative to the harvester varies from 0° to 90°. Under the low excitation level of 0.18 m s‑2, the experimental maximum output power of a FLZ energy harvester with five beams was found to be 1.016 mW. Finally, the results indicate that the proposed structure is capable of effective energy conversion across a large range of excitation angles at low-frequency and low-amplitude excitations, which makes it suitable for a wide range of working conditions.

  19. Field evaluation of a sampling and analytical method for environmental levels of airborne hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, P; Ricks, R; Ripple, S; Paustenbach, D

    1992-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), has been classified as a human respiratory carcinogen. Airborne Cr(VI) emissions are associated with a number of industrial sources including metal plating, tanning, chromite ore processing, and spray painting operations; combustion sources such as automobiles and incinerators; and fugitive dusts from contaminated soil. There has been considerable interest within industry and the regulatory community to assess the potential cancer risks of workers exposed to Cr(VI) at levels substantially below the threshold limit value (TLV) of 50 micrograms/m3. To date, only the workplace sampling and analytical method (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health [NIOSH] Method 7600) has been validated for measuring airborne Cr(VI), and it can accurately measure concentrations only as low as 500 ng/m3. This paper describes the field evaluation of a sampling and analytical method for the quantitation of airborne Cr(VI) at concentrations 5000 times lower than the current standard method (as low as 0.1 ng/m3). The collection method uses three 500-mL Greenberg-Smith impingers in series, operated at 15 Lpm for 24 hr. All three impingers are filled with 200 mL of a slightly alkaline (pH approximately 8) sodium bicarbonate buffer solution. The results of validation tests showed that both Cr(VI) and trivalent chromium, Cr(III), were stable in the collection medium and that samples may be stored for up to 100 days without appreciable loss of Cr(VI). Method precision based on the pooled coefficient of variation for replicate samples was 10.4%, and method accuracy based on the mean percent recovery of spiked samples was 94%. Both the precision and accuracy of the impinger method were within NIOSH criteria. This method could be used to measure ambient concentrations of Cr(VI) in the workplace caused by fugitive emissions from manufacturing processes or chromium-contaminated soils at workplace concentrations well below the current TLV (50 micrograms/m3

  20. Analytical Study on Multi-Tier 5G Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks: Coverage Performance and Energy Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhu; Liu, Hongjing; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the coverage performance and energy efficiency of multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) which are composed of macrocells and different types of small cells, i.e., picocells and femtocells. By virtue of stochastic geometry tools, we model the multi-tier HetNets based on a Poisson point process (PPP) and analyze the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) via studying the cumulative interference from pico-tier and femto-tier. We then derive the analytical expressions of coverage probabilities in order to evaluate coverage performance in different tiers and investigate how it varies with the small cells’ deployment density. By taking the fairness and user experience into consideration, we propose a disjoint channel allocation scheme and derive the system channel throughput for various tiers. Further, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem for multi-tier HetNets in terms of throughput performance and resource allocation fairness. To solve this problem, we devise a linear programming based approach to obtain the available area of the feasible solutions. System-level simulations demonstrate that the small cells’ deployment density has a significant effect on the coverage performance and energy efficiency. Simulation results also reveal that there exits an optimal small cell base station (SBS) density ratio between pico-tier and femto-tier which can be applied to maximize the energy efficiency and at the same time enhance the system performance. Our findings provide guidance for the design of multi-tier HetNets for improving the coverage performance as well as the energy efficiency. PMID:27827917

  1. Analytical Study on Multi-Tier 5G Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks: Coverage Performance and Energy Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhu; Liu, Hongjing; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-11-04

    In this paper, we investigate the coverage performance and energy efficiency of multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) which are composed of macrocells and different types of small cells, i.e., picocells and femtocells. By virtue of stochastic geometry tools, we model the multi-tier HetNets based on a Poisson point process (PPP) and analyze the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) via studying the cumulative interference from pico-tier and femto-tier. We then derive the analytical expressions of coverage probabilities in order to evaluate coverage performance in different tiers and investigate how it varies with the small cells' deployment density. By taking the fairness and user experience into consideration, we propose a disjoint channel allocation scheme and derive the system channel throughput for various tiers. Further, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem for multi-tier HetNets in terms of throughput performance and resource allocation fairness. To solve this problem, we devise a linear programming based approach to obtain the available area of the feasible solutions. System-level simulations demonstrate that the small cells' deployment density has a significant effect on the coverage performance and energy efficiency. Simulation results also reveal that there exits an optimal small cell base station (SBS) density ratio between pico-tier and femto-tier which can be applied to maximize the energy efficiency and at the same time enhance the system performance. Our findings provide guidance for the design of multi-tier HetNets for improving the coverage performance as well as the energy efficiency.

  2. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  3. ANALYTICAL EXPRESSIONS FOR THE ENVELOPE BINDING ENERGY OF GIANTS AS A FUNCTION OF BASIC STELLAR PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Loveridge, A. J.; Van der Sluys, M. V.; Kalogera, V.

    2011-12-10

    The common-envelope (CE) phase is an important stage in the evolution of binary stellar populations. The most common way to compute the change in orbital period during a CE is to relate the binding energy of the envelope of the Roche-lobe filling giant to the change in orbital energy. Especially in population-synthesis codes, where the evolution of millions of stars must be computed and detailed evolutionary models are too expensive computationally, simple approximations are made for the envelope binding energy. In this study, we present accurate analytic prescriptions based on detailed stellar-evolution models that provide the envelope binding energy for giants with metallicities between Z = 10{sup -4} and Z = 0.03 and masses between 0.8 M{sub Sun} and 100 M{sub Sun }, as a function of the metallicity, mass, radius, and evolutionary phase of the star. Our results are also presented in the form of electronic data tables and Fortran routines that use them. We find that the accuracy of our fits is better than 15% for 90% of our model data points in all cases, and better than 10% for 90% of our data points in all cases except the asymptotic giant branches for three of the six metallicities we consider. For very massive stars (M {approx}> 50 M{sub Sun }), when stars lose more than {approx}20% of their initial mass due to stellar winds, our fits do not describe the models as accurately. Our results are more widely applicable-covering wider ranges of metallicity and mass-and are of higher accuracy than those of previous studies.

  4. Infrared energy levels and intensities of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Rothman, L S; Benedict, W S

    1978-08-15

    Updated tables of vibrational energy levels, molecular constants, band origins, and intensities for carbon dioxide in the infrared region of the spectrum are presented. These tables are references for the AFGL Atmospheric Absorption Line Parameters Compilation.

  5. "Piekara's Chair": Mechanical Model for Atomic Energy Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golab-Meyer, Zofia

    1991-01-01

    Uses the teaching method of models or analogies, specifically the model called "Piekara's chair," to show how teaching classical mechanics can familiarize students with the notion of energy levels in atomic physics. (MDH)

  6. Housing Electrons: Relating Quantum Numbers, Energy Levels, and Electron Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that combines the concepts of quantum numbers and probability locations, energy levels, and electron configurations in a concrete, hands-on way. Uses model houses constructed out of foam board and colored beads to represent electrons. (JRH)

  7. Analytical Simulations of Energy-Absorbing Impact Spheres for a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus Dwight; Fasanella, Edwin L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations were performed to aid in the design of an energy-absorbing impact sphere for a passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that is a possible architecture for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR EEV concept uses an entry capsule and energy-absorbing impact sphere designed to contain and limit the acceleration of collected samples during Earth impact without a parachute. The spherical shaped impact sphere is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid composite, graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Collected Martian samples will fit inside a smaller spherical sample container at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons were made of analytical results obtained using MSC.Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center for impact velocities from 30 to 40 m/s. Acceleration, velocity, and deformation results compared well with the test results. The correlated finite element model was then used for simulations of various off-nominal impact scenarios. Off-nominal simulations at an impact velocity of 40 m/s included a rotated cellular structure impact onto a flat surface, a cellular structure impact onto an angled surface, and a cellular structure impact onto the corner of a step.

  8. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  9. Analytic spectrum of relic gravitational waves modified by neutrino free streaming and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H. X.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-05-15

    We include the effect of neutrino free streaming into the spectrum of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) in the currently accelerating universe. For the realistic case of a varying fractional neutrino energy density and a nonvanishing derivative of the mode function at the neutrino decoupling, the integro-differential equation of RGWs is solved by a perturbation method for the period from the neutrino decoupling to the matter-dominant stage. Incorporating it into the analytic solution of RGWs for the whole history of expansion of the universe, the analytic solution of RGWs is obtained, evolving from inflation up to the current acceleration. The resulting spectrum of RGWs covers the whole range of frequency (10{sup -19}-10{sup 10}) Hz and improves the previous results. It is found that neutrino free streaming causes a reduction of the spectral amplitude by {approx}20% in the range (10{sup -16}-10{sup -10}) Hz, and leaves the other portion of the spectrum almost unchanged. This agrees with the earlier numerical calculations. Examination is made on the difference between the accelerating and nonaccelerating models, and our analysis shows that the ratio of the spectral amplitude in the accelerating {lambda}CDM model over that in the CDM model is {approx}0.7, and within the various accelerating models of {omega}{sub {lambda}}>{omega}{sub m} the spectral amplitude is proportional to {omega}{sub m}/{omega}{sub {lambda}} for the whole range of frequency. Comparison with LIGO S5 run sensitivity shows that RGWs are not yet detectable by the present LIGO, and in the future LISA may be able to detect RGWs in some inflationary models.

  10. Analytic model for low energy excitation states and phase transitions in spin-ice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Bara, F. I.; López-Aguilar, F.

    2017-04-01

    Low energy excitation states in magnetic structures of the so-called spin-ices are produced via spin flips among contiguous tetrahedra of their crystal structure. These spin flips generate entities which mimic magnetic dipoles in every two tetrahedra according to the dumbbell model. When the temperature increases, the spin-flip processes are transmitted in the lattice, generating so-called Dirac strings, which constitute structural entities that can present mimetic behavior similar to that of magnetic monopoles. In recent studies of both specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility, two (even possibly three) phases have been shown to vary the temperature. The first of these phases presents a sharp peak in the specific heat and another phase transition occurs for increasing temperature whose peak is broader than that of the former phase. The sharp peak occurs when there are no free individual magnetic charges and temperature of the second phase transition coincides with the maximum proliferation of free deconfined magnetic charges. In the present paper, we propose a model for analyzing the low energy excitation many-body states of these spin-ice systems. We give analytical formulas for the internal energy, specific heat, entropy and their temperature evolution. We study the description of the possible global states via the nature and structure of their one-body components by means of the thermodynamic functions. Below 0.37 K, the Coulomb-like magnetic charge interaction can generate a phase transition to a condensation of pole–antipole pairs, possibly having Bose–Einstein structure which is responsible for the sharp peak of the first phase transition. When there are sufficient free positive and negative charges, the system tends to behave as a magnetic plasma, which implies the broader peak in the specific heat appearing at higher temperature than the sharper experimental peak.

  11. Ion heating and energy partition at the heliospheric termination shock: hybrid simulations and analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S Peter; Winske, Dan; Wu, Pin; Schwadron, N A; Lee, M

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos hybrid simulation code is used to examine heating and the partition of dissipation energy at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock in the presence of pickup ions. The simulations are one-dimensional in space but three-dimensional in field and velocity components, and are carried out for a range of values of pickup ion relative density. Results from the simulations show that because the solar wind ions are relatively cold upstream, the temperature of these ions is raised by a relatively larger factor than the temperature of the pickup ions. An analytic model for energy partition is developed on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and a polytropic energy equation. The polytropic index {gamma} used in the Rankine-Hugoniot relations is varied to improve agreement between the model and the simulations concerning the fraction of downstream heating in the pickup ions as well as the compression ratio at the shock. When the pickup ion density is less than 20%, the polytropic index is about 5/3, whereas for pickup ion densities greater than 20%, the polytropic index tends toward 2.2, suggesting a fundamental change in the character of the shock, as seen in the simulations, when the pickup ion density is large. The model and the simulations both indicate for the upstream parameters chosen for Voyager 2 conditions that the pickup ion density is about 25% and the pickup ions gain the larger share (approximately 90%) of the downstream thermal pressure, consistent with Voyager 2 observations near the shock.

  12. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  13. Intrinsic deep hole trap levels in Cu2O with self-consistent repulsive Coulomb energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-03-01

    The large error of the DFT+U method on full-filled shell metal oxides is due to the residue of self-energy from the localized d orbitals of cations and p orbitals of the anions. U parameters are selfconsistently found to achieve the analytical self-energy cancellation. The improved band structures based on relaxed lattices of Cu2O are shown based on minimization of self-energy error. The experimentally reported intrinsic p-type trap levels are contributed by both Cu-vacancy and the O-interstitial defects in Cu2O. The latter defect has the lowest formation energy but contributes a deep hole trap level while the Cuvacancy has higher energy cost but acting as a shallow acceptor. Both present single-particle levels spread over nearby the valence band edge, consistent to the trend of defects transition levels. By this calculation approach, we also elucidated the entanglement of strong p-d orbital coupling to unravel the screened Coulomb potential of fully filled shells.

  14. An analytic mapping of oligomer potential energy surfaces to an effective Frenkel model.

    PubMed

    Binder, Robert; Römer, Sarah; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene

    2014-07-07

    While the use of Frenkel-type models for semiconducting polymer assemblies and related molecular aggregates is well established, the direct parametrization of such models based on electronic structure data is attempted less frequently. In this work, we develop a systematic mapping procedure which is adapted to J-type and H-type homo-aggregate systems. The procedure is based upon the analytic solution of an inverse eigenvalue problem for an effective Frenkel Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings. Vibronic interactions are included for both site-local and site-correlated modes. For illustration, an application is presented to the excited-state ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of an oligothiophene octamer. The procedure performs a pointwise mapping of the PESs of oligomers of arbitrary chain length n, provided that the electronic ground state and any two of the n lowest adiabatic states of the excitonic manifold of interest are known. These three states are reproduced exactly by the procedure while the remaining n - 2 states of the excitonic manifold can be predicted. Explicit conditions are derived permitting to verify whether a given data set is compatible with the effective Frenkel model under study.

  15. NMR chemical shift as analytical derivative of the Helmholtz free energy.

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, Willem; Soncini, Alessandro

    2013-02-07

    We present a theory for the temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic shielding tensor of molecules with arbitrary electronic structure. The theory is a generalization of Ramsey's theory for closed-shell molecules. The shielding tensor is defined as a second derivative of the Helmholtz free energy of the electron system in equilibrium with the applied magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moments. This derivative is analytically evaluated and expressed as a sum over states formula. Special consideration is given to a system with an isolated degenerate ground state for which the size of the degeneracy and the composition of the wave functions are arbitrary. In this case, the paramagnetic part of the shielding tensor is expressed in terms of the g and A tensors of the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian of the degenerate state. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we provide an explicit formula for the paramagnetic shift of the central lanthanide ion in endofullerenes Ln@C(60), with Ln = Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Er(3+), and Yb(3+), where the ground state can be a strongly spin-orbit coupled icosahedral sextet for which the paramagnetic shift cannot be described by previous theories.

  16. An analytic mapping of oligomer potential energy surfaces to an effective Frenkel model

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Robert; Römer, Sarah E-mail: burghardt@chemie.uni-frankfurt.de; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene E-mail: burghardt@chemie.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-07-07

    While the use of Frenkel-type models for semiconducting polymer assemblies and related molecular aggregates is well established, the direct parametrization of such models based on electronic structure data is attempted less frequently. In this work, we develop a systematic mapping procedure which is adapted to J-type and H-type homo-aggregate systems. The procedure is based upon the analytic solution of an inverse eigenvalue problem for an effective Frenkel Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings. Vibronic interactions are included for both site-local and site-correlated modes. For illustration, an application is presented to the excited-state ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of an oligothiophene octamer. The procedure performs a pointwise mapping of the PESs of oligomers of arbitrary chain length n, provided that the electronic ground state and any two of the n lowest adiabatic states of the excitonic manifold of interest are known. These three states are reproduced exactly by the procedure while the remaining n − 2 states of the excitonic manifold can be predicted. Explicit conditions are derived permitting to verify whether a given data set is compatible with the effective Frenkel model under study.

  17. THE IMPORTANCE OF PROPER INTENSITY CALIBRATION FOR RAMAN ANALYSIS OF LOW-LEVEL ANALYTES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modern dispersive Raman spectroscopy offers unique advantages for the analysis of low-concentration analytes in aqueous solution. However, we have found that proper intensity calibration is critical for obtaining these benefits. This is true not only for producing spectra with ...

  18. Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Entry-Level Business Analytics Positions: A Multi-Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegielski, Casey G.; Jones-Farmer, L. Allison

    2016-01-01

    It is impossible to deny the significant impact from the emergence of big data and business analytics on the fields of Information Technology, Quantitative Methods, and the Decision Sciences. Both industry and academia seek to hire talent in these areas with the hope of developing organizational competencies. This article describes a multi-method…

  19. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  20. Wavelengths and Energy Levels of Neutral Kr84 and Level Shifts in All Kr Even Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Victor

    1993-01-01

    Interferometrically-measured wavelengths of 109 lines of neutral Kr84 are compared with those of Kr86. Sixty energy levels of neutral Kr84 derived from those wavelengths and 25 Kr86–Kr84 isotope shifts previously measured are given along with their shifts from the energy levels of Kr86. Twenty levels of each of Kr82, Kr80, and Kr78 are also evaluated using isotope-shift information in the literature. The differences between the experimentally observed shifts and the normal mass shift leave large negative residuals which are accounted for by ionization energy differences and by the specific mass shift. It appears that the volume effect causes only a very small, if any, energy level shift. PMID:28053495

  1. A Review of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as an Analytical Tool in Numismatic Studies.

    PubMed

    Navas, María José; Asuero, Agustín García; Jiménez, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as an analytical technique in studies of ancient coins is summarized and reviewed. Specific EDXRF applications in historical studies, in studies of the corrosion of coins, and in studies of the optimal working conditions of some laser-based treatment for the cleaning of coins are described.

  2. Analytical support for a new, low-level radioactive wastewater treatment plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, V.D.; Marsh, J.H.; Ingram, L.M.; Melton, W.L.; Magonigal, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) located in Aiken, SC, is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company under contract with the US Department of Energy. The mission of SRS is to manufacture radioisotopes for use in national defense and space exploration. The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is a wastewater treatment plant supporting SRS for low-level radioactive process waste streams. In order to comply with the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the facility had to become operational by November 8, 1988. The F/H ETF employs pH adjustment, microfiltration, organic removal, reverse osmosis, evaporation, and ion exchange to remove contaminants prior to discharge to the environment via a state-permitted outfall. Concentrated contaminants removed by these processes are diverted to other facilities for further processing. The ETF is supported by a 24 hr/day facility laboratory for process control and characterization of influent feed, treated effluent water, and concentrated waste. Permit compliance analyses reported to the state of SC are performed by an offsite certified contract laboratory. The support laboratory is efficiently organized to provide: metal analyses by ICP-AES, alpha/beta/gamma activity counting, process ions by Ion Selective Electrode (ISE), oil and grease analyses by IR technique, mercury via cold vapor AA, conductivity, turbidity, and pH. All instrumentation is contained in hoods for radioactive sample handling.

  3. Quality assurance programs developed and implemented by the US Department of Energy`s Analytical Services Program for environmental restoration and waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lillian, D.; Bottrell, D.

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has been tasked with addressing environmental contamination and waste problems facing the Department. A key element of any environmental restoration or waste management program is environmental data. An effective and efficient sampling and analysis program is required to generate credible environmental data. The bases for DOE`s EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) are contained in the charter and commitments in Secretary of Energy Notice SEN-13-89, EM program policies and requirements, and commitments to Congress and the Office of Inspector General (IG). The Congressional commitment by DOE to develop and implement an ASP was in response to concerns raised by the Chairman of the Congressional Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee, and the Chairman of the Congressional Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, regarding the production of analytical data. The development and implementation of an ASP also satisfies the IG`s audit report recommendations on environmental analytical support, including development and implementation of a national strategy for acquisition of quality sampling and analytical services. These recommendations were endorsed in Departmental positions, which further emphasize the importance of the ASP to EM`s programs. In September 1990, EM formed the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) in the Office of Technology Development to provide the programmatic direction needed to establish and operate an EM-wide ASP program. In January 1992, LMD issued the {open_quotes}Analytical Services Program Five-Year Plan.{close_quotes} This document described LMD`s strategy to ensure the production of timely, cost-effective, and credible environmental data. This presentation describes the overall LMD Analytical Services Program and, specifically, the various QA programs.

  4. Study of the crossing of quasi-energy levels in a four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Arushanyan, S; Melikyan, A; Saakyan, S

    2011-05-31

    It was shown previously that in taking into account only dipole transitions, the crossing of quasi-energy levels is possible in the system if any of the transitions forms a closed loop. It followed herefrom that for the analysis of the crossing conditions, it is necessary to consider a system which has at least four levels. In this paper we show that we can uniquely specify which quasi-energy levels cross at the given values of the parameters of the atomic system and radiation field, without solving an algebraic quartic equation. It was found that the most suitable system for the implementation of the crossing is the group of energy levels {sup 5}S{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 3/2} and {sup 5}D{sub 3/2} of a rubidium atom. The performed calculations of the laser field intensity and frequency values at which crossing takes place in this system show that they are easily attainable. It turned out that in this system there occur crossing of quasi-energy levels corresponding to the excited atomic levels. (intersection of quasi-energy levels)

  5. Determination of natural and depleted uranium in urine at the ppt level: an interlaboratory analytical exercise.

    PubMed

    Ough, E A; Lewis, B J; Andrews, W S; Bennett, L G I; Hancock, R G V; D'Agastino, P A

    2006-05-01

    An analytical exercise was initiated in order to determine those procedures with the capability to measure total uranium and uranium (238U/235U) isotopic ratios in urine samples containing >0.02 microg U kg-1 urine. A host laboratory prepared six identical sets of twelve synthetic urine samples containing total uranium in the range of 25 to 770 ng U kg-1 urine and with 238U/235U isotopic ratios ranging from 138 (100% NU) to 215 (51% DU). Sets of samples were shipped to five testing laboratories (four based in Canada and one based in Europe). Each laboratory utilized one of the following analytical techniques: sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS), quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-Q-MS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), and instrumental/delayed neutron activation analysis (I/DNAA), in their analyses.

  6. Analytical potential energy surface and kinetics of the NH(3) + H --> NH(2) + H(2) hydrogen abstraction and the ammonia inversion reactions.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Garcia, J; Corchado, J C

    2010-04-01

    Based on accurate electronic structure calculations, a new analytical potential energy surface (PES) was fitted to simultaneously describe the hydrogen abstraction reaction from ammonia by a hydrogen atom, and the ammonia inversion. Using a wide spectrum of properties of the reactive system (equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and relative energies of the stationary points, topology of the reaction paths, and points on the reaction swaths) as reference, the resulting analytical PES reproduces reasonably well the input ab initio information obtained at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level, which represents a severe test for the new surface. As a first application, on this analytical PES we perform an extensive kinetics study using variational transition-state theory with semiclassical transmission coefficients over a wide temperature range, 200-2000 K. For the hydrogen abstraction reaction, the forward rate constants reproduce the experimental measurements, while the reverse ones are slightly underestimated. Another severe test of the new surface is the analysis of the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The KIEs between unsubstituted and all deuterated reactions agree with experiment in the common temperature range. For the ammonia inversion reaction, the splitting of the degenerate vibrational levels of the double well due to the tunneling contribution, which is very important in this reaction representing 93% of the reactivity at 200 K, was calculated for the NH(3) and ND(3) species. The values found were 3.6 and 0.37 cm(-1), respectively, which although higher than experimental values, reproduce the experimental behavior on isotopic substitution.

  7. Degeneracy of energy levels of pseudo-Gaussian oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, Theodor-Felix; Iacob, Felix; Lute, Marina

    2015-12-07

    We study the main features of the isotropic radial pseudo-Gaussian oscillators spectral properties. This study is made upon the energy levels degeneracy with respect to orbital angular momentum quantum number. In a previous work [6] we have shown that the pseudo-Gaussian oscillators belong to the class of quasi-exactly solvable models and an exact solution has been found.

  8. Fairness at the collective level: a meta-analytic examination of the consequences and boundary conditions of organizational justice climate.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Daniel S; Caleo, Suzette; Carpenter, Nichelle C; Horner, Margaret T; Bernerth, Jeremy B

    2012-07-01

    This article uses meta-analytic methods (k = 38) to examine the relationship between organizational justice climate and unit-level effectiveness. Overall, our results suggest that the relationship between justice and effectiveness is significant (ρ = .40) when both constructs are construed at the collective level. Our results also indicate that distributive justice climate was most strongly linked with unit-level performance (e.g., productivity, customer satisfaction), whereas interactional justice was most strongly related to unit-level processes (e.g., organizational citizenship behavior, cohesion). We also show that a number of factors moderate this relationship, including justice climate strength, the level of referent in the justice measure, the hierarchical level of the unit, and how criteria are classified. We elaborate on these findings and attempt to provide a clearer direction for future research in this area.

  9. Energy balance regulation by thyroid hormones at central level.

    PubMed

    López, Miguel; Alvarez, Clara V; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Classically, medical textbooks taught that most effects of thyroid hormones (THs) on energy homeostasis are directly exerted in peripheral tissues. However, current evidence is changing (and challenging) our perspective about the role of THs from a 'peripheral' to a 'central' vision, implying that they affect food intake, energy expenditure, and metabolism by acting, to a large extent, at the central level. Interestingly, effects of THs are interrelated with global energy sensors in the central nervous system (CNS), such as uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; the 'AMPK-BAT axis'), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we review what is currently known about THs and their regulation of energy balance and metabolism in both peripheral and central tissues.

  10. Levelized cost of energy for a Backward Bent Duct Buoy

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana; Jenne, D. Scott; Smith, Christopher S.; Copping, Andrea E.; Copeland, Guild

    2016-12-01

    The Reference Model Project, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, was developed to provide publically available technical and economic benchmarks for a variety of marine energy converters. The methodology to achieve these benchmarks is to develop public domain designs that incorporate power performance estimates, structural models, anchor and mooring designs, power conversion chain designs, and estimates of the operations and maintenance, installation, and environmental permitting required. The reference model designs are intended to be conservative, robust, and experimentally verified. The Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) presented in this paper is one of three wave energy conversion devices studied within the Reference Model Project. Comprehensive modeling of the BBDB in a Northern California climate has enabled a full levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analysis to be completed on this device.

  11. Levelized cost of energy for a Backward Bent Duct Buoy

    DOE PAGES

    Bull, Diana; Jenne, D. Scott; Smith, Christopher S.; ...

    2016-07-18

    The Reference Model Project, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, was developed to provide publicly available technical and economic benchmarks for a variety of marine energy converters. The methodology to achieve these benchmarks is to develop public domain designs that incorporate power performance estimates, structural models, anchor and mooring designs, power conversion chain designs, and estimates of the operations and maintenance, installation, and environmental permitting required. The reference model designs are intended to be conservative, robust, and experimentally verified. The Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) presented in this paper is one of three wave energy conversion devices studied withinmore » the Reference Model Project. Furthermore, comprehensive modeling of the BBDB in a Northern California climate has enabled a full levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analysis to be completed on this device.« less

  12. Levelized cost of energy for a Backward Bent Duct Buoy

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana; Jenne, D. Scott; Smith, Christopher S.; Copping, Andrea E.; Copeland, Guild

    2016-07-18

    The Reference Model Project, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, was developed to provide publicly available technical and economic benchmarks for a variety of marine energy converters. The methodology to achieve these benchmarks is to develop public domain designs that incorporate power performance estimates, structural models, anchor and mooring designs, power conversion chain designs, and estimates of the operations and maintenance, installation, and environmental permitting required. The reference model designs are intended to be conservative, robust, and experimentally verified. The Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) presented in this paper is one of three wave energy conversion devices studied within the Reference Model Project. Furthermore, comprehensive modeling of the BBDB in a Northern California climate has enabled a full levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analysis to be completed on this device.

  13. Energy Deposition Fluctuations Induced by Ions in Microvolumes and Nanovolumes - An Analytic Approach. 1. Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-22

    weighted averages of specific energy and lineal energy are obtained. These microdosimetric quantities are useful for analyzing energy distributions...41 b. Specific Energy and the Two Component Model ................. 44 2. Lineal Energy Related Quantities...46 a. Definition and Background .............................. 46 b. Lineal Energy and the Two Component Model ................. 49

  14. An analytical coarse-graining method which preserves the free energy, structural correlations, and thermodynamic state of polymer melts from the atomistic to the mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, J.; Clark, A. J.; Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2014-05-01

    Structural and thermodynamic consistency of coarse-graining models across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. Our approach is a coarse-grained model based on integral equation theory, which can represent polymer chains at variable levels of chemical details. The model is analytical and depends on molecular and thermodynamic parameters of the system under study, as well as on the direct correlation function in the k → 0 limit, c0. A numerical solution to the PRISM integral equations is used to determine c0, by adjusting the value of the effective hard sphere diameter, dHS, to agree with the predicted equation of state. This single quantity parameterizes the coarse-grained potential, which is used to perform mesoscale simulations that are directly compared with atomistic-level simulations of the same system. We test our coarse-graining formalism by comparing structural correlations, isothermal compressibility, equation of state, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, and potential energy and entropy using both united atom and coarse-grained descriptions. We find quantitative agreement between the analytical formalism for the thermodynamic properties, and the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations, independent of the chosen level of representation. In the mesoscale description, the potential energy of the soft-particle interaction becomes a free energy in the coarse-grained coordinates which preserves the excess free energy from an ideal gas across all levels of description. The structural consistency between the united-atom and mesoscale descriptions means the relative entropy between descriptions has been minimized without any variational optimization parameters. The approach is general and applicable to any polymeric system in different thermodynamic conditions.

  15. An analytical coarse-graining method which preserves the free energy, structural correlations, and thermodynamic state of polymer melts from the atomistic to the mesoscale

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.; Clark, A. J.; Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2014-05-28

    Structural and thermodynamic consistency of coarse-graining models across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. Our approach is a coarse-grained model based on integral equation theory, which can represent polymer chains at variable levels of chemical details. The model is analytical and depends on molecular and thermodynamic parameters of the system under study, as well as on the direct correlation function in the k → 0 limit, c{sub 0}. A numerical solution to the PRISM integral equations is used to determine c{sub 0}, by adjusting the value of the effective hard sphere diameter, d{sub HS}, to agree with the predicted equation of state. This single quantity parameterizes the coarse-grained potential, which is used to perform mesoscale simulations that are directly compared with atomistic-level simulations of the same system. We test our coarse-graining formalism by comparing structural correlations, isothermal compressibility, equation of state, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, and potential energy and entropy using both united atom and coarse-grained descriptions. We find quantitative agreement between the analytical formalism for the thermodynamic properties, and the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations, independent of the chosen level of representation. In the mesoscale description, the potential energy of the soft-particle interaction becomes a free energy in the coarse-grained coordinates which preserves the excess free energy from an ideal gas across all levels of description. The structural consistency between the united-atom and mesoscale descriptions means the relative entropy between descriptions has been minimized without any variational optimization parameters. The approach is general and applicable to any polymeric system in different thermodynamic conditions.

  16. Mo uc(v) Energy Levels and f values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lin; Beck, Donald R.

    2004-05-01

    Relativistic Configuration Interaction (RCI) calculations have been done for the lowest 12 J=0 even parity levels, and the lowest 30 J=1 odd parity levels of Mo uc(v.) For the J=0 4d^2 and 4d 5d energy differences, the average error is 229 cm-1 ( M. I. Cabeza, F. G. Meijer, and L. Iglesias, Phys. Scr. 34), 223 (1986). For the other J=0 levels, the average difference with experiment (A. Tauheed, M. S. Z. Chaghtai, and K. Rahimullah, Phys. Scr. 31), 369 (1985) is considerably greater. Our average energy errors for the 11 known ^2 J=1 levels is 233 cm-1, excluding the 5s 5p ^1 P level, which is 1580 cm-1 higher than observed ^2. We predict positions of 19 4p^5 4d^3 levels, as well as f values for the 360 transitions between the calculated levels. Gauge agreements are good for transitions with f > .01. Details of the methodology have been published elsewhere (D. R. Beck and L. Pan, Phys. Scr. 69), 91 (2004).

  17. Adsorptive micro-extraction techniques--novel analytical tools for trace levels of polar solutes in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Silva, A R M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-11-19

    A novel enrichment technique, adsorptive μ-extraction (AμE), is proposed for trace analysis of polar solutes in aqueous media. The preparation, stability tests and development of the analytical devices using two geometrical configurations, i.e. bar adsorptive μ-extraction (BAμE) and multi-spheres adsorptive μ-extraction (MSAμE) is fully discussed. From the several sorbent materials tested, activated carbons and polystyrene divinylbenzene phases demonstrated the best stability, robustness and to be the most suitable for analytical purposes. The application of both BAμE and MSAμE devices proved remarkable performance for the determination of trace levels of polar solutes and metabolites (e.g. pesticides, disinfection by-products, drugs of abuse and pharmaceuticals) in water matrices and biological fluids. By comparing AμE techniques with stir bar sorptive extraction based on polydimethylsiloxane phase, great effectiveness is attained overcoming the limitations of the latter enrichment approach regarding the more polar solutes. Furthermore, convenient sensitivity and selectivity is reached through AμE techniques, since the great advantage of this new analytical technology is the possibility to choose the most suitable sorbent to each particular type of application. The enrichment techniques proposed are cost-effective, easy to prepare and work-up, demonstrating robustness and to be a remarkable analytical tool for trace analysis of priority solutes in areas of recognized importance such as environment, forensic and other related life sciences.

  18. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-06-07

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)]. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol(-1)) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (E(coll) ≥ 6 kcal mol(-1)) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  19. Alignment of electronic energy levels at electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-08-28

    The position of electronic energy levels in a phase depends on the surface potentials at its boundaries. Bringing two phases in contact at an interface will alter the surface potentials shifting the energy levels relative to each other. Calculating such shifts for electrochemical interfaces requires a combination of methods from computational surface science and physical chemistry. The problem is closely related to the computation of potentials of electrochemically inactive electrodes. These so-called ideally polarizable interfaces are impossible to cross for electrons. In this perspective we review two density functional theory based methods that have been developed for this purpose, the workfunction method and the hydrogen insertion method. The key expressions of the two methods are derived from the formal theory of absolute electrode potentials. As an illustration of the workfunction method we review the computation of the potential of zero charge of the Pt(111)-water interface as recently published by a number of groups. The example of the hydrogen insertion method is from our own work on the rutile TiO(2)(110)-water interface at the point of zero proton charge. The calculations are summarized in level diagrams aligning the electronic energy levels of the solid electrode (Fermi level of the metal, valence band maximum and conduction band minimum of the semiconductor) to the band edges of liquid water and the standard potential for the reduction of the hydroxyl radical. All potentials are calculated at the same level of density functional theory using the standard hydrogen electrode as common energy reference. Comparison to experiment identifies the treatment of the valence band of water as a potentially dangerous source of error for application to electrocatalysis and photocatalysis.

  20. Self-energy shift of the energy levels of atomic hydrogen in photonic crystal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, R. Kh; Khamadeev, M. A.; Steryakov, O. V.; Ziyatdinova, K. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    Corrections to the average kinetic energy of atomic electrons caused by the change in electron mass in the photonic crystal medium are investigated. Corresponding shift of energy levels of atoms placed in a photonic crystal is shown to be of order of the ordinary Lamb shift.

  1. First principle prediction of shallow defect level binding energies and deep level nonradiative recombination rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linwang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate calculation of defect level energies in semiconductors and their carrier capturing rate is an important issue in ab initio prediction of semiconductor properties. In this talk, I will present our result work in ab initio shallow level calculation and deep level caused nonradiative recombination rate calculation. In the shallow acceptor level calculation, a large system up to 64,000 atoms needs to be used to properly describe the weakly bounded hole wave functions. The single particle Hamiltonian of that system is patched from bulk potential and central potential. Furthermore, GW calculation is used to correct the one site potential of the impurity atom. The resulting binding energy agrees excellently with the experiments within 10 meV. To calculate the nonradiative decay rate, the electron-phonon coupling constants in the defect system are calculated all at once using a new variational algorithm. Multiphonon process formalism is used to calculate the nonradiative decay rate. It is found that the transition is induced by the electron and the optical phonon coupling, but the energy conservation is mostly satisfied by the acoustic phonons. The new algorithm allows fast calculation of such nonradiative decay rate for any defect levels, as well as other multiphonon processes in nanostructures. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Science (BES)/Materials Science and Engineering Division (MSED) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Parametric design-based modal damped vibrational piezoelectric energy harvesters with arbitrary proof mass offset: Numerical and analytical validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumentut, Mikail F.; Howard, Ian M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the primary development of novel numerical and analytical techniques of the modal damped vibration energy harvesters with arbitrary proof mass offset. The key equations of electromechanical finite element discretisation using the extended Lagrangian principle are revealed and simplified to give matrix and scalar forms of the coupled system equations, indicating the most relevant numerical technique for the power harvester research. To evaluate the performance of the numerical study, the analytical closed-form boundary value equations have been developed using the extended Hamiltonian principle. The results from the electromechanical frequency response functions (EFRFs) derived from two theoretical studies show excellent agreement with experimental studies. The benefit of the numerical technique is in providing effective and quick predictions for analysing parametric designs and physical properties of piezoelectric materials. Although analytical technique provides a challenging process for analysing the complex smart structure, it shows complementary study for validating the numerical technique.

  3. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  4. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Ziegler, James F.

