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Sample records for analytical laboratory rtal

  1. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  2. Road transportable analytical laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Remediation of DOE contaminated areas requires extensive sampling and analysis. Reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site a full range of analyses meeting high levels of quality assurance and control, would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of cleanup and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping, and manpower associated with sample shipments. Goals of RTAL are to meet the needs of DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. The system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or together, to meet specific site needs: radioanalytical lab, organic chemical analysis lab, inorganic chemical analysis lab, aquatic biomonitoring lab, field analytical lab, robotics base station, decontamination/sample screening module, and operations control center. Goal of this integrated system is a sample throughput of 20 samples/day, providing a full range of accurate analyses on each sample within 16 h (after sample preparation), compared with the 45- day turnaround time in commercial laboratories. A prototype RTAL consisting of 5 modules was built and demonstrated at Fernald(FEMP)`s OU-1 Waste Pits, during the 1st-3rd quarters of FY96 (including the `96 Blizzard). All performance and operational goals were met or exceeded: as many as 50 sample analyses/day were achieved, depending on the procedure, sample turnaround times were 50-67% less than FEMP`s best times, and RTAL costs were projected to be 30% less than FEMP costs for large volume analyses in fixed laboratories.

  3. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soils, ground water and surface waters. This document describes the requirements for such a laboratory.

  4. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  5. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Malhotra, J.L.; Herman, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes disposed of underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site a full range of analyses meeting high levels of quality assurance and control. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goals of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project are the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system is designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  6. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a portable laboratory system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface waters for the detection and quantification of hazardous materials, organics, and radioactive contaminants. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) is a sample throughput of 20 samples per day, providing a full range of analysis on each sample within 16 hours of preparation with high accuracy.

  7. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    The problem of groundwater contamination at a large number of industrial facilities is well known. Many US Army and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities share this problem of potentially contaminated water as a result of past disposal practices associated with military and energy source development activities. A wide range of contaminants are found at certain installations encompassing industrial pollutants and military-unique materials. The US Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory has been conducting research for a number of years on developing better means to determine the hazards associated with exposure to these types of complex mixtures. The methods involve the use of aquatic organisms together with in vitro mutagenicity assays and analytical chemistry in an integrated biological assessment of a specific site. Integrated Biological Assessment is an important development in the Army`s continuing efforts to locate, clean and monitor sites contaminated as a result of military operations. This method provides meaningful hazard data regarding whether a test medium contains low levels of industrial or military-unique contaminants. This is an important advance in determining which sites are clean and which require remediation. It provides continuing monitoring of the effectiveness of remediation operations. Engineering Computer Opteconomics (ECO), Inc. was tasked, in a collaborative Army and DOE effort, to develop a transportable Integrated Biological Assessment Laboratory Complex. This multimodular Complex is designed to be taken into remote areas to provide the necessary long-term on-site research for determining hazards from low levels of contamination in the environment. Each module of the Complex is designed to be self-sufficient, to provide a safe environment for the operators, and a controlled environment for the test organisms and related critical chemical and biological analyses.

  8. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume III, Appendices C through J. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) provides a portabler laboratory for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface water. This report presents data from a soils sample TCLP VOA and SVOA report, aqueous sample RCRA metals report, soils sample total and isotopic uranium report, SVOA sample analytical performance report, and and RCRA metal sample analytical performance report.

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume II, Appendices A and B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) provides a portable analytical system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface water for the detection of hazardous materials, metals, organics, and radioactive material. This report presents the data results for an aqueous sample VOA report and an aqueous sample SVOA report.

  10. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system. Quarterly report, November 1995--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganics. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs. After evaluating the needs of the DOE field activities and investigating alternative system designs, the modules included in the RTAL are: radioanalytical laboratory; organic chemical analysis laboratory; inorganic chemical analysis laboratory; aquatic biomonitoring laboratory; field analytical laboratory; robotics base station; decontamination/sample screening module; operations control center; and protected living quarters. The goal of the integrated laboratory system is a sample throughput of 20 samples per day, providing a full range of analyses on each sample within 16 hours (after sample preparation) with high accuracy and high quality assurance. The RTAL will provide the DOE with very significant savings in terms of both cost and time. This will accelerate and improve the efficiency of clean-up and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex. At the same time, the system will provide full protection for operating personnel and sensitive analytical equipment against the environmental extremes and hazards encountered at DOE sites.

  11. Road transportable analytical laboratory (RTAL) system. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Goal is the development and demonstration of a system to meet DOE needs for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. The system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules. This report documents progress on Phase II, which is a transition to Maturity Level 5, Full-Scale Demonstration.

  12. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  13. Road Transportable Analytical (RTAL) laboratory system. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. The major types of contamination found at the various sites have been summarized in the `Environmental Restoration and Management Five Year Plan` and, except for radionuclides (at most locations) and high explosives (at a few locations), are representative of the types of wastes found at many industrial facilities. The DOE faces additional unique challenges in cleaning up this contamination. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, many times wastes were stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas.

  14. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system. Quarterly report, May--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Goal is to develop and demonstrate a system for rapid, accurate analysis of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. Goal throughput is 20 samples per day, within 16 hours on each sample (after sample preparation). Purpose is to improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation throughout the DOE complex. During this period, the tasks on prototype system construction and on-site prototype demonstration were worked on; progress is reported.

  15. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  18. Mars Analytical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagati, M. Gawad; Ale-Ibrahaim, Kordi; Bins, Llonda; Davis, Michael; Gamalo, Johnny; Johnson, Matt; May, Neal; Seneviratne, Waruna; Yurko, Aric; Yurko, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    As mankind continues to explore the solar system, planetary colonization may become an important goal. Permanently manned space stations, bases on the moon, and colonization of Mars will be important steps in this exploration. The colonization and exploration of Mars will be a particular challenge. As mankind one day attempts this colonization, knowledge of the Martian environment and human capacity to live there will become vitally important. The first scientific outposts on Mars will need research laboratories to make discoveries about how we can better live there and use the natural resources of the planet to sustain human life. The design of a laboratory for an existing Martian base is the purpose of this project. A laboratory on Mars would be very useful to the scientists we send.

  19. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  20. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  1. Automation and quality in analytical laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Valcarcel, M.; Rios, A.

    1994-05-01

    After a brief introduction to the generic aspects of automation in analytical laboratories, the different approaches to quality in analytical chemistry are presented and discussed to establish the following different facets emerging from the combination of quality and automation: automated analytical control of quality of products and systems; quality control of automated chemical analysis; and improvement of capital (accuracy and representativeness), basic (sensitivity, precision, and selectivity), and complementary (rapidity, cost, and personnel factors) analytical features. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of this marriage of convenience in present and future analytical chemistry. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Safety in the Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Galen W.

    1990-01-01

    Safety issues specifically related to the analytical laboratory are discussed including hazardous reagents, transferring samples, cleaning apparatus, eye protection, and equipment damage. Special attention is given to techniques which not only endanger the technician but also endanger expensive equipment. (CW)

  3. Analytical laboratory quality control charting

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryan, Ervin F.

    2001-06-11

    In life the importance of setting goals is stressed. The desired end result must be envisioned to chart a path and determine indicators to provide feedback on the process. Quality does not happen by accident but is achieved through a constant process of setting goals, process development, monitoring process indicators, fine tuning the process, and achieving results. These goals are to be focused and clearly measurable. In industry and life the setting of goals with clear process indicators is often difficult because of the variable end result and scarcity of measurements. Laboratories are fortunate in that they have a plethora of measurements with known or desired end results (controls) to monitor the process and give instantaneous feedback on quality. A key quality tool used by the laboratory to monitor and evaluate the lab processes is control charting. When properly utilized Quality Control (QC) Charts allow labs to be proactive in addressing problems rather than reactive. Several methods are available for control charting and some are listed in the references/information sources. The content for this paper is based on the control-charting program utilized at the Department of Energy's Fernald site. This control-charting program has specific areas of emphasis, simple charts, trend analyses, and effective follow-up.

  4. Reusing Property Resulting from Analytical Laboratory Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.; DePinho, D.; Wetherstein, P.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) site in Grand Junction, Colorado, faced the problem of reusing an extensive assortment of laboratory equipment and supplies when its on-site analytical chemistry laboratory closed. This challenge, undertaken as part of the Grand Junction site's pollution prevention program, prioritized reuse of as much of the laboratory equipment and supplies as possible during a 9-month period in fiscal year 2004. Reuse remedies were found for approximately $3 million worth of instrumentation, equipment, chemicals, precious metals, and other laboratory items through other Grand Junction site projects, Federal Government databases, and extensive contact with other DOE facilities, universities, and colleges. In 2005, the DOE-LM Grand Junction site received two prestigious DOE pollution prevention awards for reuse of the laboratory's equipment and supplies. (authors)

  5. Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP) provides guidance for the planning, implementation and assessment phases of projects that require laboratory analysis of radionuclides.

  6. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Smiecinski, A.

    1996-04-30

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells.

  7. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline.

    PubMed

    Shirts, Brian H; Jackson, Brian R; Baird, Geoffrey S; Baron, Jason M; Clements, Bryan; Grisson, Ricky; Hauser, Ronald George; Taylor, Julie R; Terrazas, Enrique; Brimhall, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  8. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    PubMed Central

    Shirts, Brian H.; Jackson, Brian R.; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Baron, Jason M.; Clements, Bryan; Grisson, Ricky; Hauser, Ronald George; Taylor, Julie R.; Terrazas, Enrique; Brimhall, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and “meaningful use.” The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the “big data” clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed. PMID:25774320

  9. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  10. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  11. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sediments, toxicity testing and bioaccumulation studies performed on site sediments, and application of partitioning, transport and fate modeling. All of these tools served as lines of evidence for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. In the last ten years, a new tool for assessing remedial effectiveness has gained a great deal of attention. Passive sampling offers a tool capable of measuring the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of legacy contaminants in water and sediments. In addition to assessing the effectiveness of the remedy, passive sampling can be applied for a variety of other contaminated sediments site purposes involved with performing the preliminary assessment and site inspection, conducting the remedial investigation and feasibility study, preparing the remedial design, and assessing the potential for contaminant bioaccumulation. While there is a distinct need for using passive sampling at contaminated sediments sites and several previous documents and research articles have discussed various aspects of passive sampling, there has not been definitive guidance on the laboratory, field and analytical procedures for using pas

  12. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sediments, toxicity testing and bioaccumulation studies performed on site sediments, and application of partitioning, transport and fate modeling. All of these tools served as lines of evidence for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. In the last ten years, a new tool for assessing remedial effectiveness has gained a great deal of attention. Passive sampling offers a tool capable of measuring the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of legacy contaminants in water and sediments. In addition to assessing the effectiveness of the remedy, passive sampling can be applied for a variety of other contaminated sediments site purposes involved with performing the preliminary assessment and site inspection, conducting the remedial investigation and feasibility study, preparing the remedial design, and assessing the potential for contaminant bioaccumulation. While there is a distinct need for using passive sampling at contaminated sediments sites and several previous documents and research articles have discussed various aspects of passive sampling, there has not been definitive guidance on the laboratory, field and analytical procedures for using pas

  13. The role of light microscopy in aerospace analytical laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Light microscopy has greatly reduced analytical flow time and added new dimensions to laboratory capability. Aerospace analytical laboratories are often confronted with problems involving contamination, wear, or material inhomogeneity. The detection of potential problems and the solution of those that develop necessitate the most sensitive and selective applications of sophisticated analytical techniques and instrumentation. This inevitably involves light microscopy. The microscope can characterize and often identify the cause of a problem in 5-15 minutes with confirmatory tests generally less than one hour. Light microscopy has and will make a very significant contribution to the analytical capabilities of aerospace laboratories.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Boparai, A.S.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1991 (October 1990 through September 1991). This is the eighth annual report for the ACL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1989 (October 1988 through September 1989). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Inorganic Analytical Service within the Superfund Contract Laboratory Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains information about the ISM02.3 and ISM02.4 statement of work for the analysis of metals and cyanide at hazardous waste sites. The SOW contains the analytical method and contractual requirements for laboratories.

  18. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 1, Administrative

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Covered are: analytical laboratory operations (ALO) sample receipt and control, ALO data report/package preparation review and control, single shell tank (PST) project sample tracking system, sample receiving, analytical balances, duties and responsibilities of sample custodian, sample refrigerator temperature monitoring, security, assignment of staff responsibilities, sample storage, data reporting, and general requirements for glassware.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.; Green, D. W.; Lindahl, P. C.

    1999-03-29

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 (October 1997 through September 1998). This annual progress report, which is the fifteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  20. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.

    2000-06-15

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 (October 1998 through September 1999). This annual progress report, which is the sixteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  1. 15. VIEW OF LABORATORY EQUIPMENT IN THE BUILDING 771 ANALYTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF LABORATORY EQUIPMENT IN THE BUILDING 771 ANALYTICAL LABORATORY. THE LAB ANALYZED SAMPLES FOR PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, URANIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AND OTHER RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES. (9/25/62) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. Pre-analytical workstations: a tool for reducing laboratory errors.

    PubMed

    Da Rin, Giorgio

    2009-06-01

    Laboratory testing, a highly complex process commonly called the total testing process (TTP), is usually subdivided into three traditional (pre-, intra-, and post-) analytical phases. The majority of errors in TTP originate in the pre-analytical phase, being due to individual or system design defects. In order to reduce errors in TTP, the pre-analytical phase should therefore be prioritized. In addition to developing procedures, providing training, improving interdepartmental cooperation, information technology and robotics may be a tool to reduce errors in specimen collection and pre-analytical sample handling. It has been estimated that >2000 clinical laboratories worldwide use total or subtotal automation supporting pre-analytic activities, with a high rate of increase compared to 2007; the need to reduce errors seems to be the catalyst for increasing the use of robotics. Automated systems to prevent medical personnel from drawing blood from the wrong patient were introduced commercially in the early 1990s. Correct patient identification and test tube labelling before phlebotomy are of extreme importance for patient safety in TTP, but currently few laboratories are interested in such products. At San Bassiano hospital, the implementation of advanced information technology and robotics in the pre-analytical phase (specimen collection and pre-analytical sample handling) have improved accuracy, and clinical efficiency of the laboratory process and created a TTP that minimizes errors.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory analytical services performance evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, J.M.; Sailer, S.J.; Anderson, D.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Sample Management Office (SMO) conducts a Performance Evaluation Program that ensures that data of known quality are supplied by the analytical. chemistry service organizations with which the INEL contracts. The Analytical Services Performance Evaluation Plan documents the routine monitoring and assessment of suppliers conducted by the SMO, and it describes the procedures that are followed to ensure that suppliers meet all appropriate requirements. Because high-quality analytical support is vital to the success of DOE Environmental Management programs at the INEL, the performance of organizations providing these services must be routinely monitored and assessed. Analytical disciplines for which performance is monitored include metals, organics, radiochemical, and miscellaneous classical analysis methods.

  6. Analytical chemistry laboratory. Progress report for FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1996 through September 1997). This annual progress report is the fourteenth in this series for the ACL, and it describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  8. Organic Analytical Service within the Superfund Contract Laboratory Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains information about the SOM02.2, SOM02.3, and SOM02.4 statements of work for the analysis of organic compounds at hazardous waste sites. The SOW contains the analytical method and contractual requirements for laboratories.

  9. Analytical evaluation of laboratories wishing to perform environmental characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lauenstein, G.G.; Cantillo, A.Y.

    1997-07-01

    Laboratories competing to analyze bivalve mollusks under contract to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s Mussel Watch Project were required to undergo analytical tests of their ability to quantify environmental contaminants as part of the contract evaluation process. During the 1989 selection process laboratories that appeared to qualify on the basis of their written proposals were provided a gravimetrically prepared solution with unknown quantities of an undefined number of organic contaminants that are regularly quantified for the Mussel Watch Project. In 1994, competing laboratories were once again tested but this time using matrix materials for the quantification of both trace elements and organic contaminants. Three laboratory groups participated in the exercises. For the 1989 gravimetrically prepared solutions, all participating laboratories were able to identify the contaminants present and in all but two cases were able to report values to within {+-}25% of the known values. In 1994, all laboratories were within the acceptance criteria for the quantification of trace elements in the homogenate sample. Analytical laboratory testing is an important first step to ensure that environmental characterization studies are successful.

  10. External quality assessment of medical laboratories in Croatia: preliminary evaluation of post-analytical laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek; Dorotic, Adrijana; Grzunov, Ana

    2017-02-15

    Proper standardization of laboratory testing requires assessment of performance after the tests are performed, known as the post-analytical phase. A nationwide external quality assessment (EQA) scheme implemented in Croatia in 2014 includes a questionnaire on post-analytical practices, and the present study examined laboratory responses in order to identify current post-analytical phase practices and identify areas for improvement. In four EQA exercises between September 2014 and December 2015, 145-174 medical laboratories across Croatia were surveyed using the Module 11 questionnaire on the post-analytical phase of testing. Based on their responses, the laboratories were evaluated on four quality indicators: turnaround time (TAT), critical values, interpretative comments and procedures in the event of abnormal results. Results were presented as absolute numbers and percentages. Just over half of laboratories (56.3%) monitored TAT. Laboratories varied substantially in how they dealt with critical values. Most laboratories (65-97%) issued interpretative comments with test results. One third of medical laboratories (30.6-33.3%) issued abnormal test results without confirming them in additional testing. Our results suggest that the nationwide post-analytical EQA scheme launched in 2014 in Croatia has yet to be implemented to the full. To close the gaps between existing recommendations and laboratory practice, laboratory professionals should focus on ensuring that TAT is monitored and lists of critical values are established within laboratories. Professional bodies/institutions should focus on clarify and harmonized rules to standardized practices and applied for adding interpretative comments to laboratory test results and for dealing with abnormal test results.

  11. External quality assessment of medical laboratories in Croatia: preliminary evaluation of post-analytical laboratory testing

    PubMed Central

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek; Dorotic, Adrijana; Grzunov, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Proper standardization of laboratory testing requires assessment of performance after the tests are performed, known as the post-analytical phase. A nationwide external quality assessment (EQA) scheme implemented in Croatia in 2014 includes a questionnaire on post-analytical practices, and the present study examined laboratory responses in order to identify current post-analytical phase practices and identify areas for improvement. Materials and methods In four EQA exercises between September 2014 and December 2015, 145-174 medical laboratories across Croatia were surveyed using the Module 11 questionnaire on the post-analytical phase of testing. Based on their responses, the laboratories were evaluated on four quality indicators: turnaround time (TAT), critical values, interpretative comments and procedures in the event of abnormal results. Results were presented as absolute numbers and percentages. Results Just over half of laboratories (56.3%) monitored TAT. Laboratories varied substantially in how they dealt with critical values. Most laboratories (65-97%) issued interpretative comments with test results. One third of medical laboratories (30.6-33.3%) issued abnormal test results without confirming them in additional testing. Conclusion Our results suggest that the nationwide post-analytical EQA scheme launched in 2014 in Croatia has yet to be implemented to the full. To close the gaps between existing recommendations and laboratory practice, laboratory professionals should focus on ensuring that TAT is monitored and lists of critical values are established within laboratories. Professional bodies/institutions should focus on clarify and harmonized rules to standardized practices and applied for adding interpretative comments to laboratory test results and for dealing with abnormal test results. PMID:28392737

  12. USGS Blind Sample Project: monitoring and evaluating laboratory analytical quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludtke, Amy S.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects and disseminates information about the Nation's water resources. Surface- and ground-water samples are collected and sent to USGS laboratories for chemical analyses. The laboratories identify and quantify the constituents in the water samples. Random and systematic errors occur during sample handling, chemical analysis, and data processing. Although all errors cannot be eliminated from measurements, the magnitude of their uncertainty can be estimated and tracked over time. Since 1981, the USGS has operated an independent, external, quality-assurance project called the Blind Sample Project (BSP). The purpose of the BSP is to monitor and evaluate the quality of laboratory analytical results through the use of double-blind quality-control (QC) samples. The information provided by the BSP assists the laboratories in detecting and correcting problems in the analytical procedures. The information also can aid laboratory users in estimating the extent that laboratory errors contribute to the overall errors in their environmental data.

  13. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, Lieve M. L.

    2016-01-13

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.; Stetter, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    Technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) are reported for fiscal year 1984. The ACL is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division, the principal user, but provides technical support for all of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has three technical groups - Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, and Organic Analysis. Under technical activities 26 projects are briefly described. Under professional activities, a list is presented for publications and reports, oral presentations, awards and meetings attended. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Analytical difficulties facing today's regulatory laboratories: issues in method validation.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, James D

    2012-08-01

    The challenges facing analytical laboratories today are not unlike those faced in the past, although both the degree of complexity and the rate of change have increased. Challenges such as development and maintenance of expertise, maintenance and up-dating of equipment, and the introduction of new test methods have always been familiar themes for analytical laboratories, but international guidelines for laboratories involved in the import and export testing of food require management of such changes in a context which includes quality assurance, accreditation, and method validation considerations. Decisions as to when a change in a method requires re-validation of the method or on the design of a validation scheme for a complex multi-residue method require a well-considered strategy, based on a current knowledge of international guidance documents and regulatory requirements, as well the laboratory's quality system requirements. Validation demonstrates that a method is 'fit for purpose', so the requirement for validation should be assessed in terms of the intended use of a method and, in the case of change or modification of a method, whether that change or modification may affect a previously validated performance characteristic. In general, method validation involves method scope, calibration-related parameters, method precision, and recovery. Any method change which may affect method scope or any performance parameters will require re-validation. Some typical situations involving change in methods are discussed and a decision process proposed for selection of appropriate validation measures.

  16. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  17. Free DNA – new potential analyte in clinical laboratory diagnostics?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jasenka

    2012-01-01

    The existence of cell free DNA in the human circulatory system has been known since the 1950s, however, intensive research in this area has been conducted for the last ten years. This review paper brings a short overview of the existing literature concerning the cell free DNA research in various clinical fields and pathological states and considers the application possibilities of this new analyte in clinical laboratory diagnostics. At the moment, cell free DNA is most widely used for the purpose of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal sex or fetal RhD status. The recent discovery of epigenetic changes in placental/fetal DNA and the detection of fetal/placental-specific RNAs have made it possible to use this technology in all pregnancies irrespective of the gender of the fetus. With the application of new techniques such as next generation sequencing, digital PCR and mass spectrometry, it is now possible to detect very small amounts of specific DNA in the presence of excess of other nonspecific nucleic acids. Second most probable application is in oncology, where detection and monitoring of tumors is now possible by the detection of tumor-derived nucleic acids. Third promising field for near future implementation of this analyte is transplantation medicine, where free DNA level could serve as a marker of transplant rejection. Before any further utilization of this new biomarker, pre-analytical and analytical aspects of free DNA analysis remain to be standardized. In the field of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis, important ethical, legal and social questions remain to be discussed. PMID:22384517

  18. CheMin: A Definitive Mineralogy Instrument in the Analytical Laboratory of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Feldman, S.; Collins, S.

    2005-01-01

    An important goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL '09) mission is the determination of definitive mineralogy and chemical composition. CheMin is a miniature X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that has been chosen for the analytical laboratory of MSL. CheMin utilizes a miniature microfocus source cobalt X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray fluorescence spectra from powdered or crushed samples. A diagrammatic view of the instrument is shown. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Using analytical services at the National Water Quality Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    The National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) offers a variety of analytical services for the determination of constituents in samples of water, sediment, and biological material. As technology has advanced, many new methods have been introduced but not always incorporated into plans and schedules developed in the districts. The strengths and weaknesses of many different techniques are discussed and evaluated to promote a broad understanding of the services available at the NWQL. Method detection limits, precision, and costs are discussed, as well as possible applications for the methods. To aid in project planning, several tables have been developed that list the approved method for certain determination, particularly those being requested to satisfy cooperator or U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency regulatory requirements.

  20. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  1. 78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO AGENCY... issuance of a license amendment to Materials License No. 24-13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry... accession numbers are: 1. Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Licensee amendment request and...

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Standard Reference Sample Project: Performance Evaluation of Analytical Laboratories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, H. Keith; Daddow, Richard L.; Farrar, Jerry W.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1962, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated the Standard Reference Sample Project to evaluate the performance of USGS, cooperator, and contractor analytical laboratories that analyze chemical constituents of environmental samples. The laboratories are evaluated by using performance evaluation samples, called Standard Reference Samples (SRSs). SRSs are submitted to laboratories semi-annually for round-robin laboratory performance comparison purposes. Currently, approximately 100 laboratories are evaluated for their analytical performance on six SRSs for inorganic and nutrient constituents. As part of the SRS Project, a surplus of homogeneous, stable SRSs is maintained for purchase by USGS offices and participating laboratories for use in continuing quality-assurance and quality-control activities. Statistical evaluation of the laboratories results provides information to compare the analytical performance of the laboratories and to determine possible analytical deficiences and problems. SRS results also provide information on the bias and variability of different analytical methods used in the SRS analyses.

  3. Dioxins, Furans, PCBs, and Congeners Analytical Service within the Superfund Contract Laboratory Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains information about the DLM02.2 analytical service for the analysis of dioxins and furans at hazardous waste sites. The SOW contains the analytical method and contractual requirements for laboratories.

  4. Pre-analytical issues in the haemostasis laboratory: guidance for the clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Magnette, A; Chatelain, M; Chatelain, B; Ten Cate, H; Mullier, F

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring quality has become a daily requirement in laboratories. In haemostasis, even more than in other disciplines of biology, quality is determined by a pre-analytical step that encompasses all procedures, starting with the formulation of the medical question, and includes patient preparation, sample collection, handling, transportation, processing, and storage until time of analysis. This step, based on a variety of manual activities, is the most vulnerable part of the total testing process and is a major component of the reliability and validity of results in haemostasis and constitutes the most important source of erroneous or un-interpretable results. Pre-analytical errors may occur throughout the testing process and arise from unsuitable, inappropriate or wrongly handled procedures. Problems may arise during the collection of blood specimens such as misidentification of the sample, use of inadequate devices or needles, incorrect order of draw, prolonged tourniquet placing, unsuccessful attempts to locate the vein, incorrect use of additive tubes, collection of unsuitable samples for quality or quantity, inappropriate mixing of a sample, etc. Some factors can alter the result of a sample constituent after collection during transportation, preparation and storage. Laboratory errors can often have serious adverse consequences. Lack of standardized procedures for sample collection accounts for most of the errors encountered within the total testing process. They can also have clinical consequences as well as a significant impact on patient care, especially those related to specialized tests as these are often considered as "diagnostic". Controlling pre-analytical variables is critical since this has a direct influence on the quality of results and on their clinical reliability. The accurate standardization of the pre-analytical phase is of pivotal importance for achieving reliable results of coagulation tests and should reduce the side effects of the influence

  5. 76 FR 41747 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Extension of Global Laboratory and Analytical Use Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... acknowledged the need for methyl bromide for laboratory and analytical procedures, and added methyl bromide to... outlined specific uses and exclusions for methyl bromide under the exemption. EPA incorporated specific uses of methyl bromide in the essential laboratory and analytical use exemption at Appendix G to...

  6. SECOND FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627) WARM LABORATORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECOND FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) WARM LABORATORY ROOM, DECONTAMINATION ROOM, HOT CHEMISTRY LABORATORY, AND MULTICURIE CELL ROOM. INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105066. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-103. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich, K.A.; Gray, C.E.

    1991-08-01

    This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned.

  8. Analytical study of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The design specifications of the research laboratory as a Spacelab facility are discussed along with the types of planned experiments. These include cloud formation, freezing and scavenging, and electrical phenomena. A summary of the program conferences is included.

  9. INTEGRATING BIOANALYTICAL CAPABILITY IN AN ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product is a book chapter which is an introductory and summary chapter for the reference work "Immunoassays and Other Bianalytical Techniques" to be published by CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Books. The chapter provides analytical chemists information on new techni...

  10. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical…

  11. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical…

  12. 40 CFR 141.852 - Analytical methods and laboratory certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... only determine the presence or absence of total coliforms and E. coli; a determination of density is...). (5) Systems must conduct total coliform and E. coli analyses in accordance with one of the analytical... E. coli and other Total Coliforms in Water,” August 28, 2009. (ii) (4) EMD Millipore (a division of...

  13. 40 CFR 141.852 - Analytical methods and laboratory certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... only determine the presence or absence of total coliforms and E. coli; a determination of density is...). (5) Systems must conduct total coliform and E. coli analyses in accordance with one of the analytical... E. coli and other Total Coliforms in Water,” August 28, 2009. (ii) (4) EMD Millipore (a division of...

  14. Complexometric Titration of Zinc: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, S. G.

    1997-12-01

    Complexometric titrations with EDTA have traditionally been performed in undergraduate analytical chemistry courses to determine the calcium or magnesium content of water. These titrations are performed at a basic pH, where the formation constants of Ca-EDTA and Mg-EDTA complexes are high. These types of problems are well-treated in the analytical chemistry textbooks. In contrast, treatment of metal ions whose EDTA complexes occur significantly at low pH (e.g., Zn2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Al3+) is sparse. An incorrect conclusion can be reached by the student that practical EDTA titrations are only performed at high pH. In addition, widening the window of possible metal ions for complexometric titration affords the possibility of analyzing real world products, such as the cold lozenges discussed in the article.

  15. Integration of Environmental Analytical Chemistry with Environmental Law: The Development of a Problem-Based Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancilla, Devon A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an undergraduate level problem-based analytical chemistry laboratory course integrated with an environmental law course. Aims to develop an understanding among students on the use of environmental indicators for environmental evaluation. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  16. Integration of Environmental Analytical Chemistry with Environmental Law: The Development of a Problem-Based Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancilla, Devon A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an undergraduate level problem-based analytical chemistry laboratory course integrated with an environmental law course. Aims to develop an understanding among students on the use of environmental indicators for environmental evaluation. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  17. Evaluation of analytical errors in a clinical chemistry laboratory: a 3 year experience.

    PubMed

    Sakyi, As; Laing, Ef; Ephraim, Rk; Asibey, Of; Sadique, Ok

    2015-01-01

    Proficient laboratory service is the cornerstone of modern healthcare systems and has an impact on over 70% of medical decisions on admission, discharge, and medications. In recent years, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of errors in laboratory practice and their possible negative impact on patient outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed data spanning a period of 3 years on analytical errors observed in our laboratory. The data covered errors over the whole testing cycle including pre-, intra-, and post-analytical phases and discussed strategies pertinent to our settings to minimize their occurrence. We described the occurrence of pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors observed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital clinical biochemistry laboratory during a 3-year period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. Data were analyzed with Graph Pad Prism 5(GraphPad Software Inc. CA USA). A total of 589,510 tests was performed on 188,503 outpatients and hospitalized patients. The overall error rate for the 3 years was 4.7% (27,520/58,950). Pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors contributed 3.7% (2210/58,950), 0.1% (108/58,950), and 0.9% (512/58,950), respectively. The number of tests reduced significantly over the 3-year period, but this did not correspond with a reduction in the overall error rate (P = 0.90) along with the years. Analytical errors are embedded within our total process setup especially pre-analytical and post-analytical phases. Strategic measures including quality assessment programs for staff involved in pre-analytical processes should be intensified.

  18. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of general analytical factors in veterinary laboratories.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathy P; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Vap, Linda M; Getzy, Karen M; Evans, Ellen W; Harr, Kendal E

    2010-09-01

    Owing to lack of governmental regulation of veterinary laboratory performance, veterinarians ideally should demonstrate a commitment to self-monitoring and regulation of laboratory performance from within the profession. In response to member concerns about quality management in veterinary laboratories, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) formed a Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards (QAS) committee in 1996. This committee recently published updated and peer-reviewed Quality Assurance Guidelines on the ASVCP website. The Quality Assurance Guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports on 1) general analytic factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons, 2) hematology and hemostasis, and 3) clinical chemistry, endocrine assessment, and urinalysis. This report documents recommendations for control of general analytical factors within veterinary clinical laboratories and is based on section 2.1 (Analytical Factors Important In Veterinary Clinical Pathology, General) of the newly revised ASVCP QAS Guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimum guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing. It is hoped that these guidelines will provide a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts.

  19. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  20. Merging Old and New: An Instrumentation-Based Introductory Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    An instrumentation-based laboratory curriculum combining traditional unknown analyses with student-designed projects has been developed for an introductory analytical chemistry course. In the first half of the course, students develop laboratory skills and instrumental proficiency by rotating through six different instruments performing…

  1. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  2. Merging Old and New: An Instrumentation-Based Introductory Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    An instrumentation-based laboratory curriculum combining traditional unknown analyses with student-designed projects has been developed for an introductory analytical chemistry course. In the first half of the course, students develop laboratory skills and instrumental proficiency by rotating through six different instruments performing…

  3. The implementation of a system for managing analytical quality in networked laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jassam, Nuthar; Lindsay, Chris; Harrison, Kevin; Thompson, Douglas; Bosomworth, Mike P; Barth, Julian H

    2011-03-01

    In a network of laboratories analytical variability between instruments, even of the same type, may exist for reasons beyond the control of laboratory staff. Controlling variability is a prerequisite for the application of shared reference ranges and for ensuring the transferability of patient test results. Controlling variability requires a robust, non-conventional quality system to detect poor performance of analysers that are geographically distant. Essential to this quality system is a set of well-defined quality specifications. The approach used in our study started with (1) selection of a model for quality specifications based on biological variation; the 'three-level model' (TLM) was selected on the basis of its flexibility to accommodate various levels of analytical performance; (2) determination of the performance characteristics of the 71 analytes measured in core biochemistry in terms of imprecision and bias; (3) defining quality requirements in the form of imprecision, bias and total error for 71 analytes measured routinely in core biochemistry; and (4) developing software to assist a consistent wide application of the quality specifications and to monitor analytical indices to the common quality specifications. In this paper we describe how we have implemented this model across our network. Forty-six of the 71 analytes in our core laboratory repertoire were allocated to the TLM. We were able to demonstrate equivalence of results on all analysers, for 42 out of 46 analytes allocated to this model. We propose that other networked laboratories should investigate the suitability of this quality system for use in their network.

  4. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 3. Implementing Good Laboratory Practice in the Analytical Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Pires, Amanda; Fazzino, Lisa; Fransen, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratories submitting experimental results to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in support of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) nonclinical laboratory studies must conduct such work in compliance with the GLP regulations. To consistently meet these requirements, lab managers employ a "divide…

  5. 77 FR 16551 - Standards for Private Laboratory Analytical Packages and Introduction to Laboratory Related...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... Introduction to Laboratory Related Portions of the Food Modernization Safety Act for Private Laboratory... and Introduction to Laboratory Related Portions of the Food Modernization Safety Act for Private... and an introduction to sections of the Food Safety Modernization Act of January 6, 2011, that...

  6. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 3. Implementing Good Laboratory Practice in the Analytical Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Pires, Amanda; Fazzino, Lisa; Fransen, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratories submitting experimental results to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in support of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) nonclinical laboratory studies must conduct such work in compliance with the GLP regulations. To consistently meet these requirements, lab managers employ a "divide…

  7. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

  8. Analytical performances of food microbiology laboratories - critical analysis of 7 years of proficiency testing results.

