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Sample records for analytical atomic emission

  1. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, biomedicine and nutrition. Emphasis is being placed on: generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; development and characterization of new sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples, and investigation of new membrane separators for striping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity in plasma spectrometry.

  2. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  3. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing.

  4. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, A. A.; Qamar, Sajid; Atta, M. A.

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ( μg/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of ten of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) have been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD B) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision.

  5. Atomic-Scale Analytical Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas F

    2017-02-01

    The concept of atomic-scale tomography has been proposed in the past decade as a technique that could deliver the position of all atoms with high precision and their elemental (isotopic) identity. The technique was never intended to be limited to merely structural information and there is clearly a rich array of additional analytical information that can be brought to bear on such tomographs. In this paper, some of these types of information are considered and the implications are explored. The fuller realm of this analytical and structural information may be called atomic-scale analytical tomography.

  6. Analytical performance of an r.f. capacitively coupled plasma for atomic emission with tip-ring electrode geometry.

    PubMed

    Frenţiu, T; Rusu, A M; Ponta, M; Anghel, S D; Cordos, E A

    1996-06-01

    A low to medium power radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma is characterized as spectral source for atomic emission. The signal to background ratio and the limits of detection were determined for 19 elements as a function of the plasma torch geometry and the observation point.

  7. Differentiation of colloidal and dissolved silica: Analytical separation using spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Ranville, J.; Kashuba, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described that differentiates between solutions containing silica-dominated colloids and solutions that are essentially free of colloids. Suspensions of tuff particles were treated to remove colloids by centrifugation, filtration or both. Agreement of silica concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and by a spectrophotometric method was taken as an indication of colloid-free solutions. For two tuffs, centrifugation was effective for removing colloids. For the third, highly altered tuff, filtration was more effective for removing colloids.

  8. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line.

  9. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  10. Atomic hydrogen emission induced by TEA CO(2) laser bombardment on solid samples at low pressure and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Idris, Nasrullah; Terai, Sumito; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kobayashi, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen emission has been studied in laser plasmas by focusing a TEA CO(2) laser (10.6 microm, 500 mJ, 200 ns) on various types of samples, such as glass, quartz, black plastic sheet, and oil on copper plate sub-target. It was found that H(alpha) emission with a narrow spectral width occurs with high efficiency when the laser plasma is produced in the low-pressure region. On the contrary, the conventional well-known laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which is usually carried out at atmospheric air pressure, cannot be applied to the analysis of hydrogen as an impurity. By combining low-pressure laser-induced plasma spectroscopy with laser surface cleaning, a preliminary quantitative analysis was made on zircaloy pipe samples intentionally doped with hydrogen. As a result, a good linear relationship was obtained between H(alpha) emission intensity and its concentration.

  11. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  12. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-12-31

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  13. An analytical method for hydrogeochemical surveys: Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after using enrichment coprecipitation with cobalt and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Trace metals that are commonly associated with mineralization were concentrated and separated from natural water by coprecipitation with ammonium pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and cobalt and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The method is useful in hydrogeochemical surveys because it permits preconcentration near the sample sites, and selected metals are preserved shortly after the samples are collected. The procedure is relatively simple: (1) a liter of water is filtered; (2) the pH is adjusted; (3) Co chloride and APDC are added to coprecipitate the trace metals; and (4) later, the precipitate is filtered, dissolved, and diluted to 10 ml for a 100-fold concentration enrichment of the separated metals. Sb(III), As(III), Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Ag, V, and Zn can then be determined simultaneously by ICP-AES. In an experiment designed to measure the coprecipitation efficiency, Sb(III), Cd and Ag were recovered at 70 to 75% of their original concentration. The remaining metals were recovered at 85 to 100% of their original concentrations, however. The range for the lower limits of determination for the metals after preconcentration is 0.1 to 3.0 ??g/l. The precision of the method was evaluated by replicate analyses of a Colorado creek water and two simulated water samples. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a water reference standard (SRM 1643a) certified by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. In addition, the method was evaluated by analyzing groundwater samples collected near a porphyry copper deposit in Arizona and by analyzing meltwater from glacier-covered areas favorable for mineralization in south-central Alaska. The results for the ICP-AES analyses compared favorably with those obtained using the sequential technique of GFAAS on the acidified but unconcentrated water samples. ICP-AES analysis of trace-metal preconcentrates for hydrogeochemical surveys is more efficient than GFAAS because a

  14. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  15. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  16. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1994-09-01

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  17. Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Jennifer A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Calloway, Clifton P.; Jones, Bradley T.

    2006-02-01

    A tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometer is described and evaluated. The system employs a single tungsten coil as a combined atomizer and excitation source for the determination of metals by atomic emission spectrometry. The tungsten coil is extracted from a 150 W, 15 V commercial slide projector light bulb. A simple, laboratory constructed, computer-controlled power supply provides a constant current to the coil. A high-resolution Czerny-Turner monochromator with a charge coupled device detector completes the system. Simultaneous, multi-element analyses are possible within a 4 nm spectral window. Eleven test elements are used to characterize the system: Al (396.1 nm), Co (353.0 nm), Cr (427.1 nm), Dy (404.6 nm), Ga (403.3 nm), K (404.4 nm), Mn (403.1 nm), Pb (405.8 nm), Rb (420.2 nm), Sc (404.8 nm), and Yb (398.7 nm). Tungsten coil atomic emission detection limits are reported for these elements for the first time: 0.02 ng Al, 0.7 ng Co, 0.003 ng Cr, 0.01 ng Dy, 0.7 ng Ga, 0.3 ng K, 0.04 ng Mn, 10 ng Pb, 0.07 ng Rb, 1 ng Sc, and 0.003 ng Yb. The precision for the new technique is better than 13% relative standard deviation for all metals at concentrations two orders of magnitude above the detection limit. Aluminum, Cr, Mn, and K are determined in a standard reference material (trace elements in water) after simple dilution with water, and found values varied from certified values by up to 26%. The average tungsten coil lifetime was found to be 265 heating cycles. The elimination of the external radiation source needed for atomic absorption measurements results in an emission system that could be quite portable.

  18. Analytical capability of a medium power capacitively coupled plasma for the multielemental determination in multimineral/multivitamin preparations by atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2012-10-15

    A method for multielemental (Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn) determination in multimineral/multivitamins by atomic emission spectrometry in a medium power radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W) and low Ar consumption (0.4 L min(-1)) is proposed. Determinations were performed on commercially available tablets and a standard reference material after acidic high-pressure microwave assisted digestion and using the standard additions procedure. The detection limits (mg g(-1)) were in the range 0.003 (Na)-1.5 (P) and were not depreciated by the non-spectral interference of mineral matrices of K, Ca, Mg and Na excepting Zn and P. Found concentrations corresponded generally to the labelled contents with recovery in the range of 90-107% and 1.0-13.0% repeatability. The proposed technique could be an advantageous alternative to the more expensive inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the quality control of multimineral/multivitamin preparations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Organised surfactant assemblies in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Fernandez de la Campa, Maria del Rosario; Gonzalez, Elisa Blanco; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Luisa

    1999-02-01

    The use of surfactant-based organised assemblies in analytical atomic spectroscopy is extensively and critically reviewed along three main lines: first, the ability of organised media to enhance detection of atomic spectroscopic methods by favourable manipulation of physical and chemical properties of the sample solution second, the extension of separation mechanisms by resorting to organised media and third a discussion of synergistic combinations of liquid chromatography separations and atomic detectors via the use of vesicular mobile phases. Changes in physical properties of sample solutions aspirated in atomic spectrometry by addition of surfactants can be advantageously used in at least four different ways: (i) to improve nebulisation efficiency; (ii) to enhance wettability of solid surfaces used for atomisation; (iii) to improve compatibility between aqueous and organic phases; and (iv) to achieve good dispersion of small particles in "slurry" techniques. Controversial results and statements published so far are critically discussed. The ability of surfactant-based organised assemblies, such as micelles and vesicles, to organise reactants at the molecular level has also been applied to enhance the characteristics of chemical generation of volalite species of metals and semi-metals (e.g., hydride or ethylide generation of As, Pb, Cd, Se, Sn, and cold vapour Hg generation) used in atomic methods. Enhancements in efficiency/transport of volatile species, increases in the reaction kinetics, stabilisation of some unstable species and changes in the selectivity of the reactions by surfactants are dealt with. Non-chromatographic cloud-point separations to design pre-concentration procedures with subsequent metal determination by atomic methods are addressed along with chromatographic separations of expanded scope by addition of surfactants to the conventional aqueous mobile phases of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Finally, the synergistic

  20. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  1. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  2. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, L.; Santos, J. P.; Amaro, P.; Jänkälä, K.; Fratini, F.

    2015-05-15

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  3. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, L.; Santos, J. P.; Amaro, P.; Jänkälä, K.; Fratini, F.

    2015-05-01

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  4. Development of a digital micromirror spectrometer for analytical atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, J D; Jones, B T

    1998-12-01

    A digital micromirror device (DMD) has been incorporated into a novel spectrometer for use in analytical atomic spectrometry. The device can be taken from a commercial computer projector. A protective glass window covering the DMD chip limits the viewable wavelengths to the visible range. The DMD is used to project an image of the light source onto the exit plane of a flat-field spectrograph. A single photomultiplier tube is used for detection. The high switching rate of the micromirrors (15 μs) enables rapid full-spectrum capture, wavelength-modulation, source-modulation, fast narrow-wavelength window scans, and rapid-wavelength "jumping." Calcium, sodium, and potassium have been determined in several standard reference materials (tomato leaves, bovine liver, rice flour, total diet) by flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Absorption sensitivities for each element are near the 0.02 μg/mL level, and detection limits for both absorption and emission are near the 0.01 μg/mL level. Elemental recoveries were within 10% of certified values for most reference materials.

  5. Analytical estimate for low-altitude ENA emissivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gérard, J.-C.; Søraas, F.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.; LLera, K.; Redfern, J.

    2016-02-01

    We formulate the first analytical model for energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissivity that partially corrects for the global viewing geometry dependence of low-altitude emissions (LAEs) observed by Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS). The emissivity correction requires the pitch angle distribution (PAD) and geophysical location of low-altitude ENAs. To estimate PAD, we create an energy-dependent analytical model, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. We account for energy binning by integrating model PAD over each energy bin. We account for finite angular pixels by computing emissivity as an integral over the pitch angle range sampled by the pixel. We investigate location uncertainty in TWINS pixels by performing nine variations of the emissivity calculation. Using TWINS 2 ENA imaging data from 1131 to 1145 UT on 6 April 2010, we derive emissivity-corrected ion fluxes for two angular pixel sizes: 4° and 1°. To evaluate the method, we compare TWINS-derived ion fluxes to simultaneous in situ data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 17 satellite. The TWINS-NOAA agreement for emissivity-corrected flux is improved by up to a factor of 7, compared to uncorrected flux. The highest 1° pixel fluxes are a factor of 2 higher than for 4° pixels, consistent with pixel-derived fluxes that are artificially low because subpixel structures are smoothed out, and indicating a possible slight advantage to oversampling the instrument-measured LAE signal. Both TWINS and NOAA ion fluxes decrease westward of 2000 magnetic local time. The TWINS-NOAA comparison indicates that the global ion precipitation oval comprises multiple smaller-scale (3-5° of latitude) structures.

  6. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  7. Some unique properties of gas chromatography coupled with atomic-emission detection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan T

    2002-07-01

    The atomic-emission detector in gas chromatography is enormously versatile in applications in analytical chemistry. Its unique properties of high selectivity for most elements and low limits of detection combine to make it the preferred detector for many analytical problems. In this review the stress is laid on the possibility of using it for compound-independent calibration, for determination of the empirical formula of an unknown analyte, for isotope-selective detection, and on derivatization to give AED-active derivatives with advantageous detection properties. Both metals and non-metals are considered and examples of the use of atomic emission detection in real-world analysis are discussed.

  8. Analytical model of an isolated single-atom electron source.

    PubMed

    Engelen, W J; Vredenbregt, E J D; Luiten, O J

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model of a single-atom electron source is presented, where electrons are created by near-threshold photoionization of an isolated atom. The model considers the classical dynamics of the electron just after the photon absorption, i.e. its motion in the potential of a singly charged ion and a uniform electric field used for acceleration. From closed expressions for the asymptotic transverse electron velocities and trajectories, the effective source temperature and the virtual source size can be calculated. The influence of the acceleration field strength and the ionization laser energy on these properties has been studied. With this model, a single-atom electron source with the optimum electron beam properties can be designed. Furthermore, we show that the model is also applicable to ionization of rubidium atoms, and thus also describes the ultracold electron source, which is based on photoionization of laser-cooled alkali atoms.

  9. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  10. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  11. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  12. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 1,1-dimethylhydrazine as a high purity nitrogen source for MOVPE-water reduction and quantification using nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-atomic emission detection spectroscopy and cryogenic-mass spectroscopy analytical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Odedra, R.; Smith, L.M.; Rushworth, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrazine derivatives are attractive low temperature nitrogen sources for use in MOVPE due to their low thermal stability. However their purification and subsequent analysis has not previously been investigated in depth for this application. A detailed study on 1,1-dimethylhydrazine {l{underscore}brace}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}N-NH{sub 2}{r{underscore}brace} purified by eight different methods and the subsequent quantitative measurements of water present in the samples obtained is reported here. A correlation between {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) and cryogenic mass spectroscopy (Cryogenic-MS) has been performed. All three analysis techniques can be used to measure water in the samples and with the best purification the water content can be lowered well below 100 ppm. The high purity of this material has been demonstrated by growth results and the state-of-the-art performance of laser diodes.

  14. [Development of microwave plasma atomic emission detectors for gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mao; Shi, Yuhua; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Hanqi; Jin, Qinhan

    2007-05-01

    Three microwave plasmas including microwave induced plasma, capacitively coupled microwave plasma and microwave plasma torch as atomic emission detectors for gas chromatography are evaluated in their history, application and restriction, separately. The development of microwave plasma atomic emission detectors for gas chromatography is prospected.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  16. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Hopper, Dale E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-12-01

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C60.

  17. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Hopper, Dale E.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-12-03

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C{sub 60}.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  20. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  1. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  2. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  3. Single atom emission in an optical resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, J.J.; An, K.; Dasari, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    A single atom coupled to a single mode of a radiation field is a fundamental system for studying the interaction of radiation with matter. The study of such systems has come to be called cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Atoms coupled to a single mode of a resonator have been studied experimentally and theoretically in several interesting regimes since this basic system was first considered theoretically by Janes and Cummings. The objective of the present chapter is to provide a theoretical framework and present a unifying picture of the various phenomena which can occur in such a system. 35 refs., 11 figs.

  4. 14 CFR 34.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE... Turbine Engines) § 34.64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions....

  5. 14 CFR 34.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE... Turbine Engines) § 34.64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions....

  6. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.E.; Siskind, D.E. )

    1989-12-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2,670 {angstrom} and 3,040 {angstrom} was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter uv spectrometer operating at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution viewed the Earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2,852 {angstrom} is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2,972 {angstrom} line from O({sup 1}S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O({sup 1}S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5,577 {angstrom} emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  7. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-03-26

    A scheme for realizing two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is proposed based on controllable spontaneous emission in a coherently driven cycle-configuration atomic system. As the spatial-position-dependent atom-field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the information about the position of the atom. Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum interference between the multiple spontaneous decay channels. Moreover, we can achieve 100% probability of finding the atom at an expected position by choosing appropriate system parameters under certain conditions.

  8. Direct determination of Cu by liquid cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quanfang; Yang, Shuxiu; Sun, Duixiong; Zheng, Jidong; Li, Yun; Yu, Jie; Su, Maogen

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a novel liquid cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry was developed for the direct determination of Cu in aqueous solutions, in which the glow discharge plasma was produced in the solution between the needle-like Pt cathode and the electrolyte around it. The effects of discharge voltage, solution pH, and the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on emission intensities were investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) of Cu was compared with those measured by closed-type electrolyte cathode discharge-atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES). The results showed that the optimal operation conditions are voltage of 135 V, a pH of 1, and addition of 0.15% CTAC. CTAC can enhance the emission intensity and lower the LOD of Cu I. The net intensity of atomic emission lines of Cu I at 324.8 nm with 0.15% CTAC improved by 1.5 fold, and the LODs of the Cu at 135 V with 0.15% CTAC and without CTAC are 0.019 and 0.234 mg L- 1, respectively. The analytical capability of Cu in this study is comparable to the closed-type ELCAD-AES, and it satisfied the recommended levels of Cu in the WHO standards for drinking-water quality. This technique can be effectively used for on-line monitoring of metal ions in aqueous samples.

  9. Plasma emission sources in analytical spectroscopy-I.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; McGeachin, H M; Smith, P B

    1975-01-01

    A critical survey of plasma emission sources used in analytical spectroscopy, excluding conventional arc and spark sources, has been made. In Part I the concept of temperature applied to high-temperature excitation sources is considered, as are arc plasma jets. Part II will be concerned with microwave and capacitively coupled sources and in Part III inductively coupled sources will be dealt with. In the last part a comparison will also be made of all the sources reviewed, from the point of view of sensitivity, precision and freedom from matrix effects.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN, ORGANOLEAD, AND ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a continuing evaluation of new analytical and sample preparation techniques conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the use of capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the simultaneous determination of organotin, organ...

  11. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN, ORGANOLEAD, AND ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a continuing evaluation of new analytical and sample preparation techniques conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the use of capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the simultaneous determination of organotin, organ...

  12. Laser-induced plasma emission: from atomic to molecular spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giacomo, Alessandro; Hermann, Jörg

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper is the description of the optical emission spectral features of the plasma produced by laser-matter interaction, from a fundamental point of view. The laser induced plasma emission spectra are discussed in connection with the basic mechanisms that take place in the plasma phase at different time delays from the laser pulse. The laser induced plasma being a dynamic system, the hierarchy of the elementary mechanisms changes continuously because the electron number density and the electron temperature decrease during the expansion. As a consequence of this, over the duration of the plasma’s persistence the prevailing emitting species changes from ions to atoms and from atoms to molecules. Both atomic and molecular emission spectroscopy are discussed, to convey a complete description of the temporal evolution of laser induced plasma. Current literature, as well as the traditional plasma theories, are presented and discussed in order to give to the reader a general idea of the potentialities and drawbacks of emission spectroscopy in the study of laser induced plasma and its various applications.

  13. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  14. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-14

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  15. Atomic diffraction under oblique incidence: An analytical expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, Maxime; Roncin, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The semiclassical perturbation method developed by Henkel et al. [J. Phys. II 4, 1955 (1994), 10.1051/jp2:1994242] to model cold-atom diffraction by optical standing waves, is applied to the diffraction of fast atoms on crystal surfaces at grazing incidence (GIFAD or FAD). We first show that the interaction time and interaction length embedded in the obliquity factor is well suited to explain the transition from three-dimensional to two-dimensional (2D) diffraction. The situation of a slightly misaligned primary beam, corresponding to oblique incidence in the effective 2D system, is addressed pointing out discrepancies such as the absence of net deflection of the atomic beam. Guided by time-reversal considerations, we propose an arbitrarily symmetrized form significantly improving the agreement with experimental data recorded in oblique incidence.

  16. The development of analytical methodologies for characterizing coke oven emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Currently, coke oven operators are required by law to monitor worker's exposure to coke oven emissions for coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPV) by measuring the benzene soluble fraction of particulates. However, it is not universally accepted that CTPV are a good measure of health effects. Consequently, better methods for analyzing coke oven emissions that relate to worker's health is needed. Sampling apparatus designed to measure particulates and vapor organics, employing high volume (hi-vol) pumps and personal pumps were field tested. The analytical scheme developed was more efficient in extracting PAHs than the benzene soluble fraction method. Both filter and florisil plugs were extracted with methylene chloride using an ultrasonic bath. The extract volumes were reduced and solvent exchanged with iso-octane in a Kuderna-Danish (KD) apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography. Qualitative analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph (GC)/flame ionization detector (FID) and GC/mass spectrometer. A total of 68 compounds were identified. Sixteen PAHs selected were selected for quantitative analysis and their concentrations ranged from 0.02 ug/m{sup 3} to 5100 ug/m{sup 3}. The relative concentrations of the PAHs were compared with other processes in which PAHs are emitted, such as paving and roofing operations and were found to be unique enough that finger printing coke oven emissions may be possible.

  17. Analytical study of ultrasound influence on the molten metals atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonnikova, A.; Arkhipov, V.; Boiko, V.; Basalaev, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Zolotorev, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the study of influence of ultrasound on liquid atomization using ejection nozzles. Two principles of influence of ultrasound on the atomization process such as a change of conditions on gas-liquid boundary during the generation of ultrasound oscillation in the gas and liquid jet (film) disintegration under the action of capillary forces in cases of generation of ultrasound oscillation in the liquid are considered. The optimal values of the ultrasound oscillation frequencies are calculated. Two constructions of the nozzles patented are proposed.

  18. Atomic Auger Doppler effects upon emission of fast photoelectrons.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc; Püttner, Ralph; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Journel, Loïc; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Ablett, James M; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis

    2014-06-06

    Studies of photoemission processes induced by hard X-rays including production of energetic electrons have become feasible due to recent substantial improvement of instrumentation. Novel dynamical phenomena have become possible to investigate in this new regime. Here we show a significant change in Auger emission following 1s photoionization of neon, which we attribute to the recoil of the Ne ion induced by the emission of a fast photoelectron. Because of the preferential motion of the ionized Ne atoms along two opposite directions, an Auger Doppler shift is revealed, which manifests itself as a gradual broadening and doubling of the Auger spectral features. This Auger Doppler effect should be a general phenomenon in high-energy photoemission of both isolated atoms and molecules, which will have to be taken into account in studies of other recoil effects such as vibrational or rotational recoil in molecules, and may also have consequences in measurements in solids.

  19. Analytical solution of microwave transition spectral lines for 87Rb atoms in a Hanle configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng-Feng; Deng, Jian-Liao; Ma, Yi-Sheng; He, Hui-Juan; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2010-07-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the microwave transition spectrum of 87Rb atomic D1 line with specially prepared atomic state in a Hanle configuration. The approximate analytical results have shown that the 0-0 transition spectral line has the highest contrast and can be applied to microwave frequency standards.

  20. Master equation for collective spontaneous emission with quantized atomic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanet, François; Braun, Daniel; Martin, John

    2016-02-01

    We derive a Markovian master equation for the internal dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms including all effects related to the quantization of their motion. Our equation provides a unifying picture of the consequences of recoil and indistinguishability of atoms beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime on both their dissipative and conservative dynamics, and applies equally well to distinguishable and indistinguishable atoms. We give general expressions for the decay rates and the dipole-dipole shifts for any motional states, and we find closed-form formulas for a number of relevant states (Gaussian states, Fock states, and thermal states). In particular, we show that dipole-dipole interactions and cooperative photon emission can be modulated through the external state of motion.

  1. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  2. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dennis D.; Rutzke, Michael A.

    Atomic spectroscopy has played a major role in the development of our current database for mineral nutrients and toxicants in foods. When atomic absorption spectrometers became widely available in the 1960s, the development of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods for accurately measuring trace amounts of mineral elements in biological samples paved the way for unprecedented advances in fields as diverse as food analysis, nutrition, biochemistry, and toxicology (1). The application of plasmas as excitation sources for atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) led to the commercial availability of instruments for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) beginning in the late 1970s. This instrument has further enhanced our ability to measure the mineral composition of foods and other materials rapidly, accurately, and precisely. More recently, plasmas have been joined with mass spectrometers (MS) to form inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer ICP-MS instruments that are capable of measuring mineral elements with extremely low detection limits. These three instrumental methods have largely replaced traditional wet chemistry methods for mineral analysis of foods, although traditional methods for calcium, chloride, iron, and phosphorus remain in use today (see Chap. 12).

  3. Determination of selenium in foods by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and hydride generation.

    PubMed

    Kardos, J; Zimmer, K; Coni, E; Caroli, S; Stacchini, A

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of a survey launched by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità to assess the average daily intake of Se with food in the Italian population, a preliminary study was carried out to develop an analytical procedure for the quantification of the element in food products. The method implies the use of a hydride generation system in combination with inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and exploits the inherent advantages of this last also for the analysis of non-metals. The overall approach was tested in some Hungarian and Italian foods, adequately lending itself to routine and reliable Se assay.

  4. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  5. Spatially resolved measurements to improve analytical performance of solution-cathode glow discharge optical-emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Ray, Steven J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-11-01

    Past studies of the solution-cathode glow discharge (SCGD) revealed that elemental and molecular emission are not spatially homogenous throughout the source, but rather conform to specific zones within the discharge. Exploiting this inhomogeneity can lead to improved analytical performance if emission is collected only from regions of the discharge where analyte species emit strongly and background emission (from continuum, elemental and/or molecular sources) is lower. Effects of this form of spatial discrimination on the analytical performance of SCGD optical emission spectrometry (OES) have been investigated with an imaging spectrograph for fourteen atomic lines, with emphasis on detection limits and precision. Vertical profiles of the emission intensity, signal-to-background ratio, and signal-to-noise ratio were collected and used to determine the optimal region to view the SCGD on a per-element basis. With optimized spatial filtering, detection limits ranged from 0.09-360 ppb, a 1.4-13.6 fold improvement over those obtained when emission is collected from the full vertical profile (1.1-840 ppb), with a 4.2-fold average improvement. Precision was found to be unaffected by spatial filtering, ranging from 0.5-2.6% relative standard deviation (RSD) for all elements investigated, closely comparable to the 0.4-2.4% RSD observed when no spatial filtering is used. Spatial profiles also appear useful for identifying optimal line pairs for internal standardization and for flagging the presence of matrix interferences in SCGD-OES.

  6. Negative spontaneous emission by a moving two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannebère, Sylvain; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how the dynamics of a two-level atom is affected by its interaction with the quantized near field of a plasmonic slab in relative motion. We demonstrate that for small separation distances and a relative velocity greater than a certain threshold, this interaction can lead to a population inversion, such that the probability of the excited state exceeds the probability of the ground state, corresponding to a negative spontaneous emission rate. It is shown that the developed theory is intimately related to a classical problem. The problem of quantum friction is analyzed and the differences with respect to the corresponding classical effect are highlighted.

  7. Energetic neutral atom emissions from Titan interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D G; Brandt, P C; Roelof, E C; Dandouras, J; Krimigis, S M; Mauk, B H

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) observed the interaction of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, with Saturn's magnetosphere during two close flybys of Titan on 26 October and 13 December 2004. The MIMI Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) continuously imaged the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) generated by charge exchange reactions between the energetic, singly ionized trapped magnetospheric ions and the outer atmosphere, or exosphere, of Titan. The images reveal a halo of variable ENA emission about Titan's nearly collisionless outer atmosphere that fades at larger distances as the exospheric density decays exponentially. The altitude of the emissions varies, and they are not symmetrical about the moon, reflecting the complexity of the interactions between Titan's upper atmosphere and Saturn's space environment.

  8. Modelling of Atomic Oxygen Visible emissions from Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, Susarla; Bhardwaj, Anil

    Green (5577 Å) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms of O((1) S) and O((1) D) respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The observed red-doublet emission intensity is used to estimate the H_{2}O production rate, whereas the green to red-doublet intensity ratio (G/R ratio) has been used to confirm the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H_{2}O. The observed higher G/R ratio values are ascribed to higher CO_{2} and CO relative abundances. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of O((1) S) and O((1) D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in comets. Our model calculations on different comets suggest that the G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Our calculated mean excess energy in various photodissociation processes show that the high energy photons dissociate CO_{2} and produce O((1) S) with large velocities than that in photodissociation of H_{2}O which is consistent with larger width of green line compared to that of the red-doublet lines observed in several comets The photodissociation of H_{2}O mainly governs the red-doublet emission, whereas CO_{2} plays an important role in controlling the green line emission. The collisional quenching of O((1) S) and O((1) D) can alter the G/R ratio more than that can be due to variation in the CO_{2} and CO relative abundances. The role of CO photodissociation is found to be insignificant in producing green and red-doublet emission lines and consequently in determining the G/R ratio. If a comet has equal composition of CO_{2} and H_{2}O, which happens when comet is at larger heliocentric distances, then ˜50% of red-doublet emission intensity is controlled by the photodissociation of CO_{2}. References: Festou, M.C., & Feldman, P.D., Astron

  9. Analytical approach to atomic multichannel collisions in tight harmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Benjamin; Giannakeas, Panagiotis; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We perform an analytical investigation in the framework of generalized K -matrix theory of the scattering problem in tight isotropic and harmonic waveguides allowing for several open scattering channels. The scattering behavior is explored for identical bosons and fermions, as well as for distinguishable particles, the main aspect being the confinement-induced resonances (CIR) which are attributed to different partial waves. In particular, we present the unitarity bounds which emerge when considering a quasi-one-dimensional system. Unitarity bounds are also given for the transition coefficients, which show the limitations for efficient transversal (de)excitations by means of CIRs. We analyze the CIR for d waves and find the intriguing phenomenon of a strong transmission suppression in the presence of more than one open channel, which represents an interesting regime to be applied in the corresponding many-particle systems. The corresponding channel threshold singularities are studied and it is shown that these are solely determined by the symmetry class of the partial wave.

  10. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  11. Stimulated emission in optically pumped atomic-copper vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Joong Kim; Nackchin Sung

    1987-11-01

    We have observed, for the first time to our knowledge, stimulated emission in atomic-copper vapor that is excited by a resonant tunable laser beam. One of the important and interesting results obtained in this experiment is that excitation of the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ level of the copper atoms generates strong amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) for both /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 3/2/ and /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 5/2/ transitions. This is the first reported direct experimental evidence observed for collisional mixing between the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ and /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ levels in a copper-vapor laser. Excitation of the /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ level induces substantially weaker ASE for the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 3/2/ transition. In addition, we observed collision-induced ASE for both transitions over a wide range of detuning of the pump frequency. The preliminary results of the experiment are presented, and the implications of the results for high-pressure copper-vapor lasers are discussed.

  12. 40 CFR 87.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions. 87.64 Section 87.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions. (a) The system...

  13. 14 CFR 34.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions. 34.64 Section 34.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Turbine Engines) § 34.64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions. The...

  14. 14 CFR 34.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. 34.82 Section 34.82 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. The system and procedures for...

  15. Modeling Emission of Heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are a fruitful tool for remote diagnosis of the plasma in the heliosphere and its vicinity. So far, instruments detecting ENAs from the heliosphere were configured for observations of hydrogen atoms. Here, we estimate emissions of ENAs of the heavy chemical elements helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and neon. A large portion of the heliospheric ENAs is created in the inner heliosheath from neutralized interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs). We modeled this process and calculated full-sky intensities of ENAs for energies 0.2–130 keV/nuc. We found that the largest fluxes among considered species are expected for helium, smaller for oxygen and nitrogen, and smallest for neon. The obtained intensities are 50–106 times smaller than the hydrogen ENA intensities observed by IBEX. The detection of heavy ENAs will be possible if a future ENA detector is equipped with the capability to measure the masses of observed atoms. Because of different reaction cross-sections among the different species, observations of heavy ENAs can allow for a better understanding of global structure of the heliosphere as well as the transport and energization of PUIs in the heliosphere.

  16. Intracavity absorption and emission spectroscopy of atoms in pulsed gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Serdyukov, V. I.; Poplavskii, Yu. A.; Sinitsa, L. N.

    2009-07-15

    Absorption and emission spectra of U and Na atoms in the 590-nm spectral range were studied experimentally using pulsed hollow-cathode gas discharges. The spectra were recorded with a high-sensitivity intracavity laser spectrometer. The possibility of generating coherent emission on atomic emission lines in gas-discharge plasmas was demonstrated experimentally.

  17. Temporal and spatial temperature distributions in transversely heated graphite tube atomizers and their analytical characteristics for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Michael; Welz, Bernard; Hertzberg, Joachim; Rieck, Christof; Marowsky, Gerd

    1996-07-01

    The important role which temperature plays in atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the formation and detection of atoms in the absorption volume is discussed and the literature is reviewed. Non-homogeneous temperature distribution in the absorption volume is in contradiction to one of the prerequisites for the application of Beer's law used in AAS to convert absorbance into analyte concentration or mass, and is particularly troublesome for an "absolute analysis" envisaged for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to study the gas-phase temperature distribution in a state-of-the-art transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA). The effect of the internal gas flow on the size of the heated atmosphere is studied by steady-state temperature measurements. Temporally and spatially resolved measurements make it possible to study the temperature field within the atomizer volume in all three dimensions during the rapid heating of the furnace to final temperatures in the range 2173-2673 K. The role of the integrated platform of the THGA on the temperature field is investigated by temperature measurements of the gas phase in the presence and absence of the platform. The platform is identified as the major source of temperature gradients inside the tube volume, which may be as high as 1000 K in the radial direction during rapid heating. These gradients are most pronounced for heating cycles starting at room temperature and gradually decrease with increasing starting temperature. Shortly after the tube wall reaches its final temperature, the gas-phase temperature equilibrates and approaches the wall temperature. Because of the unavoidable contact with the cold environment at the open ends of the tube, minor temperature gradients are observed in the gas phase also in longitudinal direction, which can be further reduced by restricting the openings with end caps. The results obtained for the THGA are

  18. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  19. 40 CFR 87.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... measuring smoke exhaust emissions. 87.82 Section 87.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.82 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. The system and procedures for sampling and...

  20. 40 CFR 87.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measuring smoke exhaust emissions. 87.82 Section 87.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.82 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. The system and procedures for sampling and...

  1. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  2. Electron emission in collisions between atoms and dressed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present theoretical results for electron emission in collisions between helium atoms and dressed projectiles at high energies. Double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) as a function of the emitted electron energies and angles are calculated. In our study we have applied the three-body formalism using the three-Coulomb wave (3CW-3B) model. The interaction between the dressed projectile and the active electron in the target has been approximated by a model potential having both a long-range Coulomb potential part and a short-range part. However, the active electron in the target has been treated as hydrogenic. We have also studied the projectile charge state dependence of the DDCS. Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental data as well as other theoretical calculations. The comparison shows a good agreement between the present calculations and the measurements. The obtained results are also compatible with other theoretical findings.

  3. Determination of verapamil in pharmaceutical formulations using atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sabry; Kelzieh, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    Ion-associate complexes of verapamil hydrochloride (VpCl) with (Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Zn(II)) thiocyanates, potassium ferricyanide, and ammonium reineckate are precipitated. The solubility of the solid complexes at the recommended optimum conditions of pH and ionic strength values have been studied. Saturated solutions of each ion associate at different temperatures under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the metal ion contents in the supernatant were determined. The solubility products were thus calculated at different temperatures and the thermodynamic parameters DeltaH, DeltaG, and DeltaS were calculated. A new accurate and precise method based on direct coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of VpCl (1.96-62.86 microg ml(-1)) in pure solutions and pharmaceutical preparations is given.

  4. Exact analytical solutions of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Dai-Nam; Hoang, Ngoc-Tram D.; Le, Van-Hoang

    2017-04-01

    A hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field is a problem whose Schrödinger equation has been considered to be analytically unsolvable. However, it has been found for the case of two-dimensional space some specific values of the magnetic field for which the problem has analytical solutions. In this paper, we give a full theory for these analytical solutions. First, we construct an equation to calculate of exact-solution-points, the values of magnetic field which allow exact solutions for the Schrödinger equation. The explicit forms of the wave functions corresponding to these analytical solutions are also given. Second, we analyse the exact-solution-points and discover some important rules. (i) There exist (n - 1)2 different values of the magnetic field so that the Schrödinger equation of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom in such field has exact analytical solutions with the principal quantum number n. (ii) For more details, among these (n - 1)2 exact analytical solutions, there are nr=n -|m | -1 solutions with the same magnetic quantum number m. Both properties are also proved mathematically in this paper. For illustration, some concrete values are shown for the cases of quantum number n up to 8.

  5. Cooperative spontaneous emission of N atoms: Many-body eigenstates, the effect of virtual Lamb shift processes, and analogy with radiation of N classical oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Chang, J.-T.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-05-15

    We consider collective emission of a single photon from a cloud of N two-level atoms (one excited, N-1 ground state). For a dense cloud the problem is reduced to finding eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of an integral equation. We discuss an exact analytical solution of this many-atom problem for a spherically symmetric atomic cloud. Some eigenstates decay much faster then the single atom decay rate, while the others undergo very slow decay. We show that virtual processes yield a small effect on the evolution of rapidly decaying states. However, they change the long time dynamics from exponential decay into a power-law behavior which can be observed experimentally. For trapped states virtual processes are much more important yielding additional decay channels which results in a slow decay of the otherwise trapped states. We also show that quantum mechanical treatment of spontaneous emission of weakly excited atomic ensemble is analogous to emission of N classical harmonic oscillators.

  6. Analytical solutions for the dynamics of two trapped interacting ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso

    2006-08-15

    We discuss exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation for the system of two ultracold atoms confined in an axially symmetric harmonic potential. We investigate different geometries of the trapping potential, in particular we study the properties of eigenenergies and eigenfunctions for quasi-one-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional traps. We show that the quasi-one-dimensional and the quasi-two-dimensional regimes for two atoms can be already realized in the traps with moderately large (or small) ratios of the trapping frequencies in the axial and the transverse directions. Finally, we apply our theory to Feshbach resonances for trapped atoms. Introducing in our description an energy-dependent scattering length we calculate analytically the eigenenergies for two trapped atoms in the presence of a Feshbach resonance.

  7. Analytic description of high-order harmonic generation by atoms in a two-color laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Silaev, A. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2010-06-15

    A closed-form analytic formula describing high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a two-color field of frequencies {omega} and 2{omega} is derived quantum mechanically in the low-frequency (tunneling) limit for an electron bound by a short-range potential and generalized to the case of an active electron in a neutral atom. The HHG rates are presented as a product of an electron wave packet describing the ionization of an active electron and its propagation in a laser field up to the recombination event and an atom-specific cross section of the electron's photorecombination. In contrast to the case of a monochromatic laser pulse [Frolov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 243901 (2009)], the two-color wave packet involves the interference of two terms (involving the Airy function) that describe the emission of harmonics during the first and second half-cycles of the fundamental laser cycle and give rise to the two-plateau structures in the HHG spectra. For the case of the H atom, we show that our analytic results are in good agreement with those obtained from a numerical solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The factorization formula is used for describing the dependence of HHG rates for inert gases on the relative phase and intensities of the {omega} and 2{omega} components of a laser field. It is shown that atomic structure (including electron correlation) effects can modify substantially the two-color HHG spectra of inert gases.