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u-1 to 450 MeV u-1 or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  5. Calculations for Adjusting Endogenous Biomarker Levels During Analytical Recovery Assessments for Ligand-Binding Assay Bioanalytical Method Validation.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, John F; Evans, Cindy L; Saxena, Manju; Lopez, Adriana E

    2015-07-01

    It is often necessary to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels in spiked validation samples (VS) and in selectivity determinations during bioanalytical method validation for ligand-binding assays (LBA) with a matrix like normal human serum (NHS). Described herein are case studies of biomarker analyses using multiplex LBA which highlight the challenges associated with such adjustments when calculating percent analytical recovery (%AR). The LBA test methods were the Meso Scale Discovery V-PLEX® proinflammatory and cytokine panels with NHS as test matrix. The NHS matrix blank exhibited varied endogenous content of the 20 individual cytokines before spiking, ranging from undetectable to readily quantifiable. Addition and subtraction methods for adjusting endogenous cytokine levels in %AR calculations are both used in the bioanalytical field. The two methods were compared in %AR calculations following spiking and analysis of VS for cytokines having detectable endogenous levels in NHS. Calculations for %AR obtained by subtracting quantifiable endogenous biomarker concentrations from the respective total analytical VS values yielded reproducible and credible conclusions. The addition method, in contrast, yielded %AR conclusions that were frequently unreliable and discordant with values obtained with the subtraction adjustment method. It is shown that subtraction of assay signal attributable to matrix is a feasible alternative when endogenous biomarkers levels are below the limit of quantitation, but above the limit of detection. These analyses confirm that the subtraction method is preferable over that using addition to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels when calculating %AR for biomarker LBA.

  6. Education: a microfluidic platform for university-level analytical chemistry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Greener, Jesse; Tumarkin, Ethan; Debono, Michael; Dicks, Andrew P; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2012-02-21

    We demonstrate continuous flow acid-base titration reactions as an educational microfluidic platform for undergraduate and graduate analytical chemistry courses. A series of equations were developed for controlling and predicting the results of acid-base neutralisation reactions conducted in a microfluidic format, including the combinations of (i) a strong base and a strong acid, (ii) a strong base and a weak acid, and (iii) a strong base and a multiprotic acid. Microfluidic titrations yielded excellent repeatability. The small experimental footprint is advantageous in crowded teaching laboratories, and it offers limited waste and exposure to potentially hazardous acids and bases. This platform will help promote the utilisation of microfluidics at an earlier stage of students' careers.

  7. Public budgets for energy RD&D and the effects on energy intensity and pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre, Daniel; Álvarez, Agustín; Cantos, José María

    2015-04-01

    This study, based on the N-shaped cubic model of the environmental Kuznets curve, analyzes the evolution of per capita greenhouse gas emissions (GHGpc) using not just economic growth but also public budgets dedicated to energy-oriented research development and demonstration (RD&D) and energy intensity. The empirical evidence, obtained from an econometric model of fixed effects for 28 OECD countries during 1994-2010, suggests that energy innovations help reduce GHGpc levels and mitigate the negative impact of energy intensity on environmental quality. When countries develop active energy RD&D policies, they can reduce both the rates of energy intensity and the level of GHGpc emissions. This paper incorporates a moderating variable to the econometric model that emphasizes the effect that GDP has on energy intensity. It also adds a variable that reflects the difference between countries that have made a greater economic effort in energy RD&D, which in turn corrects the GHG emissions resulting from the energy intensity of each country.

  8. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste disposal concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, C.; Page, L.; Morreale, B.; Owens, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) manages its low-level waste (LLW), regulated by DOE Order 5820.2A by using an overall systems approach. This systems approach provides an improved and consistent management system for all DOE LLW waste, from generation to disposal. This paper outlines six basic disposal concepts used in the systems approach, discusses issues associated with each of the concepts, and outlines both present and future disposal concepts used at six DOE sites. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Analytical-numerical methods of calculations of energy and three-dimensional particle distributions in electromagnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Roganova, T. M.; Sizov, V. V.; Triphonova, S. V.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and numerical methods of calculation of the energy and three dimensional EPS characteristics are reported. The angular and lateral functions of electrons in EPS have been obtained by the Landau and small angle approximations A and B and compared with earlier data. A numerical method of solution of cascade equations for the EPS distribution function moments has been constructed. Considering the equilibrium rms angle as an example, errors appearing when approximating the elementary process cross sections by their asymptotic expressions are analyzed.

  10. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  11. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  12. Computation of crystal Green's functions in the complex-energy plane with the use of the analytical tetrahedron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin, Ph.; Vigneron, J. P.

    1984-03-01

    The analytical tetrahedron method (ATM) for evaluating perfect-crystal Green's functions is reviewed. It is shown that the ATM allows for computing matrix elements of the resolvent operator in the entire complex-energy plane. These elements are written as a scalar product involving weighting functions of the complex energy, which are computed on a mesh of k--> points in the Brillouin zone. When the usual approximations are made within each tetrahedron, namely linear interpolations for the dispersion relations as well as for the numerator matrix elements, the weighting functions only depend on the perfect-crystal dispersion relations. In addition, the analytical expression obtained for a tetrahedral contribution to the weighting functions is simpler than what is usually expected. Analytical properties of our expressions are discussed and all the limiting forms are worked out. Special attention is paid to the numerical stability of the algorithm producing the Green's-function imaginary part on the real energy axis. Expressions which have been published earlier are subject to computational problems, which are solved in the new formulas reported here.

  13. A rotamer energy level study of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Lauri; Pesonen, Janne; Sjöholm, Elina; Halonen, Lauri

    2013-10-14

    It is a common approach in quantum chemical calculations for polyatomic molecules to rigidly constrain some of the degrees of freedom in order to make the calculations computationally feasible. However, the presence of the rigid constraints also affects the kinetic energy operator resulting in the frozen mode correction, originally derived by Pesonen [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144310 (2013)]. In this study, we compare the effects of this correction to several different approximations to the kinetic energy operator used in the literature, in the specific case of the rotamer energy levels of sulfuric acid. The two stable conformers of sulfuric acid are connected by the rotations of the O-S-O-H dihedral angles and possess C2 and Cs symmetry in the order of increasing energy. Our results show that of the models tested, the largest differences with the frozen mode corrected values were obtained by simply omitting the passive degrees of freedom. For the lowest 17 excited states, this inappropriate treatment introduces an increase of 9.6 cm(-1) on average, with an increase of 8.7 cm(-1) in the zero-point energies. With our two-dimensional potential energy surface calculated at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level, we observe a radical shift in the density of states compared to the harmonic picture, combined with an increase in zero point energy. Thus, we conclude that the quantum mechanical inclusion of the different conformers of sulfuric acid have a significant effect on its vibrational partition function, suggesting that it will also have an impact on the computational values of the thermodynamic properties of any reactions where sulfuric acid plays a role. Finally, we also considered the effect of the anharmonicities for the other vibrational degrees of freedom with a VSCF-calculation at the DF-MP2-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory but found that the inclusion of the other conformer had the more important effect on the vibrational partition function.

  14. X-Ray Microanalysis and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry in the Analytical Electron Microscope: Review and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses future directions in analytical electron microscopy for microchemical analysis using X-ray and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). The technique of X-ray microanalysis, using the ratio method and k(sub AB) factors, is outlined. The X-ray absorption correction is the major barrier to the objective of obtaining I% accuracy and precision in analysis. Spatial resolution and Minimum Detectability Limits (MDL) are considered with present limitations of spatial resolution in the 2 to 3 microns range and of MDL in the 0.1 to 0.2 wt. % range when a Field Emission Gun (FEG) system is used. Future directions of X-ray analysis include improvement in X-ray spatial resolution to the I to 2 microns range and MDL as low as 0.01 wt. %. With these improvements the detection of single atoms in the analysis volume will be possible. Other future improvements include the use of clean room techniques for thin specimen preparation, quantification available at the I% accuracy and precision level with light element analysis quantification available at better than the 10% accuracy and precision level, the incorporation of a compact wavelength dispersive spectrometer to improve X-ray spectral resolution, light element analysis and MDL, and instrument improvements including source stability, on-line probe current measurements, stage stability, and computerized stage control. The paper reviews the EELS technique, recognizing that it has been slow to develop and still remains firmly in research laboratories rather than in applications laboratories. Consideration of microanalysis with core-loss edges is given along with a discussion of the limitations such as specimen thickness. Spatial resolution and MDL are considered, recognizing that single atom detection is already possible. Plasmon loss analysis is discussed as well as fine structure analysis. New techniques for energy-loss imaging are also summarized. Future directions in the EELS technique will be

  15. An Update of the Analytical Groundwater Modeling to Assess Water Resource Impacts at the Afton Solar Energy Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, John J.; Greer, Christopher B.; Carr, Adrianne E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to update a one-dimensional analytical groundwater flow model to examine the influence of potential groundwater withdrawal in support of utility-scale solar energy development at the Afton Solar Energy Zone (SEZ) as a part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Solar Energy Program. This report describes the modeling for assessing the drawdown associated with SEZ groundwater pumping rates for a 20-year duration considering three categories of water demand (high, medium, and low) based on technology-specific considerations. The 2012 modeling effort published in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (Solar PEIS; BLM and DOE 2012) has been refined based on additional information described below in an expanded hydrogeologic discussion.

  16. Energy levels of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene quantum dots with infinite-mass boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; da Costa, D. R.; Ketabi, S. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    Using the continuum model, we investigate the confined states and the corresponding wave functions of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene (TLG) quantum dots (QDs). First, a general infinite-mass boundary condition is derived and applied to calculate the electron and hole energy levels of a circular QD in both the absence and presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our analytical results for the energy spectra agree with those obtained by using the tight-binding model, where a TLG QD is surrounded by a staggered potential. Our findings show that (i ) the energy spectrum exhibits intervalley symmetry EKe(m ) =-EK'h(m ) for the electron (e) and hole (h) states, where m is the angular momentum quantum number, (i i ) the zero-energy Landau level (LL) is formed by the magnetic states with m ⩽0 for both Dirac valleys, that is different from monolayer and bilayer graphene QD with infinite-mass potential in which only one of the cones contributes, and (i i i ) groups of three quantum Hall edge states in the tight-binding magnetic spectrum approach the zero LL, which results from the layer symmetry in TLG QDs.

  17. Thirty-seventh ORNL/DOE conference on analytical chemistry in energy technology: Abstracts of papers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Abstracts only are given for papers presented during the following topical sessions: Opportunities for collaboration: Industry, academic, national laboratories; Developments in sensor technology; Analysis in containment facilities; Improving the quality of environmental data; Process analysis; Field analysis; Radiological separations; Interactive analytical seminars; Measurements and chemical industry initiatives; and Isotopic measurements and mass spectroscopy.

  18. Antimullerian Hormone Level and Endometrioma Ablation Using Plasma Energy

    PubMed Central

    Bubenheim, Michael; Auber, Mathieu; Marpeau, Loïc; Puscasiu, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of ovarian endometrioma vaporization using plasma energy on antimullerian hormone (AMH) level. Method: We report a prospective, noncomparative series (NCT01596985). Twenty-two patients with unilateral ovarian endometriomas ≥30 mm, with no surgical antecedent and no ongoing pregnancy, underwent vaporization of ovarian endometriomas using plasma energy during the period of November 29, 2010 to November 28, 2012. We assessed AMH levels before surgery, 3 months postoperatively, and at the end of follow-up. Results: The mean length of postoperative follow-up was 18.2 ± 8 months. AMH level significantly varied through the 3 assessments performed in the study, as the mean values ± SD were 3.9 ± 2.6 ng/mL before the surgery, 2.3 ± 1.1 ng/mL at 3 months, and 3.1 ± 2.2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up (P = .001). There was a significant increase from 3 months postoperatively to the end of follow-up (median change 0.7 ng/mL, P = .01). Seventy-one percent of patients had an AMH level >2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up versus 76% before the surgery (P = 1). During the postoperative follow-up, 11 patients tried to conceive, of whom 8 (73%) became pregnant. Conclusions: The ablation of unilateral endometriomas is followed in a majority of cases by a significant decrease in AMH level 3 months after surgery. In subsequent months, this level progressively increases, raising questions about the real factors that impact postoperative ovarian AMH production. PMID:25392649

  19. Analytical approximations for the long-term decay behavior of spent fuel and high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Malbrain, C.M.; Deutch, J.M.; Lester, R.K.

    1982-05-01

    Simple analytical approximations are presented that describe the radioactivity and radiogenic decay heat behavior of high-level wastes (HLWs) from various nuclear fuel cycles during the first 100,000 years of waste life. The correlations are based on detailed computations of HLW properties carried out with the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN 2. The ambiguities encountered in using simple comparisons of the hazards posed by HLWs and naturally occurring mineral deposits to establish the longevity requirements for geologic waste disposal schemes are discussed.

  20. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-07

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the 'excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells.

  1. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the ‘excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells. PMID:25099864

  2. Vintage-level energy and environmental performance of manufacturing establishments

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.A.; Bock, M.J.; Neifer, M.J.; Karlson, S.H.; Ross, M.H.

    1994-05-01

    This report examines the relationship between an industrial plant`s vintage and its energy and environmental performance. Basic questions related to defining vintage and measuring the effects of the manufacturing industry`s vintage distribution of plant-level capacity and energy intensity are explored in general for six energy-intensive sectors (paper, chlorine, nitrogenous fertilizer, aluminum, steel, and cement) at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level and in detail for two sectors (steel and cement). Results show that greenfield (i.e., newly opened) plants in the paper, steel, and cement industries exhibit low fossil fuel intensities. These results are consistent with expectations. New plants in the paper and steel industries, where processes are undergoing electrification, exhibit high electricity intensities. An analysis of a subsector of the steel industry -- minimills that use scrap-based, electric arc furnaces -- reveals a decline in electricity intensity of 6.2 kilowatt-hours per ton for each newer year of installed vintage. This estimate is consistent with those of engineering studies and raises confidence that analyses of vintage effects in other industries could be conducted. When a vintage measure is assigned on the basis of investment data rather than trade association data, the vintage/performance relationship results for the cement industry are reasonably robust; thus, the analysis of vintage and performance could be extended to sectors for which only US Bureau of the Census data are available.

  3. An Analytical Study to Correlate Serum Levels of Levetiracetam with Clinical Course in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun; Gupta, Kanchan; Singh, Gagandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With the advancement of therapeutics, newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) like Levetiracetam (LEV), with good therapeutic efficacy and tolerability are available. But unfortunately, therapeutic drug monitoring is not routinely done in India for these drugs. Objectives: The objective of this study is to determine the range of serum levels of LEV in patients at stabilized doses and correlate them with their clinical course. Materials and Methods: Patients with epilepsy and started on LEV were enrolled from the Neurology Department after the Ethics Committee approval. Serum levels of LEV were estimated using high-performance liquid chromatography and correlated with patient demographics, dosage, dosage forms, concomitant AEDs, compliance of the patient, therapeutic effect, adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and suspected toxicity. Results: Serum levels of LEV ranged from 0.4 to 102.2 μg/ml at different time points and demonstrated a negligible positive correlation with age of the patients (r = 0.12) but negligible negative correlation with bodyweight (r = −0.19). No conclusive relationship could be established for dose, gender, dosage forms, clinical efficacy (seizure frequency), ADRs, and toxicity. Compliance was verified in all the patients. Levels were found to reduce with the use of concomitant enzyme inducer drugs (56.78%) whereas increase with valproic acid (7.8%). Conclusion: These findings emphasize the need for monitoring the serum levels of newer AEDs like LEV considering the various parameters studied here, so as to maintain the therapeutic efficacy by preventing under or over dosage and to generate a broader database of serum levels of LEV in the Indian population to help appropriate prescribing with more confidence. PMID:28163500

  4. Fermi level stabilization energy in group III-nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Jones, R.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; AgerIII, J.W.; Shan, W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.

    2005-01-07

    Energetic particle irradiation is used to systematically introduce point defects into In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloys over the entire composition range. Three types of energetic particles (electrons, protons, and {sup 4}He{sup +}) are used to produce a displacement damage dose spanning five decades. In InN and In-rich InGaN the free electron concentration increases with increasing irradiation dose but saturates at a sufficiently high dose. The saturation is due to Fermi level pinning at the Fermi Stabilization Energy (E{sub FS}), which is located at 4.9 eV below the vacuum level. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) measurements show that the pinning of the surface Fermi energy at E{sub FS} is also responsible for the surface electron accumulation in as-grown InN and In-rich InGaN alloys. The results are in agreement with the amphoteric defect model that predicts that the same type of native defects are responsible for the Fermi level pinning in both cases.

  5. 21 CFR 530.22 - Safe levels and analytical methods for food-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS Specific Provisions Relating to Extralabel Use of Animal and Human Drugs in Food-Producing Animals... level for extralabel use of an approved human drug or an approved new animal drug when the agency...

  6. ANALYTIC APERTURE CALCULATION AND SCALING LAWS FOR RADIO DETECTION OF LUNAR-TARGET ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Gayley, K. G.; Mutel, R. L.; Jaeger, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    We derive analytic expressions and approximate them in closed form, for the effective detection aperture for Cerenkov radio emission from ultra-high-energy neutrinos striking the Moon. The resulting apertures are in good agreement with recent Monte Carlo simulations and support the conclusion of James and Protheroe that neutrino flux upper limits derived from the GLUE search were too low by an order of magnitude. We also use our analytic expressions to derive scaling laws for the aperture as a function of observational and lunar parameters. We find that at low frequencies downward-directed neutrinos always dominate, but at higher frequencies, the contribution from upward-directed neutrinos becomes increasingly important, especially at lower neutrino energies. Detecting neutrinos from Earth near the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min regime will likely require radio telescope arrays with extremely large collecting area (A{sub e} approx 10{sup 6} m{sup 2}) and hundreds of hours exposure time. Higher-energy neutrinos are most easily detected using lower frequencies. Lunar surface roughness is a decisive factor for obtaining detections at higher frequencies (nuapprox> 300 MHz) and higher energies (E approx> 10{sup 21} eV).

  7. A full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface for the F+CH4→HF + CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Liu, Wen-Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Ma, Xiao-Guang

    2013-06-01

    A full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface (APES) for the F + CH4 →HF + CH3 reaction is developed based on 7127 ab initio energy points at the unrestricted coupled-cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations. The correlation-consistent polarized triple-split valence basis set is used. The APES is represented with a many-body expansion containing 239 parameters determined by the least square fitting method. The two-body terms of the APES are fitted by potential energy curves with multi-reference configuration interaction, which can describe the diatomic molecules (CH, H2, HF, and CF) accurately. It is found that the APES can reproduce the geometry and vibrational frequencies of the saddle point better than those available in the literature. The rate constants based on the present APES support the experimental results of Moore et al. [Int. J. Chem. Kin. 26, 813 (1994)]. The analytical first-order derivation of energy is also provided, making the present APES convenient and efficient for investigating the title reaction with quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  8. Analytic model of the energy distribution function for highly energetic electrons in magnetron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gallian, Sara Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hitchon, William N. G.

    2015-01-14

    This paper analyzes a situation which is common for magnetized technical plasmas such as dc magnetron discharges and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) systems, where secondary electrons enter the plasma after being accelerated in the cathode fall and encounter a nearly uniform bulk. An analytic calculation of the distribution function of hot electrons is presented; these are described as an initially monoenergetic beam that slows down by Coulomb collisions with a Maxwellian distribution of bulk (cold) electrons, and by inelastic collisions with neutrals. Although this analytical solution is based on a steady-state assumption, a comparison of the characteristic time-scales suggests that it may be applicable to a variety of practical time-dependent discharges, and it may be used to introduce kinetic effects into models based on the hypothesis of Maxwellian electrons. The results are verified for parameters appropriate to HiPIMS discharges, by means of time-dependent and fully kinetic numerical calculations.

  9. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  10. Charge retention in quantized energy levels of nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dâna, Aykutlu; Akça, İmran; Ergun, Orçun; Aydınlı, Atilla; Turan, Raşit; Finstad, Terje G.

    2007-04-01

    Understanding charging mechanisms and charge retention dynamics of nanocrystal (NC) memory devices is important in optimization of device design. Capacitance spectroscopy on PECVD grown germanium NCs embedded in a silicon oxide matrix was performed. Dynamic measurements of discharge dynamics are carried out. Charge decay is modelled by assuming storage of carriers in the ground states of NCs and that the decay is dominated by direct tunnelling. Discharge rates are calculated using the theoretical model for different NC sizes and densities and are compared with experimental data. Experimental results agree well with the proposed model and suggest that charge is indeed stored in the quantized energy levels of the NCs.

  11. Energy levels of an anisotropic three-dimensional polaron in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancus, D. E.; Stan, G.

    2001-06-01

    In the context of the improved Wigner-Brillouin theory, the energy levels are found of a Fröhlich polaron in a uniaxial anisotropic polar semiconductor with complex structure, placed in a magnetic field directed either along the optical axis or orthogonal to it. All sources of anisotropy that are contained in the shape of constant-energy surfaces of the bare electron, the electron-optical-phonon interaction, and the frequency spectrum of the extraordinary phonon modes are considered. Analytical results for the electron-phonon interaction correction to the Landau levels below the optical-phonon continuum are given and, numerical results for the magnetic-field dependence of the cyclotron resonance frequency at low temperature are presented for the particular case of the layered semiconductors InSe and GaSe. Although the interaction between the bare electron and quasitransverse optical-phonon modes is weak, these modes play an important role in the pinning of Landau levels. The results given by Das Sarma for a two-dimensional isotropic magnetopolaron are generalized to the anisotropic uniaxial case by taking formally m∥-->∞ in the expression of the perturbed Landau levels found when the magnetic field is directed along the optical axis, m∥ being the component of the bare-electron effective-mass tensor along the optical axis.

  12. Multi-analyte approach for the determination of ng L(-1) levels of steroid hormones in unidentified aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Noppe, H; Verheyden, K; Gillis, W; Courtheyn, D; Vanthemsche, P; De Brabander, H F

    2007-03-14

    Since the 1970s, many analytical methods for the detection of illegal growth promoters, such as thyreostats, anabolics, beta-agonists and corticosteroids have been developed for a wide range of matrices of animal origin, including meat, fat, organ tissue, urine and faeces. The aim of this study was to develop an analytical method for the determination of ng L(-1) levels of estrogens, gestagens, androgens (EGAs) and corticosteroids in aqueous preparations (i.e. drinking water, drinking water supplements), commercially available on the 'black' market. For this, extraction was performed with Bakerbond C18 speedisk, a technique commonly used in environmental analysis. After fractionation, four fractions were collected using a methanol:water gradient program. Gas chromatography coupled to electron impact multiple mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS2) screening for the EGAs was carried out on the derivatized extracts. For the detection of corticosteroids, gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) was used after oxidation of the extracts. Confirmation was done by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization multiple mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS2). The combined use of GC and LC coupled to MS enabled the identification and quantification of anabolics and corticosteroids at the low ng L(-1) level. This study demonstrated the occurrence of both androgens and corticosteroids in different commercial aqueous samples.

  13. Analytical model of sea level elevation during a storm: Support for coastal flood risk assessment associated with cyclone passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Natan Zambroni; Calliari, Lauro Julio; Nicolodi, João Luiz

    2016-08-01

    Sea level oscillations are a result of continuous astronomic, oceanographic, and atmospheric interactions on different time and intensity scales. Thus, the collective action of forcing factors such as tide, wind, atmospheric pressure, and wave action may lead to elevated sea levels during cyclone events over the continental shelf, abruptly impacting adjacent coasts. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential risks of sea level rise and coastal flooding associated with the passage of cyclones in southern Brazil. An analytical model was developed based on extreme storm events from 1997 to 2008. The model identifies the impact of each forcing factor during temporary sea level rise. Through the development of a digital terrain model, it was possible to identify the areas most vulnerable to flooding by superimposing the terrain model onto calculated sea levels. During storm events, sea level elevations ranged from 2 to 5 m and show wind as the major forcing factor, followed by swells waves, astronomical tide and finally atmospheric pressure.

  14. Radiative lifetime and energy of the low-energy isomeric level in 229Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, E. V.; Schneider, Christian; Jeet, Justin; Hudson, Eric R.

    2015-11-01

    We estimate the range of the radiative lifetime and energy of the anomalous, low-energy 3 /2+(7.8 ±0.5 eV) state in the 229Th nucleus. Our phenomenological calculations are based on the available experimental data for the intensities of M 1 and E 2 transitions between excited levels of the 229Th nucleus in the Kπ[N nZΛ ] =5 /2+[633 ] and 3 /2+[631 ] rotational bands. We also discuss the influence of certain branching coefficients, which affect the currently accepted measured energy of the isomeric state. From this work, we establish a favored region, 0.66 ×106seV3/ω3≤τ ≤2.2 ×106seV3/ω3 , where the transition lifetime τ as a function of transition energy ω should lie at roughly the 95% confidence level. Together with the result of Beck et al. [LLNL-PROC-415170 (2009)], we establish a favored area where transition lifetime and energy should lie at roughly the 90% confidence level. We also suggest new nuclear physics measurements, which would significantly reduce the ambiguity in the present data.

  15. Energy efficiency, human behavior, and economic growth: Challenges to cutting energy demand to sustainable levels

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, Tilman

    2015-03-30

    Increasing energy efficiency in households, transportation, industries, and services is an important strategy to reduce energy service demand to levels that allow the steep reduction of greenhouse gases, and a full fledged switch of energy systems to a renewable basis. Yet, technological efficiency improvements may generate so-called rebound effects, which may ‘eat up’ parts of the technical savings potential. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing research on these effects, raises critiques, and points out open questions. It introduces micro-economic rebound effect and suggests extending consumer-side analysis to incorporate potential ‘psychological rebound effects.’ It then discusses meso-economic rebound effects, i.e. producer-side and market-level rebounds, which so far have achieved little attention in the literature. Finally, the article critically reviews evidence for macro-economic rebound effects as energy efficiency-induced economic growth impacts. For all three categories, the article summarizes assessments of their potential quantitative scope, while pointing out remaining methodological weaknesses and open questions. As a rough “rule of thumb”, in the long term and on gross average, only half the technical savings potential of across-the-board efficiency improvements may actually be achieved in the real world. Policies that aim at cutting energy service demand to sustainable levels are well advised to take due note of detrimental behavioral and economic growth impacts, and should foster policies and measures that can contain them.

  16. Energy efficiency, human behavior, and economic growth: Challenges to cutting energy demand to sustainable levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarius, Tilman

    2015-03-01

    Increasing energy efficiency in households, transportation, industries, and services is an important strategy to reduce energy service demand to levels that allow the steep reduction of greenhouse gases, and a full fledged switch of energy systems to a renewable basis. Yet, technological efficiency improvements may generate so-called rebound effects, which may `eat up' parts of the technical savings potential. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing research on these effects, raises critiques, and points out open questions. It introduces micro-economic rebound effect and suggests extending consumer-side analysis to incorporate potential `psychological rebound effects.' It then discusses meso-economic rebound effects, i.e. producer-side and market-level rebounds, which so far have achieved little attention in the literature. Finally, the article critically reviews evidence for macro-economic rebound effects as energy efficiency-induced economic growth impacts. For all three categories, the article summarizes assessments of their potential quantitative scope, while pointing out remaining methodological weaknesses and open questions. As a rough "rule of thumb", in the long term and on gross average, only half the technical savings potential of across-the-board efficiency improvements may actually be achieved in the real world. Policies that aim at cutting energy service demand to sustainable levels are well advised to take due note of detrimental behavioral and economic growth impacts, and should foster policies and measures that can contain them.

  17. Analytic energy gradients for the spin-free exact two-component theory using an exact block diagonalization for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-08-28

    We report the implementation of analytic energy gradients for the evaluation of first-order electrical properties and nuclear forces within the framework of the spin-free (SF) exact two-component (X2c) theory. In the scheme presented here, referred to in the following as SFX2c-1e, the decoupling of electronic and positronic solutions is performed for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian in its matrix representation using a single unitary transformation. The resulting two-component one-electron matrix Hamiltonian is combined with untransformed two-electron interactions for subsequent self-consistent-field and electron-correlated calculations. The "picture-change" effect in the calculation of properties is taken into account by considering the full derivative of the two-component Hamiltonian matrix with respect to the external perturbation. The applicability of the analytic-gradient scheme presented here is demonstrated in benchmark calculations. SFX2c-1e results for the dipole moments and electric-field gradients of the hydrogen halides are compared with those obtained from nonrelativistic, SF high-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess, and SF Dirac-Coulomb calculations. It is shown that the use of untransformed two-electron interactions introduces rather small errors for these properties. As a first application of the analytic geometrical gradient, we report the equilibrium geometry of methylcopper (CuCH(3)) determined at various levels of theory.

  18. Comparison of analytical and predictive methods for water, protein, fat, sugar, and gross energy in marine mammal milk.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, O T; Eisert, R; Barrell, G K

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian milks may differ greatly in composition from cow milk, and these differences may affect the performance of analytical methods. High-fat, high-protein milks with a preponderance of oligosaccharides, such as those produced by many marine mammals, present a particular challenge. We compared the performance of several methods against reference procedures using Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) milk of highly varied composition (by reference methods: 27-63% water, 24-62% fat, 8-12% crude protein, 0.5-1.8% sugar). A microdrying step preparatory to carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen (CHN) gas analysis slightly underestimated water content and had a higher repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) than did reference oven drying at 100°C. Compared with a reference macro-Kjeldahl protein procedure, the CHN (or Dumas) combustion method had a somewhat higher RSDr (1.56 vs. 0.60%) but correlation between methods was high (0.992), means were not different (CHN: 17.2±0.46% dry matter basis; Kjeldahl 17.3±0.49% dry matter basis), there were no significant proportional or constant errors, and predictive performance was high. A carbon stoichiometric procedure based on CHN analysis failed to adequately predict fat (reference: Röse-Gottlieb method) or total sugar (reference: phenol-sulfuric acid method). Gross energy content, calculated from energetic factors and results from reference methods for fat, protein, and total sugar, accurately predicted gross energy as measured by bomb calorimetry. We conclude that the CHN (Dumas) combustion method and calculation of gross energy are acceptable analytical approaches for marine mammal milk, but fat and sugar require separate analysis by appropriate analytic methods and cannot be adequately estimated by carbon stoichiometry. Some other alternative methods-low-temperature drying for water determination; Bradford, Lowry, and biuret methods for protein; the Folch and the Bligh and Dyer methods for fat; and enzymatic and reducing

  19. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  20. Rotational Energies in Various Torsional Levels of CH_2DOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.; Hilali, A. El; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Klee, S.

    2012-06-01

    Using an approach accounting for the hindered internal rotation of a monodeuterated methyl group, an analysis of the torsional spectrum of the monodeuterated species of methanol CH_2DOH has been carried out recently and led to the assignment of 76 torsional subbands in its microwave, FIR, and IR spectra. Although this approach also allowed us to account for subband centers, the rotational structure of the torsional subbands is not well understood yet. In this paper, we will deal with the rotational energies of CH_2DOH. Analyses of the rotational structure of the available subbands^b have been performed using the polynomial-type expansion introduced in the case of the normal species of methanol. For each subband, FIR or IR transitions and a-type microwave lines, within the lower torsional level, were fitted. The frequencies of the latters were taken from previous investigations or from new measurements carried out from 50 to 950 GHz with the submillimeterwave solid state spectrometer in Lille. Subbands involving lower levels with v_t=0 and K ≥ 3 could be satisfactorily analyzed. For levels characterized by lower K-values, the expansion fails. In the case of the K=1, v_t=1 level, the frequencies of a-type microwave transitions involving the lower member of the K-type doublet cannot be well reproduced. For K=0 levels with v_t=1 and 2, a large number of terms is needed in the expansion. We will try to understand why the rotational energies of these levels cannot be reproduced. The results of the analyses will be compared to those obtained with a global approach based on the rotation-torsion Hamiltonian of the molecule. [2] El Hilali, Coudert, Konov, and Klee, J. Chem. Phys. 135 (2011) 194309. [3] Ioli, Moruzzi, Riminucci, Strumia, Moraes, Winnewisser, and Winnewisser, J. Mol. Spec. 171 (1995) 130. [4] Quade and Suenram, J. Chem. Phys. 73 (1980) 1127; and Su and Quade, J. Mol. Spec. 134 (1989) 290. [5] Lauvergnat, Coudert, Klee, and Smirnov, J. Mol. Spec. 256 (2009

  1. Analytical on-shell calculation of low energy higher order scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that the use of analytical on-shell methods involving calculation of the discontinuity across the t-channel cut associated with the exchange of a pair of massless particles (photons or gravitons) can be used to evaluate one-loop contributions to electromagnetic and gravitational scattering, with and without polarizability, reproducing via simple algebraic manipulations, results obtained previously, generally using Feynman diagram techniques. In the gravitational case the use of factorization permits a straightforward and algebraic calculation of higher order scattering without consideration of ghost contributions or of triple-graviton couplings, which made previous evaluations considerably more arduous.

  2. Identifying Energy-Efficient Concurrency Levels using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis-Maury, M; Singh, K; Blagojevic, F; Nikolopoulos, D S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; McKee, S A

    2007-07-23

    Multicore microprocessors have been largely motivated by the diminishing returns in performance and the increased power consumption of single-threaded ILP microprocessors. With the industry already shifting from multicore to many-core microprocessors, software developers must extract more thread-level parallelism from applications. Unfortunately, low power-efficiency and diminishing returns in performance remain major obstacles with many cores. Poor interaction between software and hardware, and bottlenecks in shared hardware structures often prevent scaling to many cores, even in applications where a high degree of parallelism is potentially available. In some cases, throwing additional cores at a problem may actually harm performance and increase power consumption. Better use of otherwise limitedly beneficial cores by software components such as hypervisors and operating systems can improve system-wide performance and reliability, even in cases where power consumption is not a main concern. In response to these observations, we evaluate an approach to throttle concurrency in parallel programs dynamically. We throttle concurrency to levels with higher predicted efficiency from both performance and energy standpoints, and we do so via machine learning, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). One advantage of using ANNs over similar techniques previously explored is that the training phase is greatly simplified, thereby reducing the burden on the end user. Using machine learning in the context of concurrency throttling is novel. We show that ANNs are effective for identifying energy-efficient concurrency levels in multithreaded scientific applications, and we do so using physical experimentation on a state-of-the-art quad-core Xeon platform.

  3. Simplified analytical model for sound level prediction at shielded urban locations involving multiple diffraction and reflections.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weigang; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient prediction of the sound field in shadow zones behind obstacles is a challenging task but essential to produce urban noise maps. A simplified method is presented to predict sound levels at shielded urban locations, including multi-edge diffraction over successive buildings and multiple reflections between parallel façades. The model is essentially based on Pierce's diffraction theory, where the Fresnel Integral is approximated by trigonometric functions for efficient evaluation, and parameterized for urban environments. The model has been validated for idealized urban configurations by comparing to the results of Pierce's theory and a full-wave numerical method. In case of multi-edge diffraction over buildings in absence of a source or receiver canyon, deviations from the full-wave simulations are smaller than 2 dB for the octave bands with central frequencies ranging from 125 to 1000 Hz. However, larger errors are made when receivers are close to the extension line from the diffraction edge closest to the receiver. In case of combining the simplified multi-edge diffraction model with an efficient approach for including the series of mirror sources and mirror receivers, based on the Hurwitz-Lerch transcendent, this same accuracy is obtained.

  4. Analytic second derivative of the energy for density-functional tight-binding combined with the fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Hiroya; Nishimoto, Yoshio; Fedorov, Dmitri G.

    2016-07-01

    The analytic second derivative of the energy is developed for the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with density-functional tight-binding (DFTB), enabling simulations of infrared and Raman spectra of large molecular systems. The accuracy of the method is established in comparison to full DFTB without fragmentation for a set of representative systems. The performance of the FMO-DFTB Hessian is discussed for molecular systems containing up to 10 041 atoms. The method is applied to the study of the binding of α-cyclodextrin to polyethylene glycol, and the calculated IR spectrum of an epoxy amine oligomer reproduces experiment reasonably well.

  5. Analytic second derivative of the energy for density-functional tight-binding combined with the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Nishimoto, Yoshio; Fedorov, Dmitri G

    2016-07-28

    The analytic second derivative of the energy is developed for the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with density-functional tight-binding (DFTB), enabling simulations of infrared and Raman spectra of large molecular systems. The accuracy of the method is established in comparison to full DFTB without fragmentation for a set of representative systems. The performance of the FMO-DFTB Hessian is discussed for molecular systems containing up to 10 041 atoms. The method is applied to the study of the binding of α-cyclodextrin to polyethylene glycol, and the calculated IR spectrum of an epoxy amine oligomer reproduces experiment reasonably well.

  6. Measurement of radiated electromagnetic field levels before and after a changeover to energy-efficient lighting.

    PubMed

    Kerr, L N; Boivin, W S; Boyd, S M; Coletta, J N

    2001-01-01

    An energy-efficient lighting retrofit at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center (WEAC) presented the opportunity to measure the electromagnetic (EM) environments in several rooms before and after changing the fluorescent lighting systems and to compare the changes in EM fields with the proposed standard EM immunity levels. Three rooms, representing the types of work areas in the laboratory, were selected and measured before and after the lighting changeover. Electric and magnetic field measurements were taken in the extremely low frequency (ELF), very low frequency (VLF), and radio frequency (RF) ranges of the EM spectrum. In 2 rooms, ELF electric fields were reduced and VLF and RF electric fields were increased as a result of the changeover to high-frequency fixtures. A third room received low-frequency, energy-efficient fixtures during this changeover, and this change resulted in only a slight increase of the ELF electric fields. The ELF magnetic fields were greatly reduced in 2 but only slightly reduced in the third room. No significant change was seen in VLF or RF magnetic fields for any of these rooms. Some field-strength measurements exceeded the proposed immunity levels recommended in the draft International Electrotechnical Commission standard IEC 60601-1-2 (rev. 2). The data show that increasing the separation distance from the fluorescent light fixtures greatly reduces the field-strength levels, limiting the potential for EM interference.