    PubMed

    Abdel Massih, M; Planchon, V; Polet, M; Dierick, K; Mahillon, J

    2016-02-01

    Based on the results of 19 food microbiology proficiency testing (PT) schemes, this study aimed to assess the laboratory performances, to highlight the main sources of unsatisfactory analytical results and to suggest areas of improvement. The 2009-2015 results of REQUASUD and IPH PT, involving a total of 48 laboratories, were analysed. On average, the laboratories failed to detect or enumerate foodborne pathogens in 3·0% of the tests. Thanks to a close collaboration with the PT participants, the causes of outliers could be identified in 74% of the cases. The main causes of erroneous PT results were either pre-analytical (handling of the samples, timing of analysis), analytical (unsuitable methods, confusion of samples, errors in colony counting or confirmation) or postanalytical mistakes (calculation and encoding of results). PT schemes are a privileged observation post to highlight analytical problems, which would otherwise remain unnoticed. In this perspective, this comprehensive study of PT results provides insight into the sources of systematic errors encountered during the analyses. This study draws the attention of the laboratories to the main causes of analytical errors and suggests practical solutions to avoid them, in an educational purpose. The observations support the hypothesis that regular participation to PT, when followed by feed-back and appropriate corrective actions, can play a key role in quality improvement and provide more confidence in the laboratory testing results. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27.

  10. [The procedure of phlebotomy for clinical laboratory studies: perspectives of development of pre-analytical stage of laboratory process].

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaia, S N; Khorovskaia, L A; Petrova, N G

    2014-08-01

    The study was carried out to analyze issues occurring under implementation by medical nurses the procedure of phlebotomy for laboratory studies in Russia and to compare with international experience for enhancing quality of pre-analytical stage of laboratory studies. The technique of sociological survey was applied. The sampling included 123 medical nurses of the Northern West federal okrug and the Ural federal okrug. The questionnaire referred to issues of application of phlebotomy. The results were compared to data of international survey concerning the pre-analytical stage of laboratory studies carried out by the working group of the European Federation of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine (EFLM WG-PA). In Russia, the most frequent issues under blood drawing were dubbed analyses (80.4%), out-of-the-way placement of vein (39.9%), blood sampling in newborns and children aged up to 1 year (10.5%), casual pricks of needle (28%). The study established that among causes of repeated analyses were hemolysis (79.1%), "mixed up" samples of patients (15.7%), broken test tubes (5.2%). The survey determined that 19.6% of medical nurses had no training in blood drawing from vein for clinical laboratory studies. The international survey demonstrated that not all countries had both training programs on phlebotomy and national guidelines on its implementation. This issue requires an additional study. The training and educational programs for medical personnel occupied with phlebotomy are to be developed. The national standards are to be developed harmonized with international recommendations on implementation of this procedure to enhance quality of pre-analytical stage of laboratory studies.

  11. CheMin: A Definitive Mineralogy Instrument in the Analytical Laboratory of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL '09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chiprera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    An important goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL 09) mission is the determination of definitive mineralogy and chemical composition. CheMin is a miniature X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that has been chosen for the analytical laboratory of MSL. CheMin utilizes a miniature microfocus source cobalt X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray fluorescence spectra from powdered or crushed samples. A diagrammatic view of the instrument is shown.

  12. A European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences: Challenges and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, C.; Funiciello, F.; Meredith, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Scarlato, P.; Troll, V. R.; Willingshofer, E.; EPOS-WG6

    2012-04-01

    The EU policy for scientific research in the third millennium is that of a coordinated approach to support and develop continent-scale research infrastructures. The vision is to integrate the existing research infrastructures in order to increase the accessibility and usability of multidisciplinary data, enhancing worldwide interoperability by establishing a leading integrated European infrastructure and services. Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), a research infrastructure and e-science for data and observatories on earthquakes, volcanoes, surface dynamics and tectonics. Within the existing core elements to be integrated in the EPOS cyber-infrastructure are: geographical distributed observational infrastructures (seismic and geodetic networks), observatories for multidisciplinary local data acquisition (e.g., volcanoes, active fault-zone, geothermal and deep drilling experiments), and analytical facilities for data repositories and integration. The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). The Analytical and Experimental LaboratoriesGroup thus aims to link experimental, analytical, and analogue laboratories into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, including palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling.The WG6 has set a short term goal that has now been achieved, being a review of operational laboratory facilities in the community and the creation of a database from that information. Currently 12 countries (Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, United Kingdom) are included in the database. As long-term goals, the WG6 aims to create mechanisms and procedures for easy access to laboratory facilities, turning small

  13. Importance of implementing an analytical quality control system in a core laboratory.

    PubMed

    Marques-Garcia, F; Garcia-Codesal, M F; Caro-Narros, M R; Contreras-SanFeliciano, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the clinical laboratory is to provide useful information for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of disease. The laboratory should ensure the quality of extra-analytical and analytical process, based on set criteria. To do this, it develops and implements a system of internal quality control, designed to detect errors, and compare its data with other laboratories, through external quality control. In this way it has a tool to detect the fulfillment of the objectives set, and in case of errors, allowing corrective actions to be made, and ensure the reliability of the results. This article sets out to describe the design and implementation of an internal quality control protocol, as well as its periodical assessment intervals (6 months) to determine compliance with pre-determined specifications (Stockholm Consensus(1)). A total of 40 biochemical and 15 immunochemical methods were evaluated using three different control materials. Next, a standard operation procedure was planned to develop a system of internal quality control that included calculating the error of the analytical process, setting quality specifications, and verifying compliance. The quality control data were then statistically depicted as means, standard deviations, and coefficients of variation, as well as systematic, random, and total errors. The quality specifications were then fixed and the operational rules to apply in the analytical process were calculated. Finally, our data were compared with those of other laboratories through an external quality assurance program. The development of an analytical quality control system is a highly structured process. This should be designed to detect errors that compromise the stability of the analytical process. The laboratory should review its quality indicators, systematic, random and total error at regular intervals, in order to ensure that they are meeting pre-determined specifications, and if not, apply the appropriate corrective actions

  14. Minimum Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Pit Manufacturing at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Ming M.; Leasure, Craig S.

    1998-08-01

    Analytical chemistry is one of several capabilities necessary for executing the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analytical chemistry capabilities reside in the Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility and Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These analytical capabilities support plutonium recovery operations, plutonium metallurgy, and waste management. Analytical chemistry capabilities at both nuclear facilities are currently being configured to support pit manufacturing. This document summarizes the minimum analytical chemistry capabilities required to sustain pit manufacturing at LANL. By the year 2004, approximately $16 million will be required to procure analytical instrumentation to support pit manufacturing. In addition, $8.5 million will be required to procure glovebox enclosures. An estimated 50% increase in costs has been included for installation of analytical instruments and glovebox enclosures. However, no general and administrative (G and A) taxes have been included. If an additional 42.5/0 G and A tax were to be incurred, approximately $35 million would be required over the next five years to prepare analytical chemistry to support a 50-pit-per-year manufacturing capability by the year 2004.

  15. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  16. Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Insecticides from Juice: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Samantha A.; Hunter, Ronald E., Jr.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P. Barry

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to target analytical chemistry students and to teach them about insecticides in food, sample extraction, and cleanup. Micro concentrations (sub-microgram/mL levels) of 12 insecticides spiked into apple juice samples are extracted using liquid-liquid extraction and cleaned up using either a primary-secondary…

  17. Understanding Fluorescence Measurements through a Guided-Inquiry and Discovery Experiment in Advanced Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczek-Vera, Grazyna; Salin, Eric Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on fluorescence spectroscopy suitable for an advanced analytical laboratory is presented. Its conceptual development used a combination of the expository and discovery styles. The "learn-as-you-go" and direct "hands-on" methodology applied ensures an active role for a student in the process of visualization and discovery of concepts.…

  18. A Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate the Theory and Practice of Analytical Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Brian A.; Youso, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    In analytical chemistry classes, the importance of gathering a proper sample for analysis of bulk materials is often addressed only briefly or not at all. Although a number of classroom and laboratory exercises have been developed to illustrate factors that impact error introduced by sampling, they generally do not demonstrate the main goal of…

  19. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  20. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  1. Understanding Fluorescence Measurements through a Guided-Inquiry and Discovery Experiment in Advanced Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczek-Vera, Grazyna; Salin, Eric Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on fluorescence spectroscopy suitable for an advanced analytical laboratory is presented. Its conceptual development used a combination of the expository and discovery styles. The "learn-as-you-go" and direct "hands-on" methodology applied ensures an active role for a student in the process of visualization and discovery of concepts.…

  2. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  3. Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Insecticides from Juice: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Samantha A.; Hunter, Ronald E., Jr.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P. Barry

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to target analytical chemistry students and to teach them about insecticides in food, sample extraction, and cleanup. Micro concentrations (sub-microgram/mL levels) of 12 insecticides spiked into apple juice samples are extracted using liquid-liquid extraction and cleaned up using either a primary-secondary…

  4. A Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate the Theory and Practice of Analytical Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Brian A.; Youso, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    In analytical chemistry classes, the importance of gathering a proper sample for analysis of bulk materials is often addressed only briefly or not at all. Although a number of classroom and laboratory exercises have been developed to illustrate factors that impact error introduced by sampling, they generally do not demonstrate the main goal of…

  5. Analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator with permanent magnet fluxbiasing is presented. An AMCD consists of a spinning annular rim which is suspended by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic spin motor. The actuator is treated as a lumped-parameter electromechanical system in the development of the model.

  6. Analytical Validation of Androgen Receptor Splice Variant 7 Detection in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Riel, Stacy L; Haley, Lisa; Lu, Changxue; Chen, Yan; Silberstein, John; Zhu, Yezi; Zheng, Gang; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Gocke, Christopher D; Partin, Alan W; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Luo, Jun; Eshleman, James R

    2017-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) often are treated with drugs that target the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain. Constitutively active AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7) lacks the ligand-binding domain and, if detected in circulating tumor cells, may be associated with resistance to these agents. We validated an AR-V7 assay in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Circulating tumor cells were isolated, and mRNA was reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Real-time quantitative PCR amplification of reference transcripts (beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), prostate-specific transcripts (prostate-specific membrane antigen, prostate-specific antigen, and AR-full length), and AR-V7 was performed. Specimens for validation included an AR-V7 expressing prostate cancer (LNCaP95), 38 peripheral blood controls, and 21 blood samples from CRPC patients. The assay detected as few as five LNCaP95 cells spiked into peripheral blood, showing high analytical sensitivity. Multiple inter-run and intrarun replicates of LNCaP95 cell line experiments yielded similar cycle threshold values for all genes, showing high analytical precision (AR-V7 cycle threshold CV of 0.67%). All 38 healthy control samples were negative for AR-V7, showing high diagnostic specificity (100%). The diagnostic accuracy was confirmed by concurrent testing of 21 CRPC samples in the research laboratory and the clinical diagnostic laboratory: concordance in AR-V7 status was achieved in all cases (positive in 4, negative in 17) (100% accuracy). This first validated clinical assay detects the AR-V7 with high analytical sensitivity, precision, specificity, and accuracy.

  7. Scoring of solvents used in analytical laboratories by their toxicological and exposure hazards.

    PubMed

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    Green analytical chemistry, although a well recognised concept, still lacks reliable environmental impact assessment procedures. This article describes scoring of solvents, frequently used in analytical laboratories, with CHEMS-1 model. The model uses toxicological and exposure data to calculate hazard values related to the utilisation of solvents. The original model was modified to incorporate hazards related to the volatility of chemicals. The scoring of hazard values showed that polar solvents are less hazardous. The scoring results were applied to assess the total hazard values in terms of solvent consumption. The hazard scores calculated for each chemical were multiplied by the volumes of solvent used during the analytical procedure. The results show that calculation of total procedural hazard values is valuable in the green analytical chemistry assessment procedure. Moreover, the assessment procedure can be combined with other procedural greenness assessment methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Automating the Analytical Laboratories Section, Lewis Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, W. G.; Barton, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized automation of the Analytical Laboratories Section at NASA's Lewis Research Center was considered. Since that laboratory's duties are not routine, the automation goals were set with that in mind. Four instruments were selected as the most likely automation candidates: an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, an emission spectrometer, an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, and an X-ray diffraction unit. Two options for computer automation were described: a time-shared central computer and a system with microcomputers for each instrument connected to a central computer. A third option, presented for future planning, expands the microcomputer version. Costs and benefits for each option were considered. It was concluded that the microcomputer version best fits the goals and duties of the laboratory and that such an automted system is needed to meet the laboratory's future requirements.

  9. The Efficacy of Problem-Based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking…

  10. The Efficacy of Problem-Based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking…

  11. Aflatoxin testing in peanuts: a proficiency assessment scheme for Chinese analytic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Bao, Zhenmin; Zhang, Yibing; Liang, Chengzhu; Lu, Ning; Liu, Xintong; Jin, Ying; Ze, Pei Jun; Ge, Manli; Tian, Ling

    2009-01-01

    This national assessment program was established by the China National Accreditation Service for Conformity Assessment (CNAS) to evaluate the aflatoxin-testing proficiency of a cross-section of Chinese laboratories. The Shan Dong Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of China conducted the assessment according to ISO 13528:2005 (E) and the International Harmonized Protocol for Proficiency Testing. The 77 laboratories that participated in the study had either been previously accredited by CNAS or were candidates for CNAS accreditation. The analytic samples for this testing scheme were prepared from naturally contaminated peanuts and diluted to approximately 10 microg/kg for aflatoxin B1 and 18 microg/kg for total aflatoxins. The Ss/sigma p test (with a required result of Ss < or = 0.3 sigma p) was used to evaluate the homogeneity of the test samples; sample stability was confirmed with a t-test. The performance of each laboratory was designated by a z-score that was calculated using robust statistics. The robust mean of the participants' results in this study was nearly coincident with the median. A modified Horwitz equation was used to determine the standard deviation. The study compared analytic results obtained by 5 different methods: high-performance liquid chromatography (LC), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, thin-layer chromatography, fluorometry, and LC with tandem mass spectrometry. A satisfactory performance rating required z-scores between -2 and +2 for the target analytes. Of the 73 laboratories that reported results for aflatoxin B1, 66 (90.4%) performed satisfactorily. Of 32 laboratories that reported total aflatoxins (B1 + B2 + G1 + G2), 30 (93.8%) performed satisfactorily. Laboratories whose performance ratings were questionable or unsatisfactory were re-evaluated in a second interlaboratory comparison.

  12. Analytical Laboratory Science on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Odyssey Missions orbital maps of near surface ice abundance using neutron spectroscopy (Boynton et al., 2002), the Mars Exploration Rover s confirmation of aqueous processing (Squyres et al., 2004), and the Mars Express detailed infrared maps of specific mineral types that were likely formed in aqueous environments (Bibring et al., 2005) have dramatically expanded our tool set for understanding of aqueous processes on Mars. The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory is designed to extend the "follow the water" crosscutting theme of the Mars Exploration Program toward an even more detailed exploration of habitability - the potential of the Mars environment to support life. The next steps in understanding the habitability of Mars are a more detailed in situ analysis of the chemical state of elements such as C, H, O, N, S, P, Ca, and Fe that are essential for terrestrial life. Of particular interest are experiments that establish definitive mineralogy for a wider range of compounds and those that implement a more comprehensive and sensitive search for organic molecules both in the atmosphere and in surface or near surface rocks, soils, and fines. The recent reports of atmospheric methane in the Martian atmosphere make the organics exploration even more compelling. The substantial mass and power resources of MSL combined with its mobility and powerful sample acquisition and processing tools will enable it to locate a variety of near-surface samples and analyze these in some detail. NASA is presently considering the possibility of landing a second MSL rover in 2011.

  13. [Problems in organization of work at laboratories and metrological provision for an analytical process].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, T I

    2009-08-01

    In the organization of a present-day laboratory, there are 8 fundamental elements that provide its activity and are integrated into the uniform system: safety; the correct organization of work; the range of studies; a current material-and-technical basis; the metrological provision of diagnostic and analytical processes; manpower; and adequate sanitary-and-hygienic and antiepidemic measures. The problems of the laboratory's activity are outlined in the light of implementation of Federal Law on the Uniformity of Measurements under No. 102 - dated June 26, 2008, and ways of their solution are proposed.

  14. Integrating bio-inorganic and analytical chemistry into an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy exercise as part of a five-week long laboratory-based project on the purification of myoglobin from beef. Students were required to prepare samples for chemical analysis, operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, critically evaluate their iron data, and integrate these data into a study of myoglobin.

  15. [Proficiency testing for chemical analytical laboratories--general principles concerning organization and assessment of results].

    PubMed

    Ludwicki, J K; Góralczyk, K; Czaja, K; Struciński, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to promote in Poland the effective response to the international food regulations and to enhance the ability of laboratories in proving their analytical quality assurance, some general guidelines for proficiency testing have been presented according to the internationally recognised protocol (IUPAC/ISO/AOAC The International Harmonized Protocol for Proficiency Testing). The objectives of proficiency testing and its importance for accreditation for analytical laboratories were also reviewed with the special emphasis given to those dealing with food analysis. The organization of interlaboratory trials and methods for statistical treatment of results were also described, as well as reporting of results and their statistical evaluation. The proficiency testing according to the above described rules are routinely performed by the Department of Environmental Toxicology of the National Institute of Hygiene for organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in food.

  16. Quality Assurance Baseline Assessment Report to Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R. A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes observations that were made during a Quality Assurance (QA) Baseline Assessment of the Nuclear Materials Technology Analytical Chemistry Group (NMT-1). The Quality and Planning personnel, for NMT-1, are spending a significant amount of time transitioning out of their roles of environmental oversight into production oversight. A team from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Defense Program Environmental Surety Program performed an assessment of the current status of the QA Program. Several Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry procedures were reviewed, as well as Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP) QA documents. Checklists were developed and the assessment was performed according to an Implementation Work Plan, INEEL/EXT-98-00740.

  17. Analytical progresses of the International Olympic Committee and World Anti-Doping Agency Olympic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulos, Costas; Saugy, Martial; Giraud, Sylvain; Robinson, Neil; Alsayrafi, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    The Summer Olympic Games constitute the biggest concentration of human sports and activities in a particular place and time since 776 BCE, when the written history of the Olympic Games in Olympia began. Summer and Winter Olympic anti-doping laboratories, accredited by the International Olympic Committee in the past and the World Anti-Doping Agency in the present times, acquire worldwide interest to apply all new analytical advancements in the fight against doping in sports, hoping that this major human event will not become dirty by association with this negative phenomenon. This article summarizes the new analytical progresses, technologies and knowledge used by the Olympic laboratories, which for the vast majority of them are, eventually, incorporated into routine anti-doping analysis.

  18. Computerized real-time quality control program for analytical chemistry laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, M.S.; Floyd, M.A.; Morrow, R.W.

    1985-10-01

    A unique computer program has been developed for complete quality control/quality assurance of the operation and statistical control of the testing in the analytical laboratory. The system operates similar to a scanner on a production line with effective checkpoints and furnishes immediate feedback by automatically generated mail messages to appropriate personnel when any non-conformance is encountered. Corrective action is required by the technician prior to proceeding with the analysis.

  19. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  20. Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases of laboratory testing: Why and how.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2017-07-01

    An important priority in the current healthcare scenario should be to address errors in laboratory testing, which account for a significant proportion of diagnostic errors. Efforts made in laboratory medicine to enhance the diagnostic process have been directed toward improving technology, greater volumes and more accurate laboratory tests being achieved, but data collected in the last few years highlight the need to re-evaluate the total testing process (TTP) as the unique framework for improving quality and patient safety. Valuable quality indicators (QIs) and extra-analytical performance specifications are required for guidance in improving all TTP steps. Yet in literature no data are available on extra-analytical performance specifications based on outcomes, and nor is it possible to set any specification using calculations involving biological variability. The collection of data representing the state-of-the-art based on quality indicators is, therefore, underway. The adoption of a harmonized set of QIs, a common data collection and standardised reporting method is mandatory as it will not only allow the accreditation of clinical laboratories according to the International Standard, but also assure guidance for promoting improvement processes and guaranteeing quality care to patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of analytical methodologies to assess recalcitrant pesticide bioremediation in biobeds at laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Anisleidy; Niell, Silvina; Cerdeiras, M Pía; Heinzen, Horacio; Cesio, María Verónica

    2016-06-01

    To assess recalcitrant pesticide bioremediation it is necessary to gradually increase the complexity of the biological system used in order to design an effective biobed assembly. Each step towards this effective biobed design needs a suitable, validated analytical methodology that allows a correct evaluation of the dissipation and bioconvertion. Low recovery yielding methods could give a false idea of a successful biodegradation process. To address this situation, different methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of endosulfan, its main three metabolites, and chlorpyrifos in increasingly complex matrices where the bioconvertor basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis could grow. The matrices were culture media, bran, and finally a laboratory biomix composed of bran, peat and soil. The methodology for the analysis of the first evaluated matrix has already been reported. The methodologies developed for the other two systems are presented in this work. The targeted analytes were extracted from fungi growing over bran in semisolid media YNB (Yeast Nitrogen Based) with acetonitrile using shaker assisted extraction, The salting-out step was performed with MgSO4 and NaCl, and the extracts analyzed by GC-ECD. The best methodology was fully validated for all the evaluated analytes at 1 and 25mgkg(-1) yielding recoveries between 72% and 109% and RSDs <11% in all cases. The application of this methodology proved that A. biennis is able to dissipate 94% of endosulfan and 87% of chlorpyrifos after 90 days. Having assessed that A. biennis growing over bran can metabolize the studied pesticides, the next step faced was the development and validation of an analytical procedure to evaluate the analytes in a laboratory scale biobed composed of 50% of bran, 25% of peat and 25% of soil together with fungal micelium. From the different procedures assayed, only ultrasound assisted extraction with ethyl acetate allowed recoveries between 80% and 110% with RSDs

  2. Development of a Certified Low-Level Waste Stream from Analytical Laboratory Operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F; Drake, J A; Gallagher, P J

    2005-01-14

    Chemistry and Materials Science Environmental Services (CES) is LLNL's on-site environmental analytical laboratory, analyzing approximately 2500 samples annually generally for waste characterization purposes. Due to the lack of process knowledge for analyzed samples, the waste produced by CES has traditionally been characterized on a ''worst-case'' basis as RCRA-hazardous mixed waste. By instituting rigorous ''up-front'' waste characterization, including segregation of acutely/extremely hazardous materials, utilizing regulatory exemptions, and developing a novel radiological characterization strategy, CES was able to receive approval for a certified LLW waste stream, adequately characterized for disposal at the Nevada Test Site. In the 10 months of operating history, CES has diverted 33% of its waste (by mass) from mixed to LLW. This will result in significant cost savings and reduction in waste re-handling/personnel exposure.

  3. Practical solution for control of the pre-analytical phase in decentralized clinical laboratories for meeting the requirements of the medical laboratory accreditation standard DIN EN ISO 15189.

    PubMed

    Vacata, Vladimir; Jahns-Streubel, Gerlinde; Baldus, Mirjana; Wood, William Graham

    2007-01-01

    This report was written in response to the article by Wood published recently in this journal. It describes a practical solution to the problems of controlling the pre-analytical phase in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. As an indicator of quality in the pre-analytical phase of sample processing, a target analyte was chosen which is sensitive to delay in centrifugation and/or analysis. The results of analyses of the samples sent by satellite medical practitioners were compared with those from an on-site hospital laboratory with a controllable optimized pre-analytical phase. The aim of the comparison was: (a) to identify those medical practices whose mean/median sample values significantly deviate from those of the control situation in the hospital laboratory due to the possible problems in the pre-analytical phase; (b) to aid these laboratories in the process of rectifying these problems. A Microsoft Excel-based Pre-Analytical Survey tool (PAS tool) has been developed which addresses the above mentioned problems. It has been tested on serum potassium which is known to be sensitive to delay and/or irregularities in sample treatment. The PAS tool has been shown to be one possibility for improving the quality of the analyses by identifying the sources of problems within the pre-analytical phase, thus allowing them to be rectified. Additionally, the PAS tool has an educational value and can also be adopted for use in other decentralized laboratories.

  4. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Parrado, G. Cañón, Y.; Peña, M. Sierra, O. Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C. Orozco, J.

    2016-07-07

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  5. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  6. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    PubMed

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  7. A set up of a modern analytical laboratory for wastewaters from pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Natalia; Dahl, Olli

    2007-08-01

    The introduction of analytical techniques allowing rapid, selective, sensitive, and reliable determination of aqueous pollutants is of crucial importance for the protection of the environment. This critical review summarizes the advanced analytical techniques suggested over the last ten years together with already established methods, and evaluates whether they are fit for wastewater quality assessment considering the area of application, interferences, limit of detection, calibration function, and precision. The key parameters of wastewater quality assessment are: total organic carbon (TOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organochlorines (AOX), nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and toxicity. Chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, photocatalytic oxidation with semiconductor nanofilms and atomic emission spectrometry, optical fibre sensors and chemiluminescence, amperometric mediated biosensors and microbial fuel cells, respirometry and bioluminescence measurements are just part of the proposed wastewater analyst's toolkit. The diversity of fundamental phenomena and the captivating elegance of interdisciplinary applications involved in the development of wastewater analytical techniques should attract the interest of a wide scientific audience including analytical chemists, chemical physicists, microbiologists and environmentalists. To conclude, we suggest a laboratory set up for the analysis of wastewaters from the pulp and paper industry.

  8. Demonstrating Chemical and Analytical Concepts in the Undergraduate Laboratory Using Capillary Electrophoresis and Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Christopher P.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes instrumental analysis laboratory exercises that utilize capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography to demonstrate several analytical and chemical principles. Alkyl parabens (4-hydroxy alkyl benzoates), which are common ingredients in cosmetic formulations, are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic mobilities of the parabens can be explained on the basis of their relative size. 3-Hydroxy ethylbenzoate is also separated to demonstrate the effect of substituent position on the acid dissociation constant and the effect this has on electrophoretic mobility. Homologous series of alkyl benzoates and alkyl phthalates (common plasticizers) are separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography at four surfactant concentrations. This exercise demonstrates the separation mechanism of micellar electrokinetic chromatography, the concept of chromatographic phase ratio, and the concepts of micelle formation. A photodiode array detector is used in both exercises to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the detector and to demonstrate the effect of pH and substituent position on the spectra of the analytes.

  9. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  10. Pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation of the FOCUS4 personalised therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Richman, Susan D; Adams, Richard; Quirke, Phil; Butler, Rachel; Hemmings, Gemma; Chambers, Phil; Roberts, Helen; James, Michelle D; Wozniak, Sue; Bathia, Riya; Pugh, Cheryl; Maughan, Timothy; Jasani, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterisation of tumours is increasing personalisation of cancer therapy, tailored to an individual and their cancer. FOCUS4 is a molecularly stratified clinical trial for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. During an initial 16-week period of standard first-line chemotherapy, tumour tissue will undergo several molecular assays, with the results used for cohort allocation, then randomisation. Laboratories in Leeds and Cardiff will perform the molecular testing. The results of a rigorous pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation are presented and discussed. Wales Cancer Bank supplied FFPE tumour blocks from 97 mCRC patients with consent for use in further research. Both laboratories processed each sample according to an agreed definitive FOCUS4 laboratory protocol, reporting results directly to the MRC Trial Management Group for independent cross-referencing. Pyrosequencing analysis of mutation status at KRAS codons12/13/61/146, NRAS codons12/13/61, BRAF codon600 and PIK3CA codons542/545/546/1047, generated highly concordant results. Two samples gave discrepant results; in one a PIK3CA mutation was detected only in Leeds, and in the other, a PIK3CA mutation was only detected in Cardiff. pTEN and mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) resulting in 6/97 discordant results for pTEN and 5/388 for MMR, resolved upon joint review. Tumour heterogeneity was likely responsible for pyrosequencing discrepancies. The presence of signet-ring cells, necrosis, mucin, edge-effects and over-counterstaining influenced IHC discrepancies. Pre-trial assay analytical validation is essential to ensure appropriate selection of patients for targeted therapies. This is feasible for both mutation testing and immunohistochemical assays and must be built into the workup of such trials. ISRCTN90061564. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  11. Pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation of the FOCUS4 personalised therapy trial

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Susan D; Adams, Richard; Quirke, Phil; Butler, Rachel; Hemmings, Gemma; Chambers, Phil; Roberts, Helen; James, Michelle D; Wozniak, Sue; Bathia, Riya; Pugh, Cheryl; Maughan, Timothy; Jasani, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Molecular characterisation of tumours is increasing personalisation of cancer therapy, tailored to an individual and their cancer. FOCUS4 is a molecularly stratified clinical trial for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. During an initial 16-week period of standard first-line chemotherapy, tumour tissue will undergo several molecular assays, with the results used for cohort allocation, then randomisation. Laboratories in Leeds and Cardiff will perform the molecular testing. The results of a rigorous pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation are presented and discussed. Methods Wales Cancer Bank supplied FFPE tumour blocks from 97 mCRC patients with consent for use in further research. Both laboratories processed each sample according to an agreed definitive FOCUS4 laboratory protocol, reporting results directly to the MRC Trial Management Group for independent cross-referencing. Results Pyrosequencing analysis of mutation status at KRAS codons12/13/61/146, NRAS codons12/13/61, BRAF codon600 and PIK3CA codons542/545/546/1047, generated highly concordant results. Two samples gave discrepant results; in one a PIK3CA mutation was detected only in Leeds, and in the other, a PIK3CA mutation was only detected in Cardiff. pTEN and mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) resulting in 6/97 discordant results for pTEN and 5/388 for MMR, resolved upon joint review. Tumour heterogeneity was likely responsible for pyrosequencing discrepancies. The presence of signet-ring cells, necrosis, mucin, edge-effects and over-counterstaining influenced IHC discrepancies. Conclusions Pre-trial assay analytical validation is essential to ensure appropriate selection of patients for targeted therapies. This is feasible for both mutation testing and immunohistochemical assays and must be built into the workup of such trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN90061564. PMID:26350752

  12. Performance of laboratories measuring silica in the Proficiency Analytical Testing program.

    PubMed

    Shulman, S A; Groff, J H; Abell, M T

    1992-01-01

    A statistical study was performed on the results reported by laboratories analyzing silica samples in the first 101 rounds of the Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) program. Five laboratories participated in the first round of the PAT program in 1972, and participation grew to 130 laboratories before falling to 105 in Round 101. The laboratories use all three of the major methods of analysis: colorimetry, x-ray diffractometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The objectives of the study were to determine bias between methods, the variability associated with the methods, and any changes in bias or variability caused by a number of factors. The colorimetric method has consistently given the lowest results, particularly at higher loadings. X-ray diffractometry results were biased higher than infrared spectroscopy results during one period but not in the following period. Between the two periods, the procedures and materials used to prepare PAT samples changed in a number of ways, but the switch to quartz dust with a smaller particle size is a likely explanation for the bias difference. Generally, silica analyses have improved in precision over time, and this improvement has taken place for all three of the methods. The colorimetric method has shown the poorest precision of the three methods, but, unlike the differences in bias, the differences in precision have diminished considerably over time. Precision estimates from other studies were compared to those from this study to learn more about sources of variability. The largest source of variability, the differences between laboratories, was large even when laboratories used the same method, as they did in a collaborative study of silica methods.

  13. [Comparability study of analytical results between a group of clinical laboratories].

    PubMed

    Alsius-Serra, A; Ballbé-Anglada, M; López-Yeste, M L; Buxeda-Figuerola, M; Guillén-Campuzano, E; Juan-Pereira, L; Colomé-Mallolas, C; Caballé-Martín, I

    2015-01-01

    To describe the study of the comparability of the measurements levels of biological tests processed in biochemistry in Catlab's 4 laboratories. Quality requirements, coefficients of variation and total error (CV% and TE %) were established. Controls were verified with the precision requirements (CV%) in each test and each individual laboratory analyser. Fresh serum samples were used for the comparability study. The differences were analysed using a Microsoft Access® application that produces modified Bland-Altman plots. The comparison of 32 biological parameters that are performed in more than one laboratory and/or analyser generated 306 Bland-Altman graphs. Of these, 101 (33.1%) fell within the accepted range of values based on biological variability, and 205 (66.9%) required revision. Data were re-analysed based on consensus minimum specifications for analytical quality (consensus of the Asociación Española de Farmacéuticos Analistas (AEFA), the Sociedad Española de Bioquímica Clínica y Patología Molecular (SEQC), the Asociación Española de Biopatología Médica (AEBM) and the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Hemoterapia (SEHH), October 2013). With the new specifications, 170 comparisons (56%) fitted the requirements and 136 (44%) required additional review. Taking into account the number of points that exceeded the requirement, random errors, range of results in which discrepancies were detected, and range of clinical decision, it was shown that the 44% that required review were acceptable, and the 32 tests were comparable in all laboratories and analysers. The analysis of the results showed that the consensus requirements of the 4 scientific societies were met. However, each laboratory should aim to meet stricter criteria for total error. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Laboratory Techniques in Geology: Embedding Analytical Methods into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baedke, S. J.; Johnson, E. A.; Kearns, L. E.; Mazza, S. E.; Gazel, E.

    2014-12-01

    Paid summer REU experiences successfully engage undergraduate students in research and encourage them to continue to graduate school and scientific careers. However these programs only accommodate a limited number of students due to funding constraints, faculty time commitments, and limited access to needed instrumentation. At JMU, the Department of Geology and Environmental Science has embedded undergraduate research into the curriculum. Each student fulfilling a BS in Geology or a BA in Earth Science completes 3 credits of research, including a 1-credit course on scientific communication, 2 credits of research or internship, followed by a presentation of that research. Our department has successfully acquired many analytical instruments and now has an XRD, SEM/EDS, FTIR, handheld Raman, AA, ion chromatograph, and an IRMS. To give as many students as possible an overview to the scientific uses and operation methods for these instruments, we revived a laboratory methods course that includes theory and practical use of instrumentation at JMU, plus XRF sample preparation and analysis training at Virginia Tech during a 1-day field trip. In addition to practical training, projects included analytical concepts such as evaluating analytical vs. natural uncertainty, determining error on multiple measurements, signal-to-noise ratio, and evaluating data quality. State funding through the 4-VA program helped pay for analytical supplies and support for students to complete research projects over the summer or during the next academic year using instrumentation from the course. This course exemplifies an alternative path to broadening participation in undergraduate research and creating stronger partnerships between PUI's and research universities.

  15. Practical approach to archival and retrieval of analytical data in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hau, J; Fay, L B

    2001-07-01

    Today's analytical laboratory uses a large number of different instruments that are connected in networks. Together with increasing automation, data are produced at a rate that can easily reach gigabytes per month, which generates the problem of systematic archival. In addition, working under Good Laboratory Practice requires that archival of raw data be performed in such a way that they can be readily retrieved upon request, even years later. While systematic archival of data is already performed in most laboratories, it is the retrieval of saved information that is often far from straightforward. This paper describes a simple but systematic approach for both archival and retrieval of data files and related electronic documents. It consists of an unambiguous scheme for the naming of electronic files, an efficient backup strategy, a simple database holding information about any data acquired, and a convenient interface to this database that can be accessed from any workplace while assuring restricted access. The system is capable of handling several databases concurrently and is used in our facility to archive data from several workgroups. The use of freely available software such as the Linux operating system made it possible to implement a fast and stable solution at exceptionally low cost.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Transuranic Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, S.J.