  8. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  9. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  10. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chan, George C. Y. [Bloomington, IN; Hieftje, Gary M [Bloomington, IN

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  11. Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

  12. Classical line shapes based on analytical solutions of bimolecular trajectories in collision induced emission. II. Reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguera, David; Rawlings, Philip K.; Birnbaum, George

    2013-06-01

    The classical theory of collision induced emission (CIE) from pairs of dissimilar rare gas atoms was developed in Paper I [D. Reguera and G. Birnbaum, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 184304 (2006)], 10.1063/1.2371097 from a knowledge of the straight line collision trajectory and the assumption that the magnitude of the dipole could be represented by an exponential function of the inter-nuclear distance. This theory is extended here to deal with other functional forms of the induced dipole as revealed by ab initio calculations. Accurate analytical expression for the CIE can be obtained by least square fitting of the ab initio values of the dipole as a function of inter-atomic separation using a sum of exponentials and then proceeding as in Paper I. However, we also show how the multi-exponential fit can be replaced by a simpler fit using only two analytic functions. Our analysis is applied to the polar molecules HF and HBr. Unlike the rare gas atoms considered previously, these atomic pairs form stable bound diatomic molecules. We show that, interestingly, the spectra of these reactive molecules are characterized by the presence of multiple peaks. We also discuss the CIE arising from half collisions in excited electronic states, which in principle could be probed in photo-dissociation experiments.

  13. Comparative determination of Ba, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn in tea leaves by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption and liquid sampling inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, J; Sun, Y C; Chung, Y T; Yang, M H

    1998-12-01

    The comparative determination of barium, copper, iron, lead and zinc in tea leaf samples by two atomic spectrometric techniques is reported. At first, slurry sampling electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was applied. The results of Ba and Pb determination were calculated using the method of standard additions, and results of Cu, Fe and Zn from the calibration graphs based on aqueous standards. These results were compared with the results obtained after microwave-assisted wet (nitric+hydrochloric+hydrofluoric acids) digestion in closed vessels followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination with the calibration by means of aqueous standards. The exception was lead determined after a wet digestion procedure by ETAAS. The accuracy of the studied methods was checked by the use of the certified reference material Tea GBW-07605. The recoveries of the analytes varied in the range from 91 to 99% for slurry sampling ETAAS, and from 92.5 to 102% for liquid sampling ICP-AES. The advantages of slurry sampling ETAAS method are simplicity of sample preparation and very good sensitivity. Slurry sampling ETAAS method is relatively fast but if several elements must be determined in one sample, the time of the whole microwave-assisted digestion procedure and ICP-AES determination will be shorter. However, worse detection limits of ICP-AES must also be taken into the consideration in a case of some analytes.

  14. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  15. Fully analytical integration over the 3D volume bounded by the β sphere in topological atoms.

    PubMed

    Popelier, Paul L A

    2011-11-17

    Atomic properties of a topological atom are obtained by 3D integration over the volume of its atomic basin. Algorithms that compute atomic properties typically integrate over two subspaces: the volume bounded by the so-called β sphere, which is centered at the nucleus and completely contained within the atomic basin, and the volume of the remaining part of the basin. Here we show how the usual quadrature over the β sphere volume can be replaced by a fully analytical 3D integration leading to the atomic charge (monopole moment) for s, p, and d functions. Spherical tensor multipole moments have also been implemented and tested up to hexadecupole for s functions only, and up to quadrupole for s and p functions. The new algorithm is illustrated by operating on capped glycine (HF/6-31G, 35 molecular orbitals (MOs), 322 Gaussian primitives, 19 nuclei), the protein crambin (HF/3-21G, 1260 MOs, 5922 primitives and 642 nuclei), and tin (Z = 50) in Sn(2)(CH(3))(2) (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and LANL2DZ, 59 MOs, 1352 primitives).

  16. Deriving Coarse-Grained Charges from All-Atom Systems: An Analytic Solution.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Peter; Lake, Peter T; McCullagh, Martin

    2016-09-13

    An analytic method to assign optimal coarse-grained charges based on electrostatic potential matching is presented. This solution is the infinite size and density limit of grid-integration charge-fitting and is computationally more efficient by several orders of magnitude. The solution is also minimized with respect to coarse-grained positions which proves to be an extremely important step in reproducing the all-atom electrostatic potential. The joint optimal-charge optimal-position coarse-graining procedure is applied to a number of aggregating proteins using single-site per amino acid resolution. These models provide a good estimate of both the vacuum and Debye-Hückel screened all-atom electrostatic potentials in the vicinity and in the far-field of the protein. Additionally, these coarse-grained models are shown to approximate the all-atom dimerization electrostatic potential energy of 10 aggregating proteins with good accuracy.

  17. Analytical transition-matrix treatment of electric multipole polarizabilities of hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchenko, V.F.

    2015-04-15

    The direct transition-matrix approach to the description of the electric polarization of the quantum bound system of particles is used to determine the electric multipole polarizabilities of the hydrogen-like atoms. It is shown that in the case of the bound system formed by the Coulomb interaction the corresponding inhomogeneous integral equation determining an off-shell scattering function, which consistently describes virtual multiple scattering, can be solved exactly analytically for all electric multipole polarizabilities. Our method allows to reproduce the known Dalgarno–Lewis formula for electric multipole polarizabilities of the hydrogen atom in the ground state and can also be applied to determine the polarizability of the atom in excited bound states. - Highlights: • A new description for electric polarization of hydrogen-like atoms. • Expression for multipole polarizabilities in terms of off-shell scattering functions. • Derivation of integral equation determining the off-shell scattering function. • Rigorous analytic solving the integral equations both for ground and excited states. • Study of contributions of virtual multiple scattering to electric polarizabilities.

  18. 40 CFR 87.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. 87.82 Section 87.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.82 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust...

  19. In situ digestion for the determination of Ca in beverages by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luana N; Gonzalez, Mário H; Moura, Monise F; Donati, George L; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2012-08-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) is employed for the determination of calcium in juice, mineral and coconut water samples. A sample aliquot of 20 μL is placed directly on the coil and a constant-voltage power source is used to dry and atomize the sample, as well as to promote Ca atomic emission. Analytical signals are resolved and detected using a Czerny-Turner spectrometer and a charge coupled device detector. Some experimental parameters such as coil position related to the spectrometer entrance slit and integration time are critically evaluated. A heating program with relatively constant drying temperatures is used in all measurements. An in situ digestion procedure is used to partially decompose organic matrices and improve WCAES precision and accuracy. By adding an oxidizing mixture to the sample and including a digestion step in the heating cycle, no statistical difference was observed between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in juice and coconut water samples. Mineral water samples were simply diluted with 1% vv(-1) HNO(3) before analysis and no significant interference was observed for concomitants such as Na and K. Despite severe positive interference caused by Mg, good agreement was obtained between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in several mineral water samples. Limits of detection and quantification obtained were 0.02 and 0.07 mg L(-1), respectively. The method precision, calculated as the relative standard deviation for 10 consecutive measurements of a 2.5 mg L(-1) Ca solution, is 3.8%.

  20. Portable Dielectric Barrier Discharge-Atomic Emission Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Zhongchen; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xiangnan; Zhang, Hengnan; Wu, Wenhai; Gao, Jing; Jiang, Jie

    2017-02-21

    This paper describes the first demonstration of a portable dielectric barrier discharge-atomic emission spectrometer (DBD-AES). The instrument primarily consists of a miniature electro-thermal vaporizer (ETV), DBD, and optical signal acquisition units. It weighs only 4.5 kg and is powered by a 24 V DC battery with a maximum power consumption of 37 W. The accompanying software can be operated on a laptop computer. A specially designed quartz tube integrates the ETV unit with the DBD chamber. The effects of experimental parameters were investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) for mercury was 0.4 μg L(-1) (1.2 pg) with a sampling volume of 3 μL. The instrument is applicable for multielement analysis, and the LODs ranged from 0.16 to 11.65 μg L(-1) for Zn, Pb, Ag, Cd, Au, Cu, Mn, Fe, Cr, and As. The instrument was also validated by in-field analysis of seawater samples. The experimental results demonstrated the sensitivity, reliability, and practicality of the instrument.

  1. Characterization of helium/argon working gas systems in a radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission source. Part I: Optical emission, sputtering and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Steven J.; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Belkin, Mikhail; Caruso, Joseph A.

    1998-08-01

    Studies are performed to determine the influence of discharge gas composition (helium/argon working gas mixtures) on the analyte emission signal intensities, sputtering rates, and DC-bias characteristics of an analytical radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission spectroscopy (RF-GD-AES) source. As the partial pressure of He is increased from 0 to 15 torr, increased emission intensity is observed for a range of bulk and trace elements in NIST 1250 SRM (low alloy steel), regardless of the base pressure of Ar in the source (5 and 9 torr). In contrast to increases in analyte emission intensity of up to 300%, counterindicative decreases in the sputtering rates on the order of about 30-50% are observed. The magnitude of these effects depends on both the partial pressure of helium introduced to the source and the total pressure of the He and Ar gases. Use of relative emission yield (REY) to normalize changes in emission intensity to sputtering rates indicates that excitation efficiencies increase under these conditions. Increases in average electron energy and temperature appear to control this response. Decreases in both analyte emission intensities and sputter rates occur with increasing He partial pressure when the total pressure in the cell remains fixed (11 torr in these studies). Emission yields for the fixed pressure, mixed gas plasmas decrease as the partial pressure of He (He/Ar ratio) in the RF-GD source increases. In this case, decreases in electron number densities appear to dictate the lower REYs. Measurement of DC-bias values at the sample surface provide understanding with respect to the observed changes in sputtering rates as well as suggest the origins of changes in plasma electron energetics. Use of a diamond stylus profilometer provides both the quantitative sputter rate information as well as qualitative insights into the use of mixed gas plasmas for enhanced depth profiling capabilities. The analyte emission characteristics of these mixed gas

  2. Three-phase plasma arc atomic-emission spectrometric analysis of environmental samples using an ultrasonic nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Ghatass, Zekry F; Roston, Gamal D; Mohamed, Moustafa M

    2003-06-01

    Combination of an ultrasonic nebulizer and plasma excitation sources for spectrochemical analysis offers desirable features of low detection limits, high sample throughput, wide dynamic range of operation, acceptable precision and accuracy, and simultaneous quantitative analytical capabilities. Moreover, the ultrasonic nebulizer does not require sample preconcentration. Recently we have developed a three-phase plasma arc (TPPA) for atomic emission spectrochemical analysis. In the present work, to increase the analytical utility of the three-phase plasma system, an ultrasonic nebulizer was used for sample introduction. The effects of the argon gas flow rate, current, excitation temperature have been studied. The analytical calibration curves are obtained for Ca, Cr, Fe, Mg and Mn, and detection limits have been calculated. The present technique is used to determine the concentration of the elements Ca, Cr, Fe, Mg and Mn in airborne samples.

  3. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  4. Theoretical study of Na-atom emission from NaCl (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchin, Vladimir; Shluger, Alexander; Nakai, Yasuo; Itoh, Noriaki

    1994-04-01

    Several models for the elementary processes causing the emission of alkali atoms by electronic excitation of NaCl (100) surfaces have been investigated theoretically. First, the desorption of a Na atom neighboring an electronically excited F center on the surface is simulated using a quantum-mechanical embedded-cluster technique. It is shown that emission of a Na atom is energetically favorable. The kinetics of this process is shown to be controlled by the probability of a nonradiative transition between the two states: the excited state of the F center and that corresponding to a Na atom desorbing from the surface. The potential barrier for desorption of an excited Na atom from the excited F-center state is found to be 2.1 eV. It is also found that the energy for emission of a Na atom from a cluster of F centers (the F3 center) is considerably reduced (for a certain configuration of the defect) with respect to the similar energy for a single F center. The energy barrier for emission of a Na atom neighboring an F' center on the surface is calculated to be 1 eV. It is shown that the electronic excitation of kinklike sites, with a Na atom at the edge, can lead to a barrierless emission of a Na atom, leaving a Vk-type defect behind. The results of calculations are discussed critically on the basis of existing experimental data.

  5. Investigation of the atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules in CF4 plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Huiliang; Li, Jie; Tang, Caixue; Deng, Wenhui; Chen, Xianhua

    2016-10-01

    The surface chemistry reaction involved in the processing of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) produced from CF4 precursor has been explored. The atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules was investigated as they contribute to substrate etching and FC film formation during APPJ processing. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) spectra were acquired for CF4 plasma, relative concentrations of excited state species of F atoms and CF2 molecules were also dependent upon plasma parameters. The densities of F atoms increased dramatically with increasing applied RF power, whereas CF2 molecules decreased monotonically over the same power range, the subsequent electron impacted decomposition of plasma species after CF4 precursor fragmentation. The spectrum of the F atoms and CF2 molecules fallowed the same tendency with the increasing concentration of gas CF4, reaching the maximum at the 20sccm and 15sccm respectively, and then the emission intensity of reactive atoms decreased with more CF4 molecules participating. Addition certain amount O2 into CF4 plasma resulted in promoting CF4 dissociation, O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF2 molecules, which inhibit the compound of the F atoms, so with the increasing concentration of O2, the concentration of the CF2 molecules decreased and the emission intensities of F atoms showed the maximum at the O2/CF4 ratio of 20%. These results have led to the development of a scheme that illustrates the mechanisms of surface chemistry reaction and the affection of plasma parameters in CF4 plasma systems with respect to F and CF2 gas-phase species.

  6. Spatial and temporal variations in infrared emissions of the upper atmosphere. 1. Atomic oxygen (λ 63 μm) emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. I.; Medvedeva, I. V.; Perminov, V. I.; Khomich, V. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Rocket and balloon measurement data on atomic-oxygen (λ 63 µm) emission in the upper atmosphere are presented. The data from the longest (1989-2003) period of measurements of the atomic-oxygen (λ 63 µm) emission intensity obtained by spectral instruments on sounding balloons at an altitude of 38 km at midlatitudes have been systematized and analyzed. Regularities in diurnal and seasonal variations in the intensity of this emission, as well as in its relation with solar activity, have been revealed.

  7. Analytical evaluation of molecular electronic integrals using Poisson's equation: Exponential-type orbitals and atom pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absi, Noureddine; Hoggan, Philip

    The integral bottleneck in evaluating molecular energies arises from the two-electron contributions. These are difficult and time-consuming to evaluate, especially over exponential type orbitals, used here to ensure the correct behavior of atomic orbitals. The two-center two-electron integrals are essential to describe atom pairs in molecules and distinguish those that are bound. In this work on analytical integration, it is shown that the two-center Coulomb integrals involved can be expressed as one-electron kinetic energy-like integrals. This is accomplished using the fact that the Coulomb operator is a Green's function of the Laplacian. The ensuing integrals may be further simplified by defining spectral forms for the one-electron potential satisfying Poisson's equation therein. A sum of overlap integrals with the atomic orbital energy eigenvalue as a factor is then obtained to give the Coulomb energy. This is most easily evaluated by direct integration. The orbitals involved in three and four center integrals are translated to two centers. This is discussed very briefly. The evaluation of exchange energy is a straightforward extension of this work. The summation coefficients in spectral forms are evaluated analytically from Gaunt coefficients. The Poisson method may be used to calculate Coulomb energy integrals efficiently. For a single processor, gains of CPU time for a given chemical accuracy exceed a factor of 4. This method lends itself to efficient evaluation on a parallel computer.

  8. Phonon dispersion on Ag (100) surface: A modified analytic embedded atom method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Jun, Zhang; Chang-Le, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Within the harmonic approximation, the analytic expression of the dynamical matrix is derived based on the modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM) and the dynamics theory of surface lattice. The surface phonon dispersions along three major symmetry directions , and X¯M¯ are calculated for the clean Ag (100) surface by using our derived formulas. We then discuss the polarization and localization of surface modes at points X¯ and M¯ by plotting the squared polarization vectors as a function of the layer index. The phonon frequencies of the surface modes calculated by MAEAM are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data. It is found that the present results are generally in agreement with the referenced experimental or theoretical results, with a maximum deviation of 10.4%. The agreement shows that the modified analytic embedded atom method is a reasonable many-body potential model to quickly describe the surface lattice vibration. It also lays a significant foundation for studying the surface lattice vibration in other metals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471301 and 61078057), the Scientific Research Program Funded by Shaanxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 14JK1301), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20126102110045).

  9. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively.

  10. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction.

  11. Analytical model of atomic-force-microscopy force curves in viscoelastic materials exhibiting power law relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, J. S.; Santos, J. A. C.; Barros, E. B.; Alencar, L. M. R.; Cruz, W. T.; Ramos, M. V.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose an analytical model for the force-indentation relationship in viscoelastic materials exhibiting a power law relaxation described by an exponent n, where n = 1 represents the standard viscoelastic solid (SLS) model and n < 1 represents a fractional SLS model. To validate the model, we perform nanoindentation measurements of polyacrylamide gels with atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curves. We found exponents n < 1 that depend on the bisacrylamide concentration. We also demonstrate that the fitting of AFM force curves for varying load speeds can reproduce the dynamic viscoelastic properties of those gels measured with dynamic force modulation methods.

  12. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  13. THE EVOLUTION OF ATOMIC SPECTROSCOPY IN MEASURING TOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three decades of study of environmental conditions necessary for the protection of freshwater
    aquatic life have been limited by the development and application of analytical methodology utilizing atomic adsorption, atomic fluorescence, and atomic emission spectroscopy.
    The...

  14. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  15. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuichi; Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at SB steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  16. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shuichi Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-15

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at S{sub B} steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  17. Emission of fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms in low-density laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Christian; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Dickheuer, Sven

    2017-03-01

    The source of strong and broad emission of the Balmer-α line in mixed plasmas of hydrogen (or deuterium) and noble gases in front of metallic surfaces is a subject of controversial discussion of many plasma types. In this work the excitation source of the Balmer lines is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy in the plasma device PSI-2. Neutral fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms are produced by acceleration of hydrogen ions towards an electrode immersed into the plasma. By variation of the electrode potential the energy of ions and in turn of reflected fast atoms can be varied in the range of 40-300 eV. The fast atoms in front of the electrode are observed simultaneously by an Echelle spectrometer (0.001 nm/channel) and by an imaging spectrometer (0.01 nm/channel) up to few cm in the plasma. Intense excitation channels of the Balmer lines are observed when hydrogen is mixed with argon or with krypton. Especially in Ar-H and Ar-D mixed plasmas the emission of fast hydrogen atoms is very strong. Intermixing hydrogen with other noble gases (He, Ne or Xe) one observes the same effect however the emission is one order of magnitude less compared to Kr-H or Kr-D plasmas. It is shown, that the key process, impacting this emission, is the binary collision between the fast neutral hydrogen atom and the noble gas atom. Two possible sources of excitation are discussed in details: one is the excitation of hydrogen atoms by argon atoms in the ground state and the second one is the process of the so-called excitation transfer between the metastable states of noble gases and hydrogen. In the latter case the atomic data for excitation of Balmer lines are still not available in literature. Further experimental investigations are required to conclude on the source process of fast atom emission.

  18. High-pressure combustor exhaust emissions with improved air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A high-pressure combustor segment 0.456 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was tested with specially designed air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles at inlet-air temperatures of 340 to 755 k (610 deg to 1360 R), reference velocities of 12.4 to 26.1 meters per second (41 to 86 ft/sec), and fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.020. Increasing inlet-air pressure from 4 to 20 atmospheres generally increased smoke number and nitric oxide, but decreased carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon concentrations with air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles. Emission indexes for carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were lower at 4, 10, and 20 atmospheres, and nitric oxide emission indexes were lower at 10 and 20 atmospheres with air-atomizing than with pressure-atomizing nozzles.

  19. Visualization of Fermi's golden rule through imaging of light emission from atomic silver chains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Bobisch, C A; Ho, W

    2009-08-21

    Atomic-scale spatial imaging of one-dimensional chains of silver atoms allows Fermi's golden rule, a fundamental principle governing optical transitions, to be visualized. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to assemble a silver atom chain on a nickel-aluminum alloy surface. Photon emission was induced with electrons from the tip of the STM. The emission was spatially resolved with subnanometer resolution by changing the tip position along the chain. The number and positions of the emission maxima in the photon images match those of the nodes in the differential conductance images of particle-in-a-box states. This surprising correlation between the emission maxima and nodes in the density of states is a manifestation of Fermi's golden rule in real space for radiative transitions and provides an understanding of the mechanism of STM-induced light emission.

  20. Analytical screening of low emissions, high performance duct burners for supersonic cruise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. A.; Riecke, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical screening study was conducted to identify duct burner concepts capable of providing low emissions and high performance in advanced supersonic engines. Duct burner configurations ranging from current augmenter technology to advanced concepts such as premix-prevaporized burners were defined. Aerothermal and mechanical design studies provided the basis for screening these configurations using the criteria of emissions, performance, engine compatibility, cost, weight and relative risk. Technology levels derived from recently defined experimental low emissions main burners are required to achieve both low emissions and high performance goals. A configuration based on the Vorbix (Vortex burning and mixing) combustor concept was analytically determined to meet the performance goals and is consistent with the fan duct envelope of a variable cycle engine. The duct burner configuration has a moderate risk level compatible with the schedule of anticipated experimental programs.

  1. Study of gamma-ray emission by proton beam interaction with injected Boron atoms for future medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petringa, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Caliri, C.; Cuttone, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Larosa, G.; Manna, R.; Manti, L.; Marchese, V.; Marchetta, C.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Picciotto, A.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Russo, A. D.; Russo, G.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V.

    2017-03-01

    In this work an experimental and theoretical study of gamma-prompt emission has been carried out with the main aim being to understand to what extent this approach can be used during a treatment based on proton-boron fusion therapy. An experimental campaign, carried out with a high purity Germanium detector, has been performed to evaluate the gamma emission from two pure 11B and 10B targets. Furthermore, a set of analytical simulations, using the Talys nuclear reaction code has been performed and the calculated spectra compared with the experimental results. These comparisons allowed us to successfully validate Talys which was then used to estimate the gamma emission when a realistic Boron concentration was considered. Both simulations and experimental results suggest that the gamma emission is low at certain proton energies, thus in order to improve the imaging capabilities, while still maintaining the Boron therapeutic role, we propose the addition of natural Copper bound by a dipyrromethene, BodiPy, to boron atoms. Analytical simulations with Talys suggest that the characteristic spectrum of the copper prompt gamma-rays has several peaks in the energetic regions where the background is negligible.

  2. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  3. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  4. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-08-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized.

  5. Steelmaking process control using remote ultraviolet atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Samuel

    Steelmaking in North America is a multi-billion dollar industry that has faced tremendous economic and environmental pressure over the past few decades. Fierce competition has driven steel manufacturers to improve process efficiency through the development of real-time sensors to reduce operating costs. In particular, much attention has been focused on end point detection through furnace off gas analysis. Typically, off-gas analysis is done with extractive sampling and gas analyzers such as Non-dispersive Infrared Sensors (NDIR). Passive emission spectroscopy offers a more attractive approach to end point detection as the equipment can be setup remotely. Using high resolution UV spectroscopy and applying sophisticated emission line detection software, a correlation was observed between metal emissions and the process end point during field trials. This correlation indicates a relationship between the metal emissions and the status of a steelmaking melt which can be used to improve overall process efficiency.

  6. 40 CFR 86.1207-96 - Sampling and analytical systems; evaporative emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1207-96 Sampling and analytical systems... analyzers. (1) For gasoline-, liquefied petroleum gas-, natural gas- and methanol-fueled vehicles a...

  7. Preparation of three-dimensional entanglement for distant atoms in coupled cavities via atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shi-Lei; Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2014-01-01

    We propose a dissipative scheme to prepare a three-dimensional entangled state for two atoms trapped in separate coupled cavities. Our work shows that both atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay, which are two typical obstacles in unitary-dynamics-based schemes, are no longer detrimental, but necessary for three-dimensional entangled state preparation without specifying initial state and controlling the evolution time precisely. Final numerical simulation with one group of experimental parameters indicates that the performance of our scheme could be better than the unitary-dynamics-based scheme. PMID:25523944

  8. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  9. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-07-15

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  10. Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrometry (UVAS) and Liquid Atomic Emission Spectrometry (LAES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-10

    salinity information. The system worked fairly well, although the flow rate was less than optimum. However, after a deep freeze in early January, the...significantly smaller heat sink. The absorbance flow cell system was modified to include two flow cells. Having two flow cells allows the operator to...excitation spectra. After the emission power supply, the emission flow cell is the second most critical component of the LAES system . A diagram of the

  11. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  12. An analytic technique for statistically modeling random atomic clock errors in estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Minimum variance estimation requires that the statistics of random observation errors be modeled properly. If measurements are derived through the use of atomic frequency standards, then one source of error affecting the observable is random fluctuation in frequency. This is the case, for example, with range and integrated Doppler measurements from satellites of the Global Positioning and baseline determination for geodynamic applications. An analytic method is presented which approximates the statistics of this random process. The procedure starts with a model of the Allan variance for a particular oscillator and develops the statistics of range and integrated Doppler measurements. A series of five first order Markov processes is used to approximate the power spectral density obtained from the Allan variance.

  13. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanicky, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-06-01

    Tungsten carbide coatings (thickness 0.1-0.2 mm) containing 8.0, 12.2, 17.2 and 22.9% Co were studied with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES). Composition of these plasma sprayed deposits on steel disks was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and electron microprobe energy/wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The coatings were ablated by means of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm (10 Hz, 10 mJ per shot) coupled to an ICP echelle-based spectrometer equipped with a segmented charge-coupled device detector. Non-linear dependences of cobalt lines intensities on the Co percentage were observed both at a single spot ablation and at a sample translation. This behaviour could be attributed to a complex phase composition of the system W-C-Co. However, employing tungsten as internal standard the linear calibration was obtained for studied analytical lines Co II 228.616 nm, Co II 230.786 nm, Co II 236.379 nm and Co II 238.892 nm.

  14. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer warning diagnosis procedure using blank solution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoros, Christine; Salin, Eric D.

    1998-05-01

    Lines available while running a blank solution were used to monitor the analytical performance of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system in real time. Using H and Ar lines and their signal-to-background ratios (SBRs), simple rules in the form of a prediction table were developed by inspection of the data. These rules could be used for predicting changes in radio-frequency power, carrier gas flow rates, and sample introduction rate. The performance of the prediction table was good but not excellent. Another set of rules in the form of a decision tree was developed in an automated fashion using the C4.5 induction engine. The performance of the decision tree was superior to that of the prediction table. It appears that blank spectral information can be used to predict with over 90% accuracy when an ICP-AES is breaking down. However this is not as definitive at identifying the exact fault as some more exhaustive approaches involving the use of standard solutions.

  15. Low-Altitude Emission of Energetic Neutral Atoms: A New Diagnostic of the Energetics of Ion Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Nair, H.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new theoretical understanding of the emission of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) generated by the precipitation of energetic magnetospheric ions into the Earth’s monatomic oxygen (O) exosphere (200-800 km). This low altitude emission (LAE) is the brightest ENA source in images obtained from Astrid-1/PIPPI, IMAGE/MENA/HENA, and TWINS1/2. The upward ENA “albedo” from the precipitating protons in the energy range 1-100 keV can approach 50% of the incident proton intensity. Unlike FUV imaging, ENA imaging of the LAE allows us to extract the detailed (not integrated) energy spectrum of the precipitating protons. We have verified this claim by comparing ENA images from TWINS 1/2 with in situ ion spectra measured by DMSP spacecraft (~825 km altitude) flying simultaneously under the ENA LAE regions (Bazell et al., J. Geophys. Res., in press 2010, and also this Conference). Quantitative extraction of proton spectra from the ENA images requires a “thick-target” theory that treats properly the multiple atomic collisions (charge exchange of protons, stripping ENA H-atoms) and associated energy losses (including ionization and excitation). Analytic solutions to the coupled proton/H-atom transport equations have been obtained, and they provide quantitative insight into the strong dependence of the ENA LAE upon the pitch angle and the energy of the precipitating protons. Since global ENA images of LAE can be obtained with exposure times of a minute or so during large geomagnetic storms, the distribution in magnetic latitude and local time of their evolving spectra contain critical diagnostics of the physics of not only the precipitation process, but also of the acceleration of the energetic ions themselves. Simulated 24 keV ENA low altitude emission viewed from TWINS-2 generated by precipitating protons below a DMSP pass (Bazell et al., JGR, in press, 2010).

  16. The atomic gas in outer disks in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Luo, Yu

    2017-03-01

    We use semi-analytic models of galaxy formation L-Galaxies based on ΛCDM cosmology to study the HI gas component in galaxy outskirts. We adopt the radially-resolved version of the models by Fu et al. (2013), which includes both atomic and molecular gas component in interstellar medium. This model has been recently updated by Luo et al. (2016) to include cold gas stripping in the outer disk regions of the satellite galaxies by ram pressure. In our models, we can perfectly reproduce the HI size-mass relation, which is discovered by Broeils & Rhee (1997) and confirmed by many subsequent observations. In our model, the reason for such tight correlation between HI size and mass is atomic-molecular phase conversion in high gas surface density regions while HI ionization in low gas surface density region, which leads to very narrow distribution of HI mean surface density. The models also reproduce the universal exponential HI radial profiles in galaxy outskirts found by Bluedisk (Wang et al. 2013), which arises from cold gas accretion onto the galaxy disks in exponentially profiles.

  17. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  18. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-07

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures.

  19. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-04-15

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  20. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  1. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  2. Analytic basis set for high-Z atomic QED calculations: Heavy He-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, D.J.; Snyderman, N.J.

    1997-04-01

    A relativistic Sturmian analytic basis set representation for the Coulomb-Dirac Green function, previously studied by Zapryagaev, Manakov, and Pal{close_quote}chikov [Opt. Spectrosc. {bold 52}, 248 (1982)], is investigated for application to high-Z atomic QED calculations. This pseudoeigenfunction representation follows from exact identities starting from the Whittaker function representation. It eliminates the radial ordering problem of that representation, and so is particularly useful for numerical calculation of the perturbation theory Feynman diagrams with more than one electron Green function. While the Green function represents discrete bound states, and both positive and negative energy continuum states, the Sturmian (bound-state-like) form for the pseudoeigenfunctions makes it possible to more analytically calculate matrix elements for full photon exchange, reducing numerical problems for high photon frequency. For He-like Fm (Z=100) we calculate the perturbation theory equivalent of the Dirac-Fock-Breit ground-state energy, agreeing well with the Grant code and with the numerical B-spline basis set approach results of Blundell, Mohr, Johnson, and Sapirstein [Phys. Rev. A {bold 48}, 2615 (1993)]. Preliminary results on the relativistic and QED correlation are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  4. Analytic basis set for high-Z atomic QED calculations: Heavy He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, D. J.; Snyderman, N. J.

    1997-04-01

    A relativistic Sturmian analytic basis set representation for the Coulomb-Dirac Green function, previously studied by Zapryagaev, Manakov, and Pal'chikov [Opt. Spectrosc. 52, 248 (1982)], is investigated for application to high-Z atomic QED calculations. This pseudoeigenfunction representation follows from exact identities starting from the Whittaker function representation. It eliminates the radial ordering problem of that representation, and so is particularly useful for numerical calculation of the perturbation theory Feynman diagrams with more than one electron Green function. While the Green function represents discrete bound states, and both positive and negative energy continuum states, the Sturmian (bound-state-like) form for the pseudoeigenfunctions makes it possible to more analytically calculate matrix elements for full photon exchange, reducing numerical problems for high photon frequency. For He-like Fm (Z=100) we calculate the perturbation theory equivalent of the Dirac-Fock-Breit ground-state energy, agreeing well with the Grant code and with the numerical B-spline basis set approach results of Blundell, Mohr, Johnson, and Sapirstein [Phys. Rev. A 48, 2615 (1993)]. Preliminary results on the relativistic and QED correlation are also reported.

  5. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation.

  6. Sustainability of Rotrode Atomic Emission Spectrometry for Wear Deris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-04

    Most customers will have increasing expectations as a result of normal consumerism and readily apparent technological progress. 1.2. Rotrode atomic...experience. It can be run on a ship or a tarmac. Although environmental conditions and operator proficiency, among other factors, can affect the quality of...oil, LIBS is gaining headway in environmental , structural, pathological, and pharmaceutical testing. Lasers will continue to get smaller, cheaper, more

  7. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  8. Spontaneous emission from the atom stabilized by a strong high-frequency laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The spontaneous emission of a quantum system driven by a high-intensity, high-frequency classical laser field is analyzed. The study is based on the accurate consideration of the quantum system interacting with vacuum-quantized field modes in the first order of perturbation theory, while the intense laser field is considered classically beyond this theory. It is demonstrated that the spectrum of the spontaneous emission can be used for analyzing the strong-field dynamics and the structure of the energy spectrum of an atomic system. In particular, it is found that in high-frequency fields (where the energy of the laser quanta is greater than the ionization potential) atoms manifest the features of the Kramers-Henneberger atom. It is also found that in the stabilization regime, the atom emits both odd and even laser radiation harmonics.

  9. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  10. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  11. Developments in the application of gas chromatography with atomic emission (plus mass spectrometric) detection.

    PubMed

    van Stee, L L P; Brinkman, U A Th

    2008-04-04

    Capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection is a highly element-selective and sensitive detection technique for many non-metal as well as metallic elements. A 3-5 order of magnitude element/carbon selectivity, compound-independent calibration and the possibility to calculate (partial) molecular formulae are some of the attractive features of the technique. In the present review, the emphasis is on real-life applications for non-metals such as sulphur, phosphorus, nitrogen and the halogens, and on the potential of combined atomic emission/mass spectrometric detection.

  12. Analytic expressions for atomic layer deposition: Coverage, throughput, and materials utilization in cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, the authors present analytic models for atomic layer deposition (ALD) in three common experimental configurations: cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD. These models, based on the plug-flow and well-mixed approximations, allow us to determine the minimum dose times and materials utilization for all three configurations. A comparison between the three models shows that throughput and precursor utilization can each be expressed by universal equations, in which the particularity of the experimental system is contained in a single parameter related to the residence time of the precursor in the reactor. For the case of cross-flow reactors, the authors show how simple analytic expressions for the reactor saturation profiles agree well with experimental results. Consequently, the analytic model can be used to extract information about the ALD surface chemistry (e.g., the reaction probability) by comparing the analytic and experimental saturation profiles, providing a useful tool for characterizing new and existing ALD processes.

  13. Analytic Inversion of Emission Lines of Arbitrary Optical Depth for the Structure of Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Hendry, M. A.

    2000-07-01

    We derive a method for inverting emission-line profiles formed in supernova ejecta. The derivation assumes spherical symmetry and homologous expansion [i.e., v(r)~r], is analytic, and even takes account of occultation by a pseudophotosphere. Previous inversion methods have been developed that are restricted to optically thin lines, but the particular case of homologous expansion permits an analytic result for lines of arbitrary optical depth. In fact, we show that the quantity that is generically retrieved is the run of line intensity Iλ with radius in the ejecta. This result is quite general and so could be applied to resonance lines, recombination lines, etc. As a specific example, we show how to derive the run of (Sobolev) optical depth τλ with radius in the case of a pure resonance scattering emission line.

  14. Single-Photon Emission of a Hydrogenlike Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Implementing a previously obtained, original solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a nucleus ( Ze) expressed in terms of the wave function of the corresponding Schrödinger equation and its derivatives in spherical coordinates and the spin projection operator Σ3 associated with the eigenfunction, taking into account in each component of the spinor the leading term of the expansion in the small parameter ( Zα), α = e 2 / ħc ≈ 1 / 137, the partial probabilities W of emission of a photon ( Zα)* → ( Zα) + γ have been calculated. Here two orthogonal states of the linear polarization of the photon, and also the spin states of the electron, which previously had not been taken into consideration, have been taken into account in the transverse gauge. It turns out that the probabilities W of emission of a photon per unit time for any allowed transitions are proportional to (Zα)4, as was previously accepted, and the selection rules for the quantum number m have the usual form ∆ m = 0,±1. It was found that a spin flip does not take place during emission. In contrast to the customary situation with the selection rules for the quantum number l being of the form ∆ l = ±1, for ∆ m = ±1 there also exist integrals over dcosθ which are not equal to zero for undetermined odd values of ∆ l. In this, and also in a fundamentally different dependence of the amplitude on the quantum numbers consist the differences from the traditional approach to the problem. Necessary conditions are formulated, under the fulfillment of which the selection rules for l are not changed, having values ∆ l = ±1 for arbitrary ∆ m, but it was not possible, however, to give a complete proof of these rules.

  15. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  16. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  17. Incorporating nuclear vibrational energies into the "atom in molecules" analysis: An analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharabaghi, Masumeh; Shahbazian, Shant

    2017-04-01

    The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is based on the clamped nucleus paradigm and solely working with the electronic wavefunctions, so does not include nuclear vibrations in the AIM analysis. On the other hand, the recently extended version of the QTAIM, called the multi-component QTAIM (MC-QTAIM), incorporates both electrons and quantum nuclei, i.e., those nuclei treated as quantum waves instead of clamped point charges, into the AIM analysis using non-adiabatic wavefunctions. Thus, the MC-QTAIM is the natural framework to incorporate the role of nuclear vibrations into the AIM analysis. In this study, within the context of the MC-QTAIM, the formalism of including nuclear vibrational energy in the atomic basin energy is developed in detail and its contribution is derived analytically using the recently proposed non-adiabatic Hartree product nuclear wavefunction. It is demonstrated that within the context of this wavefunction, the quantum nuclei may be conceived pseudo-adiabatically as quantum oscillators and both isotropic harmonic and anisotropic anharmonic oscillator models are used to compute the zero-point nuclear vibrational energy contribution to the basin energies explicitly. Inspired by the results gained within the context of the MC-QTAIM analysis, a heuristic approach is proposed within the context of the QTAIM to include nuclear vibrational energy in the basin energy from the vibrational wavefunction derived adiabatically. The explicit calculation of the basin contribution of the zero-point vibrational energy using the uncoupled harmonic oscillator model leads to results consistent with those derived from the MC-QTAIM.

  18. Incorporating nuclear vibrational energies into the "atom in molecules" analysis: An analytical study.

    PubMed

    Gharabaghi, Masumeh; Shahbazian, Shant

    2017-04-21

    The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is based on the clamped nucleus paradigm and solely working with the electronic wavefunctions, so does not include nuclear vibrations in the AIM analysis. On the other hand, the recently extended version of the QTAIM, called the multi-component QTAIM (MC-QTAIM), incorporates both electrons and quantum nuclei, i.e., those nuclei treated as quantum waves instead of clamped point charges, into the AIM analysis using non-adiabatic wavefunctions. Thus, the MC-QTAIM is the natural framework to incorporate the role of nuclear vibrations into the AIM analysis. In this study, within the context of the MC-QTAIM, the formalism of including nuclear vibrational energy in the atomic basin energy is developed in detail and its contribution is derived analytically using the recently proposed non-adiabatic Hartree product nuclear wavefunction. It is demonstrated that within the context of this wavefunction, the quantum nuclei may be conceived pseudo-adiabatically as quantum oscillators and both isotropic harmonic and anisotropic anharmonic oscillator models are used to compute the zero-point nuclear vibrational energy contribution to the basin energies explicitly. Inspired by the results gained within the context of the MC-QTAIM analysis, a heuristic approach is proposed within the context of the QTAIM to include nuclear vibrational energy in the basin energy from the vibrational wavefunction derived adiabatically. The explicit calculation of the basin contribution of the zero-point vibrational energy using the uncoupled harmonic oscillator model leads to results consistent with those derived from the MC-QTAIM.