  7. Energy Levels and Co-evolution of Product Innovation in Supply Chain Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Guojun

    In the last decade supply chain clusters phenomenon has emerged as a new approach in product innovation studies. This article makes three contributions to the approach by addressing some open issues. The first contribution is to explicitly incorporate the energy levels in the analysis. Hence, the unit of analysis is widened from sectoral systems of innovation to socio-technical systems. Hence, the unit of analysis is widened from sectoral systems of innovation to socio-technical systems. The second contribution is to suggest an analytical distinction between different evolution method, actors involved in them, and the institutions which guide actor's perceptions and activities. Thirdly, the article opens up the black box of institutions, making them an integral part of supply chain. The article provides a coherent conceptual multi-level perspective, using insights from sociology, institutional theory and innovation studies. The perspective is particularly useful to analyze long-term dynamics supply chain clusters phenomenon, shifts from one energy level to another and the co-evolution of product innovation.

  8. Energy deposition study of low-energy cosmic radiation at sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Pushpa

    In this dissertation work, a computer simulation model based on the Geant4 simulation package has been designed and developed to study the energy deposition and track structures of cosmic muons and their secondary electrons in tissue-like materials. The particle interactions in a cubic water volume were first simulated. To analyze the energy deposition and tracks in small structures, with the intention of studying the energy localization in nanometric structures such as DNA, the chamber was sliced in three dimentions. Validation studies have been performed by comparing the results with experimental, theoretical, and other simulation results to test the accuracy of the simulation model. A human body phantom in sea-level muon environment was modeled to measure the yearly dose to a human from cosmic muons. The yearly dose in this phantom is about 22 millirems. This is close to the accepted value for the yearly dose from cosmic radiation at sea level. Shielding cosmic muons with a concrete slab from 0 to 2 meters increased the dose received by the body. This dissertation presents an extensive study on the interactions of secondary electrons created by muons in water. Index words. Radiation Dosimetry Simulation, Track Structures, Sea-Level muon Flux, Energy Deposition

  9. G-189A analytical simulation of the integrated waste management-water system using radioisotopes for thermal energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggi, J. V.; Loscutoff, A. V.; Barker, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the RITE-Integrated Waste Management and Water Recovery System using radioisotopes for thermal energy was prepared for the NASA-Manned Space Flight Center (MSFC). The RITE system is the most advanced concept water-waste management system currently under development and has undergone extended duration testing. It has the capability of disposing of nearly all spacecraft wastes including feces and trash and of recovering water from usual waste water sources: urine, condensate, wash water, etc. All of the process heat normally used in the system is produced from low penalty radioisotope heat sources. The analytical simulation was developed with the G189A computer program. The objective of the simulation was to obtain an analytical simulation which can be used to (1) evaluate the current RITE system steady state and transient performance during normal operating conditions, and also during off normal operating conditions including failure modes; and (2) evaluate the effects of variations in component design parameters and vehicle interface parameters on system performance.

  10. Analytical mechanics and field theory: derivation of equations from energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.

    2014-06-01

    Equations of motion in mechanics and field equations in field theory are conventionally derived using the least action principle. This paper presents a nonvariational derivation of Hamilton's and Lagrange's equations. The derivation starts by specifying the system energy as a function of generalized coordinates and velocities and then introduces generalized momenta in such a way that the energy remains unchanged under variations of any degree of freedom. This immediately leads to Hamilton's equations with an as yet undefined Hamiltonian. The explicit dependence of generalized momenta on the coordinates and velocities is determined by first finding the Lagrangian from the known energy function. We discuss electrodynamics as an illustrative example. The proposed approach provides new insight into the nature of canonical momenta and offers a way to find the Lagrangian from the known energy of the system.

  11. Variational and perturbative formulations of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy with mean-field embedding and its analytical gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2008-12-01

    Conventional quantum chemical solvation theories are based on the mean-field embedding approximation. That is, the electronic wavefunction is calculated in the presence of the mean field of the environment. In this paper a direct quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) analog of such a mean-field theory is formulated based on variational and perturbative frameworks. In the variational framework, an appropriate QM/MM free energy functional is defined and is minimized in terms of the trial wavefunction that best approximates the true QM wavefunction in a statistically averaged sense. Analytical free energy gradient is obtained, which takes the form of the gradient of effective QM energy calculated in the averaged MM potential. In the perturbative framework, the above variational procedure is shown to be equivalent to the first-order expansion of the QM energy (in the exact free energy expression) about the self-consistent reference field. This helps understand the relation between the variational procedure and the exact QM/MM free energy as well as existing QM/MM theories. Based on this, several ways are discussed for evaluating non-mean-field effects (i.e., statistical fluctuations of the QM wavefunction) that are neglected in the mean-field calculation. As an illustration, the method is applied to an SN2 Menshutkin reaction in water, NH3+CH3Cl→NH3CH3++Cl-, for which free energy profiles are obtained at the Hartree-Fock, MP2, B3LYP, and BHHLYP levels by integrating the free energy gradient. Non-mean-field effects are evaluated to be <0.5 kcal/mol using a Gaussian fluctuation model for the environment, which suggests that those effects are rather small for the present reaction in water.

  12. The analytical model for vortex ring pinch-off process based on the energy extremum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Wang, Fuxin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of vortex ring pinch-off is greatly helpful for us to understand the mechanism of optimal vortex formation, which further implies the optimal biological propulsion for animals. The vortex ring pinch-off implies its limiting formation and is dominated by the energy extremum principle. However, it is found that vortex ring pinch-off is a continuous process rather than a transient timescale. Therefore, we are wondering that how to identify the onset and end of pinch-off process. Based on the Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle, a dimensionless energy number is adopted to characterize the energy evolution of vortex rings. The vortex ring flow fields are obtained by DPIV with the piston-cylinder setup, and their geometric structures are identified using its Lagrangian coherent structures. The results show that the dimensionless energy numbers with the steady translating vortex rings share a critical value. It is then demonstrated that the dimensionless energy number dominates the onset and the end of pinch-off process. Besides, the onset and end of pinch-off can also be identified using LCSs. Additionally, based on the dimensionless energy number or LCSs, the corresponding vortex ring formation times(L/D) for the onset or the end of pinch-off are consistent.

  13. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  14. Numerical and analytical solutions for sound propagation and absorption in porous media at high sound pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Tianning; Zhao, Yuyuan; Zhang, Weiyong; Zhu, Jian

    2012-09-01

    On the basis of the work of Wilson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 350-359 (1988)], a more exact numerical approach was constructed for predicting the nonlinear sound propagation and absorption properties of rigid porous media at high sound pressure levels. The numerical solution was validated by the experimental results for sintered fibrous porous steel samples and its predictions were compared with the numerical solution of Wilson et al. An approximate analytical solution was further put forward for the normalized surface acoustic admittance of rigid air-saturated porous materials with infinite thickness, based on the wave perturbation method developed by Lambert and McIntosh [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1950-1959 (1990)]. Comparisons were made with the numerical results.

  15. Molecular structure and analytical potential energy function of SeCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Tian, Duan-Liang; Yan, Shi-Ying

    2014-09-01

    The density functional method (B3P86/6-311G) is used for calculating the possible structures of SeC, SeO, and SeCO molecules. The result shows that the ground state of the SeC molecule is 1Σ, the equilibrium nuclear distance is RSeC = 0.1699 nm, and the dissociation energy is De = 8.7246 eV. The ground state of the SeO molecule is 3Σ, with equilibrium nuclear distance RSeO = 0.1707 nm and dissociation energy De = 7.0917 eV. There are two structures for the ground state of the SeCO molecule: Se=C=O and Se=O=C. The linear Se=C=O is 1Σ. Its equilibrium nuclear distances and dissociation energy are RSeC = 0.1715 nm, RCO = 0.1176 nm and 18.8492 eV, respectively. The other structure Se=O=C is 1Σ. Its equilibrium nuclear distances and dissociation energy are RCO = 0.1168 nm, RSeO = 0.1963 nm and 15.5275 eV, respectively. The possible dissociative limit of the SeCO molecule is analyzed. The potential energy function for the SeCO molecule has been obtained from the many-body expansion theory. The contour of the potential energy curve describes the structure characters of the SeCO molecule. Furthermore, contours of the molecular stretching vibration based on this potential energy function are discussed.

  16. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  17. Temperature accelerated Monte Carlo (TAMC): a method for sampling the free energy surface of non-analytical collective variables.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Meloni, Simone

    2011-04-07

    We introduce a new method to simulate the physics of rare events. The method, an extension of the Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics, comes in use when the collective variables introduced to characterize the rare events are either non-analytical or so complex that computing their derivative is not practical. We illustrate the functioning of the method by studying the homogeneous crystallization in a sample of Lennard-Jones particles. The process is studied by introducing a new collective variable that we call Effective Nucleus Size N. We have computed the free energy barriers and the size of critical nucleus, which result in agreement with data available in the literature. We have also performed simulations in the liquid domain of the phase diagram. We found a free energy curve monotonically growing with the nucleus size, consistent with the liquid domain.

  18. A new analytical potential energy surface for the singlet state of He{sub 2}H{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Jingjuan; Zhang Qinggang; Yang Chuanlu; Wang Lizhi

    2012-03-07

    The analytic potential energy surface (APES) for the exchange reaction of HeH{sup +} (X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) + He at the lowest singlet state 1{sup 1}A{sup /} has been built. The APES is expressed as Aguado-Paniagua function based on the many-body expansion. Using the adaptive non-linear least-squares algorithm, the APES is fitted from 15 682 ab initio energy points calculated with the multireference configuration interaction calculation with a large d-aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. To testify the new APES, we calculate the integral cross sections for He + H{sup +}He (v= 0, 1, 2, j= 0) {yields} HeH{sup +}+ He by means of quasi-classical trajectory and compare them with the previous result in literature.

  19. On the analytical representation of free energy profiles with a Morse/long-range model: Application to the water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritzant-Martinez, Yalina; Zeng, Tao; Broom, Aron; Meiering, Elizabeth; Le Roy, Robert J.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the analytical representation of potentials of mean force (pmf) using the Morse/long-range (MLR) potential approach. The MLR method had previously been used to represent potential energy surfaces, and we assess its validity for representing free-energies. The advantage of the approach is that the potential of mean force data only needs to be calculated in the short to medium range region of the reaction coordinate while the long range can be handled analytically. This can result in significant savings in terms of computational effort since one does not need to cover the whole range of the reaction coordinate during simulations. The water dimer with rigid monomers whose interactions are described by the commonly used TIP4P model [W. Jorgensen and J. Madura, Mol. Phys. 56, 1381 (1985)], 10.1080/00268978500103111 is used as a test case. We first calculate an "exact" pmf using direct Monte Carlo (MC) integration and term such a calculation as our gold standard (GS). Second, we compare this GS with several MLR fits to the GS to test the validity of the fitting procedure. We then obtain the water dimer pmf using metadynamics simulations in a limited range of the reaction coordinate and show how the MLR treatment allows the accurate generation of the full pmf. We finally calculate the transition state theory rate constant for the water dimer dissociation process using the GS, the GS MLR fits, and the metadynamics MLR fits. Our approach can yield a compact, smooth, and accurate analytical representation of pmf data with reduced computational cost.

  20. Harvesting energy from the sloshing motion of ferrofluids in an externally excited container: Analytical modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazmi, S.; Xu, Y.; Daqaq, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    When a container carrying a magnetized ferrofluid is subjected to external mechanical stimuli, the sloshing motion of the magnetized ferrofluid generates a time-varying magnetic flux, which can be used to induce an electromotive force in a coil placed adjacent to the container. This process generates an electric current in the coil, and therewith, can be used to transduce external vibrations into electric energy. In this article, we develop a nonlinear analytical model, which governs the electro-magneto-hydrodynamics of an electromagnetic ferrofluid-based vibratory energy harvester. Using perturbation methods, we obtain an approximate analytical solution of the model for a case involving primary resonance excitation of the first mode and a two-to-one internal resonance between the first two modes. This occurs when the external excitation is harmonic with a frequency close to the fundamental sloshing frequency and when the second modal frequency is nearly twice the first modal frequency. Theoretical results are compared to experimental findings illustrating very good qualitative agreement.

  1. Analytic computation of energy derivatives - Relationships among partial derivatives of a variationally determined function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. F.; Komornicki, A.

    1986-01-01

    Formulas are presented relating Taylor series expansion coefficients of three functions of several variables, the energy of the trial wave function (W), the energy computed using the optimized variational wave function (E), and the response function (lambda), under certain conditions. Partial derivatives of lambda are obtained through solution of a recursive system of linear equations, and solution through order n yields derivatives of E through order 2n + 1, extending Puley's application of Wigner's 2n + 1 rule to partial derivatives in couple perturbation theory. An examination of numerical accuracy shows that the usual two-term second derivative formula is less stable than an alternative four-term formula, and that previous claims that energy derivatives are stationary properties of the wave function are fallacious. The results have application to quantum theoretical methods for the computation of derivative properties such as infrared frequencies and intensities.

  2. Analytic Methods for Predicting Significant Multi-Quanta Effects in Collisional Molecular Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieniek, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    Collision-induced transitions can significantly affect molecular vibrational-rotational populations and energy transfer in atmospheres and gaseous systems. This, in turn. can strongly influence convective heat transfer through dissociation and recombination of diatomics. and radiative heat transfer due to strong vibrational coupling. It is necessary to know state-to-state rates to predict engine performance and aerothermodynamic behavior of hypersonic flows, to analyze diagnostic radiative data obtained from experimental test facilities, and to design heat shields and other thermal protective systems. Furthermore, transfer rates between vibrational and translational modes can strongly influence energy flow in various 'disturbed' environments, particularly where the vibrational and translational temperatures are not equilibrated.

  3. Closed-form analytical solutions for assessing the consequences of sea-level rise on unconfined sloping island aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnaux, R.

    2016-04-01

    Closed-form analytical solutions for assessing the consequences of sea-level rise on fresh groundwater oceanic island lenses are provided for the cases of both strip and circular islands. Solutions are proposed for directly calculating the change in the thickness of the lens, the changes in volume and the changes in travel time of fresh groundwater within island aquifers. The solutions apply for homogenous aquifers recharged by surface infiltration and discharged by a down-gradient, fixed-head boundary. They also take into account the inland shift of the ocean due to land surface inundation, this shift being determined by the coastal slope of inland aquifers. The solutions are given for two simple island geometries: circular islands and strip islands. Base case examples are presented to illustrate, on one hand, the amplitude of the change of the fresh groundwater lens thickness and the volume depletion of the lens in oceanic island with sea-level rise, and on the other hand, the shortening of time required for groundwater to discharge into the ocean. These consequences can now be quantified and may help decision-makers to anticipate the effects of sea-level rise on fresh groundwater availability in oceanic island aquifers.

  4. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions: Beyond energy level alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z2, where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation. We show that Z can be expressed either in terms of the plasma frequency of the electrode or as the overlap between electrode wave functions corresponding to an empty and filled level, respectively. First-principles GW calculations for benzene-diamine connected to gold electrodes show that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels.

  5. An analytical study of a lead-acid flow battery as an energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alex; Mukerjee, Santanu; Lee, Sang C.; Lee, Dong-Ha; Park, Sam

    2014-03-01

    The most important issue with our current clean energy technology is the dependence on environmental conditions to produce power. To solve this problem a wide range of energy storage devices are being explored for grid-scale energy storage including soluble lead-acid flow batteries. Flow batteries offer a unique solution to grid-scale energy storage because of their electrolyte tanks which allow easy scaling of storage capacity. This study seeks to further understand the mechanisms of a soluble lead acid flow battery using simulations. The effects of varies changes to operating conditions and the system configuration can be explored through simulations. The simulations preformed are 2D and include the positive electrode, negative electrode, and the flow space between them. Simulations presented in this study show Pb(II) surface concentration, external electric potential, and PbO/PbO2 surface concentration on the positive electrode. Simulations have shown increasing cell temperature can increase external electric potential by as much as 0.2 V during charge. Simulations have also shown electrolyte velocity is an important aspect when investigating lead deposition onto the electrodes. Experimental work was performed to validate simulation results of current density and voltage. Good correlation was found between experimental work and simulation results.

  6. Energy transfer and energy level decay processes in Tm{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Laercio; Lousteau, Joris; Milanese, Daniel; Scarpignato, Gerardo C.; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2012-03-15

    The primary excited state decay and energy transfer processes in singly Tm{sup 3+}-doped TeO{sub 2}:ZnO:Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}:GeO{sub 2} (TZBG) glass relating to the {sup 3}F{sub 4}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 6}{approx}1.85 {mu}m laser transition have been investigated in detail using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Selective laser excitation of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold at 794 nm, the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold at 1220 nm, and {sup 3}F{sub 4} manifold at 1760 nm has established that the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold is entirely quenched by multiphonon relaxation in tellurite glass. The luminescence from the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold with an emission peak at 1465 nm suffers strong suppression due to cross relaxation that populates the {sup 3}F{sub 4} level with a near quadratic dependence on the Tm{sup 3+} concentration. The {sup 3}F{sub 4} lifetime becomes longer as the Tm{sup 3+} concentration increases due to energy migration and decreases to 2.92 ms when [Tm{sup 3+}] = 4 mol. % as a result of quasi-resonant energy transfer to free OH{sup -} radicals present in the glass at concentrations between 1 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Judd-Ofelt theory in conjunction with absorption measurements were used to obtain the radiative lifetimes and branching ratios of the energy levels located below 25 000 cm{sup -1}. The spectroscopic parameters, the cross relaxation and Tm{sup 3+}({sup 3}F{sub 4}) {yields} OH{sup -} energy transfer rates were used in a numerical model for laser transitions emitting at 2335 nm and 1865 nm.

  7. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  8. Analytic Methods for Benchmarking Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, Marc; Saur, Genevieve; Ramsden, Todd; Eichman, Joshua

    2015-05-28

    This presentation summarizes NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis work in three areas: resource potential, greenhouse gas emissions and cost of delivered energy, and influence of auxiliary revenue streams. NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis projects focus on low-­carbon and economic transportation and stationary fuel cell applications. Analysis tools developed by the lab provide insight into the degree to which bridging markets can strengthen the business case for fuel cell applications.

  9. A DPF Analysis Yields Quantum Mechanically Accurate Analytic Potential Energy Functions for the a ^1Σ^+ and X ^1Σ^+ States of NaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Walji, Sadru; Sentjens, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    Alkali hydride diatomic molecules have long been the object of spectroscopic studies. However, their small reduced mass makes them species for which the conventional semiclassical-based methods of analysis tend to have the largest errors. To date, the only quantum-mechanically accurate direct-potential-fit (DPF) analysis for one of these molecules was the one for LiH reported by Coxon and Dickinson. The present paper extends this level of analysis to NaH, and reports a DPF analysis of all available spectroscopic data for the A ^1Σ^+-X ^1Σ^+ system of NaH which yields analytic potential energy functions for these two states that account for those data (on average) to within the experimental uncertainties. W.C. Stwalley, W.T. Zemke and S.C. Yang, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data {20}, 153-187 (1991). J.A. Coxon and C.S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys. {121}, 8378 (2004).

  10. Analytical gradients of complete active space self-consistent field energies using Cholesky decomposition: Geometry optimization and spin-state energetics of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex

    SciTech Connect

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Freitag, Leon; González, Leticia; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland

    2014-05-07

    We present a formulation of analytical energy gradients at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory employing density fitting (DF) techniques to enable efficient geometry optimizations of large systems. As an example, the ground and lowest triplet state geometries of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex are computed at the DF-CASSCF level of theory and compared with structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP, BP86, and M06L functionals. The average deviation of all bond lengths compared to the crystal structure is 0.042 Å at the DF-CASSCF level of theory, which is slightly larger but still comparable with the deviations obtained by the tested DFT functionals, e.g., 0.032 Å with M06L. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviation between the DF-CASSCF and best DFT coordinates, delivered by BP86, is only 0.08 Å for S{sub 0} and 0.11 Å for T{sub 1}, indicating that the geometries are very similar. While keeping the mean energy gradient errors below 0.25%, the DF technique results in a 13-fold speedup compared to the conventional CASSCF geometry optimization algorithm. Additionally, we assess the singlet-triplet energy vertical and adiabatic differences with multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using the DF-CASSCF and DFT optimized geometries. It is found that the vertical CASPT2 energies are relatively similar regardless of the geometry employed whereas the adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps are more sensitive to the chosen triplet geometry.

  11. ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect

    David Wenzhong Gao

    2012-09-30

    The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An

  12. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-01

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L = cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF = N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu3 + in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu3 + ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of 5D0 and triplet state contracts.

  13. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-05

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L=cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF=N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu(3+) in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu(3+) ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of (5)D0 and triplet state contracts.

  14. Nuclear level densities below 40 MeV excitation energy in the mass region A ≃ 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1990-09-01

    Consistent pre-equilibrium emission and statistical model calculations of fast neutron induced reaction cross sections are used to validate nuclear level densities for excitation energies up to 40 MeV in the mass region A ≃50. A “composed” level density approach has been employed by using the back-shifted Fermi gas model for excitation energies lower than 12 MeV and a realistic analytical formula for higher excitations. In the transition region from the BSFG model range to that of full applicability of the realistic formula, an interpolation between the predictions of the two models is adopted. The interpolation rule, suggested by microscopic level density calculations, has been validated through the comparison of the calculated and experimental cross sections.

  15. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-05-05

    An accurate potential energy surface of sulfur dioxide, SO2 , in its ground electronic state X∼ 1A1 has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods are compared. The role of the core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects in determining the structure and dynamics of the SO2 molecule is discussed. The vibration-rotation energy levels of the (32) SO2 and (34) SO2 isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach. It was shown that the inclusion of the aforementioned effects was mandatory to attain the "spectroscopic" accuracy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of beryllium monohydroxide.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-01-05

    The accurate potential energy surface of beryllium monohydroxide, BeOH, in its ground electronic state X 2A' has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent core-valence basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The higher-order electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects were taken into account. The BeOH molecule was confirmed to be bent at equilibrium, with the BeOH angle of 141.2° and the barrier to linearity of 129 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the BeOH and BeOD isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach and compared with recent experimental data. The results can be useful in a further analysis of high-resolution vibration-rotation spectra of these interesting species. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Multiple piezo-patch energy harvesters integrated to a thin plate with AC-DC conversion: analytical modeling and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghakhani, Amirreza; Basdogan, Ipek; Erturk, Alper

    2016-04-01

    Plate-like components are widely used in numerous automotive, marine, and aerospace applications where they can be employed as host structures for vibration based energy harvesting. Piezoelectric patch harvesters can be easily attached to these structures to convert the vibrational energy to the electrical energy. Power output investigations of these harvesters require accurate models for energy harvesting performance evaluation and optimization. Equivalent circuit modeling of the cantilever-based vibration energy harvesters for estimation of electrical response has been proposed in recent years. However, equivalent circuit formulation and analytical modeling of multiple piezo-patch energy harvesters integrated to thin plates including nonlinear circuits has not been studied. In this study, equivalent circuit model of multiple parallel piezoelectric patch harvesters together with a resistive load is built in electronic circuit simulation software SPICE and voltage frequency response functions (FRFs) are validated using the analytical distributedparameter model. Analytical formulation of the piezoelectric patches in parallel configuration for the DC voltage output is derived while the patches are connected to a standard AC-DC circuit. The analytic model is based on the equivalent load impedance approach for piezoelectric capacitance and AC-DC circuit elements. The analytic results are validated numerically via SPICE simulations. Finally, DC power outputs of the harvesters are computed and compared with the peak power amplitudes in the AC output case.

  18. The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-09-15

    For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas-fired units account for nearly 90% of the total generating capacity added in the U.S. between 1999 and 2005 (EIA 2006b), bringing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation to 19%. Looking ahead over the next decade, the EIA expects this trend to continue, increasing the market share of gas-fired generation to 22% by 2015 (EIA 2007a). Though these numbers are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in many other countries as well. A large percentage of the total cost of gas-fired generation is attributable to fuel costs--i.e., natural gas prices. For example, at current spot prices of around $7/MMBtu, fuel costs account for more than 75% of the levelized cost of energy from a new combined cycle gas turbine, and more than 90% of its operating costs (EIA 2007a). Furthermore, given that gas-fired plants are often the marginal supply units that set the market-clearing price for all generators in a competitive wholesale market, there is a direct link between natural gas prices and wholesale electricity prices. In this light, the dramatic increase in natural gas prices since the 1990s should be a cause for ratepayer concern. Figure 1 shows the daily price history of the 'first-nearby' (i.e., closest to expiration) NYMEX natural gas futures contract (black line) at Henry Hub, along with the futures strip (i.e., the full series of futures contracts) from August 22, 2007 (red line). First, nearby prices, which closely track spot prices, have recently been trading within a $7-9/MMBtu range in the United States and, as shown by the futures strip, are expected to remain there through 2012. These price levels are $6/MMBtu higher than the $1-3/MMBtu range seen throughout most of the 1990s, demonstrating significant price escalation for natural

  19. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny Heeter, Philipp Beiter, Francisco Flores-Espino, David Hurlbut, Chang Liu

    2015-02-01

    This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand how cross-state transactions have been used to meet RPS compliance. Data on regional renewable energy flow use generator-specific information primarily sourced from EIA, SNL Energy, and FERC Form 1 filings. The renewable energy examined through this method may or may not have actually been used to meet RPS compliance.

  20. The variational explicit polarization potential and analytical first derivative of energy: Towards a next generation force field

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wangshen; Song, Lingchun; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2008-01-01

    A previous article proposed an electronic structure-based polarizable potential, called the explicit polarization (X-POL) potential, to treat many-body polarization and charge delocalization effects in polypeptides. Here, we present a variational version of the X-POL potential, in which the wave function of the entire molecular system is variationally optimized to yield the minimum total electronic energy. This allows the calculation of analytic gradients, a necessity for efficient molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, the detailed derivations of the Fock matrix and analytic force are presented and discussed. The calculations involve a double self-consistent-field procedure in which the wave function of each fragment is self-consistently optimized in the presence of other fragments, and in addition the polarization of the entire system is self-consistently optimized. The variational X-POL potential has been implemented in the Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics (CHARMM) package and tested successfully for small model compounds. PMID:18570492

  1. New Perspective on Formation Energies and Energy Levels of Point Defects in Nonmetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramprasad, R.; Zhu, H.; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    We propose a powerful scheme to accurately determine the formation energy and thermodynamic charge transition levels of point defects in nonmetals. Previously unknown correlations between defect properties and the valence-band width of the defect-free host material are identified allowing for a determination of the former via an accurate knowledge of the latter. These correlations are identified through a series of hybrid density-functional theory computations and an unbiased exploration of the parameter space that defines the Hyde-Scuseria-Ernzerhof family of hybrid functionals. The applicability of this paradigm is demonstrated for point defects in Si, Ge, ZnO, and ZrO2.

  2. Energy levels and transition probability matrix elements of ruby for maser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berwin, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Program computes fine structure energy levels of ruby as a function of magnetic field. Included in program is matrix formulation, each row of which contains a magnetic field and four corresponding energy levels.

  3. Clean Energy Policy Analyses. Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.

    2010-12-01

    This report takes a broad look at the status of local clean energy policies in the United States to develop a better understanding of local clean energy policy development and the interaction between state and local policies. To date, the majority of clean energy policy research focuses on the state and federal levels. While there has been a substantial amount of research on local level climate change initiatives, this is one of the first analyses of clean energy policies separate from climate change initiatives. This report is one in a suite of reports analyzing clean energy and climate policy development at the local, state, and regional levels.

  4. Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.

    2010-12-01

    This report takes a broad look at the status of local clean energy policies in the United States to develop a better understanding of local clean energy policy development and the interaction between state and local policies. To date, the majority of clean energy policy research focuses on the state and federal levels. While there has been a substantial amount of research on local level climate change initiatives, this is one of the first analyses of clean energy policies separate from climate change initiatives. This report is one in a suite of reports analyzing clean energy and climate policy development at the local, state, and regional levels.

  5. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Pouzoulet, F; Mazal, A

    2016-01-21

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens' model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec, for Wilkens' model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec. The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens' model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm(-1). These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis.

  6. Calculation of astrophysical S factor at low energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andic, Halil Ibrahim; Ozer, Okan

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear reactions are very important for the structure, evolution, nucleosynthesis and various observational manifestations of main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. For astrophysical applications, one needs to know value of S-factor for many reactions at low energies. The experimental measurements of cross-sections at such low energies are essentially not easily available since the Coulomb barrier. Theoretical calculations are model dependent, so that nuclear physics uncertainties of calculated S-factor can be substantial. Using the supersymmetric quantum mechanics one can obtain the supersymmetric partner potential that can vary by several orders of magnitude in the energy range of a given reaction in the calculation of S factor. Since the determination of reaction rates requires accurate values of cross sections at very low energies, then in order to eliminate the main part of the energy dependence of these cross sections one makes use of the astrophysical S-factor in Taylor Expansion series about zero-energy.

  7. City-Level Energy Decision Making. Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Aznar, Alexandra; Day, Megan; Doris, Elizabeth; Mathur, Shivani; Donohoo-Vallett, Paul

    2015-07-08

    The Cities-LEAP technical report, City-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. Cities, explores how a sample of cities incorporates data into making energy-related decisions. This report provides the foundation for forthcoming components of the Cities-LEAP project that will help cities improve energy decision making by mapping specific city energy or climate policies and actions to measurable impacts and results.

  8. Department of Energy pretreatment of high-level and low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, C.P.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    The remediation of the 1 {times} 10{sup 8} gal of highly radioactive waste in the underground storage tanks (USTs) at five US Department of Energy (DOE) sites is one of DOE`s greatest challenges. Therefore, the DOE Office of Environmental Management has created the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the safe and efficient remediation of UST waste. The TFA has divided its efforts into five areas, which are safety, characterization, retrieval/closure, pretreatment, and immobilization. All DOE pretreatment activities are integrated by the Pretreatment Technical Integration Manager of the TFA. For FY 1996, the 14 pretreatment tasks are divided into 3 systems: supernate separations, sludge treatment, and solid/liquid separation. The plans and recent results of these TFA tasks, which include two 25,000-gal demonstrations and two former TFA tasks on Cs removal, are presented. The pretreatment goals are to minimize the volume of high-level waste and the radioactivity in low-level waste.

  9. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  10. Energy performance of an architectural fabric roof: Experimental and analytical results

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, R.B.; Hart, G.H.; Goss, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a research program on the thermal performance of translucent fabric-covered buildings, a comparison between measured and predicted fabric roof heat transfer was made. Predictions, based on a steady-state ASHRAE calculation technique, were compared against measured heat transfer through three different roof systems operating under outside weather conditions. The goals of the study were to evaluate the ability to predict the net energy transfer through the fabric roof systems tested, to identify parameters that would contribute to major differences between the measured and predicted results, and to recommend improvements to those parameters. It is expected that those improvements could be made in the computer program, DOE-2. The heat transfer through a single-layer, a double-layer, and a translucent insulated fabric roof system was measured in a vertical heat flow, guarded hot box located outdoors in Granville, Ohio. The results obtained by comparing the measured and predicted net heat transfer through the three roof systems indicated that the ASHRAE calculational technique predicted heat loss to within +. 25%, but it consistently overpredicted the heat gain during cooling load situations.

  11. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  12. Highlands County Energy Education Activities--High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Presented are five instructional units, developed by the Tri-County Teacher Education Center, for the purpose of educating secondary school students on Florida's unique energy problems. Unit one provides a series of value clarification and awareness activities as an introduction to energy. Unit two uses mathematics exercises to examine energy…

  13. A rapid analytical technique for the determination of energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method.

    PubMed

    Barrie, A; Coward, W A

    1985-09-01

    The doubly labelled water method involves the administration of water enriched in 2H and 18O followed by determination of the turnover rates of these isotopes. Since 18O is eliminated from the body as both CO2 and water, while 2H leaves only as water, the difference between the two turnover rates provides a measure of CO2 production and hence energy expenditure. Isotopic analysis by conventional stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) is labour intensive and time consuming, as it requires off-line conversion of water samples to gases (H2 and CO2) followed by sequential analysis for each of the two isotopes using the mass spectrometer. Lack of suitable automated instrumentation with the ability to process large numbers of samples has prevented routine application of the method. We describe here an automated technique in which body water samples (urine, saliva, breath water or milk) are analysed simultaneously for 2H and 18O. The single bench system comprises two mass spectrometer analysers, one for measuring 2H from H2 gas, the other for measuring 18O from the water vapour (masses 18, 20). Both analysers share a common heated inlet system into which microlitre quantities of the body fluids are injected from an autosampler (102 samples). The water vapour flows both directly to one analyser for 18O measurement and into a uranium reduction furnace for conversion to H2, prior to 2H measurement by the second analyser. Both analysers also share vacuum and electronic components, enabling savings in both space and cost. In this paper we present results illustrating performance characteristics and procedures for routine application to human subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  15. Analytical structure and properties of Coulomb wave functions for real and complex energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humblet, J.

    1984-07-01

    The radical Coulomb wave functions are analysed in their dependence on the energy E considered as a complex parameter. Repulsive and attractive fields are both considered. First turning to the function Φl ∝ r- l-1 Fl introduced by Briet, slightly modifying its definition, and assuming that the angular momentum is also a complex parameter, for which the notation L is used, it is proved that ΦL is an entire function of both E and L. From an expansion of the regular Whittaker function given by Buchholz, the Taylor expansion of ΦL in powers of E and a simple recurrence relation for its coefficients are easily obtained. The expansion of the regular function Fl is readily obtained from that of ΦL for L = l, but the irregular function Gl contains Φl and ∂Φ L/∂L for L = l and - l-1. Having proved that the expansion obtained for ΦL in powers of E can also be regarded as a uniformly convergent series of entire functions of L, the derivative ∂Φ L/∂L can be obtained by term-by-term derivation. This method for obtaining the expansion of Gl is straightforward and leads to a final result involving essentially: (i) the conventional function h(η) = 1/2ψ(1 + iη) + 1/2ψ(1 - iη) - ln η which is singular at η = ∞, i.e., at k = 0; (ii) two entire functions of E, namely Φl and Ψl; the terms of the expansion of the latter in powers of E contain only Bessel functions multiplied by Bernoulli numbers and coefficients easily obtained from a simple recurrence relation. As an application of the above results, the last sections contain: (i) an alternate from of Gl expansion useful in numerical computations; (ii) the definition and expansion of two linearly independent solutions of the Coulomb equation which are entire in E; (iii) the expansion and threshold properties of the outgoing and incoming solutions, Ol and Il, corresponding to those we have obtained for Fl and Gl.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhava Syamlal; Maxwell Osawe; Stephen Zitney; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Frank Joop; Philip Simon; K. Joseph Cleetus

    2005-04-01

    To accelerate the development of advanced power plants, DOE's Vision 21 program identified the need for an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize new plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet this objective of virtual-plant simulation. Sophisticated models of many individual equipment items are available; however, a seamless coupling capability that would integrate the advanced equipment (component) models to the process (system) simulation software remained to be developed. The inability to use models in an integrated manner causes knowledge loss (e.g., knowledge captured in detailed equipment models is usually not available in process simulation) and modeling inconsistencies (e.g., physical properties and reaction kinetics data in different models are not the same). A team consisting of Fluent Inc., ALSTOM Power Inc., Aspen Technology Inc., Intergraph Corporation, and West Virginia University, in collaboration with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), addressed this challenge in a project performed over the period from October 2000 through December 2004. In this project the integration of the cycle analysis software was based on widely used commercial software: Aspen Plus{reg_sign} for process simulation and FLUENT{reg_sign} for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of equipment items. The integration software was designed to also include custom (in-house, proprietary, legacy) equipment models that often encapsulate the experience from the many years of designing and operating the equipment. The team adopted CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces, the de facto international standard for communication among process models, for exchanging information between software. The software developed in this project is the first demonstration of the use of CO interfaces to link CFD and custom equipment models with process simulators. New interface requirements identified during this project were

  17. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  18. Analytic second derivative of the energy for density functional theory based on the three-body fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Zahariev, Federico; Schmidt, Michael W.; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S.; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-03-01

    Analytic second derivatives of the energy with respect to nuclear coordinates have been developed for spin restricted density functional theory (DFT) based on the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO). The derivations were carried out for the three-body expansion (FMO3), and the two-body expressions can be obtained by neglecting the three-body corrections. Also, the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) Hessian for FMO3 can be obtained by neglecting the density-functional related terms. In both the FMO-RHF and FMO-DFT Hessians, certain terms with small magnitudes are neglected for computational efficiency. The accuracy of the FMO-DFT Hessian in terms of the Gibbs free energy is evaluated for a set of polypeptides and water clusters and found to be within 1 kcal/mol of the corresponding full (non-fragmented) ab initio calculation. The FMO-DFT method is also applied to transition states in SN2 reactions and for the computation of the IR and Raman spectra of a small Trp-cage protein (PDB: 1L2Y). Some computational timing analysis is also presented.

  19. Analytic second derivative of the energy for density functional theory based on the three-body fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Zahariev, Federico; Schmidt, Michael W; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-03-28

    Analytic second derivatives of the energy with respect to nuclear coordinates have been developed for spin restricted density functional theory (DFT) based on the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO). The derivations were carried out for the three-body expansion (FMO3), and the two-body expressions can be obtained by neglecting the three-body corrections. Also, the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) Hessian for FMO3 can be obtained by neglecting the density-functional related terms. In both the FMO-RHF and FMO-DFT Hessians, certain terms with small magnitudes are neglected for computational efficiency. The accuracy of the FMO-DFT Hessian in terms of the Gibbs free energy is evaluated for a set of polypeptides and water clusters and found to be within 1 kcal/mol of the corresponding full (non-fragmented) ab initio calculation. The FMO-DFT method is also applied to transition states in SN2 reactions and for the computation of the IR and Raman spectra of a small Trp-cage protein (PDB: 1L2Y). Some computational timing analysis is also presented.