    1996-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) specifies the quality of data necessary and the characterization techniques employed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to meet the objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) requirements. This QAPJP is written to conform with the requirements and guidelines specified in the QAPP and the associated documents referenced in the QAPP. This QAPJP is one of a set of five interrelated QAPjPs that describe the INEL Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP). Each of the five facilities participating in the TWCP has a QAPJP that describes the activities applicable to that particular facility. This QAPJP describes the roles and responsibilities of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) in the TWCP. Data quality objectives and quality assurance objectives are explained. Sample analysis procedures and associated quality assurance measures are also addressed; these include: sample chain of custody; data validation; usability and reporting; documentation and records; audits and 0385 assessments; laboratory QC samples; and instrument testing, inspection, maintenance and calibration. Finally, administrative quality control measures, such as document control, control of nonconformances, variances and QA status reporting are described.

  17. European specialist porphyria laboratories: diagnostic strategies, analytical quality, clinical interpretation, and reporting as assessed by an external quality assurance program.

    PubMed

    Aarsand, Aasne K; Villanger, Jørild H; Støle, Egil; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Marsden, Joanne; To-Figueras, Jordi; Badminton, Mike; Elder, George H; Sandberg, Sverre

    2011-11-01

    The porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders whose diagnosis depends on identification of specific patterns of porphyrin precursor and porphyrin accumulation in urine, blood, and feces. Diagnostic tests for porphyria are performed by specialized laboratories in many countries. Data regarding the analytical and diagnostic performance of these laboratories are scarce. We distributed 5 sets of multispecimen samples from different porphyria patients accompanied by clinical case histories to 18-21 European specialist porphyria laboratories/centers as part of a European Porphyria Network organized external analytical and postanalytical quality assessment (EQA) program. The laboratories stated which analyses they would normally have performed given the case histories and reported results of all porphyria-related analyses available, interpretative comments, and diagnoses. Reported diagnostic strategies initially showed considerable diversity, but the number of laboratories applying adequate diagnostic strategies increased during the study period. We found an average interlaboratory CV of 50% (range 12%-152%) for analytes in absolute concentrations. Result normalization by forming ratios to the upper reference limits did not reduce this variation. Sixty-five percent of reported results were within biological variation-based analytical quality specifications. Clinical interpretation of the obtained analytical results was accurate, and most laboratories established the correct diagnosis in all distributions. Based on a case-based EQA scheme, variations were apparent in analytical and diagnostic performance between European specialist porphyria laboratories. Our findings reinforce the use of EQA schemes as an essential tool to assess both analytical and diagnostic processes and thereby to improve patient care in rare diseases.

  18. Education: a microfluidic platform for university-level analytical chemistry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Greener, Jesse; Tumarkin, Ethan; Debono, Michael; Dicks, Andrew P; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2012-02-21

    We demonstrate continuous flow acid-base titration reactions as an educational microfluidic platform for undergraduate and graduate analytical chemistry courses. A series of equations were developed for controlling and predicting the results of acid-base neutralisation reactions conducted in a microfluidic format, including the combinations of (i) a strong base and a strong acid, (ii) a strong base and a weak acid, and (iii) a strong base and a multiprotic acid. Microfluidic titrations yielded excellent repeatability. The small experimental footprint is advantageous in crowded teaching laboratories, and it offers limited waste and exposure to potentially hazardous acids and bases. This platform will help promote the utilisation of microfluidics at an earlier stage of students' careers.

  19. ELISA and GC-MS as Teaching Tools in the Undergraduate Environmental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Ruth I.; Mathers, Dan T.; Mabury, Scott A.; Jorgensen, Greg M.

    2000-12-01

    An undergraduate experiment for the analysis of potential water pollutants is described. Students are exposed to two complementary techniques, ELISA and GC-MS, for the analysis of a water sample containing atrazine, desethylatrazine, and simazine. Atrazine was chosen as the target analyte because of its wide usage in North America and its utility for students to predict environmental degradation products. The water sample is concentrated using solid-phase extraction for GC-MS, or diluted and analyzed using a competitive ELISA test kit for atrazine. The nature of the water sample is such that students generally find that ELISA gives an artificially high value for the concentration of atrazine. Students gain an appreciation for problems associated with measuring pollutants in the aqueous environment: sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and ease of analysis. This undergraduate laboratory provides an opportunity for students to learn several new analysis and sample preparation techniques and to critically evaluate these methods in terms of when they are most useful.

  20. Analytical laboratory for the JET Active Gas Handling system - inactive commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Lasser, R.; Grieveson, B.; Hemmerich, J.L.; Stagg, R.; Walker, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Analytical Laboratory (AN) of the JET Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) is a central facility of the AGHS connected via small bore tubes to the other AGHS sub-systems. It offers various techniques such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, ionisation chambers, katharometers and calorimetry, to characterise the various gas samples. The detection ranges of the gas chromatograph for the six hydrogen molecules, helium, nitrogen and oxygen are from about 100ppm to 100% and for methane, higher hydrocarbons, CO and CO{sub 2} from about 10ppm to 100% with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionisation detector, respectively. Similar detection ranges can be achieved with the quadrupole and omegatron mass spectrometers. In addition tritiated hydrogen and hydrocarbons will be detected with flow proportional counter detectors and ionisation chambers down to the low ppm range. Inactive commissioning results will be presented. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Reengineering of Analytical Data Management for the Environmental Restoration Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.; Dorries, A.; Nasser, K.; Scherma, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the characterization, clean up, and monitoring of over 2,124 identified potential release sites (PRS). These PRSs have resulted from operations associated with weapons and energy related research which has been conducted at LANL since 1942. To accomplish mission goals, the ER Project conducts field sampling to determine possible types and levels of chemical contamination as well as their geographic extent. Last fiscal year, approximately 4000 samples were collected during ER Project field sampling campaigns. In the past, activities associated with field sampling such as sample campaign planning, paperwork, shipping and analytical laboratory tracking; verification and order fulfillment; validation and data quality assurance were performed by multiple groups working with a variety of software applications, databases and hard copy reports. This resulted in significant management and communication difficulties, data delivery delays, and inconsistent processes; it also represented a potential threat to overall data integrity. Creation of an organization, software applications and a data process that could provide for cost-effective management of the activities and data mentioned above became a management priority, resulting in a development of a reengineering task. This reengineering effort--currently nearing completion--has resulted in personnel reorganization, the development of a centralized data repository, and a powerful web-based sample management system that allows for an appreciably streamlined and more efficient data process. These changes have collectively cut data delivery times, allowed for larger volumes of samples and data to be handled with fewer personnel, and resulted in significant cost savings. This paper will provide a case study of the reengineering effort undertaken by the ER Project of its analytical data management process. It includes

  2. Analytical methods of the U.S. Geological Survey's New York District Water-Analysis Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; Olson, Mark L.; Waldron, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    The New York District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Troy, N.Y., operates a water-analysis laboratory for USGS watershed-research projects in the Northeast that require analyses of precipitation and of dilute surface water and soil water for major ions; it also provides analyses of certain chemical constituents in soils and soil gas samples.This report presents the methods for chemical analyses of water samples, soil-water samples, and soil-gas samples collected in wateshed-research projects. The introduction describes the general materials and technicques for each method and explains the USGS quality-assurance program and data-management procedures; it also explains the use of cross reference to the three most commonly used methods manuals for analysis of dilute waters. The body of the report describes the analytical procedures for (1) solution analysis, (2) soil analysis, and (3) soil-gas analysis. The methods are presented in alphabetical order by constituent. The method for each constituent is preceded by (1) reference codes for pertinent sections of the three manuals mentioned above, (2) a list of the method's applications, and (3) a summary of the procedure. The methods section for each constitutent contains the following categories: instrumentation and equipment, sample preservation and storage, reagents and standards, analytical procedures, quality control, maintenance, interferences, safety considerations, and references. Sufficient information is presented for each method to allow the resulting data to be appropriately used in environmental investigations.

  3. Integration of Environmental Analytical Chemistry with Environmental Law: The Development of a Problem-Based Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancilla, Devon A.

    2001-12-01

    Environmental chemists face difficult challenges related to generating, interpreting, and communicating complex chemical data in a manner understandable by nonchemists. For this reason, it is essential that environmental chemistry students develop the skills necessary not only to collect and interpret complex data sets, but also to communicate their findings in a credible manner in nonscientific forums. Key to this requirement is an understanding of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) elements used to support specific findings. This paper describes the development of a problem-based undergraduate environmental analytical chemistry laboratory and its integration with an undergraduate environmental law course. The course is designed to introduce students to the principles of performance-based analytical methods and the use of environmental indicators to perform environmental assessments. Conducting a series of chemical and toxicological tests, chemistry students perform an environmental assessment on the watershed of the mythical City of Rowan. Law students use these assessments to develop legal arguments under both the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act.

  4. Analytical methods of the U.S. Geological Survey's New York District Water-Analysis Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lincoln, Tricia A.; Horan-Ross, Debra A.; Olson, Mark L.; Waldron, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    The New York District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Troy, N.Y., operates a water-analysis laboratory for USGS watershed-research projects in the Northeast that require analyses of precipitation and of dilute surface water and soil water for major ions; it also provides analyses of certain chemical constituents in soils and soil gas samples. This report presents the methods for chemical analyses of water samples, soil-water samples, and soil-gas samples collected in wateshed-research projects. The introduction describes the general materials and technicques for eachmethod and explains the USGS quality-assurance program and data-management procedures; it also explains the use of cross reference to the three most commonly used methods manuals for analysis of dilute waters. The body of the report describes the analytical procedures for (1) solution analysis, (2) soil analysis, and (3) soil-gas analysis. The methods are presented in alphabetical order by constituent. The method for each constituent is preceded by (1) reference codes for pertinent sections of the three manuals mentioned above, (2) a list of the method's applications, and (3) a summary of the procedure. The methods section for each constitutent contains the following categories: instrumentation and equipment, sample preservation and storage, reagents and standards, analytical procedures, quality control, maintenance, interferences, safety considerations, and references. Sufficient information is presented for each method to allow the resulting data to be appropriately used in environmental samples.

  5. Ensuring comparability of data generated by multiple analytical laboratories for environmental decision making at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.; Campbell, B.A.; Danahy, R.J.; Dugan, T.A.; Tomlinson, F.K.

    1994-09-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility located 17 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. From 1952 until 1989, the Fernald site provided high-purity uranium metal products to support US defense programs. In 1989 the mission of Fernald changed from one of uranium production to one of environmental restoration. At Fernald, multiple functional programs require analytical data. Inorganic and organic data for these programs are currently generated by seven laboratories, while radiochemical data are being obtained from six laboratories. Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) programs have been established to help ensure comparability of data generated by multiple laboratories at different times. The quality assurance program for organic and inorganic measurements specifies which analytical methodologies and sample preparation procedures are to be used based on analyte class, sample matrix, and data quality requirements. In contrast, performance specifications have been established for radiochemical analyses. A blind performance evaluation program for all laboratories, both on-site and subcontracted commercial laboratories, provides continuous feedback on data quality. The necessity for subcontractor laboratories to participate in the performance evaluation program is a contractual requirement. Similarly, subcontract laboratories are contractually required to generate data which meet radiochemical performance specifications. The Fernald on-site laboratory must also fulfill these requirements.

  6. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Truchaud, Alain; Ozawa, Kyoichi; Pardue, Harry; Schnipelsky, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories. PMID:18924784

  7. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Place, J F; Truchaud, A; Ozawa, K; Pardue, H; Schnipelsky, P

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks.This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system.In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories.It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories.

  8. Toward a quality guide to facilitate the transference of analytical methods from research to testing laboratories: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bisetty, Krisnha; Gumede, Njabulo Joyfull; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Sagrado, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    At present, there is no single viewpoint that defines QA strategies in analytical chemistry. On the other hand, there are no unique protocols defining a set of analytical tasks and decision criteria to be performed during the method development phase (e.g., by a single research laboratory) in order to facilitate the transference to the testing laboratories intending to adapt, validate, and routinely use this method. This study proposes general criteria, a priori valid for any developed method, recommended as a provisional quality guide containing the minimum internal tasks necessary to publish new analytical method results. As an application, the selection of some basic internal quality tasks and the corresponding accepted criteria are adapted to a concrete case study: indirect differential pulse polarographic determination of nitrate in water samples according to European Commission requisites. Extra tasks to be performed by testing laboratories are also outlined.

  9. Analytical progresses of the World Anti-Doping Agency Olympic laboratories: a 2016 update from London to Rio.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadou, Ioanna; Voss, Sven; Lyris, Emmanouil; Aljaber, Amina; Alsayrafi, Mohammed; Georgakopoulos, Costas

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, the biggest event in human sports, was held in Rio de Janeiro with more than 10,500 athletes from 206 countries over the world competing for the highest of sports honors, an Olympic medal. With the hope that the Olympic ideal accompanies all aspects of the XXXI Olympiad, WADA accredited antidoping laboratories use the spearhead of analytical technology as a powerful tool in the fight against doping. This review summarizes the main analytical developments applied in antidoping testing methodology combined with the main amendments on the WADA regulations regarding analytical testing starting from the 2012 London Olympics until the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

  10. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors for urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Christie, Rebekah G; Flatland, Bente; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Szladovits, Balazs; Harr, Kendal E; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Knoll, Joyce S; Wamsley, Heather L; Freeman, Kathy P

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and documents recommendations for control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors related to urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.2 (clinical chemistry), 1.3 and 2.5 (urinalysis), 1.4 and 2.6 (cytology), and 3 (postanalytical factors important in veterinary clinical pathology) of these guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts.

  11. \\tLaboratory Environmental Sample Disposal Information Document - Companion to Standardized Analytical Methods for Environmental Restoration Following Homeland Security Events (SAM) – Revision 5.0

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Document is intended to provide general guidelines for use byEPA and EPA-contracted laboratories when disposing of samples and associated analytical waste following use of the analytical methods listed in SAM.

  12. Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Through an Orthogonal Discontinuity: A Laboratory, Analytical and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos, Ella María; Jeffrey, Robert G.; Hillis, Richard; Zhang, Xi

    2017-08-01

    Rocks are naturally fractured, and lack of knowledge of hydraulic fracture growth through the pre-existing discontinuities in rocks has impeded enhancing hydrocarbon extraction. This paper presents experimental results from uniaxial and biaxial tests, combined with numerical and analytical modelling results to develop a criterion for predicting whether a hydraulic fracture will cross a discontinuity, represented at the laboratory by unbonded machined frictional interfaces. The experimental results provide the first evidence for the impact of viscous fluid flow on the orthogonal fracture crossing. The fracture elliptical footprint also reflects the importance of both the applied loading stress and the viscosity in fracture propagation. The hydraulic fractures extend both in the direction of maximum compressive stress and in the direction with discontinuities that are arranged to be normal to the maximum compressive stress. The modelling results of fracture growth across discontinuities are obtained for the locations of slip starting points in initiating fracture crossing. Our analysis, in contrast to previous work on the prediction of frictional crossing, includes the non-singular stresses generated by the finite pressurised hydraulic fracture. Experimental and theoretical outcomes herein suggest that hydraulic fracture growth through an orthogonal discontinuity does not depend primarily on the interface friction coefficient.

  13. X-ray Measurements and Analytic Models of a Laboratory Solar Coronal Loop Merging Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Rory; Bellan, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Solar coronal loops typically erupt abruptly after long quiescent periods. Such eruptions might be initiated by interactions between two adjacent loops; this idea was explored experimentally in a laboratory simulation where two plasma-filled flux tubes merge in either a co-helicity or counter-helicity arrangement (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, and P.M. Bellan, Phys. Plasma 2, 3177(2004)). The counter-helicity arrangement produces a bright region with enhanced soft x-ray emission. We are investigating such mergings with a new diagnostic array of EUV photo-detectors of the type described by S.J. Zweben, R.J. Taylor, Plasma Physics, Vol. 23, No. 4(1981), and with analytic studies of particle orbits in the regions between two flux tubes. The EUV array provides means for obtaining spatially and temporally resolved measurements of radiation between 10 and 120 nm. Such resolution is needed to observe the bright regions. Special precautions are taken against capacitive coupling, incoming plasma, and electrical noise. We model the orbits of individual particles in our experiment to understand the merging process. These models suggest that particle trajectories divide into two classes: those confined to a single flux tube and those that freely move between adjacent flux tubes. These models also suggest how trajectories transition from the former to the latter.

  14. EUV Measurements and Analytic Models of a Laboratory Solar Coronal Loop Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bellan, P. M.

    2009-11-01

    Solar coronal loops typically erupt abruptly after long quiescent periods. Such eruptions might be initiated by interactions between adjacent loops; this was explored in a laboratory experiment where two plasma-filled flux tubes merge in either a co- or counter-helicity arrangement (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, and P.M. Bellan, Phys. Plasma 2, 3177(2004)). The latter arrangement produces a bright region with enhanced soft x-ray emission. We investigate such mergings with a new array of EUV photo-detectors (based on S.J. Zweben, R.J. Taylor, Plasma Physics, Vol. 23, No. 4(1981)), and with analytic studies of particle orbits. The EUV array provides spatially and temporally resolved measurements of radiation between 10 and 120 nm needed to observe the bright regions. Precautions are taken against capacitive coupling, incoming plasma, and noise. We model the orbits of individual particles to understand the merging process. These models suggest two classes of trajectories: those confined to a single flux tube and those that move symmetrically between adjacent flux tubes, and how trajectories transition from these classes.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following approved... bromide for field trials is not an approved use under the global laboratory and analytical use exemption..., and reporting requirements for other exempt ODSs, also apply to the use of methyl bromide under this...

  16. Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

  17. Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

  18. ISO 18812--a worldwide standard for the online-connection of analytical instruments to laboratory information systems.

    PubMed

    Fraterman, Arno

    2004-01-01

    In the past there were many attempts to standardize the interface from analytical instruments to laboratory-information-systems. Most of these attempts were national. The international standardisation bodies CEN and ISO have now developed an international standard that is presented here.

  19. Standardisation of elemental analytical techniques applied to provenance studies of archaeological ceramics: an inter laboratory calibration study.

    PubMed

    Hein, A; Tsolakidou, A; Iliopoulos, I; Mommsen, H; Buxeda i Garrigós, J; Montana, G; Kilikoglou, V

    2002-04-01

    Chemical analysis is a well-established procedure for the provenancing of archaeological ceramics. Various analytical techniques are routinely used and large amounts of data have been accumulated so far in data banks. However, in order to exchange results obtained by different laboratories, the respective analytical procedures need to be tested in terms of their inter-comparability. In this study, the schemes of analysis used in four laboratories that are involved in archaeological pottery studies on a routine basis were compared. The techniques investigated were neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For this comparison series of measurements on different geological standard reference materials (SRM) were carried out and the results were statistically evaluated. An attempt was also made towards the establishment of calibration factors between pairs of analytical setups in order to smooth the systematic differences among the results.

  20. Quality management and accreditation in a mixed research and clinical hair testing analytical laboratory setting-a review.

    PubMed

    Fulga, Netta

    2013-06-01

    Quality management and accreditation in the analytical laboratory setting are developing rapidly and becoming the standard worldwide. Quality management refers to all the activities used by organizations to ensure product or service consistency. Accreditation is a formal recognition by an authoritative regulatory body that a laboratory is competent to perform examinations and report results. The Motherisk Drug Testing Laboratory is licensed to operate at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario. The laboratory performs toxicology tests of hair and meconium samples for research and clinical purposes. Most of the samples are involved in a chain of custody cases. Establishing a quality management system and achieving accreditation became mandatory by legislation for all Ontario clinical laboratories since 2003. The Ontario Laboratory Accreditation program is based on International Organization for Standardization 15189-Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence, an international standard that has been adopted as a national standard in Canada. The implementation of a quality management system involves management commitment, planning and staff education, documentation of the system, validation of processes, and assessment against the requirements. The maintenance of a quality management system requires control and monitoring of the entire laboratory path of workflow. The process of transformation of a research/clinical laboratory into an accredited laboratory, and the benefits of maintaining an effective quality management system, are presented in this article.

  1. Principles of analytic validation of immunohistochemical assays: Guideline from the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Bradley, Linda A; Fatheree, Lisa A; Alsabeh, Randa; Fulton, Regan S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Haas, Thomas S; Karabakhtsian, Rouzan G; Loykasek, Patti A; Marolt, Monna J; Shen, Steven S; Smith, Anthony T; Swanson, Paul E

    2014-11-01

    Laboratories must validate all assays before they can be used to test patient specimens, but currently there are no evidence-based guidelines regarding validation of immunohistochemical assays. To develop recommendations for initial analytic validation and revalidation of immunohistochemical assays. The College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center convened a panel of pathologists and histotechnologists with expertise in immunohistochemistry to develop validation recommendations. A systematic evidence review was conducted to address key questions. Electronic searches identified 1463 publications, of which 126 met inclusion criteria and were extracted. Individual publications were graded for quality, and the key question findings for strength of evidence. Recommendations were derived from strength of evidence, open comment feedback, and expert panel consensus. Fourteen guideline statements were established to help pathology laboratories comply with validation and revalidation requirements for immunohistochemical assays. Laboratories must document successful analytic validation of all immunohistochemical tests before applying to patient specimens. The parameters for cases included in validation sets, including number, expression levels, fixative and processing methods, should take into account intended use and should be sufficient to ensure that the test accurately measures the analyte of interest in specimens tested in that laboratory. Recommendations are also provided for confirming assay performance when there are changes in test methods, reagents, or equipment.

  2. Analytical performance evaluation of a high-volume hematology laboratory utilizing sigma metrics as standard of excellence.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M S; Moiz, B

    2016-04-01

    Around two-thirds of important clinical decisions about the management of patients are based on laboratory test results. Clinical laboratories are required to adopt quality control (QC) measures to ensure provision of accurate and precise results. Six sigma is a statistical tool, which provides opportunity to assess performance at the highest level of excellence. The purpose of this study was to assess performance of our hematological parameters on sigma scale in order to identify gaps and hence areas of improvement in patient care. Twelve analytes included in the study were hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), red blood cell count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), red cell distribution width (RDW), total leukocyte count (TLC) with percentages of neutrophils (Neutr%) and lymphocytes (Lymph %), platelet count (Plt), mean platelet volume (MPV), prothrombin time (PT), and fibrinogen (Fbg). Internal quality control data and external quality assurance survey results were utilized for the calculation of sigma metrics for each analyte. Acceptable sigma value of ≥3 was obtained for the majority of the analytes included in the analysis. MCV, Plt, and Fbg achieved value of <3 for level 1 (low abnormal) control. PT performed poorly on both level 1 and 2 controls with sigma value of <3. Despite acceptable conventional QC tools, application of sigma metrics can identify analytical deficits and hence prospects for the improvement in clinical laboratories. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Laboratory reporting of hemostasis assays: the final post-analytical opportunity to reduce errors of clinical diagnosis in hemostasis?

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2010-03-01

    The advent of modern instrumentation, with associated improvements in test performance and reliability, together with appropriate internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assurance (EQA) measures, has led to substantial reductions in analytical errors within hemostasis laboratories. Unfortunately, the reporting of incorrect or inappropriate test results still occurs, perhaps even as frequently as in the past. Many of these cases arise due to a variety of events largely outside the control of the laboratories performing the tests. These events are primarily preanalytical, related to sample collection and processing, but can also include post-analytical events related to the reporting and interpretation of test results. The current report provides an overview of these events, as well as guidance for prevention or minimization. In particular, we propose several strategies for the post-analytical reporting of hemostasis assays, and how this may provide the final opportunity to prevent serious clinical errors in diagnosis. This report should be of interest to both the laboratory scientists working in hemostasis and clinicians that request and attempt to interpret the test results. Laboratory scientists are ultimately responsible for these test results, and there is a duty to provide both accurate and precise results to enable clinicians to manage patients appropriately and to avoid the need to recollect and retest. Also, clinicians will not be in a position to best diagnose and manage their patient unless they gain an appreciation of these issues.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of laboratory based mine overburden analytical techniques for the prediction of acidic mine drainage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradham, W.S.; Caruccio, F.T.

    1995-09-01

    A three part sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate commonly used mine overburden analytical techniques. The primary objectives of the study were: identify and evaluate the effects of variability in mine overburden geochemistry, as measured by pyrite weight percent and neutralization potential (NP), on variability of contaminant production; determine which acid/base accounting interpretation technique best predicts both qualitative and quantitative leachate quality in laboratory analytical testing; and identify the predominant factors of weathering cells, soxhlet extraction, and column leaching tests, and evaluate variability of contaminant production due to variations in; storage conditions, leachant temperature, particle size, particle sorting efficiency, and leaching interval.

  5. [Allowable limits of analytical error which can guarantee the reliability of reference intervals for interpretation of clinical laboratory data].

    PubMed

    Hosogaya, Shigemi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2008-07-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) developed a guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). The purpose of such guidance is to provide a basis for the international comparison of measurement results. In this study, we propose a basic protocol to evaluate and express uncertainty in measurement for routine test results in the clinical laboratory. We also sought to investigate the effects of measurement errors on the evaluation of biological variations in healthy subjects. To this end, we analyzed the allowable limits of analytical error which guarantee the reliability of reference intervals for the interpretation of clinical laboratory data. As a conclusion, we suggest that 1/2 or less of biological intraindividual variations is an appropriate criterion for an allowable limit of uncertainty to be applied in health check-ups, and this value is in agreement with previous reports. If this criterion as a marker for intra laboratory imprecision is met, it suggests that a given institute is able to evaluate time series changes in follow-up of individual data. If the reference interval of laboratory data for disease screening is shared by different institutes, it is suggested that a criterion of 1/4 or less of a biological inter- pulse intra-individual variation is appropriate. This criterion appears to be the goal for analytical inter-laboratory variations.

  6. Error budgets for quality management--practical tools for planning and assuring the analytical quality of laboratory testing processes.

    PubMed

    Westgard, J O

    1996-01-01

    Analytical quality is often assumed, rather than being assured or guaranteed. Given that it is still essential that laboratories produce reliable test results, managers must continue to improve their skills in analytical quality management. This paper shows managers how to use error budgets and charts of operating specifications (¿OPSpecs¿ charts) to select appropriate control rules and numbers of control measurements, taking into account the analytical or clinical quality required for a test and the imprecision and inaccuracy observed for a method. With currently available tools and a little practice, quality control (QC) procedures can be selected quickly and easily, in just 1 minute or less. Future technology is expected to automate the QC selection process and provide dynamic quality control.

  7. A Spectrophotometric Study of the Permanganate-Oxalate Reaction: An Analytical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalbus, Gene E.; Lieu, Van T.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrophotometric method assists in the study of potassium permanganate-oxalate reaction. Basic analytical techniques and rules are implemented in the experiment, which can also include the examination of other compounds oxidized by permanganate.

  8. A Spectrophotometric Study of the Permanganate-Oxalate Reaction: An Analytical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalbus, Gene E.; Lieu, Van T.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrophotometric method assists in the study of potassium permanganate-oxalate reaction. Basic analytical techniques and rules are implemented in the experiment, which can also include the examination of other compounds oxidized by permanganate.

  9. Analytic Validation of Immunohistochemistry Assays: New Benchmark Data From a Survey of 1085 Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Lauren N; Volmar, Keith E; Nowak, Jan A; Fatheree, Lisa A; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Astles, J Rex; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2017-09-01

    - A cooperative agreement between the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was undertaken to measure laboratories' awareness and implementation of an evidence-based laboratory practice guideline (LPG) on immunohistochemical (IHC) validation practices published in 2014. - To establish new benchmark data on IHC laboratory practices. - A 2015 survey on IHC assay validation practices was sent to laboratories subscribed to specific CAP proficiency testing programs and to additional nonsubscribing laboratories that perform IHC testing. Specific questions were designed to capture laboratory practices not addressed in a 2010 survey. - The analysis was based on responses from 1085 laboratories that perform IHC staining. Ninety-six percent (809 of 844) always documented validation of IHC assays. Sixty percent (648 of 1078) had separate procedures for predictive and nonpredictive markers, 42.7% (220 of 515) had procedures for laboratory-developed tests, 50% (349 of 697) had procedures for testing cytologic specimens, and 46.2% (363 of 785) had procedures for testing decalcified specimens. Minimum case numbers were specified by 85.9% (720 of 838) of laboratories for nonpredictive markers and 76% (584 of 768) for predictive markers. Median concordance requirements were 95% for both types. For initial validation, 75.4% (538 of 714) of laboratories adopted the 20-case minimum for nonpredictive markers and 45.9% (266 of 579) adopted the 40-case minimum for predictive markers as outlined in the 2014 LPG. The most common method for validation was correlation with morphology and expected results. Laboratories also reported which assay changes necessitated revalidation and their minimum case requirements. - Benchmark data on current IHC validation practices and procedures may help laboratories understand the issues and influence further refinement of LPG recommendations.

  10. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  11. Analytic Validation of Immunohistochemical Assays: A Comparison of Laboratory Practices Before and After Introduction of an Evidence-Based Guideline.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Souers, Rhona J; Fatheree, Lisa A; Volmar, Keith E; Stuart, Lauren N; Nowak, Jan A; Astles, J Rex; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2017-09-01

    - Laboratories must demonstrate analytic validity before any test can be used clinically, but studies have shown inconsistent practices in immunohistochemical assay validation. - To assess changes in immunohistochemistry analytic validation practices after publication of an evidence-based laboratory practice guideline. - A survey on current immunohistochemistry assay validation practices and on the awareness and adoption of a recently published guideline was sent to subscribers enrolled in one of 3 relevant College of American Pathologists proficiency testing programs and to additional nonsubscribing laboratories that perform immunohistochemical testing. The results were compared with an earlier survey of validation practices. - Analysis was based on responses from 1085 laboratories that perform immunohistochemical staining. Of 1057 responses, 65.4% (691) were aware of the guideline recommendations before this survey was sent and 79.9% (550 of 688) of those have already adopted some or all of the recommendations. Compared with the 2010 survey, a significant number of laboratories now have written validation procedures for both predictive and nonpredictive marker assays and specifications for the minimum numbers of cases needed for validation. There was also significant improvement in compliance with validation requirements, with 99% (100 of 102) having validated their most recently introduced predictive marker assay, compared with 74.9% (326 of 435) in 2010. The difficulty in finding validation cases for rare antigens and resource limitations were cited as the biggest challenges in implementing the guideline. - Dissemination of the 2014 evidence-based guideline validation practices had a positive impact on laboratory performance; some or all of the recommendations have been adopted by nearly 80% of respondents.

  12. EPA Region 6 Laboratory Method Specific Analytical Capabilities with Sample Concentration Range

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 6 Environmental Services Branch (ESB) Laboratory is capable of analyzing a wide range of samples with concentrations ranging for low part-per trillion (ppt) to low percent () levels, depending on the sample matrix.

  13. Juicing the Juice: A Laboratory-Based Case Study for an Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Peter M.; Dinan, Frank J.; St. Phillips, Michael; Larson, Renee; Pines, Harvey A.; Larkin, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    A young, inexperienced Food and Drug Administration (FDA) chemist is asked to distinguish between authentic fresh orange juice and suspected reconstituted orange juice falsely labeled as fresh. In an advanced instrumental analytical chemistry application of this case, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy is used to distinguish between the…

  14. Juicing the Juice: A Laboratory-Based Case Study for an Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Peter M.; Dinan, Frank J.; St. Phillips, Michael; Larson, Renee; Pines, Harvey A.; Larkin, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    A young, inexperienced Food and Drug Administration (FDA) chemist is asked to distinguish between authentic fresh orange juice and suspected reconstituted orange juice falsely labeled as fresh. In an advanced instrumental analytical chemistry application of this case, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy is used to distinguish between the…

  15. Pre-analytical errors management in the clinical laboratory: a five-year study

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Marín, Angeles; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Pérez-Hidalgo, Maria del Mar; Molina-Mendoza, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study describes quality indicators for the pre-analytical process, grouping errors according to patient risk as critical or major, and assesses their evaluation over a five-year period. Materials and methods: A descriptive study was made of the temporal evolution of quality indicators, with a study population of 751,441 analytical requests made during the period 2007–2011. The Runs Test for randomness was calculated to assess changes in the trend of the series, and the degree of control over the process was estimated by the Six Sigma scale. Results: The overall rate of critical pre-analytical errors was 0.047%, with a Six Sigma value of 4.9. The total rate of sampling errors in the study period was 13.54% (P = 0.003). The highest rates were found for the indicators “haemolysed sample” (8.76%), “urine sample not submitted” (1.66%) and “clotted sample” (1.41%), with Six Sigma values of 3.7, 3.7 and 2.9, respectively. Conclusions: The magnitude of pre-analytical errors was accurately valued. While processes that triggered critical errors are well controlled, the results obtained for those regarding specimen collection are borderline unacceptable; this is particularly so for the indicator “haemolysed sample”. PMID:24969918

  16. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory. IFCC Committee on Analytical Systems.

    PubMed

    Place, J F; Truchaud, A; Ozawa, K; Pardue, H; Schnipelsky, P

    1994-12-16

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel-processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of this paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual property and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used widely in clinical laboratories.

  17. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Eric D.; Barry, Eugene F.; Rubinstein, Harry

    1996-12-01

    Certain individuals may be sensitive to specific compounds in comsumer products. It is important to quantify these analytes in food products in order to monitor their intake. Caffeine is one such compound. Determination of caffeine in beverages by spectrophotometric procedures requires an extraction procedure, which can prove time-consuming. Although the corresponding determination by HPLC allows for a direct injection, capillary zone electrophoresis provides several advantages such as extremely low solvent consumption, smaller sample volume requirements, and improved sensitivity.