  19. Slurry sample introduction with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    1993-04-01

    The successful direct introduction of aqueous slurry samples into a highly efficient TE 101 microwave plasma has been demonstrated. Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the cavity with no desolvation apparatus. A V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer was evaluated for use with high solids content solutions. Slurry concentrations up to 10% m/v were used for the microwave induced plasma work with calibration by the standard additions method. Results are presented for the analysis of two NRCC Standard Reference Materials, i.e. TORT-1 (Lobster Hepatopancreas) and PACS-21 (Marine Sediment). Agreement between analytical results and certified values for the test elements Cd, Cu, Fe and Zn (in the range of 28-850 μg/g) was good. No memory effects were evident and the nebulizer system had a rapid clean-out time.

  20. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  1. Chemical analysis of impurity boron atoms in diamond using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D

    2008-07-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  2. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  4. Effects of atomic oxygen on OH Meinel emission bands in the MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Savigny, Christian; Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr

    The OH Meinel airglow is one of the most prominent features of the terrestrial nightglow and has been employed for several decades to remotely sense the mesopause region. However, some aspects of the OH kinetics are still not fully understood. In this contribution we present recent results on the importance of quenching by atomic oxygen on the vertical distribution of different OH Meinel bands. OH Meinel emissions from different vibrational levels are known to occur at slightly different altitudes in the terrestrial airglow with emissions originating from higher vibrational levels peaking at higher altitudes. Our earlier model studies suggested quenching by atomic oxygen to be a principal cause of these vertical shifts. Here we employ the tropical mesopause region - characterized by pronounced semiannual variations - as a natural laboratory to test the hypothesis that vertical shifts between different OH Meinel bands are a consequence of quenching by atomic oxygen. Multiyear nighttime satellite measurements of OH(3-1) and OH(6-2) volume emission rate profiles and atomic oxygen with SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) on Envisat are used. The MLT atomic oxygen profiles are retrieved from measurements of the O(1S-1D) green line emission based on the accepted 2-step excitation scheme and a semi-empirical photochemical model. The results clearly demonstrate that vertical shifts between the OH bands investigated are indeed correlated with the amount of atomic oxygen in the upper mesosphere, corroborating the hypothesis that quenching by atomic oxygen is a driver for the vertical shifts between different OH Meinel bands.

  5. The design and characteristics of direct current glow discharge atomic emission source operated with plain and hollow cathodes.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, A; Mahmood, M I

    2008-01-07

    A compact direct current glow discharge atomic emission source has been designed and constructed for analytical applications. This atomic emission source works very efficiently at a low-input electrical power. The design has some features that make it distinct from that of the conventional Grimm glow discharge source. The peculiar cathode design offered greater flexibility on size and shape of the sample. As a result the source can be easily adopted to operate in Plain or Hollow Cathode configuration. I-V and spectroscopic characteristics of the source were compared while operating it with plain and hollow copper cathodes. It was observed that with hollow cathode, the source can be operated at a less input power and generates greater Cu I and Cu II line intensities. Also, the intensity of Cu II line rise faster than Cu I line with argon pressure for both cathodes. But the influence of pressure on Cu II lines was more significant when the source is operated with hollow cathode.

  6. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Ivaşcu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, Walter

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (208Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 1010-1030 s: 5He, 8-10Be, 11,12B, 12-16C, 13-17N, 15-22O, 18-23F, 20-26Ne, 23-28Na, 23-30Mg, 27-32Al, 28-36Si, 31-39P, 32-42S, 35-45Cl, 37-47Ar, 40-49 K, 42-51. . .Ca, 44-53 Sc, 46-53Ti, 48-54V, and 49-55 Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  7. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  8. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  9. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  10. DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-08

    In this presentation, the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features and its relation to fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using various irradiation methods (ns, fs, filaments) will be discussed in detail along with its implications for remote sensing applications.

  11. Oxygen dayglow emissions as proxies for atomic oxygen and ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Valentine A.; Martyshenko, Kseniia V.; Manuilova, Rada O.; Feofilov, Artem G.

    2016-09-01

    The main goal of this study is to propose and then to justify a set of methods for retrieving the [O] and [O3] altitude distributions from the observation of emissions of the excited oxygen molecules and O(1D) atom at daytime in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. In other words, we propose retrieving the [O] and [O3] using the proxies. One of the main requirements for the proxy is that the measured value should be directly related to a variable of our interest while, at the same time, the influence of the proxies on [O3] and [O(3P)] should be minimal. For a comprehensive analysis of different O3 and O(3P) proxies, we use a full model of electronic vibrational kinetics of excited products of O3 and O2 photolysis in the MLT of the Earth. Based on this model, we have tested five excited components; namely, O2(b1Σg+, v = 0, 1, 2), O2(a1Δg , v = 0) and O(1D) as the [O3] and [O(3P)] proxies in the MLT region. Using an analytical approach to sensitivity studies and uncertainty analysis, we have therefore developed the following methods of [O(3P)] and [O3] retrieval, which utilise electronic-vibrational transitions from the oxygen molecule second singlet level (O2(b1 Σg+, v = 0, 1, 2). We conclude that O2(b1 Σg+, v = 2) and O2(b1 Σg+, v = 0) are preferable proxies for [O(3P)] retrieval in the altitude range of 90-140 km, while O2(b1 Σg+, v = 1) is the best proxy for [O3] retrieval in the altitude range of 50-98 km.

  12. Atomic Data and Emission Line Intensities for CA VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work we calculate energy levels, transition probabilities and electron-ion collisional excitation rates for the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3) and 3s(sup 2)3p3d configurations of the silicon-like ion Ca VII. The total number of intermediate coupling levels considered is 27. Collision strengths are calculated at seven incident electron energies: 8, 10, 15, 20, 30,40 and 60 Ry, using the Distorted Wave approximation and a 5-configuration model. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities and are used to calculate level populations and line emissivities under the assumption of statistical equilibrium. Line intensity ratios are calculated and compared with observed values measured from SERTS and SOHO/CDS spectra. The diagnostic potential of Ca VII is demonstrated, with particular emphasis on the possibility to measure the Ne/Ca relative abundance through simultaneous observations of Ca VII and N VI lines. Ca VII proves to be an excellent tool for the study of the FIP effect in the solar transition region.

  13. Quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers: Exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhu, S. )

    1989-11-15

    A quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers (CEL's) is developed, starting from the exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian for cascade three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode radiation field. We consider the situation where the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of three atomic levels and derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using a quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The master equation is transformed into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering {ital Q} function. The drift coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation enable us to study the steady-state operation of the two-photon CEL's analytically. We have studied both resonant two-photon CEL for which there is no threshold, and off-resonant two-photon CEL for which there exists a threshold. In both cases the initial atomic coherences provide phase locking, and squeezing in the phase quadrature of the field is found. The off-resonant two-photon CEL can build up from a vacuum when its linear gain is larger than the cavity loss (even without population inversion). Maximum squeezing is found in the no-population-inversion region with the laser intensities far below saturation in both cases, which are more than 90% for the resonant two-photon CEL and nearly 50% for the off-resonant one. Approximate steady-state {ital Q} functions are obtained for the resonant two-photon CEL and, in certain circumstances, for the off-resonant one.

  14. Direct Measurements of Terahertz Meta-atoms with Near-Field Emission of Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serita, Kazunori; Darmo, Juraj; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2017-09-01

    We present the direct measurements of terahertz meta-atoms, an elementary unit of metamaterials, by using locally generated terahertz waves in the near-field region. In contrast to a conventional far-field terahertz spectroscopy or imaging, our technique features the localized emission of coherent terahertz pulses on a sub-wavelength scale, which has a potential for visualizing details of dynamics of each meta-atom. The obtained data show the near-field coupling among the meta-atoms and the impact of the electric field distribution from the excited meta-atom to neighbor meta-atoms. The observable LC resonance response is enhanced with an increase of numbers of meta-atoms. Furthermore, our approach also has a potential for visualizing the individual mode of meta-atom at different terahertz irradiation spots. These data can help us to understand the important role of the meta-atom in metamaterials and develop the novel terahertz components and devices such as active terahertz metamaterial and compact, high-sensitive bio-sensor devices.

  15. Direct Measurements of Terahertz Meta-atoms with Near-Field Emission of Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serita, Kazunori; Darmo, Juraj; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2017-07-01

    We present the direct measurements of terahertz meta-atoms, an elementary unit of metamaterials, by using locally generated terahertz waves in the near-field region. In contrast to a conventional far-field terahertz spectroscopy or imaging, our technique features the localized emission of coherent terahertz pulses on a sub-wavelength scale, which has a potential for visualizing details of dynamics of each meta-atom. The obtained data show the near-field coupling among the meta-atoms and the impact of the electric field distribution from the excited meta-atom to neighbor meta-atoms. The observable LC resonance response is enhanced with an increase of numbers of meta-atoms. Furthermore, our approach also has a potential for visualizing the individual mode of meta-atom at different terahertz irradiation spots. These data can help us to understand the important role of the meta-atom in metamaterials and develop the novel terahertz components and devices such as active terahertz metamaterial and compact, high-sensitive bio-sensor devices.

  16. Solid phase microextraction capillary gas chromatography combined with furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry for speciation of mercury in fish tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Patricia; Campos, Reinaldo C.; Mester, Zoltan; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    2003-03-01

    The use of solid phase microextraction in conjunction with tandem gas chromatography-furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry (SPME-GC-FAPES) was evaluated for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish tissue. Samples were digested with methanolic potassium hydroxide, derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate and extracted by SPME. After the SPME extraction, species were separated by GC and detected by FAPES. All experimental parameters were optimized for best separation and analytical response. A repeatability precision of typically 2% can be achieved with long-term (3 months) reproducibility precision of 4.3%. Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DOLT-2 and TORT-2 from the National Research Council of Canada were analyzed to verify the accuracy of this technique. Detection limits of 1.5 ng g -1 for methylmercury and 0.7 ng g -1 for inorganic mercury in biological tissues were obtained.

  17. Correlation between the Gas Temperature and the Atomization Behavior of Analyte Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Estimated with a Continuum-light-source Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    In flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), the gas temperature for two types of the gas compositions, which was estimated based on a two-line method by using a simultaneous multi-wavelength spectrometer, on which a line pair of ruthenium, Ru I 372.692 nm and Ru I 372.803 nm having different excitation energies, was measured at the same time. Also using the spectrometer system, the absorption signals of both iron and ruthenium, whose oxides had different thermodynamic properties: the latter oxide was decomposed much more easily than the former one, were investigated with a nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, in comparison with an air - acetylene flame. The fuel/oxidant ratio of both the flames as well as the height of the optical path was varied as an experimental parameter. The atomization behavior of iron and ruthenium, which could be deduced from a variation in their absorption signals, was considered to be dependent not only on the gas temperature but on reducing atmosphere of the flame gas, which might be attributed to reducing radicals in a fuel-excess flame consisting of nitrous oxide. In the nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, a broader optical path having a constant and higher temperature was obtained, thus contributing to formation of analyte atoms with a stable atomization efficiency and eventually to better precision in the analytical result in FAAS.

  18. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dancsak, Stacia E; Silva, Sidnei G; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Jones, Bradley T; Donati, George L

    2014-01-02

    High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg(-1) for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg(-1) for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg(-1) for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are comparable to other traditional methods.

  19. Characterization of hydrocarbon emissions from green sand foundry core binders by analytical pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Salama, Magda; Goudzwaard, Jeff; Furness, James C

    2007-11-15

    Analytical pyrolysis was conducted to study a relative comparison of the hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas emissions of three foundry sand binders as follows: (a) conventional phenolic urethane resin, (b) biodiesel phenolic urethane resin, and (c) collagen-based binder. These binders are used in the metal casting industry for making cores that are used to create internal cavities within castings. In this study, the core samples were flash pyrolyzed in a Curie-point pyrolyzer at 920 degrees C with a heating rate of about 3000 degrees C/sec. This simulated some key features of the fast heating conditions that the core binders would experience at the metal-core interface when molten metal is poured into green sand molds. The core samples were also pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) from ambient temperature to 1000 degrees C with a heating rate of 30 degrees C/min, and this simulated key features of the slow heating conditions that the core binders would experience at distances that are further away from the metal-core interface during casting cooling. Hydrocarbon emissions from flash pyrolysis were analyzed with a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, while hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas (CO and CO2) emissions from TGA pyrolysis were monitored with mass spectrometry. The prominent hazardous air pollutant emissions during pyrolysis of the three binders were phenol, cresols, benzene, and toluene for the conventional phenolic urethane resin and biodiesel resin, and they were benzene and toluene for the collagen-based binder. It was also found that volatile organic compound and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions considerably decreased in order from conventional phenolic urethane resin to biodiesel resin to collagen-based binder. These results have shown some similarity with those for stack emission testing conducted at demonstration scale and/or full-scale foundries, and the similar trends in the two sets of results offered promise that bench

  20. Analytical model of the nonlinear dynamics of cantilever tip-sample surface interactions for various acoustic atomic force microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-04-01

    An analytical model is developed of the interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope with the sample surface that treats the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. To maintain equilibrium, the volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any). The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and amplitude modulation-atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) (intermittent contact mode). The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of A-AFM image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample. Applications of the model to measurements of LaRC™-CP2 polyimide film using RDF-AFUM and AM-AFM images predict maximum variations in the Young modulus of 24% and 18%, respectively, over a common scan area. Both predictions are in good agreement with the value of 21% obtained from independent mechanical stretching measurements of the polyimide sheet material.

  1. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  2. Multiple scattering of matter waves: An analytic model of the refractive index for atomic and molecular gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2010-08-15

    We present an analytic model of the refractive index for matter waves propagating through atomic or molecular gases. The model, which combines the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) treatment of the long-range attraction with the Fraunhofer model treatment of the short-range repulsion, furnishes a refractive index in compelling agreement with recent experiments of Jacquey et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 240405 (2007)] on Li atom matter waves passing through dilute noble gases. We show that the diffractive contribution, which arises from scattering by a two-dimensional 'hard core' of the potential, is essential for obtaining a correct imaginary part of the refractive index.

  3. [Research on the atomic emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma process].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiang; Li, Na; Xu, Lu; Wang, Bo; Jin, Hui-Liang

    2013-02-01

    In the reaction of the atmospheric pressure plasma process, the heat stable process of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet has a direct impact on the removal rate, CF4 is the provider of active F* atom, O2 is important auxiliary gas, and they play an important role in the process. In order to research the rule of the concentration of the 3 parameters upon the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used for processing and the spectrometer was used to monitor the changes in the process. The experiment indicates that: when the heat is stable, the concentration of the active F* atom essentially remains unchanged; with increasing the concentration of gas CF4, the spectrum of the active F* atom has self-absorption phenomena, so using the atomic emission spectroscopy method to monitor the changes in the concentration of active F* atom generated by CF4 is not completely exact; because O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF4, which inhibits the compound of the active F* atom, so in a certain range with increasing the concentration of gas O2, the concentration of the active F* atom becomes strong.

  4. Spectral Emission of fast non-Maxwellian Atoms at metallic Surfaces in low density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickheuer, Sven; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Brandt, Christian; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    We have observed Doppler shifted components of the Balmer-lines emitted by fast non-Maxwellian atoms using different targets in a linear magnetized plasma in the PSI-2 device. In a pure hydrogen plasma the Doppler shifted components of the Balmer emission lines cannot be detected above the signal-to-noise-ratio. However, in a mixed H/Ar plasma with composition of 1:1 the Doppler red- and blue-shifted components can be clearly observed. The Balmer-lines are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy at observations angles of 35° and 90°. For target materials we use Ag, Pd, Fe and C. An acceleration potential can be applied to the target to change the kinetic energy of the incoming ions between 40 and 200 eV enabling the observation of the Doppler shifted components. The emission mechanism is discussed in details and is probably due to excitation transfer from metastable argon atoms to the fast hydrogen atoms. The Doppler shifted signal can be used to determine the properties of the surfaces, e.g., the energy and angular distribution of reflected atoms. Also the spectral reflectance of the target surface can be obtained and tested against the reference data and measurements with light calibration sources.

  5. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  6. An Analytic Inversion of Emission Lines of Arbitrary Optical Depth for the Structure of Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Hendry, M. A.

    2000-05-01

    We have derived a method for inverting emission line profiles formed in supernova ejecta. The derivation assumes spherical symmetry and homologous expansion (i.e., v(r) r). The inversion is analytic and even takes account of occultation by a pseudo-photosphere. Previous inversion methods have been developed which are restricted to optically thin lines, but the particular case of homologous expansion permits an analytic inversion for lines of arbitrary optical depth. In fact, we show that the quantity that is generically retrieved is the run of line intensity Iλ with radius in the ejecta shell. This result could be applied to resonance lines, recombination lines, or lines dominated by collisional de-excitation.

  7. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, H.H.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  8. Design and characterization of a theta-pinch imploding thin film plasma source for atomic emission spectrochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Edward C; Goldberg, Joel M

    2011-01-01

    A new atomization device for direct atomic spectrochemical analysis has been developed that uses the theta-pinch configuration to generate a pulsed, high-energy-density plasma at atmospheric pressure. Energy from a 20-kV, 6.05-μF capacitive electrical discharge was inductively coupled to a sacrificial aluminum thin film to produce a cylindrical plasma. Current waveform analysis indicates an average power dissipation of 0.5 MW in the plasma. Electromagnetic modeling studies were used to identify theta-pinch designs possessing characteristics favorable to both plasma initiation and plasma heating. The discharge was most robust when the induced current and rate of magnetic field change were maximized. Minimizing the ratio of the coil's width to its radius was also critical. Counter to intuition, a larger diameter was found to be more successful. Spectroscopic studies indicate that the discharge forms a heterogeneous plasma with a dense, cylindrical plasma sheet confined by the walls of the discharge tube surrounding a less energetic plasma in the center. Al(II) emission in the outer plasma cylinder was temporally aligned with the induced current whereas in the center it aligns with the magnetic field. Ionization of support gas species (Ar, He, and air) was not observed, although the identity of the gas had a significant influence on the plasma reproducibility. The optimized design utilized a 5.5-turn, 19-mm-diameter theta coil with argon as the support gas. Sb(I) emission from an antimony oxide solid powder sample deposited on the thin film was observed primarily in the outer part of the plasma. Analyte emission shows contributions from magnetic compression early in the discharge and from the induced current late in the discharge. The discharge produced analytically useful signals from solid antimony oxide samples. Using spatially and temporally resolved detection, the line-to-background ratio for Sb(I) was found to be greater than 4 for emission integrated from 55

  9. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  10. Determination of barium, chromium, cadmium, manganese, lead and zinc in atmospheric particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boevski, I. V.; Daskalova, N.; Havezov, I.

    2000-11-01

    The present paper has shown that the Q concept, as proposed by P.W.J.M. Boumans, J.J.A.M. Vrakking, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 43 (1988) 69, can be used as a basic methodology in the determination of Ba, Cr, Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in pairs of atmospheric particles by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The data base of Q values for line interference [ QIj(λ a)] and Q values for wing background interference [ QWJ(Δλ a)] were obtained in our former work [N. Daskalova, Iv. Boevski, Spectral interferences in the determination of trace elements in environmental materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 54 (1999) 1099-1122]. The samples of atmospheric particles were collected by the Bergerhoff method. The ICP-AES determination was performed after sample digestion with aqua regia. Q values were used for the calculation of both the total interfering signal under the analysis lines and the true detection limits, depending on the matrix constituents in the different samples. Comparative data for the concentration of analytes were obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and direct current arc atomic emission spectrographic method (dc arc-AES).

  11. Characteristics of krypton ion emission from a gas field ionization source with a single atom tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichi, Hiroyasu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Hashizume, Tomihiro

    2017-06-01

    A scanning ion beam instrument equipped with a gas field ionization source (GFIS) has been commercialized, but only helium and neon are currently available as GFISs. The characteristics of krypton ion emission from a single atom tip (SAT) have not been reported yet. In this study, the characteristics of krypton ion emission were investigated by field ion microscopy. At 65 K, the krypton ion emission current reached approximately 40 pA, which is 1 order of magnitude higher than that at 130 K. As the krypton gas pressure was increased, the krypton ion current increased. At a pressure of 0.3 Pa, the emission current was anticipated to reach 200 pA, which may be high enough for nanofabrication. The variation of the krypton ion current was as low as 5% in one hour. We concluded that a krypton ion beam instrument equipped with a GFIS will be a powerful tool for nanofabrication.

  12. Statistical evaluation of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric method for routine water quality testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Jones, B.E.; Stein, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    In an interlaboratory test, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was compared with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of 17 major and trace elements in 100 filtered natural water samples. No unacceptable biases were detected. The analysis precision of ICP-AES was found to be equal to or better than alternative methods. Known-addition recovery experiments demonstrated that the ICP-AES determinations are accurate to between plus or minus 2 and plus or minus 10 percent; four-fifths of the tests yielded average recoveries of 95-105 percent, with an average relative standard deviation of about 5 percent.

  13. Analytical techniques for sesquiterpene emission rate studies in vegetation enclosure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Bocquet, Florence; Pollmann, Jan; Revermann, Tobias

    Sesquiterpene (SQT) compounds (C 15H 24) and their oxygenated alcohol and ketone derivatives are biogenic volatile organic compounds that have been identified in emissions from vegetation. SQT emission rates and landscape flux estimates are highly uncertain. Reliable ambient flux measurements have not been possible because of low-ambient concentrations, rapid atmospheric reactions (prohibiting ambient tower flux measurements), and analytical challenges and uncertainties that stem from the low volatility of SQT. Standards from an in situ capillary diffusion system with 18 SQT compounds and four other organic compounds (geranylacetone, 1,3,5-tri-isopropylbenzene, diphenylmethane, nonylbenzene) were used to thoroughly investigate experimental procedures for SQT emission rate studies by vegetation enclosure techniques. Recovery rates in tubing materials, sampling bags, leaf cuvettes, on six solid adsorbent materials (Tenax TA, Tenax GR, Carbotrap, Carbotrap C, Unibeads, Glass Beads) for gas chromatography analysis, and gas chromatography retention indices and mass spectral fragmentation patterns were determined. SQT compounds were found to exhibit a high degree of stickiness to all materials tested. However, the non-oxygenated SQT can be recovered in enclosure experiments for quantitative emission rate determination after careful consideration of the analytical conditions. It is utmost important to allow sufficient purging and equilibration times for all materials in contact with the sample air. In contrast oxygenated SQT were irreversibly lost in enclosure experiments which made their quantitative measurement prohibitive. Results for the other organic compounds were similar and indicate that these data mostly stem from the volatility of these compounds. Consequently, the findings of this study provide guidelines for the analysis of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in the ˜C13-C17 volatility range.

  14. Application of microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for environmental monitoring of industrially contaminated sites in Hyderabad city.

    PubMed

    Kamala C T; Balaram V; Dharmendra V; Satyanarayanan M; Subramanyam K S V; Krishnaiah A

    2014-11-01

    Recently introduced microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES) represents yet another and very important addition to the existing array of modern instrumental analytical techniques. In this study, an attempt is made to summarize the performance characteristics of MP-AES and its potential as an analytical tool for environmental studies with some practical examples from Patancheru and Uppal industrial sectors of Hyderabad city. A range of soil, sediment, water reference materials, particulate matter, and real-life samples were chosen to evaluate the performance of this new analytical technique. Analytical wavelengths were selected considering the interference effects of other concomitant elements present in different sample solutions. The detection limits for several elements were found to be in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng/g. The trace metals analyzed in both the sectors followed the topography with more pollution in the low-lying sites. The metal contents were found to be more in ground waters than surface waters. Since a decade, the pollutants are transfered from Patancheru industrial area to Musi River. After polluting Nakkavagu and turning huge tracts of agricultural lands barren besides making people residing along the rivulet impotent and sick, industrialists of Patancheru are shifting the effluents to downstream of Musi River through an 18-km pipeline from Patancheru. Since the effluent undergoes primary treatment at Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) at Patanchru and travels through pipeline and mixes with sewage, the organic effluents will be diluted. But the inorganic pollutants such as heavy and toxic metals tend to accumulate in the environmental segments near and downstreams of Musi River. The data generated by MP-AES of toxic metals like Zn, Cu, and Cr in the ground and surface waters can only be attributed to pollution from Patancheru since no other sources are available to Musi River.

  15. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  16. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  17. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  18. Automated diagnostics of a magnetron discharge plasma based on atomic molecular emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, V. M.; Zimin, A. M.; Krivitskiy, S. E.; Serushkin, S. V.; Troynov, V. I.

    2012-12-01

    A software-hardware complex intended for investigating spatial distributions of the plasma spectral emissivity is described. It allows us to record and identify the lines and systems of molecular bands in an automatic mode and to perform computer processing of spectra. Molecular bands of deuterium for different electronic-vibrational-rotational transitions are identified. The excitation temperatures of atomic levels, translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures are estimated for a discharge in a planar magnetron.

  19. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  20. Decoherence by spontaneous emission: A single-atom analog of superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2016-12-01

    We show that the decoherence of the atomic center-of-mass induced by spontaneous emission involves interferences corresponding to a single-atom analog of superradiance. We use a decomposition of the stationary decoherence rate as a sum of local and nonlocal contributions obtained to second order in the interaction by the influence functional method. These terms are respectively related to the strength of the coupling between system and environment, and to the quality of the information about the system leaking into the environment. While the local contribution always yields a positive decoherence rate, the nonlocal one may lead to recoherence when only partial information about the system is obtained from the disturbed environment. The nonlocal contribution contains interferences between different quantum amplitudes leading to oscillations of the decoherence rate reminiscent of superradiance. These concepts, illustrated here in the framework of atom interferometry within a trap, may be applied to a variety of quantum systems.

  1. Capacitively coupled microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the determination of lead in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Wensing, M W; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-02-15

    The determination of lead in whole blood by atomic emission spectrometry using a capacitively coupled microwave plasma and a tungsten filament electrode is presented. When the plasma-supporting electrode is also used as the sample holder, transfer of the sample to the plasma is 100%. Microwaves are used to dry the sample and, at higher powers, ignite a helium plasma which results in the atomization and excitation of Pb. Using this methodology, a detection limit of 3 pg of Pb was obtained using 5-microL aqueous samples. The precision was 9%. Whole blood samples were subjected to a drying stage similar to that of the aqueous samples. Following this drying stage, a low-power (30 W) helium plasma was ignited and used to ash the blood sample. Higher power plasmas (> 150 W) were used to atomize and excite the Pb. Recovery of Pb from the blood samples was 88%, when compared to aqueous standards.

  2. Determination of major and trace elements in glycol-based fluids by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Paul M.

    The development of an analysis based on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is reported for the determination of 14 major and trace elements in coolant/antifreeze solutions to provide information on composition of new solutions and wear metals in used solutions. The evaluation of new coolant/antifreeze formulations for aluminum cooling systems has indicated that corrosion protection and stability are strongly dependent on the concentrations of the various components of the solution. The inhibitors include inorganic salts, such as silicates, borates, phosphates and molybdates, and these components are now determined by traditional analytical methods based on gravimetric and titrimetric techniques, spectrophotometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and ion chromatography. The ICP-AES method may be used to replace these techniques with a simultaneous determination of four inhibitors as well as wear metals in used coolant/antifreeze solutions. The total time for analysis is reduced from several hours to approximately 15 min per sample. The relative standard deviation for the determination of the inhibitors is typically 2%. The detection limit for most of the wear metals is on the order of 0.1 mg l -1.

  3. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D.; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S.

    2015-06-01

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P or 40Ca, with 10% of 1H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the profiles

  4. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Sterpin, E; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S

    2015-06-21

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, (31)P or (40)Ca, with 10% of (1)H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the

  5. Pulsed cooperative backward emissions from non-degenerate atomic transitions in sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Ballmann, Charles W.; Cai, Han; Yi, Zhenhuan; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Hemmer, Phillip; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-10-01

    We study backward cooperative emissions from a dense sodium atomic vapor. Ultrashort pulses produced from a conventional amplified femtosecond laser system with an optical parametric amplifier are used to excite sodium atoms resonantly on the two-photon 3S1/2-4S1/2 transition. Backward superfluorescent emissions (BSFEs), both on the 4S1/2-3P3/2 and 4S1/2-3P1/2 transitions, are observed. The picosecond temporal characteristics of the BSFE are observed using an ultrafast streak camera. The power laws for the dependencies of the average time delay and the intensity of the BSFEs on input power are analyzed in the sense of cooperative emission from nonidentical atomic species. As a result, an absolute (rather than relative) time delay and its fluctuations (free of any possible external noise) are determined experimentally. The possibility of a backward swept-gain superfluorescence as an artificial laser guide star in the sodium layer in the mesosphere is also discussed.

  6. On the Effect of Photoinduced Emission of Alkali Atoms from a Paraffin Coating on the Rate of Spin Relaxation of Atoms in the Volume of a Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, E.B.; Balabas, M.V.

    2005-06-15

    The effect of photoinduced emission of alkali atoms from the paraffin coating of a cell on the spin relaxation time of the atoms was studied experimentally. No effect was detected. It was additionally found that long irradiation of the cell surface by light with a power density of about 1 mW/cm{sup 2} does not cause any degradation of the coating in spite of almost complete removal of the atoms from the coating due to their photostimulated diffusion in the layer and photodesorption. After the irradiation is complete, the surface contacting with the alkali vapor is again saturated with the alkali atoms with a time constant of about 1 h.

  7. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  8. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  9. Spontaneous emission and level shifts in absorbing disordered dielectrics and dense atomic gases: A Green's-function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, Michael

    1999-09-01

    Spontaneous emission and Lamb shift of atoms in absorbing dielectrics and dense atomic gases are discussed using a microscopic Green's-function approach. Uncorrelated and random atomic positions are assumed, and the associated unphysical interactions between different atoms at the same location are eliminated (local field correction). For the case of an atom in a purely dispersive medium, the spontaneous-emission rate is altered by the well-known Lorentz local-field factor. When the mean distance between atoms becomes less than the resonance wavelength, results different from previously suggested expressions are found. In particular, it is shown that nearest-neighbor interactions become important. The results suggest that, for large densities, absorbing disordered dielectrics cannot accurately be described by a macroscopic approach that neglects correlations between atomic positions.

  10. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  11. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  12. Determination of volatile halogenated organic compounds in soils by purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; López-García, Ignacio; Aguinaga, Nerea; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2004-10-20

    Nine volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs), including four trihalomethanes (THMs), were determined in soils by capillary gas chromatography with microwave induced-plasma atomic emission spectrometry (GC-AED), using a purge-and-trap system (PT) for sample preconcentration. Analytes were previously extracted from the soil sample in methanol and the extract was preconcentrated before being chromatographed. Element-specific detection and quantification were carried out monitoring two wavelength emission lines, corresponding to chlorine (479nm) and bromine (478nm). Each chromatographic run took 21min, including the purge step. The method showed a precision of 1.1-7.2% (R.S.D.) depending on the compound. Detection limits ranged from 0.05 to 0.55ngml(-1), for chloroform and dichloromethane, respectively, corresponding to 3.3 and 36.0ngg(-1) in the soil samples. The chromatographic profiles obtained showed no interference from co-extracted compounds. Low levels of dichloromethane and chloroform ranging from 0.04 to 1.13mugg(-1) were found in samples obtained from small gardens irrigated with tap water. The method is reliable and can be used for routine monitoring in soil samples.

  13. Interaction of vacuum ultraviolet excimer laser radiation with fused silica: II. Neutral atom and molecule emission

    SciTech Connect

    George, Sharon R.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2010-02-15

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral Si, O, and SiO from ultraviolet-grade fused silica during pulsed 157-nm irradiation at fluences well below the threshold for optical breakdown. Although the emission intensities are strongly affected by thermal treatments that affect the density of strained bonds in the lattice, they are not consistently affected by mechanical treatments that alter the density of point defects, such as polishing and abrasion. We propose that the absorption of single 157 nm photons cleave strained bonds to produce defects that subsequently diffuse to the surface. There they react with dangling bonds to release neutral atoms and molecules. Hartree-Fock calculations on clusters containing these defects support the contention that defect interactions can yield emission. More direct emission by the photoelectronic excitation of antibonding chemical states is also supported.

  14. Study of atomic oxygen greenline dayglow emission in thermosphere during geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, T.; Singh, Vir; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of geomagnetic storms on the atomic oxygen greenline (557.7 nm) dayglow emission in thermosphere is studied during solar active and solar quiet conditions. This study is primarily based on the photochemical model with inputs obtained from experimental observations and empirical models. The updated rate coefficients, quantum yields and related cross-sections have been used from experimental results and theoretical studies. This study is presented for a low latitude station Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E), India. The volume emission rate (VER) has been calculated using densities and temperatures from the empirical models. The modeled VER shows a positive correlation with the Dst index. The VER also shows a negative correlation with the number densities of O, O2, and N2. The VER, calculated at peak emission altitude, exhibits depletion during the main phase of the storm. The altitude of peak emission rate is unaffected by the geomagnetic storm activity. The study also reveals that the peak emission altitude depends on the F10.7 solar index. The peak emission altitude moves upward as the value of F10.7 solar index increases.

  15. The use of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) in the determination of lithium in cleaning validation swabs.

    PubMed

    Lewen, Nancy; Nugent, Dennis

    2010-09-05

    The pharmaceutical industry is required to perform cleaning validation studies to verify that equipment used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals is adequately cleaned from one product or process to the next. Typically, these cleaning validation studies require an analytical method that uses some form of chromatographic technique. In the case of products that may have an inorganic constituent, however, if can often be easier to verify the cleanliness of equipment by using a non-chromatographic technique. A method is described to certify the cleanliness of processing equipment by determining lithium in cleaning validation swabs using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  16. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  17. New method for removal of spectral interferences for beryllium assay using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Sherrod L; Bernard, Maureen A; Nelson, Matthew R; Youmans, Linda D

    2008-07-15

    Beryllium (Be) has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect U.S. DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium measurement by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) that allows lower detection limits. The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), plutonium (Pu), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin and TEVA Resin reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material (CRM) standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. This new method offers improvements over other separation methods that have been used by removing large amounts of all the significant spectral interferences with greater simplicity and effectiveness. The effective removal of spectral interferences allows lower method detection limits (MDL) using inductively coupled atomic emission spectrometry. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  18. Particle transport in a He-microchip plasma atomic emission system with an ultrasonic nebulizer for aqueous sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joosuck; Lim, H. B.

    2008-11-01

    The transport efficiency of dried particles generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was studied to improve the analytical performance of a lab-made, He-microchip plasma system, in which a quartz tube (~ 1 mm i.d.) was positioned inside the central channel of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) polymer chip. The polymer microchip plasma has the advantages of low cost, small size, easy handling and design, and self-ignition with long stabilization (> 24 h). However, direct introduction of aqueous solution into the microplasma for the detection of metals remains problematic due to plasma instability. In addition, the much smaller size of the system can cause signal suppression due to low transport efficiency. Therefore, knowledge of particle transport efficiency in this microplasma system is required to enhance the sensitivity and stability. The weight of transported particles in the range of 0.02 to 10 mg m - 3 was measured using a piezobalance with a precision of 0.4-17.8%, depending on the operating conditions. The significant effects of the USN operating conditions and the physical properties of the tubing, namely, length, inner diameter and surface characteristics, on the number of particles transported from the nebulizer to the microplasma were studied. When selected metals, such as Na, Mg and Pb, at a concentration of 5 mg L - 1 were nebulized, transported particles were obtained with a mass range of 0.5-5 mg m - 3 , depending on atomic weights. For application of the He-rf-microplasma, the atomic emission system was optimized by changing both the radio frequency (rf) power (60-200 W) and cooling temperature of the USN (- 12-9 °C). The limits of detection obtained for K, Na and Cu were 0.26, 0.22, and 0.28 mg L - 1 , respectively. These results confirmed the suitable stability and sensitivity of the He-rf-PDMS microchip plasma for application as an atomization source.

  19. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed.

  20. Infrared (1-12 μm) atomic and molecular emission signatures from energetic materials using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, E.; Hömmerich, U.; Brown, E.; Yang, C. S.-C.; Trivedi, S. B.; Jin, F.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Samuels, A. C.; Snyder, A. P.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique to detect the elemental composition of solids, liquids, and gases in real time. For example, recent advances in UV-VIS LIBS have shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive sensing. The extension of conventional UVVIS LIBS to the near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) regions (~1-12 μm) offers the potential to provide additional information due to IR atomic and molecular signatures. In this work, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was employed as the excitation source and focused onto several chlorate and nitrate compounds including KClO3, NaClO3, KNO3, and NaNO3 to produce intense plasma at the target surface. IR LIBS studies on background air, KCl , and NaCl were also included for comparison. All potassium and sodium containing samples revealed narrow-band, atomic-like emissions assigned to transitions of neutral alkali-metal atoms in accordance with the NIST atomic spectra database. In addition, first evidence of broad-band molecular LIBS signatures from chlorate and nitrate compounds were observed at ~10 μm and ~7.3 μm, respectively. The observed molecular emissions showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the investigated materials.

  1. Enhancement of Raman scattering for an atom or molecule near a metal nanocylinder: Quantum theory of spontaneous emission and coupling to surface plasmon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. S.; Frantsesson, A. V.; Gao, J.; Eden, J. G.

    2005-06-01

    An analytic expression for the electromagnetic enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and Raman scattering cross-section for an excited atom or molecule in close proximity to a metal nanocylinder has been derived by quantum theory. Coupling of the atomic or molecular optical radiation into the TM0 surface plasmon mode of the nanocylinder results in reradiation by the cylinder, a process that is most efficient when the incident radiation is linearly polarized, with the electric field oriented parallel to the axis of the nanocylinder. For a silver cylinder having a radius and length of 5 and 20nm, respectively, the enhancement in the spontaneous emission rate is >107 for ℏω0≃2.4eV (λ =514nm), which corresponds to an increase of ≈1014 in the Raman scattering cross section. This result, as well as the prediction that the atomic dipole generates broadband, femtosecond pulses, are in qualitative agreement with previously reported experiments involving metal nanoparticle aggregates. The theoretical results described here are expected to be of value in guiding future nonlinear optical experiments in which carbon nanotubes or metal nanowires with controllable physical and electrical characteristics are patterned onto a substrate and coupled with emitting atoms or molecules.

  2. Optimization of a hydride generation metallic furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-MF-AAS) method for tin determination: analytical and morphological parameters of a metallic atomizer.

    PubMed

    Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2013-12-15

    The present work describes a metallic tube as hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry. Its performance is evaluated through tin determination, and the accuracy of the method assessed through the analysis of sediment and water samples. Some chemical parameters (referring to the generation of the hydride) such as acid, NaOH and THB concentrations, as well as physical parameters (referring to the transport of the hydride) such as carrier, acetylene, air flow-rates, flame composition, coil length, tube hole area, among others, are evaluated for optimization of the method. Scanning electron microscopy is used for evaluating morphological parameters in both new and used (after 150 h) tube atomizers. The method presents linear Sn concentration from 50 to 1000 µg L(-1) (r>0.9995; n=3) and the analytical frequency of ca. 40 h(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) is 7.1 µg L(-1) and the precision, expressed as RSD is less than 4% (200 µg L(-1); n=10). The accuracy is evaluated through reference materials, and the results are similar at 95% confidence level according to the t-test.