  20. Analytic second derivative of the energy for density functional theory based on the three-body fragment molecular orbital method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Zahariev, Federico; Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-03-28

    Analytic second derivatives of the energy with respect to nuclear coordinates have been developed for spin restricted density functional theory (DFT) based on the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO). The derivations were carried out for the three-body expansion (FMO3), and the two-body expressions can be obtained by neglecting the three-body corrections. Also, the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) Hessian for FMO3 can be obtained by neglecting the density-functional related terms. In both the FMO-RHF and FMO-DFT Hessians, certain terms with small magnitudes are neglected for computational efficiency. The accuracy of the FMO-DFT Hessian in terms of the Gibbs free energy is evaluated for a set of polypeptides and water clusters and found to be within 1 kcal/mol of the corresponding full (non-fragmented) ab initio calculation. The FMO-DFT method is also applied to transition states in S{sub N}2 reactions and for the computation of the IR and Raman spectra of a small Trp-cage protein (PDB: 1L2Y). Some computational timing analysis is also presented.

  1. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study.

  2. Calculation of the energy levels of lithium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadykto, B. A.

    An attempt is made to develop a straightforward and sufficiently accurate method for calculating the energies of complex ion states. The method is based on Bohr's computational model and Sommerfeld's model in relativistic form (for circular orbits only). The method proposed here makes it possible to calculate excited ion states having different atomic and quantum numbers. A similar method can be used for calculating the energies of ion states with the number of electrons exceeding three.

  3. Validating An Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Burke, Christopher J.; Li, Jie; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    The Kepler Mission is developing an Analytic Completeness Model (ACM) to estimate detection completeness contours as a function of exoplanet radius and period for each target star. Accurate completeness contours are necessary for robust estimation of exoplanet occurrence rates.The main components of the ACM for a target star are: detection efficiency as a function of SNR, the window function (WF) and the one-sigma depth function (OSDF). (Ref. Burke et al. 2015). The WF captures the falloff in transit detection probability at long periods that is determined by the observation window (the duration over which the target star has been observed). The OSDF is the transit depth (in parts per million) that yields SNR of unity for the full transit train. It is a function of period, and accounts for the time-varying properties of the noise and for missing or deweighted data.We are performing flux-level transit injection (FLTI) experiments on selected Kepler target stars with the goal of refining and validating the ACM. “Flux-level” injection machinery inserts exoplanet transit signatures directly into the flux time series, as opposed to “pixel-level” injection, which inserts transit signatures into the individual pixels using the pixel response function. See Jie Li's poster: ID #2493668, "Flux-level transit injection experiments with the NASA Pleiades Supercomputer" for details, including performance statistics.Since FLTI is affordable for only a small subset of the Kepler targets, the ACM is designed to apply to most Kepler target stars. We validate this model using “deep” FLTI experiments, with ~500,000 injection realizations on each of a small number of targets and “shallow” FLTI experiments with ~2000 injection realizations on each of many targets. From the results of these experiments, we identify anomalous targets, model their behavior and refine the ACM accordingly.In this presentation, we discuss progress in validating and refining the ACM, and we

  4. New perspective on formation energies and energy levels of point defects in non-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2012-02-01

    We propose a powerful scheme to accurately determine the formation energy and thermodynamic charge transition levels of point defects in non-metals. Previously unknown correlations between defect properties and the valence-band width of the defect-free host material are identified allowing for a determination of the former via an accurate knowledge of the latter. These correlations are identified through a series of hybrid density functional theory computations and an unbiased exploration of the parameter space that defines the Hyde-Scuseria-Ernzerhof family of hybrid-functionals. The applicability of this paradigm is demonstrated for point defects in several insulators, including Si, Ge, ZrO2 and ZnO

  5. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  6. Energy Levels and the de Broglie Relationship for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-01-01

    In this article, four examples of possible lessons on energy levels for high school are described: a particle in a box, a finite square well, the hydrogen atom and a harmonic oscillator. The energy levels are deduced through the use of the steady-state condition and the de Broglie relationship. In particular, the harmonic oscillator energy levels…

  7. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  8. Teaching Field Concept and Potential Energy at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the potential energy in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)

  9. Orbital Energy Levels in Molecular Hydrogen. A Simple Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the energetics involved in the formation of molecular hydrogen using concepts that should be familiar to students beginning the study of molecular orbital theory. Emphasized are experimental data on ionization energies. Included are two-electron atomic and molecular systems. (CW)

  10. Comparison of methods for measurement of organic compounds at ultra-trace level: analytical criteria and application to analysis of amino acids in extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O; Claeys-Bruno, M; Dobrijevic, M; Rodier, C; Borruat, G; Commeyras, A; Garrelly, L

    2005-02-01

    The need for criteria to compare different analytical methods for measuring extraterrestrial organic matter at ultra-trace levels in relatively small and unique samples (e.g., fragments of meteorites, micrometeorites, planetary samples) is discussed. We emphasize the need to standardize the description of future analyses, and take the first step toward a proposed international laboratory network for performance testing.

  11. On the Relationship Between World Knowledge and Comprehension of Texts. Effects of Truth Values and Analytic Level of the Belief Structure. Number 468.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waern, Yvonne

    It is suggested that a reader's idea structure will affect processing of incoming information. Two aspects of the idea structure are further developed--the truth value aspect and the analytic level aspect. The idea structure can be characterized by ideas consisting of propositions which are considered to be more or less true or false (beliefs), or…

  12. Decreased energy levels can cause and sustain obesity.

    PubMed

    Wlodek, Danuta; Gonzales, Michael

    2003-11-07

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions and has become one of the major health problems in developed countries. Current theories consider obesity a result of overeating and sedentary life style and most efforts to treat or prevent weight gain concentrate on exercise and food intake. This approach does not improve the situation as may be seen from the steep increase in the prevalence of obesity. This encouraged us to reanalyse existing information and look for biochemical basis of obesity. Our approach was to ignore current theories and concentrate on experimental data which are described in scientific journals and are available from several databases. We developed and applied a Knowledge Discovery in Databases procedure to analyse metabolic data. We began with the contradictory information: in obesity, more calories are consumed than used up, suggesting that obese people should have excess energy. On the other side, obese people experience fatigue and decreased physical endurance that indicates diminished energy supply in the body. The result of our work is a chain of metabolic events leading to obesity. The crucial event is the inhibition of the TCA cycle at the step of aconitase. It disturbs energy metabolism and results in ATP deficiency with simultaneous fat accumulation. Further steps in obesity development are the consequences of diminished energy supply: inhibition of beta-oxidation, leptin resistance, increase in appetite and food intake and a decrease in physical activity. Thus, our theory shows that obesity does not have to be caused by overeating and sedentary life-style but may be the result of the "obese" change in metabolism which is forcing people to overeat and save energy to sustain metabolic functions of cells. This "obese" change is caused by environmental factors that activate chronic low-grade inflammatory process in the body linking obesity with the environment of developed countries.

  13. Influence of energy-transfer-upconversion on threshold pump power in quasi-three-level solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Mackenzie, J I; Clarkson, W A

    2009-07-06

    A simple analytical expression for threshold pump power in an end-pumped quasi-three-level solid-state laser, which takes into account the influence of energy-transfer-upconversion (ETU), is derived. This expression indicates that threshold pump power can be increased dramatically by ETU, especially in low gain lasers and lasers with pronounced three-level character due to the need for high excitation densities in the upper manifold to reach threshold. The analysis has been applied to an Er:YAG laser operating at 1645 nm in-band pumped by an Er,Yb fiber laser at 1532 nm. Predicted values for threshold pump power as a function of erbium doping concentration are in very good agreement with measured values. The results indicate that very low erbium doping levels (approximately 0.25 at.% or less) are required to avoid degradation in performance due to ETU even under continuous-wave lasing conditions in Er:YAG.

  14. Energy balance regulation by endocannabinoids at central and peripheral levels.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Carmelo; Mazza, Roberta; Obici, Silvana; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2011-09-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a universal and, perhaps, causative feature of obesity. Central nervous system (CNS) circuits that regulate food intake were initially believed to be the targets for dysregulation. However, it is increasingly evident that endocannabinoids affect food intake, energy expenditure and substrate metabolism by acting on peripheral sites. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1r) antagonists can effectively treat obesity and associated metabolic alterations but, unfortunately, cause and exacerbate mood disorders. Drugs restricted to act on peripheral CB1rs might be safer and more effective, retaining the anti-obesity effects but lacking the adverse neurodepressive reactions. This review summarizes the emerging roles of the ECS in energy balance and discusses future pharmacological approaches for developing peripherally restricted CB1r antagonists.

  15. Two-pion low-energy contribution to the muon g -2 with improved precision from analyticity and unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, Irinel; Das, Diganta; Imsong, I. Sentitemsu

    2014-02-01

    The two-pion contribution from low energies to the muon magnetic moment anomaly, although small, has a large relative uncertainty since in this region the experimental data on the cross sections are neither sufficient nor precise enough. It is therefore of interest to see whether the precision can be improved by means of additional theoretical information on the pion electromagnetic form factor, which controls the leading-order contribution. In the present paper, we address this problem by exploiting analyticity and unitarity of the form factor in a parametrization-free approach that uses the phase in the elastic region, known with high precision from the Fermi-Watson theorem and Roy equations for ππ elastic scattering as input. The formalism also includes experimental measurements on the modulus in the region 0.65-0.70 GeV, taken from the most recent e+e-→π+π- experiments, and recent measurements of the form factor on the spacelike axis. By combining the results obtained with inputs from CMD2, SND, BABAR, and KLOE, we make the predictions aμππ ,LO[2mπ,0.30 GeV]=(0.553±0.004)×10-10 and aμππ ,LO[0.30 GeV ,0.63 GeV]=(133.083±0.837)×10-10. These are consistent with the other recent determinations and have slightly smaller errors.

  16. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  17. Energy levels of isoelectronic impurities by large scale LDA calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2002-11-22

    Isoelectronic impurity states are localized states induced by stoichiometric single atom substitution in bulk semiconductor. Photoluminescence spectra indicate deep impurity levels of 0.5 to 0.9eV above the top of valence band for systems like: GaN:As, GaN:P, CdS:Te, ZnS:Te. Previous calculations based on small supercells seemingly confirmed these experimental results. However, the current ab initio calculations based on thousand atom supercells indicate that the impurity levels of the above systems are actually much shallower(0.04 to 0.23 eV), and these impurity levels should be compared with photoluminescence excitation spectra, not photoluminescence spectra.

  18. Optimization of energy level for coronary angiography with dual-energy and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Satoshi; Seno, Ayako; Soeda, Tsunenari; Takami, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Rika; Somekawa, Satoshi; Ishigami, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Yukiji; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Horii, Manabu; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2012-04-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) uses polyenergetic X-rays at 100- and 140-kVp tube energy, and generates 120-kVp composite images that are referred to as polyenergetic images (PEIs). Moreover, DE-CT can produce monoenergetic images (MEIs) at any effective energy level. We evaluated whether the image quality of coronary angiography is improved by optimizing the energy levels of DE-CT. We retrospectively evaluated data sets obtained from 24 consecutive patients using cardiac DE-CT at 100- and 140-kVp tube energy with a dual-source scanner. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were evaluated in the left ascending coronary artery in PEIs, and in MEIs reconstructed at 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 130, 160 and 190 keV. Energy levels of 100, 120 and 140 kVp generated the highest SNRs in PEIs from 10, 12 and 2 patients, respectively, at 60, 70 and 80 keV in MEIs from 2, 10 and 10 patients, respectively, and at 90 and 100 keV in those from one patient each. Optimization of the energy level for each patient increased the SNR by 16.6% in PEIs (P < 0.0001) and by 18.2% in MEIs (P < 0.05), compared with 120-kVp composite images. The image quality of coronary angiography using DE-CT can be improved by optimizing the energy level for individual patients.

  19. Energy levels of magneto-optical polaron in spherical quantum dot — Part 1: Strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotue, A. J.; Kenfack, S. C.; Issofa, N.; Tiotsop, M.; Fotsin, H.; Mainimo, E.; Fai, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the influence of a magnetic field on the ground state energy of a polaron in a spherical semiconductor quantum dot (QD) using the modified LLP method. The ground state energy is split into sub-energy levels and there is a degeneracy of energy levels. It is also observed that the degenerate energy increase with the electron-phonon coupling constant and decrease with the magnetic field. The numerical results show that, under the influence of magnetic field and the interaction with the total momentum along the z-direction, the split energy increases and decreases with the longitudinal and the transverse confinement length, respectively.

  20. Binding energy levels of a slowly moving ion in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongwei; Li, Fuli

    2013-02-01

    The near field electric potential of a slowly moving ion in complex plasmas is studied. We find that the potential consists of the Debye-Hückel potential, the wake potential, and the potential associated with charge fluctuations. The binding energy levels of the ion are calculated by use of the Ritz variation method. The results show that the binding energy levels are related to the magnetic quantum number m. The binding energy levels are affected by speed of the ion and dust grain number density. In contract to isolated ion or static ion in plasmas, the binding energy levels of the ion are pushed up and even become unbounded.

  1. Demonstrating the use of web analytics and an online survey to understand user groups of a national network of river level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit; Braga, Joao; Arts, Koen; Ioris, Antonio; Han, Xiwu; Sripada, Yaji; van der Wal, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The number of local, national and international networks of online environmental sensors are rapidly increasing. Where environmental data are made available online for public consumption, there is a need to advance our understanding of the relationships between the supply of and the different demands for such information. Understanding how individuals and groups of users are using online information resources may provide valuable insights into their activities and decision making. As part of the 'dot.rural wikiRivers' project we investigated the potential of web analytics and an online survey to generate insights into the use of a national network of river level data from across Scotland. These sources of online information were collected alongside phone interviews with volunteers sampled from the online survey, and interviews with providers of online river level data; as part of a larger project that set out to help improve the communication of Scotland's online river data. Our web analytics analysis was based on over 100 online sensors which are maintained by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). Through use of Google Analytics data accessed via the R Ganalytics package we assessed: if the quality of data provided by Google Analytics free service is good enough for research purposes; if we could demonstrate what sensors were being used, when and where; how the nature and pattern of sensor data may affect web traffic; and whether we can identify and profile these users based on information from traffic sources. Web analytics data consists of a series of quantitative metrics which capture and summarize various dimensions of the traffic to a certain web page or set of pages. Examples of commonly used metrics include the number of total visits to a site and the number of total page views. Our analyses of the traffic sources from 2009 to 2011 identified several different major user groups. To improve our understanding of how the use of this national

  2. Element levels in birch and spruce wood ashes: green energy?

    PubMed

    Reimann, Clemens; Ottesen, Rolf Tore; Andersson, Malin; Arnoldussen, Arnold; Koller, Friedrich; Englmaier, Peter

    2008-04-15

    Production of wood ash has increased strongly in the last ten years due to the increasing popularity of renewable and CO(2)-neutral heat and energy production via wood burning. Wood ashes are rich in many essential plant nutrients. In addition they are alkaline. The idea of using the waste ash as fertiliser in forests is appealing. However, wood is also known for its ability to strongly enrich certain heavy metals from the underlying soils, e.g. Cd, without any anthropogenic input. Concentrations of 26 chemical elements (Ag, As, Au, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Sr, Ti, and Zn) in 40 samples each of birch and spruce wood ashes collected along a 120 km long transect in southern Norway are reported. The observed maximum concentrations are 1.3 wt.% Pb, 4.4 wt.% Zn and 203 mg/kg Cd in birch wood ashes. Wood ashes can thus contain very high heavy metal concentrations. Spreading wood ashes in a forest is a major anthropogenic interference with the natural biogeochemical cycles. As with the use of sewage sludge in agriculture the use of wood ashes in forests clearly needs regulation.

  3. Density and energy level of a deep-level Mg acceptor in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Morine, Tatsuya; Nagamachi, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Reliably determining the densities and energy levels of deep-level dominant acceptors in heavily doped wide-band-gap semiconductors has been a topic of recent discussion. In these discussions, the focus is on both Hall scattering factors for holes and distribution functions for acceptors. Mg acceptor levels in 4H-SiC seem to be deep, and so here the electrical properties of Mg-implanted 4H-SiC layers are studied by measuring Hall effects. The obtained Hall scattering factors are not reliable because they drop to less than 0.5 at high measurement temperatures. Moreover, the Fermi-Dirac distribution function is unsuitable for examining Mg acceptors because the obtained acceptor density is much higher than the concentration of implanted Mg atoms. However, by using a distribution function that includes the influence of the excited states of a deep-level acceptor, the density and energy level of Mg acceptors can be reliably determined.

  4. North Dakota Industrial Arts Teachers Handbook. Energy/Power Curriculum Guide, Level I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugan, Don

    This handbook provides teachers with support material to more fully implement the North Dakota Energy and Power Curriculum Guide, Level I. It first presents the body of knowledge for Energy/Power Technology as taken from the curriculum guide. The guide is then addressed unit by unit, topic by topic. These seven units are covered: Energy/Power…

  5. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for energy conservation/rate reduction. 990.185 Section 990.185 Housing and Urban Development... Calculating Formula Expenses § 990.185 Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction. (a) General/consumption reduction. If a PHA undertakes energy conservation measures that...

  6. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.; Beiter, P.; Flores, F.; Hurlbut, D.; Liu, C.

    2015-02-01

    This presentation and associated spreadsheet examine the level of cross-state renewable energy transactions. Most state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies allow for out-of-state renewable energy or renewable energy certificates to count towards compliance. This analysis focuses on compliance for 2012 and provides stakeholders with an understanding of the extent to which RPSs are being met.

  7. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for energy conservation/rate reduction. 990.185 Section 990.185 Housing and Urban Development... Calculating Formula Expenses § 990.185 Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction. (a) General/consumption reduction. If a PHA undertakes energy conservation measures that...

  8. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for energy conservation/rate reduction. 990.185 Section 990.185 Housing and Urban Development... Calculating Formula Expenses § 990.185 Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction. (a) General/consumption reduction. If a PHA undertakes energy conservation measures that...

  9. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for energy conservation/rate reduction. 990.185 Section 990.185 Housing and Urban Development... Calculating Formula Expenses § 990.185 Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction. (a) General/consumption reduction. If a PHA undertakes energy conservation measures that...

  10. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for energy conservation/rate reduction. 990.185 Section 990.185 Housing and Urban Development... Calculating Formula Expenses § 990.185 Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction. (a) General/consumption reduction. If a PHA undertakes energy conservation measures that...

  11. Energy conversion modeling of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of solids via energy transfer paths between transition levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong; Sun, Mingzi

    2017-04-05

    An energy conversion model has been established for the intrinsic persistent luminescence in solids related to the native point defect levels, formations, and transitions. In this study, we showed how the recombination of charge carriers between different defect levels along the zero phonon line (ZPL) can lead to energy conversions supporting the intrinsic persistent phosphorescence in solids. This suggests that the key driving force for this optical phenomenon is the pair of electrons hopping between different charged defects with negative-Ueff. Such a negative correlation energy will provide a sustainable energy source for electron-holes to further recombine in a new cycle with a specific quantum yield. This will help us to understand the intrinsic persistent luminescence with respect to native point defect levels as well as the correlations of electronics and energetics.

  12. Accurate Analytic Potential Energy Function and Spectroscopic Study for G1Πg State of Dimer 7Li2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Heng; Ma, Heng; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhu, Zun-Lue

    2007-06-01

    The reasonable dissociation limit for the G1Πg state of dimer 7Li2 is determined. The equilibrium internuclear distance, dissociation energy, harmonic frequency, vibrational zero energy, and adiabatic excitation energy are calculated using a symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction method in complete active space in Gaussian03 program package at such numerous basis sets as 6-311++G, 6-311++G(2df,2pd), 6-311++G(2df,p), cc-PVTZ, 6-311++G(3df,3pd), CEP-121G, 6-311++G(2df,pd), 6-311++G(d,p),6-311G(3df,3pd), D95(3df,3pd), 6-311++G(3df,2p), 6-311++G(2df), 6-311++G(df,pd) D95V++, and DGDZVP. The complete potential energy curves are obtained at these sets over a wide internuclear distance range and have least squares fitted to Murrell-Sorbie function. The conclusion shows that the basis set 6-311++G(2df,p) is a most suitable one for the G1Πg state. At this basis set, the calculated spectroscopic constants Te, De, E0, Re, ωe, ωeχe, αe, and Be are of 3.9523 eV, 0.813 06 eV, 113.56 cm-1, 0.320 15 nm, 227.96 cm-1, 1.6928 cm-1, 0.004 436 cm-1, and 0.4689 cm-1, respectively, which are in good agreement with measurements whenever available. The total 50 vibrational levels and corresponding inertial rotation constants are for the first time calculated and compared with available RKR data. And good agreement with measurements is obtained.

  13. Rotation vibration energy level clustering in the XB1 ground electronic state of PH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Jensen, Per; Bunker, P. R.

    2006-10-01

    We use previously determined potential energy surfaces for the Renner-coupled XB1 and AA1 electronic states of the phosphino (PH 2) free radical in a calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of highly excited rotational and vibrational energy levels of the X˜ state. We show how spin-orbit coupling, the Renner effect, rotational excitation, and vibrational excitation affect the clustered energy level patterns that occur. We consider both 4-fold rotational energy level clustering caused by centrifugal distortion, and vibrational energy level pairing caused by local mode behaviour. We also calculate ab initio dipole moment surfaces for the X˜ and A˜ states, and the X˜-A˜ transition moment surface, in order to obtain spectral intensities.

  14. Wind energy development in the United States: Can state-level policies promote efficient development of wind energy capacity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Blair S.

    In the absence of strong U.S. federal renewable energy policies, state governments have taken the lead in passing legislation to promote wind energy. Studies have shown that many of these policies, including Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), have aided in the development of wind energy capacity nationwide. This paper seeks to analyze whether these state-level policies have led to an efficient development of U.S. wind energy. For the purposes of this paper, wind energy development is considered efficient if competitive markets enable wind capacity to be built in the most cost effective manner, allowing states to trade wind energy between high wind potential states and low wind potential states. This concept is operationalized by analyzing how state policies that incentivize the in-state development of wind energy impact where wind capacity is developed. A multivariate regression model examining wind capacity in the 48 contiguous United States that had some wind capacity between 1999 and 2008 found these in-state policies are associated with increased wind capacity, controlling for states' wind potential. The results suggest that state-level policies are distorting where wind is developed. These findings support the enactment of a more comprehensive federal energy policy, such as a national RPS, a cap-and-trade program, or a targeted federal transmission policy. These federal policies could spur national markets that would result in the more efficient development of U.S. wind energy.

  15. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    1984-11-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (~1N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments.

  16. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool. Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Flapper, Joris; Ke, Jing; Kramer, Klaas; Sathaye, Jayant

    2012-02-01

    The overall goal of the project is to develop a computer-based benchmarking and energy and water savings tool (BEST-Dairy) for use in the California dairy industry - including four dairy processes - cheese, fluid milk, butter, and milk powder. BEST-Dairy tool developed in this project provides three options for the user to benchmark each of the dairy product included in the tool, with each option differentiated based on specific detail level of process or plant, i.e., 1) plant level; 2) process-group level, and 3) process-step level. For each detail level, the tool accounts for differences in production and other variables affecting energy use in dairy processes. The dairy products include cheese, fluid milk, butter, milk powder, etc. The BEST-Dairy tool can be applied to a wide range of dairy facilities to provide energy and water savings estimates, which are based upon the comparisons with the best available reference cases that were established through reviewing information from international and national samples. We have performed and completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of the BEST-Dairy tool, through which feedback from voluntary users in the U.S. dairy industry was gathered to validate and improve the tool's functionality. BEST-Dairy v1.2 was formally published in May 2011, and has been made available for free downloads from the internet (i.e., http://best-dairy.lbl.gov). A user's manual has been developed and published as the companion documentation for use with the BEST-Dairy tool. In addition, we also carried out technology transfer activities by engaging the dairy industry in the process of tool development and testing, including field testing, technical presentations, and technical assistance throughout the project. To date, users from more than ten countries in addition to those in the U.S. have downloaded the BEST-Dairy from the LBNL website. It is expected that the use of BEST-Dairy tool will advance understanding of energy and water

  17. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  18. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  19. QM:QM electronic embedding using Mulliken atomic charges: energies and analytic gradients in an ONIOM framework.

    PubMed

    Hratchian, Hrant P; Parandekar, Priya V; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Frisch, Michael J; Vreven, Thom

    2008-01-21

    An accurate first-principles treatment of chemical reactions for large systems remains a significant challenge facing electronic structure theory. Hybrid models, such as quantum mechanics:molecular mechanics (QM:MM) and quantum mechanics:quantum mechanics (QM:QM) schemes, provide a promising avenue for such studies. For many chemistries, including important reactions in materials science, molecular mechanics or semiempirical methods may not be appropriate, or parameters may not be available (e.g., surface chemistry of compound semiconductors such as indium phosphide or catalytic chemistry of transition metal oxides). In such cases, QM:QM schemes are of particular interest. In this work, a QM:QM electronic embedding model within the ONIOM (our own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) extrapolation framework is presented. To define the embedding potential, we choose the real-system low-level Mulliken atomic charges. This results in a set of well-defined and unique embedding charges. However, the parametric dependence of the charges on molecular geometry complicates the energy gradient that is necessary for the efficient exploration of potential energy surfaces. We derive an efficient form for the forces where a single set of self-consistent field response equations is solved. Initial tests of the method and key algorithmic issues are discussed.

  20. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc Jablonski, Aleksander

    2009-11-15

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  1. Variational calculation of highly excited rovibrational energy levels of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Polyansky, Oleg L; Kozin, Igor N; Ovsyannikov, Roman I; Małyszek, Paweł; Koput, Jacek; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N

    2013-08-15

    Results are presented for highly accurate ab initio variational calculation of the rotation-vibration energy levels of H2O2 in its electronic ground state. These results use a recently computed potential energy surface and the variational nuclear-motion programs WARV4, which uses an exact kinetic energy operator, and TROVE, which uses a numerical expansion for the kinetic energy. The TROVE calculations are performed for levels with high values of rotational excitation, J up to 35. The purely ab initio calculations of the rovibrational energy levels reproduce the observed levels with a standard deviation of about 1 cm(-1), similar to that of the J = 0 calculation, because the discrepancy between theory and experiment for rotational energies within a given vibrational state is substantially determined by the error in the vibrational band origin. Minor adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry and to the height of the torsional barrier. Using these and correcting the band origins using the error in J = 0 states lowers the standard deviation of the observed-calculated energies to only 0.002 cm(-1) for levels up to J = 10 and 0.02 cm(-1) for all experimentally known energy levels, which extend up to J = 35.

  2. On the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient and spectra of inner radiation belt particles - Analytic solutions and comparison with numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphalen, H.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical method by which the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient may be deduced from spectral observations of the particle population at the inner edge of the earth's radiation belts is presented. This region has previously been analyzed with numerical techniques; in this report an analytical treatment that illustrates characteristic limiting cases in the L shell range where the time scale of Coulomb losses is substantially shorter than that of radial diffusion (L approximately 1-2) is given. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the particle spectra there are shaped by the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient regardless of the spectral shapes of the particle populations diffusing inward from the outer radiation zone, so that from observed spectra the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be determined. To insure realistic simulations, inner zone data obtained from experiments on the DIAL, AZUR, and ESRO 2 spacecraft have been used as boundary conditions. Excellent agreement between analytic and numerical results is reported.

  3. Ab initio ground-state potential energy function and vibration-rotation energy levels of imidogen, NH.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2015-06-30

    The accurate ground-state potential energy function of imidogen, NH, has been determined from ab initio calculations using the multireference averaged coupled-pair functional (MR-ACPF) method in conjunction with the correlation-consistent core-valence basis sets up to octuple-zeta quality. The importance of several effects, including electron correlation beyond the MR-ACPF level of approximation, the scalar relativistic, adiabatic, and nonadiabatic corrections were discussed. Along with the large one-particle basis set, all of these effects were found to be crucial to attain "spectroscopic" accuracy of the theoretical predictions of vibration-rotation energy levels of NH.

  4. Energy Efficiency Policy in the United States. Overview of Trends at Different Levels of Government

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, Elizabeth; Cochran, Jaquelin; Vorum, Martin

    2009-12-01

    This report catalogs by sector--buildings, transportation, industrial, and power--energy efficiency policies at the federal, state, and local levels, and identifies some prominent policy trends. Four key findings emerged from this report: 1) leadership on energy efficiency is necessary--and is found--at each level of government; 2) there is no widely accepted methodology for evaluating energy efficiency policies; 3) coordination among the three levels of government--and across sectors--is increasingly important, and there are opportunities to significantly improve policy performance through a unified strategy; and 4) there are efficiencies to be gained by informing policies in one sector with experience from others.

  5. Energy Efficiency Policy in the United States: Overview of Trends at Different Levels of Government

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Cochran, J.; Vorum, M.

    2009-12-01

    This report catalogs by sector--buildings, transportation, industrial, and power--energy efficiency policies at the federal, state, and local levels, and identifies some prominent policy trends. Four key findings emerged from this report: 1) leadership on energy efficiency is necessary--and is found--at each level of government; 2) there is no widely accepted methodology for evaluating energy efficiency policies; 3) coordination among the three levels of government--and across sectors--is increasingly important, and there are opportunities to significantly improve policy performance through a unified strategy; and 4) there are efficiencies to be gained by informing policies in one sector with experience from others.

  6. Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous GaN and ZnO Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.; Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.

    2014-03-01

    Electronic energy level alignment at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces is fundamental to electrochemical activity. Motivated in particular by the search for new materials that can be more efficient for photocatalysis, we develop a first principles method to calculate this alignment at aqueous interfaces and demonstrate it for the specific case of non-polar GaN and ZnO interfaces with water. In the first step, density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics is used to sample the physical interface structure and to evaluate the electrostatic potential step at the interface. In the second step, the GW approach is used to evaluate the reference electronic energy level separately in the bulk semiconductor (valence band edge energy) and in bulk water (the 1b1 energy level), relative to the internal electrostatic energy reference. Use of the GW approach naturally corrects for errors inherent in the use of Kohn-Sham energy eigenvalues to approximate the electronic excitation energies in each material. With this predicted interface alignment, specific redox levels in water, with potentials known relative to the 1b1 level, can then be compared to the semiconductor band edge positions. Our results will be discussed in the context of experiments in which photoexcited GaN and ZnO drive the hydrogen evolution reaction. Research carried out at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Quality of Research Design Moderates Effects of Grade Retention on Achievement: A Meta-analytic, Multi-level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chiharu S.; Chen, Qi; Willson, Victor L.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2010-01-01

    The present meta-analysis examined the effect of grade retention on academic outcomes and investigated systemic sources of variability in effect sizes. Using multi-level modeling, we investigated characteristics of 207 effect sizes across 22 studies published between 1990 and 2007 at two levels: the study (between) and individual (within) levels. Design quality was a study-level variable. Individual level variables were median grade retained and median number of years post retention. Quality of design was associated with less negative effects. Studies employing middle to high methodological designs yielded effect sizes not statistically significantly different from zero and 0.34 higher (more positive) than studies with low design quality. Years post retention was negatively associated with retention effects, and this effect was stronger for studies using grade comparisons versus age comparisons. Results challenge the widely held view that retention has a negative impact on achievement. Suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:20717492

  8. New Fe I Level Energies and Line Identifications from Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of the Fe I atom is critical to many areas of astrophysics and beyond. Measurements of the energies of its high-lying levels remain woefully incomplete, however, despite extensive laboratory and solar analysis. In this work, we use high-resolution archival absorption-line ultraviolet and optical spectra of stars whose warm temperatures favor moderate Fe I excitation. We derive the energy for a particular upper level in Kurucz's semiempirical calculations by adopting a trial value that yields the same wavelength for a given line predicted to be about as strong as that of a strong unidentified spectral line observed in the stellar spectra, then checking the new wavelengths of other strong predicted transitions that share the same upper level for coincidence with other strong observed unidentified lines. To date, this analysis has provided the upper energies of 66 Fe I levels. Many new energy levels are higher than those accessible to laboratory experiments; several exceed the Fe I ionization energy. These levels provide new identifications for over 2000 potentially detectable lines. Almost all of the new levels of odd parity include UV lines that were detected but unclassified in laboratory Fe I absorption spectra, providing an external check on the energy values. We motivate and present the procedure, provide the resulting new energy levels and their uncertainties, list all the potentially detectable UV and optical new Fe I line identifications and their gf values, point out new lines of astrophysical interest, and discuss the prospects for additional Fe I energy level determinations.

  9. Initial concept for forecasting the flux and energy spectrum of energetic particles using ground-level cosmic ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Lev; Zukerman, Igor

    We describe the principles and operation of automated programs ``FEP-Research-1st Alert'', ``FEP-Research-2nd Alert'', and ``FEP-Research-3rd Alert''. The program ``FEP-Research-lst Alert'' gives preliminary determinations of the energy spectrum and flux at the beginning of an event on the basis of 1-minute data of total neutron intensity and intensities of different multiplicities in the neutron monitor (NM) at the Emilio Segre' Observatory (2025m above sea level, Rc = 10.8 GV) as well as available 1-minute on-line data in the near future of Cosmic Ray Observatories which collaborate with the Israel Cosmic Ray Center (Rome, Haleakala, Climax, Oulu, Moscow, Apatity, Mexico, Aragaz and others). Using well-known coupling functions for neutron monitors we have derived functions that relate the spectral index of flare energetic particles (FEP) to observations of multiplicities. We also derived important functions using ratios of FEP observations from the different cosmic ray monitors mentioned above. All these functions are approximated analytically with good accuracy and can be used for automatic realtime determination of the energy spectrum and fluxes of FEP. Using approximate values of the diffusion coefficient for the current level of solar activity as a function of particle energy, the program ``FEP-Research-1st Alert'' determines very roughly the expected level of radiation in space after (1)/(2), 1, (3)/(2) and 2 hours. If this level is expected to be dangerous for satellites and spacecrafts, the program ``FEP- Research-1st Alert'' sends preliminary 1st Alert. More accurate forecasts are given after 5-10 minutes by the program ``FEP-Research-2nd Alert'', and after 10-20 minutes program by the ``FEP-Research-3rd Alert'' using information on the diffusion coefficient obtained from on-line FEP ground data.

  10. Impact behaviour of Napier/polyester composites under different energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, I.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Haslan, M.; Helmi E., A.; M. Haameem J., A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of different energy levels on the impact behaviour of Napier fibre/polyester reinforced composites were investigated. Napier fibre was extracted using traditional water retting process to be utilized as reinforcing materials in polyester composite laminates. 25% fibre loading composite laminates were prepared and impacted at three different energy levels; 2.5,5 and 7.5 J using an instrumented drop weight impact testing machine (IMATEK IM10). The outcomes show that peak force and contact time increase with increased impact load. The energy absorption was then calculated from the force displacement curve. The results indicated that the energy absorption decreases with increasing energy levels of the impact. Impacted specimens were observed visually for fragmentation fracture using an optical camera to identify the failure mechanisms. Fracture fragmentation pattern from permanent dent to perforation with radial and circumferential was observed.

  11. Analytic Energy Gradients and Spin Multiplicities for Orbital-Optimized Second-Order Perturbation Theory with Density-Fitting Approximation: An Efficient Implementation.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur

    2014-10-14

    An efficient implementation of analytic energy gradients and spin multiplicities for the density-fitted orbital-optimized second-order perturbation theory (DF-OMP2) [Bozkaya, U. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 2371-2378] is presented. The DF-OMP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the cost of single point analytic gradient computations with the orbital-optimized MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (OO-RI-MP2) [Neese, F.; Schwabe, T.; Kossmann, S.; Schirmer, B.; Grimme, S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 3060-3073]. Our results demonstrate that the DF-OMP2 method provides substantially lower computational costs for analytic gradients than OO-RI-MP2. On average, the cost of DF-OMP2 analytic gradients is 9-11 times lower than that of OO-RI-MP2 for systems considered. We also consider aromatic bond dissociation energies, for which MP2 provides poor reaction energies. The DF-OMP2 method exhibits a substantially better performance than MP2, providing a mean absolute error of 2.5 kcal mol(-1), which is more than 9 times lower than that of MP2 (22.6 kcal mol(-1)). Overall, the DF-OMP2 method appears very helpful for electronically challenging chemical systems such as free radicals or other cases where standard MP2 proves unreliable. For such problematic systems, we recommend using DF-OMP2 instead of the canonical MP2 as a more robust method with the same computational scaling.

  12. Building Energy Use Modeling at the U.S. State Level Under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Eom, J.; Clarke, L.; Kyle, P.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change plays an important role in building energy use for heating and cooling. As global building energy use accounts for as much as about 32% of global final energy consumption in 2005, the impact of climate change on greenhouse gas emissions may also be significant. As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into regional energy system planning. In this study, we have developed a detailed building energy model with U.S. 50-state representation, embedded in an integrated assessment framework (Global Change Assessment Model). The climate change impact on heating and cooling demand is measured through estimating heating and cooling degree days (HDD/CDDs) derived from MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) climate data and linking the estimates to the building energy model. Having the model calibrated against historical data at the U.S. state level, we estimated the building energy use in the 21st century at the U.S. state level and analyzed its spatial pattern. We have found that the total building energy use (heating and cooling) in U.S. states is over- or under-estimated without having climate feedback taken into account, and that the difference with and without climate feedback at the state level varies from -25% to 25% in reference scenario and -15% to 10% in climate mitigation scenario. The result not only confirms earlier finding that global warming leads to increased cooling and decreased heating energy use, it also indicates that climate change has a different impact on total building energy use at national and state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (Figure 1). The scale impact in building energy use modeling emphasizes the importance of developing a building energy model that represents socioeconomic development, energy service expansion, and

  13. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-05

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state.