  18. Determination of Calcium in Dietary Supplements: Statistical Comparison of Methods in the Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvey, Sarah L.; Shahmohammadi, Golbon; McLain, Derek R.; Dietz, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two methods for the determination of the calcium content of commercial dietary supplement tablets. In a two-week sequence, the sample tablets are first analyzed via complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and then, following ion exchange of the calcium ion present…

  19. Incorporating Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences into Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Melissa A.; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    A continuous effort within an undergraduate university setting is to improve students' learning outcomes and thus improve students' attitudes about a particular field of study. This is undoubtedly relevant within a chemistry laboratory. This paper reports the results of an effort to introduce a problem-based learning strategy into the analytical…

  20. Determination of Calcium in Dietary Supplements: Statistical Comparison of Methods in the Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvey, Sarah L.; Shahmohammadi, Golbon; McLain, Derek R.; Dietz, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two methods for the determination of the calcium content of commercial dietary supplement tablets. In a two-week sequence, the sample tablets are first analyzed via complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and then, following ion exchange of the calcium ion present…

  1. Incorporating Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences into Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Melissa A.; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    A continuous effort within an undergraduate university setting is to improve students' learning outcomes and thus improve students' attitudes about a particular field of study. This is undoubtedly relevant within a chemistry laboratory. This paper reports the results of an effort to introduce a problem-based learning strategy into the analytical…

  2. Pre-Analytical Components of Risk in Four Branches of Clinical Laboratory in Romania--Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    David, Remona E; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2016-01-01

    Development of quality measurement principles is a strategic point for each clinical laboratory. Preexamination process is the most critical and the most difficult to be managed. The aim of this study is to identify, quantify, and monitor the nonconformities of the pre-analytical process using quality indicators that can affect the patient's health safety in four different locations of a Romanian private clinical laboratory. The study group consisted of all the analysis requests received by the departments of biochemistry, hematology, and coagulation from January through March 2015. In order to collect the pre-analytical nonconformities, we created a "Risk Budget", using the entries from the "Evidence notebook--non-conform samples" from the above mentioned departments. The laboratory established the quality indicators by means of the risk management technique in order to identify and control the sources of errors, FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analyses), which had been implemented and monitored for its purposes and special needs. For the assessment of the control level over the processes, the results were transformed on the Six Sigma scale, using the Westgard calculation method and being obtained in this way the frequency with which an error may occur. (https://www.westgard. com/six-sigma-calculators.htm). The obtained results prove that the quantification and monitoring of the indicators can be a control instrument for the pre-analytic activities. The calculation of the Six Sigma value adds extra information to the study because it allows the detection of the processes which need improvement (Sigma value higher than 4 represents a well controlled process). The highest rates were observed for the hemolyzed and the lipemic samples, in the department of biochemistry and hemolyzed, insufficient sample volume, or clotted samples for the department of hematology and coagulation. Significant statistical differences between laboratories participating in the study have

  3. Analytic laboratory performance of a point of care urine culture kit for diagnosis and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Bongard, E; Frimodt-Møller, N; Gal, M; Wootton, M; Howe, R; Francis, N; Goossens, H; Butler, C C

    2015-10-01

    Currently available point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests for managing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in general practice are limited by poor performance characteristics, and laboratory culture generally provides results only after a few days. This laboratory evaluation compared the analytic performance of the POC UK Flexicult(™) (Statens Serum Institut) (SSI) urinary kit for quantification, identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing and routine UK National Health Service (NHS) urine processing to an advanced urine culture method. Two hundred urine samples routinely submitted to the Public Health Wales Microbiology Laboratory were divided and: (1) analysed by routine NHS microbiological tests as per local laboratory standard operating procedures, (2) inoculated onto the UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit and (3) spiral plated onto Colorex Orientation UTI medium (E&O Laboratories Ltd). The results were evaluated between the NHS and Flexicult(™ )methods, and discordant results were compared to the spiral plating method. The UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit was compared to routine NHS culture for identification of a pure or predominant uropathogen at ≥ 10(5) cfu/mL, with a positive discordancy rate of 13.5% and a negative discordancy rate of 3%. The sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 73.8-93.7] and 82.6% (95% CI 75.8-87.7), respectively. The UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit was comparable to routine NHS urine processing in identifying microbiologically positive UTIs in this laboratory evaluation. However, the number of false-positive samples could lead to over-prescribing of antibiotics in clinical practice. The Flexicult(™) SSI kit could be useful as a POC test for UTIs in primary care but further pragmatic evaluations are necessary.

  4. Tank 103, 219-S Facility at 222-S Laboratory, analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, R.K.

    1998-06-18

    This is the final report for the polychlorinated biphenyls analysis of Tank-103 (TK-103) in the 219-S Facility at 222-S Laboratory. Twenty 1-liter bottles (Sample numbers S98SO00074 through S98SO00093) were received from TK-103 during two sampling events, on May 5 and May 7, 1998. The samples were centrifuged to separate the solids and liquids. The centrifuged sludge was analyzed for PCBs as Aroclor mixtures. The results are discussed on page 6. The sample breakdown diagram (Page 114) provides a cross-reference of sample identification of the bulk samples to the laboratory identification number for the solids. The request for sample analysis (RSA) form is provided as Page 117. The raw data is presented on Page 43. Sample Description, Handling, and Preparation Twenty samples were received in the laboratory in 1-Liter bottles. The first 8 samples were received on May 5, 1998. There were insufficient solids to perform the requested PCB analysis and 12 additional samples were collected and received on May 7, 1998. Breakdown and sub sampling was performed on May 8, 1998. Sample number S98SO00084 was lost due to a broken bottle. Nineteen samples were centrifuged and the solids were collected in 8 centrifuge cones. After the last sample was processed, the solids were consolidated into 2 centrifuge cones. The first cone contained 9.7 grams of solid and 13.0 grams was collected in the second cone. The wet sludge from the first centrifuge cone was submitted to the laboratory for PCB analysis (sample number S98SO00102). The other sample portion (S98SO00103) was retained for possible additional analyses.

  5. Multiple pre- and post-analytical lean approaches to the improvement of the laboratory turnaround time in a large core laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lou, Amy H; Elnenaei, Manal O; Sadek, Irene; Thompson, Shauna; Crocker, Bryan D; Nassar, Bassam A

    2017-10-01

    Core laboratory (CL), as a new business model, facilitates consolidation and integration of laboratory services to enhance efficiency and reduce costs. This study evaluates the impact of total laboratory automation system (TLA), electric track vehicle (ETV) system and auto-verification (AV) of results on overall turnaround time (TAT) (phlebotomy to reporting TAT: PR-TAT) within a CL setting. Mean, median and percentage of outlier (OP) for PR-TAT were compared for pre- and post-CL eras using five representative tests based on different request priorities. Comparison studies were also carried out on the intra-laboratory TAT (in-lab to reporting TAT: IR-TAT) and the delivery TAT (phlebotomy to in-lab TAT: PI-TAT) to reflect the efficiency of the TLA (both before and after introducing result AV) and ETV systems respectively. Median PR-TATs for the urgent samples were reduced on average by 16% across all representative analytes. Median PR-TATs for the routine samples were curtailed by 51%, 50%, 49%, 34% and 22% for urea, potassium, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), complete blood count (CBC) and prothrombin time (PT) respectively. The shorter PR-TAT was attributed to a significant reduction of IR-TAT through the TLA. However, the median PI-TAT was delayed when the ETV was used. Application of various AV rules shortened the median IR-TATs for potassium and urea. However, the OP of PR-TAT for the STAT requests exceeding 60min were all higher than those from the pre-CL era. TLA and auto-verification rules help to efficiently manage substantial volumes of urgent and routine samples. However, the ETV application as it stands shows a negative impact on the PR-TAT. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Efficacy of Problem-based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, AL

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking ability of students in both the treatment and control groups were evaluated before and at the end of the implementation of the programme, using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. In addition, changes in students' self-regulated learning skills using the Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) and their self-evaluation proficiency were evaluated. Analysis of covariance showed that the creative thinking ability of the treatment group had improved statistically significantly after the PBL course (p < 0.001) compared to that of the students in the comparison group. PBL was shown to have a positive effect on creative thinking ability. The SRLIS test showed that students in the treatment group used self-regulated learning strategies more frequently than students in the comparison group. According to the results of the self-evaluation, students became more positive and confident in problem-solving and group work as the semester progressed. Overall, PBL was shown to be an effective pedagogical instructional strategy for enhancing chemistry students' creative thinking ability, self-regulated learning skills and self-evaluation.

  7. Towards a green analytical laboratory: microextraction techniques as a useful tool for the monitoring of polluted soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Campillo, Natalia; Hernandez Cordoba, Manuel; Perez Sirvent, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Microextraction techniques are a valuable tool at the analytical laboratory since they allow sensitive measurements of pollutants to be carried out by means of easily available instrumentation. There is a large number of such procedures involving miniaturized liquid-liquid or liquid-solid extractions with the common denominator of using very low amounts (only a few microliters) or even none of organic solvents. Since minimal amounts of reagents are involved, and the generation of residues is consequently minimized, the approach falls within the concept of Green Analytical Chemistry. This general methodology is useful both for inorganic and organic pollutants. Thus, low amounts of metallic ions can be measured without the need of using ICP-MS since this instrument can be replaced by a simple AAS spectrometer which is commonly present in any laboratory and involves low acquisition and maintenance costs. When dealing with organic pollutants, the microextracts obtained can be introduced into liquid or gas chromatographs equipped with common detectors and there is no need for the most sophisticated and expensive mass spectrometers. This communication reports an overview of the advantages of such a methodology, and gives examples for the determination of some particular contaminants in soil and water samples The authors are grateful to the Comunidad Autonóma de la Región de Murcia , Spain (Fundación Séneca, 19888/GERM/15) for financial support

  8. Emotions beyond the laboratory: theoretical fundaments, study design, and analytic strategies for advanced ambulatory assessment.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Frank H; Grossman, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Questionnaire and interview assessment can provide reliable data on attitudes and self-perceptions on emotion, and experimental laboratory assessment can examine functional relations between stimuli and reactions under controlled conditions. On the other hand, ambulatory assessment is less constrained and provides naturalistic data on emotion in daily life, with the potential to (1) assure external validity of laboratory findings, (2) provide normative data on prevalence, quality and intensity of real-life emotion and associated processes, (3) characterize previously unidentified emotional phenomena, and (4) model real-life stimuli for representative laboratory research design. Technological innovations now allow for detailed ambulatory study of emotion across domains of subjective experience, overt behavior and physiology. However, methodological challenges abound that may compromise attempts to characterize biobehavioral aspects of emotion in the real world. For example, emotional effects can be masked by social engagement, mental and physical workloads, as well as by food intake and circadian and quasi-random variation in metabolic activity. The complexity of data streams and multitude of factors that influence them require a high degree of context specification for meaningful data interpretation. We consider possible solutions to typical and often overlooked issues related to ambulatory emotion research, including aspects of study design decisions, recording devices and channels, electronic diary implementation, and data analysis.

  9. Analytical validation of a reference laboratory ELISA for the detection of feline leukemia virus p27 antigen.

    PubMed

    Buch, Jesse S; Clark, Genevieve H; Cahill, Roberta; Thatcher, Brendon; Smith, Peter; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Leutenegger, Christian M; O'Connor, Thomas P; Beall, Melissa J

    2017-09-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is an oncogenic retrovirus of cats. Immunoassays for the p27 core protein of FeLV aid in the detection of FeLV infections. Commercial microtiter-plate ELISAs have rapid protocols and visual result interpretation, limiting their usefulness in high-throughput situations. The purpose of our study was to validate the PetChek FeLV 15 ELISA, which is designed for the reference laboratory, and incorporates sequential, orthogonal screening and confirmatory protocols. A cutoff for the screening assay was established with 100% accuracy using 309 feline samples (244 negative, 65 positive) defined by the combined results of FeLV PCR and an independent reference p27 antigen ELISA. Precision of the screening assay was measured using a panel of 3 samples (negative, low-positive, and high-positive). The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.9-7.9%; the inter-assay CV was 6.0-8.6%. For the confirmatory assay, the intra-assay CV was 3.0-4.7%, and the inter-assay CV was 7.4-9.7%. The analytical sensitivity for p27 antigen was 3.7 ng/mL for inactivated whole FeLV and 1.2 ng/mL for purified recombinant FeLV p27. Analytical specificity was demonstrated based on the absence of cross-reactivity to related retroviruses. No interference was observed for samples containing added bilirubin, hemoglobin, or lipids. Based on these results, the new high-throughput design of the PetChek FeLV 15 ELISA makes it suitable for use in reference laboratory settings and maintains overall analytical performance.

  10. Evaluation of menstrual cycle-related changes in 85 clinical laboratory analytes.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shiori; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Yamanishi, Hachiro; Hirano, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yuji; Kamisako, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    The menstrual cycle-related changes in clinical laboratory values were analysed by use of data obtained in the Asian multicentre study aimed at derivation of common reference intervals for 85 major clinical laboratory tests. Among 1876 healthy female volunteers, 893 had regular menstruation. They were classified into five groups according to dates between sample collection and the start of the last menstrual cycle: early follicular phase (1-6 days), late follicular phase (7-12 days), ovulatory phase (13-16 days), early luteal phase (17-22 days), and late luteal phase (23-31 days). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the menstrual cycle-related changes in test results. The magnitude was expressed as a standard deviation ratio of between-phase standard deviation to between-individual standard deviation based on nested ANOVA. Aside from obvious changes for four sex hormones (oestradiol, progesterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone), we observed statistically significant menstrual cycle-related changes in the following tests (standard deviation ratio >0.15): Na, Cl, creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, carbohydrate antigen 125, and parathyroid hormone were higher during the early follicular phase, while insulin, total cholesterol, and white blood cell were higher during the luteal phase. Significant associations of those test items with the four sex hormones were revealed. The menstrual cycle-related changes in laboratory test results were revealed in some commonly tested items other than sex hormones. The findings are of interest in understanding female physiology in relation to hormonal changes, but the magnitude of changes is rather small and not very relevant in interpreting test results. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a quarterly report describing the use of a new soil gas collection device which allows the collection of soil gas in the field for later analysis in the laboratory. It describes the installation of this sampling device and the procedure for setting the probe, extraction of soil gas beneath the surface, and sealing of the soil gas for transport. The sites used for initial testing was the top of Yucca Mountain and Crystal Spring in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. The results from this initial test showed no volatile matter present in the soil at these locations.

  12. Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.

  13. Microextraction techniques at the analytical laboratory: an efficient way for determining low amounts of residual insecticides in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Pilar; Navarro, Tania; Campillo, Natalia; Fenoll, Jose; Garrido, Isabel; Cava, Juana; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Microextraction techniques allow sensitive measurements of pollutants to be carried out by means of instrumentation commonly available at the analytical laboratory. This communication reports our studies focused to the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in polluted soils. These chemicals are synthetic analogues of pyrethrum widely used for pest control in agricultural and household applications. Because of their properties, pyrethroids tend to strongly absorb to soil particles and organic matter. Although they are considered as pesticides with a low toxicity for humans, long times exposure to them may cause damage in immune system and in the neurological system. The procedure here studied is based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), and permits the determination of fifteen pyrethroid compounds (allethrin, resmethrin, tetramethrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, acrinathrin, permethrin, λ-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, flucythrinate, fenvalerate, esfenvalerate, τ-fluvalinate, and deltamethrin) in soil samples using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analytes were first extracted from the soil samples (4 g) by treatment with 2 mL of acetonitrile, 2 mL of water and 0.5 g of NaCl. The enriched organic phase (approximately 0.8 mL) was separated by centrifugation, and this solution used as the dispersant in a DLLME process. The analytes did not need to be derivatized before their injection into the chromatographic system, due to their volatility and thermal stability. The identification of the different pyrethroids was carried out based on their retention times and mass spectra, considering the m/z values of the different fragments and their relative abundances. The detection limits were in the 0.2-23 ng g-1 range, depending on the analyte and the sample under analysis. The authors are grateful to the Comunidad Autonóma de la Región de Murcia, Spain (Fundación Séneca, 19888/GERM/15) and to the Spanish MINECO (Project

  14. A comparison of the costs of treating wastes from a radio analytical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.; Pole, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    The Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) is a government-owned, government-operated facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RESL`s traditional strengths are in precise radionuclide analysis and dosimetry measurements. RESL generates small quantities of various types of waste. This study identified potential waste management options for a solvent extraction process waste stream and the cost differences resulting from either process changes, improved technology usage, or material substitutions or changes at RESL. Where possible, this report identifies changes that have resulted or may result in waste reduction and cost savings. DOE P2 directs the lab to review processes, evaluate waste practices, and estimate potential reductions in waste volumes and waste management costs. This study focused on selected processes, but the processes are illustrative of potential waste volume reductions and cost minimizations that may be achieved elsewhere at the INEL and throughout the DOE complex. In analyzing a waste disposal process, the authors allocated component costs to functional categories. These categories included the following: (1) operational costs, included waste generation and collection into a storage area; (2) administrative costs, including worker training, routine inspections, and reporting; and (3) disposal costs, including preparing the waste for shipment and disposing of it.

  15. Quality-control analytical methods: endtoxins: essential testing for pyrogens in the compounding laboratory, part 1.

    PubMed

    Dubczak, John; Latta, Kennth S; Hedman, Hilary; Smith, Donald R

    2010-01-01

    Inadvertent exposure to endotoxins administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or intrathecally can cause a constellation of adverse effects that range from fever to multiple organ failure and death. Pharmacists who compound sterile formulations must remain exceptionally vigilant to guard against the contamination of such preparations with those pyrogens. Fortunately, endotoxin screening analyses are available for onsite use or from contract testing laboratories, and both options offer accurate, repeatable, and timely results. The volume of sterile compounding performed, the need for immediate results, and cost often dictate the compounder's choice of endotoxin testing. In this first of a 3-part series, we summarize the evolution of pyrogen screening and explain the mechanisms of two endotoxin test kits that provide valid results on site. A Table comparing those kits is presented for easy reference. In part 2 of the series, additional endotoxin test kits will be compared, and contract laboratory pyrogen testing will be profiled. In part 3, a simplified endotoxin test method for compounded sterile products will be presented.

  16. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this surveillance was to determine traceability of various pieces of the study to one another and to any standards that may be used; as well as record keeping quality, and the use of good laboratory practices. The specific goals of the surveillance were to assure that the scientific work be documented sufficiently that it could be continued by another scientist in the absence of the originator; and be repeated at another time with the same results. The results of the surveillance indicate that these goals are basically being met. Some concerns were raised by myself and were met with a positive attitude and eagerness to improve the study documentation. Actions required to improve the study record keeping and documentation are detailed in the Summary and listed in Corrective actions. A brief follow-up assessment will be scheduled to review the adequacy and effectiveness of the actions taken for this project.

  17. The quality of the extra-analytical phase of laboratory practice in some developing European countries and Mexico - a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Nikolac, Nora; Supak-Smolcic, Vesna; Honovic, Lorena; Avram, Sanja; Beregovaja, Elena; Dobreanu, Minodora; Guimaraes, Joao-Tiago; Kovacs, Gabor L; Singh, Nada Majkic; Sierra-Amor, Rosa Isabel; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Zima, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    This cross-sectional multicentric survey study aimed to assess the quality of the extra-analytical phase of laboratory activities in some developing European countries and Mexico. We assessed the quality of the extra-analytical practices in participating laboratories regarding the: a) sample acceptance criteria; b) phlebotomy procedures; c) test results reporting and d) recording non-conformities. A survey was performed during the April-May 2009. A total of 15 clinical laboratories from the following countries were included: Bosnia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine. Questions were scored (scores from 1-4) and average scores was calculated for each category. The overall score for all respondents (n = 443) was 3.10 ± 0.33. The average score was 3.11 ± 0.56 for sample acceptance criteria, 2.76 ± 0.58 for phlebotomy and 3.34 ± 0.53, for test results reporting (F = 116.49; p < 0.001). Laboratory accreditation was associated with better practices and higher overall quality of the extra-analytical procedures (F = 16.62; p < 0.001). Moreover, the highest scores for sample acceptance criteria (F = 8.32; p < 0.001), phlebotomy procedures (F = 13.28; p < 0.001) and for reporting non-conformities (F = 33.62; p < 0.001) were observed for accredited laboratories or laboratories under preparation for accreditation. The overall quality of the extra-analytical practices in countries in this survey is not satisfactory. Phlebotomy practices are the most critical extra-analytical activity. Since laboratory accreditation was associated with better practices and higher overall quality of the extra-analytical procedures, we believe that the most significant improvement could be made by implementing the total quality management system and standardizing laboratory procedures.

  18. Development of Analytical Protocols For Organics and Isotopes Analysis on the 2009 MARS Science Laboratory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory, under development for launch in 2009, is designed explore and quantitatively asses a local region on Mars as a potential habitat for present or past life. Its ambitious goals are to (1) assess the past or present biological potential of the target environment, (2) to characterize the geology and geochemistry at the MSL landing site, and (3) to investigate planetary processes that influence habitability. The planned capabilities of the rover payload will enable a comprehensive search for organic molecules, a determination of definitive mineralogy of sampled rocks and fines, chemical and isotopic analysis of both atmospheric and solid samples, and precision isotope measurements of several volatile elements. A range of contact and remote surface and subsurface survey tools will establish context for these measurements and will facilitate sample identification and selection. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of MSL addresses several of the mission's core measurement goals. It includes a gas chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, and a tunable laser spectrometer. These instruments will be designed to analyze either atmospheric samples or gases extracted from solid phase samples such as rocks and fines. We will describe the range of measurement protocols under development and study by the SAM engineering and science teams for use on the surface of Mars.

  19. Molecular detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato - An analytical comparison of real-time PCR protocols from five different Scandinavian laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lager, Malin; Faller, Maximilian; Wilhelmsson, Peter; Kjelland, Vivian; Andreassen, Åshild; Dargis, Rimtas; Quarsten, Hanne; Dessau, Ram; Fingerle, Volker; Margos, Gabriele; Noraas, Sølvi; Ornstein, Katharina; Petersson, Ann-Cathrine; Matussek, Andreas; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Henningsson, Anna J

    2017-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick transmitted disease in Europe. The diagnosis of LB today is based on the patient´s medical history, clinical presentation and laboratory findings. The laboratory diagnostics are mainly based on antibody detection, but in certain conditions molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may serve as a complement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity and concordance of eight different real-time PCR methods at five laboratories in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Each participating laboratory was asked to analyse three different sets of samples (reference panels; all blinded) i) cDNA extracted and transcribed from water spiked with cultured Borrelia strains, ii) cerebrospinal fluid spiked with cultured Borrelia strains, and iii) DNA dilution series extracted from cultured Borrelia and relapsing fever strains. The results and the method descriptions of each laboratory were systematically evaluated. The analytical sensitivities and the concordance between the eight protocols were in general high. The concordance was especially high between the protocols using 16S rRNA as the target gene, however, this concordance was mainly related to cDNA as the type of template. When comparing cDNA and DNA as the type of template the analytical sensitivity was in general higher for the protocols using DNA as template regardless of the use of target gene. The analytical specificity for all eight protocols was high. However, some protocols were not able to detect Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia lusitaniae or Borrelia japonica.

  20. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2012-11-26

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

  1. ANALYTICAL PLANS SUPPORTING THE SWPF GAP ANALYSIS BEING CONDUCTED WITH ENERGYSOLUTIONS AND THE VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AT THE CUA

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

    2014-10-28

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested that the glass formulation team of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and ES-VSL develop a technical basis that validates the current Product Composition Control System models for use during the processing of the coupled flowsheet or that leads to the refinements of or modifications to the models that are needed so that they may be used during the processing of the coupled flowsheet. SRNL has developed a matrix of test glasses that are to be batched and fabricated by ES-VSL as part of this effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES-VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses based upon the results of testing by ASTM’s Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A.

  2. Stability of purgeable VOCs in water samples during pre-analytical holding. Part 2: Analyses by an EPA regional laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Bayne, C.K.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L.; Bottrell, D.W.

    1997-03-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that prevalent and priority purgeable VOCs in properly preserved water samples are stable for at least 28 days. For the purposes of this study, VOCs were considered functionally stable if concentrations measured after 28 days did not change by more than 10% from the initial values. An extensive stability experiment was performed on freshly-collected surface water spiked with a suite of 44 purgeable VOCs. The spiked water was then distributed into multiple 40-mL VOC vials with 0.010-in Teflon-lined silicone septum caps prefilled with 250 mg of NaHSO{sub 4} (resulting pH of the water {approximately}2). The samples were sent to a commercial [Analytical Resources, Inc. (ARI)] and EPA (Region IV) laboratory where they were stored at 4 C. On 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 71 days after sample preparation, analysts from ARI took 4 replicate samples out of storage and analyzed these samples for purgeable VOCs following EPA/SW846 8260A. A similar analysis schedule was followed by analysts at the EPA laboratory. This document contains the results from the EPA analyses; the ARI results are described in a separate report.

  3. Can current analytical quality performance of UK clinical laboratories support evidence-based guidelines for diabetes and ischaemic heart disease?--A pilot study and a proposal.

    PubMed

    Jassam, Nuthar; Yundt-Pacheco, John; Jansen, Rob; Thomas, Annette; Barth, Julian H

    2013-08-01

    The implementation of national and international guidelines is beginning to standardise clinical practice. However, since many guidelines have decision limits based on laboratory tests, there is an urgent need to ensure that different laboratories obtain the same analytical result on any sample. A scientifically-based quality control process will be a pre-requisite to provide this level of analytical performance which will support evidence-based guidelines and movement of patients across boundaries while maintaining standardised outcomes. We discuss the finding of a pilot study performed to assess UK clinical laboratories readiness to work to a higher grade quality specifications such as biological variation-based quality specifications. Internal quality control (IQC) data for HbA1c, glucose, creatinine, cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol were collected from UK laboratories participating in the Bio-Rad Unity QC programme. The median of the coefficient of variation (CV%) of the participating laboratories was evaluated against the CV% based on biological variation. Except creatinine, the other four analytes had a variable degree of compliance with the biological variation-based quality specifications. More than 75% of the laboratories met the biological variation-based quality specifications for glucose, cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol. Slightly over 50% of the laboratories met the analytical goal for HBA1c. Only one analyte (cholesterol) had a performance achieving the higher quality specifications consistent with 5σ. Our data from IQC do not consistently demonstrate that the results from clinical laboratories meet evidence-based quality specifications. Therefore, we propose that a graded scale of quality specifications may be needed at this stage.

  4. Analytical performance of a versatile laboratory microscopic X-ray fluorescence system for metal uptake studies on argillaceous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, Felicián; Osán, János; Szabó, B. Katalin; Török, Szabina

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale microscopic X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) plays an increasingly important role in various fields where multielemental investigations of samples are indispensable. In case of geological samples, the reasonable detection limits (LOD) and spatial resolutions are necessary to identify the trace element content in microcrystalline level. The present study focuses on the analytical performance of a versatile laboratory-scale micro-XRF system with various options of X-ray sources and detectors to find the optimal experimental configuration in terms of sensitivities and LOD for selected elements in loaded petrographic thin sections. The method was tested for sorption studies involving thin sections prepared from cores of Boda Claystone Formation, which is a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Loaded ions in the sorption measurements were Cs(I) and Ni(II) chemically representing fission and corrosion products. Based on the collected elemental maps, the correlation between the elements representative of main rock components and the selected loaded ion was studied. For the elements of interest, Cs(I) and Ni(II) low-power iMOXS source with polycapillary and silicon drift detector was found to be the best configuration to reach the optimal LOD values. Laboratory micro-XRF was excellent to identify the responsible key minerals for the uptake of Cs(I). In case of nickel, careful corrections were needed because of the relatively high Ca content of the rock samples. The results were compared to synchrotron radiation micro-XRF.

  5. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  6. Automation of the γ-ray spectroscopy counting system at the Dow Chemical Company Analytical Sciences Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romick, J. D.; Rigot, W. L.; Morabito, P. L.; Quinn, T. J.; Kocher, C. W.; Duke, D. J.

    1994-12-01

    The neutron activation analysis group within the Analytical Sciences Laboratory analyzes 3000-5000 samples annually for a wide variety of analytes. Due to the high sample load, it is imperative that the gamma spectroscopy counting system be automated to maximize the efficiency of the system while ensuring the accuracy of the analyses. Using a Zymark robotic system, Compumotor drives, and DEC-based Canberra/Nuclear Data software we have automated sample changing, detector positioning, and data acquisition. Automation of these functions has resulted in a more consistent counting geometry, minimized crosstalk between samples, and accurate repositioning of the detectors for standardless quantitative analysis. The Zymark robotic system currently controls two detector systems, but is designed to control up to three independent detector systems. Canberra/Nuclear Data software, operating on a Microvax 3100, issues commands to the Zymark controller to change samples when spectral acquisition is complete. Once a new sample is in place, the robot sends a signal to the Microvax to begin data acquisition. Up to 40 samples, with sizes between 1 and 20 ml, can be accommodated using customized sample racks and sample holders. The location of the sample racks relative to the detectors has eliminated noticeable crosstalk between samples in the racks and samples being counted. The two HPGe detectors for each detector system sit on motorized platforms controlled by programmable Compumotor drives. Programmed function keys move the detectors in or out at fixed increments to optimize sample/detector geometry. The high resolution of the stepper motors enables accurate repositioning of detectors so that previously acquired standard spectra can be compared with samples activated and counted under identical conditions but at different times.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on inspection of analytical laboratories oversight at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-26

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy has overall programmatic responsibility for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The SPR Project Management Office (SPRPMO), located in New Orleans, Louisiana, and under the direction of the Project Manager, manages day-to-day project activities. The SPR currently has five underground crude oil storage facilities, and one marine terminal, on or near the Gulf Coasts of Texas and Louisiana. The purpose of this inspection was to review oversight of M and O and subcontractor laboratories performing analyses on samples taken for SPR environmental compliance and oil quality purposes. During this inspection, the M and O contractor operated on-site environmental laboratories at four of the SPR storage facilities, and oil quality laboratories at two of the facilities. The number of subcontractor laboratories varies depending on the need for analytical support. The objective of this inspection was to determine if the SPRPMO had implemented management systems to provide adequate oversight of M and O contractor analytical laboratory activities, as well as to ensure effective oversight of subcontractor analytical laboratories.

  8. Determination of Total Arsenic and Speciation in Apple Juice by Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ping; Colon, Luis A.; Aga, Diana S.

    2016-01-01

    A two-part laboratory experiment was designed for upper-level analytical chemistry students to provide hands-on experience in the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. In the first part of the experiment, the students analyze total arsenic in…

  9. Developing and Implementing Inquiry-Based, Water Quality Laboratory Experiments for High School Students to Explore Real Environmental Issues Using Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandler, Daphna; Blonder, Ron; Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and the implementation of five laboratory experiments; four of them, intended for high-school students, are inquiry-based activities that explore the quality of water. The context of water provides students with an opportunity to study the importance of analytical methods and how they influence our everyday…

  10. Developing and Implementing Inquiry-Based, Water Quality Laboratory Experiments for High School Students to Explore Real Environmental Issues Using Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandler, Daphna; Blonder, Ron; Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and the implementation of five laboratory experiments; four of them, intended for high-school students, are inquiry-based activities that explore the quality of water. The context of water provides students with an opportunity to study the importance of analytical methods and how they influence our everyday…

  11. Determination of Total Arsenic and Speciation in Apple Juice by Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ping; Colon, Luis A.; Aga, Diana S.

    2016-01-01

    A two-part laboratory experiment was designed for upper-level analytical chemistry students to provide hands-on experience in the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. In the first part of the experiment, the students analyze total arsenic in…

  12. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical and analytical factors for hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis, and crossmatching in veterinary laboratories.

    PubMed

    Vap, Linda M; Harr, Kendal E; Arnold, Jill E; Freeman, Kathleen P; Getzy, Karen; Lester, Sally; Friedrichs, Kristen R

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and provides recommendations for control of preanalytical and analytical factors related to hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis testing, and crossmatching and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.3 (mammalian hematology), 1.2 and 2.4 (nonmammalian hematology), 1.5 and 2.7 (hemostasis testing), and 1.6 and 2.8 (crossmatching) of the complete guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts.

  13. Statistical comparison of the results from six analytical chemistry laboratories of the mercury content of muscle tissue of two species of sharks.

    PubMed

    Walker, T I

    1977-01-01

    Statistical tests were carried out on the results of chemical analysis for total mercury concentrations of replicate samples of muscle tissue of school shark Galeorhinus australis (Macleay) and gummy shark Mustelus antarcticus Guenther from six independent analytical laboratories. These tests showed that one laboratory produced results 9% below the overall average of all results, another 1% below average while the other four were all 5% above average. Moreover, one laboratory had significantly lower scatter of results than the others, and the percentage scatter (standard error expressed as a percentage of the mean) in two of the laboratories tended to diminish as the magnitude of the results increased. Correction for what were concluded to be wild points indicated that the scatter for all laboratories was below 14%.

  14. Determining 'age at death' for forensic purposes using human bone by a laboratory-based biomechanical analytical method.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, P; Williams, A; Christodoulou, G; Giles, R

    2014-05-01

    Determination of age-at-death (AAD) is an important and frequent requirement in contemporary forensic science and in the reconstruction of past populations and societies from their remains. Its estimation is relatively straightforward and accurate (±3yr) for immature skeletons by using morphological features and reference tables within the context of forensic anthropology. However, after skeletal maturity (>35yr) estimates become inaccurate, particularly in the legal context. In line with the general migration of all the forensic sciences from reliance upon empirical criteria to those which are more evidence-based, AAD determination should rely more-and-more upon more quantitative methods. We explore here whether well-known changes in the biomechanical properties of bone and the properties of bone matrix, which have been seen to change with age even after skeletal maturity in a traceable manner, can be used to provide a reliable estimate of AAD. This method charts a combination of physical characteristics some of which are measured at a macroscopic level (wet & dry apparent density, porosity, organic/mineral/water fractions, collagen thermal degradation properties, ash content) and others at the microscopic level (Ca/P ratios, osteonal and matrix microhardness, image analysis of sections). This method produced successful age estimates on a cohort of 12 donors of age 53-85yr (7 male, 5 female), where the age of the individual could be approximated within less than ±1yr. This represents a vastly improved level of accuracy than currently extant age estimation techniques. It also presents: (1) a greater level of reliability and objectivity as the results are not dependent on the experience and expertise of the observer, as is so often the case in forensic skeletal age estimation methods; (2) it is purely laboratory-based analytical technique which can be carried out by someone with technical skills and not the specialised forensic anthropology experience; (3) it can

  15. Defining a roadmap for harmonizing quality indicators in Laboratory Medicine: a consensus statement on behalf of the IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Error and Patient Safety" and EFLM Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases".

    PubMed

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Panteghini, Mauro; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; Cadamuro, Janne; Galoro, César Alex De Olivera; Pino Castro, Isabel Garcia Del; Shcolnik, Wilson; Plebani, Mario

    2017-08-28

    The improving quality of laboratory testing requires a deep understanding of the many vulnerable steps involved in the total examination process (TEP), along with the identification of a hierarchy of risks and challenges that need to be addressed. From this perspective, the Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" (WG-LEPS) of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) is focusing its activity on implementation of an efficient tool for obtaining meaningful information on the risk of errors developing throughout the TEP, and for establishing reliable information about error frequencies and their distribution. More recently, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has created the Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases" (TFG-PSEP) for defining performance specifications for extra-analytical phases. Both the IFCC and EFLM groups are working to provide laboratories with a system to evaluate their performances and recognize the critical aspects where improvement actions are needed. A Consensus Conference was organized in Padova, Italy, in 2016 in order to bring together all the experts and interested parties to achieve a consensus for effective harmonization of quality indicators (QIs). A general agreement was achieved and the main outcomes have been the release of a new version of model of quality indicators (MQI), the approval of a criterion for establishing performance specifications and the definition of the type of information that should be provided within the report to the clinical laboratories participating to the QIs project.

  16. Study of the Stability of Various Biochemical Analytes in Samples Stored at Different Predefined Storage Conditions at an Accredited Laboratory of India

    PubMed Central

    Kachhawa, Kamal; Kachhawa, Poonam; Varma, Meena; Behera, Rasmirekha; Agrawal, Divya; Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Storage of serum and other blood products is often necessary in laboratories because of technical issues or to preserve samples for subsequent research purposes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the stability of biochemical analytes is affected by storage conditions. Materials and Methods: A total of 17 biochemical analytes in the sera of ten patients were examined following storage. Subsequent to determining the baseline measurements, the serum of each patient was aliquoted and stored at −20°C for 7, 15, and 30 days and then analyzed for stability. The results were compared with the initial analysis measurements obtained from fresh samples. Mean changes compared to baseline (T0) concentrations were evaluated both statistically and clinically. Results: Our results show that sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, uric acid, total calcium, phosphorus, direct bilirubin, total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were stable under all conditions. Serum amylase was the only analyte demonstrating instability following prolonged storage; amylase levels changed significantly (both statistically and clinically) at 7, 15, and 30 days (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Most common biochemical analytes, except for amylase, showed adequate stability in serum following 30 days of storage at −20­C. Serum amylase analysis should be conducted on the same day that the sample is received in the laboratory. PMID:28042210

  17. International proficiency testing of analytical laboratories for foods and feeds from 1990 to 1996: the experiences of the United Kingdom Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme.