  3. Balmer alpha emission and hydrogen atom energy in ion-source discharges

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.; Kim, J.

    1981-07-01

    The structure of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line emission profiles from three types of neutral beam injector ion source plasmas (filling pressure approx. 10 mTorr, electron density approx. 1 to 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, electron temperature approx. 2 to 4 eV) is studied with the aid of a simple model for the neutral particle balance and H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. A large fraction of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ is produced by dissociative excitation of H/sub 2/ and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/, while the remainder is produced by excitation of H atoms, most of which have energies that are close to the characteristic H/sub 2/ dissociation energies. The H/sub ..cap alpha../ linewidth is thus insensitive to the discharge operating conditions and equals approx. 0.27 A when only slow (approx. 0.3 eV) dissociatively excited atoms are present or approx. 0.35 A when fast (> 1 eV) atoms, apparently also produced in dissociation reactions, are present as well.

  4. Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran

    Hybrid quantum systems are promising candidates for opening new avenues for quantum technologies [G. Kurizki et. al, PNAS, 112 (13), 3866-3873 (2015)]. Hybrid atom-optomechanical (HAOM) systems set an intriguing example in this context. From the perspective of practical utilizations of these HAOM systems in future quantum devices, it is crucial to fully understand the excitation dynamics as well as the spectral features of these systems. In this poster, I'll present my calculations of single-photon time-dependent (TD) spectrum emitted by such a HAOM system in a strong atom-cavity as well as strong cavity-mechanics (strong-strong) coupling regime [``Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity'', Imran M. Mirza, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 32 (8), 1604-1614 (2015)]. In order to make the system more realistic the effects of dissipation through the mechanical oscillator, optical cavity and spontaneous emission from the two-level emitter are also incorporated. The TD spectrum reveals some novel features that are not possible to observe otherwise. For instance, time order in which different side bands appears which explains different photon-phonon interactions responsible for the production of distinct spectral resonances. .

  5. Influence of Helium Atoms Absorption on the Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umaev, S. M.; Levchenko, A. A.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Filatov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the emission properties of charge sources based on carbon nanotubes prepared by arc discharge deposition of nanotubes onto a flat copper substrate (Borisenko et al. in Instrum Exp Tech 57(6):755, 2014; Low Temp Phys 41(7):567, 2015). The charge sources were submerged into superfluid helium at temperature T=1.3 K. The collector fixed above the charge source at a distance of 0.3 mm was connected to an electrometer. The current of charges was measured by the electrometer when a high voltage was applied to the charge source. In the originally prepared source, the emission of charges (electrons) on the level of 10^{-10}A is observed at a negative voltage above U=80 V and increases with increasing voltage. If the source of charge was kept in liquid helium for 15 h, the current-voltage characteristic changed significantly. The current of charges on the same level of 10^{-10} A was registered at a voltage of U=150 V. Extraction of gases from the source placed in a vacuum chamber at room temperature for 48 h leads to the complete recovery of the emission properties. One can assume that the degradation of the emission properties of the sources is associated with the adsorption of helium atoms by carbon nanotubes at low temperatures. We did not observe any degradation of the emission properties of the charge sources in the case of positive charges injection into superfluid helium.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element Analysis of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic... to Part 136—Inductively Coupled Plasma—Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element... technique. Samples are nebulized and the aerosol that is produced is transported to the plasma torch where...

  7. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  8. Study of the analytical methods for iron determination in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, M.; Gonzalez, M.C.; Jimenez, O.; Rodriquez, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    In the determination of iron in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry (A.A.S.), methods of sample preparation, such as dilution with an organic solvent and sample pretreatment to destroy organic material, are investigated. Moreover, methods of analysis using calibration curve and standard additions are presented. The possible cause of error associated with iron determination in organic samples by flame (F-A.A.S.) and graphite furnace (GF-A.A.S.) atomic absorption spectrometry are discussed. From all of these studies, the use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after sample dilution with methyl isobutyl ketone, and the use of the method of standard additions are advised for iron determination.

  9. Analytic expressions for Atomic Layer Deposition: coverage, throughput, and materials utilization in cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the authors present analytic models for atomic layer deposition (ALD) in three common experimental configurations: cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD. These models, based on the plug-flow and well-mixed approximations, allow us to determine the minimum dose times and materials utilization for all three configurations. A comparison between the three models shows that throughput and precursor utilization can each be expressed by universal equations, in which the particularity of the experimental system is contained in a single parameter related to the residence time of the precursor in the reactor. For the case of cross-flow reactors, the authors show how simple analytic expressions for the reactor saturation profiles agree well with experimental results. Consequently, the analytic model can be used to extract information about the ALD surface chemistry (e. g., the reaction probability) by comparing the analytic and experimental saturation profiles, providing a useful tool for characterizing new and existing ALD processes. (C) 2014 American Vacuum Society

  10. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  11. Influence of spontaneous emission on a single-state atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Weel, M.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Cahn, S. B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of spontaneous emission (SE) on a single-state time domain atom interferometer (AI) that uses trapped Rb atoms. The AI uses two standing wave pulses separated by time T to produce an echo signal at time 2T due to interference between momentum states. We find that SE influences both the shape of the echo signal and its periodic time-dependent amplitude in a manner consistent with theoretical predictions. The results show that the time-dependent signal from the AI is related to the effective radiative decay rate of the excited state. We also present results that test theoretical predictions for several properties of the echo formation such as the variation in momentum transfer due to the change in the angle between the traveling wave components of the excitation pulses, strength of the atom-field interaction, and the effect of spatial profile of the excitation beams. These studies are important for realizing precision measurements of the atomic fine structure constant and gravity using this interferometer.

  12. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations.

  13. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.

    2012-01-10

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic database and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  14. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  15. [Determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-yan; Zhang, Yuan-li

    2002-02-01

    A direct method was reported for the determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The dissolution conditions of coal samples as well as interference conditions of hydrochloric acid and matrix were studied. The recommended method not only proved to be simple and rapid than traditional gravimetric method but show satisfying precision and accuracy as well. The results of samples are as same as gravimetry. The recoveries are more than 96%, and the relative standard deviation of six samples are less than 3%.

  16. Preconcentration of heavy metals in urine and quantification by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Artíguez, M; Cameán, A; Repetto, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the determination of heavy metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method proposed requires purification of the samples with activated charcoal under acidic conditions before preconcentration by complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The formed complexes are extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and the resulting residue is finally digested under acid oxidant conditions. Because of its low detection limit (below 10 micrograms/L), this procedure can be applied conveniently for toxicological diagnostic purposes.

  17. [Determination of trace niobium and tantalum in rock sample by atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-zhi; Zhou, Chang-li; Luo, Chuan-nan

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the determination of trace Nb and Ta in sample using carbon powder and hafnium oxide as buffer by atomic emission spectrometry (AES). Hafnium has been selected as internal standard, since it has scinilar evaporation curve as those of Nb and Ta. Samples can be analyzed without chemical pretreatment. The sample was directly loaded onto the ordinary electrode. The method is simple, rapid and accurate. The range of determination for Nb and Ta are 0%-0.25% and 0%-0.125% respectively, and the detection limits are found to be 0.003% and 0.001%, respectively. Satisfactory results are obtained.

  18. The extreme wings of atomic emission and absorption lines. [in low pressure gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Sando, K. M.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of the extreme wings of atomic and molecular emission and absorption lines in low pressure gases. Classical and semiclassical results are compared with accurate quantal calculations of the self-broadening of Lyman-alpha in the hydrogen absorption spectrum that arises from quasimolecular transition. The results of classical, quantal, and semiclassical calculations of the absorption coefficient in the red wing are shown for temperatures of 500, 200, and 100 K. The semiclassical and quantal spectra agree well in shape at 500 K. Various other findings are discused.

  19. Photochemistry of atomic oxygen green and red-doublet emissions in comets at larger heliocentric distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, Susarla; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2014-06-01

    Context. In comets, the atomic oxygen green (5577 Å) to red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) emission intensity ratio (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used to confirm H2O as the parent species producing forbidden oxygen emission lines. The larger (>0.1) value of G/R ratio observed in a few comets is ascribed to the presence of higher CO2 and CO relative abundances in the cometary coma. Aims: We aim to study the effect of CO2 and CO relative abundances on the observed G/R ratio in comets observed at large (>2 au) heliocentric distances by accounting for important production and loss processes of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms in the cometary coma. Methods: Recently we have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study photochemistry of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms and the production of green and red-doublet emissions in comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp. In the present work we applied the model to six comets where green and red-doublet emissions are observed when they are beyond 2 au from the Sun. Results: The collisional quenching of O(1S) and O(1D) can alter the G/R ratio more significantly than that due to change in the relative abundances of CO2 and CO. In a water-dominated cometary coma and with significant (>10%) CO2 relative abundance, photodissociation of H2O mainly governs the red-doublet emission, whereas CO2 controls the green line emission. If a comet has equal composition of CO2 and H2O, then ~50% of red-doublet emission intensity is controlled by the photodissociation of CO2. The role of CO photodissociation is insignificant in producing both green and red-doublet emission lines and consequently in determining the G/R ratio. Involvement of multiple production sources in the O(1S) formation may be the reason for the observed higher green line width than that of red lines. The G/R ratio values and green and red-doublet line widths calculated by the model are consistent with the observation. Conclusions: Our model calculations suggest that in low gas production rate comets the G

  20. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. Results The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94–106% in atomic absorption and 97–103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6–5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9–6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference

  1. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  2. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  3. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  4. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  5. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  6. Fluorescence emission of Ca-atom from photodissociated Ca2 in Ar-doped helium droplets. I. Experimental.

    PubMed

    Masson, A; Briant, M; Hernando, A; Halberstadt, N; Mestdagh, J-M; Gaveau, M-A

    2012-11-14

    The Ca(2) → Ca(4s4p(1)P) + Ca(4s(2)(1)S) photodissociation was investigated in a He droplet isolation experiment where the droplets are doped by Ar atoms. Fluorescence spectra associated with the Ca(4s4p(1)P → 4s(2)(1)S) emission were recorded as a function of the average number of Ar atoms per droplet. Three contributions were observed depending on whether the emitting Ca atoms are free, bound to helium atoms or bound to argon atoms. Moreover, the full Ca(4s4p(1)P → 4s(2)(1)S) fluorescence emission was recorded as a function of the wavelength of the photodissociation laser, hence providing the action spectrum of the Ca(2) → Ca(4s4p(1)P) + Ca(4s(2)(1)S) process. The latter spectrum suggests that in He droplets doped by argon, Ca atoms are attracted inside the droplet where they associate as Ca(2). Full analysis of the spectra indicate that the emission of Ca bound to a single Ar atom is redshifted by 94 cm(-1) with respect to the emission of free Ca.

  7. An Atomically Precise Au10 Ag2 Nanocluster with Red-Near-IR Dual Emission.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Guan, Zong-Jie; Pei, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Shang-Fu; Wan, Xian-Kai; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    A red-near-IR dual-emissive nanocluster with the composition [Au10 Ag2 (2-py-C≡C)3 (dppy)6 ](BF4 )5 (1; 2-py-C≡C is 2-pyridylethynyl, dppy=2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine) has been synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 has a trigonal bipyramidal Au10 Ag2 core that contains a planar Au4 (2-py-C≡C)3 unit sandwiched by two Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs. Cluster 1 shows intense red-NIR dual emission in solution. The visible emission originates from metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from silver atoms to phosphine ligands in the Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs, and the intense NIR emission is associated with the participation of 2-pyridylethynyl in the frontier orbitals of the cluster, which is confirmed by a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The analytical differential cross section of elastic scattering of atoms aimed to be used in Monte Carlo modeling of propagation of fast particles in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikin, E. G.

    2017-08-01

    The analytical differential cross section (DCS) of elastic scattering of atoms that reproduces the stopping power and the straggling of energy loss is proposed. Analytical expressions derived from the DCS for diffusion σd and viscosity σv cross sections of elastic collisions of atoms are in good agreement with known cross sections of 38Ar-40Ar and H-Li collisions obtained from quantum mechanical simulations. The Monte Carlo modeling of the transport of sputtered Cu atoms in Ar and implantation of Bi ions in B and C materials made using the proposed DCS demonstrates its accuracy in the modeling of elastic collisions.

  9. Analytic evaluation of three-electron atomic integrals with Slater wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    1997-03-01

    The formulas of Fromm and Hill and of Remiddi, for the three-electron correlated atomic integral using Slater-type atomic orbitals, are shown to be equivalent in their common region of applicability. The demonstration required the derivation of an identity connecting dilogarithm functions which is either new or not widely known. It is then shown how to modify the more general of these formulas (that of Fromm and Hill) to eliminate the necessity of branch tracking in the complex plane and thereby to achieve a straightforwardly computable formalism. By obtaining a formal cancellation of the individual-term singularities in the Fromm-Hill formula, problems of numerical instability are also avoided. The work is validated with a computer program and sample calculations.

  10. The use of an analytic Hamiltonian matrix for solving the hydrogenic atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Mohammad

    2001-10-01

    The non-relativistic Hamiltonian corresponding to the Shrodinger equation is converted into analytic Hamiltonian matrix using the kth order B-splines functions. The Galerkin method is applied to the solution of the Shrodinger equation for bound states of hydrogen-like systems. The program Mathematica is used to create analytic matrix elements and exact integration is performed over the knot-sequence of B-splines and the resulting generalized eigenvalue problem is solved on a specified numerical grid. The complete basis set and the energy spectrum is obtained for the coulomb potential for hydrogenic systems with Z less than 100 with B-splines of order eight. Another application is given to test the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule for the hydrogenic systems.

  11. Field electron emission of layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets with atom-thick sharp edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huihui; Li, Yuan; Li, Qi; Li, Borui; Song, Zengcai; Huang, Wenxiao; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun; Carroll, David; Fang, Guojia

    2014-06-01

    Field electron emission properties of solution processed few-layer Bi2Se3 nanosheets are studied for the first time, which exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.3 V μm-1, a high field enhancement factor of up to 6860 and good field emission stability. This performance is better than that of the as reported layered MoS2f sheets and is comparable to that of single layer graphene films. The efficient field emission behaviours are found to be not only attributed to their lower work function but also related to their numerous sharp edges or protrusion decorated structure based on our simulation results. Besides, the contribution of possible two-dimensional electron gas surface states of atom-thick layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets is discussed in this paper. We anticipate that these solution processed layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets have great potential as robust high-performance vertical structure electron emitters for future light weight and highly flexible vacuum micro/nano-electronic device applications.Field electron emission properties of solution processed few-layer Bi2Se3 nanosheets are studied for the first time, which exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.3 V μm-1, a high field enhancement factor of up to 6860 and good field emission stability. This performance is better than that of the as reported layered MoS2f sheets and is comparable to that of single layer graphene films. The efficient field emission behaviours are found to be not only attributed to their lower work function but also related to their numerous sharp edges or protrusion decorated structure based on our simulation results. Besides, the contribution of possible two-dimensional electron gas surface states of atom-thick layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets is discussed in this paper. We anticipate that these solution processed layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets have great potential as robust high-performance vertical structure electron emitters for future light weight and highly flexible vacuum micro/nano-electronic device applications

  12. Carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; Mora, Juan; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the influence of carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions on the emission signal of 34 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, I, In, Ir, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pt, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Te, and Zn) in axially viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry has been investigated. To this end, atomic and ionic emission signals for diluted glycerol, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid solutions were registered and results were compared to those obtained for a 1% w w- 1 nitric acid solution. Experimental results show that the emission intensities of As, Se, and Te atomic lines are enhanced by charge transfer from carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ions. Iodine and P atomic emission is enhanced by carbon- and sulfur-based charge transfer whereas the Hg atomic emission signal is enhanced only by carbon. Though signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions is also expected for ionic emission lines of the above-mentioned elements, no experimental evidence has been found with the exception of Hg ionic lines operating carbon solutions. The effect of carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus charge transfer reactions on atomic emission depends on (i) wavelength characteristics. In general, signal enhancement is more pronounced for electronic transitions involving the highest upper energy levels; (ii) plasma experimental conditions. The use of robust conditions (i.e. high r.f. power and lower nebulizer gas flow rates) improves carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ionization in the plasma and, hence, signal enhancement; and (iii) the presence of other concomitants (e.g. K or Ca). Easily ionizable elements reduce ionization in the plasma and consequently reduce signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions.

  13. Thermodynamics of atomic and ionized hydrogen: analytical results versus equation-of-state tables and Monte Carlo data.

    PubMed

    Alastuey, A; Ballenegger, V

    2012-12-01

    We compute thermodynamical properties of a low-density hydrogen gas within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential. Our calculations are done using the exact scaled low-temperature (SLT) expansion, which provides a rigorous extension of the well-known virial expansion-valid in the fully ionized phase-into the Saha regime where the system is partially or fully recombined into hydrogen atoms. After recalling the SLT expansion of the pressure [A. Alastuey et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)], we obtain the SLT expansions of the chemical potential and of the internal energy, up to order exp(-|E_{H}|/kT) included (E_{H}≃-13.6 eV). Those truncated expansions describe the first five nonideal corrections to the ideal Saha law. They account exactly, up to the considered order, for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations, including the formation of bound states (atom H, ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, molecule H_{2},⋯) and atom-charge and atom-atom interactions. Among the five leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve well-defined internal partition functions for the molecule H_{2} and ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, for which no closed-form analytical formula exist currently. We provide accurate low-temperature approximations for those partition functions by using known values of rotational and vibrational energies. We compare then the predictions of the SLT expansion, for the pressure and the internal energy, with, on the one hand, the equation-of-state tables obtained within the opacity program at Livermore (OPAL) and, on the other hand, data of path integral quantum Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations. In general, a good agreement is found. At low densities, the simple analytical SLT formulas reproduce the values of the OPAL tables up to the last digit in a large range of temperatures, while at higher densities (ρ∼10^{-2} g/cm^{3}), some

  14. Thermodynamics of atomic and ionized hydrogen: Analytical results versus equation-of-state tables and Monte Carlo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastuey, A.; Ballenegger, V.

    2012-12-01

    We compute thermodynamical properties of a low-density hydrogen gas within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential. Our calculations are done using the exact scaled low-temperature (SLT) expansion, which provides a rigorous extension of the well-known virial expansion—valid in the fully ionized phase—into the Saha regime where the system is partially or fully recombined into hydrogen atoms. After recalling the SLT expansion of the pressure [A. Alastuey , J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-007-9464-0 130, 1119 (2008)], we obtain the SLT expansions of the chemical potential and of the internal energy, up to order exp(-|EH|/kT) included (EH≃-13.6 eV). Those truncated expansions describe the first five nonideal corrections to the ideal Saha law. They account exactly, up to the considered order, for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations, including the formation of bound states (atom H, ions H- and H2+, molecule H2,⋯) and atom-charge and atom-atom interactions. Among the five leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve well-defined internal partition functions for the molecule H2 and ions H- and H2+, for which no closed-form analytical formula exist currently. We provide accurate low-temperature approximations for those partition functions by using known values of rotational and vibrational energies. We compare then the predictions of the SLT expansion, for the pressure and the internal energy, with, on the one hand, the equation-of-state tables obtained within the opacity program at Livermore (OPAL) and, on the other hand, data of path integral quantum Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations. In general, a good agreement is found. At low densities, the simple analytical SLT formulas reproduce the values of the OPAL tables up to the last digit in a large range of temperatures, while at higher densities (ρ˜10-2 g/cm3

  15. A NONSTEADY-STATE ANALYTICAL MODEL TO PREDICT GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LANDFILLS. (R825689C072)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A general mathematical model is developed to predict emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from hazardous or sanitary landfills. The model is analytical in nature and includes important mechanisms occurring in unsaturated subsurface landfill environme...

  16. A NONSTEADY-STATE ANALYTICAL MODEL TO PREDICT GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LANDFILLS. (R825689C072)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A general mathematical model is developed to predict emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from hazardous or sanitary landfills. The model is analytical in nature and includes important mechanisms occurring in unsaturated subsurface landfill environme...

  17. Hydrodemetallation and Hydrodesulfurization Spent Catalysts Elemental Analysis: Comparison of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and Atomic Emission Spectrometries.

    PubMed

    Garoux, Laetitia; Gourhand, Sébastien; Hébrant, Marc; Schneider, Michel; Diliberto, Sébastien; Meux, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Petroleum industries continuously consume catalysts on very large scales. The recycling of spent catalysts is thus of major economic and environmental importance and its first step consists of the characterization of the valuable metal content. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis is compared with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for the analysis of five samples of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) catalysts. The elements are considered for their economic interest (Co, Ni, Mo, and V) or for the problems that can arise when they are present in the sample in significant quantities (Al, As, P, Fe). First, the systematic comparison of the analysis of known synthetic samples was performed. The originality here is that the samples were first beaded with lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7) for WDXRF analysis and then dissolved in hot HCl 6M for ICP-AES measurements. With this processing, we were able to clearly identify the origin of analytical problems when they arose. Second, the semi-quantitative protocol of WDXRF is compared with the quantitative procedure. Finally, the analysis of the spent catalysts is presented and the information gained by the systematic comparison of ICP-AES and WDXRF is shared. The interest of the simultaneous determination by the two techniques when such complicated heterogeneous matrices are involved is clearly demonstrated.

  18. A separation method to overcome the interference of aluminium on zinc determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Djane S.; das Graças Korn, Maria; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Carvalho, Marcelo S.

    2000-04-01

    The use of polyurethane foam (PUF) to separate zinc from large amounts of aluminium and its determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique (ICP-AES) in aluminium matrices is described. The proposed method is based on the solid-phase extraction of the zinc(II) cation as a thiocyanate complex. Parameters such as effect of pH on zinc sorption, zinc desorption from the foam and analytical features of the procedure were studied. Results showed that the zinc(II) cation within the range from 0.02 to 65.0 μg in 0.2 mol l -1 thiocyanate solution and pH range from 1.0 to 4.0, could be quantitatively extracted by 0.1 g of PUF. The precision of the method was calculated as the relative standard deviation from a series of seven measurements. It was 3.9% for 1.0 μg of zinc in a volume solution of 50 ml. The proposed procedure was used for zinc determination in both aluminium alloys and salts with zinc concentration in the range from 50 to 300 μg g -1. A standard addition technique was used and achieved results showing that this procedure has good accuracy and precision.

  19. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  20. Determination of metal concentrations in lichen samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique after applying different digestion procedures.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, S G; Yenisoy-Karakas, S; Dogangün, A

    2004-05-28

    Three digestion procedures have been tested on lichen samples for application in the determination of major, minor and trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in lichen samples collected in Aegean Region of Turkey by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The acid mixture of concentrated HNO(3), H(2)O(2) and HF were used. The instrument was optimized using lichen matrix considering RF power, nebulizer pressure, auxiliary flow rate and pump rate. The accuracy of the overall analyses was first estimated by analysis of two certified reference materials. Good agreement between measured and reference values were found for almost all elements. As the second way of determining the accuracy, results obtained from independent analytical techniques (ICP-AES and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)) were compared for all elements by analyzing real samples. Correlation coefficients of two techniques for the elements ranged between 0.70 (Mg) and 0.96 (Fe). Among the three digestion systems, namely microwave, open vessel and acid bomb, microwave digestion system gave the best recovery results. The method detection limit (MDL) was computed using reagent blanks of microwave digestion system since it provides cleaner sample preparation. Detection limit is adequate for all elements to determine the elements in lichen samples. The precision was assessed from the replicate analyses of reagent blanks of microwave digestion system and was found to be less than 1.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.).

  1. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  2. Dynamic emission and population control in a Λ-type excitation scheme of atomic potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, G.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Lyras, A.

    2017-06-01

    The nonlinear interaction of a four-level atomic configuration in potassium, with ns pump and coupling fields, is numerically investigated. The resonant pump acts on the two-photon transition | 4{{{S}}}{1/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 6{{{S}}}{1/2}> causing internally generated emissions in two atomic paths: path-1, | 4{{{S}}}{1/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 6{{{S}}}{1/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 5{{{P}}}{3/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 4{{{S}}}{1/2}> , and path-2, | 4{{{S}}}{1/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 6{{{S}}}{1/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 4{{{P}}}{3/2}> ≤ftrightarrow | 4{{{S}}}{1/2}> , respectively. The coupling laser resonantly excites the single-photon transition | 6{{{S}}}{1/2}> \\to | 4{{{P}}}{3/2}> in a Λ-type scheme. A controlled temporal shift and enhancement of the partially coherent cascade emissions of path-2 is obtained. The amplification without inversion mechanism is proposed to explain the lower path-2 emission. It is shown that when the coupling field is delayed from the pump, then an efficient dynamic effect is induced, based on an additional population interplay of states | 6{{{S}}}{1/2}> and | 4{{{P}}}{3/2}> . Finally, a novel coherent method for temporally controlling the quasi-stationary population dynamics in a saturated system is proposed, when the driving fields are also delayed. The importance of the present work is related to the fact that the induced coherence (polarisation or energy injection) of the coupling field can be temporally controlled in nonlinear gaseous media.

  3. Hydrogen-like atom in a superstrong magnetic field: Photon emission and relativistic energy level shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    Following our previous work, additional arguments are presented that in superstrong magnetic fields B ≫ (Zα)2 B 0, B 0 = m 2 c 3/ eħ ≈ 4.41 × 1013 G, the Dirac equation and the Schrödinger equation for an electron in the nucleus field following from it become spatially one-dimensional with the only z coordinate along the magnetic field, "Dirac" spinors become two-component, while the 2 × 2 matrices operate in the {0; 3} subspace. Based on the obtained solution of the Dirac equation and the known solution of the "onedimensional" Schrödinger equation by ordinary QED methods extrapolated to the {0; 3} subspace, the probability of photon emission by a "one-dimensional" hydrogen-like atom is calculated, which, for example, for the Lyman-alpha line differs almost twice from the probability in the "three-dimensional" case. Similarly, despite the coincidence of nonrelativistic energy levels, the calculated relativistic corrections of the order of (Zα)4 substantially differ from corrections in the absence of a magnetic field. A conclusion is made that, by analyzing the hydrogen emission spectrum and emission spectra at all, we can judge in principle about the presence or absence of superstrong magnetic fields in the vicinity of magnetars (neutron stars and probably brown dwarfs). Possible prospects of applying the proposed method for calculations of multielectron atoms are pointed out and the possibility of a more reliable determination of the presence of superstrong magnetic fields in magnetars by this method is considered.

  4. Study of the heavy atom-induced room temperature phosphorescence properties of melatonin and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Miller, James N.

    2006-02-01

    Liquid phase room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) properties of melatonin were studied using heavy atom induced-room temperature phosphorescence (HAI-RTP) technique. 1.2 M potassium iodide was used as a heavy atom reagent together with 0.002 M sodium sulphite as deoxygenating agent to produce the RTP signal. The maximum phosphorescence emission and excitation wavelengths of melatonin were 290 and 457 nm, respectively. The effect of potassium iodide concentration on the RTP lifetime of melatonin was also investigated and based on the results, the rate constants for phosphorescence decay ( kp) and radiationless deactivation through reaction with heavy atom ( kh) were determined. Based on the obtained results, a simple and sensitive room temperature phosphorimetric method was developed for the determination of melatonin. The method allowed the determination of 10.0-200 ng ml -1 melatonin in aqueous solution with the limits of detection and quantification of 3.6 and 12 ng ml -1, respectively. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of melatonin in commercial pharmaceutical formulations.

  5. Improving the analytical performance of hydride generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Combined effect of additives and optical filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Zamboni, Roberto

    2001-10-01

    The effects of tetrahydroborate and acid concentration and the presence of L-cysteine and thiourea were investigated in the determination of As, Bi and Sn using continuous flow hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS). The aim was to find conditions allowing the control of those effects exerting negative influence on the analytical performance of the HG AFS apparatus. The effects taken into account were: (i) the radiation scattering generated by carryover of solution from the gas-liquid separator to the atomizer; (ii) the introduction of molecular species generated by tetrahydroborate decomposition into the atomizer; and (iii) interference effects arising from other elements in the sample matrix and from different acids. The effects (i) and (ii) could be controlled using mild reaction conditions in the HG stage. The effect of HG conditions on carryover was studied by radiation scattering experiments without hydride atomization. Compromised HG conditions were found by studying the effects of tetrahydroborate (0.1-20 g l -1) and acid (0.01-7 mol l -1) concentration, and the addition of L-cysteine (10 g l -1) and thiourea (0.1 mol l -1) on the HG AFS signals. The effect of optical filters was investigated with the aim of improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Optical filters with peak wavelengths of 190 and 220 nm provided an improvement of detection limits by factors of approximately 4 and 2 for As and Te, respectively. Under optimized conditions the detection limits were 6, 5, 3, 2, 2 and 9 ng l -1 for As, Sb, Bi, Sn, Se and Te, respectively. Good tolerance to various acid compositions and sample matrices was obtained by using L-cysteine or thiourea as masking agents. Determination of arsenic in sediment and copper certified reference materials, and of bismuth in steel, sediment, soil and ore certified reference material is reported.

  6. Analytically reduced form of multicenter integrals from Gaussian transforms. [in atomic and molecular physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straton, Jack C.

    1989-01-01

    The four-dimensional Fourier-Feynman transformations previously used in analytically reducing the general class of integrals containing multicenter products of 1s hydrogenic orbitals, Coulomb or Yukawa potentials, and plane waves, are replaced by the one-dimensional Gaussian transformation. This reduces the previously required double-diagonalization of the quadratic form of the multicenter integrals to only one diagonalization, yielding a simpler reduced form of the integral. The present work also extends the result to include all s states and pairs of states with l not equal to zero summed over the m quantum number.

  7. 14 CFR 34.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  8. 14 CFR 34.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  9. Numerical modelling of emission of a two-level atom near a metal nanoparticle with account for tunnelling of an electron from an atom into a particle

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorovich, S V; Protsenko, I E

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of numerical modelling of emission of a two-level atom near a metal nanoparticle under resonant interaction of light with plasmon modes of the particle. Calculations have been performed for different polarisations of light by a dipole approximation method and a complex multipole method. Depending on the distance between a particle and an atom, the contribution of the nonradiative process of electron tunnelling from a two-level atom into a particle, which is calculated using the quasi-classical approximation, has been taken into account and assessed. We have studied spherical gold and silver particles of different diameters (10 – 100 nm). The rates of electron tunnelling and of spontaneous decay of the excited atomic state are found. The results can be used to develop nanoscale plasmonic emitters, lasers and photodetectors. (nanooptics)

  10. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  11. Focused analyte spray emission apparatus and process for mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick J [Kennewick, WA; Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Laskin, Alexander [Richland, WA

    2012-01-17

    An apparatus and process are disclosed that deliver an analyte deposited on a substrate to a mass spectrometer that provides for trace analysis of complex organic analytes. Analytes are probed using a small droplet of solvent that is formed at the junction between two capillaries. A supply capillary maintains the droplet of solvent on the substrate; a collection capillary collects analyte desorbed from the surface and emits analyte ions as a focused spray to the inlet of a mass spectrometer for analysis. The invention enables efficient separation of desorption and ionization events, providing enhanced control over transport and ionization of the analyte.

  12. Characterization of helium/argon working gas systems in a radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission source. Part II: Langmuir probe and emission intensity studies for Al, Cu and Macor samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Mikhail; Caruso, Joseph A.; Christopher, Steven J.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    1998-08-01

    The application of a tuned Langmuir probe is extended to the measurement of the charged particle characteristics (electron and ion number density, average electron energy and electron temperature) in an analytical radiofrequency glow discharge (RF-GD) in helium. The effects of discharge operating conditions, such as RF power and pressure, on the charged particle characteristics for conducting (aluminum) and nonconducting (Macor) samples are studied. The differences in plasma characteristics between argon and helium working gases are discussed. Langmuir probe measurements are also performed in an argon/helium mixture. Variations of the emission intensities of sputtered analytes (copper and aluminum) are investigated when helium is introduced into an argon RF glow discharge plasma. It is recognized that, although the number of sample atoms in the plasma gradually decreases due to reduced sputtering, the emission intensities of various Al(I) and Cu(I) lines increase with helium addition. Measured electron and ion number densities also decrease with helium addition, whereas the average electron energy and electron temperature increase, accounting for the enhancement of emission intensities.

  13. Atom-dimer scattering length for fermions with different masses: Analytical study of limiting cases

    SciTech Connect

    Alzetto, F.; Leyronas, X.; Combescot, R.

    2010-12-15

    We consider the problem of obtaining the scattering length for a fermion colliding with a dimer, formed from a fermion identical to the incident one and another different fermion. This is done in the universal regime where the range of interactions is short enough that the scattering length a for nonidentical fermions is the only relevant quantity. This is the generalization to fermions with different masses of the problem solved long ago by Skorniakov and Ter-Martirosian for particles with equal masses. We solve this problem analytically in the two limiting cases where the mass of the solitary fermion is very large or very small compared to the mass of the two other identical fermions. This is done for both the value of the scattering length and the function entering the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian integral equation, for which simple explicit expressions are obtained.

  14. Regime Transition in Electromechanical Fluid Atomization and Implications to Analyte Ionization for Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas P.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the transition from purely mechanical ejection to electromechanical ejection to electrospraying are investigated through complementary scaling analysis and optical visualization. Experimental characterization and visualization are performed with the ultrasonically-driven array of micromachined ultrasonic electrospray (AMUSE) ion source to decouple the electrical and mechanical fields. A new dimensionless parameter, the Fenn number, is introduced to define a transition between the spray regimes, in terms of its dependence on the characteristic Strouhal number for the ejection process. A fundamental relationship between the Fenn and Strouhal numbers is theoretically derived and confirmed experimentally in spraying liquid electrolytes of different ionic strength subjected to a varying magnitude electric field. This relationship and the basic understanding of the charged droplet generation physics have direct implications on the optimal ionization efficiency and mass spectrometric response for different types of analytes. PMID:20729096

  15. Regime transition in electromechanical fluid atomization and implications to analyte ionization for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-11-01

    The physical processes governing the transition from purely mechanical ejection to electromechanical ejection to electrospraying are investigated through complementary scaling analysis and optical visualization. Experimental characterization and visualization are performed with the ultrasonically-driven array of micromachined ultrasonic electrospray (AMUSE) ion source to decouple the electrical and mechanical fields. A new dimensionless parameter, the Fenn number, is introduced to define a transition between the spray regimes, in terms of its dependence on the characteristic Strouhal number for the ejection process. A fundamental relationship between the Fenn and Strouhal numbers is theoretically derived and confirmed experimentally in spraying liquid electrolytes of different ionic strength subjected to a varying magnitude electric field. This relationship and the basic understanding of the charged droplet generation physics have direct implications on the optimal ionization efficiency and mass spectrometric response for different types of analytes. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A device for automatic photoelectric control of the analytical gap for emission spectrographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietrich, John A.; Cooley, Elmo F.; Curry, Kenneth J.

    1977-01-01

    A photoelectric device has been built that automatically controls the analytical gap between electrodes during excitation period. The control device allows for precise control of the analytical gap during the arcing process of samples, resulting in better precision of analysis.

  17. Electrospray mass spectrometry with controlled in-source atomization (ERIAD) as a promising elemental method: evaluation of analytical features.

    PubMed

    Gall, L N; Fomina, N S; Giles, R; Masukevich, S V; Beliaeva, O A; Gall, N R

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization with controlled in-source fragmentation and atomization (ERIAD) is promising method for mass-spectrometric elemental analysis. This paper concerns the main analytical features and necessary instrumentation for ERIAD. The method is shown to be effective for more than 70 elements of the periodic table: those that present as cations in a water solution. It shows a high absolute sensitivity with a low spread from Li to U, and a detection limit of tens of parts per trillion. The soft ionization used results in the absence of plasma chemical reaction products, typical for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the spectra are nearly free from interferences. The method does not require a high resolution and can be used for samples with an artificial isotopic content. The method is essentially valid for radiochemistry and metallomics, as it has the possibility to combine measurements of chemical, elemental, and even isotopic content simultaneously.

  18. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  19. Comparison of four analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Boutakhrit, K; Crisci, M; Bolle, F; Van Loco, J

    2011-02-01

    Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverages and canned foods by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), electrothermal atomisation-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in terms of linearity, precision, recovery, limit of detection, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) (Decision 2002/657/EC). Calibration ranges were covered from ng l⁻¹ to mg l⁻¹ level. Limits of detection that ranged from 0.01, 0.05, 2.0 to 200 µg l⁻¹ were reached for ICP-MS; HG-ICP-AES; ETA-AAS and ICP-AES, respectively. Precision, calculated according to ISO 5725-2 for repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility and expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 1.6% to 4.9%; and recovery, based on Decision 2002/657/EC, was found to be between 95% and 110%. Procedures for the mineralisation or extraction of total tin were compared. Wet digestion, sequentially, with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide provided the best results. The influence of possible interferences present in canned food and beverage was studied, but no interference in the determination of tin was observed. Since maximum levels for tin established by European Union legislation vary from 50 mg kg⁻¹ in canned baby foods and infant foods up to 200 mg kg⁻¹ in canned food, ICP-AES was chosen as the preferred technique for routine analysis thanks to its good precision, reliability and ease of use. The accuracy of this routine method was confirmed by participation in six proficiency test schemes with z-scores ranging from -1.9 to 0.6. Several canned foodstuffs and beverage samples from a local market were analysed with this technique.

  20. [Determination of trace elements in shark cartilage by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Deng, B; Zhang, Z

    1998-10-01

    Semiquantitative estimation of all elements in shark cartilage was investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The determination of trace elements, namely Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr in shark cartilage, was carried out using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The matrix effects were overcome by using yttrium as an internal standard element. The recoveries are in the range of 81.6 to 100.7%. The determination limits of Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr are 0.60, 0.55, 0.21, 0.39, 0.042, 0.27, 0.038 and 0.48 microg x g(-1), respectively. The results showed that the shark cartilage contains higher amount of Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr than those in other fishes and in other animal bones.

  1. Measurement of lanthanum and technetium in uranium fuels by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, K.; Crane, P.; Cummings, D.; Krsul, J.; McKnight, R.

    1999-06-10

    An important parameter in characterizing an irradiated nuclear fuel is determining the amount of uranium fissioned. By determining the amount of uranium fissioned in the fuel a burnup performance parameter can be calculated, and the amount of fission products left in the fuel can be predicted. The quantity of uranium fissioned can be calculated from the amount of lanthanum and technetium present in the fuel. Lanthanum and technetium were measured in irradiated fuel samples using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument and separation equipment located in a shielded glove-box. A discussion of the method, interferences, detection limits, quality control and a comparison to other work will be presented.