  14. Effect of energy and protein levels on nutrient utilization and their requirements in growing Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Sonali; Kundu, Shivlal Singh; Mondal, Goutam; Sontakke, Umesh; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate different levels of energy and protein for optimum growth of Murrah male buffalo calves, a growth trial (150 days) was conducted on 30 calves (body weight 202.5 ± 6.8 kg). Six diets were formulated to provide 90, 100 and 110% protein level and 90 and 110% energy level requirements for buffalo calves, derived from ICAR 2013 recommendations for buffaloes. The crude protein (CP) intake was increased with higher dietary CP, whereas no effect of energy levels or interaction between protein and energy was observed on CP intake. There were significant effects (P < 0.01) of the interaction between protein and energy (P < 0.05) on metabolizable energy (ME) intake. The digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) was higher (P < 0.0001) in high-energy groups compared to low-energy groups. The CP digestibility increased with the increased CP and ME of the rations. The absorbed N was improved linearly with an increased level of dietary CP, whereas the N retention was similar among all the groups distributed as per different energy or protein levels. The nutrient intake (protein or energy) per kg body weight (BW)(0.75) at various fortnight intervals was regressed linearly from the average daily gain (ADG) per kg BW(0.75). By setting the average daily gain at zero in the developed regression equation, a maintenance requirement was obtained, i.e. 133.1 kcal ME, 6.45 g CP and 3.95 g metabolizable protein (MP) per kg BW(0.75). Requirement for growth was 6.12 kcal ME, 0.46 g CP and 0.32 g MP per kg BW(0.75) per day. Metabolizable amino acid requirement was estimated from partitioning of MP intake and ADG. The ME requirements were lower, whereas the MP requirement of Murrah buffaloes was higher than ICAR (2013) recommendations.

  15. Energy level of the nitrogen dangling bond in amorphous silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.L. ); Kanicki, J. ); Robertson, J. ); Lenahan, P.M. )

    1991-09-30

    The composition dependence and room-temperature metastability of the paramagnetic nitrogen dangling-bond center is amorphous silicon nitride suggest that its energy level lies close to the N {ital p}{pi} states, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  16. Experimental Energy Levels and Partition Function of the 12C2 Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Szabó, István; Császár, Attila G.; Bernath, Peter F.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    The carbon dimer, the 12C2 molecule, is ubiquitous in astronomical environments. Experimental-quality rovibronic energy levels are reported for 12C2, based on rovibronic transitions measured for and among its singlet, triplet, and quintet electronic states, reported in 42 publications. The determination utilizes the Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels (MARVEL) technique. The 23,343 transitions measured experimentally and validated within this study determine 5699 rovibronic energy levels, 1325, 4309, and 65 levels for the singlet, triplet, and quintet states investigated, respectively. The MARVEL analysis provides rovibronic energies for six singlet, six triplet, and two quintet electronic states. For example, the lowest measurable energy level of the {{a}}{}3{{{\\Pi }}}{{u}} state, corresponding to the J = 2 total angular momentum quantum number and the F 1 spin-multiplet component, is 603.817(5) cm-1. This well-determined energy difference should facilitate observations of singlet-triplet intercombination lines, which are thought to occur in the interstellar medium and comets. The large number of highly accurate and clearly labeled transitions that can be derived by combining MARVEL energy levels with computed temperature-dependent intensities should help a number of astrophysical observations as well as corresponding laboratory measurements. The experimental rovibronic energy levels, augmented, where needed, with ab initio variational ones based on empirically adjusted and spin-orbit coupled potential energy curves obtained using the Duo code, are used to obtain a highly accurate partition function, and related thermodynamic data, for 12C2 up to 4000 K.

  17. Analysis of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells proteome by 2-DE and MS: analytical and biological variability in the protein expression level and protein identification.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Boo, María; Garrido, Juan J; Ogueta, Samuel; Calvete, Juan J; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; Moreno, Angela

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we present the protein map corresponding to the porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to better understand the role of these cells in the pig immune system. To conform the map, the proteins were separated by 2-DE using a 5-8 range pH gradient in IEF and approximately 800 spots were detected. Due to the high level of indeterminate variability associates to the 2-DE, analytical and biological variances were analyzed. The analytical variance was calculated for 50 proteins in three replicate 2-DE gels from the same protein extract whereas the biological variance was determined by comparison of the patterns obtained for the same 50 proteins in different animals. Values of 15.13 and 33.70% were determined for analytical and biological variances, respectively. These average variances will provide a quantified and statistical basis for future proteomic studies directed to evaluate relevant quantitative changes in the biological response. A representative set of the major proteins was subjected to MALDI-TOF analysis and over 75% of the proteins were identified on the basis of their similarity with its human homologue proteins. A large number of cytoskeletal and metabolic proteins were found as well as some proteins related to cell mobility and immunological functions. Finally, other proteins implicated in the cell signaling process, transport or apoptosis were also identified giving a wide overview of the porcine PBMC protein map.

  18. Suppressing recombination in polymer photovoltaic devices via energy-level cascades.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Johnson, Kerr; Vaynzof, Yana; Bakulin, Artem A; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K H; Friend, Richard H

    2013-08-14

    An energy cascading structure is designed in a polymer photovoltaic device to suppress recombination and improve quantum yields. By the insertion of a thin polymer interlayer with intermediate energy levels, electrons and holes can effectively shuttle away from each other while being spatially separated from recombination. An increase in open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current are observed in modified devices.

  19. Energy level alignment at planar organic heterojunctions: influence of contact doping and molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Andreas

    2017-04-05

    Planar organic heterojunctions are widely used in photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and bilayer field-effect transistors. The energy level alignment in the devices plays an important role in obtaining the aspired gap arrangement. Additionally, the π-orbital overlap between the involved molecules defines e.g. the charge-separation efficiency in solar cells due to charge-transfer effects. To account for both aspects, direct/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to determine the energy level landscape and the molecular orientation at prototypical planar organic heterojunctions. The combined experimental approach results in a comprehensive model for the electronic and morphological characteristics of the interface between the two investigated molecular semiconductors. Following an introduction on heterojunctions used in devices and on energy levels of organic materials, the energy level alignment of planar organic heterojunctions will be discussed. The observed energy landscape is always determined by the individual arrangement between the energy levels of the molecules and the work function of the electrode. This might result in contact doping due to Fermi level pinning at the electrode for donor/acceptor heterojunctions, which also improves the solar cell efficiency. This pinning behaviour can be observed across an unpinned interlayer and results in charge accumulation at the donor/acceptor interface, depending on the transport levels of the respective organic semiconductors. Moreover, molecular orientation will affect the energy levels because of the anisotropy in ionisation energy and electron affinity and is influenced by the structural compatibility of the involved molecules at the heterojunction. High structural compatibility leads to π-orbital stacking between different molecules at a heterojunction, which is of additional interest for photovoltaic active interfaces and for ground

  20. Energy level alignment at planar organic heterojunctions: influence of contact doping and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Planar organic heterojunctions are widely used in photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and bilayer field-effect transistors. The energy level alignment in the devices plays an important role in obtaining the aspired gap arrangement. Additionally, the π-orbital overlap between the involved molecules defines e.g. the charge-separation efficiency in solar cells due to charge-transfer effects. To account for both aspects, direct/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to determine the energy level landscape and the molecular orientation at prototypical planar organic heterojunctions. The combined experimental approach results in a comprehensive model for the electronic and morphological characteristics of the interface between the two investigated molecular semiconductors. Following an introduction on heterojunctions used in devices and on energy levels of organic materials, the energy level alignment of planar organic heterojunctions will be discussed. The observed energy landscape is always determined by the individual arrangement between the energy levels of the molecules and the work function of the electrode. This might result in contact doping due to Fermi level pinning at the electrode for donor/acceptor heterojunctions, which also improves the solar cell efficiency. This pinning behaviour can be observed across an unpinned interlayer and results in charge accumulation at the donor/acceptor interface, depending on the transport levels of the respective organic semiconductors. Moreover, molecular orientation will affect the energy levels because of the anisotropy in ionisation energy and electron affinity and is influenced by the structural compatibility of the involved molecules at the heterojunction. High structural compatibility leads to π-orbital stacking between different molecules at a heterojunction, which is of additional interest for photovoltaic active interfaces and for ground

  1. Role of energy-level mismatches in a multi-pathway complex of photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, James; Ryu, Junghee; Lee, Changhyoup; Yoo, Seokwon; Jeong, Hyunseok; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2011-10-01

    Considering a multi-pathway structure in a light-harvesting complex of photosynthesis, we investigated the role of energy-level mismatches between antenna molecules in transferring the absorbed energy to a reaction center (RC). We found a condition in which the antenna molecules faithfully play their roles: when their effective absorption ratios are larger than those of the receiver molecule directly coupled to the RC. In the absence of energy-level mismatches and dephasing noise, there arises quantum destructive interference between multiple paths that restricts the energy transfer. On the other hand, the destructive interference diminishes as asymmetrically biasing the energy-level mismatches and/or introducing quantum noise of dephasing for the antenna molecules, so that the transfer efficiency is greatly enhanced to nearly unity. Remarkably, the near-unity efficiency can be achieved at a wide range of asymmetric energy-level mismatches. Temporal characteristics are also optimized at the energy-level mismatches where the transfer efficiency is nearly unity. We discuss these effects, in particular, for the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex.

  2. Background contamination by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in trace level high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) analytical procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrario, J.; Byrne, C.; Dupuy, A. E. Jr

    1997-01-01

    The addition of the "dioxin-like" polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners to the assessment of risk associated with the 2,3,7,8-chlorine substituted dioxins and furans has dramatically increased the number of laboratories worldwide that are developing analytical procedures for their detection and quantitation. Most of these procedures are based on established sample preparation and analytical techniques employing high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS), which are used for the analyses of dioxin/furans at low parts-per-trillion (ppt) levels. A significant and widespread problem that arises when using these sample preparation procedures for the analysis of coplanar PCBs is the presence of background levels of these congeners. Industrial processes, urban incineration, leaking electrical transformers, hazardous waste accidents, and improper waste disposal practices have released appreciable quantities of PCBs into the environment. This contamination has resulted in the global distribution of these compounds via the atmosphere and their ubiquitous presence in ambient air. The background presence of these compounds in method blanks must be addressed when determining the exact concentrations of these and other congeners in environmental samples. In this study reliable procedures were developed to accurately define these background levels and assess their variability over the course of the study. The background subtraction procedures developed and employed increase the probability that the values reported accurately represent the concentrations found in the samples and were not biased due to this background contamination.

  3. Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic Reference Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, D. S.; Yu, Y. H.; Neary, V.

    2015-04-24

    In 2010 the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the development of six marine energy converter reference models. The reference models are point designs of well-known marine energy converters. Each device was designed to operate in a specific marine resource, instead of a generic device that can be deployed at any location. This method allows each device to be used as a benchmark for future reference model to benchmark future devices. The six designs consist of three current energy converters and three wave energy converters. The reference model project has generated both technical and economic data sets that are available in the public domain. The methodology to calculate the levelized cost of energy for the reference model project and an overall comparison of the cost of energy from these six reference-model designs are presented in this paper.

  4. Omega—3 fatty acid and ADHD: Blood level analysis and meta-analytic extension of supplementation trials

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, Elizabeth; Nigg, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the value of Omega—3 (n—3) fatty acid supplementation for treatment of ADHD remains high. No prior meta-analysis has examined whether ADHD is associated with alterations in blood lipid levels and meta-analyses of supplementation have reached conflicting conclusions. Methods We report two new meta-analyses. Study 1 examined blood levels of Omega—3 fatty acids in relation to ADHD. Study 2 examined a larger sample of randomized intervention trials than previously reported. Results Study 1 included 9 studies (n = 586) and found lower overall blood levels of n—3 in individuals with ADHD versus controls (g = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.26–0.59; p < .001). Study 2 included 16 studies (n = 1408) and found that n—3 supplementation improved ADHD composite symptoms; using the best available rating and reporter (g = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.15–0.37; p < .001). Supplementation showed reliable effects on hyperactivity by parent and teacher report, but reliable effects for inattention only by parent report. Conclusions Omega—3 levels are reduced in children with ADHD. Dietary supplementation appears to create modest improvements in symptoms. There is sufficient evidence to consider Omega—3 fatty acids as a possible supplement to established therapies. However it remains unclear whether such intervention should be confined to children with below normal blood levels. PMID:25181335

  5. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-07-26

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  7. Energy level alignment between C 60 and Al using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. H.; Kang, S. J.; Kim, C. Y.; Cho, S. W.; Yoo, K.-H.; Whang, C. N.

    2006-09-01

    The energy level alignment between C 60 and Al has been investigated by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. To obtain the interfacial electronic structure between C 60 and Al, C 60 was deposited on a clean Al substrate in a stepwise manner. The valence-band spectra were measured immediately after each step of C 60 deposition without breaking the vacuum. The measured onset of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy level was located at 1.59 eV from the Fermi level of Al. The vacuum level was shifted 0.68 eV toward lower binding energy with additional C 60 layers. The observed vacuum level shift means that the interface dipole exists at the interface between C 60 and Al. The barrier height of electron injection from Al to C 60 is 0.11 eV, which is smaller value than that of hole injection.

  8. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  9. Growth and energy budget of juvenile lenok Brachymystax lenok in relation to ration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Zhongjie; Zhang, Tanglin; Yuan, Jing; Mou, Zhenbo; Liu, Jiashou

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of ration level (RL) on the growth and energy budget of lenok Brachymystax lenok. Juvenile lenok (initial mean body weight 3.06±0.13 g) were fed for 21 d at five different ration levels: starvation, 2%, 3%, 4% bwd (body weight per day, based on initial mean values), and apparent satiation. Feed consumption, apparent digestibility, and growth were directly measured. Specific growth rates in terms of wet weight, dry weight, protein, and energy increased logarithmically with an increase in ration levels. The relationship between specific growth rate in terms of wet weight (SGRw, %/d) and RL (%) was characterized by a decelerating curve: SGRw=-1.417+3.166ln(RL+1). The apparent digestibility coefficients of energy exhibited a decreasing pattern with increasing ration level, and there was a significant difference among different RLs. Body composition was significantly affected by ration size. The relationship between feed efficiency rate in terms of energy (FERe) and RL was: FERe=-14.167+23.793RL-3.367(RL)2, and the maximum FERe was observed at a 3.53% ration. The maintenance requirement for energy of juvenile lenok was 105.39 kJ BW (kg)-0.80/d, the utilization efficiency of DE for growth was 0.496. The energy budget equation at satiation was: 100IE=29.03FE+5.78(ZE+UE)+39.56 HE+25.63 RE, where IE is feed energy, FE is fecal energy, ZE+UE is excretory energy, HE is heat production, and RE is recovered energy. Our results suggest that the most suitable feeding rate for juvenile lenok aquaculture for wet weight growth is 2.89% bwd, whereas for energy growth, the suggested rate is 3.53% bwd at this growth stage.

  10. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ∼420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s24p45d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ∼135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree–Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm‑1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV).

  11. Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov

    2016-09-03

    Energy-water nexus has substantially increased importance in the recent years. Synergistic approaches based on systems-analysis and mathematical models are critical for helping decision makers better understand the interrelationships and tradeoffs between energy and water. In energywater nexus management, various decision makers with different goals and preferences, which are often conflicting, are involved. These decision makers may have different controlling power over the management objectives and the decisions. They make decisions sequentially from the upper level to the lower level, challenging decision making in energy-water nexus. In order to address such planning issues, a bi-level decision model is developed, which improvesmore » upon the existing studies by integration of bi-level programming into energy-water nexus management. The developed model represents a methodological contribution to the challenge of sequential decisionmaking in energy-water nexus through provision of an integrated modeling framework/tool. An interactive fuzzy optimization methodology is introduced to seek a satisfactory solution to meet the overall satisfaction of the two-level decision makers. The tradeoffs between the two-level decision makers in energy-water nexus management are effectively addressed and quantified. Application of the proposed model to a synthetic example problem has demonstrated its applicability in practical energy-water nexus management. Optimal solutions for electricity generation, fuel supply, water supply including groundwater, surface water and recycled water, capacity expansion of the power plants, and GHG emission control are generated. In conclusion, these analyses are capable of helping decision makers or stakeholders adjust their tolerances to make informed decisions to achieve the overall satisfaction of energy-water nexus management where bi-level sequential decision making process is involved.« less

  12. Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov

    2016-09-03

    Energy-water nexus has substantially increased importance in the recent years. Synergistic approaches based on systems-analysis and mathematical models are critical for helping decision makers better understand the interrelationships and tradeoffs between energy and water. In energywater nexus management, various decision makers with different goals and preferences, which are often conflicting, are involved. These decision makers may have different controlling power over the management objectives and the decisions. They make decisions sequentially from the upper level to the lower level, challenging decision making in energy-water nexus. In order to address such planning issues, a bi-level decision model is developed, which improves upon the existing studies by integration of bi-level programming into energy-water nexus management. The developed model represents a methodological contribution to the challenge of sequential decisionmaking in energy-water nexus through provision of an integrated modeling framework/tool. An interactive fuzzy optimization methodology is introduced to seek a satisfactory solution to meet the overall satisfaction of the two-level decision makers. The tradeoffs between the two-level decision makers in energy-water nexus management are effectively addressed and quantified. Application of the proposed model to a synthetic example problem has demonstrated its applicability in practical energy-water nexus management. Optimal solutions for electricity generation, fuel supply, water supply including groundwater, surface water and recycled water, capacity expansion of the power plants, and GHG emission control are generated. In conclusion, these analyses are capable of helping decision makers or stakeholders adjust their tolerances to make informed decisions to achieve the overall satisfaction of energy-water nexus management where bi-level sequential decision making process is involved.

  13. Level-energy-dependent mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms sputtered by krypton-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nogami, Keisuke; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mineta, Shota; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2015-11-15

    Visible emission spectra were acquired from neutral atoms sputtered by 35–60 keV Kr{sup +} ions from a polycrystalline tungsten surface. Mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms in seven different 6p states were also obtained via the dependence of photon intensities on the distance from the surface. The average velocities parallel to the surface normal varied by factors of 2–4 for atoms in the different 6p energy levels. However, they were almost independent of the incident ion kinetic energy. The 6p-level energy dependence indicated that the velocities of the excited atoms were determined by inelastic processes that involve resonant charge exchange.

  14. A First Step in Learning Analytics: Pre-Processing Low-Level Alice Logging Data of Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Linda; McDowell, Charlie; Denner, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Educational data mining can miss or misidentify key findings about student learning without a transparent process of analyzing the data. This paper describes the first steps in the process of using low-level logging data to understand how middle school students used Alice, an initial programming environment. We describe the steps that were…

  15. Probing Energy Levels of Large Array Quantum Dot Superlattice by Electronic Transport Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisri, S. Z.; Degoli, E.; Spallanzani, N.; Krishnan, G.; Kooi, B.; Ghica, C.; Yarema, M.; Protesescu, L.; Heiss, W.; Kovalenko, M.; Pulci, O.; Ossicini, S.; Iwasa, Y.; Loi, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot superlattice (CQDS) emerges as new type of hybrid solids allowing easy fabrication of devices that exploits the quantum confinement properties of individual QD. This materials displays peculiar characters, making investigation of their transport properties nontrivial. Besides the bandgap variations, 0D nature of QD lead to the formation of discrete energy subbands. These subbands are crucial for multiple exciton generation (for efficient solar cell), thermoelectric material and multistate transistor. Full understanding of the CQDS energy level structure is vital to use them in complex devices. Here we show a powerful method to determine the CQDS electronic energy levels from their intrinsic charge transport characteristics. Via the use of ambipolar transistors with CQDS as active materials and gated using highly capacitive ionic liquid gating, Fermi energy can be largely tuned. It can access energy levels beyond QD's HOMO & LUMO. Ability to probe not only the bandgap, but also the discrete energy level from large assembly of QD at room temperature suggests the formation of energy minibands in this system.

  16. Truncated Conjugate Gradient: An Optimal Strategy for the Analytical Evaluation of the Many-Body Polarization Energy and Forces in Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new class of methods, denoted as Truncated Conjugate Gradient(TCG), to solve the many-body polarization energy and its associated forces in molecular simulations (i.e. molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo). The method consists in a fixed number of Conjugate Gradient (CG) iterations. TCG approaches provide a scalable solution to the polarization problem at a user-chosen cost and a corresponding optimal accuracy. The optimality of the CG-method guarantees that the number of the required matrix-vector products are reduced to a minimum compared to other iterative methods. This family of methods is non-empirical, fully adaptive, and provides analytical gradients, avoiding therefore any energy drift in MD as compared to popular iterative solvers. Besides speed, one great advantage of this class of approximate methods is that their accuracy is systematically improvable. Indeed, as the CG-method is a Krylov subspace method, the associated error is monotonically reduced at each iteration. On top of that, two improvements can be proposed at virtually no cost: (i) the use of preconditioners can be employed, which leads to the Truncated Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (TPCG); (ii) since the residual of the final step of the CG-method is available, one additional Picard fixed point iteration (“peek”), equivalent to one step of Jacobi Over Relaxation (JOR) with relaxation parameter ω, can be made at almost no cost. This method is denoted by TCG-n(ω). Black-box adaptive methods to find good choices of ω are provided and discussed. Results show that TPCG-3(ω) is converged to high accuracy (a few kcal/mol) for various types of systems including proteins and highly charged systems at the fixed cost of four matrix-vector products: three CG iterations plus the initial CG descent direction. Alternatively, T(P)CG-2(ω) provides robust results at a reduced cost (three matrix-vector products) and offers new perspectives for long polarizable MD as a production

  17. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  18. Examining student ideas about energy measurements on quantum states across undergraduate and graduate levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passante, Gina; Emigh, Paul J.; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Energy measurements play a fundamental role in the theory of quantum mechanics, yet there is evidence that the underlying concepts are difficult for many students, even after all undergraduate instruction. We present results from an investigation into student ability to determine the possible energies that can be measured for a given wave function and Hamiltonian, to determine the probabilities of each energy measurement and how they depend on time, and to recognize how a measurement of energy affects the state. By analyzing student responses to open-ended questions, we identify five broad, interrelated sets of conceptual and reasoning difficulties related to energy measurements. Data are drawn from sophomore-, junior-, and graduate-level quantum mechanics courses. Particular attention is paid to incorrect ideas that persist across all levels.

  19. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  20. Excitation energy dependence of the level density parameter close to the doubly magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Sen, A.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Dey, A.; Meena, J. K.; Saha, A. K.; Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra have been measured from 4He+208Pb and 4He+209Bi reactions by using 4He-ion beams of several bombarding energies. Excitation-energy dependence of the level density parameter has been studied for the two systems in the excitation energy range of ˜18 -50 MeV. For both the reactions an overall reduction of the asymptotic level density parameter with increasing excitation energy (temperature) is observed. The trend of the data was compared with the Thomas-Fermi model predictions and found to be in reasonable agreement. The value of the shell damping parameter has been extracted from the lowest-energy data in the case of Po,211210 and At,212211 nuclei close to the Z =82 and N =126 shell closure, and it was found to be consistent with the recent measurement in the vicinity of doubly magic 208Pb nucleus.

  1. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment.

  2. Developing Energy Literacy in US Middle-Level Students Using the Geospatial Curriculum Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Fu, Qiong; Peffer, Tamara E.; Kulo, Violet

    2013-06-01

    This quantitative study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial curriculum approach to promote energy literacy in an urban school district and examined factors that may account for energy content knowledge achievement. An energy literacy measure was administered to 1,044 eighth-grade students (ages 13-15) in an urban school district in Pennsylvania, USA. One group of students received instruction with a geospatial curriculum approach (geospatial technologies (GT)) and another group of students received 'business as usual' (BAU) curriculum instruction. For the GT students, findings revealed statistically significant gains from pretest to posttest (p < 0.001) on knowledge of energy resource acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. The GT students had year-end energy content knowledge scores significantly higher than those who learned with the BAU curriculum (p < 0.001; effect size being large). A multiple regression found that prior energy content knowledge was the only significant predictor to the year-end energy content knowledge achievement for the GT students (p < 0.001). The findings support that the implementation of a geospatial curriculum approach that employs learning activities that focus on the spatial nature of energy resources can improve the energy literacy of urban middle-level education students.

  3. Starch levels on performance, milk composition and energy balance of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Carolina Almeida; Batistel, Fernanda; de Souza, Jonas; Martinez, Junio Cesar; Correa, Paulo; Pedroso, Alexandre Mendonça; Santos, Flávio Augusto Portela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of starch levels in diets with the replacement of citrus pulp for corn on milk yield, milk composition, and energy balance of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-eight multiparous Holstein cows were used in seven 4 × 4 Latin squares conducted concurrently, and each experimental period consisted of 20 days (16 days for adaptation and 4 days for sampling). The experimental treatments comprised four starch levels: 15, 20, 25, and 30% in the diet. The dry matter intake increased linearly with increasing starch levels. The milk yield and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield showed quadratic response to increasing starch levels. The milk protein content and milk total solids content responded linearly to increasing starch levels. The feed efficiency, milk lactose content, milk urea nitrogen, plasma urea nitrogen, and plasma glucose concentration were not affected by starch levels. The estimated net energy for lactation (NEL) intake increased linearly as the starch level was raised. Although the milk NEL output per kilogram of milk was not affected by starch, the milk NEL output daily responded quadratically to starch levels. In addition, the NEL in body weight gain also responded quadratically to increasing starch levels. The efficiency of energy use for milk yield and the NEL efficiency for production also responded quadratically to increasing starch levels. Diets for mid-lactating dairy cows producing around 30 kg/day of milk should be formulated to provide around 25% starch to optimize performance.

  4. Energy levels of odd-even nuclei using broken pair model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamammu, I. M.; Haq, S.; Eldahomi, J. M.

    2012-09-06

    A method to calculate energy levels and wave functions of odd-even nuclei, in the frame work of the broken pair model have been developed. The accuracy of the model has been tested by comparing the shell model results of limiting cases in which the broken pair model exactly coincides with the shell model, where there are two-proton/neutron + one-neutron/proton in the valence levels. The model is then applied to calculate the energy levels of some nuclei in the Zirconium region. The model results compare reasonably well with the shell model as well as with the experimental data.

  5. A meta-analytic review of the relationships between the five-factor model and DSM-IV-TR personality disorders: a facet level analysis.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Douglas B; Widiger, Thomas A

    2008-12-01

    Theory and research have suggested that the personality disorders contained within the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) can be understood as maladaptive variants of the personality traits included within the five-factor model (FFM). The current meta-analysis of FFM personality disorder research both replicated and extended the 2004 work of Saulsman and Page (The five-factor model and personality disorder empirical literature: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1055-1085) through a facet level analysis that provides a more specific and nuanced description of each DSM-IV-TR personality disorder. The empirical FFM profiles generated for each personality disorder were generally congruent at the facet level with hypothesized FFM translations of the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders. However, notable exceptions to the hypotheses did occur and even some findings that were consistent with FFM theory could be said to be instrument specific.

  6. First-Principles Approach to Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a first principles method to calculate the energy level alignment between semiconductor band edges and reference energy levels at aqueous interfaces. This alignment is fundamental to understand the electrochemical characteristics of any semiconductor electrode in general and the potential for photocatalytic activity in particular. For example, in the search for new photo-catalytic materials, viable candidates must demonstrate both efficient absorption of the solar spectrum and an appropriate alignment of the band edge levels in the semiconductor to the redox levels for the target reactions. In our approach, the interface-specific contribution to the electrostatic step across the interface is evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics to sample the physical interface structure and the corresponding change in the electrostatic potential at the interface. The reference electronic levels in the semiconductor and in the water are calculated using the GW approach, which naturally corrects for errors inherent in the use of Kohn-Sham energy eigenvalues to approximate the electronic excitation energies in each material. Taken together, our calculations provide the alignment of the semiconductor valence band edge to the centroid of the highest occupied 1b1 level in water. The known relationship of the 1b1 level to the normal hydrogen electrode completes the connection to electrochemical levels. We discuss specific results for GaN, ZnO, and TiO2. The effect of interface structural motifs, such as different degrees of water dissociation, and of dynamical characteristics, will be presented together with available experimental data. Work supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  7. C sub 60 bonding and energy-level alignment on metal and semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, T.R.; Chen, Y.; Harvey, S.E.; Kroll, G.H.; Weaver, J.H. ); Haufler, R.E.; Smalley, R.E. )

    1991-12-15

    Electronic-structure studies of C{sub 60} condensed on metal surfaces show that the energy levels derived from the fullerene align with the substrate Fermi level, not the vacuum level. For thick layers grown on metals at 300 K, the binding energy of the C 1{ital s} main line was 284.7 eV and the center of the band derived from the highest occupied molecular orbital was 2.25 eV below the Fermi level. For monolayer amounts of C{sub 60} adsorbed on Au and Cr, however, the C 1{ital s} line was broadened asymmetrically and shifted to lower binding energy, the shakeup features were less distinct, and a band derived from the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) was shifted toward the Fermi level. These monolayer effects demonstrate partial occupancy of a LUMO-derived state, dipole formation, and changes in screening that are associated with LUMO occupancy. Results for C{sub 60} monolayers on {ital n}-type GaAs(110) show transfer of {le}0.02 electron per fullerene, as gauged by substrate band bending. For C{sub 60} on {ital p}-type GaAs, however, the bands remained flat because electron redistribution was not possible, and the C{sub 60}-derived energy levels were aligned to the substrate vacuum level.

  8. An analytical model of dissipated viscous and hysteretic energy due to interaction forces in a pneumatic tire: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancati, Renato; Strano, Salvatore; Timpone, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    When in use, a tire dissipates energy according to various mechanisms: rolling resistance, viscosity, hysteresis, friction energy, etc. This dissipation of energy contributes to influencing tire temperature, contact conditions and the resulting friction coefficient. This research project deals with viscoelastic and hysteretic mechanisms, and presents an explicit expression of the energy dissipated by tire-road interactions caused by these mechanisms. It is based on the Dahl model with regard to the hysteretic force together with a spring and a frequency variable damping coefficient with regard to the viscoelastic one. The energy expression found in this way can be used in tire thermal models to determine one of the heat flows needed to estimate the contact temperature and to find out the actual friction coefficient to be used in real time tire-road interaction models. Experimental tests were carried out, for longitudinal interaction only, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed expression by identifying the parameters and validating the results.

  9. The rapid bi-level exploration on the evolution of regional solar energy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Qing; An, Haizhong; Li, Huajiao; Hao, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    As one of the renewable energy, solar energy is experiencing increased but exploratory development worldwide. The positive or negative influences of regional characteristics, like economy, production capacity and allowance policies, make them have uneven solar energy development. In this paper, we aim at quickly exploring the features of provincial solar energy development, and their concerns about solar energy. We take China as a typical case, and combine text mining and two-actor networks. We find that the classification of levels based on certain nodes and the amount of degree avoids missing meaningful information that may be ignored by global level results. Moreover, eastern provinces are hot focus for the media, western countries are key to bridge the networks and special administrative region has local development features; third, most focus points are more about the application than the improvement of material. The exploration of news provides practical information to adjust researches and development strategies of solar energy. Moreover, the bi-level exploration, which can also be expanded to multi-level, is helpful for governments or researchers to grasp more targeted and precise knowledge.

  10. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of fluorescence light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-06-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of photon energy of incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed, especially for the 1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Ji=1 /2 +γ1→(1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 →1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Jf=1 /2 +γ2 photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the γ2 fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate (1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 overlapping resonances owing to their finite lifetime (linewidth). We therefore suggest that accurate measurements of the angular distribution and linear polarization might help identify the sequence and small splittings of closely spaced energy levels, even if they cannot be spectroscopically resolved.

  11. Energy levels of one-dimensional systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian S.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2016-10-01

    The standard approach to calculating the energy levels for quantum systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is to solve an eigenvalue problem involving a fourth- or higher-order differential equation in quasiposition space. It is shown that the problem can be reformulated so that the energy levels of these systems can be obtained by solving only a second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. Through this formulation the energy levels are calculated for the following potentials: particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, Pöschl-Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well. For the particle in a box, the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation is a second-order differential equation with constant coefficients. For the harmonic oscillator, Pöschl-Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well, a method that involves using Wronskians has been used to solve the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. It is observed for all of these quantum systems that the introduction of a nonzero minimal length uncertainty induces a positive shift in the energy levels. It is shown that the calculation of energy levels in systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is not limited to a small number of problems like particle in a box and the harmonic oscillator but can be extended to a wider class of problems involving potentials such as the Pöschl-Teller and Gaussian wells.

  12. Excited-state geometries and vibrational frequencies studied using the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method. I. HAX-type molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Oyagi, Fumito; Abe, Yoko; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    In this series of studies, we systematically apply the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction singles and doubles nonvariational method to calculate the equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies of excited and ionized states of molecules. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated using the second derivatives numerically computed from the analytical first derivatives and the anharmonicity was evaluated from the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces around the local minima. In this paper, the method is applied to the low-lying valence singlet and triplet excited states of HAX-type molecules, HCF, HCCl, HSiF, HSiCl, HNO, HPO, and their deuterium isotopomers. The vibrational level emission spectra of HSiF and DSiF and absorption spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl were also simulated within the Franck-Condon approximation and agree well with the experimental spectra. The results show that the present method is useful and reliable for calculating these quantities and spectra. The change in geometry in the excited states was qualitatively interpreted in the light of the electrostatic force theory. The effect of perturbation selection with the localized molecular orbitals on the geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies is also discussed.

  13. An analytical method for the measurement of trace level acidic and basic AMC using liquid-free sample traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Tyler M.; Zaloga, Emily C.; Chase, Katherine M.; Lobert, Jürgen M.

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of parts-per-trillion (ppt) level acidic and basic airborne molecular contamination (AMC) is essential for process protection and yield control in semiconductor photo-lithography and adjacent applications. Real-time monitoring solutions are highly desired, as they provide instantaneous and continuous measurement. However, even the most advanced monitors cannot achieve detection limits in the low parts-per-trillion (ppt) range and many restrictions apply for the detection of acidic AMC. High cost of ownership is another disadvantage. Discontinuous sampling with sample traps is capable of achieving ppt-level measurement, but the currently accepted methods use sample traps filled with de-ionized water (impingers) to capture soluble acidic and basic AMC. Several inherent disadvantages of these methods result in inconsistent data and increased detection limits. Some proprietary solid state solutions have been reported, but involve complex preparation, have high background signals and require 24-72 hour sample duration, or they are protected trade secrets that are not available as an industry standard. To eliminate these disadvantages, we developed a liquid-free sample trap that allows parts-per-quadrillion level (ppq) measurement of acidic and basic AMC within one work shift, typically a 4-6 hour sample period. The traps can easily be manufactured and prepared in small lab operations, are sealed and protected from the outside and operator handling in the field, have months of shelf life and show high capture efficiencies while minimizing reactions and artifacts. Capacity results for the liquid-free base trap using ammonia (NH3) as a test gas yielded more than 200 ppb-h at 100% capture efficiency without any moisture (simulating sampling of CDA or N2) and 350 ppb-h at 40% RH. The capacity results for sulfur dioxide (SO2) were highly dependent on moisture content of the sample gas and yielded 5 ppb-h at 90% capture efficiency and 0% RH, but increased

  14. Spectrum and energy levels of quadruply-ionized molybdenum (Mo V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Tauheed, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    The spectrum of quadruply-ionized molybdenum Mo V was observed from 200 to 4700 Å with sliding spark discharges on 10.7 m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. The existing analyses of this spectrum (Tauheed et al 1985 Phys. Scr. 31 369; Cabeza et al 1986 Phys. Scr. 34 223) were extended to include the 5s2, 5p2, 5s5d, 5s6s, 4d5f, and 4d5g configurations as well as the missing 3H6 level of 4d4f and about 75 levels of the core-excited configuration 4p54d3. The values of the 4d5d 1S0, 5s5p 1P1, and 4d6p 3P0 levels were revised. There are now about 900 lines classified as transitions between 66 even parity and 191 odd parity energy levels. Of these, about 600 lines and 130 levels are new. From the optimized energy level values, Ritz-type wavelengths were determined for about 380 lines, with uncertainties varying from 0.0003 to 0.002 Å. The observed configurations were theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. The fitted parameters were used to calculate oscillator strengths for all classified lines. A few unclassified lines and undesignated levels are also given. An improved value for the ionization energy was obtained by combining the observed energy of the 4d5g configuration with an ab initio calculation of its term value. The adopted value is 438 900 ± 150 cm-1 (54.417 ± 0.019 eV).