    PubMed

    Key, P E; Patey, A L; Rowling, S; Wilbourn, A; Worner, F M

    1997-01-01

    The Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme (FAPAS) organized by a Secretariat of the UK Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food has checked the proficiency of analytical laboratories for foods and feeds from 1990 to 1996. FAPAS was started for UK laboratories but was expanded worldwide at the request of analysts in other countries who did not have a home-based scheme. Thirteen thousand homogeneity-checked test materials were issued, covering a very wide range of analytes, including pesticides, toxins, veterinary drug residues, trace and nutritional elements, food colors, preservatives, sweeteners, alcohol congeners, fatty acids, nitrate, and proximate analysis. Participants returned 85% of requested data, and 47,000 z-score proficiency assessments were made, of which 81% were satisfactory. Evidence is presented of improvements in overall analytical ability with increased participation in proficiency testing in the areas of proximate analysis; organochlorine pesticide analysis; and lead, mercury, and acesulfame-K analyses. Little improvement was shown in other analytical areas such as calcium analysis. Overall accuracies for analysis of specific pesticides and specific trace elements in the circulated test materials were compared.

  18. Analysis of Environmental Contamination resulting from Catastrophic Incidents: Part two: Building Laboratory Capability by Selecting and Developing Analytical Methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples with analytically diverse types including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface resid...

  19. March 2017 Grenada Manufacturing, LLC Data Validation Reports and Analytical Laboratory Reports for the Main Plant Building Vapor Intrusion Sampling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data Validation Reports and Full Analytical Lab Reports for Indoor Air, Ambient Air and Sub-slab samples taken during the facility vapor intrusion investigation in March 2017 at the Grenada Manufacturing plant

  20. Analysis of Environmental Contamination resulting from Catastrophic Incidents: Part two: Building Laboratory Capability by Selecting and Developing Analytical Methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples with analytically diverse types including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface resid...

  1. An inter-laboratory comparison of different analytical methods for the determination of monomethylmercury in various soil and sediment samples: A platform for method improvement.

    PubMed

    Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H; Matsuyama, Akito; Fajon, Vesna; Horvat, Milena; Tomiyasu, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    An inter-laboratory study was conducted to compare results from different analytical methods for monomethylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in 17 soil and sediment samples. The samples were collected from mercury-contaminated areas, including Minamata Bay and Kagoshima Bay in Japan, the Idrija mercury mine in Slovenia, and an artisanal small-scale gold mining area in Indonesia. The Hg in these samples comes from several different sources: industrial waste from an acetaldehyde production facility, volcanic activity, Hg mining activity, and artisanal and small-scale gold mining activity (ASGM). MeHg concentrations in all the samples were measured in four separate laboratories, using three different determination methods: Kagoshima University (Japan), using high-performance liquid chromatography-chemiluminescence detection (HPLC-CL); National Institute for Minamata Disease (Japan), using gas chromatography-electron capture detection; and Metropolitan Council Environmental Services (USA) and Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), both using alkylation-gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. The methods gave comparable MeHg results for most of the samples tested, but for some samples, the results exhibited significant variability depending on the method used. The HPLC-CL method performed poorly when applied to samples with elevated sulfur concentrations, producing MeHg concentrations that were much lower than those from the other methods. Additional analytical work demonstrated the elimination of this sulfur interference when the method was modified to bind sulfur prior to the analytical step by using Hg(2+) as a masking agent. These results demonstrate the value of laboratory intercomparison exercises in contributing to the improvement of analytical methods.

  2. Authentic Learning Enviroment in Analytical Chemistry Using Cooperative Methods and Open-Ended Laboratories in Large Lecture Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.

    1996-09-01

    It is recognized that a need exists to move from the passive learning styles that have characterized chemistry courses to an active style in which students participate and assume responsibility for their learning (1 - 5). In addition, it is argued that course reform should be linked to authentic student achievement, so that students can actively experience the feelings of practicing professionals (6). Course experiments where such changes have been introduced have proven successful but the number of examples of such changes is limited in the higher level courses or courses with large enrollments (7 - 11). In this paper, a one-semester introductory analytical chemistry course is described that accomplishes this goal by the use of open-ended laboratories, cooperative learning, and spreadsheet programs. The course uses many of the ideas described by Walters (7). It is offered at the upperclass level to nonmajors and at the freshman level to students with solid chemistry backgrounds from high school. Typically there are 90 students, who are divided into 5 sections. A teaching assistant is assigned to each section. The course has two 4-hour laboratories and two or three lectures each week (depending on whether it is the upperclass or freshman course). The heart of the course changes is the use of open-ended laboratory experiments in the last half of the course. A sample group project is to have the students develop a mixture of acid-base indicators that can serve as a spectroscopic pH meter. These projects are enhanced by dividing the students into teams of four who take charge of all aspects of accomplishing the projects' goals. Since there are many skills required to make these projects work, the first half of the course is spent developing the individual conceptual, computational, laboratory, problem solving, and group skills so students are prepared for the last half. These changes have markedly improved the student attitudes towards each other and towards learning

  3. Validation of analytical formulae for the efficiency calibration of gamma detectors used in laboratory and in-situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Mahmoud I

    2006-12-01

    Direct analytical formulae for the efficiency calibration of gamma (scintillation and semiconductor) detectors using an arbitrarily positioned radiating point source are extended to include sources with volumetric shapes. The attenuation of photons by the source itself (self-absorption) is determined by calculating the photon path length through the source material. The theoretical and the published experimental efficiency values are in good agreement.

  4. A reference interval study for common biochemical analytes in Eastern Turkey: a comparison of a reference population with laboratory data mining

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Ozarda, Yesim; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Umudum, Fatma Zuhal; Bakan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) in a Turkish population living in Northeast Turkey (Erzurum) for 34 analytes using direct and indirect methods. In the present study, the regional RIs obtained were compared with other RI studies, primarily the nationwide study performed in Turkey. Materials and methods For the direct method, 435 blood samples were collected from a healthy group of females (N = 218) and males (N = 217) aged between 18 and 65 years. The sera were analysed in Ataturk University hospital laboratory using Roche reagents and analysers for 34 analytes. The data from 1,366,948 records were used to calculate the indirect RIs using a modified Bhattacharya method. Results Significant gender-related differences were observed for 17 analytes. There were also some apparent differences between RIs derived from indirect and direct methods particularly in some analytes (e.g. gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase, LDL-cholesterol and iron). The RIs derived with the direct method for some, but not all, of the analytes were generally comparable with the RIs reported in the nationwide study and other previous studies in Turkey.There were large differences between RIs derived by the direct method and the expected values shown in the kit insert (e.g. aspartate aminotransferase, total-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and vitamin B12). Conclusions These data provide region-specific RIs for 34 analytes determined by the direct and indirect methods. The observed differences in RIs between previous studies could be related to nutritional status and environmental factors. PMID:27346966

  5. A reference interval study for common biochemical analytes in Eastern Turkey: a comparison of a reference population with laboratory data mining.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Ozarda, Yesim; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Umudum, Fatma Zuhal; Bakan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) in a Turkish population living in Northeast Turkey (Erzurum) for 34 analytes using direct and indirect methods. In the present study, the regional RIs obtained were compared with other RI studies, primarily the nationwide study performed in Turkey. For the direct method, 435 blood samples were collected from a healthy group of females (N = 218) and males (N = 217) aged between 18 and 65 years. The sera were analysed in Ataturk University hospital laboratory using Roche reagents and analysers for 34 analytes. The data from 1,366,948 records were used to calculate the indirect RIs using a modified Bhattacharya method. Significant gender-related differences were observed for 17 analytes. There were also some apparent differences between RIs derived from indirect and direct methods particularly in some analytes (e.g. gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase, LDL-cholesterol and iron). The RIs derived with the direct method for some, but not all, of the analytes were generally comparable with the RIs reported in the nationwide study and other previous studies in Turkey.There were large differences between RIs derived by the direct method and the expected values shown in the kit insert (e.g. aspartate aminotransferase, total-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and vitamin B12). These data provide region-specific RIs for 34 analytes determined by the direct and indirect methods. The observed differences in RIs between previous studies could be related to nutritional status and environmental factors.

  6. The study of statistical methods for evaluating the comparability of routine chemistry analytes among 3 routine laboratory measurement systems in China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chuanbao; He, Falin; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests are important for clinicians to make diagnostic decisions, but discrepancies may directly lead to incorrect diagnosis. We would like to introduce some statistical methods to evaluate the comparability of chemistry analytes while comparing the performances of different measurement systems. We used a panel of 10 fresh-frozen single donation serum samples to assess assays for the measurement of glucose and other 13 analytes. Statistical methods used in this article include traditional statistical analysis, robust statistics, regression analysis and differences on medical decision levels (MDL). All the statistical analysis results would be evaluated. 20 Chinese tertiary hospitals accredited to ISO 15189 took part in this work. The commercial random access platforms included: Olympus (8 labs), Hitachi (6 labs) and Roche (6 labs). To compare the acceptable rates, Chi square test was used. The statistical analysis results are as follows: (1) Coefficient of variations are between 2.8 and 3.9 %, with the slopes and intercepts of regression functions between 0.928 to 1.064 and -0.174 to 0.630, respectively. (2) The percentage of robust z-scores between -2 and 2 is bigger than 90 %. (3) The total percentages of differences on all the MDLs are: less than optimal was 31.7 % (19/60); less than desirable was 60.0 % (36/60); less than minimum was 65.0 % (39/60); more than minimum was 35.0 % (21/60). In this study, 2 laboratories (Nos. 8 and 16) were considered as poor performance by z-scores. 10 laboratories (Nos. 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16 and 19) have unacceptable measurement errors on MDLs. 10 laboratories (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 20) can achieve mutual recognition of serum glucose testing results, including: 5 (5/8) Olympus, 2 (2/6) Hitachi and 3 (3/6) Roche. There was no significant difference among acceptable rates of the three measurements systems for the serum glucose assay. Traditional statistical analysis, robust statistics

  7. Analytical Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Laboratory Impacts on Stardust Aluminium Foils: Interpreting Impact Crater Morphology and the Composition of Impact Residues.

    SciTech Connect

    Kearsley, A T; Graham, G A; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-10-19

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms{sup -1}) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 has allowed realistic simulation of dust collection in laboratory experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminium foil components of the Stardust collector. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the impact residues in scanning electron microscopes, and the modification of dust chemical composition during creation of impact craters as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Together, these observations help to underpin the interpretation of size, density and composition for particles impacted upon the Stardust aluminium foils.

  8. Analysis of the analytical performance of laboratories participating in two major U.S. bulk asbestos proficiency testing programs.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Bruce W; Winstead, Wayne G

    2008-07-01

    Quality assurance and proficiency testing programs have been available for 27 years for U.S. laboratories using polarized light microscopy to analyze bulk building materials for asbestos. Total enrollment in the two principal bulk asbestos proficiency testing programs conducted by RTI International peaked at nearly 900 laboratories in the mid-1990s. Enrollment has stabilized in the last 5 years at approximately 475 laboratories, and rates of return of analysis results currently exceed 95%. More than 115,000 test samples have been sent worldwide by RTI to laboratories in these two programs. A review of more than 109,000 analysis results was undertaken to determine the frequencies of various qualitative error types, the types of bulk building materials most responsible for those errors, and the accuracy of precision of semiquantitative results. This assessment revealed that a small number of bulk building materials cause the majority of difficulties in each program, although error frequencies vary between the two programs. Overall laboratory performance has improved since the programs first began in the late 1980s, with a significant decline in qualitative errors and a much less dramatic decrease in errors associated with semiquantitative estimation of the amount of asbestos present.

  9. Stability of purgeable VOCs in water samples during pre-analytical holding: Part 1, Analysis by a commercial laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Bayne, C.K.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L.; Scarborough, S.S.; Bottrell, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that prevalent and priority purgeable VOCs in properly preserved water samples are stable for at least 28 days. (VOCs are considered stable if concentrations do not change by more than 10%.) Surface water was spiked with 44 purgeable VOCs. Results showed that the measurement of 35 out of 44 purgeable VOCs in properly preserved water samples (4 C, 250 mg NaHSO{sub 4}, no headspace in 40 mL VOC vials with 0.010-in. Teflon-lined silicone septum caps) will not be affected by sample storage for 28 days. Larger changes (>10%) and low practical reporting times were observed for a few analytes, e.g. acrolein, CS{sub 2}, vinyl acetate, etc.; these also involve other analytical problems. Advantages of a 28-day (compared to 14-day) holding time are pointed out.

  10. Quality control for the in-clinic veterinary laboratory and pre-analytic considerations for specialized diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Camus, Melinda S

    2016-09-01

    This review, aimed primarily at general practitioners, focuses on quality assurance/quality control principles for all three phases of clinical pathology testing: preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic. Specific emphasis is placed on the preanalytic phase of diagnostic modalities for identifying neoplastic cells, specifically flow cytometry, PCR for antigen receptor rearrangement, and immunocytochemistry. Recommendations for establishing an in-clinic quality assurance system are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatic Spectrophotometric Reaction Rate Determination of Glucose in Fruit Drinks and Carbonated Beverages. An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Food Science-Oriented Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilarou, Argyro-Maria G.; Georgiou, Constantinos A.

    2000-10-01

    The glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase coupled reaction using phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine is used for the kinetic determination of glucose in drinks and beverages. This laboratory experiment demonstrates the implementation of reaction rate kinetic methods of analysis, the use of enzymes as selective analytical reagents for the determination of substrates, the kinetic masking of ascorbic acid interference, and the analysis of glucose in drinks and beverages. The method is optimized for student use in the temperature range of 18-28 °C and can be used in low-budget laboratories equipped with an inexpensive visible photometer. The mixed enzyme-chromogen solution that is used is stable for two months. Precision ranged from 5.1 to 12% RSD for analyses conducted during a period of two months by 48 students.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following approved...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following approved...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following approved...

  15. Assembly of a Modular Fluorimeter and Associated Software: Using LabVIEW in an Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algar, W. Russ; Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory activity for an upper-level undergraduate course in instrumental analysis has been created around LabVIEW. Students learn rudimentary programming and interfacing skills during the construction of a fluorimeter assembled from common modular components. The fluorimeter consists of an inexpensive data acquisition module, LED light…

  16. Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

  17. National Survey on Internal Quality Control for HbA(1c) Analytical Instruments in 331 Hospital Laboratories of China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; Fei, Yang; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The narrow gap of HbA1 value of mass fraction between "normal" (< 6.0%) and "diabetes" (≥ 6.5%) necessitates tight control of inter-assay standardization, assay precision, and trueness. This survey was initiated to obtain knowledge of the current situation of internal quality control (IQC) practice for HbA(1c) in China and find out the most appropriate quality specifications. Data of IQC for HbA(1c) in 331 institutions participating in the national proficiency testing (PT) programs in China were evaluated using four levels of quality specifications, and the percentages of laboratories meeting the quality requirement were calculated to find out the most appropriate quality specifications for control materials of HbA(1c) in China. The IQC data varied vastly among 331 clinical laboratories in China. The measurement of control materials covered a wide range from 4.52% to 12.24% (inter-quartile range) and there were significant differences among the CVs of different methods, including LPLC, CE-HPLC, AC-HPLC, immunoturbidimetry, and others. Among the four main methods, CE-HPLC and AC-HPLC achieved a better precision. As we can see, the performance of laboratories for HbA(1c) has yet to be improved. Clinical laboratories in China should improve their performance with a stricter imprecision criteria.

  18. Assembly of a Modular Fluorimeter and Associated Software: Using LabVIEW in an Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algar, W. Russ; Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory activity for an upper-level undergraduate course in instrumental analysis has been created around LabVIEW. Students learn rudimentary programming and interfacing skills during the construction of a fluorimeter assembled from common modular components. The fluorimeter consists of an inexpensive data acquisition module, LED light…

  19. An Internet-based external quality assessment in cytogenetics that audits a laboratory's analytical and interpretative performance.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Rosalind J; Maher, Eddy J; Quellhorst-Pawley, Bettina; Howell, Rodney T

    2008-10-01

    A novel approach to external quality assessment (EQA) using the Internet mimics the diagnostic situation so that multiple tests can be requested and EQA cases can be 'tailor made' to address a specific chromosome syndrome, disease, or clinical dilemma. The web-based EQA system was trialled on a large UK EQA scheme, UK NEQAS for Clinical Cytogenetics. It has also been used to implement a new Cytogenetics European Quality Assessment scheme, CEQA, set up with the intention of providing laboratories in countries without access to a local EQA scheme the opportunity of participation in EQA. Overall, Internet-based EQA allows for a varied EQA programme. Poor performance was detected in both CEQA and UK NEQAS constitutional EQA schemes and also in the UK NEQAS oncology EQA scheme. The Internet-based EQA overcomes submission delays due to international surface mail. There is also a reduction in administration and assessors' time compared to a retrospective EQA involving the submission of unique cases for EQA assessment, as participants analyse the same three Internet-based EQA cases simultaneously. Many EU27 (EU member states) laboratories still do not participate in their national EQA schemes, so until EQA participation becomes mandatory as a component of compulsory laboratory accreditation, the quality of laboratory diagnostic service is unpredictable.

  20. Creating and Evaluating a Hypertext System of Documenting Analytical Test Methods in a Chemical Plant Quality Assurance Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles E., Jr.

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a hypertext documentation system in an industrial laboratory and to evaluate its usefulness by participative observation and a questionnaire. Existing word-processing test method documentation was converted directly into a hypertext format or "hyperdocument." The hyperdocument was designed and…

  1. Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

  2. A Multi-State Factor-Analytic and Psychometric Meta-Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the 50 agricultural mechanics laboratory management competencies identified by Johnson and Schumacher in 1989 have served as the basis for numerous needs assessments of secondary agriculture teachers. This study reevaluated Johnson and Schumacher's instrument, as modified by Saucier, Schumacher, Funkenbusch, Terry, and…

  3. Analytical techniques for retrieval of atmospheric composition with the quadrupole mass spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Franz, Heather; G. Trainer, Melissa; H. Wong, Michael; L. K. Manning, Heidi; C. Stern, Jennifer; R. Mahaffy, Paul; K. Atreya, Sushil; Benna, Mehdi; G. Conrad, Pamela; N. Harpold, Dan; A. Leshin, Laurie; A. Malespin, Charles; P. McKay, Christopher; Thomas Nolan, J.; Raaen, Eric

    2014-06-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is the largest scientific payload on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, which landed in Mars' Gale Crater in August 2012. As a miniature geochemical laboratory, SAM is well-equipped to address multiple aspects of MSL's primary science goal, characterizing the potential past or present habitability of Gale Crater. Atmospheric measurements support this goal through compositional investigations relevant to martian climate evolution. SAM instruments include a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a gas chromatograph that are used to analyze martian atmospheric gases as well as volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials (Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report presents analytical methods for retrieving the chemical and isotopic composition of Mars' atmosphere from measurements obtained with SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer. It provides empirical calibration constants for computing volume mixing ratios of the most abundant atmospheric species and analytical functions to correct for instrument artifacts and to characterize measurement uncertainties. Finally, we discuss differences in volume mixing ratios of the martian atmosphere as determined by SAM (Mahaffy et al., 2013) and Viking (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977) from an analytical perspective. Although the focus of this paper is atmospheric observations, much of the material concerning corrections for instrumental effects also applies to reduction of data acquired with SAM from analysis of solid samples. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument measures the composition of the martian atmosphere. Rigorous calibration of SAM's mass spectrometer was performed with relevant gas mixtures. Calibration included derivation of a new model to correct for electron multiplier effects. Volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 obtained with SAM differ from those obtained with Viking. Differences between SAM and Viking

  4. Laboratory-scale evaluation of various sampling and analytical methods for determining mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Agbede, R.O.; Bochan, A.J.; Clements, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101A was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.

  5. Combining Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling for measurement uncertainty estimation of hematology analytes in a medical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; Xu, Lili; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Shaoqing; Xu, Shuizhu; Jing, Rongrong

    2017-09-18

    Measurement uncertainty (MU) is a metrological concept, which can be used for objectively estimating the quality of test results in medical laboratories. The Nordtest guide recommends an approach that uses both internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assessment (EQA) data to evaluate the MU. Bootstrap resampling is employed to simulate the unknown distribution based on the mathematical statistics method using an existing small sample of data, where the aim is to transform the small sample into a large sample. However, there have been no reports of the utilization of this method in medical laboratories. Thus, this study applied the Nordtest guide approach based on bootstrap resampling for estimating the MU. We estimated the MU for the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), and platelets (Plt). First, we used 6months of IQC data and 12months of EQA data to calculate the MU according to the Nordtest method. Second, we combined the Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling with the quality control data and calculated the MU using MATLAB software. We then compared the MU results obtained using the two approaches. The expanded uncertainty results determined for WBC, RBC, Hb, and Plt using the bootstrap resampling method were 4.39%, 2.43%, 3.04%, and 5.92%, respectively, and 4.38%, 2.42%, 3.02%, and 6.00% with the existing quality control data (U [k=2]). For WBC, RBC, Hb, and Plt, the differences between the results obtained using the two methods were lower than 1.33%. The expanded uncertainty values were all less than the target uncertainties. The bootstrap resampling method allows the statistical analysis of the MU. Combining the Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling is considered a suitable alternative method for estimating the MU. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of chemistry analytes between 2 portable, commercially available analyzers and a conventional laboratory analyzer in reptiles.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie L; Flatland, Bente; Schumacher, Juergen P; Clarke Iii, Elsburgh O; Fry, Michael M

    2010-12-01

    Advantages of handheld and small bench-top biochemical analyzers include requirements for smaller sample volume and practicality for use in the field or in practices, but little has been published on the performance of these instruments compared with standard reference methods in analysis of reptilian blood. The aim of this study was to compare reptilian blood biochemical values obtained using the Abaxis VetScan Classic bench-top analyzer and a Heska i-STAT handheld analyzer with values obtained using a Roche Hitachi 911 chemical analyzer. Reptiles, including 14 bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps), 4 blue-tongued skinks (Tiliqua gigas), 8 Burmese star tortoises (Geochelone platynota), 10 Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans), 5 red-tailed boas (Boa constrictor), and 5 Northern pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus), were manually restrained, and a single blood sample was obtained and divided for analysis. Results for concentrations of albumin, bile acids, calcium, glucose, phosphates, potassium, sodium, total protein, and uric acid and activities of aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase obtained from the VetScan Classic and Hitachi 911 were compared. Results for concentrations of chloride, glucose, potassium, and sodium obtained from the i-STAT and Hitachi 911 were compared. Compared with results from the Hitachi 911, those from the VetScan Classic and i-STAT had variable correlations, and constant or proportional bias was found for many analytes. Bile acid data could not be evaluated because results for 44 of 45 samples fell below the lower linearity limit of the VetScan Classic. Although the 2 portable instruments might provide measurements with clinical utility, there were significant differences compared with the reference analyzer, and development of analyzer-specific reference intervals is recommended. ©2010 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  8. Dual-domain mass-transfer parameters from electrical hysteresis: theory and analytical approach applied to laboratory, synthetic streambed, and groundwater experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Ong, John B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Models of dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) are used to explain anomalous aquifer transport behavior such as the slow release of contamination and solute tracer tailing. Traditional tracer experiments to characterize DDMT are performed at the flow path scale (meters), which inherently incorporates heterogeneous exchange processes; hence, estimated “effective” parameters are sensitive to experimental design (i.e., duration and injection velocity). Recently, electrical geophysical methods have been used to aid in the inference of DDMT parameters because, unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute dynamics and can target specific points along subsurface flow paths. Here we propose an analytical framework for graphical parameter inference based on a simple petrophysical model explaining the hysteretic relation between measurements of bulk and fluid conductivity arising in the presence of DDMT at the local scale. Analysis is graphical and involves visual inspection of hysteresis patterns to (1) determine the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities and (2) identify the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. We demonstrate the approach using laboratory column experimental data, synthetic streambed experimental data, and field tracer-test data. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. We show that localized electrical hysteresis patterns resulting from diffusive exchange are independent of injection velocity, indicating that repeatable parameters can be extracted under varied experimental designs, and these parameters represent the true intrinsic properties of specific volumes of porous media of aquifers and hyporheic zones.

  9. The Asian project for collaborative derivation of reference intervals: (2) results of non-standardized analytes and transference of reference intervals to the participating laboratories on the basis of cross-comparison of test results.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Kazuo, Mori; Huang, Yang-Yang; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Haruki; Kitagawa, Masami; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Sadao; Tsou, Chia-Chun; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Ishida, Shigeo; Leong, Linda; Sano, Michitaka; Lim, Hwan Sub; Suwabe, Akira; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Kojima, Keiya; Okubo, Yoshio

    2013-07-01

    The 2009 Asian multicenter study for derivation of reference intervals (RIs) featured: 1) centralized measurements to exclude reagent-dependent variations; 2) inclusion of non-standardized analytes (hormones, tumor makers, etc.) in the target; and 3) cross-check of test results between the central and local laboratories. Transferability of centrally derived RIs for non-standardized analytes based on the cross-check was examined. Forty non-standardized analytes were centrally measured in sera from 3541 reference individuals recruited by 63 laboratories. Forty-four laboratories collaborated in the cross-check study by locally measuring aliquots of sera from 9 to 73 volunteers (average 22.2). Linear relationships were obtained by the major-axis regression. Error in converting RIs using the regression line was expressed by the coefficient of variation of slope b [CV(b)]. CV(b) <10% was set as the cut-off value allowing the conversion. The significance of factors for partitioning RIs was determined similarly as in the first report. Significant sex-, age-, and region-related changes in test results were observed in 17, 15, and 11 of the 40 analytes, respectively. In the cross-comparison study, test results were not harmonized in the majority of immunologically measured analytes, but their average CV(b)s were <10% except for total protein, cystatin C, CA19-9, free thyroxine, and triiodothyronine. After conversion, 74% of centrally derived RIs were transferred to each local laboratory. Our results point to the feasibility of: 1) harmonizing test results across different laboratories; and 2) sharing centrally derived RIs of non-standardized analytes by means of comparative measurement of a set of commutable specimens.

  10. Validated analytical data summary report for White Oak Creek Watershed remedial investigation supplemental sampling, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM Federal) was tasked by the Environmental Restoration Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Inc. (Energy Systems), to collect supplemental surface soil data for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. The WOC watershed RI/FS is being conducted to define a remediation approach for complying with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The data generated from these supplemental sampling activities will be incorporated into the RUFS to aid decision makers and stakeholders with the selection of remedial alternatives and establish remediation goals for the WOC watershed. A series of Data Quality Objective (DQO) meetings were held in February 1996 to determine data needs for the WOC watershed RI/FS. The meetings were attended by representatives from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and contractors to DOE. During the DQO meetings, it was determined that the human health risk associated with exposure to radionuclides was high enough to establish a baseline for action; however, it was also determined that the impacts associated with other analytes (mainly metals) were insufficient for determining the baseline ecological risk. Based on this premise, it was determined that additional sampling would be required at four of the Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) included in the WOC watershed to fulfill this data gap.

  11. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  12. European multicentre evaluation of the Du Pont Dimension 380 under the auspices of the European Group for the Evaluation of Analytical Systems in Laboratory Medicine (EGE-Lab).

    PubMed

    Hänseler, E; Vonderschmitt, D; Haeckel, R; Römer, M; Collombel, C; Goudable, J; Pourcher, E

    1991-01-01

    The Clinical Chemistry Analyzer Dimension 380 manufactured by Du Pont de Nemours was tested in a multicentre evaluation according to the guide-lines of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (ECCLS) and in part to the protocol of the Société Française de Biologie Clinique (SFBC). The instrument and the reagents were evaluated as a system, since both reagents and reagent cartridges are specifically designed for the instrument. Fourteen analytes including electrolytes, substrates and enzymes were tested. The evaluators summarized their experience as follows: 1. All parameters tested yield results comparable to established procedures. 2. Very good performance of the ion-selective-electrode unit. 3. The imprecision data of the system are, for most parameters, between 1 and 4% CV and thus equal to or better than those of the instruments compared. 4. No reagent or sample carry-over was detected after a minor modification of the instrument. 5. The linearity of Dimension test methods in general covers the range stated by the manufacturer. 6. Very good stability of the calibration curves (up to 2 months). 7. Good practicability of the whole system, including handling of reagents and a very user-friendly software.

  13. Analytical sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); McConchie, D.M. . Centre for Coastal Management)

    1994-01-01

    Both a self instruction manual and a cookbook'' guide to field and laboratory analytical procedures, this book provides an essential reference for non-specialists. With a minimum of mathematics and virtually no theory, it introduces practitioners to easy, inexpensive options for sample collection and preparation, data acquisition, analytic protocols, result interpretation and verification techniques. This step-by-step guide considers the advantages and limitations of different procedures, discusses safety and troubleshooting, and explains support skills like mapping, photography and report writing. It also offers managers, off-site engineers and others using sediments data a quick course in commissioning studies and making the most of the reports. This manual will answer the growing needs of practitioners in the field, either alone or accompanied by Practical Sedimentology, which surveys the science of sedimentology and provides a basic overview of the principles behind the applications.

  14. Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (3-hydroxycotinine/cotinine) in Plasma and Urine by Different Analytical Methods and Laboratories: Implications for Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Julie-Anne; Novalen, Maria; Jatlow, Peter; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Murphy, Sharon E.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kankaanpää, Aino; Galanti, Laurence; Stefan, Cristiana; George, Tony P.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The highly genetically variable enzyme CYP2A6 metabolizes nicotine to cotinine (COT) and COT to trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (3HC). The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR, 3HC/COT) is commonly used as a biomarker of CYP2A6 enzymatic activity, rate of nicotine metabolism, and total nicotine clearance; NMR is associated with numerous smoking phenotypes, including smoking cessation. Our objective was to investigate the impact of different measurement methods, at different sites, on plasma and urinary NMR measures from ad libitum smokers. Methods Plasma (n=35) and urine (n=35) samples were sent to eight different laboratories, which employed similar and different methods of COT and 3HC measurements to derive the NMR. We used Bland-Altman analysis to assess agreement, and Pearson correlations to evaluate associations, between NMR measured by different methods. Results Measures of plasma NMR were in strong agreement between methods according to Bland-Altman analysis (ratios 0.82–1.16) and were highly correlated (all Pearson r>0.96, P<0.0001). Measures of urinary NMR were in relatively weaker agreement (ratios 0.62–1.71) and less strongly correlated (Pearson r values of 0.66–0.98, P<0.0001) between different methods. Plasma and urinary COT and 3HC concentrations, while weaker than NMR, also showed good agreement in plasma, which was better than in urine, as was observed for NMR. Conclusions Plasma is a very reliable biological source for the determination of NMR, robust to differences in these analytical protocols or assessment site. Impact Together this indicates a reduced need for differential interpretation of plasma NMR results based on the approach used, allowing for direct comparison of different studies. PMID:26014804

  15. Analytical techniques: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation, containing articles on a number of analytical techniques for quality control engineers and laboratory workers, is presented. Data cover techniques for testing electronic, mechanical, and optical systems, nondestructive testing techniques, and gas analysis techniques.

  16. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  17. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  18. APPLICATION OF NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTICS TO EVALUATE THE COMPARABILITY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FROM TWO U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER-QUALITY LABORATORIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peart, Dale B.; Friedman, Linda C.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey operates two water-quality laboratories. The quality of data produced by each laboratory is judged primarily from an evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of reference samples. Quality-assurance reports that contain an analysis of the results obtained from chemical analysis of these reference materials by the two laboratories are prepared quarterly, and annual summaries of the data are published. The procedures that are used to determine whether a laboratory shows an overall lack of precision or bias involve the application of binomial distributions to the data.

  19. [Laboratory of Biopolymer Compounds].

    PubMed

    Ostapchuk, A M

    2008-01-01

    General information is presented concerning the Laboratory of Biological Polymeric Compounds at the Institute of Microbiology and Virology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; equipment, analytical and biophysical methods applied in the laboratory are listed.

  20. Web Analytics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Web Analytics Program collects, analyzes, and provides reports on traffic, quality assurance, and customer satisfaction metrics for EPA’s website. The program uses a variety of analytics tools, including Google Analytics and CrazyEgg.

  1. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Shane; Nigbor, Mike; Hillman, Daniel

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  2. Low-Cost Method for Quantifying Sodium in Coconut Water and Seawater for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Flame Test, a Mobile Phone Camera, and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Edgar P.; da Silva, Nilbert S. A.; de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; das Neves, Luiz S.; de Lima, Kassio M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The flame test is a classical analytical method that is often used to teach students how to identify specific metals. However, some universities in developing countries have difficulties acquiring the sophisticated instrumentation needed to demonstrate how to identify and quantify metals. In this context, a method was developed based on the flame…

  3. Low-Cost Method for Quantifying Sodium in Coconut Water and Seawater for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Flame Test, a Mobile Phone Camera, and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Edgar P.; da Silva, Nilbert S. A.; de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; das Neves, Luiz S.; de Lima, Kassio M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The flame test is a classical analytical method that is often used to teach students how to identify specific metals. However, some universities in developing countries have difficulties acquiring the sophisticated instrumentation needed to demonstrate how to identify and quantify metals. In this context, a method was developed based on the flame…

  4. Laboratory diagnosis of gestational diabetes: An in silico investigation into the effects of pre-analytical processing on the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Erin; Lunt, Helen; Docherty, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Delayed separation of red cells from plasma causes pre analytical glucose loss, which in turn results in an under-diagnosis of GDM (gestational diabetes) based on the OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test). In silico investigations may help laboratory decision making, when exploring pragmatic improvements to sample processing. Late pregnancy 0, 1 and 2h 75g OGTT values were obtained from two distinct populations of pregnant women: 1. Values derived from the HAPO (Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome) Study and 2. New Zealand women identified as at higher risk of GDM by their caregivers, undergoing OGTT during routine antenatal care. In both populations studied, in silico modelling focussed on the effects of pre-analytical delays in plasma separation, when using fluoride collection tubes. Using a model that 'batched' samples from the three OGTT collection times, diagnostic sensitivity was estimated as follows: 66.1% for HAPO research population and 48.4% for the 1305 women receiving routine antenatal care. If samples were not batched, but processed shortly after each blood sample was collected, then sensitivity increased to 81%. Exploration of a range of clinical and laboratory scenarios using in silico modelling, showed that delaying the processing of pregnancy OGTT samples, using batched sample collection into fluoride tubes, causes unacceptable loss of GDM diagnostic sensitivity across two distinct population groups. This modelling approach will hopefully provide information that helps with final decision making around improved laboratory processing techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Modern Solid-State Analytical Tools for Investigations of an Advanced Carbon Capture Material: Experiments for the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wriedt, Mario; Sculley, Julian P.; Aulakh, Darpandeep; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    A simple and straightforward synthesis of an ultrastable porous metal-organic framework (MOF) based on copper(II) and a mixed N donor ligand system is described as a laboratory experiment for chemistry undergraduate students. These experiments and the resulting analysis are designed to teach students basic research tools and procedures while…

  6. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  7. Using Modern Solid-State Analytical Tools for Investigations of an Advanced Carbon Capture Material: Experiments for the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wriedt, Mario; Sculley, Julian P.; Aulakh, Darpandeep; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    A simple and straightforward synthesis of an ultrastable porous metal-organic framework (MOF) based on copper(II) and a mixed N donor ligand system is described as a laboratory experiment for chemistry undergraduate students. These experiments and the resulting analysis are designed to teach students basic research tools and procedures while…

  8. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  9. SRL online Analytical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R&D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R&D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control & Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

  10. SRL online Analytical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

  11. Principles of analytical validation of next-generation sequencing based mutational analysis for hematologic neoplasms in a CLIA-certified laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Singh, Rajesh R; Routbort, Mark J; Patel, Keyur P; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy based on mutational profiles is the current standard of practice for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies. Next-generation sequencing (NGS)- based analysis has been adopted by clinical laboratories for high-throughput mutational profiling of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. The technology is fairly novel and complex, hence both validation and test implementation in a CLIA-certified laboratory differ substantially from traditional sequencing platforms. Recently, organizations such as the American College of Medical Genetics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and College of American Pathologists have published principles and guidelines for NGS test development to ensure standardization of testing across institutions. Summarized here are the recommendations from these organizations as they pertain to targeted NGS-based testing of hematologic malignancies ('liquid tumors'), with particular emphasis on myeloid neoplasms.