  2. Gravitational properties of light: The emission of counter-propagating laser pulses from an atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    The gravitational field of a laser pulse, although not detectable at the moment, has a special feature which continues to attract attention; cause and effect propagate with the same speed, the speed of light. One particular result of this feature is that the gravitational field of an emitted laser pulse and the gravitational effect of the emitter's energy-momentum change are intimately entangled. In this article, a specific example of an emission process is considered: An atom, modeled as a point mass, emits two counter-propagating pulses. The corresponding curvature and the effect on massive and massless test particles is discussed. A comparison is made with the metric corresponding to a spherically symmetric massive object that isotropically emits radiation; the Vaidya metric.

  3. Near-threshold emission of electrons during grazing scattering of keV Ne atoms from an Al(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Matulevich, Y.; Lederer, S.; Winter, H.

    2005-01-15

    The number of electrons emitted during grazing scattering of Ne atoms with kilo-electron-volt energies from an Al(111) surface is recorded in coincidence with the energy loss of scattered projectiles. Irrespective of the total projectile energies used, we observe a pronounced increase of total electron emission yields when the energy for motion normal to the surface exceeds about 25 eV. Based on energy loss spectra and classical computer simulations of projectile trajectories we attribute electron emission under these scattering conditions to a promotion mechanism in binary collisions between Ne and Al target atoms resulting in single and double excitations of projectiles.

  4. Thermal Processes and Emission of Atoms from the Liquid Phase Target Surface of a Magnetron Sputtering System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleykher, G. A.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Yuryeva, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    Mathematical models of thermal and erosion processes in the thermally insulated target of a magnetron sputtering system are constructed. With their help, the special features of forming the emission flux of atoms from the surface of the target whose material experiences first order phase transformations are obtained. The influence of the power density deposited into the magnetron discharge is investigated, the inhomogeneity of its distribution over the target surface is considered, and the special features of atom emission in pulsed-periodic plasma generation regimes are studied. The efficiency of the models is confirmed by a comparison of the calculated results with experimental measurements.

  5. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perring, Loïc; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99+/-5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given.

  6. Nondestructive atomic compositional analysis of BeMgZnO quaternary alloys using ion beam analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolnai, Z.; Toporkov, M.; Volk, J.; Demchenko, D. O.; Okur, S.; Szabó, Z.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Avrutin, V.; Kótai, E.

    2015-02-01

    The atomic composition with less than 1-2 atom% uncertainty was measured in ternary BeZnO and quaternary BeMgZnO alloys using a combination of nondestructive Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with 1 MeV He+ analyzing ion beam and non-Rutherford elastic backscattering experiments with 2.53 MeV energy protons. An enhancement factor of 60 in the cross-section of Be for protons has been achieved to monitor Be atomic concentrations. Usually the quantitative analysis of BeZnO and BeMgZnO systems is challenging due to difficulties with appropriate experimental tools for the detection of the light Be element with satisfactory accuracy. As it is shown, our applied ion beam technique, supported with the detailed simulation of ion stopping, backscattering, and detection processes allows of quantitative depth profiling and compositional analysis of wurtzite BeZnO/ZnO/sapphire and BeMgZnO/ZnO/sapphire layer structures with low uncertainty for both Be and Mg. In addition, the excitonic bandgaps of the layers were deduced from optical transmittance measurements. To augment the measured compositions and bandgaps of BeO and MgO co-alloyed ZnO layers, hybrid density functional bandgap calculations were performed with varying the Be and Mg contents. The theoretical vs. experimental bandgaps show linear correlation in the entire bandgap range studied from 3.26 eV to 4.62 eV. The analytical method employed should help facilitate bandgap engineering for potential applications, such as solar blind UV photodetectors and heterostructures for UV emitters and intersubband devices.

  7. Investigations on laser ablation microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry using polymer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leis, F.; Bauer, H. E.; Prodan, L.; Niemax, K.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of laser ablation-microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-MIP-AES) for the analysis of plastic materials has been investigated. A Nd/YAG laser, operated in its fundamental mode at 1064 nm, was used to ablate small amounts of various plastics. The sample atoms were transported and excited in a closely neighbored continuously running microwave induced plasma (MIP) operated in argon or helium at reduced pressure. A 0.5-m échelle spectrometer, equipped with an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) as a detector was used for recording the spectra. The amount of ablated material was found to be strongly dependent on the matrix (10-190 ng/shot). Signals for some metals often used as additives in polymers (Al, Ca, Cu, Sb, Ti) and for the elements F, Cl, Br, J, and P in various polymers were recorded in the spectral range 250-840 nm. The estimated detection limits were found to be in the range 0.001-0.08% for metals and 0.05-0.7% for non-metals. Spectral lines of fluorine and iodine could only be measured in the helium MIP. For high concentrations of chlorine and carbon in the samples (polyvinylchloride), a memory effect was observed.

  8. [Application of atomic emission spectroscopy analysis in the atmospheric pressure plasma polishing process study].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Ju-Fan; Dong, Shen

    2008-07-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma polishing (APPP) is a novel precision machining technology. It performs the atom scale material removal based on low temperature plasma chemical reactions. As the machining process is chemical in nature, it avoids the surface/subsurface defects usually formed in conventional mechanical machining processes. APPP firstly introduces a capacitance coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma torch to generate reactive plasma and excite chemical reactions further. The removal process is a complicated integrating action which tends to be affected by many factors, such as the gas ratio, the RF power and so on. Therefore, to improve the machining quality, all the aspects should be considered and studied, to establish the foundation for further model building and theoretical analysis. The atomic emission spectroscopy analysis was used to study the process characteristics. A commercial micro spectrometer was used to collect the spectrograms under different parameters, by comparing which the influence of the RF power and gas ratio was initially studied. The analysis results indicate that an increase in RF power results in a higher removal rate within a certain range. The gas ratio doesn't show obvious influence on the removal rate and surface roughness in initial experiments, but the element compositions detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technology on the machined surfaces under different ratios really indicate distinct difference. Then the theoretical analysis revealed the corresponding electron transition orbits of the excited reactive fluorine atoms, which is necessary for further mechanism research and apparatus improvement. Then the initial process optimization was made based on the analysis results, by which the Ra 0.6 nm surface roughness and 32 mm3 x min(-1) removal rate were achieved on silicon wafers.

  9. Four-level atom dynamics and emission statistics using a quantum jump approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, S. N.

    2007-01-01

    Four-level atom dynamics is studied in a ladder system in the nine parameter space consisting of driving field strengths, detunings and decay constants, {Ω1,Ω2,Ω3,Δ1,Δ2,Δ3,Γ2,Γ3,Γ4} . One can selectively excite or induce two-level behavior between particular levels of ones choice by appropriately tuning the driving field strengths at three-photon resonance. The dynamics may be classified into two main regions of interest (i) small Ω2 coupling the ∣2⟩-∣3⟩ transition and (ii) large Ω2 . In case (i) one sees two-level behavior consisting of adjacent levels and in a particular region in the parameter space, there is an intermittent shelving of the electrons in one of the two subsystems. In case (ii) the levels consist of the ground state and the upper most level. Emission statistics is studied using the delay function approach in both the cases. In case (i), the behavior of the second order correlation function g2(t) , is similar to that of two-level emission for low Ω1 coupling the ∣1⟩-∣2⟩ transition, and the correlation increases with Ω1 for smaller time delays. While, in case (ii) when, in addition, Ω3 coupling the ∣3⟩-∣4⟩ transitionis kept low, g2(t) shows superpoissonian distribution, which may be attributed to three-photon processes.

  10. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  11. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  12. Electron emission perpendicular to the polarization direction in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; Arbó, D. G.

    2017-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of ionization of the hydrogen atom due to an XUV pulse in the presence of an infrared (IR) laser with both fields linearly polarized in the same direction. In particular, we study the energy distribution of photoelectrons emitted perpendicularly to the polarization direction. As we previously showed in Gramajo et al. [Phys. Rev. A 94, 053404 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.053404] for parallel emission, by means of a very simple semiclassical model which considers electron trajectories born at different ionization times, the electron energy spectrum can be interpreted as the interplay of intra- and intercycle interferences. However, contrary to the case of parallel emission the intracycle interference pattern stems from the coherent superposition of four electron trajectories giving rise to (i) interference of electron trajectories born during the same half cycle (intra-half-cycle interference) and (ii) interference between electron trajectories born during the first half cycle with those born during the second half cycle (inter-half-cycle interference). The intercycle interference is responsible for the formation of the sidebands. We also show that the destructive inter-half-cycle interference for the absorption and emission of an even number of IR laser photons is responsible for the characteristic sidebands in the perpendicular direction separated by twice the IR photon energy. This contrasts with the emission along the polarization axis (all sideband orders are present) since intra-half-cycle interferences do not exist in that case. The intracycle interference pattern works as a modulation of the sidebands and, in the same way, it is modulated by the intra-half-cycle interference pattern. We analyze the dependence of the energy spectrum on the laser intensity and the time delay between the XUV pulse and the IR laser. Finally, we show that our semiclassical simulations are in very good agreement with quantum calculations within the

  13. Damped Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolovsky, A.R.; Ponomarev, A.V.; Korsch, H.J.

    2002-11-01

    The paper studies Bloch oscillations of cold neutral atoms in the optical lattice. The effect of spontaneous emission on the dynamics of the system is analyzed both analytically and numerically. The spontaneous emission is shown to cause (i) the decay of Bloch oscillations with the decrement given by the rate of spontaneous emission and (ii) the diffusive spreading of the atoms with a diffusion coefficient depending on both the rate of spontaneous emission and the Bloch frequency.

  14. Fluorescence emission of Ca-atom from photodissociated Ca2 in Ar doped helium droplets. II. Theoretical.

    PubMed

    Hernando, A; Masson, A; Briant, M; Mestdagh, J-M; Gaveau, M-A; Halberstadt, N

    2012-11-14

    The stability of the ground or excited state calcium atom in an argon-doped helium droplet has been investigated using an extension of the helium density functional method to treat clusters. This work was motivated by the experimental study presented in a companion paper, hereafter called Paper I [A. Masson, M. Briant, J. M. Mestdagh, M. A. Gaveau, A. Hernando, and N. Halberstadt, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 184310 (2012)], which investigated Ca(2) photodissociation in an argon-doped helium droplet and the nature of the fluorescent species. It is found that one single argon atom is sufficient to bring the calcium atom inside the droplet, for droplets of over 200 helium atoms. The absorption and emission spectra of CaAr(M) (M = 0-7) clusters have been simulated using the recently developed density sampling method to describe the influence of the helium environment. Absorption spectra exhibit broad, double bands that are significantly blueshifted with respect to the calcium atomic line. The emission spectra are less broad and redshifted with respect to the calcium resonance line. The shifts are found to be additive only for M ≤ 2, because only the first two argon atoms are located in equivalent positions around the calcium p orbital. This finding gives a justification for the fit presented in the companion paper, which uses the observed shifts in the emission spectra as a function of argon pressure to deduce the shifts as a function of the number of argon atoms present in the cluster. An analysis of this fit is presented here, based on the calculated shifts. It is concluded that the emitting species following Ca(2) photodissociation in an argon-doped droplet in Paper I could be Ca∗Ar(M) in a partly evaporated droplet where less than 200 helium atoms remain.

  15. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  16. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  17. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  18. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  19. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes.

  20. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic determination of rare earth elements in geological samples after preconcentration by countercurrent chromatography—I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhovskaya, V. M.; Maryutina, T. A.; Grebneva, O. N.; Kuz'min, N. M.; Spivakov, B. Ya.

    1993-09-01

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) was applied to group pre-separation of rare earth elements (REE) in rocks. A 0.5 mol/l solution of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in n-decane as stationary phase, and aqueous HC1 solution as mobile phase were used. Experimental conditions were found for quantitative separation of REE from the rock constituents that interfere with their inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) determination. The complete preseparation procedure takes 40 min at a mobile phase pumping rate of 2 ml/min. Interelement and off-peak background corrections were applied to compensate for the contributions of mutual spectral interferences to the analyte line and background intensities. Standard reference rock materials and samples of different composition with well known REE contents were analysed. The data obtained are in good agreement with certified and previously determined values, except for "heavy" REE such as Tm, Yb and Lu.

  2. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of cadmium (Cd) in fish by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomisation.

    PubMed

    Costa, L C S M; Neto, A P N; Araújo, M Q; Melo, M C C; Furtado, D M S; Kikuchi, A N S

    2012-01-01

    The validation of an analytical method was carried out for the determination of cadmium (Cd) in fish. The method was based on sample digestion in a microwave oven and subsequent reading using an atomic absorption spectrometer with a graphite furnace. The factorial design of experiments was applied to assess method ruggedness using the methodology of Box et al. [Box GEP, Hunter WG, Hunter JS. 1978. Statistics for experiments: an introduction to design, data analysis and model building. New York (NY): Wiley], studying the influence of sample mass, volume and concentration of acid used for sample digestion and the volume of modifier used. To study the possible matrix effect in the determination of Cd, the standard addition method was also performed. The results were treated using the OLS method. For the normality test a homoskedastic distribution was observed for the developed method and the results were adjusted to the statistical model proposed. F-tests and Student's t-tests indicated that there was no matrix effect on the calibration curve between the concentration range 1.0-10.0 µg Cd l(-1). Parameters such as selectivity, precision, decision limit, detection capability and limit of quantification were established by the method of standard addition to blank samples. The limit of quantification was 6.8 µg kg(-1). Accuracy, which was evaluated by using a certified reference material, was 107.0%. The recovery of the spiked analyte was 93.69% for the concentration of 50 µg kg(-1). Precision was defined by the coefficient of variation observed (Horrat value), estimated in terms of repeatability and reproducibility, and the values were below the limit, which is 2.0. The validation procedure confirmed the suitability of the method.

  3. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  4. Performance evaluation of four directional emissivity analytical models with thermal SAIL model and airborne images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Rongyuan; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Liu, Qiang; Nerry, Françoise

    2015-04-06

    Land surface emissivity is a crucial parameter in the surface status monitoring. This study aims at the evaluation of four directional emissivity models, including two bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models and two gap-frequency-based models. Results showed that the kernel-driven BRDF model could well represent directional emissivity with an error less than 0.002, and was consequently used to retrieve emissivity with an accuracy of about 0.012 from an airborne multi-angular thermal infrared data set. Furthermore, we updated the cavity effect factor relating to multiple scattering inside canopy, which improved the performance of the gap-frequency-based models.

  5. Approaching the Limit in Atomic Spectrochemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hieftje, Gary M.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the ability of current analytical methods to approach the single-atom detection level, theoretical and experimentally determined detection levels are presented for several chemical elements. A comparison of these methods shows that the most sensitive atomic spectrochemical technique currently available is based on emission from…

  6. Practicality of Using Oxygen Atom Emissions to Evaluate the Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been proposed [Akasofu, 1999] that observation of the O(1S - 1D) green line from the atmospheres of extra-solar planets might be a marker for habitability. Guidance on this question is available within our own solar system. The green line is a dominant feature in the visible terrestrial nightglow, and the ultimate origin of its mesospheric emission is the three-body recombination of oxygen atoms. Until recently, it was believed that the green line was not a feature of the nightglows of the CO2 planets, Venus and Mars. It is now known that Venus at times shows green line emission with an intensity equal to terrestrial values [Slanger et al., 2001]. Furthermore, the intensity is quite variable, as is true for the much stronger O2( a-X) 1.27 μ emission. Recent observations of the Mars nightglow [Bertaux et al., 2005] give ambiguous results in the region of the O(1S-3P) line at 297.2 nm, but the same line in the dayglow is very strong, as evidenced in earlier Mariner results [Barth et al., 1971], and from the recent Mars Express data [F. Leblanc, private communication]. The O(1D-3P) 630 nm red line is a feature associated with Io, where dissociation of SO2 is a presumed source [Scherb et al., 1998]. Thus, observation of the oxygen green/red lines in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets provides insufficient information to reach conclusions about a habitable environment. Such detection would only indicate that there are oxygen-containing molecules present. Determination of an O2 column depth, by Fraunhofer A-band absorption, would be much more conclusive. Akasofu, S.-I., EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 80, 397, 1999. Barth, C.A., C.W. Hord, J.B. Pearce, K.K. Kelly, G.P. Anderson, and A.I. Stewart, Mariner 6 and 7 Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment: Upper Atmosphere Data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 2213-2227, 1971. Bertaux, J.-L., F. Leblanc, S. Perrier, E. Quemerais, O. Korablev, E. Dimarellis, A. Reberac, F. Forget, P

  7. The influence of atomic collisions on collective spontaneous emission from an f-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenasfard, Z.; Naderi, M. H.; Soltanolkotabi, M.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spontaneous emission of an f-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate of a gas with N identical two-level atoms immersed in a single-mode ideal cavity with s atoms initially excited. We apply an f-deformed quantum model in which Gardiner's phonon operators are deformed by an operator-valued functionf(\\hat n) of the particle number operator \\hat n. We consider the collisions between the atoms as a special kind of f-deformation where the collision rate κ is regarded as a corresponding deformation parameter. The time evolution of the expectation value of the atomic inversion is presented, the phenomenon of collective collapses and revivals is shown and the effects of deformation on the cooperative behaviour of the system are discussed.

  8. Use of gradient dilution to flag and overcome matrix interferences in axial-viewing inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-10-01

    Despite the undisputed power of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), its users still face serious challenges in obtaining accurate analytical results. Matrix interference is perhaps the most important challenge. Dilution of a matrix-containing sample is a common practice to reduce matrix interference. However, determining the optimal dilution factor requires tedious and time-consuming offline sample preparation, since emission lines and the effect of matrix interferences are affected differently by the dilution. The current study exploits this difference by employing a high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump prior to the nebulizer to perform on-line mixing of a sample solution and diluent. Linear gradient dilution is performed on both the calibration standard and the matrix-containing sample. By ratioing the signals from two emission lines (from the same or different elements) as a function of dilution factor, the analyst can not only identify the presence of a matrix interference, but also determine the optimal dilution factor needed to overcome the interference. A ratio that does not change with dilution signals the absence of a matrix interference, whereas a changing ratio indicates the presence of an interference. The point on the dilution profile where the ratio stabilizes indicates the optimal dilution factor to correct the interference. The current study was performed on axial-viewing ICP-AES with o-xylene as the solvent.

  9. 40 CFR 87.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1, 2011, report CO2 values along with your emission levels of regulated NOX to the Administrator for... on or after January 1, 2011. By January 1, 2011, report CO2 values along with your emission levels of... date of manufacture of the individual engine was before January 1, 2011. Round CO2 to the nearest 1 g...

  10. 40 CFR 87.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) (b) Starting January 1, 2011, report CO2 values along with your emission levels of regulated NOX to... individual production model was on or after January 1, 2011. By January 1, 2011, report CO2 values along with your emission levels of regulated NOX to the Administrator for engines currently in production and of a...

  11. Accurate analytical measurements in the atomic force microscope: a microfabricated spring constant standard potentially traceable to the SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Hedley, John

    2003-12-01

    Calibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules at nanoscale lateral resolution. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference artefact for this calibration, using a method that allows traceability to the SI (Système International). Traceability is crucial to ensure that force measurements by AFM are comparable to those made by optical tweezers and other methods. The new non-contact calibration method measures the spring constant of these artefacts, by a combination of electrical measurements and Doppler velocimetry. The device was fabricated by silicon surface micromachining. The device allows AFM cantilevers to be calibrated quite easily by the 'cantilever-on-reference' method, with our reference device having a spring constant uncertainty of around ± 5% at one standard deviation. A simple substitution of the analogue velocimeter used in this work with a digital model should reduce this uncertainty to around ± 2%. Both are significant improvements on current practice, and allow traceability to the SI for the first time at these nanonewton levels.

  12. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts.

  13. Atmospheric Absorption Applied to Plume Emission. Experimental and Analytical Investigations of Hot Gas Emission Attenuated by Cold Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    ABSTRACT ( Continued ) Spectral measurements of the radiance of a hot gas cell, both unattenuated and attenrated by a long simulated atmospheric path, were...Molecular Spectroscopy and Gas Emissivities, Addison -Wesley, Readirg, Massachusetts, 1959. of their magnitude. Burch et al.,[6 made limited measurements ...PERFORMING ORGANIZATIOM NAME AND ADDRESS tO. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Enviromental Research Institute of Michigan AREA I WORK UNIT NUMUERS Infrared and

  14. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  15. [Determination of chlorine in gasoline by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Xu, Dong-yu; Zhang, Shi-yuan; Chen, Ze-yong

    2014-12-01

    A new method was studied for the analysis of chlorine in gasoline by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples werediluted 1+4(φ) with kerosene. The intense spectral line for chlorine (134.724 nm) was used. In order to eliminate carbon and maintain stable plasma, small amounts of oxygen (0.050 L · min(-1)) were added to the auxiliary gas. The instrumental main condition was optimized in terms of effects of generator power, nebulizer gas flow, auxiliary gas flow, and oxygen flow on SBR for chlorine. Standard addition method was used to compensate matrix effect and signal drift. The recovery for spiking gasoline samples and the limit of detection were in the range of 96.6%~103.9% and 0.27 mg · L(-1) respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was between 1.57% and 4.49%. Compared with microcoulometry, the analysis results of organic chlorine were basically the same. Moreover, chlorine content, including organic chlorine and inorganic chloride was determined by ICP-AES. The proposed method had the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity, and expanded the ICP-AES application in non-metals especially halogen elements. It can be used for the analysis of chlorine in gasoline and provides technical support for quality evaluation.

  16. Intra- and intercycle interference of electron emissions in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; Garibotti, C. R.; Arbó, D. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen in the direction of polarization due to a linearly polarized XUV pulse in the presence of a strong IR laser. We describe the photoelectron spectra as an interference problem in the time domain. Electron trajectories stemming from different optical laser cycles give rise to intercycle interference energy peaks known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by a coarse-grained structure coming from the intracycle interference of the two electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We make use of a simple semiclassical model that offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the photoelectron kinetic energy. We analyze such interference pattern as a function of the time delay between the IR and the XUV pulses and also as a function of the laser intensity. We compare the semiclassical predictions with the continuum-distorted-wave strong-field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  17. Simultaneous multielemental analysis of some environmental and biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hee, S.S.Q.; Boyle, J.R.

    1988-05-15

    The Parr bomb technique is found to be the preferred acid digestion method for multielemental analysis by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) when compared with microwave and hot plate methods for many environmental and biological specimens, but especially for the latter. One digestion alone often did not produce quantitative results compared with a sequential digestion scheme. The digestions were then refined to be as similar as possible for the various substrates studied. The interference of carbon on As and Se had to be corrected at less than or equal to 3000 ..mu..g of C/mL in the analysis solution, and thus the C content had to be monitored to assess the efficiency of the digestions and to determine if interelemental correction for C presence was required. The C correction was adequate in the range 3000-10,000 ..mu..g of C/ml. The use of modified k values was demonstrated to provide accuracy and had to be used for ICP-AES spectrometers where background corrections were performed first for fixed channels. The results on Cincinnati soils and feces of Cincinnati children showed that Si and Ti were possible tracer elements for soil ingestion by the children.

  18. Determination of additives in PVC material by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerlin, M.; Mermet, J. M.; Bertucci, M.; Zydowicz, P.

    1997-04-01

    UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) has been applied to the direct determination of additives in solid poly(vinyl chloride) materials. A Nd:YAG laser, operating at its fourth harmonic (266 nm), was used with a beam masking device, in the most reproducible conditions, to introduce solid particles into the plasma torch of a simultaneous ICP-AES system. Emphasis was placed on both precision and accuracy in the analysis of PVC materials by LA-ICP-AES. A series of six in-house PVC reference materials was prepared by incorporating several additives in increasing concentrations. Three alternative methods were evaluated to certify the amount of incorporated elements: ICP-AES with sample dissolution, NAA and XRF. Satisfactory results and good agreement were obtained for seven elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Mg, Sb, Sn and Ti) among the ten incorporated. Sample homogeneity appeared to be satisfactory, and calibration graphs obtained by LA-ICP-AES for several elements are presented. Finally, the performance of the technique in terms of repeatability (1.6-5%), reproducibility (2-5%), and limits of detection was investigated.

  19. An analytical model for estimating the reduction of methane emission through landfill cover soils by methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Su, Yao; Wu, Yun; Liu, Weiping; He, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    Landfill is an important source of atmospheric methane (CH4). In this study, the development and partial validation are presented for an analytical model for predicting the reduction of CH4 emission in landfill cover soils by CH4 oxidation. The model combines an analytic solution of a coupled oxygen (O2) and CH4 soil gas transport in landfill covers with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation, including the influences of environmental factors such as cover soil thickness, CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate. Comparison of soil gas concentration profiles with a soil column experiment is provided for a partial validation, and then this model is applied to predict the reduction of CH4 emission through landfill covers in several other cases. A discussion is provided to illustrate the roles of soil layer thickness, reaction rate constant for CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate in determining CH4 emissions. The results suggest that the increase of cover soil thickness cannot always increase CH4 oxidation rates or removal efficiency, which becomes constant if the thickness of landfill cover soil is larger than a limit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Ariel Tessler, Nir Einziger, Pinchas D.; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-06-14

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  1. Crystallization-induced emission enhancement: A novel fluorescent Au-Ag bimetallic nanocluster with precise atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Sha; Chai, Jinsong; Song, Yongbo; Fan, Jiqiang; Rao, Bo; Sheng, Hongting; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2017-01-01

    We report the first noble metal nanocluster with a formula of Au4Ag13(DPPM)3(SR)9 exhibiting crystallization-induced emission enhancement (CIEE), where DPPM denotes bis(diphenylphosphino)methane and HSR denotes 2,5-dimethylbenzenethiol. The precise atomic structure is determined by x-ray crystallography. The crystalline state of Au4Ag13 shows strong luminescence at 695 nm, in striking contrast to the weak emission of the amorphous state and hardly any emission in solution phase. The structural analysis and the density functional theory calculations imply that the compact C–H⋯π interactions significantly restrict the intramolecular rotations and vibrations and thus considerably enhance the radiative transitions in the crystalline state. Because the noncovalent interactions can be easily modulated via varying the chemical environments, the CIEE phenomenon might represent a general strategy to amplify the fluorescence from weakly (or even non-) emissive nanoclusters. PMID:28835926

  2. Angular dependence of Doppler profiles of atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions: Estimation of anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Keiji; Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1985-11-01

    The angular dependence of Doppler profiles of atomic fluorescence produced in electron impact dissociation of molecules was simulated in consideration of the effect of the anisotropy of dissociation and the ``polarization'' in magnetic sublevel. The asymmetry parameter b and the polarization of the electric vector of emission Jp are key parameters of Doppler profiles for the excited atom of known translational energy distribution. The difference of two Doppler profiles taken at 90° and 45°, which is denoted as angular difference Doppler profile, is shown to be useful to estimate these two key parameters.

  3. Analytical solution for phase space evolution of electrons operating in a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimori, Nobuyuki

    2005-10-01

    I present an analytical solution for the phase space evolution of electrons in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the linear regime before saturation in the resonant case by solving the one dimensional FEL equation together with the solution of the cubic equation, which represents the evolution of the SASE FEL field. The electrons are shown to be bunched around π/6 ahead of a resonant electron every resonant FEL wavelength in the high gain regime. The phase relation is similar to that in a low gain FEL where an electron beam above resonance is injected, explaining the positive FEL gain. The analytical solutions agree well with numerical simulations and are applied to obtain the coherent optical transition radiation (OTR) intensity produced from electron microbunching at FEL wavelength. The coherent OTR intensity is shown to be proportional to FEL intensity.

  4. Applied analytical combustion/emissions research at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, J. M.; Kundu, K. P.; Nguyen, H. L.

    1992-07-01

    Emissions of pollutants from future commercial transports are a significant concern. As a result, the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is investigating various low emission combustor technologies. As part of this effort, a combustor analysis code development program was pursued to guide the combustor design process, to identify concepts having the greatest promise, and to optimize them at the lowest cost in the minimum time.

  5. Applied analytical combustion/emissions research at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Kundu, K. P.; Nguyen, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    Emissions of pollutants from future commercial transports are a significant concern. As a result, the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is investigating various low emission combustor technologies. As part of this effort, a combustor analysis code development program was pursued to guide the combustor design process, to identify concepts having the greatest promise, and to optimize them at the lowest cost in the minimum time.

  6. Determination of non-metallic elements by capacitively coupled helium microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry with capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Uchida, H; Berthod, A; Winefordner, J D

    1990-07-01

    A capacitively coupled microwave helium plasma with a tubular tantalum electrode was evaluated as an element selective detector for gas chromatography (GC). The end of a 10-m bonded fused capillary column was directly inserted into the tubular electrode without any switching system. A heated copper tube was used to house the part of the GC column that protruded from the oven. The optimisation of operating parameters, line selection, background emission and horizontal and vertical observation position is described. Analytical figures of merit including sensitivity, reproducibility, signal to background ratio, selectivity, dynamic range and limit of detection (LOD), were evaluated for carbon, hydrogen, chlorine and bromine emission. Limits of detection in the low ng range (20 pmol) were obtained for halogenated compounds using carbon emission, whereas LODs in the 0.1 micrograms range (2 nmol) were obtained using chlorine or bromine emission lines.

  7. Excitation of O(1D) atoms in aurorae and emission of the forbidden OI 6300-A line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Roble, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The electron aurora leads to six processes capable of exciting the O(1D2) metastable state of the atomic-oxygen ground-state configuration, the parent state of the 6300-A red line. Altitude profiles of the volume emission rate resulting from each process are computed for Maxwellian electron spectra with characteristic energies between 0.1 and 2.0 keV. Since each process peaks at a different altitude, the sum or total volume emission rate extends over a wide altitude range. Measurements of 6300-A emission obtained by rocket and satellite-borne instruments are summarized, and it is shown that the chemical reaction of N(2D) with O2 is the major source of O(1D) atoms in the electron aurora. New calculations of the 6300-A:4728-A column emission-rate ratio are presented for a range of characteristic energies in an assumed Maxwellian electron spectrum. An approximate equation for the red-line emission per unit energy input is given as a function of electron-spectrum characteristic energy.

  8. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  9. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  10. 40 CFR 86.107-96 - Sampling and analytical systems; evaporative emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analyzers. (1) For gasoline fueled, natural gas-fueled, liquefied petroleum gas-fueled and methanol-fueled... a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. (3) The methanol sampling system... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling and analytical systems...

  11. Coupling dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: An oxymoron?

    PubMed

    Martínez, David; Torregrosa, Daniel; Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; Mora, Juan

    2018-01-01

    Coupling dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is usually troublesome due to the limited plasma tolerance to the organic solvents usually employed for metal extraction. This work explores different coupling strategies allowing the multi-element determination by ICP-AES of the solutions obtained after DLLME procedures. To this end, three of the most common extractant solvents in DLLME procedures (1-undecanol, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate and chloroform) have been selected to face most of the main problems reported in DLLME-ICP-AES coupling (i.e., those arising from the high solvent viscosity and volatility). Results demonstrate that DLLME can be successfully coupled to ICP-AES after a careful optimization of the experimental conditions. Thus, elemental analysis in 1-undecanol and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate extracts can be achieved by ICP-AES after a simple dilution step with methanol (1:0.5). Chloroform can be directly introduced into the plasma with minimum changes in the ICP-AES configuration usually employed when operating with aqueous solutions. Diluted inorganic acid solutions (1% w w(-1) either nitric or hydrochloric acids) have been successfully tested for the first time as a carrier for the introduction of organic extractants in ICP-AES. The coupling strategies proposed have been successfully applied to the multi-element analysis (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) of different water samples (i.e. marine, tap and river) by DLLME-ICP-AES. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death.

  13. Analytical combustion/emissions research related to the NASA high-speed research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee

    1991-01-01

    Increasing the pressure and temperature of the engines of new generation supersonic airliners increases the emissions of nitrogen oxides to a level that would have an adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer. In the process of implementing low emissions combustor technologies, NASA Lewis Research Center has pursued a combustion analysis program to guide combustor design processes, to identify potential concepts of greatest promise, and to optimize them at low cost, with short turn-around time. The approach is to upgrade and apply advanced computer programs for gas turbine applications. Efforts have been made to improve the code capabilities of modeling the physics. Test cases and experiments are used for code validation. To provide insight into the combustion process and combustor design, two-dimensional and three-dimensional codes such as KIVA-II and LeRC 3D have been used. These codes are operational and calculations have been performed to guide low emissions combustion experiments.

  14. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  15. Simulation of field-induced molecular dissociation in atom-probe tomography: Identification of a neutral emission channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanuttini, David; Blum, Ivan; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Vurpillot, François; Douady, Julie; Jacquet, Emmanuelle; Anglade, Pierre-Matthieu; Gervais, Benoit

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of dicationic metal-oxide molecules under large electric-field conditions, on the basis of ab initio calculations coupled to molecular dynamics. Applied to the case of ZnO2 + in the field of atom probe tomography (APT), our simulation reveals the dissociation into three distinct exit channels. The proportions of these channels depend critically on the field strength and on the initial molecular orientation with respect to the field. For typical field strength used in APT experiments, an efficient dissociation channel leads to emission of neutral oxygen atoms, which escape detection. The calculated composition biases and their dependence on the field strength show remarkable consistency with recent APT experiments on ZnO crystals. Our work shows that bond breaking in strong static fields may lead to significant neutral atom production, and therefore to severe elemental composition biases in measurements.

  16. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  17. Direct determination of trace elements in niobium, tantalum and their oxides by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after microwave dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebneva, O. N.; Kubrakova, I. V.; Kudinova, T. F.; Kuz'min, N. M.

    1997-07-01

    Analytical schemes for the determination of trace elements in high-purity niobium, tantalum and their oxides are proposed. The schemes are based on microwave dissolution of the metals and oxides followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) determination of impurities in the solutions. The possibilities of interelement and off-peak background corrections in ICP-AES analysis are discussed. The accuracy of the results obtained is confirmed by the determination of trace elements after a matrix sorption separation procedure. For a number of elements, a comparison of the results obtained by ICP-AES without and with the matrix separation procedure and by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) shows good agreement. The limits of detection for direct ICP-AES determination are in the range 0.4*1.0 μg g -1 for Ba, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Y and La; between 2.0 and 10.0 μ g -1 for B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hf, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, Zr and Ta; and for K, Sb and W a detection limit of 20 μ g -1 is achieved. The schemes proposed are intended for rapid routine analysis.

  18. Atomizing characteristics of swirl can combustor modules with swirl blast fuel injectors. [in terms of NOX emission rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Cold flow atomization tests of several different designs of swirl can combustor modules were conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter duct at airflow rates (per unit area) of 7.3 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec and water flow rates of 6.3 to 18.9 g/sec. The effect of air and water flow rates on the mean drop size of water sprays produced with the swirl blast fuel injectors were determined. Also, from these data it was possible to determine the effect of design modifications on the atomizing performance of various fuel injector and air swirler configurations. The trend in atomizing performance, as based on the mean drop size, was then compared with the trends in the production of nitrogen oxides obtained in combustion studues with the same swirl can combustors. It was found that the fuel injector design that gave the best combustor performance in terms of a low NOx emission index also gave the best atomizing performance as characterized by a spray of relatively small mean drop diameter. It was also demonstrated that at constant inlet air stream momentum the nitrogen oxides emission index was found to vary inversely with the square of the mean drop diameter of the spray produced by the different swirl blast fuel injectors. Test conditions were inlet air static pressures of 100,000 to 200,000 N/sq m at an inlet air temperature of 293 K.

  19. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-02-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g - 1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  20. Exploring star formation in high-z galaxies using atomic and molecular emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullberg, Bitten

    2016-03-01

    The conditions under which stars are formed and the reasons for triggering and quenching of starburst events in high-z galaxies, are still not well understood. Studying the interstellar medium (ISM) and the morphology of high-z galaxies are therefore key points in order to understand galaxy evolution. The cosmic star formation rate density peaks between 1>1, and low to moderate [CII] optical depth tau(CII)<1. Combining millimetre/sub-millimetre and optical data cubes for the high-z radio galaxy (HzRG) MRC0943-242, has revealed a much more complicated morphology than seen in the individual data sets. The millimetre/sub-millimetre observations data have allowed us to spatially separate of the AGN and starburst dominated components, which ~65 kpc apart. The optical data reveal structures of emitting and absorbing gas at multiple wavelengths. A deep high resolution millimetre/sub-millimetre study of the HzRG MRC1138-262, shows emission from water (H2O) and an unusually large amount of neutral atomic carbon ([CI]) relative to highly excited CO compared to lensed DSFGs. The

  1. 40 CFR 87.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... along with your emission levels of regulated NOX to the Administrator for engines of a type or model of... Administrator for engines currently in production and of a type or model for which the date of manufacture of... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES...

  2. Study on the properties of vacancies and phonon dispersions by the improved ones of the modified analytic embedded atom method potentials for Al, Ni, and Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hak-Son; Pak, Jae-Yon; Jong, Yon-Song

    2017-04-01

    The properties of the mono- and bi-vacancies and the phonon dispersions are calculated by adopting the improved ones of the modified analytical embedded atom method potentials for facet-centered cubic metals Al, Ni, and Ir. The results mainly agree with the experimental data and the other calculation results. Therefore, the improved potentials are effective in the study on the physical properties of the metals.

  3. Zeeman effects in the hyperfine structure of atomic iodine photodissociation laser emission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of hyperfine structure in laser emission from CF3I and C2F5I photodissociation lasers. Constant magnetic fields affect the time behavior of the emission by changing the relative gains of the hyperfine transitions. Time-varying fields usually present in photodissociation lasers further complicate the emission.

  4. Zeeman effects in the hyperfine structure of atomic iodine photodissociation laser emission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of hyperfine structure in laser emission from CF3I and C2F5I photodissociation lasers. Constant magnetic fields affect the time behavior of the emission by changing the relative gains of the hyperfine transitions. Time-varying fields usually present in photodissociation lasers further complicate the emission.

  5. Effect of composition of electrolyte cathode on emission intensity of metal atoms in the discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotkin, N. A.; Titov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The emission spectra and the plasma parameters of discharges were investigated. Water solutions of copper and nickel chlorides with additions of sodium chloride were used as electrolyte cathodes. The change of the relative intensities of the emission lines of the elements (Cu and Ni) with increasing NaCl concentrations in the solution is shown. The gas temperature and the reduced electric field strength in the plasma were founded. The electron energy distribution function and the excitation rate coefficients for emitting states of copper and nickel atoms by the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation were obtained. It was shown that in plasma emission spectroscopy measuring it is necessaryto considerthe correlation between rates of excitation and composition of the sample solution in order to determine the concentration of metal ions in the water solutions.

  6. The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Ludmila; Leonovich, Vitaly; Tashchilin, Anatoly

    The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure was revealed at mid-latitudes. The paper presents the study results of the dependence of the observed emissions intensity from the sudden variations in the solar wind and the geomagnetic field. These results show a relationship of the emissions disturbance amplitude with the solar wind speed, as well as with the geomagnetic field variations. We used the zenith photometer optical data, the geomagnetic field and the total electron content variations obtained for the Eastern Siberia region (52(°) N, 103(°) E). The investigation was supported by the RFFI grants № 12-05-00024-а, № 13-05-00733.

  7. Analytic treatment of source photon emission times to reduce noise in implicit Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, Travis J.; Gentile, Nicholas A.