  15. Energy Use and Power Levels in New Monitors and Personal Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, Judy A.; Homan, Gregory K.; Mahajan, Akshay; Nordman, Bruce; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-07-23

    Our research was conducted in support of the EPA ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program, whose goal is to reduce the amount of electricity consumed by office equipment in the U.S. The most energy-efficient models in each office equipment category are eligible for the ENERGY STAR label, which consumers can use to identify and select efficient products. As the efficiency of each category improves over time, the ENERGY STAR criteria need to be revised accordingly. The purpose of this study was to provide reliable data on the energy consumption of the newest personal computers and monitors that the EPA can use to evaluate revisions to current ENERGY STAR criteria as well as to improve the accuracy of ENERGY STAR program savings estimates. We report the results of measuring the power consumption and power management capabilities of a sample of new monitors and computers. These results will be used to improve estimates of program energy savings and carbon emission reductions, and to inform rev isions of the ENERGY STAR criteria for these products. Our sample consists of 35 monitors and 26 computers manufactured between July 2000 and October 2001; it includes cathode ray tube (CRT) and liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors, Macintosh and Intel-architecture computers, desktop and laptop computers, and integrated computer systems, in which power consumption of the computer and monitor cannot be measured separately. For each machine we measured power consumption when off, on, and in each low-power level. We identify trends in and opportunities to reduce power consumption in new personal computers and monitors. Our results include a trend among monitor manufacturers to provide a single very low low-power level, well below the current ENERGY STAR criteria for sleep power consumption. These very low sleep power results mean that energy consumed when monitors are off or in active use has become more important in terms of contribution to the overall unit energy consumption (UEC

  16. Higher-order JWKB expressions for the energy levels and the wavefunction at the origin

    SciTech Connect

    Pasupathy, J.; Singh, V.

    1980-09-01

    An exact quantization condition is derived for the energy levels of a particle in a radial potential assumed finite at the origin. This is used to derive corrections to the semiclassical JWKB quantization condition. The normalization integral of the wavefunction is further related to the energy derivative of wavefunction at origin and use this expression to derive the corrections to the semiclassical JWKB expressions for the wavefunction at origin. An application to upsilon leptonic decay width is also given.

  17. High level predictions on the potential energy hypersurface of the nitric oxide dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Magers, D.H.; Leszczynski, J.

    1994-12-31

    The potential energy hypersurface of the NO dimer is investigated at the SCF and MP2 levels of theory using three spit-valence basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311G(2d), 6-311G(3df). Seven minimum energy conformers are identified. Their molecular structures, energetics, and harmonic vibrational frequencies are discussed and compared to available experimental data.

  18. Method and system for in vivo measurement of bone tissue using a two level energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.; Judy, P. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for radiologically determining the bone mineral content of living human bone tissue independently of the concurrent presence of adipose and other soft tissues. A target section of the body of the subject is irradiated with a beam of penetrative radiations of preselected energy to determine the attenuation of such beam with respect to the intensity of each of two radiations of different predetermined energy levels. The resulting measurements are then employed to determine bone mineral content.

  19. Advanced Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Superheavy Ions: Energy Levels, Radiation and Finite Nuclear Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, Alexander V.; Gurnitskaya, E.P.; Loboda, A.V.

    2005-10-26

    Advanced quantum approach to calculation of spectra for superheavy ions with an account of relativistic, correlation, nuclear, radiative effects is developed and based on the gauge invariant quantum electrodynamics (QED) perturbation theory (PT). The Lamb shift polarization part is calculated in the Ueling approximation, self-energy part is defined within a new non-PT procedure of Ivanov-Ivanova. Calculation results for energy levels, hyperfine structure parameters of some heavy elements ions are presented.

  20. Effect of a metallic gate on the energy levels of a shallow donor

    SciTech Connect

    Slachmuylders, A. F.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Magnus, W.

    2008-02-25

    We have investigated the effect of a metallic gate on the bound states of a shallow donor located near the gate. We calculate the energy spectrum as a function of the distance between the metallic gate and the donor and find an anticrossing behavior in the energy levels for certain distances. We show how a transverse electric field can tune the average position of the electron with respect to the metallic gate and the impurity.

  1. Orbital Engineering in Nickelate Heterostructures Driven by Anisotropic Oxygen Hybridization rather than Orbital Energy Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Okamoto, J.; Pelliciari, J.; Disa, A. S.; Huang, Y.; Chen, Z. -Y.; Wu, W. B.; Chen, C. T.; Ismail-Beigi, S.; Ahn, C. H.; Walker, F. J.; Huang, D. J.; Schmitt, T.; Dean, M. P. M.

    2016-09-30

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering to investigate the electronic origin of orbital polarization in nickelate heterostructures taking LaTiO3-LaNiO3-3×(LaAlO3), a system with exceptionally large polarization, as a model system. Furthermore, we find that heterostructuring generates only minor changes in the Ni 3d orbital energy levels, contradicting the often-invoked picture in which changes in orbital energy levels generate orbital polarization. Instead, O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that orbital polarization is caused by an anisotropic reconstruction of the oxygen ligand hole states. This also provides an explanation for the limited success of theoretical predictions based on tuning orbital energy levels and implies that future theories should focus on anisotropic hybridization as the most effective means to drive large changes in electronic structure and realize novel emergent phenomena.

  2. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  3. Orbital Engineering in Nickelate Heterostructures Driven by Anisotropic Oxygen Hybridization rather than Orbital Energy Levels

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Okamoto, J.; ...

    2016-09-30

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering to investigate the electronic origin of orbital polarization in nickelate heterostructures taking LaTiO3-LaNiO3-3×(LaAlO3), a system with exceptionally large polarization, as a model system. Furthermore, we find that heterostructuring generates only minor changes in the Ni 3d orbital energy levels, contradicting the often-invoked picture in which changes in orbital energy levels generate orbital polarization. Instead, O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that orbital polarization is caused by an anisotropic reconstruction of the oxygen ligand hole states. This also provides an explanation for the limited success of theoretical predictions based on tuning orbital energy levels andmore » implies that future theories should focus on anisotropic hybridization as the most effective means to drive large changes in electronic structure and realize novel emergent phenomena.« less

  4. Computing converged free energy differences between levels of theory via nonequilibrium work methods: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Fiona L; Hudson, Phillip S; Woodcock, Henry L; Boresch, Stefan

    2017-03-08

    We demonstrate that Jarzynski's equation can be used to reliably compute free energy differences between low and high level representations of systems. The need for such a calculation arises when employing the so-called "indirect" approach to free energy simulations with mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) Hamiltonians; a popular technique for circumventing extensive simulations involving quantum chemical computations. We have applied this methodology to several small and medium sized organic molecules, both in the gas phase and explicit solvent. Test cases include several systems for which the standard approach; that is, free energy perturbation between low and high level description, fails to converge. Finally, we identify three major areas in which the difference between low and high level representations make the calculation of ΔAlow→high difficult: bond stretching and angle bending, different preferred conformations, and the response of the MM region to the charge distribution of the QM region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of fixed points in nonlinear Landau-Zener model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan-Zuo; Tian, Dong-Ping; Chong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Liu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90(17), 170404 (2003)] proved that the characters of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should be entirely determined by the topology of energy levels and the stability of fixed points in the classical Hamiltonian system, according to the adiabatic theorem. In the special case of nonlinear Landau-Zener model, we simplify their results to be that the properties of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should just be determined by the attributes of fixed points. It is because the topology of energy levels is governed by the behavior and symmetries of fixed points, and intuitively this fact is represented as a correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of the fixed points which can be quantitatively described as the same complexity numbers.

  6. Analytical Enantio-Separation of Linagliptin in Linagliptin and Metformin HCl Dosage Forms by Applying Two-Level Factorial Design

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Sushant B.; Mane, Rahul M.; Narayanan, Kalyanraman L.; Bhosale, Popatrao N.

    2016-01-01

    A novel, stability indicating, reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed to determine the S-isomer of linagliptin (LGP) in linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride (MET HCl) tablets (LGP–MET HCl) by implementing design of experiment (DoE), i.e., two-level, full factorial design (23 + 3 centre points = 11 experiments) to understand the critical method parameters (CMP) and its relation with the critical method attribute (CMA), and to ensure robustness of the method. The separation of the S-isomer, LGP and MET HCl in the presence of their impurities was achieved on Chiralpak® IA-3 (Amylose tris (3, 5-dimethylphenylcarbamate), immobilized on 3 µm silica gel) stationary phase (250 × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) using isocratic elution and detector wavelength at 225 nm with a flow rate of 0.5 mL·min−1, an injection volume of 10 µL with a sample cooler (5 °C) and column oven temperature of 25 °C. Ethanol:Methanol:Monoethanolamine (EtOH:MeOH:MEA) in the ratio of 60:40:0.2 v/v/v was used as a mobile phase. The developed method was validated in accordance with international council for harmonisation (ICH) guidelines and was applied for the estimation of the S-isomer of LGP in LGP–MET HCl tablets. The same method also can be extended for the estimation of the S-isomer in LGP dosage forms. PMID:27763526

  7. Capacity Payments in Restructured Markets under Low and High Penetration Levels of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkin, Thomas; Beiter, Philipp; Margolis, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Growing levels of variable renewable energy resources arguably create new challenges for capacity market designs, because variable renewable energy suppresses wholesale energy prices while providing relatively little capacity. This effect becomes more pronounced the higher the variable renewable energy penetration in a market. The purpose of this report is threefold. First, we provide a brief outline of the purpose and design of various capacity markets using administratively determined capacity demand curves. Second, we discuss some of the main challenges raised in existing literature and a set of interviews that we conducted with market participants, regulators, and observers. Third, we consider some of the challenges to capacity markets that arise with higher variable renewable energy penetration.

  8. Level set method coupled with Energy Image features for brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Punga, Mirela Visan; Gaurav, Rahul; Moraru, Luminita

    2014-06-01

    Up until now, the noise and intensity inhomogeneity are considered one of the major drawbacks in the field of brain magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. This paper introduces the energy image feature approach for intensity inhomogeneity correction. Our approach of segmentation takes the advantage of image features and preserves the advantages of the level set methods in region-based active contours framework. The energy image feature represents a new image obtained from the original image when the pixels' values are replaced by local energy values computed in the 3×3 mask size. The performance and utility of the energy image features were tested and compared through two different variants of level set methods: one as the encompassed local and global intensity fitting method and the other as the selective binary and Gaussian filtering regularized level set method. The reported results demonstrate the flexibility of the energy image feature to adapt to level set segmentation framework and to perform the challenging task of brain lesion segmentation in a rather robust way.

  9. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W LVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code (FAC), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to ∼98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 6}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 4}3d{sup 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d{sup 3}, and 3p{sup 6}3d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  10. Low Levels of Energy Expenditure in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Implications for Obesity Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B.; Parsons, Susan K.; Must, Aviva; Kelly, Michael J.; Wong, William W.; Saltzman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk of obesity but causes for this elevated risk are uncertain. We evaluated total energy expenditure (TEE) in childhood cancer survivors using the doubly labeled water method in a cross-sectional study of 17 survivors of pediatric leukemia or lymphoma (median age 11.5 years). Mean TEE was 2,073 kcal/day, which was nearly 500 kcal/day lower than estimated energy requirements with recommended levels of physical activity. This energy gap is likely to contribute to the risk of obesity in this population and future trials are needed to assess implications and potential treatment strategies. PMID:25197775

  11. The levelized cost of energy for distributed PV : a parametric study.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, Alan C.; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2010-06-01

    The maturation of distributed solar PV as an energy source requires that the technology no longer compete on module efficiency and manufacturing cost ($/Wp) alone. Solar PV must yield sufficient energy (kWh) at a competitive cost (c/kWh) to justify its system investment and ongoing maintenance costs. These metrics vary as a function of system design and interactions between parameters, such as efficiency and area-related installation costs. The calculation of levelized cost of energy includes energy production and costs throughout the life of the system. The life of the system and its components, the rate at which performance degrades, and operation and maintenance requirements all affect the cost of energy. Cost of energy is also affected by project financing and incentives. In this paper, the impact of changes in parameters such as efficiency and in assumptions about operating and maintenance costs, degradation rate and system life, system design, and financing will be examined in the context of levelized cost of energy.

  12. Energy levels and zero field splitting parameter for Fe2+ doped in ZnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, Simona

    2013-11-01

    The aim of present paper is to report the results on the modeling of the crystal field parameters of Fe2+ doped in host matrix ZnS, simulate the energy levels scheme and calculate the zero field splitting parameter D of such system. The crystal field parameters were modeled in the frame of the superposition model of crystal field and the simulation of the energy levels scheme and calculation of the zero field splitting parameters done by diagonalization the Hamiltonian of Fe2+:ZnS system. The obtained results were disscused and compared with experimental data. Satisfactory agreement have been obtained.

  13. Tuning the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of organic chromophores for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Daniel P; Marinado, Tannia; Karlsson, Karl Martin; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Qin, Peng; Boschloo, Gerrit; Brinck, Tore; Hagfeldt, Anders; Sun, Licheng

    2007-12-07

    A series of organic chromophores have been synthesized in order to approach optimal energy level composition in the TiO2-dye-iodide/triiodide system in the dye-sensitized solar cells. HOMO and LUMO energy level tuning is achieved by varying the conjugation between the triphenylamine donor and the cyanoacetic acid acceptor. This is supported by spectral and electrochemical experiments and TDDFT calculations. These results show that energetic tuning of the chromophores was successful and fulfilled the thermodynamic criteria for dye-sensitized solar cells, electrical losses depending on the size and orientation of the chromophores were observed.

  14. New blue emissive conjugated small molecules with low lying HOMO energy levels for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupthi Devaiah, C.; Hemavathi, B.; Ahipa, T. N.

    2017-03-01

    Versatile conjugated small molecules bearing cyanopyridone core (CP1-5), composed of various donor/acceptor moieties at position - 4 and - 6 have been designed, developed and characterized. Their solvatochromic studies were conducted and analyzed using Lippert-Mataga, Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent scales and interesting results were obtained. The polarizability/dipolarity of the solvent greatly influenced the spectra. The electrochemical studies were carried out using cyclic voltammetry to calculate the HOMO-LUMO energy levels. The study revealed that the synthesized conjugated small molecules possess low lying HOMO energy levels which can be exploited for application in various fields of optoelectronics.

  15. Automatic computer procedure for generating exact and analytical kinetic energy operators based on the polyspherical approach: General formulation and removal of singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Ndong, Mamadou; Lauvergnat, David; Nauts, André; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2013-11-28

    We present new techniques for an automatic computation of the kinetic energy operator in analytical form. These techniques are based on the use of the polyspherical approach and are extended to take into account Cartesian coordinates as well. An automatic procedure is developed where analytical expressions are obtained by symbolic calculations. This procedure is a full generalization of the one presented in Ndong et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 034107 (2012)]. The correctness of the new implementation is analyzed by comparison with results obtained from the TNUM program. We give several illustrations that could be useful for users of the code. In particular, we discuss some cyclic compounds which are important in photochemistry. Among others, we show that choosing a well-adapted parameterization and decomposition into subsystems can allow one to avoid singularities in the kinetic energy operator. We also discuss a relation between polyspherical and Z-matrix coordinates: this comparison could be helpful for building an interface between the new code and a quantum chemistry package.

  16. Life cycle assessment as an analytical tool in strategic environmental assessment. Lessons learned from a case study on municipal energy planning in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerklund, Anna

    2012-01-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is explored as an analytical tool in strategic environmental assessment (SEA), illustrated by case where a previously developed SEA process was applied to municipal energy planning in Sweden. The process integrated decision-making tools for scenario planning, public participation and environmental assessment. This article describes the use of LCA for environmental assessment in this context, with focus on methodology and practical experiences. While LCA provides a systematic framework for the environmental assessment and a wider systems perspective than what is required in SEA, LCA cannot address all aspects of environmental impact required, and therefore needs to be complemented by other tools. The integration of LCA with tools for public participation and scenario planning posed certain methodological challenges, but provided an innovative approach to designing the scope of the environmental assessment and defining and assessing alternatives. - Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LCA was explored as analytical tool in an SEA process of municipal energy planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process also integrated LCA with scenario planning and public participation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benefits of using LCA were a systematic framework and wider systems perspective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of tools required some methodological challenges to be solved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This proved an innovative approach to define alternatives and scope of assessment.

  17. An analytical approach to the multiply scattered light in the optical images of the extensive air showers of ultra-high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    One of the methods for studying the highest energy cosmic rays is to measure the fluorescence light emitted by the extensive air showers induced by them. To reconstruct a shower cascade curve from measurements of the number of photons arriving from the subsequent shower track elements it is necessary to take into account the multiple scatterings that photons undergo on their way from the shower to the detector. In contrast to the earlier Monte-Carlo work, we present here an analytical method to treat the Rayleigh and Mie scatterings in the atmosphere. The method consists in considering separately the consecutive 'generations' of the scattered light. Starting with a point light source in a uniform medium, we then examine a source in a real atmosphere and finally - a moving source (shower) in it. We calculate the angular distributions of the scattered light superimposed on the not scattered light registered from a shower at a given time. The analytical solutions (although approximate) show how the exact numerical results should be parametrised what we do for the first two generations (the contribution of the higher ones being small). Not allowing for the considered effect may lead to an overestimation of shower primary energy by ˜15% and to an underestimation of the primary particle mass (E0=1019eV with the core distance 25 km and θZ=40°).

  18. FITPULS: a code for obtaining analytic fits to aggregate fission-product decay-energy spectra. [In FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    LaBauve, R.J.; George, D.C.; England, T.R.

    1980-03-01

    The operation and input to the FITPULS code, recently updated to utilize interactive graphics, are described. The code is designed to retrieve data from a library containing aggregate fine-group spectra (150 energy groups) from fission products, collapse the data to few groups (up to 25), and fit the resulting spectra along the cooling time axis with a linear combination of exponential functions. Also given in this report are useful results for aggregate gamma and beta spectra from the decay of fission products released from /sup 235/U irradiated with a pulse (10/sup -4/ s irradiation time) of thermal neutrons. These fits are given in 22 energy groups that are the first 22 groups of the LASL 25-group decay-energy group structure, and the data are expressed both as MeV per fission second and particles per fission second; these pulse functions are readily folded into finite fission histories. 65 figures, 11 tables.

  19. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: tetrahedral molecules.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A V; Rey, M; Tyuterev, Vl G

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB4 molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q)(-2) type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH4 molecule is demonstrated.

  20. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB{sub 4} molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q){sup −2} type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH{sub 4} molecule is demonstrated.

  1. Energy levels and radiative transition rates for Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Sunny Singh, J.; Jha, A.K.S.; Mohan, Man

    2014-07-15

    Fine-structure energies of the 67 levels belonging to the 1s{sup 2}, 1s 2l, 1s3l, 1s4l, 1s5l, and 1s6l configurations of Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII have been calculated using the General-Purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package. In addition, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, transition wavelengths, and line strengths have been calculated for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among these levels. Lifetimes are also presented for all excited levels of these three ions. We have compared our results with the results available in the literature and the accuracy of the data is assessed. We predict new energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities where no other theoretical or experimental results are available, which will form the basis for future experimental work.

  2. Scattering study of the Ne + NeH{sup +}(v{sub 0} = 0, j{sub 0} = 0) → NeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on an ab initio based analytical potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N.; Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás

    2016-01-21

    Initial state selected dynamics of the Ne + NeH{sup +}(v{sub 0} = 0, j{sub 0} = 0) → NeH{sup +} + Ne reaction is investigated by quantum and statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods on the ground electronic state. The three-body ab initio energies on a set of suitably chosen grid points have been computed at CCSD(T)/aug-cc-PVQZ level and analytically fitted. The fitting of the diatomic potentials, computed at the same level of theory, is performed by spline interpolation. A collinear [NeHNe]{sup +} structure lying 0.72 eV below the Ne + NeH{sup +} asymptote is found to be the most stable geometry for this system. Energies of low lying vibrational states have been computed for this stable complex. Reaction probabilities obtained from quantum calculations exhibit dense oscillatory structures, particularly in the low energy region and these get partially washed out in the integral cross section results. SQM predictions are devoid of oscillatory structures and remain close to 0.5 after the rise at the threshold thus giving a crude average description of the quantum probabilities. Statistical cross sections and rate constants are nevertheless in sufficiently good agreement with the quantum results to suggest an important role of a complex-forming dynamics for the title reaction.

  3. Influence of lanthanide ion energy levels on luminescence of corresponding metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huimin; Zang, Lixin; Guo, Chengshan

    2017-03-15

    Lanthanide (Ln) porphyrins exhibit diverse luminescence properties that have not been fully explained yet. A series of Ln ions (Ln ions = La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Yb(3+), and Lu(3+)) were coordinated with hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), and their luminescence properties and related differences were studied. Spectral analysis indicated that all Ln-HMMEs exhibit fluorescence emission. Gd- and Lu-HMMEs were the only lanthanide-HMMEs displaying strong molecular π-π room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) with quantum yield ΦP > 10(-3). Tb(3+) can also induce RTP from HMME but ΦP of Tb-HMME is much smaller (ΦP ∼ 10(-4)). The observed luminescence property differences were analyzed in detail, focusing on the 4f energy levels of Ln ions. These levels mostly lie below the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) excited states of HMME, resulting in energy transfer from the T1 state in HMME to Ln ions and, therefore, in the absence of RTP from the corresponding metalloporphyrins. Gd(3+) and Lu(3+) are the only lanthanide ions not possessing such 4f energy levels, avoiding T1 quenching in Gd- and Lu-HMMEs. Although Tb(3+) has low-lying 4f energy levels, the corresponding transition from the ground state is partly forbidden, resulting in weak energy transfer from HMME to Tb(3+) that accounts for the low RTP quantum yield of the corresponding complex. Thus, our results indicate that the luminescence property differences of lanthanide porphyrins are due to the disparate energy levels of the Ln ions.

  4. Analytical Versus Numerical Estimates of Water-Level Declines Caused by Pumping, and a Case Study of the Iao Aquifer, Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Meyer, William

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons were made between model-calculated water levels from a one-dimensional analytical model referred to as RAM (Robust Analytical Model) and those from numerical ground-water flow models using a sharp-interface model code. RAM incorporates the horizontal-flow assumption and the Ghyben-Herzberg relation to represent flow in a one-dimensional unconfined aquifer that contains a body of freshwater floating on denser saltwater. RAM does not account for the presence of a low-permeability coastal confining unit (caprock), which impedes the discharge of fresh ground water from the aquifer to the ocean, nor for the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells, which is significant because water-level declines are greatest in the vicinity of withdrawal wells. Numerical ground-water flow models can readily account for discharge through a coastal confining unit and for the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells. For a given aquifer hydraulic-conductivity value, recharge rate, and withdrawal rate, model-calculated steady-state water-level declines from RAM can be significantly less than those from numerical ground-water flow models. The differences between model-calculated water-level declines from RAM and those from numerical models are partly dependent on the hydraulic properties of the aquifer system and the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells. RAM invariably predicts the greatest water-level declines at the inland extent of the aquifer where the freshwater body is thickest and the potential for saltwater intrusion is lowest. For cases in which a low-permeability confining unit overlies the aquifer near the coast, however, water-level declines calculated from numerical models may exceed those from RAM even at the inland extent of the aquifer. Since 1990, RAM has been used by the State of Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management for establishing sustainable-yield values for the State?s aquifers. Data

  5. Analytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90° rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  6. Analytic materials.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  7. Extensive and accurate energy levels and transition rates for Al-like Zn XVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Zhang, C. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Chen, Z. B.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-03-01

    Energy levels and transition rates for electric-dipole (E1), electric-quadrupole (E2), magnetic-dipole (M1), and magnetic-quadrupole (M2) transitions of the lowest 393 levels arising from the 3l3 (0 ≤ l ⩽ 2), 3s2 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 3), 3 s 3 p 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 3), 3p2 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 2), 3 s 3 d 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 1), and 3s2 5 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 4) configurations in Al-like Zn are calculated through the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method and second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). In the MCDHF calculation, valence-valence and core-valence correlations with the 2 p and 2 s electrons are taken into account. The effect of Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamics corrections on excitation level energies and level lifetimes are assessed though the MCDHF and MBPT calculations. The two sets of level energies are in excellent agreement of better than 0.1%, while the level lifetimes mostly agree to within 2%. Comparisons are also made with experimental measurements and other theoretical results to assess the accuracy of our calculations.

  8. Energy level alignment at hybridized organic-metal interfaces from a GW projection approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifeng; Tamblyn, Isaac; Quek, Su Ying

    Energy level alignments at organic-metal interfaces are of profound importance in numerous (opto)electronic applications. Standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations generally give incorrect energy level alignments and missing long-range polarization effects. Previous efforts to address this problem using the many-electron GW method have focused on physisorbed systems where hybridization effects are insignificant. Here, we use state-of-the-art GW methods to predict the level alignment at the amine-Au interface, where molecular levels do hybridize with metallic states. This non-trivial hybridization implies that DFT result is a poor approximation to the quasiparticle states. However, we find that the self-energy operator is approximately diagonal in the molecular basis, allowing us to use a projection approach to predict the level alignments. Our results indicate that the metallic substrate reduces the HOMO-LUMO gap by 3.5 4.0 eV, depending on the molecular coverage/presence of Au adatoms. Our GW results are further compared with those of a simple image charge model that describes the level alignment in physisorbed systems. Syq and YC acknowledge Grant NRF-NRFF2013-07 and the medium-sized centre program from the National Research Foundation, Singapore.

  9. Energy levels of neutral and singly ionized berkelium, /sup 249/Bk I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, E.F.; Conway, J.G.; Blaise, J.

    1987-09-01

    Energy-level analyses of the observed emission spectrum of berkelium have yielded 179 odd and 186 even levels of neutral berkelium Bk I, and 42 odd and 117 even levels of singly ionized berkelium Bk II. The levels are tabulated with the J value, the g value, the configuration and hyperfine constants A and B, and the width given for many of the levels. The ground states of Bk I and Bk II are (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s/sup 2/ /sup 6/H/sup 0//sub 15/2/ and (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s /sup 7/H/sup 0//sub 8/, respectively. A table lists the lowest level of each identified electronic configuration of Bk I and Bk II.

  10. On-Site Renewable Energy and Green Buildings: A System-Level Analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Sami G; Bilec, Melissa M

    2016-05-03

    Adopting a green building rating system (GBRSs) that strongly considers use of renewable energy can have important environmental consequences, particularly in developing countries. In this paper, we studied on-site renewable energy and GBRSs at the system level to explore potential benefits and challenges. While we have focused on GBRSs, the findings can offer additional insight for renewable incentives across sectors. An energy model was built for 25 sites to compute the potential solar and wind power production on-site and available within the building footprint and regional climate. A life-cycle approach and cost analysis were then completed to analyze the environmental and economic impacts. Environmental impacts of renewable energy varied dramatically between sites, in some cases, the environmental benefits were limited despite the significant economic burden of those renewable systems on-site and vice versa. Our recommendation for GBRSs, and broader policies and regulations, is to require buildings with higher environmental impacts to achieve higher levels of energy performance and on-site renewable energy utilization, instead of fixed percentages.

  11. Effects of Seismological and Soil Parameters on Earthquake Energy demand in Level Ground Sand Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    nabili, sara; shahbazi majd, nafiseh

    2013-04-01

    any specified level were estimated by three several method including the strain energy in which is the areas of hysteresis loops, the arias intensity and the kinetic energy computed from the acceleration time histories at its corresponding level. Finally, the dependency of the demand energy to the soil and seismological parameters was shown by means of several diagrams.

  12. Determination of the ionization energy of vanadium levels in zinc selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Makhniy, V. P.; Kinzerskaya, O. V.

    2012-02-15

    By comparing the experimental spectra of optical absorption and photoconductivity with those calculated using the Lucovsky formulas, it is established that the V impurity in ZnSe forms acceptor levels with the ionization energy 0.62 eV.

  13. Energy Levels in Helium and Neon Atoms by an Electron-Impact Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Electronic energy levels in noble gas atoms may be determined with a simple teaching apparatus incorporating a resonance potentials tube in which the electron beam intensity is held constant. The resulting spectra are little inferior to those obtained by more elaborate electron-impact methods and complement optical emission spectra. (Author/SK)

  14. Exploring Learners' Conceptual Resources: Singapore a Level Students' Explanations in the Topic of Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes findings from a study to explore Singapore A-level (Grades 11 and 12, 16-19 yr old) students' understanding of ionisation energy, an abstract and complex topic that is featured in school chemistry courses. Previous research had reported that students in the United Kingdom commonly use alternative notions based on the perceived…

  15. Improved Experimental and Theoretical Energy Levels of Carbon I from Solar Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Edward S.; Geller, Murray

    1997-01-01

    We have improved the energy levels in neutral carbon using high resolution infrared solar spectra. The main source is the ATMOS spectrum measured by the Fourier transaform spectroscopy technique from 600 to 4800 cm-1, supplemented by the MARK IV balloon data, covering from 4700 to 5700 cm-1.

  16. Prospective Physics Teachers' Level of Understanding Energy, Power and Force Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul; Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine prospective physics teachers' level of understanding of the concepts of energy and the related concepts of force and power. The study was carried out with the participation of 56 physics education department students at a university in Karadeniz region. All participants had previously taken an introductory…

  17. Energy Related Technology Programs at the Non-Baccalaureate Postsecondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooking, Walter J.

    Guidelines are presented for institution administrators considering the initiation of programs to train energy-related technicians at the associate degree level. Two essential preliminary steps are outlined: Acquiring and analyzing all available information about the proposed field including national legislation and surveying the probable need for…

  18. Entropy-Energy Inequality for a Qutrit on the Example of a Three-Level Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, V. I.; Markovich, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the entropy-energy inequality for a three-level atom implemented on superconducting circuits with the Josephson junction. It is suggested to use the positivity of the relative entropy of the qutritquantum system for verification of tomography of quantum states of qudits. The relations obtained are considered in detail on the example of the temperature density matrix.

  19. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  20. Second to fourth digit length ratio (2D:4D) and adult sex hormone levels: new data and a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Hönekopp, Johannes; Bartholdt, Luise; Beier, Lothar; Liebert, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    The relative length of the second (index) to the fourth (ring) finger (2D:4D) is a putative negative correlate of prenatal testosterone (T) exposure. Therefore, 2D:4D (and to a lesser extent D(r-l), the difference between 2D:4D in the right hand and in the left hand) has often been used to study effects of prenatal androgenization on human behavior and cognition. However, evidence suggests that 2D:4D may also be related to levels of circulating sex hormones in adults. This would question the validity of 2D:4D as a means of studying the effects of prenatal sex hormones. Here we present new data from two non-clinical samples (64 women and 102 men) regarding the relationships of 2D:4D and D(r-l) with circulating sex hormone levels. We then present a meta-analytic review of all the present evidence regarding this issue. The results suggest that, in the normal population, 2D:4D and D(r-l) are not associated with adult sex hormone levels. The findings from this current study add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that 2D:4D is a suitable tool to study the effects of prenatal androgenization on human behavior and cognition.

  1. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1b₁ energy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and themore » dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.« less

  2. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1benergy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and the dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.

  3. Energy levels and radiative data for Kr-like W38+ from MCDHF and RMBPT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, XueLing; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Si, Ran; Chen, ChongYang; Jönsson, Per; Wang, Kai; Yan, Jun; Hutton, Roger; Zou, YaMing

    2016-07-01

    Energies, transition rates, line strengths and lifetimes have been computed for all levels of the 4p 6 and 4p 54d configurations of W38+ by using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method as well as relativistic many-body perturbation theory. We investigate systematically correlation, relativistic and quantum electro-dynamical (QED) effects of different properties, including excitation energies and transition rates. We demonstrate that it is important to include the core-valence correlation of rather deep subshells (including 3d and 3p) to reach close to spectroscopic accuracy for the transition energies. We also show that high-multipole transitions (E3, M2) are important for the lifetime of some metastable levels of 4p 54d ({}3{F}3,{}1{D}2,{}3{D}2). The present results are in good agreement with experiments and of considerably higher accuracy than those achieved in previous theoretical works.

  4. Variational Calculations of Ro-Vibrational Energy Levels and Transition Intensities for Tetratomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A description is given of an algorithm for computing ro-vibrational energy levels for tetratomic molecules. The expressions required for evaluating transition intensities are also given. The variational principle is used to determine the energy levels and the kinetic energy operator is simple and evaluated exactly. The computational procedure is split up into the determination of one dimensional radial basis functions, the computation of a contracted rotational-bending basis, followed by a final variational step coupling all degrees of freedom. An angular basis is proposed whereby the rotational-bending contraction takes place in three steps. Angular matrix elements of the potential are evaluated by expansion in terms of a suitable basis and the angular integrals are given in a factorized form which simplifies their evaluation. The basis functions in the final variational step have the full permutation symmetries of the identical particles. Sample results are given for HCCH and BH3.

  5. First-Principles Approach to Calculating Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-01

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1b1 energy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101 ¯0) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and the dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. These effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.

  6. A comparison of fatigue and energy levels at 6 weeks and 14 to 19 months postpartum.

    PubMed

    Troy, N W

    1999-05-01

    It has been assumed that women recover from pregnancy and childbirth within 6 weeks. Recent research shows that women's fatigue levels are the same, or higher, at 6 weeks postpartum as at the time of delivery. This study determined the differences in primiparous women's fatigue and energy levels at 6 weeks and 14 to 19 months postpartum. Determinations of how some contributing factors and outcomes of postpartum fatigue relate to each other and to fatigue and energy at 14 to 19 months postpartum were also made. Analyses revealed that women are more fatigued and less energetic at 14 to 19 months than they were at 6 weeks postpartum. Quality of sleep did not correlate with fatigue or energy. At 14 to 19 months postpartum return to full functional status is almost complete, with household and infant care responsibilities being most complete. The women were experiencing mild life crises of various sorts, were somewhat depressed, and were gratified in the mothering role.

  7. Light, nutrients, and food-chain length constrain planktonic energy transfer efficiency across multiple trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Elizabeth M; Newell, Jennifer M; González, María J; Vanni, Michael J

    2008-11-25

    The efficiency of energy transfer through food chains [food chain efficiency (FCE)] is an important ecosystem function. It has been hypothesized that FCE across multiple trophic levels is constrained by the efficiency at which herbivores use plant energy, which depends on plant nutritional quality. Furthermore, the number of trophic levels may also constrain FCE, because herbivores are less efficient in using plant production when they are constrained by carnivores. These hypotheses have not been tested experimentally in food chains with 3 or more trophic levels. In a field experiment manipulating light, nutrients, and food-chain length, we show that FCE is constrained by algal food quality and food-chain length. FCE across 3 trophic levels (phytoplankton to carnivorous fish) was highest under low light and high nutrients, where algal quality was best as indicated by taxonomic composition and nutrient stoichiometry. In 3-level systems, FCE was constrained by the efficiency at which both herbivores and carnivores converted food into production; a strong nutrient effect on carnivore efficiency suggests a carryover effect of algal quality across 3 trophic levels. Energy transfer efficiency from algae to herbivores was also higher in 2-level systems (without carnivores) than in 3-level systems. Our results support the hypothesis that FCE is strongly constrained by light, nutrients, and food-chain length and suggest that carryover effects across multiple trophic levels are important. Because many environmental perturbations affect light, nutrients, and food-chain length, and many ecological services are mediated by FCE, it will be important to apply these findings to various ecosystem types.

  8. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  9. New analytical potential energy surface for the F(2P)+CH4 hydrogen abstraction reaction: kinetics and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-García, J; Bravo, J L; Rangel, C

    2007-04-12

    A new potential energy surface for the gas-phase F(2P)+CH4 reaction and its deuterated analogues is reported, and its kinetics and dynamics are studied exhaustively. This semiempirical surface is completely symmetric with respect to the permutation of the four methane hydrogen atoms, and it is calibrated to reproduce the topology of the reaction and the experimental thermal rate constants. For the kinetics, the thermal rate constants were calculated using variational transition-state theory with semiclassical transmission coefficients over a wide temperature range, 180-500 K. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental variation with temperature. The influence of the tunneling factor is negligible, due to the flattening of the surface in the entrance valley, and we found a direct dependence on temperature, and therefore positive and small activation energies, in agreement with experiment. Two sets of kinetic isotope effects were calculated, and they show good agreement with the sparse experimental data. The coupling between the reaction coordinate and the vibrational modes shows qualitatively that the FH stretching and the CH3 umbrella bending modes in the products appear vibrationally excited. The dynamics study was performed using quasi-classical trajectory calculations, including corrections to avoid zero-point energy leakage along the trajectories. First, we found that the FH(nu',j') rovibrational distributions agree with experiment. Second, the excitation function presents an oscillatory pattern, reminiscent of a reactive resonance. Third, the state specific scattering distributions present reasonable agreement with experiment, and as the FH(nu') vibrational state increases the scattering angle becomes more forward. These kinetics and dynamics results seem to indicate that a single, adiabatic potential energy surface is adequate to describe this reaction, and the reasonable agreement with experiment (always qualitative and sometimes quantitative) lends

  10. Energies and Electric Dipole Transitions for Low-Lying Levels of Protactinium IV and Uranium V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ürer, Güldem; Özdemir, Leyla

    2012-02-01

    We have reported a relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) study on low-lying level structures of protactinium IV (Z =91) and uranium V (Z =92) ions. Excitation energies and electric dipole (E1) transition parameters (wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition rates) for these low-lying levels have been given. We have also investigated the influence of the transverse Breit and quantum electrodynamic (QED) contributions besides correlation effects on the level structure. A comparison has been made with a few available data for these ions in the literature.

  11. Adenylate nucleotide levels and energy charge in Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation.

    PubMed

    Leps, W T; Ensign, J C

    1979-07-01

    The adenylate nucleotide concentrations, based on internal water space, were determined in cells of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation and the energy charge of the cells was calculated. The energy charge of spherical cells rose during the first 10 h of growth, then remained nearly constant for as long as 20 h into the stationary phase. The energy charge of rod-shaped cells rose during the first 4 h of growth, then remained constant during subsequent growth and decreased in the stationary growth phase. Both spherical and rod-shaped cells excreted adenosine monophosphate but not adenosine triphosphate or adenosine diphosphate during starvation. The intracellular energy charge of spherical cells declined during the initial 10 h and then remained constant for 1 week of starvation at a value of 0.78. The intracellular energy charge of rod-shaped cells declined during the first 24 h of starvation, remained constant for the next 80 h, then decreased to a value of 0.73 after a total of 168 h starvation. Both cell forms remained more than 90% viable during this time. Addition of a carbon and energy source to starving cells resulted in an increase in the ATP concentration and as a result the energy charge increased to the smae levels as found during growth.