  12. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis for geochemical analyses of terrestrial impact structures: current analytical procedures at the university of vienna geochemistry activation analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-12-01

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory at the Department of Lithospheric Research, University of Vienna, has been upgraded in the year 2006. This paper describes the sample preparation, new instrumentation and data evaluation for hundreds of rock samples of two terrestrial impact structures. The measurement and data evaluation are done by using Genie 2000 and a custom-made batch software for the used analysis sequences.

  13. Laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Bradway, D E; Siegelman, F L

    1994-09-01

    An investigation of alleged data fraud at a pesticide analytical laboratory led EPA to take a closer look at the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) inspection program. There was special focus on changes which might be made in the program to enhance the chances of detecting fraud in regulated studies. To this end, the Assistant Administrator of the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) requested EPA's Office of Inspector General (OIG) to examine the GLP program. Several reports were issued by the OIG, including the recommendation that a laboratory accreditation program be adopted. EPA has been examining ways to implement the OIG's recommendations, including (1) laboratory accreditation consisting of three components: document submission and assessment, site visit and assessment, and proficiency assessment; and (2) mandatory registration of all facilities participating in GLP-regulated studies, based on document submission and assessment. These two alternatives are compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed.

  14. Environmental Response Laboratory Network (ERLN) Laboratory Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network requires its member labs follow specified quality systems, sample management, data reporting, and general, in order to ensure consistent analytical data of known and documented quality.

  15. Non-destructive micro-analytical differentiation of copper pigments in paint layers of works of art using laboratory-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Svarcová, Silvie; Cermáková, Zdeňka; Hradilová, Janka; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David

    2014-11-11

    An unambiguous identification of pigments in paint layers of works of art forms a substantial part of the description of a painting technique, which is essential for the evaluation of the work of art including determination of the period and/or region of its creation as well as its attribution to a workshop or an author. Copper pigments represent a significant group of materials used in historic paintings. Because of their substantial diversity and, on the other hand, similarity, their identification and differentiation is a challenging task. An analytical procedure for unambiguous determination of both mineral-type (azurite, malachite, posnjakite, atacamite, etc.) and verdigris-type (copper acetates) copper pigments in the paint layers is presented, including light microscopy under VIS and UV light, electron microscopy with elemental microanalysis, Fourier transformed infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR), and X-ray powder micro-diffraction (micro-XRD). Micro-Raman measurements were largely hindered by fluorescence. The choice of the analytical methods meets the contemporary requirement of a detailed description of various components in heterogeneous and minute samples of paint layers without their destruction. It is beneficial to use the combination of phase sensitive methods such as micro-FTIR and micro-XRD, because it allows the identification of both mineral-type and verdigris-type copper pigments in one paint layer. In addition, preliminary results concerning the study of the loss of crystallinity of verdigris-type pigments in proteinaceous binding media and the effect of lead white and lead tin yellow as highly absorbing matrix on verdigris identification in paint layers are reported.

  16. Non-destructive micro-analytical differentiation of copper pigments in paint layers of works of art using laboratory-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švarcová, Silvie; Čermáková, Zdeňka; Hradilová, Janka; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David

    2014-11-01

    An unambiguous identification of pigments in paint layers of works of art forms a substantial part of the description of a painting technique, which is essential for the evaluation of the work of art including determination of the period and/or region of its creation as well as its attribution to a workshop or an author. Copper pigments represent a significant group of materials used in historic paintings. Because of their substantial diversity and, on the other hand, similarity, their identification and differentiation is a challenging task. An analytical procedure for unambiguous determination of both mineral-type (azurite, malachite, posnjakite, atacamite, etc.) and verdigris-type (copper acetates) copper pigments in the paint layers is presented, including light microscopy under VIS and UV light, electron microscopy with elemental microanalysis, Fourier transformed infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR), and X-ray powder micro-diffraction (micro-XRD). Micro-Raman measurements were largely hindered by fluorescence. The choice of the analytical methods meets the contemporary requirement of a detailed description of various components in heterogeneous and minute samples of paint layers without their destruction. It is beneficial to use the combination of phase sensitive methods such as micro-FTIR and micro-XRD, because it allows the identification of both mineral-type and verdigris-type copper pigments in one paint layer. In addition, preliminary results concerning the study of the loss of crystallinity of verdigris-type pigments in proteinaceous binding media and the effect of lead white and lead tin yellow as highly absorbing matrix on verdigris identification in paint layers are reported.

  17. Inter-laboratory comparison of an analytical method for the determination of the feed additive semduramicin in poultry feed at authorised level by liquid chromatography single quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Huebra, M J; Vincent, U; von Holst, C

    2011-01-01

    A collaborative study was carried out according to internationally recognised guidelines in order to establish the performance characteristics of an LC/MS method for the determination of the feed additive semduramicin (SEM) in poultry feed at the level (20-25 mg kg(-1)) authorised within the European Union. Fifteen laboratories participated in the validation study, and all reported results. The content of SEM in the tested materials, provided as blind duplicates, ranged from 11.5 mg kg(-1), which corresponds to half the mean authorised level, to 45.0 mg kg(-1), which corresponds to twice the mean authorised level. All the materials were analysed by the participating laboratories using two different quantification approaches: standard addition and external standard calibration. The relative standard deviation of reproducibility (RSD(R)) for both quantification approaches varied from 8% to 18%, corresponding to HORRAT values ranging from 0.8 to 1.5, which were therefore in all cases below the critical value of 2.0. Consequently, the proposed analytical method and both quantification approaches can be considered to be fully validated and transferable to the control laboratories and applied for the determination of SEM in poultry compound feed at authorised level within the frame of official control. Further steps in the administrative procedure aiming to adopt the method as part of an ISO/CEN standard are currently ongoing.

  18. 7 CFR 98.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Analytical methods. 98.4 Section 98.4 Agriculture....4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to.... Army Individual Protection Directorate's Military Specifications, approved analytical test...

  19. 7 CFR 98.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Analytical methods. 98.4 Section 98.4 Agriculture... Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform analyses... Protection Directorate's Military Specifications, approved analytical test methods noted therein, U.S....

  20. 7 CFR 98.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Analytical methods. 98.4 Section 98.4 Agriculture....4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to.... Army Individual Protection Directorate's Military Specifications, approved analytical test...

  1. Optimisation of an analytical method and results from the inter-laboratory comparison of the migration of regulated substances from food packaging into the new mandatory European Union simulant for dry foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Natalia; Beldì, Giorgia; Peychès Bach, Aurélie; Simoneau, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of the development, optimisation and validation at European Union level of an analytical method for using poly(2,6-diphenyl phenylene oxide--PPPO), which is stipulated in Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011, as food simulant E for testing specific migration from plastics into dry foodstuffs. Two methods for fortifying respectively PPPO and a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film with surrogate substances that are relevant to food contact were developed. A protocol for cleaning the PPPO and an efficient analytical method were developed for the quantification of butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), benzophenone (BP), diisobutylphthalate (DiBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) and 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, diisononyl ester (DINCH) from PPPO. A protocol for a migration test from plastics using small migration cells was also developed. The method was validated by an inter-laboratory comparison (ILC) with 16 national reference laboratories for food contact materials in the European Union. This allowed for the first time data to be obtained on the precision and laboratory performance of both migration and quantification. The results showed that the validation ILC was successful even when taking into account the complexity of the exercise. The results showed that the method performance was 7-9% repeatability standard deviation (rSD) for most substances (regardless of concentration), with 12% rSD for the high level of BHT and for DiBP at very low levels. The reproducibility standard deviation results for the 16 European Union laboratories were in the range of 20-30% for the quantification from PPPO (for the three levels of concentrations of the five substances) and 15-40% from migration experiments from the fortified plastic at 60°C for 10 days and subsequent quantification. Considering the lack of data previously available in the literature, this work has demonstrated that the validation of a method is possible both for migration from a film and for

  2. Clean Water Act Analytical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA publishes laboratory analytical methods (test procedures) that are used by industries and municipalities to analyze the chemical, physical and biological components of wastewater and other environmental samples required by the Clean Water Act.

  3. Analytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90° rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  4. Analytic materials.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  5. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  6. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  7. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E; Stender, Anthony S; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  8. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  9. Expert Systems for the Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Monchy, Allan R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses two computer problem solving programs: rule-based expert systems and decision analysis expert systems. Explores the application of expert systems to automated chemical analyses. Presents six factors to consider before using expert systems. (MVL)

  10. Expert Systems for the Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Monchy, Allan R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses two computer problem solving programs: rule-based expert systems and decision analysis expert systems. Explores the application of expert systems to automated chemical analyses. Presents six factors to consider before using expert systems. (MVL)

  11. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.4 Analytical methods. The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform mandatory analyses for egg products are listed as...

  12. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.4 Section 94.4 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.4 Analytical methods. The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform mandatory analyses for egg products are listed as...

  13. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.4 Section 94.4 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.4 Analytical methods. The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform mandatory analyses for egg products are listed as...

  14. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  15. Environmental Response Laboratory Network (ERLN) Data Submission Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These Environmental Response Laboratory Network specifications are essential to the mission of providing consistent analytical data of know and documented quality for each Analytical Service Request (ASR).

  16. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  17. 42 CFR 493.1250 - Condition: Analytic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Analytic systems. 493.1250 Section 493... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1250 Condition: Analytic systems. Each laboratory that performs nonwaived testing must meet...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1250 - Condition: Analytic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Analytic systems. 493.1250 Section 493... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1250 Condition: Analytic systems. Each laboratory that performs nonwaived testing must meet...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1250 - Condition: Analytic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Analytic systems. 493.1250 Section 493... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1250 Condition: Analytic systems. Each laboratory that performs nonwaived testing must meet...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1250 - Condition: Analytic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Analytic systems. 493.1250 Section 493... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1250 Condition: Analytic systems. Each laboratory that performs nonwaived testing must meet...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1250 - Condition: Analytic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Analytic systems. 493.1250 Section 493... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1250 Condition: Analytic systems. Each laboratory that performs nonwaived testing must meet...

  2. Drinking Water and Wastewater Laboratory Networks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This website provides the drinking water sector with an integrated nationwide network of laboratories with the analytical capability to respond to intentional and unintentional drinking water incidents.

  3. Product identification techniques used as training aids for analytical chemists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    Laboratory staff assistants are trained to use data and observations of routine product analyses performed by experienced analytical chemists when analyzing compounds for potential toxic hazards. Commercial products are used as examples in teaching the analytical approach to unknowns.

  4. Analytical and test equipment: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of innovations in testing and measuring technology for both the laboratory and industry. Topics discussed include spectrometers, radiometers, and descriptions of analytical and test equipment in several areas including thermodynamics, fluid flow, electronics, and materials testing.

  5. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  6. Enterprise analytics.

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-09-01

    Ranking search results is a thorny issue for enterprise search. Search engines rank results using a variety of sophisticated algorithms, but users still complain that search can't ever seem to find anything useful or relevant! The challenge is to provide results that are ranked according to the users definition of relevancy. Sandia National Laboratories has enhanced its commercial search engine to discover user preferences, re-ranking results accordingly. Immediate positive impact was achieved by modeling historical data consisting of user queries and subsequent result clicks. New data is incorporated into the model daily. An important benefit is that results improve naturally and automatically over time as a function of user actions. This session presents the method employed, how it was integrated with the search engine,metrics illustrating the subsequent improvement to the users search experience, and plans for implementation with Sandia's FAST for SharePoint 2010 search engine.

  7. Procedures For Microbial-Ecology Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1993-01-01

    Microbial Ecology Laboratory Procedures Manual provides concise and well-defined instructions on routine technical procedures to be followed in microbiological laboratory to ensure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  8. 30 CFR 795.10 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Qualified laboratories. 795.10 Section 795.10... laboratories. (a) Basic qualifications. To be designated a qualified laboratory, a firm shall demonstrate that... necessary field samples and making hydrologic field measurements and analytical laboratory determinations...

  9. 30 CFR 795.10 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Qualified laboratories. 795.10 Section 795.10... laboratories. (a) Basic qualifications. To be designated a qualified laboratory, a firm shall demonstrate that... necessary field samples and making hydrologic field measurements and analytical laboratory determinations...

  10. 30 CFR 795.10 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Qualified laboratories. 795.10 Section 795.10... laboratories. (a) Basic qualifications. To be designated a qualified laboratory, a firm shall demonstrate that... necessary field samples and making hydrologic field measurements and analytical laboratory determinations...

  11. 30 CFR 795.10 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Qualified laboratories. 795.10 Section 795.10... laboratories. (a) Basic qualifications. To be designated a qualified laboratory, a firm shall demonstrate that... necessary field samples and making hydrologic field measurements and analytical laboratory determinations...

  12. LABORATORY MISCONDUCT - WHAT CAN HAPPEN TO YOU?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contracted laboratories perform a vast number of routine and special analytical services that are the foundation of decisions upon which rests the fate of the environment. Guiding these laboratories in the generation of environmental data has been the analytical protocols and ...

  13. LABORATORY MISCONDUCT - WHAT CAN HAPPEN TO YOU?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contracted laboratories perform a vast number of routine and special analytical services that are the foundation of decisions upon which rests the fate of the environment. Guiding these laboratories in the generation of environmental data has been the analytical protocols and ...

  14. Analytical clinical chemistry precision. State of the art for fourteen analytes.

    PubMed

    Ross, J W; Fraser, M D

    1977-07-01

    Relationships of concentration and coefficient of variation for 14 clinical chemistry analytes are described. Estimated mean regression curves and standard deviations of individual laboratory coefficients of variation about the mean regression are calculated. Two analytes, calcium and sodium, showed no relationship of concentration to precision. Twelve analytes showed significant relations between concentration and coefficient of variation. State-of-the-art precision is compared with medical goals. The average coefficient of variation for one analyte, calcium, fails to meet medical goals for automated or manual methods. Average precisions for 13 analytes meet medical goals. The distribution of individual laboratory precision above average state-of-the-art figures is discussed. The proportions of laboratories failing to meet medical goals are large for sodium, chloride and glucose, in addition to calcium.

  15. Laboratory Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    CARLSON, D.D.

    1999-10-08

    Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

  16. Emphasizing Mineral Chemistry in an Analytical Chemistry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry unit in the second year of the chemistry degree course at Curtin University that was designed to reflect the numerous employment opportunities for chemistry graduates in the mineral processing industries and private analytical laboratories. Presents the lecture syllabus, the laboratory course description, and…

  17. Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ARL-TR-7286 ● MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation by...TR-7286 ● MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation Patricia L McDermott...

  18. Analytical Chemistry and Measurement Science: (What Has DOE Done for Analytical Chemistry?)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Shults, W. D.

    1989-04-01

    Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or were brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business.

  19. Analytical chemistry and measurement science: (What has DOE done for analytical chemistry. )

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six ''high impact'' research/development areas that either originated within or were brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. ''High impact'' means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business. 21 refs.

  20. Analytical chemistry and measurement science; (What DOE has done for analytical chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D. . Analytical Chemistry Div.)

    1989-11-01

    Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex have had impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six research/development areas that either originated within or were brought to maturity with the DOE laboratories. These areas have lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business.

  1. Hanford analytical services quality assurance requirements documents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1997-09-25

    Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD) is issued by the Analytical Services, Program of the Waste Management Division, US Department of Energy (US DOE), Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The HASQARD establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700.6C (DOE 1991b). The HASQARD is designed to meet the needs of DOE-RL for maintaining a consistent level of quality for sampling and field and laboratory analytical services provided by contractor and commercial field and laboratory analytical operations. The HASQARD serves as the quality basis for all sampling and field/laboratory analytical services provided to DOE-RL through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Management Division in support of Hanford Site environmental cleanup efforts. This includes work performed by contractor and commercial laboratories and covers radiological and nonradiological analyses. The HASQARD applies to field sampling, field analysis, and research and development activities that support work conducted under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement and regulatory permit applications and applicable permit requirements described in subsections of this volume. The HASQARD applies to work done to support process chemistry analysis (e.g., ongoing site waste treatment and characterization operations) and research and development projects related to Hanford Site environmental cleanup activities. This ensures a uniform quality umbrella to analytical site activities predicated on the concepts contained in the HASQARD. Using HASQARD will ensure data of known quality and technical defensibility of the methods used to obtain that data. The HASQARD is made up of four volumes: Volume 1, Administrative Requirements; Volume 2, Sampling Technical Requirements; Volume 3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements; and Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements. Volume 1 describes the administrative requirements

  2. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  3. Let's Talk... Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  5. Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrew Stephen, Timothy Veenstra, and Gordon Whiteley, Guest Writers, and Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

  6. Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrew Stephen, Timothy Veenstra, and Gordon Whiteley, Guest Writers, and Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

  7. Use of Veterinary Records To Teach Laboratory Thinking Skills in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolverton, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol using clinical veterinary data that teaches the cognitive, analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary for students in a biology core laboratory course. (WRM)

  8. Use of Veterinary Records To Teach Laboratory Thinking Skills in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolverton, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol using clinical veterinary data that teaches the cognitive, analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary for students in a biology core laboratory course. (WRM)

  9. [From laboratory to practice: counseling with clinicians].

    PubMed

    Watson, I D

    2014-05-01

    The provision of medical laboratory services is a key element in diagnostic and treatment. The care of analytical quality remains in focus of attention. The interest to pre-analytical quality increased. However, alongside with it quality of post-analytical stage and such its significant element as support of timely and effective application of laboratory results in interest of patient has great importance. The purpose of study was to consider approaches to development of this aspect of medical laboratory practice and to demonstrate the modes which proved their effectiveness.

  10. Hanford analytical sample projections 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.M.

    1996-06-26

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1996 to 2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Analytical Services, Site Monitoring, and Industrial Hygiene. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

  11. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  12. Laboratory Microcomputing

    PubMed Central

    York, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers will play a major role in the laboratory, not only in the calculation and interpretation of clinical test data, but also will have an increasing place of importance in the management of laboratory resources in the face of the transition from revenue generating to the cost center era. We will give you a glimpse of what can be accomplished with the management data already collected by many laboratories today when the data are processed into meaningful reports.

  13. Laboratory Building

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  14. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  15. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  16. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  17. Harmonization of pre-analytical quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    Plebani, Mario; Sciacovelli, Laura; Aita, Ada; Chiozza, Maria Laura

    2014-01-01

    Quality indicators (QIs) measure the extent to which set targets are attained and provide a quantitative basis for achieving improvement in care and, in particular, laboratory services. A body of evidence collected in recent years has demonstrated that most errors fall outside the analytical phase, while the pre- and post-analytical steps have been found to be more vulnerable to the risk of error. However, the current lack of attention to extra-laboratory factors and related QIs prevent clinical laboratories from effectively improving total quality and reducing errors. Errors in the pre-analytical phase, which account for 50% to 75% of all laboratory errors, have long been included in the ‘identification and sample problems’ category. However, according to the International Standard for medical laboratory accreditation and a patient-centered view, some additional QIs are needed. In particular, there is a need to measure the appropriateness of all test request and request forms, as well as the quality of sample transportation. The QIs model developed by a working group of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) is a valuable starting point for promoting the harmonization of available QIs, but further efforts should be made to achieve a consensus on the road map for harmonization. PMID:24627719

  18. Harmonization of pre-analytical quality indicators.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario; Sciacovelli, Laura; Aita, Ada; Chiozza, Maria Laura

    2014-01-01

    Quality indicators (QIs) measure the extent to which set targets are attained and provide a quantitative basis for achieving improvement in care and, in particular, laboratory services. A body of evidence collected in recent years has demonstrated that most errors fall outside the analytical phase, while the pre- and post-analytical steps have been found to be more vulnerable to the risk of error. However, the current lack of attention to extra-laboratory factors and related QIs prevent clinical laboratories from effectively improving total quality and reducing errors. Errors in the pre-analytical phase, which account for 50% to 75% of all laboratory errors, have long been included in the 'identification and sample problems' category. However, according to the International Standard for medical laboratory accreditation and a patient-centered view, some additional QIs are needed. In particular, there is a need to measure the appropriateness of all test request and request forms, as well as the quality of sample transportation. The QIs model developed by a working group of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) is a valuable starting point for promoting the harmonization of available QIs, but further efforts should be made to achieve a consensus on the road map for harmonization.

  19. The ideal laboratory information system.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Jorge L; Young, Donald S

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory information systems (LIS) are critical components of the operation of clinical laboratories. However, the functionalities of LIS have lagged significantly behind the capacities of current hardware and software technologies, while the complexity of the information produced by clinical laboratories has been increasing over time and will soon undergo rapid expansion with the use of new, high-throughput and high-dimensionality laboratory tests. In the broadest sense, LIS are essential to manage the flow of information between health care providers, patients, and laboratories and should be designed to optimize not only laboratory operations but also personalized clinical care. To list suggestions for designing LIS with the goal of optimizing the operation of clinical laboratories while improving clinical care by intelligent management of laboratory information. Literature review, interviews with laboratory users, and personal experience and opinion. Laboratory information systems can improve laboratory operations and improve patient care. Specific suggestions for improving the function of LIS are listed under the following sections: (1) Information Security, (2) Test Ordering, (3) Specimen Collection, Accessioning, and Processing, (4) Analytic Phase, (5) Result Entry and Validation, (6) Result Reporting, (7) Notification Management, (8) Data Mining and Cross-sectional Reports, (9) Method Validation, (10) Quality Management, (11) Administrative and Financial Issues, and (12) Other Operational Issues.

  20. Exploration Laboratory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, M.; Ronzano, K.; Shaw, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability for manned exploration missions. Since a single, compact space-ready laboratory analysis capability to perform all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available, the ELA project objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of emerging operational and analytical capability as a biomedical diagnostics precursor to long duration manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations in fiscal year (FY) 2015 was the downselection of platform technologies for demonstrations in the space environment. The technologies selected included two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) performers: DNA Medicine Institute's rHEALTH X and Intelligent Optical System's lateral flow assays combined with Holomic's smartphone analyzer. The selection of these technologies were based on their compact size, breadth of analytical capability and favorable ability to process fluids in a space environment, among several factors. These two technologies will be advanced to meet ground and flight demonstration success criteria and requirements. The technology demonstrations and metrics for success will be finalized in FY16. Also, the downselected performers will continue the technology development phase towards meeting prototype deliverables in either late 2016 or 2017.

  1. Exploration Laboratory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, M.; Ronzano, K.; Shaw, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability for manned exploration missions. Since a single, compact space-ready laboratory analysis capability to perform all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available, the ELA project objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of emerging operational and analytical capability as a biomedical diagnostics precursor to long duration manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations in fiscal year (FY) 2015 was the down selection of platform technologies for demonstrations in the space environment. The technologies selected included two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) performers: DNA Medicine Institutes rHEALTH X and Intelligent Optical Systems later flow assays combined with Holomics smartphone analyzer. The selection of these technologies were based on their compact size, breadth of analytical capability and favorable ability to process fluids in a space environment, among several factors. These two technologies will be advanced to meet ground and flight demonstration success criteria and requirements that will be finalized in FY16. Also, the down selected performers will continue the technology development phase towards meeting prototype deliverables in either late 2016 or 2017.

  2. Environmental Response Laboratory Network Membership and Benefits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Member laboratories must meet core requirements including quality systems, policies and procedures, sample and data management, and analytical capabilities. Benefits include training and exercise opportunities, information sharing and technical support.

  3. Environmental Response Laboratory Network (ERLN) Overview

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides Federal, State, and local decision-makers with reliable, high quality analytical data used to identify chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants collected in support of response and cleanup.

  4. Modern analytical chemistry in the contemporary world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šíma, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Students not familiar with chemistry tend to misinterpret analytical chemistry as some kind of the sorcery where analytical chemists working as modern wizards handle magical black boxes able to provide fascinating results. However, this approach is evidently improper and misleading. Therefore, the position of modern analytical chemistry among sciences and in the contemporary world is discussed. Its interdisciplinary character and the necessity of the collaboration between analytical chemists and other experts in order to effectively solve the actual problems of the human society and the environment are emphasized. The importance of the analytical method validation in order to obtain the accurate and precise results is highlighted. The invalid results are not only useless; they can often be even fatal (e.g., in clinical laboratories). The curriculum of analytical chemistry at schools and universities is discussed. It is referred to be much broader than traditional equilibrium chemistry coupled with a simple description of individual analytical methods. Actually, the schooling of analytical chemistry should closely connect theory and practice.

  5. Overview of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project: Results from the pilot phase with 35 collaborating laboratories and multiple analytical groups, generating a core dataset of 3020 proteins and a publicly-available database

    SciTech Connect

    Omenn, Gilbert; States, David J.; Adamski, Marcin; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Menon, Rajasree; Hermjakob, Henning; Apweiler, Rolf; Haab, Brian B.; Simpson, Richard; Eddes, James; Kapp, Eugene; Moritz, Rod; Chan, Daniel W.; Rai, Alex J.; Admon, Arie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hancock, William S.; Hefta, Stanley A.; Meyer, Helmut; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong-Shin; Ping, Peipei; Pounds, Joel G.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Qian, Xiaohong; Wang, Rong; Wasinger, Valerie; Wu, Chi Yue; Zhao, Xiaohang; Zeng, Rong; Archakov, Alexander; Tsugita, Akira; Beer, Ilan; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pisano, Michael; Andrews, Philip; Tammen, Harald; Speicher, David W.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2005-08-13

    HUPO initiated the Plasma Proteome Project (PPP) in 2002. Its pilot phase has (1) evaluated advantages and limitations of many depletion, fractionation, and MS technology platforms; (2) compared PPP reference specimens of human serum and EDTA, heparin, and citrate-anticoagulated plasma; and (3) created a publicly-available knowledge base (www.bioinformatics. med.umich.edu/hupo/ppp; www.ebi.ac.uk/pride). Thirty-five participating laboratories in 13 countries submitted datasets. Working groups addressed (a) specimen stability and protein concentrations; (b) protein identifications from 18 MS/MS datasets; (c) independent analyses from raw MS-MS spectra; (d) search engine performance, subproteome analyses, and biological insights; (e) antibody arrays; and (f) direct MS/SELDI analyses. MS-MS datasets had 15 710 different International Protein Index (IPI) protein IDs; our integration algorithm applied to multiple matches of peptide sequences yielded 9504 IPI proteins identified with one or more peptides and 3020 proteins identified with two or more peptides (the Core Dataset). These proteins have been characterized with Gene Ontology, InterPro, Novartis Atlas, OMIM, and immunoassay based concentration determinations. The database permits examination of many other subsets, such as 1274 proteins identified with three or more peptides. Reverse protein to DNA matching identified proteins for 118 previously unidentified ORFs. We recommend use of plasma instead of serum, with EDTA (or citrate) for anticoagulation. To improve resolution, sensitivity and reproducibility of peptide identifications and protein matches, we recommend combinations of depletion, fractionation, and MS/MS technologies, with explicit criteria for evaluation of spectra, use of search algorithms, and integration of homologous protein matches. This Special Issue of PROTEOMICS presents papers integral to the collaborative analysis plus many reports of supplementary work on various aspects of the PPP workplan

  6. 40 CFR 141.89 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.89 Analytical methods. (a) Analyses for lead, copper, pH, conductivity, calcium, alkalinity, orthophosphate, silica, and temperature... State. Analyses under this section for lead and copper shall only be conducted by laboratories that...

  7. Analytic Networks in Music Task Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Richard M.

    For a student to acquire the conceptual systems of a discipline, the designer must reflect that structure or analytic network in his curriculum. The four networks identified for music and used in the development of the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Music Program are the variable-value, the whole-part, the process-stage, and the class-member…

  8. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for egg...

  9. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for egg...

  10. Analytical Methods for Trace Metals. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the theoretical concepts involved in the methods listed in the Federal Register as approved for determination of trace metals. Emphasis is on laboratory operations. This course is intended for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in analytical methods for trace metals. Students should have…

  11. Metabolomics for laboratory diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał J; Kaliszan, Roman

    2015-09-10

    Metabolomics is an emerging approach in a systems biology field. Due to continuous development in advanced analytical techniques and in bioinformatics, metabolomics has been extensively applied as a novel, holistic diagnostic tool in clinical and biomedical studies. Metabolome's measurement, as a chemical reflection of a current phenotype of a particular biological system, is nowadays frequently implemented to understand pathophysiological processes involved in disease progression as well as to search for new diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of various organism's disorders. In this review, we discussed the research strategies and analytical platforms commonly applied in the metabolomics studies. The applications of the metabolomics in laboratory diagnostics in the last 5 years were also reviewed according to the type of biological sample used in the metabolome's analysis. We also discussed some limitations and further improvements which should be considered taking in mind potential applications of metabolomic research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Basic Information for EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contains basic information on the role and origins of the Selected Analytical Methods including the formation of the Homeland Security Laboratory Capacity Work Group and the Environmental Evaluation Analytical Process Roadmap for Homeland Security Events

  13. Verifying performance characteristics of quantitative analytical systems: calibration verification, linearity, and analytical measurement range.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Anthony A; Long, Tom; Souers, Rhona; Styer, Patricia; Ventura, Christina B; Klee, George G

    2014-09-01

    Both the regulations in the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) and the checklists of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Laboratory Accreditation Program require clinical laboratories to verify performance characteristics of quantitative test systems. Laboratories must verify performance claims when introducing an unmodified, US Food and Drug Administration-cleared or approved test system, and they must comply with requirements for periodic calibration and calibration verification for existing test systems. They must also periodically verify the analytical measurement range of many quantitative test systems. To provide definitions for many of the terms used in these regulations, to describe a set of basic analyses that laboratories may adapt to demonstrate compliance with both CLIA and the CAP Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists for performing calibration verification and for verifying the analytical measurement range of test systems, to review some of the recommended procedures for establishing performance goals, and to provide data illustrating the performance goals used in some of the CAP's calibration verification and linearity surveys. The CAP's calibration verification and linearity survey programs, the CLIA regulations, the Laboratory Accreditation Program requirements, and published literature were used to meet these objectives. Calibration verification and linearity and analytical measurement range verification should be performed using suitable materials with assessment of results using well-defined evaluation protocols. We describe the CAP's calibration verification and linearity programs that may be used for these purposes.

  14. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.

    PubMed

    Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

    2010-04-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable.

  15. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Virgil James; Hu, Jian Sheng; Chambers, Andrea

    1999-06-01

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn of methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in use in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste.

  16. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Johnson; J. S. Hu; A. G. Chambers

    1999-06-01

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn the methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in used in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste.

  17. Analytical Chemistry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zolotov, Yuri

    2016-09-06

    Research in Russian analytical chemistry (AC) is carried out on a significant scale, and the analytical service solves practical tasks of geological survey, environmental protection, medicine, industry, agriculture, etc. The education system trains highly skilled professionals in AC. The development and especially manufacturing of analytical instruments should be improved; in spite of this, there are several good domestic instruments and other satisfy some requirements. Russian AC has rather good historical roots.

  18. Understanding Business Analytics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Business Analytics, Decision Analytics, Business Intelligence, Advanced Analytics, Data Science . . . to a certain degree, to label is to limit - if only...broad category of inquiry that can be used to help drive changes and improvements in business practices. Data Science : the study of where infor...Management Sciences (INFORMS) This scientific process of transforming data into insight with ana- lytics for better decision-making has taken the form

  19. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  20. Analytical performance of a bronchial genomic classifier.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhanzhi; Whitney, Duncan; Anderson, Jessica R; Cao, Manqiu; Ho, Christine; Choi, Yoonha; Huang, Jing; Frink, Robert; Smith, Kate Porta; Monroe, Robert; Kennedy, Giulia C; Walsh, P Sean

    2016-02-26

    The current standard practice of lung lesion diagnosis often leads to inconclusive results, requiring additional diagnostic follow up procedures that are invasive and often unnecessary due to the high benign rate in such lesions (Chest 143:e78S-e92, 2013). The Percepta bronchial genomic classifier was developed and clinically validated to provide more accurate classification of lung nodules and lesions that are inconclusive by bronchoscopy, using bronchial brushing specimens (N Engl J Med 373:243-51, 2015, BMC Med Genomics 8:18, 2015). The analytical performance of the Percepta test is reported here. Analytical performance studies were designed to characterize the stability of RNA in bronchial brushing specimens during collection and shipment; analytical sensitivity defined as input RNA mass; analytical specificity (i.e. potentially interfering substances) as tested on blood and genomic DNA; and assay performance studies including intra-run, inter-run, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. RNA content within bronchial brushing specimens preserved in RNAprotect is stable for up to 20 days at 4 °C with no changes in RNA yield or integrity. Analytical sensitivity studies demonstrated tolerance to variation in RNA input (157 ng to 243 ng). Analytical specificity studies utilizing cancer positive and cancer negative samples mixed with either blood (up to 10 % input mass) or genomic DNA (up to 10 % input mass) demonstrated no assay interference. The test is reproducible from RNA extraction through to Percepta test result, including variation across operators, runs, reagent lots, and laboratories (standard deviation of 0.26 for scores on > 6 unit scale). Analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity and robustness of the Percepta test were successfully verified, supporting its suitability for clinical use.

  1. Components of laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Royal, P D

    1995-12-01

    Accreditation or certification is a recognition given to an operation or product that has been evaluated against a standard; be it regulatory or voluntary. The purpose of accreditation is to provide the consumer with a level of confidence in the quality of operation (process) and the product of an organization. Environmental Protection Agency/OCM has proposed the development of an accreditation program under National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratories as a supplement to the current program. This proposal was the result of the Inspector General Office reports that identified weaknesses in the current operation. Several accreditation programs can be evaluated and common components identified when proposing a structure for accrediting a GLP system. An understanding of these components is useful in building that structure. Internationally accepted accreditation programs provide a template for building a U.S. GLP accreditation program. This presentation will discuss the traditional structure of accreditation as presented in the Organization of Economic Cooperative Development/GLP program, ISO-9000 Accreditation and ISO/IEC Guide 25 Standard, and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories, which has a biological component. Most accreditation programs are managed by a recognized third party, either privately or with government oversight. Common components often include a formal review of required credentials to evaluate organizational structure, a site visit to evaluate the facility, and a performance evaluation to assess technical competence. Laboratory performance is measured against written standards and scored. A formal report is then sent to the laboratory indicating accreditation status. Usually, there is a scheduled reevaluation built into the program. Fee structures vary considerably and will need to be examined closely when building a GLP program.