    2012-09-10

    Statistical uncertainty is inherent to any Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport problems. In space-angle-frequency independent radiative transfer calculations, the uncertainty in the solution is entirely due to random sampling of source photon emission times. We have developed a modification to the Implicit Monte Carlo algorithm that eliminates noise due to sampling of the emission time of source photons. In problems that are independent of space, angle, and energy, the new algorithm generates a smooth solution, while a standard implicit Monte Carlo solution is noisy. For space- and angle-dependent problems, the new algorithm exhibits reduced noise relative to standard implicit Monte Carlo in some cases, and comparable noise in all other cases. In conclusion, the improvements are limited to short time scales; over long time scales, noise due to random sampling of spatial and angular variables tends to dominate the noise reduction from the new algorithm.

  8. Analytical Exponential Decay Coefficients and Internal Radiant Emission Phenomena of the Submarine Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    leakage around a blocking filter placed in front of the light sensor or internal emission of radiation from the hydrosol into the waveband of interest. The...series was the effects of the highly asymmetrical volume scattering function of natural hydrosols on the upwelling and downwelling streams of radiant flux...simulation was a demonstration that two-flow type models of radiant flux cannot be inverted in natural hydrosols (Stavn and Weldemann, 1989). An

  9. A semi-analytical emission model for diffusion flame, rich/lean and premixed lean combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, N.K.; Mongia, H.C.

    1995-04-01

    To enhanced gas turbine combustor performance and emissions characteristics, better design methods need to be developed. In the present investigation, an emission model that simulates a detailed chemical kinetic scheme has been developed to provide the rate of reactions of the parent fuel, an intermediate hydrocarbon compound, CO, and H{sub 2}. The intermediate fuel has variable carbon and hydrogen contents depending on operating conditions, that were selected in the development effort to simulate actual operating conditions, that were selected in the development effort to simulate actual operation of rich/lean, diffusion flame, and lean combustor concepts. The developed reaction rate expressions address also the limited reaction rates that may occur in the near-wall regions of the combustor due to the admittance of radial air jets and cooling air in these regions. The validation effort included the application of the developed model to a combustor simulated by a multiple-reactor arrangement. The results indicate the accurate duplication of the calculations obtained from the detailed kinetic scheme using the developed model. This illustrates the great potential of using such a unified approach to guide the design of various types of combustor to meet the more stringent emissions and performance requirements of next-generation gas turbine engines.

  10. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen, preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of combustor operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) to nitrogen oxides NO sub x was analytically determined. The effect of FBN and of operating conditions on carbon monoxide (CO) formation was also studied. For these computations, the combustor was assumed to be a two stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor. Propane-air was used as the combustible mixture and fuel-bound nitrogen was simulated by adding nitrogen atoms to the mixture. The oxidation of propane and formation of NO sub x and CO were modeled by a fifty-seven reaction chemical mechanism. The results for NO sub x and CO formation are given as functions of primary and secondary stage equivalence ratios and residence times.

  11. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  12. Comparison of ultrasonic and thermospray systems for high performance sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conver, Timothy S.; Koropchak, John A.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes detailed work done in our lab to compare analytical figures of merit for pneumatic, ultrasonic and thermospray sample introduction (SI) systems with three different inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instruments. One instrument from Leeman Labs, Inc. has an air path echelle spectrometer and a 27 MHz ICP. For low dissolved solid samples with this instrument, we observed that the ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and fused silica aperture thermospray (FSApT) both offered similar LOD improvements as compared to pneumatic nebulization (PN), 14 and 16 times, respectively. Average sensitivities compared to PN were better for the USN, by 58 times, compared to 39 times for the FSApT. For solutions containing high dissolved solids we observed that FSApT optimized at the same conditions as for low dissolved solids, whereas USN required changes in power and gas flows to maintain a stable discharge. These changes degraded the LODs for USN substantially as compared to those utilized for low dissolved solid solutions, limiting improvement compared to PN to an average factor of 4. In general, sensitivities for USN were degraded at these new conditions. When solutions with 3000 μg/g Ca were analyzed, LOD improvements were smaller for FSApT and USN, but FSApT showed an improvement over USN of 6.5 times. Sensitivities compared to solutions without high dissolved solids were degraded by 19% on average for FSApT, while those for USN were degraded by 26%. The SI systems were also tested with a Varian Instruments Liberty 220 having a vacuum path Czerny-Turner monochromator and a 40 MHz generator. The sensitivities with low dissolved solids solutions compared to PN were 20 times better for the USN and 39 times better for FSApT, and LODs for every element were better for FSApT. Better correlation between relative sensitivities and anticipated relative analyte mass fluxes for FSApT and USN was observed with the Varian instrument. LOD

  13. Method 200.7: Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAM lists this method for preparation and analysis of aqueous liquid and drinking water samples. This method will determine metal-containing compounds as the total metal (e.g., total arsenic), using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

  14. Bias and uncertainty in the absorption emission measurement of atomic sodium density in the SSME exit plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of atomic sodium concentration in the TTB 019 firing of April 1990 is significant in that it represents the first measurement of density at the exit plane of the space shuttle main engine. The knowledge of the sodium density, combined with the certainty that the exit plane of the plume is optically thin at the sodium D-line wavelengths, provides essential information for evaluation of diagnostic techniques using sodium atoms, such as resonant Doppler velocimetry for temperature, pressure, and velocity through high resolution fluorescent lineshape analysis. The technique used for the sodium atom line transmission (SALT) measurements is that of resonant absorption emission using a hollow cathode lamp as the reference source. Through the use of two-dimensional kinetic (TDK) predictions of temperature and density for the flight engine case and radiative transfer calculations, this line-of-sight spectrally integrated transmission indicates a sodium atom concentration, i.e., mole fraction, of 0.91e-10. The subject of this paper is the assumptions and measurement uncertainties tied into the calculation. Because of the narrow shape of the source emission, the uncertainties in the absorption profile could introduce considerable bias in the measurement. The following were investigated: (1) the inclusion of hyperfine splitting of the D-lines in the calculation; (2) the use of the flight engine predictions of plume temperature and density versus those for the large throat engine; (3) the assumption of a Gaussian, i.e., Doppler, distribution for the source radiance with a temperature of 400 K; (4) the use of atomic collisional shift and width values for the work by Jongerius; and (5) a Doppler shift for a 7 degree outward velocity vector at the plume edge. Also included in the study was the bias introduced by an uncertainty in the measurement of the D1/D2 line ratio in the source.

  15. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  16. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I. V.; Ene, A.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  17. Determination of antimony, arsenic, bismuth and copper by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the electrorefining of copper.

    PubMed

    Piippanen, T; Tummavuori, J

    1996-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emissionspectrometry (ICP-AES) has been applied as a rapid and routine method for the analysis of process electrolytes in the electrorefining of copper. Antimony, arsenic, bismuth and copper have been selected as major electrolyte constituents. For these elements profound statistical studies of spectral and interelement effects have been carried out. For As, Bi and Sb two analyte wavelengths have been selected, and for Cu one relatively insensitive analyte line has been chosen due to the high Cu concentration in samples. Best analytical lines were: As at 193.759 nm, Bi at 306.772 nm, Sb at 206.833 nm and Cu at 216.953 nm. Multiple linear regression proved to be very capable in the search of the best analytical wavelength and identifying interfering elements. Using simple acid based standards all elements investigated can be determined separately in complicated matrices with satisfactory results. Differences between true values and measured values can be partly eliminated by appropriate calculational methods.

  18. Middle- and low-latitude emissions from energetic neutral atom precipitation seen from ATLAS 1 under quiet magnetic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Ishimoto, M.; Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    During the ATLAS 1 mission spectral observations were made at middle and low latitudes of features expected from the precipitation of energetic neutral atoms. The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory was used at night in the UV and visible with maximum gain. The tangent ray heights of the look directions ranged from near 100 km to near 200 km, and the geomagnetic conditions were quiet during the observations, which were made March 28 to April 3, 1992. The N2(+) 1N 391.4-nm and O I 130.4 and 135.6-nm emissions were observed at all latitudes, with lower emission rates at lower magnetic dip latitudes, except that enhancements in the O I lines were seen within 30 deg of the dip equator to radiative recombination of ionospheric plasma. The latitude profile observed for the N2(+) 1N emission did not show an equatorial or midlatitude peak. This implies that the source of energetic neutrals is more consistent with prompt charge exchange loss of freshly injected trapped ions with relatively low mirror heights (i.e., ions on higher L shells with equatorial pitch angle distributions nearly isotropic to the loss cone) than loss of highly eroded populations of particles with high mirror heights (i.e., ions on lower L shells with pancake equatorial pitch angle distributions). The N2(+) 1N emission rates have been compared with models of atmospheric emission due to fluxes of O/O(+) and H/H(+) in the thermosphere, as produced by energetic neutral oxygen or hydrogen atom precipitation. Energy deposition rates are inferred.

  19. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  20. Two-Photon Emission of a Hydrogenlike Atom with Photon Polarization and Electron Spin States Taken into Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The process of two-photon emission ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + 2 γ of a hydrogenlike atom is considered with spin states of the electron and polarization of the photons taken into account, which had not been done before. A general expression for the probability of the process per unit time has been obtained for different polarization states of the photons with a formulation of hard and soft selection rules for the quantum numbers m and l. It is shown that by virtue of the established specifics of the properties of the two-photon emission process (absence of a Zeeman effect and dependence of the probability on the polarization states of the photons), it can in principle be identified against the background of single-photon emission ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, despite the presence of additional small factors: 1) α = e 2/ ћc ≈ 1/137 of the perturbation theory in e, and 2) the square of the atomic expansion parameter ( Zα)2 in the expression for the probability.

  1. Metal content monitoring in Hypericum perforatum pharmaceutical derivatives by atomic absorption and emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomez, María R; Soledad, Cerutti; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D

    2004-02-18

    Metals have been investigated in different plant materials in order to establish their normal concentration range and consider their role in plants as part of human medicinal treatment. Metal monitoring as a pattern recognition method is a promising tool in the characterization and/or standardization of phytomedicines. In the present work measurable amounts of Ca, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn were detected in phytopharmaceutical derivatives of Hypericum perforatum by atomic techniques. Atomic methodologies like flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) allow reliable determination of mineral content in pharmaceutical quality control of medicinal plants. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) patterns of characteristic components (fingerprints) have been performed for the search of adulterants in phytopharmaceutical products.

  2. Determination of aluminum and silicon in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with electrothermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Barnes, Ramon M.

    An atomic emission spectrometric method is described for the determination of trace elements in microvolume samples especially of biological materials. Based upon the arrangement of a commercial electrothermal vaporizer and a 40-MHz inductively coupled plasma, the direct determination of aluminum and silicon in human body fluids such as urine and serum and aluminum in hemodialysis solution is performed. The instrumental system involves vaporizing the sample from a modified graphite electrode followed by atomization and excitation of the vapors in the ICP discharge. Compromise experimental conditions are reported and calibration functions compared. Limits of detection in 5-μl samples were 8 pg Al and 2.5 ng Si, and after preconcentration of Al with a poly(acrylamidoxime) resin, the detection limit was 1 pg Al. Recovery of 5 μg Si/ml and 10 ng Al/ml from aqueous and synthetic standards was 80-85% and 96-103%, respectively.

  3. Determination of calcium by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, and lead by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, in calcium supplements after microwave dissolution or dry-ash digestion: method trial.

    PubMed

    Siitonen, P H; Thompson, H C

    1998-01-01

    A 3-laboratory method trial was conducted to evaluate 2 sample digestion procedures and instrumental determination parameters for analysis of calcium and lead in Ca supplements. Calcium supplements were treated by dry-ash digestion or microwave dissolution prior to spectrometric analysis. In each case, Pb was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and Ca by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Blind duplicates of 6 Ca supplement samples were analyzed after each sample treatment procedure. Matrix pairs contained dissimilar Pb levels to cover the analyte range encountered during method development. Calcium content of the Ca supplement samples also reflected the range seen during method development. Stock solutions of Ca and Pb were supplied to collaborators for preparation of quantitation standards to remove a variable external to the method. National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material (NIST SRM) 1486, bone meal, was included to assess method accuracy and recovery at NIST certificate Ca and Pb levels for this material (26.58 +/- 0.24% Ca and 1.335 +/- 0.014 micrograms Pb/g). Analyses of the NIST SRM yielded 25.9 +/- 1.1 and 27.2 +/- 2.3% Ca and 1.53 +/- 0.19 and 1.26 +/- 0.19 micrograms Pb/g for dry-ash and microwave procedures, respectively. Statistical analyses of data indicated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility for determination of Pb and Ca in various Ca supplements. With either sample preparation technique, the method is appropriate for determining Pb or Ca in Ca supplements.

  4. Investigation of charge transfer with non-argon gaseous species in mixed-gas inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-03-01

    Potential charge-transfer reactions with non-argon gaseous species in a mixed-gas inductively coupled plasma were probed by means of two different experimental methodologies, namely the plasma-related matrix-effect approach and the relative-intensity technique. The foreign gases, introduced one by one into the central channel, were oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, krypton, methane and carbon dioxide at volumetric concentrations of 15%, 10%, 5%, 100%, 3% and 3%, respectively. Both matrix effects and relative intensities showed no change in behavior for emission lines with excitation energies in the vicinity of the ionization potentials of the foreign gases. This pattern suggests that the contribution of charge transfer from the foreign-gas ion is not important to the overall ionization and excitation of the analyte, in the normal analytical zone of the plasma and at the concentration of foreign gases used here.

  5. Dislocation emission at the Silicon/Silicon nitride interface: A million atom molecular dynamics simulation on parallel computers

    PubMed

    Bachlechner; Omeltchenko; Nakano; Kalia; Vashishta; Ebbsjo; Madhukar

    2000-01-10

    Mechanical behavior of the Si(111)/Si(3)N4(0001) interface is studied using million atom molecular dynamics simulations. At a critical value of applied strain parallel to the interface, a crack forms on the silicon nitride surface and moves toward the interface. The crack does not propagate into the silicon substrate; instead, dislocations are emitted when the crack reaches the interface. The dislocation loop propagates in the (1; 1;1) plane of the silicon substrate with a speed of 500 (+/-100) m/s. Time evolution of the dislocation emission and nature of defects is studied.

  6. Dislocation Emission at the Silicon/Silicon Nitride Interface: A Million Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Madhukar, Anupam

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of the Si\\(111\\)/Si3N4\\(0001\\) interface is studied using million atom molecular dynamics simulations. At a critical value of applied strain parallel to the interface, a crack forms on the silicon nitride surface and moves toward the interface. The crack does not propagate into the silicon substrate; instead, dislocations are emitted when the crack reaches the interface. The dislocation loop propagates in the \\(1¯ 1¯1\\) plane of the silicon substrate with a speed of 500 \\(+/-100\\) m/s. Time evolution of the dislocation emission and nature of defects is studied.

  7. Retrieval of thermospheric atomic oxygen, nitrogen and temperature from the 732 NM emission measured by the ISO on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, Judy A.; Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, Phillip G.; Yung, Sopo

    1993-01-01

    The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) was a part of the ATLAS 1 Mission flown on the shuttle Atlantis from March 24 to April 2, 1992. During limb scanning operations, the ISO measured the O+(2P) ion emission at 732 nm. We have used a numerical inversion technique to retrieve thermospheric atomic oxygen, molecular nitrogen and temperature profiles. These preliminary results indicate a lower thermospheric temperature cooler than that predicted by MSIS for the solar conditions during the mission. Although the densities agree at low altitudes, the reduced scale height produces O and N2 densities 25 percent lower than the MSIS at 300 km.

  8. Retrieval of thermospheric atomic oxygen, nitrogen and temperature from the 732 NM emission measured by the ISO on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, Judy A.; Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, Phillip G.; Yung, Sopo

    1993-01-01

    The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) was a part of the ATLAS 1 Mission flown on the shuttle Atlantis from March 24 to April 2, 1992. During limb scanning operations, the ISO measured the O+(2P) ion emission at 732 nm. We have used a numerical inversion technique to retrieve thermospheric atomic oxygen, molecular nitrogen and temperature profiles. These preliminary results indicate a lower thermospheric temperature cooler than that predicted by MSIS for the solar conditions during the mission. Although the densities agree at low altitudes, the reduced scale height produces O and N2 densities 25 percent lower than the MSIS at 300 km.

  9. New method for determining relative oscillator strengths of atoms through combined absorption and emission measurements - Application to titanium /Ti I/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Whaling, W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces a procedure that combines measurements of absorption and emission by atoms to obtain relative oscillator strengths that are independent of temperature determination in the sources and of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium. The experimental observations are formed into sets of transitions and required to satisfy defined ratios. The procedure is illustrated with the published data of Whaling et al. and Smith and Kuehne for 16 transitions in Ti I. It is shown that the relative oscillator strengths resulting from this procedure have calculated uncertainties between 5 and 17% (about 95% confidence level). Evidence is presented to suggest that these uncertainties have been overestimated.

  10. An `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' formalism for X-ray and optical emission from slowly rotating magnetic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; ud-Doula, Asif; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David H.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2016-11-01

    Slowly rotating magnetic massive stars develop `dynamical magnetospheres' (DMs), characterized by trapping of stellar wind outflow in closed magnetic loops, shock heating from collision of the upflow from opposite loop footpoints, and subsequent gravitational infall of radiatively cooled material. In 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the interplay among these three components is spatially complex and temporally variable, making it difficult to derive observational signatures and discern their overall scaling trends. Within a simplified, steady-state analysis based on overall conservation principles, we present here an `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' (ADM) model that provides explicit formulae for density, temperature, and flow speed in each of these three components - wind outflow, hot post-shock gas, and cooled inflow - as a function of colatitude and radius within the closed (presumed dipole) field lines of the magnetosphere. We compare these scalings with time-averaged results from MHD simulations, and provide initial examples of application of this ADM model for deriving two key observational diagnostics, namely hydrogen H α emission line profiles from the cooled infall, and X-ray emission from the hot post-shock gas. We conclude with a discussion of key issues and advantages in applying this ADM formalism towards derivation of a broader set of observational diagnostics and scaling trends for massive stars with such dynamical magnetospheres.

  11. Comment on ''Effect of entanglement on the decay dynamics of a pair of H(2p) atoms due to spontaneous emission''

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro; Plaja, Luis

    2011-06-15

    T. Tanabe et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 040101(R) (2010)] have experimentally demonstrated that the emission properties of unstable atoms in entangled and product states are different. The authors define an apparent decay time as a fitting parameter which falls below the lifetime of the single atom for entangled pairs. We argue that their results about coincidence time spectra are correct, but those concerning lifetimes cannot be considered conclusive because they assume the emission of photons by the two atoms to be independent processes, a doubtful hypothesis for entangled states. We suggest an improved evaluation of the lifetimes based on a rigorous approach, which demands some modifications of the experimental procedure.

  12. Antimony in drinking water, red blood cells, and serum: development of analytical methodology using transversely heated graphite furnace atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K S; Poon, R; Chu, I; Connor, J W

    1997-05-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) method has been developed for determining microg/L levels of Sb in samples of water and blood. The AAS method is based on the concept of stabilized temperature platform furnace atomization (STPF) realized through the use of a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) furnace, longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction, and matrix modification with palladium nitrate-magnesium nitrate-nitric acid. The method of standard additions is not mandatory. The detection limit (3 standard deviations of the blank) is 2.6 microg Sb/L for the water, red blood cells (RBCs), and serum samples. Data are presented on the degree of accuracy and precision. The THGA-AAS method is simple, fast, and contamination-free because the entire operation from sampling to AAS measurement is carried out in the same tube. The method has been applied to the determination of Sb in some leachate tap water samples derived from a static copper plumbing system containing Sn/Sb solders, and in small samples (0.5 ml) of RBCs and serum derived from rats given Sb-supplemented drinking water.

  13. Background correction in atomic emission spectrometry using repetitive harmonic wavelength scanning and applying Fourier analysis—I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, T.; Visser, K.

    1995-07-01

    Repetitive wavelength scanning can be used as a means of detecting and correcting for unwanted background in atomic emission spectrometry (AES). This paper deals with the theory underlying such harmonic wavelength scanning in time and stresses the relative importance of the relevant parameters. A set of integrated Turbo Pascal programs for an IBM PC was developed to provide a numerical simulation for the deconvolution of a detected spectral profile during repetitive harmonic wavelength scanning. By applying this numerical analysis the theory for separating the net spectral emission signal and the background radiation by filtering specific frequency components is investigated. It is concluded that, barring the dc component, repetitive scanning over a symmetric spectral profile leads to the generation of even-numbered Fourier harmonics at the modulation frequency, while an asymmetric spectral profile generates odd-numbered Fourier harmonics.

  14. A COUPLED CHEMISTRY-EMISSION MODEL FOR ATOMIC OXYGEN GREEN AND RED-DOUBLET EMISSIONS IN THE COMET C/1996 B2 HYAKUTAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla E-mail: anil_bhardwaj@vssc.gov.in

    2012-03-20

    The green (5577 Angstrom-Sign ) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Angstrom-Sign ) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the {sup 1}S and {sup 1}D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H{sub 2}O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O({sup 1}S) and O({sup 1}D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H{sub 2}O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO{sub 2} and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O({sup 1} S) to O({sup 1} D) would be around 0.03 ({+-}0.01) if H{sub 2}O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is {approx}0.6 if the parent is CO{sub 2}. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O({sup 1} S) production in the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  15. A Coupled Chemistry-emission Model for Atomic Oxygen Green and Red-doublet Emissions in the Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-03-01

    The green (5577 Å) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the 1 S and 1 D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H2O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1 S) and O(1 D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H2O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO2 and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O(1 S) to O(1 D) would be around 0.03 (±0.01) if H2O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is ~0.6 if the parent is CO2. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O(1 S) production in the photodissociation of H2O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  16. Atomically precise doping of monomanganese ion into coreless supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanocluster inducing unusual red shift in Mn(2+) emission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Le; Liu, Xiaochun; Yan, Wenbo; Wu, Tao; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-03-26

    We report a simple and yet effective method to introduce Mn(2+) ions into semiconducting nanoclusters with atomically precise control. Our method utilizes one type of micrometer-sized crystals, composed of well-defined isolated supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanoclusters (∼2 nm, [Cd6In28S52(SH)4]) whose core metal site is unoccupied in as-synthesized pristine form. This unique model structure with vacant core site makes it possible to achieve ordered distribution of Mn(2+) dopants, and at the same time effectively preclude the formation of Mn(2+) clusters in the host matrix. A two-step synthesis strategy is applied to realize an atomically precise doping of Mn(2+) ion into the core site of the nanoclusters, and to achieve uniform distribution of Mn(2+) dopants in the crystal lattice. The PL, X-ray photoelectron (XPS), as well as the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra reveal the successful incorporation of Mn(2+) ion into the core site of the nanocluster. Different from the pristine host material with weak green emission (∼490 nm), the Mn(2+)-doped material shows a strong red emission (630 nm at room temperature and 654 nm at 30 K), which is significantly red-shifted relative to the orange emission (∼585 nm) observed in traditional Mn(2+)-doped II-VI semiconductors. Various experiments including extensive synthetic variations and PL dynamics have been performed to probe the mechanistic aspects of synthesis process and resultant unusual structural and PL properties. The quaternary semiconductor material reported here extends the emission window of Mn(2+)-doped II-VI semiconductor from yellow-orange to red, opening up new opportunities in applications involving photonic devices and bioimaging.

  17. Determination of rare earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled argon plasma/atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Inductively coupled argon plasma/optical emission spectrometery (ICAP/OES) is useful as a simultaneous, multielement analytical technique for the determination of trace elements in geological materials. A method for the determination of trace-level rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials using an ICAP 63-channel emission spectrometer is described. Separation and preconcentration of the REE and yttrium from a sample digest are achieved by a nitric acid gradient cation exchange and hydrochloric acid anion exchange. Precision of 1-4% relative standard deviation and comparable accuracy are demonstrated by the triplicate analysis of three splits of BCR-1 and BHVO-1. Analyses of other geological materials including coals, soils, and rocks show comparable precision and accuracy.

  18. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on the analytical applications of flame infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.K.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the temperature dependence of the flame/furnace infrared emission (FIRE) produced by the antisymmetric stretching vibration of carbon dioxide. The model can be used to predict the detector performance as a function of the temperature of the excitation source. Thermospray and cross-flow pneumatic nebulizers were studied for interfacing a FIRE radiometer to a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Due to the large quantities of liquid mobile phase introduced into the burner, the temperature of the H[sub 2]/air flame was changed significantly. The detector could be configured in carbon- or chlorine-specific modes. When the carbon-specific mode was employed, the mobile phase was restricted to deionized water. With the chlorine-specific mode, combustible organic mobile phases could be used and the detector could selectively determine mixtures of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Flame background caused by the combustion of carbon-containing mobile phases could be electronically subtracted by using dual channel FIRE radiometer. Typical detection limits for both kinds of interface are in the range of [mu]g s[sup [minus]1]. The FIRE radiometer can be interfaced to an HPLC to form dissolved carbon dioxide which is then purged by H[sub 2] gas through a special purge chamber. Sodium peroxydisulfate (Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 8]), in the presence of silver nitrate, was employed as an oxidizing agent to oxidize carboxylic acids and sugars to carbon dioxide. The specially designed purge chamber can also be used in both process analysis and flow injection analysis (FIA) for the determination of total inorganic carbon, purgeable organic carbon in aqueous samples and the available chlorine in bleach liquors. Nonvolatile organics can be determined by means of sample pretreatment with sodium peroxydisulfate catalyzed with silver at elevated temperature. Hydrogen/nitrous oxide was investigated as an alternative fuel/oxidant mixture.

  20. Anisotropic emission of neutral atoms: evidence of an anisotropic Rydberg sheath in nanoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-02-01

    Intense laser-produced plasma is a complex amalgam of ions, electrons and atoms both in ground and excited states. Little is known about the spatial composition of the excited states that are an integral part of most gaseous or cluster plasma. In cluster-plasma, Rydberg excitations change the charge composition of the ions through charge transfer reactions and shape the angular distributions. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive technique that reveals the anisotropic Rydberg excited cluster sheath by measuring anisotropy in fast neutral atoms. The sheath is stronger in the direction of light polarization and the enhanced charge transfer by the excited clusters results in larger neutralization.

  1. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongonwou, F.; Tetchou Nganso, H. M.; Ekogo, T. B.; Kwato Njock, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  2. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ongonwou, F.; Tetchou Nganso, H.M.; Ekogo, T.B.; Kwato Njock, M.G.

    2016-12-15

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  3. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc Jablonski, Aleksander

    2009-11-15

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  4. Ab initio analytical Raman intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method in an atomic orbital basis. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Rérat, Michel; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-10-28

    We present a fully analytical formulation for calculating Raman intensities of crystalline periodic systems using a local basis set. Numerical differentiation with respect to atomic coordinates and with respect to wavevectors is entirely avoided as is the determination of crystal orbital coefficient derivatives with respect to nuclear displacements. Instead, our method utilizes the orbital energy-weighted density matrix and is based on the self-consistent solution of first- and second-order Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham equations for the electronic response to external electric fields at the equilibrium geometry. This method has also been implemented in the Crystal program, which uses a Gaussian type basis set.

  5. A novel analytical system involving hydride generation and gold-coated W-coil trapping atomic absorption spectrometry for selenium determination at ng l - 1 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, İ.; Arslan, Y.; Bakırdere, S.; Ataman, O. Y.

    2008-08-01

    A novel analytical technique was developed where gaseous hydrogen selenide formed by sodium tetrahydroborate reduction is transported to and trapped on a resistively heated gold-coated W-coil atom trap for in situ preconcentration. Gold coating on W-coil was prepared by using an organic solution of Au. The atom trap is held at 165 °C during the collection stage and is heated up to 675 °C for revolatilization; analyte species formed are transported to an externally heated quartz T-tube where the atomization takes place and the transient signal is obtained. The carrier gas consisted of 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 75 ml min - 1 H 2 during the collection step and 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 450 ml min - 1 H 2 in the revolatilization step. The half width of the transient signal obtained is less than 0.5 s. The RSD for the measurements was found to be 3.9% ( n = 11) for 0.10 µg l - 1 Se using peak height measurements. The calibration plot for 27.0 ml of sample collected in 4.0 min using a flow rate of 6.75 ml min - 1 was linear between 0.13 and 2.0 µg l - 1 of Se. The limit of detection (3 s) is 39 ng l - 1 . The enhancement factor for the characteristic concentration ( Co) was found to be 20.1 when compared to conventional hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry system without trap. In order to check the accuracy of the method, standard reference material, natural water NIST 1640 was employed; the result was found to be in good agreement with the certified value at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Analytic solutions and their dynamics of atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huilan; Yao, Yuqin

    2017-01-01

    The time- and space-modulated nonlinearity is the important character of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Many works have been done on atomic BECs with spatially modulated nonlinearity, but there is little work on atomic-molecular BECs. In this paper, we construct one family of explicitly exact solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities and trapping potential by similarity transformations. We discuss the dynamics of matter waves including breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons, resonant solitons and moving solitons. We analyze the linear stability of the solutions by adding various initial stochastic noise. We also provide the experimental parameters to produce these phenomena in future experiments.

  7. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-15

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 A wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  8. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-06-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed, and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methylisobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organometallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts, and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered. 227 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. [Analysis of pesticides including chlorine in welsh onions and mushrooms using gas chromatograph with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED)].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Yukinari; Takano, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Maki; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Sakai, Naoko; Kamijo, Kyoko; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2004-12-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 32 kinds of pesticide residues in onions, Welsh onions and mushrooms using gas chromatograph with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) was developed. The pesticides were extracted with acetone-n-hexane (2:3) mixture. The crude extract was partitioned between 5% sodium chloride and ethyl acetate-n-hexane (1:4) mixture. The extract was passed through a Florisil mini-column for cleanup with 10 mL of acetone-n-hexane (1:9) mixture. Although the sensitivity of GC-AED was inferior to that of GC-ECD, GC-AED has a superior element-selectivity. Therefore pesticide residues in foods could be analyzed more exactly by using GC-AED. Thirty-two pesticides including chlorine in onion, Welsh onion and shiitake mushroom were detected without interference. Recoveries of these pesticides from samples determined by GC-AED were 64-114%, except for a few pesticides.

  10. Speciation analysis of triethyl-lead and tributyl-tin compounds in human urine by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Zachariadis, George A; Rosenberg, Erwin

    2012-05-01

    This work describes the development of a fast method for speciation analysis of triethyl-lead and tributyl-tin species in urine samples after in situ derivatization by tetraethyl- or tetrapropyl-borate reagents. The alkylation reaction is done in the aqueous and urine medium and the less-polar derivatives are extracted in hexane by liquid-liquid extraction. The species were extracted and the extract was efficiently collected from the aqueous phase after centrifugation. Finally, the organometallic species are separated by gas chromatography and determined from the emission signals of elemental lead and tin. Atomic lead and tin are formed from the organolead and organotin compounds during atomization of the column eluate in a microwave-induced helium plasma source. The simultaneous measurement of lead (Pb) at 405.780 nm and tin (Sn) at 303.419 nm was achieved by an atomic emission detector. Finally, the analytes were determined with satisfactory precision (<5%) and detection limits of 0.05 μg Pb/L and 0.48 μg Sn/L, respectively, when 10 mL of urine is extracted with 1 mL of hexane and 1 μL of extract is injected.

  11. Determination of trace impurities in boron nitride by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using solid sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, P.; Hassler, J.; Kudrik, I.; Krivan, V.

    2007-09-01

    Two digestion-free methods for trace analysis of boron nitride based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma spectrometry optical emission (ETV-ICP-OES) using direct solid sampling have been developed and applied to the determination of Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr in four boron nitride materials in concentration intervals of 1-23, 54-735, 0.05-21, 0.005-1.3, 1.6-112, 4.5-20, 0.03-1.8, 6-46, 38-170 and 0.4-2.3 μg g - 1 , respectively. At optimized experimental conditions, with both methods, effective in-situ analyte/matrix separation was achieved and calibration could be performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions. In solid sampling GFAAS, before sampling, the platform was covered with graphite powder and, for determination of Si, also the Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier was used. In the determination of all analyte elements by solid sampling ETV-ICP-OES, Freon R12 was added to argon carrier gas. For solid sampling GFAAS and ETV-ICP-OES, the achievable limits of detection were within 5 (Cu)-130 (Si) ng g - 1 and 8 (Cu)-200 (Si) ng g - 1 , respectively. The results obtained by these two methods for four boron nitride materials of different purity grades are compared each with the other and with those obtained in analysis of digests by ICP-OES. The performance of the two solid sampling methods is compared and discussed.

  12. Optimized microwave-assisted decomposition method for multi-element analysis of glass standard reference material and ancient glass specimens by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zachariadis, G; Dimitrakoudi, E; Anthemidis, A; Stratis, J

    2006-02-28

    A novel microwave-assisted wet-acid decomposition method for the multi-element analysis of glass samples using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed and optimized. The SRM 621 standard reference glass material was used for this purpose, because it has similar composition with either archaeological glass specimens or common modern glasses. For the main constituents of SRM 621 (Ca, Na, Al, Fe, Mg, Ba and Ti), quality control data are given for all the examined procedures. The chemical and instrumental parameters of the method were thoroughly optimized. Thirteen acid mixtures of hydrochloric, nitric, and hydrofluoric acids in relation to two different microwave programs were examined in order to establish the most efficient protocol for the determination of metals in glass matrix. For both microwave programs, an intermediate step was employed with addition of H(3)BO(3) in order to compensate the effect of HF, which was used in all protocols. The suitability of the investigated protocols was evaluated for major (Ca, Na, Al), and minor (Fe, Mg, Ba, Ti, Mn, Cu, Sb, Co, Pb) glass constituents. The analytes were determined using multi-element matrix matched standard solutions. The analytical data matrix was processed chemometrically in order to evaluate the examined protocols in terms of their accuracy, precision and sensitivity, and eventually select the most efficient method for ancient glass. ICP-AES parameters such as spectral line, RF power and sample flow rate were optimized using the proposed protocol. Finally, the optimum method was successfully applied to the analysis of a number of ancient glass fragments.

  13. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  14. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  15. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry - NICE-AAS - A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-10-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10- 12 cm- 1 Hz- 1/2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10- 11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10- 5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10- 21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under atmospheric

  16. Post sunset behavior of the 6300 A atomic oxygen airglow emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical model of the 6300 A OI airglow emission was developed based on the assumptions that both the charged and neutral portions of the Earth's upper atmosphere are in steady state conditions of diffusive equilibrium. Intensities of 6300 A OI emission line were calculated using electron density true height profiles from a standard C-4 ionosonde and exospheric temperatures derived from Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of the Doppler broadened 6300 A emission line shape as inputs to the model. Reaction rate coefficient values, production mechanism efficiencies, solar radiation fluxes, absorption cross sections, and models of the neutral atmosphere were varied parametrically to establish a set of acceptable inputs which will consistently predict 6300 A emission intensities that closely agree with intensities observed during the post-sunset twilight period by an airglow observatory consisting of a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a turret photometer. Emission intensities that can only result from the dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions were observed during the latter portion of the observational period. Theoretical calculations indicate that contamination of the 6300 A OI emission should be on the order of or less than 3 percent; however, these results are very sensitive to the wavelengths of the individual lines and their intensities relative to the 6300 A OI intensity. This combination of a model atmosphere, production mechanism efficiencies, and quenching coefficient values was used when the dissociative photoexcitation and direct impact excitation processes were contributing to the intensity to establish best estimates of solar radiation fluxes in the Schumann--Runge continuum and associated absorption cross sections. Results show that the Jacchia 1971 model of the upper atmosphere combined with the Ackerman recommended solar radiation fluxes and associated absorption cross sections produces theoretically calculated intensities that more

  17. Effects of nozzle lip geometry on spray atomization and emissions advanced gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, Gerald J.; Roychoudhury, Subir; Nguyen, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of nozzle lip geometry on nozzle fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution for a rich burn section of a rich burn/quick quench/lean burn combustor. It is seen that the nozzle lip geometry greatly affects the fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution. It is determined that at an equivalence ratio of 1.6 the NO concentration could be lowered by a factor greater than three by changing the nozzle lip geometry.

  18. Spontaneous light emission by atomic hydrogen: Fermi's golden rule without cheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, V.; Durt, T.; Nicolet, A.; Zolla, F.

    2015-10-01

    Focusing on the 2 p- 1 s transition in atomic hydrogen, we investigate through first order perturbation theory the time evolution of the survival probability of an electron initially taken to be in the excited (2 p) state. We examine both the results yielded by the standard dipole approximation for the coupling between the atom and the electromagnetic field - for which we propose a cutoff-independent regularisation - and those yielded by the exact coupling function. In both cases, Fermi's golden rule is shown to be an excellent approximation for the system at hand: we found its maximal deviation from the exact behaviour of the system to be of order 10-8 /10-7. Our treatment also yields a rigorous prescription for the choice of the optimal cutoff frequency in the dipole approximation. With our cutoff, the predictions of the dipole approximation are almost indistinguishable at all times from the exact dynamics of the system.

  19. Controlled single-photon emission from a single trapped two-level atom.

    PubMed

    Darquié, B; Jones, M P A; Dingjan, J; Beugnon, J; Bergamini, S; Sortais, Y; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2005-07-15

    By illuminating an individual rubidium atom stored in a tight optical tweezer with short resonant light pulses, we created an efficient triggered source of single photons with a well-defined polarization. The measured intensity correlation of the emitted light pulses exhibits almost perfect antibunching. Such a source of high-rate, fully controlled single-photon pulses has many potential applications for quantum information processing.

  20. Statistical properties of spontaneous emission from atoms near a rough surface

    SciTech Connect

    Biehs, S.-A.; Greffet, J.-J.

    2011-11-15

    We study the lifetime of the excited state of an atom or molecule near a plane surface with a given random surface roughness. In particular, we discuss the impact of the scattering of surface modes within the rough surface. Our study is completed by considering the lateral correlation length of the decay rate and the variance discussing its relation to the C{sub 0} correlation.

  1. Efficient emission of positronium atoms from an Na-coated polycrystalline tungsten surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terabe, H.; Iida, S.; Wada, K.; Hyodo, T.; Yagishita, A.; Nagashima, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for the ortho-positronium emitted from clean and Na-coated tungsten surfaces have been measured using the pulsed slow positron beam at KEK-IMSS slow positron facility. Emission efficiency of positronium from the Na-coated sample was found to be several times greater than that from uncoated tungsten surfaces.

  2. Tunable and high-purity room temperature single-photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; Ali, Sajid; Efetov, Dmitri K; Furchi, Marco M; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    2017-09-26

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. Here, we demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters over 6 meV, and material processing sharply improves the single photon purity. We observe high single photon count rates exceeding 7 × 10(6) counts per second at saturation, after correcting for uncorrelated photon background. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.Inhomogeneous spectral distribution and multi-photon emission are currently hindering the use of defects in layered hBN as reliable single photon emitters. Here, the authors demonstrate strain-controlled wavelength tuning and increased single photon purity through suitable material processing.