  12. Cascade splitting of two atomic energy levels due to multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Ya-Ping; Jia, Feng-Dong; Sun, Zhen; Lv, Shuang-Fei; Qing, Bo; Huang, Wei; Xue, Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Dai, Xing-Can; Zhong, Zhi-Ping

    2014-09-01

    We have theoretically and experimentally studied the spectroscopic properties of dressed levels in a strong monochromatic field, and propose a model of cascade splitting of two atomic energy levels. In this model two related dressed levels can be split into four levels, and transitions connecting four new levels will constitute spectroscopic structures. Two types of proof-in-principle experiments are performed to verify the model. One experiment measures the probe absorption spectra of a degenerate two-level atomic system with two strong monochromatic coupling fields. The system consists of 52S1/2,F=2 and 52P3/2,F'=3 states of Rb87 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as well as the cooling beams and an additional coupling field. New spectral features are observed and proven to be due to the transitions of new levels generated by splitting of the dressed levels. The other experiment measures the pump-probe spectra in a degenerate two-level atomic system with one strong monochromatic coupling field. The system consists of 52S1/2,F=2 and 52P3/2,F'=3 states of the Rb87 atom in a magneto-optical trap and one coupling field. We have observed spectral features that obviously differ from the prediction that comes from the two-level dressed-atom approach. They cannot be explained by existing theories. The model of cascade splitting of two atomic energy levels is employed to explain the observations in these two types of experiments.

  13. Analytic representation of the proton-proton and proton-nucleus cross-sections and its application to the sea-level spectrum and charge ratio of muons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Golden, R. L.; Stephens, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    We have calculated the sea-level differential muon momentum spectrum and their charge ratio from 1 GeV/c to 5000 GeV/c, using all of the available accelerator data. We find an excellent agreement between our calculation and the existing experimental data. We see no need, at present, to invoke any change either in the cosmic-ray chemical composition or in the nature of the hadron-nucleus interaction at hadron energies above 1500 GeV.

  14. Energy levels and radiative rates for Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.

    2016-09-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII are reported. These data are determined in the quasi-relativistic approach (QR), by employing a very large configuration interaction (CI) expansion which is highly important for these ions. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST and other available theoretical data, for a majority of the levels. The A-values (and resultant lifetimes) are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 radiative transitions among the energetically lowest 322 levels of each ion.

  15. Delayed dopamine signaling of energy level builds appetitive long-term memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Musso, Pierre-Yves; Tchenio, Paul; Preat, Thomas

    2015-02-24

    Sensory cues relevant to a food source, such as odors, can be associated with post-ingestion signals related either to food energetic value or toxicity. Despite numerous behavioral studies, a global understanding of the mechanisms underlying these long delay associations remains out of reach. Here, we demonstrate in Drosophila that the long-term association between an odor and a nutritious sugar depends on delayed post-ingestion signaling of energy level. We show at the neural circuit level that the activity of two pairs of dopaminergic neurons is necessary and sufficient to signal energy level to the olfactory memory center. Accordingly, we have identified in these dopaminergic neurons a delayed calcium trace that correlates with appetitive long-term memory formation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the Drosophila brain remembers food quality through a two-step mechanism that consists of the integration of olfactory and gustatory sensory information and then post-ingestion energetic value.

  16. A system for measuring thermal activation energy levels in silicon by thermally stimulated capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrum, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    One method being used to determine energy level(s) and electrical activity of impurities in silicon is described. The method is called capacitance transient spectroscopy (CTS). It can be classified into three basic categories: the thermally stimulated capacitance method, the voltage-stimulated capacitance method, and the light-stimulated capacitance method; the first two categories are discussed. From the total change in capacitance and the time constant of the capacitance response, emission rates, energy levels, and trap concentrations can be determined. A major advantage of using CTS is its ability to detect the presence of electrically active impurities that are invisible to other techniques, such as Zeeman effect atomic absorption, and the ability to detect more than one electrically active impurity in a sample. Examples of detection of majority and minority carrier traps from gold donor and acceptor centers in silicon using the capacitance transient spectrometer are given to illustrate the method and its sensitivity.

  17. Magnetic field dependence of energy levels in biased bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, D. R.; Zarenia, M.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using the tight-binding approach, we study the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field on the energy levels of hexagonal, triangular, and circular bilayer graphene (BLG) quantum dots (QDs) with zigzag and armchair edges. We obtain the energy levels for AB (Bernal)-stacked BLG QDs in both the absence and the presence of a perpendicular electric field (i.e., biased BLG QDs). We find different regions in the spectrum of biased QDs with respect to the crossing point between the lowest-electron and -hole Landau levels of a biased BLG sheet. Those different regions correspond to electron states that are localized at the center, edge, or corner of the BLG QD. Quantum Hall corner states are found to be absent in circular BLG QDs. The spatial symmetry of the carrier density distribution is related to the symmetry of the confinement potential, the position of zigzag edges, and the presence or absence of interlayer inversion symmetry.

  18. Effects of Dietary Energy Levels on the Physiological Parameters and Reproductive Performance of Gestating Gilts

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S. S.; Jung, S. W.; Jang, J. C.; Chung, W. L.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary energy levels on the physiological parameters and reproductive performance of gestating first parity sows. A total of 52 F1 gilts (Yorkshire×Landrace) were allocated to 4 dietary treatments using a completely randomized design. Each treatment contained diets with 3,100, 3,200, 3,300, or 3,400 kcal of metabolizable energy (ME)/kg, and the daily energy intake of the gestating gilts in each treatment were 6,200, 6,400, 6,600, and 6,800 kcal of ME, respectively. During gestation, the body weight (p = 0.04) and weight gain (p = 0.01) of gilts linearly increased with increasing dietary energy levels. Backfat thickness was not affected at d110 of gestation by dietary treatments, but increased linearly (p = 0.05) from breeding to d 110 of gestation. There were no significant differences on the litter size or litter birth weight. During lactation, the voluntary feed intake of sows tended to decrease when the dietary energy levels increased (p = 0.08). No difference was observed in backfat thickness of the sows within treatments; increasing energy levels linearly decreased the body weight of sows (p<0.05) at d 21 of lactation and body weight gain during lactation (p<0.01). No significant differences were observed in the chemical compositions of colostrum and milk. Therefore, these results indicated that high-energy diets influenced the bodyweight and backfat thickness of sows during gestation and lactation. NRC (2012) suggested that the energy requirement of the gestation gilt should be between 6,678 and 7,932 kcal of ME/d. Similarly, our results suggested that 3,100 kcal of ME/kg is not enough to maintain the reproductive performance for gilts during gestation with 2 kg feed daily. Gilts in the treatment 3,400 kcal of ME/kg have a higher weaning number of piglets, but bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other treatments during lactation. But bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other

  19. Energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Wang, K.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Brage, T.; Zou, Y. M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Helium-like ions provide an important X-ray spectral diagnostics in astrophysical and high-temperature fusion plasmas. An interpretation of the observed spectra provides information on temperature, density, and chemical compositions of the plasma. Such an analysis requires information for a wide range of atomic parameters, including energy levels and transition rates. Our aim is to provide a set of accurate energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Methods: The second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) was adopted in this paper. To support our MBPT results, we performed an independent calculation using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method. Results: We provide accurate energies for the lowest singly excited 70 levels among 1snl(n ≤ 6,l ≤ (n-1)) configurations and the lowest doubly excited 250 levels arising from the K-vacancy 2ln'l'(n' ≤ 6,l' ≤ (n'-1)) configurations of helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Wavelengths, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for the E1, M1, E2, and M2 transitions among these levels. The radiative lifetimes are reported for all the calculated levels. Conclusions: Our MBPT results for singly excited n ≤ 2 levels show excellent agreement with other elaborate calculations, while those for singly excited n ≥ 3 and doubly excited levels show significant improvements over previous theoretical results. Our results will be very helpful for astrophysical line identification and plasma diagnostics. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A141

  20. A novel analytical system involving hydride generation and gold-coated W-coil trapping atomic absorption spectrometry for selenium determination at ng l - 1 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, İ.; Arslan, Y.; Bakırdere, S.; Ataman, O. Y.

    2008-08-01

    A novel analytical technique was developed where gaseous hydrogen selenide formed by sodium tetrahydroborate reduction is transported to and trapped on a resistively heated gold-coated W-coil atom trap for in situ preconcentration. Gold coating on W-coil was prepared by using an organic solution of Au. The atom trap is held at 165 °C during the collection stage and is heated up to 675 °C for revolatilization; analyte species formed are transported to an externally heated quartz T-tube where the atomization takes place and the transient signal is obtained. The carrier gas consisted of 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 75 ml min - 1 H 2 during the collection step and 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 450 ml min - 1 H 2 in the revolatilization step. The half width of the transient signal obtained is less than 0.5 s. The RSD for the measurements was found to be 3.9% ( n = 11) for 0.10 µg l - 1 Se using peak height measurements. The calibration plot for 27.0 ml of sample collected in 4.0 min using a flow rate of 6.75 ml min - 1 was linear between 0.13 and 2.0 µg l - 1 of Se. The limit of detection (3 s) is 39 ng l - 1 . The enhancement factor for the characteristic concentration ( Co) was found to be 20.1 when compared to conventional hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry system without trap. In order to check the accuracy of the method, standard reference material, natural water NIST 1640 was employed; the result was found to be in good agreement with the certified value at the 95% confidence level.

  1. The excitation of electronic transverse energy levels in an intense magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of the X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1 show a line emission feature at about 60 keV, which has been interpreted as the fundamental electron cyclotron line in a magnetic field of around six trillion gauss. In this interpretation, the line radiation results from transitions between transverse energy levels, which are quantized by the field. The expected line luminosity from the excitation of these levels by protons which are falling into the polar cap of a neutron star are calculated. They are assumed to attain kinetic energies up to around 200 MeV, the gravitational potential energy at the surface. The cross sections for high energy Coulomb encounters between small pitch angle protons and electrons in a strong field are measured and used to calculate the energy loss rate of the infalling protons. This rate, together with the rate of elastic nuclear proton collisions, is then used to calculate the number of line photons an infalling proton can be expected to produce, directly or indirectly. The results are applied to Hercules X-1.

  2. Resonant nature of intrinsic defect energy levels in PbTe revealed by infrared photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Jin, Shuqiang; Ye, Zhenyu; Wu, Huizhen; Qi, Zhen

    2014-07-01

    Step-scan Fourier-transform infrared photoreflectance and modulated photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the optical transitions of the epitaxial PbTe thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF2 (111) substrate in the vicinity of energy gap of lead telluride at 77 K. It is found that the intrinsic defect energy levels in the electronic structure are of resonant nature. The Te-vacancy energy level is located above the conduction band minimum by 29.1 meV. Another defect (VX) energy level situated below valance band maximum by 18.1 meV is also revealed. Whether it is associated with the Pb vacancy is still not clear. It might also be related to the misfit dislocations stemming from the lattice mismatch between PbTe and BaF2 substrate. The experimental results support the theory prediction (N. J. Parada and G. W. Pratt, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 180 (1969), N. J. Parada, Phys. Rev. B 3, 2042 (1971)) and are consistent with the reported Hall experimental results (G. Bauer, H. Burkhard, H. Heinrich, and A. Lopez-Otero, J. Appl. Phys. 47, 1721 (1976)).

  3. Energy levels distribution in supersaturated silicon with titanium for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, E. Castán, H.; García, H.; Dueñas, S.; Bailón, L.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; García-Hemme, E.; González-Díaz, G.; Olea, J.

    2015-01-12

    In the attempt to form an intermediate band in the bandgap of silicon substrates to give it the capability to absorb infrared radiation, we studied the deep levels in supersaturated silicon with titanium. The technique used to characterize the energy levels was the thermal admittance spectroscopy. Our experimental results showed that in samples with titanium concentration just under Mott limit there was a relationship among the activation energy value and the capture cross section value. This relationship obeys to the well known Meyer-Neldel rule, which typically appears in processes involving multiple excitations, like carrier capture/emission in deep levels, and it is generally observed in disordered systems. The obtained characteristic Meyer-Neldel parameters were Tmn = 176 K and kTmn = 15 meV. The energy value could be associated to the typical energy of the phonons in the substrate. The almost perfect adjust of all experimental data to the same straight line provides further evidence of the validity of the Meyer Neldel rule, and may contribute to obtain a deeper insight on the ultimate meaning of this phenomenon.

  4. Analytic solutions in the dyon black hole with a cosmic string: Scalar fields, Hawking radiation and energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, H.S.; Bezerra, V.B.; Silva, G.V.

    2015-11-15

    Charged massive scalar fields are considered in the gravitational and electromagnetic field produced by a dyonic black hole with a cosmic string along its axis of symmetry. Exact solutions of both angular and radial parts of the covariant Klein–Gordon equation in this background are obtained, and are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. The role of the presence of the cosmic string in these solutions is showed up. From the radial solution, we obtain the exact wave solutions near the exterior horizon of the black hole, and discuss the Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux. -- Highlights: •A cosmic string is introduced along the axis of symmetry of the dyonic black hole. •The covariant Klein–Gordon equation for a charged massive scalar field in this background is analyzed. •Both angular and radial parts are transformed to a confluent Heun equation. •The resulting Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux are obtained.

  5. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relationships Between the Five-Factor Model and DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders: A Facet Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and research have suggested that the personality disorders contained within the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) can be understood as maladaptive variants of the personality traits included within the five-factor model (FFM). The current meta-analysis of FFM personality disorder research both replicated and extended the 2004 work of Saulsman and Page (The five-factor model and personality disorder empirical literature: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1055-1085) through a facet-level analysis that provides a more specific and nuanced description of each DSM-IV-TR personality disorder. The empirical FFM profiles generated for each personality disorder were generally congruent at the facet level with hypothesized FFM translations of the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders. However, notable exceptions to the hypotheses did occur and even some findings that were consistent with FFM theory could be said to be instrument specific. PMID:18708274

  6. Analytic evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling terms at the MR-CI level. II. Minima on the crossing seam: formaldehyde and the photodimerization of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Dallos, Michal; Lischka, Hans; Shepard, Ron; Yarkony, David R; Szalay, Peter G

    2004-04-22

    The method for the analytic calculation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector at the multireference configuration-interaction (MR-CI) level and its program implementation into the COLUMBUS program system described in the preceding paper [Lischka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7322 (2004)] has been combined with automatic searches for minima on the crossing seam (MXS). Based on a perturbative description of the vicinity of a conical intersection, a Lagrange formalism for the determination of MXS has been derived. Geometry optimization by direct inversion in the iterative subspace extrapolation is used to improve the convergence properties of the corresponding Newton-Raphson procedure. Three examples have been investigated: the crossing between the 1(1)B1/2(1)A1 valence states in formaldehyde, the crossing between the 2(1)A1/3(1)A1 pi-pi* valence and ny-3py Rydberg states in formaldehyde, and three crossings in the case of the photodimerization of ethylene. The methods developed allow MXS searches of significantly larger systems at the MR-CI level than have been possible before and significantly more accurate calculations as compared to previous complete-active space self-consistent field approaches.

  7. Influence of Desorption Conditions on Analyte Sensitivity and Internal Energy in Discrete Tissue or Whole Body Imaging by IR-MALDESI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Elias P.; Bokhart, Mark T.; Ghashghaei, H. Troy; Muddiman, David C.

    2015-06-01

    Analyte signal in a laser desorption/postionization scheme such as infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) is strongly coupled to the degree of overlap between the desorbed plume of neutral material from a sample and an orthogonal electrospray. In this work, we systematically examine the effect of desorption conditions on IR-MALDESI response to pharmaceutical drugs and endogenous lipids in biological tissue using a design of experiments approach. Optimized desorption conditions have then been used to conduct an untargeted lipidomic analysis of whole body sagittal sections of neonate mouse. IR-MALDESI response to a wide range of lipid classes has been demonstrated, with enhanced lipid coverage received by varying the laser wavelength used for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Targeted MS2 imaging (MS2I) of an analyte, cocaine, deposited beneath whole body sections allowed determination of tissue-specific ion response factors, and CID fragments of cocaine were monitored to comment on wavelength-dependent internal energy deposition based on the "survival yield" method.

  8. Influence of Desorption Conditions on Analyte Sensitivity and Internal Energy in Discrete Tissue or Whole Body Imaging by IR-MALDESI

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Elias P.; Bokhart, Mark T.; Ghashghaei, H. Troy; Muddiman, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Analyte signal in a laser desorption/postionization scheme such as infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) is strongly coupled to the degree of overlap between the desorbed plume of neutral material from a sample and an orthogonal electrospray. In this work, we systematically examine the effect of desorption conditions on IR-MALDESI response to pharmaceutical drugs and endogenous lipids in biological tissue using a design of experiments approach. Optimized desorption conditions have then been used to conduct an untargeted lipidomic analysis of whole body sagittal sections of neonate mouse. IR-MALDESI response to a wide range of lipid classes has been demonstrated, with enhanced lipid coverage received by varying the laser wavelength used for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Targeted MS2 imaging (MS2I) of an analyte, cocaine, deposited beneath whole body sections allowed determination of tissue-specific ion response factors, and CID fragments of cocaine were monitored to comment on wavelength-dependent internal energy deposition based on the “survival yield” method. PMID:25840812

  9. Energy-level statistics in the fine conformational resolution of RNA folding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel; Burastero, Teresita; Salthú, Rodolfo; Tablar, Ana

    1999-11-01

    This work is aimed at determining the energy-level statistics of the fine resolution of soft-mode dynamics warranting an adiabatically simplified structural relaxation of a folding biopolymer chain. The parameters defining the intrabasin structure relaxation are specified for RNA, so that each Watson-Crick base-pairing pattern may be treated as a quasiequilibrium ensemble of substates or torsional isomers within relevant folding time scales. The temperature-dependent threshold for energy dispersion associated with the fine structure of each superbasin is determined so as to warrant the adiabatic entrainment of the torsional dynamics.

  10. Seleno groups control the energy-level alignment between conjugated organic molecules and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhausen, Jens; Heimel, Georg; Wilke, Andreas; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Duhm, Steffen; Bürker, Christoph; Schreiber, Frank; Xin, Qian; Vollmer, Antje; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Koch, Norbert

    2014-01-07

    The charge injection from metallic electrodes into hole transporting layers of organic devices often suffers from deviations from vacuum-level alignment at the interface. Even for weakly interacting cases, Pauli repulsion causes an interface dipole between the metal and conjugated organic molecules (COMs) (so called “push-back” or “cushion” effect), which leads notoriously to an increase of the hole injection barrier. On the other hand, for chalcogenol self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on metal surfaces, chemisorption via the formation of chalcogen-metal bonds is commonly observed. In these cases, the energy-level alignment is governed by chalcogen-derived interface states in the vicinity of the metal Fermi-level. In this work, we present X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data that demonstrate that the interfacial energy-level alignment mechanism found for chalcogenol SAMs also applies to seleno-functionalized COMs. This can be exploited to mitigate the push-back effect at metal contacts, notably also when COMs with low ionization energies are employed, permitting exceedingly low hole injection barriers, as shown here for the interfaces of tetraseleno-tetracene with Au(111), Ag(111), and Cu(111)

  11. Material Characterization in the Electro-Analytic Approach for Applications in Chemical Mechanical Planarization and Electrochemical Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, Simon E.

    The work presented in this thesis covers electro-analytical characterization for multiple applications in material science. Electrochemical techniques were used to investigate soluble film formation on metals used in chemical mechanical planarization in order to better understand the removal rate process by studying new chemicals proposed by groups in industry. Second, an ionic liquid was used as an electrolyte in a lithium ion cathode half cell to show the essential functionality of the IL and the temperature advantage over traditional electrolytes. Lastly, a comprehensive measurement for charge recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells was performed using both open-circuit voltage decay and impedance spectroscopy, which may be used to better understand the limiting factors that affect the cell's efficiently. Electrochemical techniques were applied to new methods and materials to extend the development of material manufacturing and advance the measurement process. The fabrication of interconnect structures for semiconductor devices requires low down-pressure chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of Ta barrier layers. Guanidine carbonate (GC) serves as an effective surface-complexing agent for such CMP applications, where the rate of Ta removal can be chemically controlled through pH-tuned selectivity with respect to the removal of Cu lines. Electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study the surface-modifying roles of GC that make this chemical an attractive complexing agent for Ta CMP. In addition, the effects of including H2O2 (an oxidizer) and dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA, a dissolution inhibitor for Cu) in GC-based CMP solutions are investigated to examine the selective CMP mechanisms of Ta and Cu in these solutions. The results suggest that the removal of Ta is supported in part by structurally weak guanidinium-tantalic-acid surface complexes formed on Ta/Ta2O5. The bicarbonate/carbonate anions of GC also facilitate Ta removal through

  12. Energy Level Alignment at Metal/Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductor Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Atxabal, Ainhoa; Braun, Slawomir; Arnold, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangnan; Parui, Subir; Liu, Xianjie; Gozalvez, Cristian; Llopis, Roger; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Casanova, Felix; Ortmann, Frank; Fahlman, Mats; Hueso, Luis E

    2017-03-15

    Energy barriers between the metal Fermi energy and the molecular levels of organic semiconductor devoted to charge transport play a fundamental role in the performance of organic electronic devices. Typically, techniques such as electron photoemission spectroscopy, Kelvin probe measurements, and in-device hot-electron spectroscopy have been applied to study these interfacial energy barriers. However, so far there has not been any direct method available for the determination of energy barriers at metal interfaces with n-type polymeric semiconductors. This study measures and compares metal/solution-processed electron-transporting polymer interface energy barriers by in-device hot-electron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. It not only demonstrates in-device hot-electron spectroscopy as a direct and reliable technique for these studies but also brings it closer to technological applications by working ex situ under ambient conditions. Moreover, this study determines that the contamination layer coming from air exposure does not play any significant role on the energy barrier alignment for charge transport. The theoretical model developed for this work confirms all the experimental observations.

  13. Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule–Metal Interfaces from Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key quantity for molecule–metal interfaces is the energy level alignment of molecular electronic states with the metallic Fermi level. We develop and apply an efficient theoretical method, based on density functional theory (DFT) that can yield quantitatively accurate energy level alignment information for physisorbed metal–molecule interfaces. The method builds on the “DFT+Σ” approach, grounded in many-body perturbation theory, which introduces an approximate electron self-energy that corrects the level alignment obtained from conventional DFT for missing exchange and correlation effects associated with the gas-phase molecule and substrate polarization. Here, we extend the DFT+Σ approach in two important ways: first, we employ optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functionals to compute the gas-phase term, rather than rely on GW or total energy differences as in prior work; second, we use a nonclassical DFT-determined image-charge plane of the metallic surface to compute the substrate polarization term, rather than the classical DFT-derived image plane used previously. We validate this new approach by a detailed comparison with experimental and theoretical reference data for several prototypical molecule–metal interfaces, where excellent agreement with experiment is achieved: benzene on graphite (0001), and 1,4-benzenediamine, Cu-phthalocyanine, and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride on Au(111). In particular, we show that the method correctly captures level alignment trends across chemical systems and that it retains its accuracy even for molecules for which conventional DFT suffers from severe self-interaction errors. PMID:25741626

  14. Misidentification of Major Constituents by Automatic Qualitative Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis: A Problem that Threatens the Credibility of the Analytical Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury*, Dale E.

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium rhodium alloys, platinum chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, K[alpha] (K-L2,3) K[beta] (K-M2,3); L[alpha] (L3-M4,5) L[beta] (L2-M4) L[gamma] (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur.

  15. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  16. Analytic potential energy functions for the X1Σ+ and a3Π0+ states of InH from a direct-potential-fit data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayesteh, Alireza; Ghazizadeh, Ehsan

    2016-12-01

    All vibration-rotation data in the X1Σ+ ground state and electronic data of the a3Π and A1Π excited states of InH and InD were used in multi-isotopolgue analyses to obtain Dunham coefficients for the X1Σ+ and a3Π0+ states, and band constants for the a3Π0-, a3Π1, a3Π2, and A1Π states. Analytic potential energy functions were obtained for the X1Σ+ and a3Π0+ states using a direct-potential-fit analysis, and correction functions for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation were determined for both electronic states.

  17. Quantification of Water Energy Nexus for Sustainable Development at Local Level: Case Study of Tamil Nadu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, S.; Tayal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Interdependency between water and energy is generally transacted in trade-off mode; where either of the resource gets affected because of the other. Generally this trade-off is commonly known as water-energy nexus. Many studies have been undertaken in various parts of the world using various approaches to tease out the intricate nexus. This research has adopted a different approach to quantify the inter-dependency. The adopted approach made an attempt to tease out the nexus from demand side for both the resources. For water demand assessment PODIUM Sim model was used and for other parameters available secondary data was used. Using this approach percentage share of water for energy and energy for water was estimated. For an informed decision making and sustainable development, assessment was carried out at state level as most of the policies are made specifically for the state. The research was done for the southernmost state of India, Tamil Nadu which is a rapidly growing industrial hub. Tamil Nadu is energy and water intensive state and the analysis shows that the share of water demand from energy sector compared to water demand from other major sectors is miniscule. While, the energy demand in water sector for various processes in different sectors compared to energy demand as total has a comparable share of range 15-25%. This analysis indicated the relative risk sectors face in competition for the resource. It point outs that water sector faces fierce competition with other sectors for energy. Moreover, the results of the study has assessed that state has negative water balance, which may make access to water more energy intensive with time. But, a projection into future scenario with an assumption based on the ongoing policy program of improving irrigation efficiency was made. It provided a solution of a potential positive equilibrium which conserves both water and energy. This scenario gave promising results which indicated less of water demand from

  18. Precise determination of the low-energy hadronic contribution to the muon g -2 from analyticity and unitarity: An improved analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, Irinel; Das, Diganta; Imsong, I. Sentitemsu

    2016-06-01

    The two-pion low-energy contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμ≡(g -2 )μ/2 , expressed as an integral over the modulus squared of the pion electromagnetic form factor, brings a relatively large contribution to the theoretical error, since the low accuracy of experimental measurements in this region is amplified by the drastic increase of the integration kernel. We derive stringent constraints on the two-pion contribution by exploiting analyticity and unitarity of the pion electromagnetic form factor. To avoid the poor knowledge of the modulus of this function, we use instead its phase, known with high precision in the elastic region from Roy equations for pion-pion scattering via the Fermi-Watson theorem. Above the inelastic threshold we adopt a conservative integral condition on the modulus, determined from data and perturbative QCD. Additional high precision data on the modulus in the range 0.65-0.71 GeV, obtained from e+e- annihilation and τ -decay experiments, are used to improve the predictions on the modulus at lower energies by means of a parametrization-free analytic extrapolation. The results are optimal for a given input and do not depend on the unknown phase of the form factor above the inelastic threshold. The present work improves a previous analysis based on the same technique, including more experimental data and employing better statistical tools for their treatment. We obtain for the contribution to aμ from below 0.63 GeV the value (133.258 ±0.723 )×10-10 , which amounts to a reduction of the theoretical error by about 6 ×10-11 .

  19. Energy levels of Th+ between 7.3 and 8.3 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Nemitz, N.; Okhapkin, M. V.; Peik, E.

    2013-07-01

    Using resonant two-step laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions, we observe 43 previously unknown energy levels within the energy range from 7.3 to 8.3 eV. The high density of states promises a strongly enhanced electronic bridge excitation of the 229mTh nuclear state that is expected in this energy range. From the observation of resonantly enhanced three-photon ionization of Th+, the second ionization potential of thorium can be inferred to lie within the range between 11.9 and 12.3 eV. Pulsed laser radiation in a wide wavelength range from 237 to 289 nm is found to provide efficient photodissociation of molecular ions that are formed in reactions of Th+ with impurities in the buffer gas, leading to a significantly increased storage time for Th+ in the ion trap.

  20. Energy pumping analysis of skating motion in a half pipe and on a level surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Xin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an energy pumping mechanism for locomotion is analysed. The pumping is accomplished by exerting forces perpendicular to the direction of motion. The paper attempts to demonstrate an interesting application of the classical mechanics to two sporting events: a person skating in a half pipe and a person travelling on a level surface on a skateboard. The equations of motion based on simplified mechanical models are derived using the Lagrange mechanics. The energy-pumping phenomenon is revealed through numerical simulations with simple pumping actions. The result presented in this paper can be used as an interesting class project in undergraduate mechanics or physics courses. It also motivates potential new applications of energy pumping in many engineering fields.

  1. Bidirectional Five-Level Power Processing Interface for Low Voltage Battery Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jain-Yi; Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Wu, Kuen-Der; Lin, You-Si; Wu, Jinn-Chang

    A bidirectional five-level power processing interface for low voltage battery energy storage system (BESS) is developed in this paper. This BESS consists of a bidirectional five-level DC-AC converter, a bidirectional dual boost/buck DC-DC converter and a battery set. This five-level DC-AC converter includes a bidirectional full-bridge converter and a bidirectional dual buck DC-DC converter. The five-level power processing interface can charge power to the battery set form the utility or discharge the power from the battery set to the utility depending on the demanded operation of user. A hardware prototype is developed to verify the performance of this BESS. Experimental results show the performance of the developed BESS is as expected.

  2. Phase diagram of a graphene bilayer in the zero-energy Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knothe, Angelika; Jolicoeur, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    Bilayer graphene under a magnetic field has an octet of quasidegenerate levels due to spin, valley, and orbital degeneracies. This zero-energy Landau level is resolved into several incompressible states whose nature is still elusive. We use a Hartree-Fock treatment of a realistic tight-binding four-band model to understand the quantum ferromagnetism phenomena expected for integer fillings of the octet levels. We include the exchange interaction with filled Landau levels below the octet states. This Lamb-shift-like effect contributes to the orbital splitting of the octet. We give phase diagrams as a function of applied bias and magnetic field. Some of our findings are in agreement with experiments. We discuss the possible appearance of phases with orbital coherence.

  3. The program LOPT for least-squares optimization of energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.

    2011-02-01

    The article describes a program that solves the least-squares optimization problem for finding the energy levels of a quantum-mechanical system based on a set of measured energy separations or wavelengths of transitions between those energy levels, as well as determining the Ritz wavelengths of transitions and their uncertainties. The energy levels are determined by solving the matrix equation of the problem, and the uncertainties of the Ritz wavenumbers are determined from the covariance matrix of the problem. Program summaryProgram title: LOPT Catalogue identifier: AEHM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 254 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 427 839 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Perl v.5 Computer: PC, Mac, Unix workstations Operating system: MS Windows (XP, Vista, 7), Mac OS X, Linux, Unix (AIX) RAM: 3 Mwords or more Word size: 32 or 64 Classification: 2.2 Nature of problem: The least-squares energy-level optimization problem, i.e., finding a set of energy level values that best fits the given set of transition intervals. Solution method: The solution of the least-squares problem is found by solving the corresponding linear matrix equation, where the matrix is constructed using a new method with variable substitution. Restrictions: A practical limitation on the size of the problem N is imposed by the execution time, which scales as N and depends on the computer. Unusual features: Properly rounds the resulting data and formats the output in a format suitable for viewing with spreadsheet editing software. Estimates numerical errors resulting from the limited machine precision. Running time: 1 s for N=100, or 60 s for N=400 on a typical PC.

  4. Energy Levels and Oscillator Strengths for Allowed Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    We have calculated energy levels and oscillator strengths for dipole-allowed transitions between the terms belonging to the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3), 3S(sup 2)3p3d, 3S(sup 2)3p4s, 3S(sup 2)3p4p and 3s(sup 2)3p4d configurations of S iii in the LS-coupling scheme. We used flexible radial functions and included a large number of configurations in the configuration-interaction expansions to ensure convergence. The calculated energy levels are in close agreement with the recent laboratory measurement. The present oscillator strengths are compared with other calculations and experiments and most of the existing discrepancies between the available calculations are resolved.

  5. Correlation, Breit and Quantum Electrodynamics effects on energy level and transition properties of W54+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaobin; Sun, Rui; Koike, Fumihiro; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Dong, Chenzhong

    2017-03-01

    The electron correlation effects and Breit interaction as well as Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) effects were expected to have important contribution to the energy level and transition properties of heavy highly charged ions. The ground states [Ne]3 s 23 p 63 d 2 and first excited states [Ne]3 s 23 p 53 d 3 of W54+ ion have been studied by using Multi-Configuration Dirac-Fock method with the implementation of Grasp2K package. A restricted active space method was employed to investigate the correlation contribution from different models. The Breit interaction and QED effects were taken into account in the relativistic configuration interaction calculation with the converged wavefunction. It is found that the correlation contribution from 3 s and 3 p orbital have important contribution to the energy level, transition wavelength and probability of the ground and the first excited state of W54+ ion.

  6. Global exploration of the energy landscape of solids on the ab initio level.

    PubMed

    Doll, K; Schön, J C; Jansen, M

    2007-12-14

    Predicting which crystalline modifications can be present in a chemical system requires the global exploration of its energy landscape. Due to the large computational effort involved, in the past this search for sufficiently stable minima has been performed employing a variety of empirical potentials and cost functions followed by a local optimization on the ab initio level. However, this entails the risk of overlooking important modifications that are not modeled accurately using empirical potentials. In order to overcome this critical limitation, we develop an approach to employ ab initio energy functions during the global optimization phase of the structure prediction. As an example, we perform a global exploration of the landscape of LiF on the ab initio level and show that the relevant crystalline modifications are found during the search.

  7. Continuous or discrete: Tuning the energy level alignment of organic layers with alkali dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ules, Thomas; Lüftner, Daniel; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Puschnig, Peter; Ramsey, Michael G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the effects of cesium (Cs) deposited on pentacene (5A) and sexiphenyl (6P) monolayers on the Ag(110) substrate. The process of doping and the energy level alignment are studied quantitatively and contrasted. While ultimately for both molecules lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) filling on charge transfer upon Cs dosing is observed, the doping processes are tellingly different. In the case of 5A, hybrid molecule-substrate states and doping states coexist at lowest Cs exposures, while for 6P doping states appear only after Cs has completely decoupled the monolayer from the substrate. With the support of density functional theory calculations, this different behavior is rationalized by the local character of electrostatic potential changes induced by dopants in relation to the spatial extent of the molecules. This also has severe effects on the energy level alignment, which for most dopant/molecule systems cannot be considered continuous but discrete.

  8. Absolute Binding Energies of Core Levels in Solids from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Taisuke; Lee, Chi-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    A general method is presented to calculate absolute binding energies of core levels in metals and insulators, based on a penalty functional and an exact Coulomb cutoff method in the framework of density functional theory. The spurious interaction of core holes between supercells is avoided by the exact Coulomb cutoff method, while the variational penalty functional enables us to treat multiple splittings due to chemical shift, spin-orbit coupling, and exchange interaction on equal footing, both of which are not accessible by previous methods. It is demonstrated that the absolute binding energies of core levels for both metals and insulators are calculated by the proposed method in a mean absolute (relative) error of 0.4 eV (0.16%) for eight cases compared to experimental values measured with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy within a generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional.

  9. Symmetry breaking in the zero-energy Landau level in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Cadden-Zimansky, P; Jiang, Z; Kim, P

    2010-02-12

    The quantum Hall effect near the charge neutrality point in bilayer graphene is investigated in high magnetic fields of up to 35 T using electronic transport measurements. In the high-field regime, the eightfold degeneracy in the zero-energy Landau level is completely lifted, exhibiting new quantum Hall states corresponding to filling factors nu=0, 1, 2, and 3. Measurements of the activation energy gaps for the nu=2 and 3 filling factors in tilted magnetic fields exhibit no appreciable dependence on the in-plane magnetic field, suggesting that these Landau level splittings are independent of spin. In addition, measurements taken at the nu=0 charge neutral point show that, similar to single layer graphene, the bilayer becomes insulating at high fields.

  10. [Selective excitation spectra and energy level structure of Dy3+:ThO2 crystal].

    PubMed

    Yin, M; Krupa, J C

    2001-08-01

    Dy3+:ThO2 crystal was grown by the flux technique for the first time. The emission spectra, excitation spectra and fluorescence decay curves were measured and discussed. By using emission spectra obtained under selective dye laser excitation at 12 K, together with the crystal-field theory, the site symmetry of Dy3+ ions in ThO2 was determined as C3 nu and its energy level structure was tabulated. The lifetime of radiative level 4F9/2 was also determined as 0.40 ms.

  11. Level Energies, Oscillator Strengths and Lifetimes for Transitions in Pb IV

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Zanon, A.; Albeniz, J.

    2008-10-22

    Oscillator strengths for several lines of astrophysical interest arising from some configurations and some levels radiative lifetimes of Pb IV have been calculated. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. Transition Probabilities and oscillator strengths obtained, although in general agreement with the rare experimental data, do present some noticeable discrepancies that are studied in the text.

  12. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  13. Comprehensive Observations of the Ultraviolet Spectrum and Improved Energy Levels for Singly Ionized Chromium (Cr II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-01

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 Å. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  14. Vibrational energy levels for CH4 from an ab initio potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, D. W.; Partridge, H.

    2001-01-01

    Many areas of astronomy and astrophysics require an accurate high temperature spectrum of methane (CH4). The goal of the present research is to determine an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for CH4. As a first step towards this goal, we have determined a PES including up to octic terms. We compare our results with experiment and to a PES based on a quartic expansion. Our octic PES gives good agreement with experiment for all levels, while the quartic PES only for the lower levels.

  15. Vibrational energy levels for CH4 from an ab initio potential.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, D W; Partridge, H

    2001-03-15

    Many areas of astronomy and astrophysics require an accurate high temperature spectrum of methane (CH4). The goal of the present research is to determine an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for CH4. As a first step towards this goal, we have determined a PES including up to octic terms. We compare our results with experiment and to a PES based on a quartic expansion. Our octic PES gives good agreement with experiment for all levels, while the quartic PES only for the lower levels.

  16. Level set segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on local Gaussian distribution fitting energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yunjie; Pan, Xiaohua; Hong, Xunning; Xia, Deshen

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a variational level set approach in a multi-phase formulation to segmentation of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images with intensity inhomogeneity. In our model, the local image intensities are characterized by Gaussian distributions with different means and variances. We define a local Gaussian distribution fitting energy with level set functions and local means and variances as variables. The means and variances of local intensities are considered as spatially varying functions. Therefore, our method is able to deal with intensity inhomogeneity without inhomogeneity correction. Our method has been applied to 3T and 7T MR images with promising results.

  17. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Fe V, Co VI and Ni VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.

    2017-03-01

    Energy levels, Landé g-factors and radiative lifetimes are reported for the lowest 182 levels of the 3d4, 3d34s and 3d34p configurations of Fe V, Co VI and Ni VII. Additionally, radiative rates (A-values) have been calculated for the E1, E2 and M1 transitions among these levels. The calculations have been performed in a quasi-relativistic approach (QR) with a very large configuration interaction (CI) wavefunction expansion, which has been found to be necessary for these ions. Our calculated energies for all ions are in excellent agreement with the available measurements, for most levels. Discrepancies among various calculations for the radiative rates of E1 transitions in Fe V are up to a factor of two for stronger transitions (f ≥ 0.1), and larger (over an order of magnitude) for weaker ones. The reasons for these discrepancies have been discussed and mainly are due to the differing amount of CI and methodologies adopted. However, there are no appreciable discrepancies in similar data for M1 and E2 transitions, or the g-factors for the levels of Fe V, the only ion for which comparisons are feasible.

  18. Energy Performance Assessment of Radiant Cooling System through Modeling and Calibration at Component Level

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Yasin; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case study of an information technology office building with a radiant cooling system and a conventional variable air volume (VAV) system installed side by side so that performancecan be compared. First, a 3D model of the building involving architecture, occupancy, and HVAC operation was developed in EnergyPlus, a simulation tool. Second, a different calibration methodology was applied to develop the base case for assessing the energy saving potential. This paper details the calibration of the whole building energy model to the component level, including lighting, equipment, and HVAC components such as chillers, pumps, cooling towers, fans, etc. Also a new methodology for the systematic selection of influence parameter has been developed for the calibration of a simulated model which requires large time for the execution. The error at the whole building level [measured in mean bias error (MBE)] is 0.2%, and the coefficient of variation of root mean square error (CvRMSE) is 3.2%. The total errors in HVAC at the hourly are MBE = 8.7% and CvRMSE = 23.9%, which meet the criteria of ASHRAE 14 (2002) for hourly calibration. Different suggestions have been pointed out to generalize the energy saving of radiant cooling system through the existing building system. So a base case model was developed by using the calibrated model for quantifying the energy saving potential of the radiant cooling system. It was found that a base case radiant cooling system integrated with DOAS can save 28% energy compared with the conventional VAV system.

  19. A Novel Ultrasonic Method for Liquid Level Measurement Based on the Balance of Echo Energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Wei, Yue-Juan; Liu, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Yao, Zong; Zhang, Liang; Xiong, Ji-Jun

    2017-03-28

    This study presents a novel method for determining the liquid level from the outside of a sealed container, which is based on the balance of echo energy received by two receiving sensors. The proposed method uses one transmitting transducer and two receiving sensors that are encapsulated in a coupling plane and arranged by certain rules. The calculation and comparison of echo energy are grounded on the difference ultrasonic impedance between gas and liquid media. First, by analyzing the propagation and attenuation characteristics of ultrasonic waves in a solid, an acoustic model for calculating the echo energy is established and simulated in MATLAB. Second, the proposed method is evaluated through a series of experiments. The difference and ratio of echo energy received by two receiving sensors are calculated and compared under two different coupling conditions. Two kinds of the sensors that are arranged by different rules are selected for measuring the liquid level, and the measurement are analyzed and discussed in detail. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the proposed method can meet the proposed accuracy requirements and can effectively solve the problems caused by some poor coupling conditions.

  20. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  1. Energy Levels and Branching Ratios of Tm3+ in Ten Garnet Laser Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    Judd - Ofelt parameters for Tm 3 + in garnets............................................... 8 3. Energy levels of the 1H, and 3 F4 multiplets of Tm 3...electric dipole line strengths, Sed, are from et al [7] were used to calculate the Judd - Ofelt table 6 of that reference. The branching ratio for parameters...while f14 approximately equals the T--- experimental values, and the calculated Ql6 is ij T) ij(6) approximately five times too large. Judd - Ofelt T

  2. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5},4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4f,4s4p{sup 6},4p{sup 6}4d,4s4p{sup 5}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d{sup 2}, and 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  3. Quantum cosmological Friedman models with a Yang-Mills field and positive energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2010-02-01

    We prove the existence of a spectral resolution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation when the matter field is provided by a Yang-Mills field, with or without mass term, if the spatial geometry of the underlying spacetime is homothetic to {\\bb R}^{3} . The energy levels of the resulting quantum model, i.e. the eigenvalues of the corresponding self-adjoint Hamiltonian with a pure point spectrum, are strictly positive. This work has been supported by the DFG.

  4. Analytical Investigation of the Significance of Turbine-Inlet Temperature in High-Energy Rocket Turbodrive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlik, Harold E.

    1959-01-01

    The effect of turbine-inlet temperature on rocket gross weight was investigated for three high-energy long-range rockets in order to explore the desirability of turbine cooling in rocket turbodrive applications. Temperatures above and below the maximum that is permissible in uncooled turbines were included. Turbine bleed rate and stage number were considered as independent variables. The gross weight of the hydrogen-reactor system was more sensitive to changes in turbine-inlet temperature than either the hydrogen-oxygen or the hydrogen-fluorine systems. Gross weight of the hydrogen-reactor system could be reduced by 2.6 percent by the use of cooling and a turbine-inlet temperature of 3000 R. The reductions in the first stages of the hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-fluorine systems were 0.7 and 0.2 percent, respectively. The effect of turbine-inlet temperature on rocket gross weight was small because the resulting turbine weight and bleed rate variations were small. Since these small gains must be balanced against considerations of greater cost, weight, and complexity as well as lessened reliability with a system utilizing a cooled turbine, none of the systems investigated showed gains warranting the use of turbine cooling.

  5. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  6. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  7. Pronounced polarization-induced energy level shifts at boundaries of organic semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K. A.; Schiffrin, A.; Roussy, T. S.; Capsoni, M.; Burke, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Organic semiconductor devices rely on the movement of charge at and near interfaces, making an understanding of energy level alignment at these boundaries an essential element of optimizing materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we employ low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate a model system: two-dimensional nanostructures of the prototypical organic semiconductor, PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) adsorbed on NaCl (2 ML)/Ag(111). Pixel-by-pixel scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows mapping of occupied and unoccupied electronic states across these nanoislands with sub-molecular spatial resolution, revealing strong electronic differences between molecules at the edges and those in the centre, with energy level shifts of up to 400 meV. We attribute this to the change in electrostatic environment at the boundaries of clusters, namely via polarization of neighbouring molecules. The observation of these strong shifts illustrates a crucial issue: interfacial energy level alignment can differ substantially from the bulk electronic structure in organic materials.

  8. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno, Arifin, Zainal; Sutanto, Bayu

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, EHOMO and ELUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where Ered = -0.37V, ELUMO = -4.28 eV, Eox = 1.15V, EHOMO = -5.83 eV, and Eband gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  9. Pronounced polarization-induced energy level shifts at boundaries of organic semiconductor nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, K. A.; Schiffrin, A.; Roussy, T. S.; Capsoni, M.; Burke, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Organic semiconductor devices rely on the movement of charge at and near interfaces, making an understanding of energy level alignment at these boundaries an essential element of optimizing materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we employ low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate a model system: two-dimensional nanostructures of the prototypical organic semiconductor, PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) adsorbed on NaCl (2 ML)/Ag(111). Pixel-by-pixel scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows mapping of occupied and unoccupied electronic states across these nanoislands with sub-molecular spatial resolution, revealing strong electronic differences between molecules at the edges and those in the centre, with energy level shifts of up to 400 meV. We attribute this to the change in electrostatic environment at the boundaries of clusters, namely via polarization of neighbouring molecules. The observation of these strong shifts illustrates a crucial issue: interfacial energy level alignment can differ substantially from the bulk electronic structure in organic materials. PMID:26440933

  10. Crystal field parameters and energy levels scheme of trivalent chromium doped BSO

    SciTech Connect

    Petkova, P.; Andreici, E.-L.; Avram, N. M.

    2014-11-24

    The aim of this paper is to give an analysis of crystal field parameters and energy levels schemes for the above doped material, in order to give a reliable explanation for experimental data. The crystal field parameters have been modeled in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM) of the crystal field theory, taken into account the geometry of systems, with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions. The effect of the charges of the ligands and covalence bonding between chromium cation and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the crystal field parameters we simulated the scheme of energy levels of chromium ions by diagonalizing the matrix of the Hamiltonian of the doped crystal. The obtained energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison with experiment shows that the results are quite satisfactory which justify the model and simulation scheme used for the title system.

  11. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, R; Bianchi, F; Blumstengel, S; Christodoulou, C; Ovsyannikov, R; Kobin, B; Moudgil, K; Barlow, S; Hecht, S; Marder, S R; Henneberger, F; Koch, N

    2015-04-15

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  12. Learning Analytics: Readiness and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the relatively new field of learning analytics, first by considering the relevant meanings of both "learning" and "analytics," and then by looking at two main levels at which learning analytics can be or has been implemented in educational organizations. Although integrated turnkey systems or…

  13. An analysis of Renewable Portfolio Standard policy formulation and its influence on state level energy prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollester, Peter Colin

    Over the past two decades, environmental concern has crept to the forefront of the world policy agenda. This concern has manifested itself differently throughout the world. In the United States, this has come in the form of Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) which have become one of the primary policy tools which states use to encourage renewable energy generation. The advent of RPS has spurred intense debate at a federal and state level, centering on the economic merits of promoting renewable energy generation. Detractors argue that RPS will raise electricity rates, since generation from renewable sources is typically costlier than energy generated from fossil fuels. At this point, evidence to the relationship between RPS on electricity prices remains unclear. Researchers have attempted to understand this relationship through a variety of means. The most common being regression based models, which utilize readily available United States Energy Information Agency (US EIA) data, and have uncovered a number of important independent variables which are incorporated into the model in this study. Examples include personal income, state population, and deregulation of an energy market. In addition to empirical studies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created complex mathematical models which generate scenario projections based on a number of assumptions. While interesting, these are forward looking tools and as such have not yielded a tremendous amount of insight into the underlying policy mechanics of RPS. A challenge of addressing this topic which is worth noting is that much of the research available which analyzes the merits of RPS caters to distinct political or private sector agendas. The research gathered for this study is comprehensive, and attempts to avoid studies with any clear political, ideological, or financial motivation. Using the insights from previous researchers this study develops a rigorous fixed effects regression model to

  14. Characterization of Final Action Official Method(SM) 2011.19 and First Action Official Method 2015.06 Performance at Analyte Levels Corresponding to CODEX STAN 72 (1981) Minimum Levels.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph J; Pacquette, Lawrence H

    2017-03-01

    A limited single-laboratory validation (SLV) was conducted in the authors' laboratory to investigate the performance of AOAC Official MethodsSM 2011.19 Determination of Chromium (Cr), Selenium (Se), and Molybdenum (Mo) in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritional Products by Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometry and 2015.06 Determination of Minerals and Trace Elements in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometry at analyte levels below the practical LOQs (PLOQs) already published for these Final Action Official Methods. This work was needed to verify that the actual LOQs were below the minimum requirements for minerals in infant formula as given in CODEX STAN 72 (1981). Linearity studies at low levels were conducted as well as the analysis of blanks over multiple days to establish the LOQs (as opposed to PLOQs) for these nutrients. Several placebo matrixes from the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) program were tested over multiple days at two different sample sizes to quantitate the effect of doubling the sample size given in the original publications. The SLV results indicate that both methods can meet the Codex minimum requirements as-is, without modification of the methods, albeit with a relaxation of the stringent precision criteria originally established for these methods by SPIFAN. Precision can be improved by doubling the sample size, but this step is not necessary to use the method for its intended purpose. A concurrent collaborative study of Method 2015.06 showed that the RSDR obtained across eight laboratories for several infant formula placebos containing mineral concentrations between the PLOQ and LOQ were indeed worse than SPIFAN expectations, but reasonable Horwitz ratios (HorRat) were nonetheless obtained for these analytes.

  15. Detection of high-frequency energy level changes in speech and singing.

    PubMed

    Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J; Story, Brad H

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that human listeners are sensitive to level differences in high-frequency energy (HFE) in isolated vowel sounds produced by male singers. Results indicated that sensitivity to HFE level changes increased with overall HFE level, suggesting that listeners would be more "tuned" to HFE in vocal production exhibiting higher levels of HFE. It follows that sensitivity to HFE level changes should be higher (1) for female vocal production than for male vocal production and (2) for singing than for speech. To test this hypothesis, difference limens for HFE level changes in male and female speech and singing were obtained. Listeners showed significantly greater ability to detect level changes in singing vs speech but not in female vs male speech. Mean differences limen scores for speech and singing were about 5 dB in the 8-kHz octave (5.6-11.3 kHz) but 8-10 dB in the 16-kHz octave (11.3-22 kHz). These scores are lower (better) than those previously reported for isolated vowels and some musical instruments.

  16. Detection of high-frequency energy level changes in speech and singing

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Story, Brad H.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that human listeners are sensitive to level differences in high-frequency energy (HFE) in isolated vowel sounds produced by male singers. Results indicated that sensitivity to HFE level changes increased with overall HFE level, suggesting that listeners would be more “tuned” to HFE in vocal production exhibiting higher levels of HFE. It follows that sensitivity to HFE level changes should be higher (1) for female vocal production than for male vocal production and (2) for singing than for speech. To test this hypothesis, difference limens for HFE level changes in male and female speech and singing were obtained. Listeners showed significantly greater ability to detect level changes in singing vs speech but not in female vs male speech. Mean differences limen scores for speech and singing were about 5 dB in the 8-kHz octave (5.6–11.3 kHz) but 8–10 dB in the 16-kHz octave (11.3–22 kHz). These scores are lower (better) than those previously reported for isolated vowels and some musical instruments. PMID:24437780

  17. Soap bubbles in analytical chemistry. Conductometric determination of sub-parts per million levels of sulfur dioxide with a soap bubble.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Borst, Walter L; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate; Li, Jianzhong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-04-15

    Soap bubbles provide a fascinating tool that is little used analytically. With a very low liquid volume to surface area ratio, a soap bubble can potentially provide a very useful interface for preconcentration where mass transfer to an interfacial surface is important. Here we use an automated system to create bubbles of uniform size and film thickness. We utilize purified Triton-X 100, a nonionic surfactant, to make soap bubbles. We use such bubbles as a gas-sampling interface. Incorporating hydrogen peroxide into the bubble provides a system where electrical conductance increases as the bubble is exposed to low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas. We theoretically derive the conductance of a hollow conducting spherical thin film with spherical cap electrodes. We measure the film thickness by incorporating a dye in the bubble making solution and laser transmission photometry and find that it agrees well with the geometrically computed thickness. With the conductance of the bubble-making soap solution being measured by conventional methods, we show that the measured values of the bubble conductance with known bubble and electrode dimensions closely correspond to the theoretically computed value. Finally, we demonstrate that sub-ppm levels of SO(2) can readily be detected by the conductivity change of a hydrogen peroxide-doped soap bubble, measured in situ, when the gas flows around the bubble.

  18. Torsional energy levels of CH₃OH⁺/CH₃OD⁺/CD₃OD⁺ studied by zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zuyang; Gao, Shuming; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2014-10-14

    The torsional energy levels of CH3OH(+), CH3OD(+), and CD3OD(+) have been determined for the first time using one-photon zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies for CH3OH, CH3OD, and CD3OD are determined as 10.8396, 10.8455, and 10.8732 eV with uncertainties of 0.0005 eV, respectively. Theoretical calculations have also been performed to obtain the torsional energy levels for the three isotopologues using a one-dimensional model with approximate zero-point energy corrections of the torsional potential energy curves. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The barrier height of the torsional potential energy without zero-point energy correction was calculated as 157 cm(-1), which is about half of that of the neutral (340 cm(-1)). The calculations showed that the cation has eclipsed conformation at the energy minimum and staggered one at the saddle point, which is the opposite of what is observed in the neutral molecule. The fundamental C-O stretch vibrational energy level for CD3OD(+) has also been determined. The energy levels for the combinational excitation of the torsional vibration and the fundamental C-O stretch vibration indicate a strong torsion-vibration coupling.

  19. Strategic planning at the national level: Evaluating and ranking energy projects by environmental impact

    SciTech Connect

    Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen . E-mail: theth@hi.is

    2007-08-15

    A method for evaluating and ranking energy alternatives based on impact upon the natural environment and cultural heritage was developed as part of the first phase of an Icelandic framework plan for the use of hydropower and geothermal energy. The three step procedure involved assessing i) site values and ii) development impacts within a multi-criteria analysis, and iii) ranking the alternatives from worst to best choice from an environmental-cultural heritage point of view. The natural environment was treated as four main classes (landscape + wilderness, geology + hydrology, species, and ecosystem/habitat types + soils), while cultural heritage constituted one class. Values and impacts were assessed within a common matrix with 6 agglomerated attributes: 1) diversity, richness, 2) rarity, 3) size (area), completeness, pristineness, 4) information (epistemological, typological, scientific and educational) and symbolic value, 5) international responsibility, and 6) scenic value. Standardized attribute scores were used to derive total class scores whose weighted sums yielded total site value and total impact. The final output was a one-dimensional ranking obtained by Analytical Hierarchical Process considering total predicted impacts, total site values, risks and uncertainties as well as special site values. The value/impact matrix is compact (31 cell scores) but was considered to be of sufficient resolution and has the advantage of facilitating overview and communication of the methods and results. The classes varied widely in the extent to which value assessments could be based on established scientific procedures and the project highlighted the immense advantage of an internationally accepted frame of reference, first for establishing the theoretical and scientific foundation, second as a tool for evaluation, and third for allowing a global perspective.

  20. Changes in sample collection and analytical techniques and effects on retrospective comparability of low-level concentrations of trace elements in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, T.; Szabo, Z.; Gibs, J.

    2001-01-01

    Ground-water sampling techniques were modified to reduce random low-level contamination during collection of filtered water samples for determination of trace-element concentrations. The modified sampling techniques were first used in New Jersey by the US Geological Survey in 1994 along with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis to determine the concentrations of 18 trace elements at the one microgram-per-liter (μg/L) level in the oxic water of the unconfined sand and gravel Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The revised technique tested included a combination of the following: collection of samples (1) with flow rates of about 2L per minute, (2) through acid-washed single-use disposable tubing and (3) a single-use disposable 0.45-μm pore size capsule filter, (4) contained within portable glove boxes, (5) in a dedicated clean sampling van, (6) only after turbidity stabilized at values less than 2 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), when possible. Quality-assurance data, obtained from equipment blanks and split samples, indicated that trace element concentrations, with the exception of iron, chromium, aluminum, and zinc, measured in the samples collected in 1994 were not subject to random contamination at 1μg/L.Results from samples collected in 1994 were compared to those from samples collected in 1991 from the same 12 PVC-cased observation wells using the available sampling and analytical techniques at that time. Concentrations of copper, lead, manganese and zinc were statistically significantly lower in samples collected in 1994 than in 1991. Sampling techniques used in 1994 likely provided trace-element data that represented concentrations in the aquifer with less bias than data from 1991 when samples were collected without the same degree of attention to sample handling.

  1. Calculation of energy levels, {ital E}1 transition amplitudes, and parity violation in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V.A.; Flambaum, V.V.; Sushkov, O.P.

    1995-05-01

    Many-body perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction was used to calculate energy levels, {ital E}1 trransition amplitudes, and the parity-nonconserving (PNC) {ital E}1 amplitude of the 7{ital s}-8{ital s} transition in francium. The method takes into account the core-polarization effect, the second-order correlations, and the three dominating sequences of higher-order correlation diagrams: screening of the electron-electron interaction, particle-hole interaction, and the iterations of the self-energy operator. The result for the PNC amplitude for {sup 223}Fr is {ital E}1(7{ital s}-8{ital s})=(1.59{plus_minus}{similar_to}1%){times}10{sup {minus}10}{ital iea}{sub {ital B}}({minus}{ital Q}{sub {ital W}}/{ital N}), where {ital Q}{sub {ital W}} is the weak charge of the nucleus, {ital N}=136 is the number of neutrons, {ital e}={vert_bar}{ital e}{vert_bar} is the elementary charge, and {ital a}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr radius. Our prediction for the position of the 8{ital s} energy level of Fr, which has not been measured yet, is 13 110 cm{sup {minus}1} below the limit of the continuous spectrum. The accuracy of the calculations was controlled by comparison with available experimental data and analogous calculations for cesium. It is estimated to be {similar_to}0.1% for the energy levels and {similar_to}1% for the transition amplitudes.

  2. Light-Controlled Reversible Modulation of Frontier Molecular Orbital Energy Levels in Trifluoromethylated Diarylethenes.

    PubMed

    Herder, Martin; Eisenreich, Fabian; Bonasera, Aurelio; Grafl, Anna; Grubert, Lutz; Pätzel, Michael; Schwarz, Jutta; Hecht, Stefan

    2017-01-17

    Among bistable photochromic molecules, diarylethenes (DAEs) possess the distinct feature that upon photoisomerization they undergo a large modulation of their π-electronic system, accompanied by a marked shift of the HOMO/LUMO energies and hence oxidation/reduction potentials. The electronic modulation can be utilized to remote-control charge- as well as energy-transfer processes and it can be transduced to functional entities adjacent to the DAE core, thereby regulating their properties. In order to exploit such photoswitchable systems it is important to precisely adjust the absolute position of their HOMO and LUMO levels and to maximize the extent of the photoinduced shifts of these energy levels. Here, we present a comprehensive study detailing how variation of the substitution pattern of DAE compounds, in particular using strongly electron-accepting and chemically stable trifluoromethyl groups either in the periphery or at the reactive carbon atoms, allows for the precise tuning of frontier molecular orbital levels over a broad energy range and the generation of photoinduced shifts of more than 1 eV. Furthermore, the effect of different DAE architectures on the transduction of these shifts to an adjacent functional group is discussed. Whereas substitution in the periphery of the DAE motif has only minor implications on the photochemistry, trifluoromethylation at the reactive carbon atoms strongly disturbs the isomerization efficiency. However, this can be overcome by using a nonsymmetrical substitution pattern or by combination with donor groups, rendering the resulting photoswitches attractive candidates for the construction of remote-controlled functional systems.

  3. Energy level alignment at the methylammonium lead iodide/copper phthalocyanine interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shi; Goh, Teck Wee; Sum, Tze Chien E-mail: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg; Sabba, Dharani; Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Huan, Cheng Hon Alfred E-mail: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-08-01

    The energy level alignment at the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) interface is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). XPS reveal a 0.3 eV downward band bending in the CuPc film. UPS validate this finding and further reveal negligible interfacial dipole formation – verifying the viability of vacuum level alignment. The highest occupied molecular orbital of CuPc is found to be closer to the Fermi level than the valance band maximum of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, facilitating hole transfer from CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} to CuPc. However, subsequent hole extraction from CuPc may be impeded by the downward band bending in the CuPc layer.

  4. Effects of treatment in the levels of circulating cytokines and growth factors in cystic fibrosis and dialyzed patients by multi-analytical determination with a biochip array platform.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Amedea Silvia; Colombo, Carla; Torresani, Erminio; Fortunato, Francesca; Biffi, Arianna; Cariani, Lisa; Daccò, Valeria; Carbone, Annalucia; Edefonti, Alberto; Paglialonga, Fabio; Conese, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases need non-invasive sensitive, reliable and predictive clinical biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring therapy. Since inflammation is a complex phenomenon, simultaneous evaluation of different analytes in the same sample may help in defining this complexity and in developing specific anti-inflammatory intervention strategies. In this study, we used a biochip array system capable of measuring 12 cytokines and growth factors (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1 α, IL-1 β, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1, VEGF, and EGF) in three groups: 97 control subjects; 24 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients before and during the antibiotic treatment (6 and 15days) for acute pulmonary exacerbation as well as 15days after the withdrawal of therapy; 22 children and young adults on chronic hemodialysis (HD) at the beginning and at the end of a standard HD session. CF patients in acute exacerbation displayed higher IL-2, IL-6, VEGF and MCP-1 levels than the control subjects. IL-6 significantly decreased during therapy (P<0.01) but not 15days after the withdrawal of therapy. IL-8 and EGF levels were significantly lower after 15days from the interruption of therapy (P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively). Regression analysis showed that IL-4 and IL-6 correlated with the amelioration of the respiratory function during therapy. Patients on HD displayed higher IL-6 but lower IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IFN-γ and EGF levels than control subjects. Serum levels of IL-8, IL-10 and IFN-γ were significantly higher at the end of the HD session (P<0.05 for all three). A biochip array allowed to define a pattern of cytokines/growth factors associated with an acute exacerbation in CF patients and IL-4 and IL-6 as predictors of response to therapy. In younger HD patients, we identified a biomarker pattern which is different from that of older patients. Finally, further studies are warranted to examine the role of these biomarkers in the pathogenesis of complications in HD patients.

  5. Fine-structure energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes in Si-like nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Large scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d and 3s23p4f configurations of Ni XV, are performed using very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST results. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. It is noted that our calculated radiative rates show significant disagreement (23-30%) with those calculated by Ishikawa and Vilkas (2002 Phys. Scr. 65 219) for the transitions involving the 3s3p3(5S2) level. For this high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) our calculated lifetime is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Träbert et al (1989 Z. Phys. D 11 207). In this calculation, we also predict many additional new and accurate data for various optically allowed and intercombination transitions to complete the void in the existing data.

  6. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    A general treatment of core-level binding-energy shifts in metals relative to the free atom is introduced and applied to all elemental metals in the Periodic Table. The crucial ingredients of the theoretical description are (a) the assumption of a fully screened final state in the metallic case and (b) the (Z+1) approximation for the screening valence charge distribution around the core-ionized site. This core-ionized site is, furthermore, treated as an impurity in an otherwise perfect metal. The combination of the complete screening picture and the (Z+1) approximation makes it possible to introduce a Born-Haber cycle which connects the initial state with the final state of the core-ionization process. From this cycle it becomes evident that the main contributions to the core-level shift are the cohesive energy difference between the (Z+1) and Z metal and an appropriate ionization energy of the (Z+1) atom (usually the first ionization potential). The appearance of the ionization potential in the shift originates from the assumption of a charge-neutral final state, while the contribution from the cohesive energies essentially describes the change of bonding properties between the initial and final state of the site. The calculated shifts show very good agreement with available experimental values (at present, for 19 elements). For the other elements we have made an effort to combine experimental ionization potentials with theoretical calculations in order to obtain accurate estimates of some of the atomic-core-level binding energies. Such energies together with measured metallic binding energies give "pseudoexperimental" shifts for many elements. Our calculated core-level shifts agree exceedingly well also with these data. For some of the transition elements the core-level shift shows a deviating behavior in comparison with that of neighboring elements. This is shown to be due to a difference in the atomic ground-state configuration, such as, for example, d5s in

  7. Energy and antioxidant responses of pacific oyster exposed to trace levels of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quéré, Claudie; Pernet, Fabrice; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2015-09-21

    Here, we assess the physiological effects induced by environmental concentrations of pesticides in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Oysters were exposed for 14 d to trace levels of metconazole (0.2 and 2 μg/L), isoproturon (0.1 and 1 μg/L), or both in a mixture (0.2 and 0.1 μg/L, respectively). Exposure to trace levels of pesticides had no effect on the filtration rate, growth, and energy reserves of oysters. However, oysters exposed to metconazole and isoproturon showed an overactivation of the sensing-kinase AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), a key enzyme involved in energy metabolism and more particularly glycolysis. In the meantime, these exposed oysters showed a decrease in hexokinase and pyruvate kinase activities, whereas 2-DE proteomic revealed that fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (F-1,6-BP), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was up-regulated. Activities of antioxidant enzymes were higher in oysters exposed to the highest pesticide concentrations. Both pesticides enhanced the superoxide dismutase activity of oysters. Isoproturon enhanced catalase activity, and metconazole enhanced peroxiredoxin activity. Overall, our results show that environmental concentrations of metconazole or isoproturon induced subtle changes in the energy and antioxidant metabolisms of oysters.

  8. Energy levels, transition probabilities, and electron impact excitations for La XXX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, J.Y. . E-mail: jyzhong@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2006-09-15

    energy levels, spontaneous radiative decay rates, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for La XXX. The data refer to 107 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6})3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4l, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4l, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4l (l = s, p, d, f). The collision strengths are calculated with a 20-collision-energy grid in terms of the energy of the scattered electron between 10 and 10,000 eV by using the distorted-wave approximation. Effective collision strengths are obtained at seven electron temperatures: T {sub e} (eV) = 10, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian electron distribution. Coupled with these atomic data, a hydrodynamic code MED103 can be used to simulate the Ni-like La X-ray laser at 8.8 nm.

  9. Size-dependent energy levels of InSb quantum dots measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Vaxenburg, Roman; Liu, Wenyong; Rupich, Sara M; Lifshitz, Efrat; Efros, Alexander L; Talapin, Dmitri V; Sibener, S J

    2015-01-27

    The electronic structure of single InSb quantum dots (QDs) with diameters between 3 and 7 nm was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). In this size regime, InSb QDs show strong quantum confinement effects which lead to discrete energy levels on both valence and conduction band states. Decrease of the QD size increases the measured band gap and the spacing between energy levels. Multiplets of equally spaced resonance peaks are observed in the tunneling spectra. There, multiplets originate from degeneracy lifting induced by QD charging. The tunneling spectra of InSb QDs are qualitatively different from those observed in the STS of other III-V materials, for example, InAs QDs, with similar band gap energy. Theoretical calculations suggest the electron tunneling occurs through the states connected with L-valley of InSb QDs rather than through states of the Γ-valley. This observation calls for better understanding of the role of indirect valleys in strongly quantum-confined III-V nanomaterials.

  10. Cross-correlations of the Lyman-alpha forest with weak lensing convergence I: Analytical Estimates of S/N and Implications for Neutrino Mass and Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-10-01

    We expect a detectable correlation between two seemingly unrelated quantities: the four point function of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the amplitude of flux decrements in quasar (QSO) spectra. The amplitude of CMB convergence in a given direction measures the projected surface density of matter. Measurements of QSO flux decrements trace the small-scale distribution of gas along a given line-of-sight. While the cross-correlation between these two measurements is small for a single line-of-sight, upcoming large surveys should enable its detection. This paper presents analytical estimates for the signal to noise (S/N) for measurements of the cross-correlation between the flux decrement and the convergence, {delta}F{kappa}, and for measurements of the cross-correlation between the variance in flux decrement and the convergence, <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}>. For the ongoing BOSS (SDSS III) and Planck surveys, we estimate an S/N of 30 and 9.6 for these two correlations. For the proposed BigBOSS and ACTPOL surveys, we estimate an S/N of 130 and 50 respectively. Since <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}> {proportional_to} {delta}{sub s}{sup 4}, the amplitude of these cross-correlations can potentially be used to measure the amplitude of {delta}{sub 8} at z {approx} 2 to 2.5% with BOSS and Planck and even better with future data sets. These measurements have the potential to test alternative theories for dark energy and to constrain the mass of the neutrino. The large potential signal estimated in our analytical calculations motivate tests with non-linear hydrodynamical simulations and analyses of upcoming data sets.

  11. Incorporating stakeholder preferences in the selection of technologies for using invasive alien plants as a bio-energy feedstock: applying the analytical hierarchy process.

    PubMed

    De Lange, W J; Stafford, W H L; Forsyth, G G; Le Maitre, D C

    2012-05-30

    Invasive alien plants (IAPs) impose significant social costs on the population of the Agulhas Plain region in South Africa due to their adverse impacts on ecosystem goods and services (decreased water supply and increased fire risk). While the cost of clearing IAPs is considerable, this paper assesses opportunities to reduce some of the social and environmental burdens (e.g. disruptions of ecosystems which have negative impacts on livelihoods) by using IAP biomass to produce bio-energy. However, such an initiative could increase financial dependency on these plants and is thus considered to be a major risk factor which could create adverse incentives to illegally grow these plants. A participatory decision-making process with active stakeholder participation is a key element in managing such an initiative. We used a multi-stakeholder engagement process and the analytical hierarchy process to define and weigh suitable criteria for the assessment of different "IAP biomass to bio-energy" technology scenarios on the Agulhas Plain. Feasible scenarios were constructed by means of an expert panel which were then ranked according to stakeholder preference. The six criteria were: minimising impacts on natural resources; job creation; certainty of benefits to local people in the study area; development of skills for life; technology performance and cost efficiency. This ranking was largely determined by the preference for resource efficiency in terms of minimising impacts on natural ecosystems and the localisation of benefits. The smaller, modular technologies were consequently preferred since these realise direct local benefits while developing local skills and capacity in their manufacture, sales and maintenance. The rankings as obtained in this study are context-bound, which implies that the findings only have limited application to areas with similar biophysical and socio-economic characteristics. However, the method itself is fully generalisable, and the same

  12. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  13. Calculation of energy levels and transition amplitudes for barium and radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Physics; Univ. of New South Wales

    2007-01-01

    The radium atom is a promising system for studying parity and time invariance violating weak interactions. However, available experimental spectroscopic data for radium are insufficient for designing an optimal experimental setup. We calculate the energy levels and transition amplitudes for radium states of significant interest. Forty states corresponding to all possible configurations consisting of the 7s, 7p and 6d single-electron states as well as the states of the 7s8s, 7s8p and 7s7d configurations have been calculated. The energies of ten of these states corresponding to the 6d{sup 2}, 7s8s, 7p{sup 2} and 6d7p configurations are not known from experiment. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy.

  14. Lamb shift of non-degenerate energy level systems placed between two infinite parallel conducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billaud, B.; Truong, T.-T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the Lamb shift in systems with non-degenerate energy levels, put in the electromagnetic environment provided by two infinite parallel conducting plates, is analyzed. An explicit formula giving the relative Lamb shift (as compared to the standard one in a vacuum) is derived for spherical semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), via a careful mathematical treatment of divergences in the calculations using the theory of distributions. This result settles a controversy between two different formulas existing in the current literature. Its sensitive dependence on the plates separation may be viewed as an indirect manifestation of the Lamb shift and may be used for the fine tuning of the QD non-degenerate energy spectrum in some experimental contexts.

  15. Fused Silica Final Optics for Inertial Fusion Energy: Radiation Studies and System-Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kubota, Alison; Caturla, Maria J.; Dixit, Sham N.; Speth, Joel A.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2003-06-15

    The survivability of the final optic, which must sit in the line of sight of high-energy neutrons and gamma rays, is a key issue for any laser-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Previous work has concentrated on the use of reflective optics. Here, we introduce and analyze the use of a transmissive final optic for the IFE application. Our experimental work has been conducted at a range of doses and dose rates, including those comparable to the conditions at the IFE final optic. The experimental work, in conjunction with detailed analysis, suggests that a thin, fused silica Fresnel lens may be an attractive option when used at a wavelength of 351 nm. Our measurements and molecular dynamics simulations provide convincing evidence that the radiation damage, which leads to optical absorption, not only saturates but that a 'radiation annealing' effect is observed. A system-level description is provided, including Fresnel lens and phase plate designs.

  16. S-matrix Calculations of Energy Levels of the Lithium Isoelectronic Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2010-11-02

    A QED approach to the calculation of the spectra of the lithium isoelectronic sequence is implemented. A modified Furry representation based on the Kohn-Sham potential is used to evaluate all one- and two-photon diagrams with the exception of the two-loop Lamb shift. Three-photon diagrams are estimated with Hamiltonian methods. After incorporating recent calculations of the two-loop Lamb shift and recoil corrections a comprehensive tabulation of the 2s, 2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} energy levels as well as the 2s - 2p{sub 1/2} and 2s - 2p{sub 3/2} transition energies for Z = 10 - 100 is presented.

  17. Origin of the energy level alignment at organic/organic interfaces: The role of structural defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussolotti, Fabio; Yang, Jinpeng; Hinderhofer, Alexander; Huang, Yuli; Chen, Wei; Kera, Satoshi; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Ueno, Nobuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the electronic properties of as-deposited and N2-exposedCuPc/F16CuPc interface, a prototype system for organic photovoltaic applications, are investigated by using ultralow background, high-sensitivity photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that (i) N2 exposure significantly modifies the energy level alignment (ELA) at the interface between CuPc and F16CuPc layer and (ii) the direction of the N2-induced energy level shift of the CuPc depends on the position of the Fermi level (EF) in the CuPc highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap of the as-deposited film. These observations are related to the changes in the density of gap states (DOGS) produced by structural imperfections in the molecular packing geometry, as introduced by the N2 penetration into the CuPc layer. This result demonstrates the key role of structure-induced DOGS in controlling the ELA at organic/organic interfaces.

  18. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  19. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  20. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis & Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.