  2. Evaluation of analytical performance based on partial order methodology.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars; Bruggemann, Rainer; Kenessova, Olga; Erzhigitov, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Classical measurements of performances are typically based on linear scales. However, in analytical chemistry a simple scale may be not sufficient to analyze the analytical performance appropriately. Here partial order methodology can be helpful. Within the context described here, partial order analysis can be seen as an ordinal analysis of data matrices, especially to simplify the relative comparisons of objects due to their data profile (the ordered set of values an object have). Hence, partial order methodology offers a unique possibility to evaluate analytical performance. In the present data as, e.g., provided by the laboratories through interlaboratory comparisons or proficiency testings is used as an illustrative example. However, the presented scheme is likewise applicable for comparison of analytical methods or simply as a tool for optimization of an analytical method. The methodology can be applied without presumptions or pretreatment of the analytical data provided in order to evaluate the analytical performance taking into account all indicators simultaneously and thus elucidating a "distance" from the true value. In the present illustrative example it is assumed that the laboratories analyze a given sample several times and subsequently report the mean value, the standard deviation and the skewness, which simultaneously are used for the evaluation of the analytical performance. The analyses lead to information concerning (1) a partial ordering of the laboratories, subsequently, (2) a "distance" to the Reference laboratory and (3) a classification due to the concept of "peculiar points". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 40 CFR 136.6 - Method modifications and analytical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... person or laboratory using a test procedure (analytical method) in this Part. (2) Chemistry of the method... (analytical method) provided that the chemistry of the method or the determinative technique is not changed... prevent efficient recovery of organic pollutants and prevent the method from meeting QC requirements,...

  4. Gatlinburg conference: barometer of progress in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the field of analytical chemistry over the past twenty-five years. The AEC-ERDA-DOE family of laboratories contributed greatly to this progress. It is not surprising then to find a close correlation between program content of past Gatlinburg conferences and developments in analytical methodology. These conferences have proved to be a barometer of technical status.

  5. 40 CFR 136.6 - Method modifications and analytical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... a surfactant that will not affect the chemistry of the method), which may include Brij-35 or sodium... person or laboratory using a test procedure (analytical method) in this Part. (2) Chemistry of the method... (analytical method) provided that the chemistry of the method or the determinative technique is not...

  6. 76 FR 40924 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Sciences Corporation, Aegis Analytical Laboratories, Inc.). Alere Toxicology Services, 1111 Newton St...-202-2783 (Formerly: Forensic Toxicology Laboratory Baptist Medical Center). Clinical Reference Lab... Affairs Medical Center, Forensic Toxicology ] Laboratory, 1 Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55417, 612-725...

  7. 77 FR 71605 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... Sciences Corporation, Aegis Analytical Laboratories, Inc.) Alere Toxicology Services, 1111 Newton St...-202-2783. (Formerly: Forensic Toxicology Laboratory Baptist Medical Center.) Clinical Reference Lab...-5295. Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Forensic Toxicology Laboratory, 1 Veterans Drive...

  8. [The current clinical laboratory in the public health system and medical science: a lecture].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2011-11-01

    The analytic and diagnostic possibilities of current clinical laboratories are discussed. The roles of laboratory information in the formation of new research directions are characterized. The proposals on the development of economic basics of the development of laboratory medicine.

  9. [Quality improvement of medical diagnostic laboratories].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Andrea Rita; Endröczi, Elemér; Mikó, Tivadar

    2003-07-13

    Service quality in medical laboratories is influenced by a number of variables. Medical laboratories have long recognized the need for total quality management that incorporates the continuous improvement of all stages, such as the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases, of the diagnostic process, in addition to the traditional internal and external quality control of analytical procedures. Based on national and international experience, continuous improvement of quality and its external assessment are of high priority in order to guarantee a reliable, effective and cost-effective diagnostic service. Certification of health care services, according to ISO 9001 standards in Hungarian hospitals, is not sufficient to prove professional competence of medical laboratories, which called for a system of laboratory accreditation. Accreditation is an external professional audit by which an independent accreditation body gives formal recognition that the medical laboratory is competent to provide high quality services that are compliant with rigorous professional standards of best practice. The primary aim of accreditation is the improvement of the quality of diagnostic services by voluntary participation, professional peer review, continuous training and education and compliance with professional standards. In vitro medical laboratories have pioneered quality control and quality assurance in health care. Based on these strengths and traditions, the introduction of the accreditation program of medical laboratories in Hungary is one of the key professional and ethical responsibilities of diagnostic professions, in order to improve the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services during the course of Hungary's accession to the European Union.

  10. Quality in laboratory medicine: 50years on.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The last 50years have seen substantial changes in the landscape of laboratory medicine: its role in modern medicine is in evolution and the quality of laboratory services is changing. The need to control and improve quality in clinical laboratories has grown hand in hand with the growth in technological developments leading to an impressive reduction of analytical errors over time. An essential cause of this impressive improvement has been the introduction and monitoring of quality indicators (QIs) such as the analytical performance specifications (in particular bias and imprecision) based on well-established goals. The evolving landscape of quality and errors in clinical laboratories moved first from analytical errors to all errors performed within the laboratory walls, subsequently to errors in laboratory medicine (including errors in test requesting and result interpretation), and finally, to a focus on errors more frequently associated with adverse events (laboratory-associated errors). After decades in which clinical laboratories have focused on monitoring and improving internal indicators of analytical quality, efficiency and productivity, it is time to shift toward indicators of total quality, clinical effectiveness and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Laboratory accreditation and proficiency testing].

    PubMed

    Kuwa, Katsuhiko

    2003-05-01

    ISO/TC 212 covering clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems will issue the international standard for medical laboratory quality and competence requirements, ISO 15189. This standard is based on the ISO/IEC 17025, general requirements for competence of testing and calibration laboratories and ISO 9001, quality management systems-requirements. Clinical laboratory services are essential to patient care and therefore should be available to meet the needs of all patients and clinical personnel responsible for human health care. If a laboratory seeks accreditation, it should select an accreditation body that operates according to this international standard and in a manner which takes into account the particular requirements of clinical laboratories. Proficiency testing should be available to evaluate the calibration laboratories and reference measurement laboratories in clinical medicine. Reference measurement procedures should be of precise and the analytical principle of measurement applied should ensure reliability. We should be prepared to establish a quality management system and proficiency testing in clinical laboratories.

  12. Validating Analytical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  13. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  14. Validating Analytical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  15. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  16. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  17. Learning Analytics Considered Harmful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is written to present a prospective stance on how learning analytics, as a core evaluative approach, must help instructors uncover the important trends and evidence of quality learner data in the online course. A critique is presented of strategic and tactical issues of learning analytics. The approach to the critique is taken through…

  18. Instrumentation: Analytical Capabilities on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westall, Frances; Allen, Carl; Braiser, Martin; Farmer, Jack; Massell, Wulf; Agee, Carl B.; Steele, Andrew; Fortson, Russ

    1998-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will consist of a series of long-term missions, with early missions focusing upon establishing the Mars base, and undertaking basic field reconnaissance. A capable laboratory on Mars is an essential element in the exploration strategy. Analytical equipment both in the field and in the laboratory serves to extend the senses of the crew and help them sharpen their sampling skills as they learn to recognize rocks in the field and understand their geologic context and significance. On-site sample analyses allow results to be incorporated into evolving surface exploration plans and strategies, which will be developing in real-time as we learn more about Mars. Early Mars missions will focus on reconnaissance EVAs to collect rock and soil samples, maximizing the amount of Mars material returned to Earth. Later missions will be increasingly devoted to both extensive field campaigns and laboratory analyses. The capabilities and equipment described below will be built up at the Mars base incrementally over many missions, with science payloads and investigative infrastructure being partitioned among launch opportunities. This discussion considers what we require to measure, observe, and explore on a new planetary territory. Alternatively, what do we need to know and how do we equip ourselves to provide ample capabilities to acquire these data? Suggestions follow describing specific instruments that we could use. Appendix 5 lists a strawman science instrument payload, and a feasibility study of equipment transportation into the field on pressurized or unpressurized rovers.

  19. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  20. Monitoring the performance of occupational health laboratories.

    PubMed

    Abell, M T; Doemeny, L J

    1991-08-01

    To monitor the performance of occupational health laboratories analyzing workplace air, the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), with assistance from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has established four national quality assurance programs. They are the Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) Program, the AIHA Laboratory Accreditation Program, the Asbestos Analysts Registry, and the Bulk Quality Assurance Program. This paper focuses on the PAT program, a quality audit program that provides samples of asbestos, silica, metals, and solvents to laboratories quarterly. PAT data for asbestos, silica, and lead were examined for trends in precision. Simple graphs of coefficient of variation during the 18-yr history of the program provide evidence of improved agreement among laboratories performing these analyses. The improvement took place in spite of growth in the number of laboratories and decreases in the levels being analyzed. The improvement is attributed to several factors, including improved analytical methods and the very existence of the PAT and AIHA Laboratory Accreditation Programs.

  1. Laboratory diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the first major goals of the microbiology laboratory is to isolate or detect clinically significant microorganisms from an affected site and, if more than one type of microorganism is present, to isolate them in approximately the same ratio as occurs in vivo. Whether an isolate is “clinically...

  2. Language Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    An educational survey of British language teachers concerning the use of the language laboratory focuses primarily on function, facilities, and performance specifications. Read in conjunction with two other reports published by the Ministry of Technology, this study is meant to help teachers, architects, and administrators develop language…

  3. Emerging pesticide residue issues and analytical approaches.

    PubMed

    Fintschenko, Yolanda; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Wong, Jon W

    2010-05-26

    The 46th Annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop of 2009 (FPRW 2009) held in St. Pete Beach, FL, is the latest in an annual tradition drawing scientists from U.S. federal and state government laboratories, industry, and other laboratories worldwide. In 2009, selected FPRW presenters were invited to contribute to this special issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry with a section devoted to emerging pesticide residue issues and analytical approaches. What follows is the written record of what should become a scientific conversation launched at FPRW 2009. There are two distinct approaches to organic residue analysis: instrumental methods and assays. In much of the world, scientists primarily rely on laboratories equipped with instrumentation for analysis, usually gas chromatography and liquid chromatography with some type of selective detector. In the discussion of instrumental approaches, the focus is on chromatography with mass spectrometry as a detection method. Approaches such as biomonitoring and assays fall outside the traditional instrumental method approach to residue analysis. Assays that do not require laboratory equipment are of greater interest for screening and are well-suited to field use. Regardless of the analytical method, the success of multiresidue analysis relies on the appropriate choice of sample preparation and cleanup methodologies. Many new sample preparation and cleanup approaches used for pesticide and other small molecule contaminant residue analyses in a variety of complex sample matrices are discussed in this special issue. The goal of these approaches is to reduce overall analysis time and solvent consumption without compromising the analytical results.

  4. Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System (R7LIMS) which maintains records for the Regional Laboratory. Any Laboratory analytical work performed is stored in this system which replaces LIMS-Lite, and before that LAST. The EPA and its contractors may use this database. The Office of Policy & Management (PLMG) Division at EPA Region 7 is the primary managing entity; contractors can access this database but it is not accessible to the public.

  5. Evidenced based practice: classroom to clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Landin, Cecelia W

    2013-01-01

    Evidence based practice (EBP) can be incorporated into the curriculum of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) Programs. Current components of curriculum can include EBP in pre-analytic, analytic, and post-analytic topics. Discussion of EBP topics in the classroom using practices assessed through the Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative (LMBP) of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will give students a clear understanding of EBP and how it is used in the clinical laboratory for improved health care quality. Student involvement in Quality Improvement projects to improve laboratory performance and patient outcomes can be developed through capstone projects. Examples of clinical projects and application of EBP into the MLS curriculum are discussed.

  6. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1996 - FY 2001. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.M.

    1997-07-02

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal year 1997-2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Wastes Remediation Systems, Solid Wastes, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition to this revision, details on Laboratory scale technology (development), Sample management, and Data management activities were requested. This information will be used by the Hanford Analytical Services program and the Sample Management Working Group to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs.

  7. Spectroelectrochemical Sensing of Aqueous Iron: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Stuart, Dean; Gray, H. Neil

    2007-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory experiment to illustrate the use of spectroelectrochemical techniques for determination of aqueous iron. The experiment described in this article is applicable to an undergraduate laboratory course in analytical chemistry. Students are asked to fabricate spectroelectrochemical sensors, make electrochemical and optical…

  8. OBLIQUE PHOTO OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE PHOTO OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) LOOKING SOUTHEAST. LABORATORY AND OFFICE BUILDING (CPP-602) APPEAR ON LEFT IN PHOTO. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-22-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 11/1998 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Spectroelectrochemical Sensing of Aqueous Iron: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Stuart, Dean; Gray, H. Neil

    2007-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory experiment to illustrate the use of spectroelectrochemical techniques for determination of aqueous iron. The experiment described in this article is applicable to an undergraduate laboratory course in analytical chemistry. Students are asked to fabricate spectroelectrochemical sensors, make electrochemical and optical…

  10. Visual Analytics 101

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Burtner, Edwin R.; Cook, Kristin A.

    2016-06-13

    This course will introduce the field of Visual Analytics to HCI researchers and practitioners highlighting the contributions they can make to this field. Topics will include a definition of visual analytics along with examples of current systems, types of tasks and end users, issues in defining user requirements, design of visualizations and interactions, guidelines and heuristics, the current state of user-centered evaluations, and metrics for evaluation. We encourage designers, HCI researchers, and HCI practitioners to attend to learn how their skills can contribute to advancing the state of the art of visual analytics

  11. ISHMAEL: In-Situ Sample Handling Modular Analytical Experimental Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, G. H.; Kossakovski, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    In-Situ instruments are an integral part of mission designs for exploration of planetary surfaces. A technology gap exists today between sample acquisition and sample analysis tools. Integrated science payload packages need an integrated sample handling system.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Boparai, A.S.; Bass, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    The ACL activities covered IFR fuel reprocessing, corium-concrete interactions, environmental samples, wastes, WIPP support, Advanced Photon Source, H-Tc superconductors, EBWR vessel, soils, illegal drug detection, quality control, etc.

  15. Characterization of Analytical Reference Glass-1 (ARG-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.L.

    1993-12-01

    High-level radioactive waste may be immobilized in borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Aiken, South Carolina, and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), Richland, Washington. The vitrified waste form will be stored in stainless steel canisters before its eventual transfer to a geologic repository for long-term disposal. Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) (DOE 1993), Section 1.1.2 requires that the waste form producers must report the measured chemical composition of the vitrified waste in their production records before disposal. Chemical analysis of glass waste forms is receiving increased attention due to qualification requirements of vitrified waste forms. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been supporting the glass producers` analytical laboratories by a continuing program of multilaboratory analytical testing using interlaboratory ``round robin`` methods. At the PNL Materials Characterization Center Analytical Round Robin 4 workshop ``Analysis of Nuclear Waste Glass and Related Materials,`` January 16--17, 1990, Pleasanton, California, the meeting attendees decided that simulated nuclear waste analytical reference glasses were needed for use as analytical standards. Use of common standard analytical reference materials would allow the glass producers` analytical laboratories to calibrate procedures and instrumentation, to control laboratory performance and conduct self-appraisals, and to help qualify their various waste forms.

  16. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  17. National Water Quality Laboratory Profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raese, Jon W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Water Quality Laboratory determines organic and inorganic constituents in samples of surface and ground water, river and lake sediment, aquatic plant and animal material, and precipitation collected throughout the United States and its territories by the U.S. Geological Survey. In water year 1994, the Laboratory produced more than 900,000 analytical results for about 65,000 samples. The Laboratory also coordinates an extensive network of contract laboratories for the determination of radiochemical and stable isotopes and work for the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Contamination Hydrology Program. Heightened concerns about water quality and about the possible effects of toxic chemicals at trace and ultratrace levels have contributed to an increased demand for impartial, objective, and independent data.

  18. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  19. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  20. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Pullum, Laura L; Ramanathan, Arvind; Shipman, Galen M; Thornton, Peter E; Potok, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  1. The Mars Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Waite, J. H.; Chassefiere, E.; Sacks, R.; Block, B.; Scherer, S.; Young, D. T.; Miller, G. P.; Nicks, D. K.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Croonquist, A.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Jambon, A.

    2004-11-01

    Future missions to Mars will offer the opportunity to continue the search for organic molecules accessible from the surface, and to better quantify the cycling of volatile elements through geochemical pathways. This presentation describes an analytical instrument suite that is designed to measure elemental, isotopic, and potential organic signatures contained in the atmosphere and near surface reservoirs on Mars. The Mars Analytical Chemistry Experiment (MACE) combines two unique mass-spectrometer-based instruments to accomplish these measurements. The first instrument combines a sample handling system with a reusable pyrolysis oven for processing solid materials. Evolved volatile gases from the pyrolyzer are either oxidized for elemental analysis, or sent through a preconcentrator into a two-dimensional gas chromatograph for separation of organics. The processed gas stream is them sent to a high resolution dynamic time-of-flight mass spectrometer for detection. The second instrument is designed primarily for direct atmospheric measurements, using a combination of catalyst beds, getters, and cryogenic traps to separate and concentrate species of interest, such as noble gases. Concentrated gases are subsequently detected with a second mass spectrometer. This instrument can also be used to analyze evolved gases from the pyrolyzer in the first instrument. A breadboard version of each of these instruments has been demonstrated in the laboratory. In this presentaion, we will discuss the design, applicability, and capabilities of the MACE suite in more detail.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Within the scope of a number of emerging contaminant issues in environmental analysis, one area that has received a great deal of public interest has been the assessment of the role of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as stressors and agents of change in ecosystems as well as their role in unplanned human exposure. The relationship between personal actions and the occurrence of PPCPs in the environment is clear-cut and comprehensible to the public. In this overview, we attempt to examine the separations aspect of the analytical approach to the vast array of potential analytes among this class of compounds. We also highlight the relationship between these compounds and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and between PPCPs and EDCs and the more traditional environmental analytes such as the persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Although the spectrum of chemical behavior extends from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the current focus has shifted to moderately and highly polar analytes. Thus, emphasis on HPLC and LC/MS has grown and MS/MS has become a detection technique of choice with either electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. This contrasts markedly with the bench mark approach of capillary GC, GC/MS and electron ionization in traditional environmental analysis. The expansion of the analyte list has fostered new vigor in the development of environmental analytical chemistry, modernized the range of tools appli

  3. Visual analytics as a translational cognitive science.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Green, Tera Marie; Arias-Hernández, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Visual analytics is a new interdisciplinary field of study that calls for a more structured scientific approach to understanding the effects of interaction with complex graphical displays on human cognitive processes. Its primary goal is to support the design and evaluation of graphical information systems that better support cognitive processes in areas as diverse as scientific research and emergency management. The methodologies that make up this new field are as yet ill defined. This paper proposes a pathway for development of visual analytics as a translational cognitive science that bridges fundamental research in human/computer cognitive systems and design and evaluation of information systems in situ. Achieving this goal will require the development of enhanced field methods for conceptual decomposition of human/computer cognitive systems that maps onto laboratory studies, and improved methods for conducting laboratory investigations that might better map onto real-world cognitive processes in technology-rich environments. Copyright © 2011 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were classified according to function, and errors were classified as pre-analytical, analytical, post-analytical, or service-related, and then further divided into descriptive subgroups. Samples were taken from hospital wards (38.6%), outpatient clinics (25.7%), general practitioners (29.4%), and other hospitals. A total of 1189 errors were reported in 1151 reports during the first year, corresponding to an error rate of 1 error for every 142 patients, or 1 per 1223 tests. The majority of events were due to human errors (82.6%), and only a few (4.3%) were the result of technical errors. Most of the errors (81%) were pre-analytical. Of the remainder, 10% were analytical, 8% were post-analytical, and 1% was service-related. Nearly half of the errors (n=550) occurred with samples received from general practitioners or clinical hospital wards. Identification errors were relatively common when non-technicians collected blood samples. Each clinical laboratory should record errors in a structured manner. A relation database is a useful tool for the recording and extraction of data, as the database can be structured to reflect the workflow at each individual laboratory.

  5. Cryoglobulinaemia: clinical and laboratory perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chan, Angel O K; Lau, June S M; Chan, C H; Shek, C C

    2008-02-01

    Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate in the serum upon cooling to below core body temperature and re-dissolve at higher temperatures. Cryoglobulinaemia may be life-threatening. The three types of cryoglobulinaemia are associated with a wide spectrum of haematological, autoimmune, and chronic infectious diseases, especially hepatitis C infection. Our laboratory has received 378 requests for cryoglobulin testing over the past 5 years, with a detection rate of 4.8% in the 271 patients involved. Twelve per cent of the specimens were not processed due to being at an inappropriate temperature on arrival at the laboratory. Clinicians should be aware of temperature requirements when requesting cryoglobulin testing in suspected cases, and for all relevant protein tests in patients with cryoglobulinaemia. Handling specimens at inappropriate temperatures in the pre-analytical and analytical phases of the investigation might lead to cryoprecipitation and therefore false-negative results. The potential pitfalls encountered with specimen handling, analysis, and result interpretation are discussed in detail.

  6. Computerized Analytical Data Management System and Automated Analytical Sample Transfer System at the COGEMA Reprocessing Plants in La Hague

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, T.; Goasmat, F.; Poilane, F.

    2002-02-25

    Managing the operation of large commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, such as UP3 and UP2-800 in La Hague, France, requires an extensive analytical program and the shortest possible analysis response times. COGEMA, together with its engineering subsidiary SGN, decided to build high-performance laboratories to support operations in its plants. These laboratories feature automated equipment, safe environments for operators, and short response times, all in centralized installations. Implementation of a computerized analytical data management system and a fully automated pneumatic system for the transfer of radioactive samples was a key factor contributing to the successful operation of the laboratories and plants.

  7. Workflow and cost analysis on MODULAR ANALYTICS.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Herbert; Dossler, Bettina; Keller, Franz; Steigerwald, Udo

    2003-01-01

    Four stand-alone analyzers in a centralized laboratory were replaced by two modular analytical systems processing 45 methods of the general chemistry and specific protein segment. This consolidation led to a reduction of the daily workflow and operational costs. The cost saving with 1.3 million reported results per year was 53,000 Euro, which can be assessed as an important contribution to cost reduction in the health care system.

  8. Engineering Bioluminescent Proteins: Expanding their Analytical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Bioluminescence has been observed in nature since the dawn of time, but now, scientists are harnessing it for analytical applications. Laura Rowe, Emre Dikici, and Sylvia Daunert of the University of Kentucky describe the origins of bioluminescent proteins and explore their uses in the modern chemistry laboratory. The cover features spectra of bioluminescent light superimposed on an image of jellyfish, which are a common source of bioluminescent proteins. Images courtesy of Emre Dikici and Shutterstock. PMID:19725502

  9. Green analytical chemistry introduction to chloropropanols determination at no economic and analytical performance costs?

    PubMed

    Jędrkiewicz, Renata; Orłowski, Aleksander; Namieśnik, Jacek; Tobiszewski, Marek

    2016-01-15

    In this study we perform ranking of analytical procedures for 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol determination in soy sauces by PROMETHEE method. Multicriteria decision analysis was performed for three different scenarios - metrological, economic and environmental, by application of different weights to decision making criteria. All three scenarios indicate capillary electrophoresis-based procedure as the most preferable. Apart from that the details of ranking results differ for these three scenarios. The second run of rankings was done for scenarios that include metrological, economic and environmental criteria only, neglecting others. These results show that green analytical chemistry-based selection correlates with economic, while there is no correlation with metrological ones. This is an implication that green analytical chemistry can be brought into laboratories without analytical performance costs and it is even supported by economic reasons.

  10. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  11. Plasma creatinine in dogs: intra- and inter-laboratory variation in 10 European veterinary laboratories

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is substantial variation in reported reference intervals for canine plasma creatinine among veterinary laboratories, thereby influencing the clinical assessment of analytical results. The aims of the study was to determine the inter- and intra-laboratory variation in plasma creatinine among 10 veterinary laboratories, and to compare results from each laboratory with the upper limit of its reference interval. Methods Samples were collected from 10 healthy dogs, 10 dogs with expected intermediate plasma creatinine concentrations, and 10 dogs with azotemia. Overlap was observed for the first two groups. The 30 samples were divided into 3 batches and shipped in random order by postal delivery for plasma creatinine determination. Statistical testing was performed in accordance with ISO standard methodology. Results Inter- and intra-laboratory variation was clinically acceptable as plasma creatinine values for most samples were usually of the same magnitude. A few extreme outliers caused three laboratories to fail statistical testing for consistency. Laboratory sample means above or below the overall sample mean, did not unequivocally reflect high or low reference intervals in that laboratory. Conclusions In spite of close analytical results, further standardization among laboratories is warranted. The discrepant reference intervals seem to largely reflect different populations used in establishing the reference intervals, rather than analytical variation due to different laboratory methods. PMID:21477356

  12. FIRST FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627) SHOWING REMOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) SHOWING REMOTE ANALYTICAL LABORATORY, DECONTAMINATION ROOM, AND MULTICURIE CELL ROOM. INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-008-105065. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-102. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Virtual Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, P.

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations playa central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  14. Exhaled breath condensate – from an analytical point of view

    PubMed Central

    Dodig, Slavica; Čepelak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the goal of many researchers is analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) as noninvasively obtained sample. A total quality in laboratory diagnostic processes in EBC analysis was investigated: pre-analytical (formation, collection, storage of EBC), analytical (sensitivity of applied methods, standardization) and post-analytical (interpretation of results) phases. EBC analysis is still used as a research tool. Limitations referred to pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical phases of EBC analysis are numerous, e.g. low concentrations of EBC constituents, single-analyte methods lack in sensitivity, and multi-analyte has not been fully explored, and reference values are not established. When all, pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical requirements are met, EBC biomarkers as well as biomarker patterns can be selected and EBC analysis can hopefully be used in clinical practice, in both, the diagnosis and in the longitudinal follow-up of patients, resulting in better outcome of disease. PMID:24266297

  15. VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF THE PLUTONIUM LABORATORY IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF THE PLUTONIUM LABORATORY IN BUILDING 559. THE LABORATORY WAS USED TO ANALYZE THE PURITY OF PLUTONIUM. PLUTONIUM SAMPLES WERE CONTAINED WITHIN GLOVE BOXES - Rocky Flats Plant, Chemical Analytical Laboratory, North-central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Teaching Analytical Method Transfer through Developing and Validating Then Transferring Dissolution Testing Methods for Pharmaceuticals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimaru, Irene; Koether, Marina; Chichester, Kimberly; Eaton, Lafayette

    Analytical method transfer (AMT) and dissolution testing are important topics required in industry that should be taught in analytical chemistry courses. Undergraduate students in senior level analytical chemistry laboratory courses at Kennesaw State University (KSU) and St. John Fisher College (SJFC) participated in development, validation, and…

  17. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  18. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  19. Competing on talent analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise.

  20. [The ideal form of laboratory information management].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiromi; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2005-01-01

    In a clinical laboratory, not many staff can point out the problems of laboratory information management. Although the clinical laboratory introduced information systems in early stage, no organization supplies specialists to this field. Much knowledge is hidden in the clinical laboratory data, which can be discovered by data-mining technology. We can contribute to medical development with this technology. Moreover, the cost of routine work and research work may also be mitigated. However, data-mining technology including structurally recorded data and diversified analytic systems are required to build such capability. The laboratory information management division should make sufficient use of the formal information with non-fixed data base searching. This section should become an important section in the hospital by supplying advanced knowledge discovery and strategic decision-making. In this paper, we discuss the necessity of the information education in the clinical laboratory field and describe the importance of information management in a clinical laboratory.

  1. Modular workcells: modern methods for laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Felder, R A

    1998-12-01

    Laboratory automation is beginning to become an indispensable survival tool for laboratories facing difficult market competition. However, estimates suggest that only 8% of laboratories will be able to afford total laboratory automation systems. Therefore, automation vendors have developed alternative hardware configurations called 'modular automation', to fit the smaller laboratory. Modular automation consists of consolidated analyzers, integrated analyzers, modular workcells, and pre- and post-analytical automation. These terms will be defined in this paper. Using a modular automation model, the automated core laboratory will become a site where laboratory data is evaluated by trained professionals to provide diagnostic information to practising physicians. Modem software information management and process control tools will complement modular hardware. Proper standardization that will allow vendor-independent modular configurations will assure success of this revolutionary new technology.

  2. Evaluation of Analytical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. Scott

    The field of food analysis, or any type of analysis, involves a considerable amount of time learning principles, methods, and instrument operations and perfecting various techniques. Although these areas are extremely important, much of our effort would be for naught if there were not some way for us to evaluate the data obtained from the various analytical assays. Several mathematical treatments are available that provide an idea of how well a particular assay was performed or how well we can reproduce an experiment. Fortunately, the statistics are not too involved and apply to most analytical determinations.

  3. Monitoring the analytic surface.

    PubMed

    Spence, D P; Mayes, L C; Dahl, H

    1994-01-01

    How do we listen during an analytic hour? Systematic analysis of the speech patterns of one patient (Mrs. C.) strongly suggests that the clustering of shared pronouns (e.g., you/me) represents an important aspect of the analytic surface, preconsciously sensed by the analyst and used by him to determine when to intervene. Sensitivity to these patterns increases over the course of treatment, and in a final block of 10 hours shows a striking degree of contingent responsivity: specific utterances by the patient are consistently echoed by the analyst's interventions.

  4. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  5. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  6. Hanford performance evaluation program for Hanford site analytical services

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, L.P.

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, states that it is the responsibility of DOE contractors to ensure that ``quality is achieved and maintained by those who have been assigned the responsibility for performing the work.`` Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) is designed to meet the needs of the Richland Operations Office (RL) for maintaining a consistent level of quality for the analytical chemistry services provided by contractor and commmercial analytical laboratory operations. Therefore, services supporting Hanford environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, and waste management analytical services shall meet appropriate quality standards. This performance evaluation program will monitor the quality standards of all analytical laboratories supporting the Hanforad Site including on-site and off-site laboratories. The monitoring and evaluation of laboratory performance can be completed by the use of several tools. This program will discuss the tools that will be utilized for laboratory performance evaluations. Revision 0 will primarily focus on presently available programs using readily available performance evaluation materials provided by DOE, EPA or commercial sources. Discussion of project specific PE materials and evaluations will be described in section 9.0 and Appendix A.

  7. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  8. Single-analyte to multianalyte fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, John J.; Metzger, Axel; Niikura, Kenichi; Cabell, Larry A.; Savoy, Steven M.; Yoo, J. S.; McDevitt, John T.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Shear, Jason B.; Anslyn, Eric V.

    1999-05-01

    The rational design of small molecules for the selective complexation of analytes has reached a level of sophistication such that there exists a high degree of prediction. An effective strategy for transforming these hosts into sensors involves covalently attaching a fluorophore to the receptor which displays some fluorescence modulation when analyte is bound. Competition methods, such as those used with antibodies, are also amenable to these synthetic receptors, yet there are few examples. In our laboratories, the use of common dyes in competition assays with small molecules has proven very effective. For example, an assay for citrate in beverages and an assay for the secondary messenger IP3 in cells have been developed. Another approach we have explored focuses on multi-analyte sensor arrays with attempt to mimic the mammalian sense of taste. Our system utilizes polymer resin beads with the desired sensors covalently attached. These functionalized microspheres are then immobilized into micromachined wells on a silicon chip thereby creating our taste buds. Exposure of the resin to analyte causes a change in the transmittance of the bead. This change can be fluorescent or colorimetric. Optical interrogation of the microspheres, by illuminating from one side of the wafer and collecting the signal on the other, results in an image. These data streams are collected using a CCD camera which creates red, green and blue (RGB) patterns that are distinct and reproducible for their environments. Analysis of this data can identify and quantify the analytes present.

  9. Collection of analytes from microneedle patches.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Andrey V; Zvezdin, Vasiliy N; Samant, Pradnya; Grenader, Mark I; Zemlyanova, Marina; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-11-04

    Clinical medicine and public health would benefit from simplified acquisition of biological samples from patients that can be easily obtained at point of care, in the field, and by patients themselves. Microneedle patches are designed to serve this need by collecting dermal interstitial fluid containing biomarkers without the dangers, pain, or expertise needed to collect blood. This study presents novel methods to collect biomarker analytes from microneedle patches for analysis by integration into conventional analytical laboratory microtubes and microplates. Microneedle patches were made out of cross-linked hydrogel composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) and poly(ethylene glycol) prepared by micromolding. Microneedle patches were shown to swell with water up to 50-fold in volume, depending on degree of polymer cross-linking, and to collect interstitial fluid from the skin of rats. To collect analytes from microneedle patches, the patches were mounted within the cap of microcentrifuge tubes or formed the top of V-bottom multiwell microplates, and fluid was collected in the bottom of the tubes under gentle centrifugation. In another method, microneedle patches were attached to form the bottom of multiwell microplates, thereby enabling in situ analysis. The simplicity of biological sample acquisition using microneedle patches coupled with the simplicity of analyte collection from microneedles patches integrated into conventional analytical equipment could broaden the reach of future screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of biomarkers in healthcare and environmental/workplace settings.

  10. Collection of Analytes from Microneedle Patches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clinical medicine and public health would benefit from simplified acquisition of biological samples from patients that can be easily obtained at point of care, in the field, and by patients themselves. Microneedle patches are designed to serve this need by collecting dermal interstitial fluid containing biomarkers without the dangers, pain, or expertise needed to collect blood. This study presents novel methods to collect biomarker analytes from microneedle patches for analysis by integration into conventional analytical laboratory microtubes and microplates. Microneedle patches were made out of cross-linked hydrogel composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) and poly(ethylene glycol) prepared by micromolding. Microneedle patches were shown to swell with water up to 50-fold in volume, depending on degree of polymer cross-linking, and to collect interstitial fluid from the skin of rats. To collect analytes from microneedle patches, the patches were mounted within the cap of microcentrifuge tubes or formed the top of V-bottom multiwell microplates, and fluid was collected in the bottom of the tubes under gentle centrifugation. In another method, microneedle patches were attached to form the bottom of multiwell microplates, thereby enabling in situ analysis. The simplicity of biological sample acquisition using microneedle patches coupled with the simplicity of analyte collection from microneedles patches integrated into conventional analytical equipment could broaden the reach of future screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of biomarkers in healthcare and environmental/workplace settings. PMID:25367229

  11. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey; Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  12. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1995 services catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Timme, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, required containers, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples.

  13. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  14. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  15. Analytics: Changing the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2013-01-01

    In this third and concluding discussion on analytics, the author notes that we live in an information culture. We are accustomed to having information instantly available and accessible, along with feedback and recommendations. We want to know what people think and like (or dislike). We want to know how we compare with "others like me."…

  16. Social Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers.…

  17. Social Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers.…

  18. Analytics: Changing the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2013-01-01

    In this third and concluding discussion on analytics, the author notes that we live in an information culture. We are accustomed to having information instantly available and accessible, along with feedback and recommendations. We want to know what people think and like (or dislike). We want to know how we compare with "others like me."…

  19. Challenges for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James J.; Kielman, Joseph

    2009-09-23

    Visual analytics has seen unprecedented growth in its first five years of mainstream existence. Great progress has been made in a short time, yet great challenges must be met in the next decade to provide new technologies that will be widely accepted by societies throughout the world. This paper sets the stage for some of those challenges in an effort to provide the stimulus for the research, both basic and applied, to address and exceed the envisioned potential for visual analytics technologies. We start with a brief summary of the initial challenges, followed by a discussion of the initial driving domains and applications, as well as additional applications and domains that have been a part of recent rapid expansion of visual analytics usage. We look at the common characteristics of several tools illustrating emerging visual analytics technologies, and conclude with the top ten challenges for the field of study. We encourage feedback and collaborative participation by members of the research community, the wide array of user communities, and private industry.