  3. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  4. Energetic particle imaging: The evolution of techniques in imaging high-energy neutral atom emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Westlake, J. H.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Andrews, G. B.; Nelson, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Energetic neutral atom imaging instruments have been flown on a variety of space missions to satisfy a variety of science requirements. In this paper we discuss the most recent developments that lead to improvements in energy range, angular resolution, and background rejection for the high-energy range, as represented in the past by the Cassini magnetosphere imaging instrument Ion and Neutral Camera, the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission High-Energy Neutral Atom instrument, and to some degree the IMAGE mission Medium-Energy Neutral Atom instrument. The new approaches discussed here rely on the use of ultrathin foils without UV filters and on very high speed coincidence logic to reduce accidentals from intense background sources. We present laboratory results demonstrating an electrostatic design that meets the coincidence timing requirements, position, and scattering performance consistent with angular resolution (full width at half maximum) of 2° for hydrogen above 10 keV and a hydrogen energy threshold ≤1 keV.

  5. Controlled Photon Emission and Raman Transition Experiments with a Single Trapped Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. P. A.; Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Dingjan, J.; Bergamini, S.; Sortais, Y.; Messin, G.; Browaeys, A.; Grangier, P.

    2005-12-01

    We present recent results on the coherent control of an optical transition in a single rubidium atom, trapped in an optical tweezer. We excite the atom using resonant light pulses that are short (4 ns) compared with the lifetime of the excited state (26 ns). By varying the intensity of the laser pulses, we can observe an adjustable number of Rabi oscillations, followed by free decay once the light is switched off. To generate the pulses we have developed a novel laser system based on frequency doubling a telecoms laser diode at 1560 nm. By setting the laser intensity to make a π pulse, we use this coherent control to make a high quality triggered source of single photons. We obtain an average single photon rate of 9600s-1 at the detector. Measurements of the second-order temporal correlation function show almost perfect antibunching at zero delay. In addition, we present preliminary results on the use of Raman transitions to couple the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of our trapped atom. This will allow us to prepare and control a qubit formed by two hyperfine sub-levels.

  6. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices-rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ∼ 0.5% and ∼ 0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  7. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M.; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices--rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ~0.5% and ~0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  8. Determination of trace elements in heroin by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry using ultrasonic nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budič, Bojan; Klemenc, Sonja

    2000-06-01

    A method for the determination of Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S, Sr and Zn in heroin samples by ICP-AES using ultrasonic nebulization is described. The samples were microwave digested with HNO 3. To improve the detection limits and minimise the matrix interferences the experimental parameters were optimised by variation of the operating power, carrier gas flow rate and observation height above the load coil. Optimum operating conditions for most of the analytes were at operating power 1550 W, carrier gas flow rate between 0.8 and 1.0 l min -1 and observation height between 10 and 12 mm above load coil. The limits of detection were below 0.5 μg g -1 (dry mass) for most of the elements investigated. The analytical recoveries of spiked samples were in the range between 94 and 103% and precision was on average better than 6%. The analysis of heroin samples shows that the method is simple, rapid and capable of providing accurate results for all the analytes investigated with the exception of nickel which was below the limit of detection in the analyzed samples.

  9. Analytical Study of the Effect of the System Geometry on Photon Sensitivity and Depth of Interaction of Positron Emission Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Pablo; Lois, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon) or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required. PMID:23049553

  10. Analytical study of the effect of the system geometry on photon sensitivity and depth of interaction of positron emission mammography.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pablo; Lois, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon) or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  11. Explosive radiation sources for analytical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Plotnikov, S. V.; Turlybekuly, A.

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of using the explosion energy of condensed explosives in solids analytical spectroscopy was investigated. For the atomization and excitation emission spectra of solids (BaCl2 and SrCl2) pressed powders of furazanotetrazinedioxide (FTDO, C2N6O3) were used. Initiation of the explosion was induced by the influence of high-current electron beam. The impurity atoms that are the part of FTDO, as well as atoms and molecules formed by the evaporation of BaCl2 and SrCl2 were identified in the spectra of explosion plasma.

  12. Solid state effects in electron emission from atomic collisions near surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Minniti, R.; Elston, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present a brief progress report of recent studies of the ejected electron spectra arising from glancing-angle ion-surface scattering involving collision energies of hundreds of keV/u. A broad range of electron energies and emission angles is analyzed containing prominent structures such as the convoy electron peak and the binary ridge. Particular emphasis is placed on the search for signatures of dynamic image interactions and multiple scattering near surfaces. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  13. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  14. Tracing the Milky Way Nuclear Wind with 21cm Atomic Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence in 21 cm H i emission for voids several kiloparsecs in size centered approximately on the Galactic center, both above and below the Galactic plane. These appear to map the boundaries of the Galactic nuclear wind. An analysis of H i at the tangent points, where the distance to the gas can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, shows a sharp transition at Galactic radii R ≲ 2.4 kpc from the extended neutral gas layer characteristic of much of the Galactic disk, to a thin Gaussian layer with FWHM ˜ 125 pc. An anti-correlation between H i and γ-ray emission at latitudes 10^\\circ ≤slant | b| ≤slant 20^\\circ suggests that the boundary of the extended H i layer marks the walls of the Fermi Bubbles. With H i, we are able to trace the edges of the voids from | z| \\gt 2 {{kpc}} down to z ≈ 0, where they have a radius ˜2 kpc. The extended Hi layer likely results from star formation in the disk, which is limited largely to R ≳ 3 kpc, so the wind may be expanding into an area of relatively little H i. Because the H i kinematics can discriminate between gas in the Galactic center and foreground material, 21 cm H i emission may be the best probe of the extent of the nuclear wind near the Galactic plane.

  15. Kinetic Energy Distribution of D(2p) Atoms From Analysis of the D Lyman-a Line Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciocca, Marco; Ajello, Joseph M.; Liu, Xianming; Maki, Justin

    1997-01-01

    The absolute cross sections of the line center (slow atoms) and wings (fast atoms) and total emission line profile were measured from threshold to 400 eV. Analytical model coeffiecients are given for the energy dependence of the measured slow atom cross section.

  16. Kinetic Energy Distribution of D(2p) Atoms From Analysis of the D Lyman-a Line Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciocca, Marco; Ajello, Joseph M.; Liu, Xianming; Maki, Justin

    1997-01-01

    The absolute cross sections of the line center (slow atoms) and wings (fast atoms) and total emission line profile were measured from threshold to 400 eV. Analytical model coeffiecients are given for the energy dependence of the measured slow atom cross section.

  17. Atomic emission spectrometric determination of ephedrine, cinchonine, chlorpheniramine, atropine and diphenhydramine based on formation of ion associates with ammonium reineckate.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S

    1999-12-01

    Ion-associate complexes of ephedrine HCl (I), cinchonine HCl (II), chlorpheniramine maleate (III), atropine sulphate (IV) and diphenhydramine HCl (V) with ammonium reineckate were precipitated and their solubilities were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. Saturated solutions of each ion-associate under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the Cr ion content in the supernatant was determined. The solubility products were thus elucidated at different temperatures. A new accurate and precise method using direct current plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of the investigated drugs in pure solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations is described. The drugs can determined by the present method in the ranges 1.6-52,2.64-85.8,3.12-101.4,5.52-180.4 and 2.72-75.85 microg/ml solutions of I, II, III, IV and V, respectively.

  18. Atom and molecule emission caused by ion impact into a frozen oxygen target: Role of rovibrational excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Pedrys, Roman; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2013-11-01

    Translational energy distributions of particles sputtered by 750 eV Ne+ ion impact into a cryogenic O2 target are studied using molecular-dynamics simulation. When comparing the energy distribution of emitted molecules to a Thompson distribution, good agreement can only be found for energies E with Uemission. Around 2% of the sputtered particles consist of radicals (atomic O). These originate from direct projectile-molecule collisions; they are emitted early in the collision cascade and feature a strong high-energy contribution.

  19. Analysis of sulfur-organic compounds in jet fuel by chromatographic sniffing and gas chromatography with atomic emission detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, P.A.

    1995-04-01

    When the Swedish Air Force changed fuel from Jet B to Jet A-1 during 1991-1992, a working environmental problem was reported from the military air force bases. The symptoms were unpleasant odor, headache and indisposition. This problem arose from some batches of the new fuel, Jet A-1. In order to investigate the compounds in the fuel which gave rise to this problem a chromatographic sniffing technique (sensory analysis) was used. The identification of the compounds from the sniffing analysis was done with a atomic emission detector for gas chromatography. The problem stemmed from relatively volatile sulfur-organic compounds. An interesting question is if these compounds also are strongly involved in the fuel system deposit formation. This presentation shows this new analysis technique and the complex pattern of sulfur-organic compounds related to fuels from different refinery processes.

  20. Formation and stimulated photodissociation of metastable molecules with emission of photon at the collision of two atoms in a laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazazyan, E.; Gazazyan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of metastable molecules (Feshbach resonances) at the collision of two atoms and subsequent stimulated transition to a lower unbound electronic molecular state, with emission of a photon of the laser radiation has been investigated. This can develop, in particular, for Rb 2 molecules due to resonance scattering of two Rb atoms. This process is a basis for the creation of excimer lasers. Expressions have been obtained for the cross sections of elastic and inelastic resonance scattering and the intensity of the stimulated emission of the photons.

  1. Quantum interference and radiative coupling in two-atom single-photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurizki, G.; Ben-Reuven, A.

    1985-10-01

    The recent experiment by Grangier, Aspect, and Vigue on interference in the emission from fragments of electronically photodissociated molecules is treated as a special case of cooperative fluorescence (CF) from products of various molecular processes. This treatment relates time-resolved features of the CF to characteristics (such as orbital symmetry) of the dissociating parent molecule (PM), suggests various PM state preparations (including formation of subradiant states), and discusses the persistence of CF in systems of nonidentical fragments. The diagnostic potentialities of such studies are emphasized.

  2. Effect of the electronic structure of target atoms on the emission continuum of laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, Nikolai E; Michurin, Sergei V; Fedorov, Gennadii M

    2004-06-30

    The low-temperature laser plasma at the surface of metal targets is experimentally investigated. Continuous spectra emitted from a laser plume are found to be similar for targets consisting of the elements of the same subgroup of the Mendeleev periodic table. The similarity manifests itself both in the dependence of the emission intensity on the external pressure and in the structure of absorption bands related to a fine-dispersed phase existing in the peripheral regions of the plume. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. Angular asymmetry of low-energy electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fainstein, P.D.; Gulyas, L.; Martin, F.; Salin, A.

    1996-05-01

    We show that two factors contribute to the forward-backward angular asymmetry in low-energy electron emission by ion impact: the deviation of the target potential from a pure Coulomb potential and the two-center effect. We perform calculations with various theories that include these two effects: the continuum-distorted-wave{endash}eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) and the CDW approximations based on distorted-wave perturbation theory and a close-coupling calculation using a discrete representation of the continuum. The various theories give consistent results on the asymmetry but discrepancies remain between theory and experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Battery-Operated Atomic Emission Analyzer for Waterborne Arsenic Based on Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Excitation Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; He, Dong; Zhu, Zhenli; Peng, Huan; Liu, Zhifu; Wen, Guojun; Bai, Jianghao; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong; Wang, Yanxin

    2017-03-21

    In this paper, a sensitive atomic emission spectrometer (AES) based on a new low power and low argon consumption (<8 W, 100 mL min(-1)) miniature direct current (dc) atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasma (3 mm × 5 mm) excitation source was developed for the determination of arsenic in water samples. In this method, arsenic in water was reduced to AsH3 by hydride generation (HG), which was then transported to the APGD source for excitation and detected by a compact CCD (charge-coupled device) microspectrometer. Different parameters affecting the APGD and the hydride generation reactions were investigated. The detection limit for arsenic with the proposed APGD-AES was 0.25 μg L(-1), and the calibration curves were found to be linear up to 3 orders of magnitude. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of certified reference material (GBW08605), tap water, pond water, groundwater, and hot spring samples. Measurements from the APGD analyzer showed good agreement with the certified value/values obtained with well-established hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). These results suggest that the developed robust, cost-effective, and fast analyzer can be used for field based arsenic determination and may provide an important tool for arsenic contamination and remediation programs.

  5. Solid sampling electrothermal vaporization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, L.; Verrept, P.; Boonen, S.; Vanhaecke, F.; Dams, R.

    1995-06-01

    Solid sampling using electrothermal vaporization is an attractive sample introduction method for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For AAS, the method is well established. The techniques needed to apply SS-ETV in ICP-based methods are described, with the emphasis on the coupling of different types of ETV-devices to the inductively coupled plasma torch and on the requirements for the spectrometer and the data acquisition and handling system. Though standardization is not straightforward, it is shown that standard addition and external calibration with solid standards yield accurate results. The latter is demonstrated by the analysis of standard reference materials. Figures of merit for SS-ETV-ICP-AES and SS-ETV-ICP-MS are presented. The literature concerning ICP-AES and ICP-MS (methods and applications) is briefly reviewed and new results of SS-ETV-ICP-MS analysis of SRMs are presented.

  6. Spectral and Atomic Physics Analysis of Xenon L-Shell Emission From High Energy Laser Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Daniel; Kemp, G. E.; Widmann, K.; Benjamin, R. D.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Liedahl, D.; Moore, A. S.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of the L-shell (n =2) radiation in mid to high-Z ions is useful for probing plasma conditions in the multi-keV temperature range. Xenon in particular with its L-shell radiation centered around 4.5 keV is copiously produced from plasmas with electron temperatures in the 5-10 keV range. We report on a series of time-resolved L-shell Xe spectra measured with the NIF X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) in high-energy long-pulse (>10 ns) laser produced plasmas at the National Ignition Facility. The resolving power of the NXS is sufficiently high (E/ ∂E >100) in the 4-5 keV spectral band that the emission from different charge states is observed. An analysis of the time resolved L-shell spectrum of Xe is presented along with spectral modeling by detailed radiation transport and atomic physics from the SCRAM code and comparison with predictions from HYDRA a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline atomic-physics from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Infrared light emission from nano hot electron gas created in atomic point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, T.; Klein, H. R.; Iazykov, M.; Dumas, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Gold atomic point contacts are prototype systems to evidence ballistic electron transport. The typical dimension of the nanojunction being smaller than the electron-phonon interaction length, even at room temperature, electrons transfer their excess energy to the lattice only far from the contact. At the contact however, favored by huge current densities, electron-electron interactions result in a nano hot electron gas acting as a source of photons. Using a home built Mechanically Controlled Break Junction, it is reported here, for the first time, that this nano hot electron gas also radiates in the infrared range (0.2 eV to 1.2 eV). Moreover, following the description introduced by Tomchuk et al. (Sov. Phys.-Solid State, 8 (1966) 2510), we show that this radiation is compatible with a black-body-like spectrum emitted from an electron gas at temperatures of several thousands of kelvins.

  8. Automated system for identification of atomic elements and calculation of lines profiles in emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Wilder; Restrepo, Elisabeth; Devia, Alfonso

    2001-04-01

    A database was designed starting from the Kurucz cd-rom N0 23 of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. In this database the different atomic elements are ordered by wavelength with their ionization levels. Also, there are other data like statistic weight, Einstein's coefficient, information about energy levels, constant of damping, among others. The spectra of the discharge are processed using a digital filtrate technique, with the purpose of reducing the noise present in the data to locate the points where the maximum amplitudes are presented. Starting from these results, consultations dynamic SQL are made, these obtain the elements present in these regions from the database. Finally, by means of the use of statistical methods it is determined which are the elements that have the highest probability of conform with the plasma. .

  9. Development of a coincidence system for the measurement of X-ray emission atomic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Filiberto; Miranda, Javier

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary results obtained in experiments carried out with an x-ray spectrometer built at the Instituto de Física for Atomic Physics and environmental sciences studies are presented. The experiments are based on a coincidence method for signals produced by LEGe and Si(Li) detectors. The x-ray fluorescence yields (ωLi) and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (fij) for elements with 55 ≤ Z ≤ 60 are among the quantities of interest. The method is based on the simultaneous detection of K x-rays with the LEGe detector and the L x-rays with the Si(Li) detector. The primary radiation source is an x-ray tube with Rh anode. The system was tested with the coincidence of the L x-rays from Ce with its K line, demonstrating the feasibility of the experiments.

  10. Observations of the O+ (2P-2D) 732 and 733 nm Thermospheric Airglow Emissions with the Wind Imaging Interferometer Leading to Atomic Oxygen Concentrations and ionospheric Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Cho, Y. M.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing of airglow emission provides a powerful approach to the measurement of composition, temperature and winds in the thermosphere, on short and long time scales, including the responses to magnetic storms. Of the available emissions, one that has not been exploited to its full potential is the O+ (2P-2D) pair of doublets at 732.0 and 733.0 nm wavelength. This presentation is of recently analyzed results from WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, launched in 1991. WINDII is a Doppler Michelson interferometer with the capacity to measure airglow emission rates, Doppler temperatures from line widths and winds from Doppler shifts. One of the filters used to select specific airglow emissions was intended for measurement of the P1(2) line of the (8,3) Meinel band of OH at 731.63 nm but it also transmitted the O+ lines of interest. These have recently been retrieved from the data and are the basis of this presentation. The O+ emission is produced in the daytime, primarily from the photo-ionization of atomic oxygen and so knowing the solar flux the concentration of atomic oxygen can be determined. As a first step the variation of the emission rate on solar flux, solar zenith angle and conjugate photoelectron flux has been investigated, and preliminary results on atomic oxygen concentration are presented. In addition, ion winds can be determined from the Doppler shifts of the emission, which may be compared with the neutral winds obtained with WINDII from the atomic oxygen O(1S) and O(1D) emissions at 557.7 nm and 630.0 nm respectively. This possibility will allow the study of the interactions between the thermosphere and ionosphere for a wide range of conditions.

  11. Wafer-Size and Single-Crystal MoSe2 Atomically Thin Films Grown on GaN Substrate for Light Emission and Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuxin; Liu, Huiqiang; Chen, Xuechen; Chu, Guang; Chu, Sheng; Zhang, Hang

    2016-08-10

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layered semiconductors are important for next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. Here, we designed the growth of an MoSe2 atomic layer on a lattice-matched GaN semiconductor substrate. The results demonstrated that the MoSe2 films were less than three atomic layers thick and were single crystalline of MoSe2 over the entire GaN substrate. The ultrathin MoSe2/GaN heterojunction diode demonstrated ∼850 nm light emission and could also be used in photovoltaic applications.

  12. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  13. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser radiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: The generation of atomic Zn line emission at laser fluences below breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Emanuel H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2013-08-22

    The production of gas phase atomic and ionic line spectra accompanying the high laser fluence irradiation of solid surfaces is well known and is most often due to the production and interaction of high densities of atoms, ions, and electrons generated from laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma expands and moves rapidly away from the irradiated spot and is accompanied by intense emission of light. This type of plume is well studied and is frequently exploited in the technique of chemical analysis known as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Here, we describe a similar but weaker emission of light generated in vacuum by the laser irradiation of single crystal ZnO at fluences well below breakdown; this emission consists entirely of optical line emission from excited atomic Zn. Furthermore, we compare the properties of the resulting laser-generated gas-phase light emission (above and below breakdown) and describe a mechanism for the production of the low-fluence optical emission resulting from a fortuitous choice of material and laser wavelength.

  14. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser radiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: The generation of atomic Zn line emission at laser fluences below breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Enamul H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    The production of gas phase atomic and ionic line spectra accompanying the high laser fluence irradiation of solid surfaces is well known and is most often due to the production and interaction of high densities of atoms, ions, and electrons generated from laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma expands and moves rapidly away from the irradiated spot and is accompanied by intense emission of light. This type of “plume” is well studied and is frequently exploited in the technique of chemical analysis known as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Here, we describe a similar but weaker emission of light generated in vacuum by the laser irradiation of single crystal ZnO at fluences well below breakdown; this emission consists entirely of optical line emission from excited atomic Zn. We compare the properties of the resulting laser-generated gas-phase light emission (above and below breakdown) and describe a mechanism for the production of the low-fluence optical emission resulting from a fortuitous choice of material and laser wavelength.

  15. An analytical continuation approach for evaluating emission lineshapes of molecular aggregates and the adequacy of multichromophoric Förster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Costagliola, Gianluca; Ishizaki, Akihito; Giorda, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    In large photosynthetic chromophore-protein complexes not all chromophores are coupled strongly, and thus the situation is well described by formation of delocalized states in certain domains of strongly coupled chromophores. In order to describe excitation energy transfer among different domains without performing extensive numerical calculations, one of the most popular techniques is a generalization of Förster theory to multichromophoric aggregates (generalized Förster theory) proposed by Sumi [J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 252 (1999), 10.1021/jp983477u] and Scholes and Fleming [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 1854 (2000), 10.1021/jp993435l]. The aim of this paper is twofold. In the first place, by means of analytic continuation and a time convolutionless quantum master equation approach, a theory of emission lineshape of multichromophoric systems or molecular aggregates is proposed. In the second place, a comprehensive framework that allows for a clear, compact, and effective study of the multichromophoric approach in the full general version proposed by Jang, Newton, and Silbey [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 218301 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.218301] is developed. We apply the present theory to simple paradigmatic systems and we show on one hand the effectiveness of time-convolutionless techniques in deriving lineshape operators and on the other hand we show how the multichromophoric approach can give significant improvements in the determination of energy transfer rates in particular when the systems under study are not the purely Förster regime. The presented scheme allows for an effective implementation of the multichromophoric Förster approach which may be of use for simulating energy transfer dynamics in large photosynthetic aggregates, for which massive computational resources are usually required. Furthermore, our method allows for a systematic comparison of multichromophoric Föster and generalized Förster theories and for a clear understanding of their respective limits

  16. Nanoengineered analytical immobilized metal affinity chromatography stationary phase by atom transfer radical polymerization: Separation of synthetic prion peptides

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, P.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Millhauser, G.L.; Tsarevsky, N.V.; Bombalski, L.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Shimmin, D.; Avdalovic, N.; Pohl, C.

    2010-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was employed to create isolated, metal-containing nanoparticles on the surface of non-porous polymeric beads with the goal of developing a new immobilized metal affnity chromatography (IMAC) stationary phase for separating prion peptides and proteins. Transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize nanoparticles on the substrate surface. Individual ferritin molecules were also visualized as ferritin–nanoparticle complexes. The column's resolving power was tested by synthesizing peptide analogs to the copper binding region of prion protein and injecting mixtures of these analogs onto the column. As expected, the column was capable of separating prion-related peptides differing in number of octapeptide repeat units (PHGGGWGQ), (PHGGGWGQ)2, and (PHGGGWGQ)4. Unexpectedly, the column could also resolve peptides containing the same number of repeats but differing only in the presence of a hydrophilic tail, Q → A substitution, or amide nitrogen methylation. PMID:17481564

  17. Characterization of Homogeneous, Cooperative Protein-DNA Clusters by Sedimentation Equilibrium Analytical Ultracentrifugation and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tessmer, Ingrid; Fried, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Strong, positively cooperative binding can lead to the clustering of proteins on DNA. Here, we describe one approach to the analysis of such clusters. Our example is based on recent studies of the interactions of O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) with high-molecular-weight DNAs (Adams et al., 2009; Tessmer, Melikishvili, & Fried, 2012). Cooperative cluster size distributions are predicted using the simplest homogeneous binding and cooperativity (HBC) model, together with data obtained by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. These predictions are tested using atomic force microscopy imaging; for AGT, measured cluster sizes are found to be significantly smaller than those predicted by the HBC model. A mechanism that may account for cluster size limitation is briefly discussed.

  18. Observations of argon emission lines used for fluorine atom actinometry in low power rf discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, S. E.

    1986-04-01

    Anomalous power and frequency dependences of some argon emission lines are observed in a low power rf discharge in a 2% admixture of argon in CF4. Frequency ranges from 0.12 to 13.56 MHz for pressures of 25 and 50 mTorr and 20 W power to the plasma. Power and frequency dependences of the 7504 Å line differ from those for the 6416 Å, 6871 Å, and 7126 Å lines. These differences and argon excitation cross sections are used to examine the validity of actinometry assumptions. The 6871 Å or 6416 Å lines work better under these conditions as actinometer references, while the 7504 Å seems preferable for etch plasmas.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Surface Segregation of Au75Pd25 at (110) Surface Using AN Analytic Embedded Atom Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Liao, Shuzhi

    The surface concentrations and concentration depth profiles to the (110) surface of an Au75Pd25 alloy is studied by modified analytical embedded atom method (MAEAM) with the Monte Carlo simulations. The results indicate that Au enriched in the two topmost layers, but depleted in the third layer. The Au concentration in the non-reconstructed surface is less than that in the reconstructed surface. Au concentration in third layer of reconstructed surface, which is more agreement with experimental data in present simulations, is about 63% 61% and 55%, at 800K, 600K and 400K respectively. Thus the present simulations are helpful for a better understanding of surface segregation of AuPd alloys.

  20. Direct determination of cadmium in solids using a capacitively coupled microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pless, A M; Croslyn, A; Gordon, M J; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1997-01-01

    A capacitively coupled microwave plasma (CMP) operating at 800 W was examined for the direct determination of cadmium in solids. The laboratory-constructed system contained a tungsten cup electrode capable of holding microsample quantities. A low-powered plasma was used to heat the sample, while at higher powers the plasma was used for sample vaporization and excitation. This plasma enabled thermal vaporization (TV) sample introduction to be accomplished in situ as the plasma formed directly around the sample. Thus, the need for sample preparation, procedural steps and sample transport was eliminated. This technique was capable of the direct determination of trace elements in solid samples in less than 5 min. The effects of experimental parameters such as gas flow rate, atomization power and electrode position were investigated. Detection limits obtained for Cd by TV-CMP-AES were in the picogram range with a relative standard deviation of <20%. The accuracy and precision of the method were also evaluated by measuring Cd in several NIST Standard Reference Materials.

  1. Analytical and experimental investigation of the feasibility of accelerated lifetime testing of materials exposed to an atomic oxygen beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, Royal; Barnes, Alan; Tolk, Norman

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of atomic particles with surfaces is of both scientific and technological interest. Past work emphasizes the measurement of high-energy sputtering yields. Very little work utilized low-energy beams for which chemical and electronic effects can be important. Even less work has been carried out using well-defined low-energy projectiles. The use of low-energy, reactive projectiles permits one to investigate surface processes that have not been well characterized. As the energy of the projectile decreases, the collisional cascades and spikes, that are common for high-energy projectiles, become less important, and chemical and electronic effects can play a significant role. Aspects of particle-surface interactions are of concern in several areas of technology. For example, the erosion, desorption, and glow of surfaces of spacecraft in orbit are important in the arena of space technology. The materials studied under this contract are of possible use on the exterior portions of the power generation system of Space Station Freedom. Under the original designs, Space Station Freedom's power generation system would generate potential differences on the surface as high as 200 volts. Ions in the plasma that often surround orbiting vehicles would be accelerated by these potentials leading to bombardment and erosion of the exposed surfaces. The major constituent of the atmosphere, approximately 90 percent, in the low earth orbit region is atomic oxygen. Since atomic oxygen is extremely reactive with most materials, chemical effects can arise in addition to the physical sputtering caused by the acceleration of the oxygen ions. Furthermore, the incident oxygen ions can remain embedded in the exposed surfaces, altering the chemical composition of the surfaces. Since the effective binding energy of a chemically altered surface can be quite different from that of the pure substrate, the sputtering yield of a chemically altered surface is usually different also. The low

  2. Plasma emission induced by an Nd-YAG laser at low pressure on solid organic sample, its mechanism, and analytical application

    SciTech Connect

    Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Sardy, Sar; Kusnowo, Anung; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, T.J.; Pardede, Marincan; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, M.O.

    2005-03-01

    An Nd-YAG laser (1064 nm, 120 mJ, 8 ns) was focused on various types of solid organic samples such as a black acrylic plate, a black polyvinyl chloride plastic sheet, and a methoxy polyaniline film coated on the surface of a glass substrate, under a surrounding air pressure of 2 Torr. A modulated plasma technique was used to study the mechanism of excitation of the emission of the organic material. As a result, we conclude that ablated atoms and molecules are excited by a shock-wave mechanism, similar to the case of hard samples such as metal. The ablation speed of hydrogen emission (H I 656.2 nm) was examined and the results show that the release speed of the ablated atoms is relatively low (less than Mach 10) and persists for a longer period of time (around 1 {mu}s); this phenomenon can be understood by assuming that the soft target absorbs recoil energy, causing a low release speed of ablated atoms which would form the shock wave. This was overcome by placing a subtarget on the back of the soft sample so as to enhance the repelling force, thus increasing the release speed of the atoms. A possible application of the low-pressure plasma on an organic solid was demonstrated in the detection of chlorine in a black polyvinyl chloride plastic sheet.

  3. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  4. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  5. Ultrasound bath-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis procedures as sample pretreatment for the multielement determination in mussels by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peña-Farfal, Carlos; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Pinochet-Cancino, Hugo; de Gregori-Henríquez, Ida

    2004-07-01

    Ultrasound energy has been applied to speed up enzymatic hydrolysis processes of mussel tissue in order to determine trace and ultratrace elements (As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). The element releases, by action of three proteases (pepsin, pancreatin, trypsin), lipase, and alpha-amylase, have been evaluated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Different variables such as pH, sonication temperature, ionic strength, hydrolysis time, ultrasound frequency, extracting volume, and enzyme mass were simultaneously studied by applying an experimental design approach (Plackett-Burman design and central composite design). Results showed that the hydrolysis time was statistically nonsignificant (confidence interval of 95%) for most of the elements and enzymes, meaning that the hydrolysis procedure can be finished within a 30-60-min range. These hydrolysis times are far shorter than those obtained when using thermostatic cameras, between 12 and 24 h. Statistically significant factors were the ultrasound frequency (the highest metals releasing at high-ultrasound frequency), pH, sonication temperature, and ionic strength. All metals can be extracted using the same operating conditions (pH of 1.0 and sodium chloride at 1.0% for pepsin; pH of 7.5, temperature at 37 degrees C, and 0.4 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate/potassium hydrogen phosphate buffer for amylase; pH of 8.0 and 0.5 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate/potassium hydrogen phosphate buffer for pancreatin; pH of 5.0 and 0.5 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate/potassium hydrogen phosphate buffer for lipase; pH of 8.0 and 0.2 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate/potassium hydrogen phosphate buffer for trypsin). Analytical performances, such as limits of detection and quantification, repeatability of the overall procedure, and accuracy, by analyzing DORM-1, DORM-2, and TORT-1 certified reference materials, were finally assessed for each enzyme.

  6. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, D. N.; Zachariadis, G. A.; Anthemidis, A. N.; Tsirliganis, N. C.; Stratis, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level).

  7. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  8. QM:QM electronic embedding using Mulliken atomic charges: energies and analytic gradients in an ONIOM framework.

    PubMed

    Hratchian, Hrant P; Parandekar, Priya V; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Frisch, Michael J; Vreven, Thom

    2008-01-21

    An accurate first-principles treatment of chemical reactions for large systems remains a significant challenge facing electronic structure theory. Hybrid models, such as quantum mechanics:molecular mechanics (QM:MM) and quantum mechanics:quantum mechanics (QM:QM) schemes, provide a promising avenue for such studies. For many chemistries, including important reactions in materials science, molecular mechanics or semiempirical methods may not be appropriate, or parameters may not be available (e.g., surface chemistry of compound semiconductors such as indium phosphide or catalytic chemistry of transition metal oxides). In such cases, QM:QM schemes are of particular interest. In this work, a QM:QM electronic embedding model within the ONIOM (our own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) extrapolation framework is presented. To define the embedding potential, we choose the real-system low-level Mulliken atomic charges. This results in a set of well-defined and unique embedding charges. However, the parametric dependence of the charges on molecular geometry complicates the energy gradient that is necessary for the efficient exploration of potential energy surfaces. We derive an efficient form for the forces where a single set of self-consistent field response equations is solved. Initial tests of the method and key algorithmic issues are discussed.

  9. QM:QM electronic embedding using Mulliken atomic charges: Energies and analytic gradients in an ONIOM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hratchian, Hrant P.; Parandekar, Priya V.; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Frisch, Michael J.; Vreven, Thom

    2008-01-01

    An accurate first-principles treatment of chemical reactions for large systems remains a significant challenge facing electronic structure theory. Hybrid models, such as quantum mechanics:molecular mechanics (QM:MM) and quantum mechanics:quantum mechanics (QM:QM) schemes, provide a promising avenue for such studies. For many chemistries, including important reactions in materials science, molecular mechanics or semiempirical methods may not be appropriate, or parameters may not be available (e.g., surface chemistry of compound semiconductors such as indium phosphide or catalytic chemistry of transition metal oxides). In such cases, QM:QM schemes are of particular interest. In this work, a QM:QM electronic embedding model within the ONIOM (our own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) extrapolation framework is presented. To define the embedding potential, we choose the real-system low-level Mulliken atomic charges. This results in a set of well-defined and unique embedding charges. However, the parametric dependence of the charges on molecular geometry complicates the energy gradient that is necessary for the efficient exploration of potential energy surfaces. We derive an efficient form for the forces where a single set of self-consistent field response equations is solved. Initial tests of the method and key algorithmic issues are discussed.

  10. Measuring atomic emission from beacons for long-distance chemical signaling.

    PubMed

    LaFratta, Christopher N; Pelse, Ian; Falla, Jose Luis; Liu, Yi; Palacios, Manuel A; Manesse, Mael; Whitesides, George M; Walt, David R

    2013-10-01

    In an effort to exploit chemistry for information science, we have constructed a system to send a message powered by a combustion reaction. Our system uses the thermal excitation of alkali metals to transmit an encoded signal over long distances. A message is transmitted by burning a methanol-soaked cotton string embedded with combinations of high, low, or zero levels of potassium, rubidium, and/or cesium ions. By measuring the intensities at the characteristic emission wavelengths of each metal in the near-infrared, 19 unique signals can be distinguished. We have built a custom telescope to detect these signals from 1 km away for nearly 10 min. The signal is isotropic, is self-powered, and has a low background. A potential application of this platform is for search and rescue signaling where another layer of information can be transmitted, in addition to the location of the beacon. This work, which seeks to encode and transmit information using chemistry instead of electronics, is part of the new field of "infochemistry".

  11. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  12. Evaluation of an improved atomic data basis for carbon in UEDGE emission modeling for L-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Leonard, A. W.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2013-07-01

    New scaled carbon atomic electron-impact excitation data is utilized to evaluate comparisons between experimental measurements and fluid emission modeling of detached plasmas at DIII-D. The C I and C II modeled emission lines for 909.8 and 514.7 nm were overestimated by a factor of 10-20 than observed experimentally for the inner leg, while the outer leg was within a factor of 2. Due to higher modeled emissions, a previous study using the UEDGE code predicted that a higher amount of carbon was required to achieve a detached outboard divertor plasma in L-mode at DIII-D. The line emission predicted by using the new scaled carbon data yields closer results when compared against experiment. We also compare modeling and measurements of Dα emission from neutral deuterium against predictions from newly calculated R-Matrix with pseudostates data available at the ADAS database.

  13. The delayed ionization and atomic ion emission of binary metal metallocarbohedrenes TixMyC12 (M=Zr, Nb; 0 <= y <= 4; x+y=8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, S. F.; May, B. D.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Investigations of the photophysical character of binary metal containing metallocarbohedrene clusters (Met-Cars), reveal the phenomena of delayed ionization. Additionally, the onset of a channel corresponding to delayed atomic ion emission is observed at high laser fluence, becoming progressively more significant as the fluence is raised. The fluence dependence of both the delayed electron and delayed atomic ion emission channels at 355 and 532 nm are reported, and the Met-Car delayed ion yield estimated. At moderate fluences, the yield of the delayed electron emission channel leading to the Met-Car ion is found to be on the order of 70% of the total Met-Car signal. All of the experimental findings point to thermionic emission being the operative mechanism for the delayed ionization, while the delayed atomic ion emission is evidently a new mechanism [B. D. May, S. F. Cartier, and A. W. Castleman, Jr., Chem. Phys. Lett. 242, 265 (1995)] which may be due to the collective electronic excitation of these cluster materials.

  14. Emission Characteristics of Ca and Mg Atoms in Gas Plasma Induced by the Bombardment of Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser at 1 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Sukra Lie, Zener; Inn Lee, Yong; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    To study the mechanism of atomic excitation in gas plasma, a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on a metal subtarget through a hole (2 mm in diameter) produced in a glass slide sample (1.5 mm in thickness); the glass slide sample was placed in close contact with a nickel metal plate, which functions as the metal subtarget. It was demonstrated that a strong gas plasma can be induced in various gases including He, N2, and CO2 and that plasma can be employed as the excitation source for spectrochemical analysis. It has been proved that, in He gas plasma, strong Ca ionic emissions (Ca II 393.3 nm and Ca II 373.7 nm) with a long lifetime can be observed regardless of excitation energy. On the other hand, in N2 and CO2 gases, the emissions are very weak and have a short lifetime. We assumed that, in He gas plasma, He metastable atoms play significant role in excitation. In the case of the Ca atom, the double ionization of Ca (Ca2+) is directly induced when a Ca atom collides with He metastable atoms through the Penning effect. The ion produced then recombines with an electron to produce an ionic excitation state, from which ionic emission is induced. In neutral Ca and Mg emissions, unique emission characteristics were observed in the He gas plasma case, namely, the triplet state is the main product and the singlet state is a minor product. This result can be explained by our proposed model.

  15. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag.

  16. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  17. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  18. The molecular oxygen dayglow emissions as proxies for atomic oxygen and ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Valentine A.; Manuilova, Rada; Martyshenko, Kseniia

    Currently there is no reliable method for remote sensing of altitude profile of the [O( (3) P)] in the daytime mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but atomic oxygen is a key component in the mechanism of the atmosphere cooling by quenching of vibrationally excited CO _{2} molecules and also one of basic quencher of electronically excited components in MLT region. On the other hand, airglow emission in 1.27 mum IR Atm(0 - 0) band from O _{2}(a (1) Delta _{g}, v = 0) has been used as a proxy for [O _{3}] in MLT for over a decade. However, this method is not suitable for detecting of relatively rapid [O _{3}] variations which occur due to the variability of the solar spectrum in the UV range (120 - 320 nm) and other space factors. The reason of above mentioned is the large value of photochemical lifetime of the O _{2}(a (1) Delta _{g}, v = 0) molecule which is within tau _{O2(a)} =3 (.) 10 (2) - 1 (.) 10 (3) s in the mesosphere and reaches 3 (.) 10 (3) s in the lower thermosphere. The aim of this study is revealing of proxies for retrievals of [O( (3) P)] and [O _{3}]. In the framework of developed model of electronic vibrational kinetics of excited products of O _{3} and O _{2} photolysis in MLT of the Earth (model YM-2011) [1] we solved direct problem for the system of 10 kinetic equations for populations of electronically-vibrationally excited levels of oxygen molecule O _{2}(a (1) Delta _{g}, v=0 - 5), O _{2}(b (1) Sigma (+) _{g}, v=0, 1, 2) and excited oxygen atom O( (1) D). In whole, more than 60 aeronomical reactions of photoexcitation and deexcitation, of energy transfer between these excited levels and of quenching of the levels in collisions with O( (3) P), O _{2}, N _{2}, O _{3} and CO _{2} are considered. Sensitivity analysis of obtained solutions showed that emissions in 629 nm band of the O _{2}(b (1) Sigma (+) _{g}, v=2) and 762 nm band of the O _{2}(b (1) Sigma (+) _{g}, v=0) molecules can be effective proxies for atomic oxygen in the altitude range 85

  19. An atomic orbital-based formulation of analytical gradients and nonadiabatic coupling vector elements for the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, James W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-10-21

    We recently presented an algorithm for state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) orbital optimization that capitalizes on sparsity in the atomic orbital basis set to reduce the scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. Here, we extend those algorithms to calculate the analytic gradient and nonadiabatic coupling vectors for SA-CASSCF. Combining the low computational scaling with acceleration from graphical processing units allows us to perform SA-CASSCF geometry optimizations for molecules with more than 1000 atoms. The new approach will make minimal energy conical intersection searches and nonadiabatic dynamics routine for molecular systems with O(10{sup 2}) atoms.

  20. A microwave-induced plasma based on microstrip technology and its use for the atomic emission spectrometric determination of mercury with the aid of the cold-vapor technique.

    PubMed

    Engel, U; Bilgiç, A M; Haase, O; Voges, E; Broekaert, J A

    2000-01-01

    A new low-power, small-scale 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source at atmospheric pressure for atomic emission spectrometry based on microstrip technology is described. The MicroStrip Plasma (MSP) source was produced in microstrip technology on a fused-silica wafer and designed as an element-selective detector for miniaturized analytical applications. The electrodeless microwave-induced plasma (MIP) operates at microwave input power of 10-40 W and gas flows of 50-1000 mL.min-1 of Ar. Rotational (OH) and excitation (Fe) temperatures were found to be 650 and 8000 K, respectively. Spatially resolved measurements of the Hg I 253.7-nm atomic emission line with an electronic slitless spectrograph (ESS) showed that a cylindrically symmetric plasma with a diameter of about 1 mm is obtained. With the MSP, Hg could be determined by applying the flow injection cold vapor (FI-CV) technique with a detection limit of 50 pg.ml-1. In terms of the relative standard deviation, a time stability of < 1.4% for 45 replicates within 80 min can be realized at a concentration level of 10 ng.ml-1 of Hg. Hg could be determined in the leachate of a certified standard reference soil (STSD-4) obtained by treatment with aqua regia at the 930 +/- 76 ng.g-1 level. Results obtained by calibration with aqueous solutions of Hg and with standard addition were found to be in good agreement with those of cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg{sup +}/Dy{sup +}, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  3. [Characterization of dinosaur fossils and their surrounding rocks by atomic emission spectrometry and X-ray powder diffractometry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qun; Wang, Yi-lin; Li, Chao-zhen; Yuan, Bo

    2005-02-01

    More dinosaur fossils have been found in the Laochangqing valley, Lufeng county than anywhere else in the world, and the dinosaur fossils found here cover the longest time span (including the early and middle Jurassic ages). This excavation offers an ideal experimental base for prehistoric biology studies. This paper presents an elementary analysis of the components and structure of the dinosaur fossils in three different geologic-layers and their surrounding rocks in the above mentioned area. Atomic emission spectrum shows that the fossils are rich in the contents of calcium (>5%) and phosphor, but low in the content of silicon (3%-8%), while the surrounding rocks are high in the content of silicon (>10%). Furthermore, XRD results show that the major compound of the fossils is CaCO3 (66%), followed by SiO2 (17%); while that of the surrounding rocks is SiO2 (>80%), followed by CaCO3 (<12%). The most important difference between the fossils and the surrounding rocks is, according to the experiment, that phosphate has been identified in the former but not in the latter. This is a characteristic that can be used to distinguish the dinosaur fossils from other rocks. This paper provides valuable data for further zoological studies on the living conditions and evolution of the dinosaurs in the Laochangqing valley, Lufeng county.

  4. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard.

  5. Adsorption, X-ray Diffraction, Photoelectron, and Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Benchmark Studies for the Eighth Industrial Fluid Properties Simulation Challenge.

    PubMed

    Ross, Richard B; Aeschliman, David B; Ahmad, Riaz; Brennan, John K; Brostrom, Myles L; Frankel, Kevin A; Moore, Jonathan D; Moore, Joshua D; Mountain, Raymond D; Poirier, Derrick M; Thommes, Matthias; Shen, Vincent K; Schultz, Nathan E; Siderius, Daniel W; Smith, Kenneth D

    2016-02-01

    The primary goal of the eighth industrial fluid properties simulation challenge was to test the ability of molecular simulation methods to predict the adsorption of organic adsorbates in activated carbon materials. The challenge focused on the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon standard BAM-P109 (Panne and Thünemann 2010). Entrants were challenged to predict the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon at a temperature of 273 K and at relative pressures of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6. The relative pressure (P/Po) is defined as that relative to the bulk saturation pressure predicted by the fluid model at a given temperature (273 K in this case). The predictions were judged by comparison to a set of experimentally determined values, which are published here for the first time and were not disclosed to the entrants prior to the challenge. Benchmark experimental studies, described herein, were also carried out and provided to entrants in order to aid in the development of new force fields and simulation methods to be employed in the challenge. These studies included argon, carbon dioxide, and water adsorption in the BAM-P109 activated carbon as well as X-ray diffraction, X-ray microtomography, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic emission spectroscopy studies of BAM-P109. Several concurrent studies were carried out for the BAM-P108 activated carbon (Panne and Thünemann 2010). These are included in the current manuscript for comparison.

  6. Adsorption, X-ray Diffraction, Photoelectron, and Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Benchmark Studies for the Eighth Industrial Fluid Properties Simulation Challenge*+

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Richard B.; Aeschliman, David B.; Ahmad, Riaz; Brennan, John K.; Brostrom, Myles L.; Frankel, Kevin A.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Moore, Joshua D.; Mountain, Raymond D.; Poirier, Derrick M.; Thommes, Matthias; Shen, Vincent K.; Schultz, Nathan E.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the eighth industrial fluid properties simulation challenge was to test the ability of molecular simulation methods to predict the adsorption of organic adsorbates in activated carbon materials. The challenge focused on the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon standard BAM-P109 (Panne and Thünemann 2010). Entrants were challenged to predict the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon at a temperature of 273 K and at relative pressures of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6. The relative pressure (P/Po) is defined as that relative to the bulk saturation pressure predicted by the fluid model at a given temperature (273 K in this case). The predictions were judged by comparison to a set of experimentally determined values, which are published here for the first time and were not disclosed to the entrants prior to the challenge. Benchmark experimental studies, described herein, were also carried out and provided to entrants in order to aid in the development of new force fields and simulation methods to be employed in the challenge. These studies included argon, carbon dioxide, and water adsorption in the BAM-P109 activated carbon as well as X-ray diffraction, X-ray microtomography, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic emission spectroscopy studies of BAM-P109. Several concurrent studies were carried out for the BAM-P108 activated carbon (Panne and Thünemann 2010). These are included in the current manuscript for comparison. PMID:27840543

  7. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of 27 trace elements in table salts after coprecipitation with indium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Tohda, Koji

    2009-07-15

    The coprecipitation method using indium phosphate as a new coprecipitant has been developed for the separation of trace elements in table salts prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Indium phosphate could quantitatively coprecipitate 27 trace elements, namely, Be, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, in a table salt solution at pH 10. The rapid coprecipitation technique, in which complete recovery of the precipitate was not required in the precipitate-separation process, was completely applicable, and, therefore, the operation for the coprecipitation was quite simple. The coprecipitated elements could be determined accurately and precisely by ICP-AES using indium as an internal standard element after dissolution of the precipitate with 5 mL of 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid. The detection limits (three times the standard deviation of the blank values, n=10) ranged from 0.001 microg (Lu) to 0.11 microg (Zn) in 300 mL of a 10% (w/v) table salt solution. The method proposed here could be applied to the analyses of commercially available table salts.

  8. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels.

  9. Development of rapid slurry methods for flame and direct current plasma emission and graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of solid animal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Fietkau, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are presented describing developments in the rapid, direct atomic spectrochemical analysis of meat samples by the technique of slurry atomization. The number of elements that can be determined in meat slurry samples has been increased and the concentration range that can be detected extended to included analysis at the part per billion as well as the percent level. Slurry atomization involves the rapid preparation procedure whereby the sample is simple homogenized with deionized distilled water prior to analysis. In this manner, rapid, quantitative analysis of hot dogs (processed meat) for dietary salt (Na, K) was achieved by premixed air-natural gas flame emission spectrometry. Quantitative analysis of mechanically separated meat for residual bone fragments (as Ca) was attained using a simple photometer when the premixed air-acetylene flame was used. The phosphate interference of the Ca emission signal was overcome by placing an insert in the spray chamber which decreased the droplet size of the aerosol reaching the flame. Slight matrix modification in the form of 2% nitric acid was necessary to solubilize the Ca from the bone fragments. Determining elements present at very low concentrations i.e. part per billion levels, in homogenized beef liver was evaluated using graphite furnace atomic absorption and shown to be viable for determinations of Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni. Qualitative multielement analysis of several types of meat slurries by direct current plasma (DCP) emission spectrometry using both photographic and electronic modes of detection was reported for the first time.

  10. X-RAY NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROCESSES IN ATOMS USING A SELF-AMPLIFIED SPONTANEOUS EMISSION FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N

    2008-08-08

    X-ray free electron lasers (xFEL) will open new avenues to the virtually unexplored territory of non-linear interactions of x rays with matter. Initially xFELs will be based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Each SASE pulse consists of a number of coherent intensity spikes of random amplitude, i.e. the process is chaotic and pulses are irreproducible. The coherence time of SASE xFELs will be a few femtoseconds for a photon energy near 1 keV. The importance of coherence properties of light in non-linear optical processes was theoretically discovered in the early 1960s. In this contribution we will illustrate the impact of field chaoticity on x-ray non-linear optical processes on neon for photon energies around 1 keV and intensities up to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Resonant and non-resonant processes are discussed. The first process to be addressed is the formation of a double-core hole in neon by photoionization with x rays above 1.25 keV energy. In contrast to the long-wavelength regime, non-linear optical processes in the x-ray regime are characterized in general by sequential single-photon single-electron interactions. Despite this fact, the sequential absorption of multiple x-ray photons depends on the statistical properties of the radiation field. Treating the x rays generated by a SASE FEL as fully chaotic, a quantum-mechanical analysis of inner-shell two-photon absorption is performed. By solving a system of time-dependent rate equations, we demonstrate that double-core hole formation in neon via x-ray two-photon absorption is enhanced by chaotic photon statistics. At an intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the statistical enhancement is about 30%, much smaller than typical values in the optical regime. The second part of this presentation discusses the resonant Auger effect of atomic neon at the 1s-3p transition (at 867.1 eV). For low X-ray intensity, the excitation process 1s {yields} 3p in Neon can be treated perturbatively. The

  11. Prediction of CO Cameron band and atomic oxygen visible emissions in comets C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, S.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2014-04-01

    The forbidden emissions of cometary species have special importance in the cometary spectra. The excited species which produce these forbidden emissions can not be populated by direct solar radiation excitation. These metastable species are produced mainly from dissociative excitation and ion-electron recombination reactions. Thus the observed emissions have been used as tracers of parent cometary species. The CO (a3 -X1) is a forbidden transition which produces Cameron band emission in the ultraviolet region during dissociative excitation of CObearing neutrals and the dissociative recombination of CO-ionic species in the cometary coma. Similarly, the forbidden transitions of metastable atomic oxygen 1S-3P (green, 5577 Å), and 1D-3P (red-doublet, 6300 and 6364 Å) produce line emissions in the visible region. These emissions have been used to probe H2O and CO2 abundances in the comets. We have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study various production and loss mechanisms of these excited metastable states. The model is applied to comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) which will have a close fly-by of Mars during mid October, 2014, when Indian Mars orbiter Mission and NASA's Maven, would be orbiting the planet. The model is also applied on ESA's Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko which will be useful for different observations over various heliocentric distances. The predicted intensities and quantitative analysis of these emissions can be a theoretical support for various space and ground-based observations.

  12. Analytical solution for the normal emission portion of the averaged Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzvieskii-Paddack coefficient for a single facet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuja, Antonella A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzvieskii-Paddack (YORP) effect has been well studied for asteroids. This paper develops an analytic solution to find the normal emission YORP component for a single facet. The solution presented here does not account for self-shadowing or self-heating. The YORP coefficient for all facets can be summed together to find the total coefficient of the asteroid. The normal emission component of YORP has been shown to be the most important for asteroids and it directly affects the rate of change of the asteroid's spin period. The analytical solution found is a sole function of the facet's geometry and the obliquity of the asteroid. This solution is universal for any facet and its orientation. The behaviour of the coefficient is analysed with this analytical solution. The closed-form solution is used to find the total YORP coefficient for the asteroids Apollo and 1998 ML14 whose shape models are composed of different numbers of facets. The results are then compared to published results and those obtained through numerical quadrature for validation.

  13. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate and gas phase from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzu-Ting; Lin, Shaw-Tao; Lin, Tser-Sheng; Chung, Hua-Yi

    2015-02-15

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in particulate and gas phases generated from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios were examined. Five types of mosquito coils were burned in a test chamber with a total airflow rate of 8.0 L/min at a constant relative humidity and temperature. The concentrations of individual PAHs were determined using the GC/MS technique. Among the used mosquito coils, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 1.23 to 1.57, yielding total mass, gaseous, and particulate PAH emission factors of 28.17-78.72 mg/g, 26,139.80-35,932.98 and 5735.22-13,431.51 ng/g, respectively. The various partitions of PAHs in the gaseous and particulate phases were in the ranges, 70.26-83.70% and 16.30-29.74% for the utilized mosquito coils. The carcinogenic potency of PAH emissions in the particulate phase (203.82-797.76 ng/g) was approximately 6.92-25.08 times higher than that of the gaseous phase (26.27-36.07 ng/g). Based on the analyses of PAH emissions, mosquito coils containing the lowest H/C ratio, a low oxygen level, and additional additives (i.e., CaCO3) are recommended for minimizing the production of total PAH emission factors and carcinogenic potency.

  14. Modelling of the evaporation behaviour of particulate material for slurry nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, D.; Heitland, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for modelling the evaporation behaviour of particles in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Computer software has been developed in FORTRAN 77 language in order to simulate the evaporation behaviour of particles of refractory materials such as encountered in the analysis of advanced ceramic powders by slurry nebulization inductively coupled argon plasma atomic spectrometry. The program simulates the evaporation of single particles in the inductively coupled plasma and also enable it to calculate on the base of a given particle size distribution the evaporation behaviour of all the particles contained in a sample. In a so-called "intensity concept", the intensity is calculated as a function of the observation height in order to determine recovery rates for slurries compared with aqueous solutions. This yields a quick insight whether a calibration with aqueous solutions can be used for analysis of slurries of a given powder by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and also is a help in determining the optimal parameters for analyses of powders by means of slurry nebulization ICP-AES. Applications for the evaporation of Al 2O 3 and SiC powders document the usefulness of the model for the case of a 1.5 kW argon ICP of which the temperature at 8 mm above the load coil has been determined to be 6100 K. The model predicts the maximum particle size for SiC and Al 2O 3 that can be transported (10-15 μm) and evaporated for a given efficiency under given experimental conditions. For both Al 2O 3 and SiC, two ceramic powders of different grain size were investigated. The median particle sizes cover

  15. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, and selenium in fruit slurry: analytical application to nutritional and toxicological quality control.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, C; Lorenzo, M L; Lopez, M C

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for direct determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, and selenium in slurried fruit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The fresh samples were suspended in Triton X-100 and shaken with 10 g zirconia spheres until a slurry was formed. The graphite furnace conditions were optimized for each element. The detection limits were 0.3, 3.5, 15.0, 0.5, and 10.0 ng/g for Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Se, respectively. Accuracy and precision were checked against sample mineralization in a microwave acid-digestion bomb. Results for analyses of National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials agreed closely with certified values. Analytical application of this method was tested with 40 samples of 8 widely consumed fruit species. The mean values (referred to fresh weight of edible fraction) for each fruit species had ranges of 0.0003-0.050 microgram/g for Cd, 0.316-1.094 micrograms/g for Cu, 2.00-5.50 micrograms/g for Fe, 0.050-0.396 microgram/g for Pb, and 0.010-0.020 microgram/g for Se. The proposed method is useful for routine multielemental analysis in nutritional and toxicological quality control of fruits and similar foodstuffs.

  16. Shock-tube studies of atomic silicon emission in the spectral range 180 to 300 nm. [environment simulation for Jupiter probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, S. G.; Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy of shock-heated atomic silicon was performed in the spectral range 180 to 300 nm, in an environment simulating the ablation layer expected around a Jovian entry probe with a silica heat shield. From the spectra obtained at temperatures from 6000 to 10,000 K and electron number densities from 1 quadrillion to 100 quadrillion per cu cm, the Lorentzian line-widths were determined. The results showed that silicon lines are broadened significantly by both electrons (Stark broadening) and hydrogen atoms (Van der Waals broadening), and the combined line-widths are much larger than previously assumed. From the data, the Stark and the Van der Waals line-widths were determined for 34 silicon lines. Radiative transport through a typical shock layer was computed using the new line-width data. The computations showed that silicon emission in the hot region is large, but it is mostly absorbed in the colder region adjacent to the wall.

  17. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  18. Evaluation of lithium determination in three analyzers: flame emission, flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharpour, Mehri; Hagani, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    Lithium carbonate salt has become an increasingly important substance in the treatment of manic depressive disorders, and its relatively narrow therapeutic range has caused laboratories to monitor the serum concentration carefully. In the present work we evaluated lithium measurement in 3 different analyzers. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; Three different analyzers including Flame Emission (FES), Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS), and Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) were used. All chemicals had a grade suitable for trace metal analysis. Within-day precision of CV was ≤ 1.5% for FES & FAAS, except for ISE (1.9% CV). Between-days precision of CV was less for FES than for FAAS and ISE (1.3% versus 2.2% & 2.3%). The percent recovery of added lithium in pooled patients' serum was higher for ISE than for FASS and FES (103.4% versus 96.2% and 94.6%). We also obtained a higher average lithium concentration for patients' serum samples (n=16) measured by ISE than for FAAS and FES (0.825±0.30 versus 0.704±0.26 & 0.735±0.19). Paired t-test results revealed a significant difference (p< 0.001) for patient sera analyzed with FAAS and ISE. We report higher results for ISE than the other two analyzers and conclude that the choice between the two flame methods for patients' serum lithium determination is arbitrary and that FES analyzer is a more attractive routine alternative for lithium determination than FAAS because of its cost and ease of performance. In addition, the results obtained by ISE are precise. However, its accuracy may depend on other interfering factors.

  19. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  20. Methods of atomic oxygen and ozone retrieval from observations of the O2 dayglow emissions in the MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Valentine; Martyshenko, Kseniia; Manuilova, Rada

    2015-04-01

    The problem of creating the new methods of remote sensing of altitude profile of the [O(3P)] and [O3] in the daytime is actual for the mesosphere and lower thermosphere range. Currently there is no reliable method for remote sensing of altitude profile of the [O(3P)], but atomic oxygen is a key component in the mechanism of the atmosphere cooling by quenching of vibrationally excited CO2 molecules and also one of basic quencher of excited components in MLT region. The airglow emission in 1.27 µm IR Atm(0 - 0) band from [O2(a1Δg, v=0)] has been used as a proxy for [O3] in MLT for over a decade. However, lifetime of O2(a1Δg, v=0) is more than 1 hour, therefore this method is not suitable for detecting of relatively rapid [O3] variations which occur due to the variability of the solar spectrum in the UV range (120 - 320 nm) and other space factors. The aim of this study is revealing of proxies for retrievals of [O(3P)] and [O3]. In the framework of developed model of electronic vibrational kinetics of excited products of O3 and O2 photolysis in MLT of the Earth (model YM-2011) [1] we consider the photolysis of O2 in the Schumann-Runge continuum and Lyaman-A H atom and of O3 in Hartley band and for excited products of photolysis ( O2(a1Δg, v=0 - 5), O2(b1Σ+g, v=0, 1, 2) and excited oxygen atom O(1D)) we took into account more than 60 aeronomical reactions of photoexcitation and deexcitation by energy transfer between the excited levels and of quenching of the levels in collisions with O(3P) O2, N2, O(3P), O3, CO2. We tested 5 excited components, namely, O2(b1Σ+g, v=0, 1, 2), O2(a1Δg, v=0 - 5) and O(1D) as the O(3P) and O3 proxies. The total system of kinetic equations for 10 components has been solved and altitude profiles of concentrations of O(1D), O2(b1Σ+g, v=0, 1, 2), and O2(a1Δg, v=0 - 5) have been calculated. To compare characteristics of assumed proxies we used sensitivity analysis of the proxy concentrations altitude profiles to variations of [O3] and

  1. Identification of a single light atom within a multinuclear metal cluster using valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Dible, Benjamin R; Chiang, Karen P; Brennessel, William W; Bergmann, Uwe; Holland, Patrick L; DeBeer, Serena

    2011-11-07

    Iron valence-to-core Fe Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C XES) is established as a means to identify light atoms (C, N, O) within complex multimetallic frameworks. The ability to distinguish light atoms, particularly in the presence of heavier atoms, is a well-known limitation of both crystallography and EXAFS. Using the sensitivity of V2C XES to the ionization potential of the bound ligand, energetic shifts of ~10 eV in the ligand 2s ionization energies of bound C, N, and O may be observed. As V2C XES is a high-energy X-ray method, it is readily applicable to samples in any physical form. This method thus has great potential for application to multimetallic inorganic frameworks involved in both small molecule storage and activation. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Simultaneous detection of selenium by atomic fluorescence and sulfur by molecular emission by flow-injection hydride generation with on-line reduction for the determination of selenate, sulfate and sulfite.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J F; Palmer, C D

    2009-10-12

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ICP-AFS) instrument, was modified so that it was capable of monitoring transient chromatographic or flow-injection profiles and that sulfur molecular emission and selenium atomic fluorescence could be monitored simultaneously in an argon-hydrogen diffusion flame on a glass burner. The analytes were introduced as hydrogen selenide and hydrogen sulfide, generated on a flow-injection manifold. Selenate was reduced to hydride-forming selenite by microwave-assisted on-line reaction with hydrochloric acid, and sulfate, or sulfite, was reduced to hydride-forming sulfide by a mixture of hydriodic acid, acetic acid and sodium hypophosphite. The effects of the nature of reducing agent, flow rate, microwave power and coil length were studied. The limit of detection (3s) for selenium was 10microgL(-1), and for sulfide was 70microgL(-1) (200-microL injection volume). The calibration was linear for selenium up to 2mgL(-1) and to 10mgL(-1) for sulfide. The throughput was 180h(-1). The three sulfur species could be differentiated on the basis of reactivity at various microwave powers.

  3. [Study on the method for the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current arc full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES)].

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-hong; Yao, Jian-zhen; Tang, Rui-ling; Zhang, Xue-mei; Li, Wen-ge; Zhang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determmation of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES) was established. Direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectrometer with a large area of solid-state detectors has functions of full spectrum direct reading and real-time background correction. The new electrodes and new buffer recipe were proposed in this paper, and have applied for national patent. Suitable analytical line pairs, back ground correcting points of elements and the internal standard method were selected, and Ge was used as internal standard. Multistage currents were selected in the research on current program, and each current set different holding time to ensure that each element has a good signal to noise ratio. Continuous rising current mode selected can effectively eliminate the splash of the sample. Argon as shielding gas can eliminate CN band generating and reduce spectral background, also plays a role in stabilizing the are, and argon flow 3.5 L x min(-1) was selected. Evaporation curve of each element was made, and it was concluded that the evaporation behavior of each element is consistent, and combined with the effects of different spectrographic times on the intensity and background, the spectrographic time of 35s was selected. In this paper, national standards substances were selected as a standard series, and the standard series includes different nature and different content of standard substances which meet the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 1.1, 0.09, 0.01, 0.41, and 0.56 microg x g(-1) respectively, and the precisions (RSD, n=12) for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 4.57%-7.63%, 5.14%-7.75%, 5.48%-12.30%, 3.97%-10.46%, and 4.26%-9.21% respectively. The analytical accuracy was

  4. Determination of bismuth by dielectric barrier discharge atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation: method optimization and evaluation of analytical performance.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Jan; Boušek, Jaroslav; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Mester, Zoltán; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-07

    Atomization of bismuth hydride in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and the performance of this device compared to that of a conventional quartz tube atomizer (QTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Modification of the inner surface of the DBD atomizer using dimethyldichlorsilane (DMDCS) was essential since it improved sensitivity by a factor of 2-4. Argon, at a flow rate of 125 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free Bi atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. The detection limit for Bi (1.1 ng mL(-1)) is worse than with the QTA (0.16 ng mL(-1) Bi). A poorer detection limit compared to a QTA is a consequence of the shorter optical path of the DBD. Moreover, the lower atomization efficiency and/or faster decay of free atoms in the DBD has to be considered. The performance of the DBD as an atomizer reflects both effects, i.e., atomization efficiency and free atom decay, was estimated to be 65% of that of the externally heated quartz tube atomizer. Nevertheless, this hydride generation DBD-AAS approach can be used for the routine determination of Bi, providing repeatability and accuracy comparable to that reached with a QTA, as demonstrated by analysis of NIST SRM 1643e (trace elements in water). The potential of in-atomizer preconcentration in a DBD atomizer is outlined.

  5. TH-C-BRD-01: Analytical Computation of Prompt Gamma Ray Emission and Detection for Proton Range Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Prieels, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype demonstrated that on-line range monitoring within 1–2 mm could be performed by comparing expected and measured PG detection profiles. Monte Carlo (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but this would result in prohibitive computation time for a complete pencil beam treatment plan. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of pre-computed MC data. Methods: The formation of the PG detection signal can be separated into: 1) production of PGs and 2) detection by the camera detectors after PG transport in geometry. For proton energies from 40 to 230 MeV, PG productions in depth were pre-computed by MC (PENH) for 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P and 40Ca. The PG production was then modeled analytically by adding the PG production for each element according to local proton energy and tissue composition.PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response were modeled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to pre-computed MC data (PENELOPE). The database was generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions.As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to PENH for a water phantom, a phantom with different slabs (adipose, muscle, lung) and a thoracic CT. Results: Good agreement (within 5%) was observed between the analytical model and PENH for the PG production. Similar accuracy for detecting range shifts was also observed. Speed of around 250 ms per profile was achieved (single CPU) using a non-optimized MatLab implementation. Conclusion: We devised a fast analytical model for generating PG detection profiles. In the test cases considered in this study, similar accuracy than MC was achieved for detecting range shifts. This research is supported by IBA.

  6. Abundant Acceptor Emission from Nitrogen-Doped ZnO Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition under Oxygen-Rich Conditions.

    PubMed

    Guziewicz, E; Przezdziecka, E; Snigurenko, D; Jarosz, D; Witkowski, B S; Dluzewski, P; Paszkowicz, W

    2017-08-09

    Nitrogen-doped and undoped ZnO films were grown by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) under oxygen-rich conditions. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal a dominant donor-related emission at 3.36 eV and characteristic acceptor-related emissions at 3.302 and 3.318 eV. Annealing at 800 °C in oxygen atmosphere leads to conversion of conductivity from n- to p-type, which is reflected in photoluminescence spectra. Annealing does not increase any acceptor-related emission in the undoped sample, while in the ZnO:N it leads to a considerable enhancement of the photoluminescence at 3.302 eV. The high resolution cathodoluminescence cross-section images show different spatial distribution of the donor-related and the acceptor-related emissions, which complementarily contribute to the overall luminescence of the annealed ZnO:N material. Similar area of both emissions indicates that the acceptor luminescence comes neither from the grain boundaries nor from stacking faults. Moreover, in ZnO:N the acceptor-emission regions are located along the columns of growth, which shows a perspective to achieve a ZnO:N material with homogeneous acceptor conductivity at least at the micrometer scale.

  7. Validation of an analytical method for simultaneous high-precision measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment plants using a gas chromatography-barrier discharge detector system.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Raffaella; Caivano, Marianna; Buchicchio, Alessandro; Mancini, Ignazio M; Bianco, Giuliana; Caniani, Donatella

    2017-01-13

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) emit CO2 and N2O, which may lead to climate change and global warming. Over the last few years, awareness of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from WWTPs has increased. Moreover, the development of valid, reliable, and high-throughput analytical methods for simultaneous gas analysis is an essential requirement for environmental applications. In the present study, an analytical method based on a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a barrier ionization discharge (BID) detector was developed for the first time. This new method simultaneously analyses CO2 and N2O and has a precision, measured in terms of relative standard of variation RSD%, equal to or less than 6.6% and 5.1%, respectively. The method's detection limits are 5.3ppmv for CO2 and 62.0ppbv for N2O. The method's selectivity, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, intermediate precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification were good at trace concentration levels. After validation, the method was applied to a real case of N2O and CO2 emissions from a WWTP, confirming its suitability as a standard procedure for simultaneous GHG analysis in environmental samples containing CO2 levels less than 12,000mg/L.

  8. QED Theory of Radiation Emission and Absorption Lines for Atoms and Ions in a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.

    2008-10-22

    The results of numerical calculating the multi-photon resonance shift and width for transition 6S-6F in the atom of Cs (wavelength 1059nm) in a laser pulse of the Gaussian and soliton-like shapes are presented. QED theory of radiation atomic lines is used.

  9. Single-photon superradiance and radiation trapping by atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Li, Fu; Li, Hongyuan; Zhang, Xiwen; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-04-01

    The collective nature of light emission by atomic ensembles yields fascinating effects such as superradiance and radiation trapping even at the single-photon level. Light emission is influenced by virtual transitions and the collective Lamb shift which yields peculiar features in temporal evolution of the atomic system. We study how two-dimensional atomic structures collectively emit a single photon. Namely, we consider spherical, cylindrical, and spheroidal shells with two-level atoms continuously distributed on the shell surface and find exact analytical solutions for eigenstates of such systems and their collective decay rates and frequency shifts. We identify states which undergo superradiant decay and states which are trapped and investigate how size and shape of the shell affects collective light emission. Our findings could be useful for quantum information storage and the design of optical switches.

  10. HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT): THE ORIGIN OF MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC EMISSION IN LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS IN TAURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Lee, Jinhee; Evans II, Neal J.; Green, Joel D.

    2014-10-01

    Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 μm as part of the Herschel key program, ''Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time''. The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at ∼30%, while the cooling fraction by H{sub 2}O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H{sub 2}O. The gas with a power-law temperature distribution with a moderately high density can reproduce the observed CO fluxes, indicative of CO close to LTE. However, H{sub 2}O is mostly subthermally excited. L1551-IRS5 is the most luminous source (Ł{sub bol} = 24.5 L {sub ☉}) and the [O I] 63.1 μm line accounts for more than 70% of its FIR line luminosity, suggesting complete photodissociation of H{sub 2}O by a J shock. In L1551-IRS5, the central velocity shifts of the [O I] line, which exceed the wavelength calibration uncertainty (∼70 km s{sup –1}) of PACS, are consistent with the known redshifted and blueshifted outflow direction.

  11. Low Altitude Emission (LAE) of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) Observed by TWINS and its Relation to the CINEMA CubeSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazell, D.; Sotirelis, T.; Nair, H.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    The brightest source of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) at energies >1keV is low altitude emission (LAE) from ~200-400km near auroral latitudes where precipitating energetic ions undergo multiple atomic collisions with the monatomic (O) exosphere. This emission is many times brighter than that from the high-altitude ring current region where the energetic ions interact only weakly with the much less dense monatomic (H) hydrogen geocorona. The recently selected NSF CubeSat mission CINEMA [Lin et al., this special session] has, as part of its science payload (STEIN), an ENA imager covering energies 4-100keV. From a high-inclination ~800km orbit, STEIN will view the LAE four times during every 90 minutes. The NASA TWINS stereo ENA imagers (2-40keV) will also view the LAE from their Molniya orbits (apogee radius~7Re). We have been analyzing the TWINS ENA images of LAE and comparing them with in situ ion measurements (1-40keV) from DMSP spacecraft when their tracks take them under the ion precipitation regions imaged by TWINS. We have developed an ENA emissivity function that relates the directionally-dependent emergent ENA spectrum to that of the precipitating ions. The TWINS/DMSP direct comparisons show good agreement. We offer suggestions on joint observing strategies for CINEMA, TWINS and DMSP after the CINEMA launch in the second half of 2011.

  12. Determination of trace impurities in high-purity zirconium dioxide by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry using microwave-assisted digestion and wavelet transform-based correction procedure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoguo; Li, Yibing

    2006-10-02

    This paper describes a rapid, accurate and precise method for the determination of trace Fe, Hf, Mn, Na, Si and Ti in high-purity zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) powders by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The samples were dissolved by a microwave-assisted digestion system. Four different digestion programs with various reagents were tested. It was found that using a mixture of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4), the total sample dissolution time was 30 min, much shorter than that required for conventional digestion in an opening system. The determination of almost all of the target analytes suffered from spectral interferences, since Zr shows a line-rich atomic emission spectrometry. The wavelet transform (WT), a recently developed mathematical technique was applied to the correction of spectral interference, and more accurate and precise results were obtained, compared with traditional off-peak background correction procedure. Experimental work revealed that a high Zr concentration would result in a significant decrease in peak height of the analyte lines, which was corrected by standard addition method. The performance of the developed method was evaluated by using synthetic samples. The recoveries were in the range of 87-112% and relative standard deviation was within 1.1-3.4%. The detection limits (3sigma) for Fe, Hf, Mn, Na, Si and Ti were found to be 1.2, 13.3, 1.0, 4.5, 5.8 and 2.0 microg g(-1), respectively. The results showed that with the microwave-assisted digestion and the WT correction, the detection limits have improved by a factor of about 5 for Fe, 4 for Mn and Ti, 3 for Si, and 2 for Hf and Na, respectively, in comparison with conventional open-system digestion and off-peak correction. The proposed technique was applied to the analysis of trace elements above-mentioned in three types of ZrO2 powders.

  13. Non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the x-ray emission of radiatively heated materials of different atomic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földes, I. B.; Eidmann, K.; Veres, G.; Bakos, J. S.; Witte, K.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray self-emission of radiatively heated materials with different values of Z has been investigated. Thin foils were uniformly heated by a 120-eV Hohlraum radiation of 400-ps duration in order to study the self-emission of a homogeneous, optically thin material. The x-ray emission spectra were followed for more than 2 ns. The spectrally integrated emission shows not only a strong Z dependence, but different temporal behaviors for different values of Z. The lower is the value of Z of the x-ray heated matter, the longer is the duration of self-emission. Theoretical comparison with a hydrocode and FLY post-processing shows a non-local-thermal equilibrium behavior caused by direct photoionization due to the thermal pumping radiation, which has a higher brightness temperature than the matter temperature of the heated material.

  14. Short-range surface plasmonics: Localized electron emission dynamics from a 60-nm spot on an atomically flat single-crystalline gold surface.

    PubMed

    Frank, Bettina; Kahl, Philip; Podbiel, Daniel; Spektor, Grisha; Orenstein, Meir; Fu, Liwei; Weiss, Thomas; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Davis, Timothy J; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Frank-J; Giessen, Harald

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally and theoretically visualize the propagation of short-range surface plasmon polaritons using atomically flat single-crystalline gold platelets on silicon substrates. We study their excitation and subfemtosecond dynamics via normal-incidence two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. By milling a plasmonic disk and grating structure into a single-crystalline gold platelet, we observe nanofocusing of the short-range surface plasmon polariton. Localized two-photon ultrafast electron emission from a spot with a smallest dimension of 60 nm is observed. Our novel approach opens the door toward reproducible plasmonic nanofocusing devices, which do not degrade upon high light intensity or heating due to the atomically flat surface without any tips, protrusions, or holes. Our nanofoci could also be used as local emitters for ultrafast electron bunches in time-resolved electron microscopes.

  15. Simultaneous determination of trace heavy metals in ambient aerosols by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Talebi, S M; Malekiha, M

    2008-07-01

    The simultaneous determination of heavy metals associated with airborne particulate matter in the atmosphere of the city Isfahan (Iran) was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. The preconcentration procedure developed found instrumental to determine the trace heavy metals associated with ambient aerosols collected at a short sampling period or collected from rural areas where the concentrations of these metals are much less than those in urban areas. Several samples were analyzed by both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as a conventional method and the proposed method. The results obtained by the two methods were found in good agreement. The method was applied to the determination of atmospheric level of heavy metals in rural area and also for study of variation in levels of heavy metals in urban atmosphere during the days and nights.

  16. Studying the R-branch and the Q-branch emission spectral lines of diatomic molecules using improved analytical formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yonghong; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Yi; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Li, Huidong; Feng, Hao

    2016-06-01

    The difference converging method (DCM) used to predict the R-branch and the Q-branch high-lying rotational lines for diatomic systems is improved in this study. The key analytical formulae of the DCM method are modified by adding a higher order spectral term Hυ, and adding a physical converging criterion to improve the accuracy of predictions. Applications of the improved DCM method to the R-branch of the TiF molecule and the Q-branch of the 193IrN molecule show that the accuracy of the R-branch and the Q-branch rotational lines is about one order of magnitude better than the results obtained using the previous formulae, which demonstrate the necessity of the added small term Hυ and the physical converging criterion. The DCM results are also shown to be better than the extrapolated rotational lines using the least-squares method.

  17. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  18. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples.

  19. Determination of nickel in biological materials after microwave dissolution using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with prior extraction into butan-1-ol.

    PubMed

    Vereda Alonso, E; García de Torres, A; Cano Pavón, J M

    1992-07-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of nickel in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after extraction of the nickel ion into butan-1-ol by using 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridylmethylene)thiocarbonohydrazide as the extracting reagent. Fast, efficient and complete sample digestion is achieved by an HNO3-HCl poly(tetrafluoroethylene) bomb dissolution technique using microwave heating. Results obtained for eleven certified reference materials agreed with the certified values.

  20. Purge-and-trap preconcentration system coupled to capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection for 2,4,6-trichloroanisole determination in cork stoppers and wines.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Aguinaga, Nerea; Viñas, Pilar; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2004-12-17

    A method based on solvent extraction and purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (PT-GC-AED) for the determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) in wines and cork stoppers was optimized and evaluated. TCA was previously extracted from the samples in pentane and the preconcentrated extract was reconstituted in water before being injected into the chromatograph by means of the PT system. Element-specific detection and quantification was carried out by monitoring the chlorine (479 nm) emission line. Two different calibration graphs were used to quantify TCA in the cork or the wine samples, owing to the interference produced by the ethanol content in the wines. Detection limits of 25 pg g(-1) and 5 ng l(-1) were obtained for corks and wines, respectively. The method provided recoveries from spiked samples ranging from 88.5 to 102.3%, confirming the reliability of the procedure and its suitability for routine monitoring.