  20. Analytic Modeling of Insurgencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    influenced by interests and utilities. 4.1 Carrots and Sticks An analytic model that captures the aforementioned utilitarian aspect is presented in...instead of the insurgents, to improve or worsen their welfare . The insurgents execute two types of actions: (a) violent actions, aimed to coerce potential

  1. SWAT laboratory test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Ronald R.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    1993-03-01

    The non-cooperative-target beam-control problem has been the subject of intense investigation since the synthetic-beacon concept was first introduced to the high-energy-laser community in 1982. While numerous analytical studies and computer simulations have been performed to evaluate the practical utility of this phase-measurement technique, prior to Lincoln Laboratory's SWAT (Short-Wavelength Adaptive Techniques) program, no experimental verification had been obtained. In the first phase of the SWAT investigation, completed in 1985, a high degree of correlation between differential-phase measurements from natural and artificial sources was demonstrated. The next phase of the SWAT program will be performed at the AMOS (Air Force Maui Optical Station) facility in Maui, where a 241-actuator adaptive-optics system and an array of six dye lasers will be integrated with the site's 60-cm beam director. Prior to shipment, the adaptive-optics subsystem was subjected to a thorough laboratory evaluation, which culminated in a series of compensation tests involving simulated beacon sources. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and provide strong evidence of the efficacy of the synthetic-beacon approach.

  2. Analytic characterization of biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Peter M; DiGrazia, Lisa M

    2017-04-15

    The biosimilar development process, comparability for biological agents, and analytic characterization of biosimilars are described. Healthcare providers must understand the requirements for biosimilar approval, including the science behind biosimilar development and testing that contributes to the totality of evidence. The foundation of development is to demonstrate that a biosimilar is highly similar to the reference product through analytic characterization. Advances in analytic techniques enable scientists to extensively characterize biological products to identify potential product differences compared with the reference product that may affect the purity, safety, and efficacy of the biosimilar candidate. When developing a biosimilar, the clinical efficacy of the biological product has been proven with trials from the reference biological product; therefore, analytic testing on the molecular structure and biological function becomes the focus. In addition, nonclinical studies in animals are performed, including toxicology and immunogenicity testing. In humans, clinical pharmacology studies are performed to evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the proposed biosimilar. If there is any residual uncertainty about the proposed biological product after this testing, the developer should use guidance from the Food and Drug Administration to determine what additional clinical studies may be needed to adequately address that uncertainty. Requirements for the approval of a biosimilar product include analytic characterization, which tests for similarity in primary amino acid structure, analysis of higher-order structure using circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, detection of posttranslational modifications, assessment of optimal target binding, and testing for impurities and optimal potency. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the

  4. Total quality management in clinical virology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Tibbets, M W; Gomez, R; Kannangai, R; Sridharan, G

    2006-10-01

    The diagnostic laboratories in India are progressively promoting higher standards and are moving towards accreditation and international acceptance. Hence, the concept of "Quality" will need to be understood and implemented. Total quality management (TQM) in a laboratory is an integrated program involving all laboratory staff and management. TQM is a framework to operate and it is aiming for integration, consistency, increase in efficiency and a continuous drive for improvement. A well structured clinical virology service will include serology setup, cell culture facility and capacity for molecular diagnosis. The quality of results from the laboratory is significantly influenced by many pre-analytical and post-analytical factors which needed attention. The end goal of the TQM should be to provide the best care possible for the patient.

  5. A regulatory model for clinical laboratories: an empirical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Peddecord, K M

    1989-04-01

    Clinical laboratories in the United States are subject to various regulatory and accreditation programs, which mandate a broad range of requirements regarding personnel, quality-control systems, and analytical proficiency standards. Reported here, for a cross-section of U.S. laboratories, is the degree of compliance with these regulatory requirements, some other laboratory characteristics, and their relation to analytical proficiency. The results suggest that those laboratory characteristics that predict highest proficiency-test performance differ for each laboratory specialty. Regression models are presented that explain from 12% to 35% of the variation in analytical performance and suggest that factors outside of those specified in the regulatory model and other characteristics measured in this research are important. Indeed, the current regulatory approach may not ensure highest performance. Also discussed are the current status, limitations, and prospects for change of the clinical laboratory regulatory system.

  6. Developments in analytical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G.

    The situation regarding photogrammetric instrumentation has changed quite dramatically over the last 2 or 3 years with the withdrawal of most analogue stereo-plotting machines from the market place and their replacement by analytically based instrumentation. While there have been few new developments in the field of comparators, there has been an explosive development in the area of small, relatively inexpensive analytical stereo-plotters based on the use of microcomputers. In particular, a number of new instruments have been introduced by manufacturers who mostly have not been associated previously with photogrammetry. Several innovative concepts have been introduced in these small but capable instruments, many of which are aimed at specialised applications, e.g. in close-range photogrammetry (using small-format cameras); for thematic mapping (by organisations engaged in environmental monitoring or resources exploitation); for map revision, etc. Another innovative and possibly significant development has been the production of conversion kits to convert suitable analogue stereo-plotting machines such as the Topocart, PG-2 and B-8 into fully fledged analytical plotters. The larger and more sophisticated analytical stereo-plotters are mostly being produced by the traditional mainstream photogrammetric systems suppliers with several new instruments and developments being introduced at the top end of the market. These include the use of enlarged photo stages to handle images up to 25 × 50 cm format; the complete integration of graphics workstations into the analytical plotter design; the introduction of graphics superimposition and stereo-superimposition; the addition of correlators for the automatic measurement of height, etc. The software associated with this new analytical instrumentation is now undergoing extensive re-development with the need to supply photogrammetric data as input to the more sophisticated G.I.S. systems now being installed by clients, instead

  7. Significant steps in the evolution of analytical chemistry--is the today's analytical chemistry only chemistry?

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Miltiades I; Efstathiou, Constantinos E

    2012-12-15

    In this review the history of chemistry and specifically the history and the significant steps of the evolution of analytical chemistry are presented. In chronological time spans, covering the ancient world, the middle ages, the period of the 19th century, and the three evolutional periods, from the verge of the 19th century to contemporary times, it is given information for the progress of chemistry and analytical chemistry. During this period, analytical chemistry moved gradually from its pure empirical nature to more rational scientific activities, transforming itself to an autonomous branch of chemistry and a separate discipline. It is also shown that analytical chemistry moved gradually from the status of exclusive serving the chemical science, towards serving, the environment, health, law, almost all areas of science and technology, and the overall society. Some recommendations are also directed to analytical chemistry educators concerning the indispensable nature of knowledge of classical analytical chemistry and the associated laboratory exercises and to analysts, in general, why it is important to use the chemical knowledge to make measurements on problems of everyday life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Harmonization of laboratory testing - Current achievements and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jillian R; Johnson, Roger; Barth, Julian; Panteghini, Mauro

    2014-05-15

    Harmonization in laboratory testing is more far-reaching than merely analytical harmonization. It includes all aspects of the total testing process from the "pre-pre-analytical" phase through analysis to the "post-post-analytical" phase. Harmonizing the pre-analytical phase requires use of standardized operating procedures for correct test selection, sample collection and handling, while standardized test terminology, and units and traceability to ISO standard 17511 are required to ensure equivalency of measurement results. Use of harmonized reference intervals and decision limits for analytes where platforms share allowable bias requirements will reduce inaccurate clinical interpretation and unnecessary laboratory testing. In the post-analytical phase, harmonized procedures for the management of critical laboratory test results are required to improve service quality and ensure patient safety. Monitoring of the outcomes of harmonization activities is through surveillance by external quality assessment schemes that use commutable materials and auditing of the "pre-pre-analytical" and "post-post-analytical" phases. Successful implementation of harmonization in laboratory testing requires input by all stakeholders, including the clinical laboratory community, diagnostics industry, clinicians, professional societies, IT providers, consumer advocate groups and governmental bodies.

  9. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-05-20

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  10. Requirements for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-03-01

    It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

  11. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  12. Multifunctional nanoparticles: analytical prospects.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Alejandro Simón; Díaz-García, Marta Elena

    2010-05-07

    Multifunctional nanoparticles are among the most exciting nanomaterials with promising applications in analytical chemistry. These applications include (bio)sensing, (bio)assays, catalysis and separations. Although most of these applications are based on the magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties of multifunctional nanoparticles, other aspects such as the synergistic effect of the functional groups and the amplification effect associated with the nanoscale dimension have also been observed. Considering not only the nature of the raw material but also the shape, there is a huge variety of nanoparticles. In this review only magnetic, quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon and inorganic nanotubes as well as silica, titania and gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are addressed. This review presents a narrative summary on the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for analytical applications, along with a discussion on some critical challenges existing in the field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  13. Analytical caustic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the determination of caustic surfaces in terms of rays, reflectors, and wavefronts. Analytical caustics are obtained as a family of lines, a set of points, and several types of equations for geometries encountered in optics and microwave applications. Standard methods of differential geometry are applied under different approaches: directly to reflector surfaces, and alternatively, to wavefronts, to obtain analytical caustics of two sheets or branches. Gauss/Seidel aberrations are introduced into the wavefront approach, forcing the retention of all three coefficients of both the first- and the second-fundamental forms of differential geometry. An existing method for obtaining caustic surfaces through exploitation of the singularities in flux density is examined, and several constant-intensity contour maps are developed using only the intrinsic Gaussian, mean, and normal curvatures of the reflector. Numerous references are provided for extending the material of the present document to the morphologies of caustics and their associated diffraction patterns.

  14. Analytical applications of aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombelli, S.; Minunni, M.; Mascini, M.

    2007-05-01

    Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA ligands which can be selected for different targets starting from a library of molecules containing randomly created sequences. Aptamers have been selected to bind very different targets, from proteins to small organic dyes. Aptamers are proposed as alternatives to antibodies as biorecognition elements in analytical devices with ever increasing frequency. This in order to satisfy the demand for quick, cheap, simple and highly reproducible analytical devices, especially for protein detection in the medical field or for the detection of smaller molecules in environmental and food analysis. In our recent experience, DNA and RNA aptamers, specific for three different proteins (Tat, IgE and thrombin), have been exploited as bio-recognition elements to develop specific biosensors (aptasensors). These recognition elements have been coupled to piezoelectric quartz crystals and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices as transducers where the aptamers have been immobilized on the gold surface of the crystals electrodes or on SPR chips, respectively.

  15. Avatars in Analytical Gaming

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Cowell, Amanda K.

    2009-08-29

    This paper discusses the design and use of anthropomorphic computer characters as nonplayer characters (NPC’s) within analytical games. These new environments allow avatars to play a central role in supporting training and education goals instead of planning the supporting cast role. This new ‘science’ of gaming, driven by high-powered but inexpensive computers, dedicated graphics processors and realistic game engines, enables game developers to create learning and training opportunities on par with expensive real-world training scenarios. However, there needs to be care and attention placed on how avatars are represented and thus perceived. A taxonomy of non-verbal behavior is presented and its application to analytical gaming discussed.

  16. Analytical services contract reform alternatives project

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.W.; Fox, M.R.; Kristofzski, J.G.; Minette, M.J.

    1995-03-23

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) was directed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to examine the feasibility of outsourcing all or part of its laboratory and analytical functions as part of a contract reform effort. The analytical services provided by WHC were found to be significantly greater than that of a typical environmental laboratory which provides sample analysis based on a simple sample in-report out model. In addition to high-volume production analysis, the work scope includes special analytical services, technical consulting, sample handling and disposition, and special material preparations. Numerous broad ranging potential contract reform alternatives were identified and categorized into seven main alternatives with associated sub-alternatives. Issues associated with each alternative varied significantly depending on the alternative. Fifteen issues were identified and described including human resources, contract, and procurement areas. Readers of this report will perhaps identify additional alternatives and/or issues. In addressing the issues, it was determined that those issues pertaining to labor relations and procurement require major policy resolutions by WHC/DOE senior management prior to being able to establish meaningful assumptions for cost/benefit analyses of the seven alternatives. Further review was therefore stopped without economic analyses or recommendation for any specific alternative. Accordingly, this report is intended to fulfill the requirements of RL Milestone AS-95-016.

  17. Competing on analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated.

  18. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  19. Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1990-01-01

    An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  20. Fabricating Cotton Analytical Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shang-Chi; Hsu, Min-Yen; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-08-30

    A robust, low-cost analytical device should be user-friendly, rapid, and affordable. Such devices should also be able to operate with scarce samples and provide information for follow-up treatment. Here, we demonstrate the development of a cotton-based urinalysis (i.e., nitrite, total protein, and urobilinogen assays) analytical device that employs a lateral flow-based format, and is inexpensive, easily fabricated, rapid, and can be used to conduct multiple tests without cross-contamination worries. Cotton is composed of cellulose fibers with natural absorptive properties that can be leveraged for flow-based analysis. The simple but elegant fabrication process of our cotton-based analytical device is described in this study. The arrangement of the cotton structure and test pad takes advantage of the hydrophobicity and absorptive strength of each material. Because of these physical characteristics, colorimetric results can persistently adhere to the test pad. This device enables physicians to receive clinical information in a timely manner and shows great potential as a tool for early intervention.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B

    1999-08-27

    Gross alpha/beta/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed by expert scientists and technicians from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory who perform similar functions in their routine jobs. The Hot Spot Team carries sample control kits to provide responding field teams with the procedures, tools, and equipment for sample collection and field measurements. High-hazard samples brought back from the field are prepared for analysis in HEPA-filtered gloveboxes staffed by technicians from LLNL's Plutonium Facility. The samples are passed on to the Mobile Laboratory which carries a variety of radiological and chemical analytical equipment in portable configuration for use in the field. Equipment and personnel can also deploy special assets to local hospitals or the field for detection of plutonium in a lung or wound. Quick assessment of personnel contamination is essential for time-critical medical intervention. In addition to pulling the trailer, the Hot Spot Truck also stores some of the equipment, consumables, and a PTO generator. The Hot Spot Laboratory has the capability to be self-sufficient for several weeks when deployed to determine Pu uptake.

  2. Interlaboratory comparability, bias, and precision for four laboratories measuring constituents in precipitation, November 1982-August 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Malo, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Four laboratories were evaluated in their analysis of identical natural and simulated precipitation water samples. Interlaboratory comparability was evaluated using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test, and linear-regression models describing the relations between individual laboratory analytical results for natural precipitation samples. Results of the statistical analyses indicate that certain pairs of laboratories produce different results when analyzing identical samples. Analyte bias for each laboratory was examined using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test on data produced by the laboratories from the analysis of identical simulated precipitation samples. Bias for a given analyte produced by a single laboratory has been indicated when the laboratory mean for that analyte is shown to be significantly different from the mean for the most-probable analyte concentrations in the simulated precipitation samples. Ion-chromatographic methods for the determination of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate have been compared with the colorimetric methods that were also in use during the study period. Comparisons were made using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test for means produced by the two methods. Analyte precision for each laboratory has been estimated by calculating a pooled variance for each analyte. Analyte estimated precisions have been compared using F-tests and differences in analyte precisions for laboratory pairs have been reported. (USGS)

  3. Good laboratory practice and laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J; McQuaker, N

    1993-12-01

    Principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) and laboratory accreditation programs, particularly as they pertain to the environmental sector, are reviewed. The multitude of programs is proving costly for many laboratories and there is mounting pressure to develop reciprocity agreements between programs and to consolidate nationally and internationally. Inclusion of GLP and laboratory accreditation requirements in government regulations is resulting in a significantly increased number of laboratories participating in these programs.

  4. Laboratory interface in support of Environmental Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardue, G.J. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A vital part of quality environmental data resides in the communication between the project and the analytical laboratory. It is essential that the project clearly identify its objectives to the laboratory and that the laboratory understands the scope and limitations of the analytical process. Successful completion of an environmental project must include an aggressive program between project managers and subcontracted Lyrical laboratories. All to often, individuals and organizations tend to deflect errors and failures observed in environmental toward {open_quotes}the other guy{close_quotes}. The engineering firm will blame the laboratory, the laboratory will blame the field operation, the field operation will blame the engineering, and everyone will blame the customer for not understanding the true variables in the environmental arena. It is the contention of the authors, that the majority of failures derive from a lack of communication and misunderstanding. Several initiatives can be taken to improve communication and understanding between the various pieces of the environmental data quality puzzle. This presentation attempts to outline mechanisms to improve communication between the environmental project and the analytical laboratory with the intent of continuous quality improvement. Concepts include: project specific laboratory statements of work which focus on project and program requirements; project specific analytical laboratory readiness reviews (project kick-off meetings); laboratory team workshops; project/program performance tracking and self assessment and promotion of team success.

  5. GUIDANCE FOR OBTAINING REPRESENTATIVE ANALYTICAL LABORATORY SUBSAMPLES FROM PARTICULATE LABORATORY SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ongoing research program has been established to experimentally verify the application of the Gy theory to environmental samples, which serves as a supporting basis for -the material presented in this guidance. Research results from studies performed by the United
    States E...

  6. GUIDANCE FOR OBTAINING REPRESENTATIVE ANALYTICAL LABORATORY SUBSAMPLES FROM PARTICULATE LABORATORY SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ongoing research program has been established to experimentally verify the application of the Gy theory to environmental samples, which serves as a supporting basis for -the material presented in this guidance. Research results from studies performed by the United
    States E...

  7. Visual Analytics: How Much Visualization and How Much Analytics?

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, Daniel; Mansmann, Florian; Thomas, James J.

    2009-12-16

    The term Visual Analytics has been around for almost five years by now, but still there are on-going discussions about what it actually is and in particular what is new about it. The core of our view on Visual Analytics is the new enabling and accessible analytic reasoning interactions supported by the combination of automated and visual analytics. In this paper, we outline the scope of Visual Analytics using two problem and three methodological classes in order to work out the need for and purpose of Visual Analytics. Thereby, the respective methods are explained plus examples of analytic reasoning interaction leading to a glimpse into the future of how Visual Analytics methods will enable us to go beyond what is possible when separately using the two methods.

  8. Existing technology transfer report: analytical capabilities. Appendix B. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-06-01

    The overall objective of the on-going analytical efforts was to develop in-house expertise and analytical capability for the analysis of coal and coal-derived products in support of SRC-I process technology. The approach taken and work accomplished involved: identification of test methods and associated equipment; review and implementation of analytical facility plan; evaluation of existing instrumentation; evaluation and purchase of new instruments; training of laboratory personnel; validation or development of analytical methods; development of standard product work-up methods and development of analytical protocol for detailed characterization of SRC-I solid and liquid products. This volume contains Appendix B with the following attachments: solvent separation procedure A; Wilsonville solvent separation procedure, distillation separation procedure; solvent separation modified Wilsonville Procedure W; statistical comparison of 3 solvent separation procedures; methods development for column chromatography, and application of gas chromatography to characterization of a hydrogen donor solvent; and high performance liquid chromatographic procedure.

  9. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Experiments to Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Peter T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Reviews the principles of liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (LCEC), an analytical technique that incorporates the advantages of both liquids chromatography and electrochemistry. Also suggests laboratory experiments using this technique. (MLH)

  10. Turn Around Time (TAT) as a Benchmark of Laboratory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Binita; Chawla, Ranjna; Gupta, V. K.; Mallika, V.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory analytical turnaround time is a reliable indicator of laboratory effectiveness. Our study aimed to evaluate laboratory analytical turnaround time in our laboratory and appraise the contribution of the different phases of analysis towards the same. The turn around time (TAT) for all the samples (both routine and emergency) for the outpatient and hospitalized patients were evaluated for one year. TAT was calculated from sample reception to report dispatch. The average TAT for the clinical biochemistry samples was 5.5 h for routine inpatient samples while the TAT for the outpatient samples was 24 h. The turnaround time for stat samples was 1 h. Pre- and Post-analytical phases were found to contribute approximately 75% to the total TAT. The TAT demonstrates the need for improvement in the pre- and post-analytical periods. We need to tread the middle path to perform optimally according to clinician expectations. PMID:21966108

  11. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Experiments to Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Peter T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Reviews the principles of liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (LCEC), an analytical technique that incorporates the advantages of both liquids chromatography and electrochemistry. Also suggests laboratory experiments using this technique. (MLH)

  12. Directory of Analytical Methods, Department 1820

    SciTech Connect

    Whan, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Materials Characterization Department performs chemical, physical, and thermophysical analyses in support of programs throughout the Laboratories. The department has a wide variety of techniques and instruments staffed by experienced personnel available for these analyses, and we strive to maintain near state-of-the-art technology by continued updates. We have prepared this Directory of Analytical Methods in order to acquaint you with our capabilities and to help you identify personnel who can assist with your analytical needs. The descriptions of the various capabilities are requester-oriented and have been limited in length and detail. Emphasis has been placed on applications and limitations with notations of estimated analysis time and alternative or related techniques. A short, simplified discussion of underlying principles is also presented along with references if more detail is desired. The contents of this document have been organized in the order: bulky analysis, microanalysis, surface analysis, optical and thermal property measurements.

  13. [The practical experience of quality control organization in the laboratory of Municipal consultative diagnostic center 1 of St. Petersburg].

    PubMed

    Ostroumova, M N; Mnuskina, M M

    2011-10-01

    The article specifies the functioning of quality control system in the laboratory of Municipal consultative diagnostic center i 1 of St. Petersburg. Initially, on the basis of interpretations of biological variations of every analyte, the requirements to analytical quality are developed. Subsequently, the actually attainable reproducibility of measurements and their bias is examined. The real analytical characteristics of 27 biochemical analytes are presented. The aggregate laboratory ratings are quoted based on the results of involvement in three EQAS programs since 2005, concerning biochemistry, immunochemistry and hematology. The important quality of laboratory research on its analytical stage is maintained by the interaction between inter-laboratory and regular external control.

  14. [Laboratory errors – why the laboratory is not (always) to blame].

    PubMed

    Savoca, Reto

    2015-02-01

    More than half of the so called "laboratory errors" has already happened before the analysis starts in the laboratory and many mistakes are made after the analysis itself. Pre- and post-analytical errors cause 60 to 90 % of all unexpected or erroneous values; only 10 to 15 % are caused by analytical problems. Internal quality control and external quality assessments are a matter of course today while standardisation still could be improved. The pre- and post-analytical processes however are only scarcely supervised. Good patient preparation, reliable patient identification and correct blood draws still cannot be taken for granted - improved training and education are necessary. There is also room for improvement in the communication of the results and the implementation of the consequences thereof. Errors in all phases of the analytical process contain valuable clues for optimisations. An improved culture of failure management would allow tapping the full potential of these clues.

  15. MERRA Analytic Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D. Q.; McInerney, M. A.; Tamkin, G. S.; Thompson, J. H.; Gill, R.; Grieg, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) is a cyberinfrastructure resource for developing and evaluating a new generation of climate data analysis capabilities. MERRA/AS supports OBS4MIP activities by reducing the time spent in the preparation of Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data used in data-model intercomparison. It also provides a testbed for experimental development of high-performance analytics. MERRA/AS is a cloud-based service built around the Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS) technology that is currently used by the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) to deliver Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) data to the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Crucial to its effectiveness, MERRA/AS's servers will use a workflow-generated realizable object capability to perform analyses over the MERRA data using the MapReduce approach to parallel storage-based computation. The results produced by these operations will be stored by the vCDS, which will also be able to host code sets for those who wish to explore the use of MapReduce for more advanced analytics. While the work described here will focus on the MERRA collection, these technologies can be used to publish other reanalysis, observational, and ancillary OBS4MIP data to ESGF and, importantly, offer an architectural approach to climate data services that can be generalized to applications and customers beyond the traditional climate research community. In this presentation, we describe our approach, experiences, lessons learned,and plans for the future.; (A) MERRA/AS software stack. (B) Example MERRA/AS interfaces.

  16. Mars Analytical Microimager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batory, Krzysztof J.; Govindjee; Andersen, Dale; Presley, John; Lucas, John M.; Sears, S. Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah

    Unambiguous detection of extraterrestrial nitrogenous hydrocarbon microbiology requires an instrument both to recognize potential biogenic specimens and to successfully discriminate them from geochemical settings. Such detection should ideally be in-situ and not jeopardize other experiments by altering samples. Taken individually most biomarkers are inconclusive. For example, since amino acids can be synthesized abiotically they are not always considered reliable biomarkers. An enantiomeric imbalance, which is characteristic of all terrestrial life, may be questioned because chirality can also be altered abiotically. However, current scientific understanding holds that aggregates of identical proteins or proteinaceous complexes, with their well-defined amino acid residue sequences, are indisputable biomarkers. Our paper describes the Mars Analytical Microimager, an instrument for the simultaneous imaging of generic autofluorescent biomarkers and overall morphology. Autofluorescence from ultraviolet to near-infrared is emitted by all known terrestrial biology, and often as consistent complex bands uncharacteristic of abiotic mineral luminescence. The MAM acquires morphology, and even sub-micron morphogenesis, at a 3-centimeter working distance with resolution approaching a laser scanning microscope. Luminescence is simultaneously collected via a 2.5-micron aperture, thereby permitting accurate correlation of multi-dimensional optical behavior with specimen morphology. A variable wavelength excitation source and photospectrometer serve to obtain steady-state and excitation spectra of biotic and luminescent abiotic sources. We believe this is the first time instrumentation for detecting hydrated or desiccated microbiology non-destructively in-situ has been demonstrated. We have obtained excellent preliminary detection of biota and inorganic matrix discrimination from terrestrial polar analogues, and perimetric morphology of individual magnetotactic bacteria. Proposed

  17. The Microcomputer as an Educational Laboratory Workstation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciociolo, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory workstations which provide direct connection for monitoring and control of analytical instruments such as pH meters, spectrophotometers, temperature, and chromatographic instruments. This is accomplished through analog/digital and digital/analog converters for analog signals and input/output devices for on/off signals.…

  18. Laboratory services series: a programmed maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuxbury, D.C.; Srite, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    The diverse facilities, operations and equipment at a major national research and development laboratory require a systematic, analytical approach to operating equipment maintenance. A computer-scheduled preventive maintenance program is described including program development, equipment identification, maintenance and inspection instructions, scheduling, personnel, and equipment history.

  19. 40 CFR 141.28 - Certified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certified laboratories. 141.28 Section 141.28 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Monitoring and Analytical Requirements § 141.28...

  20. Environmental Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.; Austin, Rachel N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of environmental chemistry and the use of laboratory exercises in analytical and general chemistry courses. Notes the importance of lab work in heightening student interest in coursework including problem-based learning in undergraduate curricula, ready adaptability of environmental coursework to existing curricula, and…

  1. The Microcomputer as an Educational Laboratory Workstation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciociolo, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory workstations which provide direct connection for monitoring and control of analytical instruments such as pH meters, spectrophotometers, temperature, and chromatographic instruments. This is accomplished through analog/digital and digital/analog converters for analog signals and input/output devices for on/off signals.…

  2. An update on laboratory information management systems.

    PubMed

    McDowall, R D

    1993-01-01

    The realization that a laboratory is an effective information generator within an organization has begun to influence the functions required of a laboratory information management system (LIMS): different laboratories require different functions. The trends in general computing such as open systems, adoption of relational database technology, and the use of more efficient development languages, are also impacting on the development of LIMS. These trends, plus the development of standards for both LIMS and analytical data interchange, will allow the development of systems that are quicker to implement, easier to maintain and meet the business need better.

  3. Accountability through regulation in Ontario's Medical Laboratory Sector.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Brenda; Bourne, Lavern; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Although the use of performance indicators for the analytical (and highly measurable) phase of the medical laboratory process has had a long and successful history, it is now recognized that the value of a laboratory test is embedded in a system of care. This case study, using both documents and interview data, examines the approaches to accountability in the Ontario Medical Laboratory Sector, noting both the challenges and benefits. This sector relies heavily on the regulation instrument, including a requirement that all medical laboratories licensed by the provincial government must follow the guidelines set out by the Quality Management Program - Laboratory Services. We found the greatest challenges exist in the pre-analytical phase (where a large portion of total laboratory errors occur), particularly the interface between the laboratory and other providers.

  4. Accountability through Regulation in Ontario's Medical Laboratory Sector

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Brenda; Bourne, Lavern; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of performance indicators for the analytical (and highly measurable) phase of the medical laboratory process has had a long and successful history, it is now recognized that the value of a laboratory test is embedded in a system of care. This case study, using both documents and interview data, examines the approaches to accountability in the Ontario Medical Laboratory Sector, noting both the challenges and benefits. This sector relies heavily on the regulation instrument, including a requirement that all medical laboratories licensed by the provincial government must follow the guidelines set out by the Quality Management Program – Laboratory Services. We found the greatest challenges exist in the pre-analytical phase (where a large portion of total laboratory errors occur), particularly the interface between the laboratory and other providers. PMID:25305390

  5. Learning Analytics: Readiness and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the relatively new field of learning analytics, first by considering the relevant meanings of both "learning" and "analytics," and then by looking at two main levels at which learning analytics can be or has been implemented in educational organizations. Although integrated turnkey systems or…

  6. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  7. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  8. Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.; Daley, J.G.; Roach, P.D.

    1986-06-01

    Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused at (1) development of mathematical models and analytical tools for predicting component and engine performance, and (2) experimental research into fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena occurring in Stirling cycle devices. A result of the analytical effort has been the formation of a computer library specifically for Stirling engine researchers and developers. The library contains properties of structural materials commonly used, thermophysical properties of several working fluids, correlations for heat transfer calculations and general specifications of mechanical arrangements (including various drive mechanisms) that can be utilized to model a particular engine. The library also contains alternative modules to perform analysis at different levels of sophistication, including design optimization. A reversing flow heat transfer facility is operating at Argonne to provide data at prototypic Stirling engine operating conditions under controlled laboratory conditions. This information is needed to validate analytical models.

  9. Analytical pyrolysis of cells and cell fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Faix, O.; Bertelt, E.

    1995-12-01

    Wood of spruce, beech and birch was disintegrated without chemical pretreatment after 10 minutes of steaming at 110{degrees}C in a laboratory defibrator. Fibers, vessels, and fragments of secondary wall were separated by wet screening. A hydrocylon was used for separation of middle lamellae. By using analytical pyrolysis-GC/MS, parenchymatic cells were found to be richer in lignin than the other cells. The lignin content of middle lamellae was 35% (beech, spruce) and 39% (birch). In agreement with the literature, the S/G ratios of the vessels and middle lamellae was lower than those of the other cells and cell fragments.

  10. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  11. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  12. Analytical modeling of satellites in geosynchronous environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    Experiences with surface charging of geosynchronous satellites are reviewed and mechanisms leading to discharges on satellite surfaces are considered. It was found that the large differential voltages between the surface and the substrate required to produce massive laboratory discharges do not occur on satellites in space. Analytical modeling predictions supported by dielectric charging data from P78-2, SCATHA (Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes) flight results are discussed. Ungrounded insulator areas, buried charge layers (due to mid-energy range particles), and positive differential voltages (where structure voltages are less negative than surrounding dielectric surface voltages) are considered as possible mechanisms producing satellite charge up.

  13. Use of computers in quality assurance of laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Tan, I K; Jacob, E; Lim, S H

    1990-09-01

    Implementation of comprehensive internal quality control programmes and participation in external quality assessment schemes to monitor analytical performance of laboratory tests have been widely accepted as an essential and integral part of good laboratory practice. As these programmes involve a great deal of repetitive statistical calculations and graphic presentation of data on quality control materials, many laboratories and practically all organisers of inter-laboratory quality assessment schemes increasingly rely on computers to handle the burdensome processing of data and to provide timely feedback in a manner that is easily understood and readily interpreted by analytical staff. However, in spite of the best effort to ensure reliable analytical performance, spurious and misleading results can still occur as a result of non-analytical errors which are not readily detected by methods designed to monitor the quality of analytical process. The use of sophisticated computer system has enabled our laboratory to check for the existence of some of these errors. This paper describes the application of computers in a variety of internal and external quality assessment programmes and demonstrates the usefulness of retrieving patients' cumulative test results and at the same time performing delta or percentage difference checks on such data in the detection of non-analytical errors and unexpected variations in results. The role of the computer in minimising transcription errors, reducing turn-around time of testing and reporting, as well as improving the quality of laboratory reports is also mentioned.

  14. The analytic renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct ;Analytic Renormalization Group; linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  15. Measuring myokines with cardiovascular functions: pre-analytical variables affecting the analytical output.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Sansoni, Veronica; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    In the last few years, a growing number of molecules have been associated to an endocrine function of the skeletal muscle. Circulating myokine levels, in turn, have been associated with several pathophysiological conditions including the cardiovascular ones. However, data from different studies are often not completely comparable or even discordant. This would be due, at least in part, to the whole set of situations related to the preparation of the patient prior to blood sampling, blood sampling procedure, processing and/or store. This entire process constitutes the pre-analytical phase. The importance of the pre-analytical phase is often not considered. However, in routine diagnostics, the 70% of the errors are in this phase. Moreover, errors during the pre-analytical phase are carried over in the analytical phase and affects the final output. In research, for example, when samples are collected over a long time and by different laboratories, a standardized procedure for sample collecting and the correct procedure for sample storage are acknowledged. In this review, we discuss the pre-analytical variables potentially affecting the measurement of myokines with cardiovascular functions.

  16. Pre-analytical and analytical factors influencing Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker variability.

    PubMed

    Fourier, Anthony; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand

    2015-09-20

    A panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total Tau (t-Tau), phosphorylated Tau protein at residue 181 (p-Tau) and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ42 and Aβ40), is frequently used as an aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis for young patients with cognitive impairment, for predicting prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, for AD discrimination in atypical clinical phenotypes and for inclusion/exclusion and stratification of patients in clinical trials. Due to variability in absolute levels between laboratories, there is no consensus on medical cut-off value for the CSF AD signature. Thus, for full implementation of this core AD biomarker panel in clinical routine, this issue has to be solved. Variability can be explained both by pre-analytical and analytical factors. For example, the plastic tubes used for CSF collection and storage, the lack of reference material and the variability of the analytical protocols were identified as important sources of variability. The aim of this review is to highlight these pre-analytical and analytical factors and describe efforts done to counteract them in order to establish cut-off values for core CSF AD biomarkers. This review will give the current state of recommendations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: the complete picture.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Evidence of the acute lack of interchangeable laboratory results and consensus in current practice among clinical laboratories has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. Although the focus is mainly on the standardization of measurement procedures, the scope of harmonization goes beyond method and analytical results: it includes all other aspects of laboratory testing, including terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits, as well as test profiles and criteria for the interpretation of results. This review provides further insight on the issue of harmonization in laboratory medicine in view of the urgent need for a complete picture now that old and new drivers are calling for more effective efforts in this field. The main drivers for standardization and harmonization projects are first and foremost patient safety, but also the increasing trends towards consolidation and networking of clinical laboratories, accreditation programs, clinical governance, and advances in Information Technology (IT), including the electronic patient record. The harmonization process, which should be considered a three-tier approach involving local, national and international fronts, must go beyond the harmonization of methods and analytical results to include all other aspects of laboratory testing. A pertinent example of the importance of a complete picture in harmonization programs is given by the National Bone Health Alliance working in the field of bone turnover markers in cooperation with scientific societies including the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC).

  18. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

    2003-02-27

    During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

  19. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety. PMID:24574660

  20. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety.