Science.gov

Sample records for analytical tem comparisons

  1. Comparison of ion milling techniques for cross-sectional TEM of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, J. T.; Boggs, C. W.; Pennycook, S. J.

    1985-03-01

    The use of cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has become invaluable for the characterization of the near-surface regions of semiconductors following ion-implantation and/or transient thermal processing. A fast and reliable technique is required which produces a large thin region while preserving with the original sample surface. New analytical techniques, particularly the direct imaging of dopant distributions, also require good thickness uniformity. Two methods of ion milling are commonly used, and are compared. The older method involves milling with a single gun from each side in turn, whereas a newer method uses two guns to mill from both sides simultaneously.

  2. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  3. The function and benefits of a multifunctional heating holder developed for use with conventional high resolution analytical TEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamino, T.

    2008-08-01

    Specimen heating holder consisting of a gas injector and two sets of heating element has been developed for use with conventional high resolution analytical TEMs. One of the heating elements is used for specimen heating and the other for metal deposition. Both heating elements are made of fine wire of tungsten. The specimen holder allows high resolution in-situ TEM observation of a process of gas-solid reaction followed by a metal deposition on the reactant product. The microscope used in the study was a standard TEM equipped with EDX detector and TV camera system. Thanks to the high speed pumping system and well designed column, the pressure of the electron gun area was kept at 5x10-5Pa or lower for more than 5 hours while the specimen chamber was gas injected to the pressure of 10-1Pa. Oxidation of Al to synthesize A12O3 carrier, deposition of AuPd catalyst on the Al2O3 carrier and behaviour of the deposited AuPd nano-particles at high temperatures in the air injected environment were successfully observed at atomic resolution.

  4. The Smallest Lunar Grains: Analytical TEM Characterization of the Sub-micron Size Fraction of a Mare Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, M.; Christoffersen, R.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition, mineralogical type, and morphology of lunar regolith grains changes considerably with decreasing size, and below the approx.25 m size range the correlation between these parameters and remotely-sensed lunar surface properties connected to space weathering increases significantly. Although trends for these parameters across grain size intervals greater than 20 m are now well established, the 0 to 20 m size interval remains relatively un-subdivided with respect to variations in grain modal composition, chemistry and microstructure. Of particular interest in this size range are grains in the approximate < 1 m diameter class, whose fundamental properties are now the focus of lunar research pertaining to electrostatic grain transport, dusty plasmas, and lunar dust effects on crew health and exploration systems. In this study we have used analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the mineralogy, microstructure and major element composition of grains below the 1 m size threshold in lunar soil 10084.

  5. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  6. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matt; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kirby, Nigel; Kluth, Patrick; Riley, Daniel; Corr, Cormac

    2016-05-01

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail.

  7. High-resolution and analytical TEM investigation of metastable-tetragonal phase stabilization in undoped nanocrystalline zirconia.

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P; Howe, James M; Shukla, Satyajit; Seal, Sudipta

    2004-09-01

    Submicron and nano-sized nanocrystalline pure zirconia (ZrO2) powders having metastable tetragonal and tetragonal-plus-monoclinic crystal structures, respectively, were synthesized using the sol-gel technique. The as-precipitated and the calcinated ZrO2 powders were analyzed for their morphology, nanocrystallite size and structures, aggregation tendency, local electronic properties, and elemental compositions by conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and field-emission analytical electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray and electron energy-loss spectroscopies. The results from this study indicate that a combination of nanocrystallite size, strain-induced grain-growth confinement, and the simultaneous presence of the monoclinic phase can lead to stabilization of the metastable tetragonal-phase in undoped ZrO2. As a result, the tetragonal phase is stabilized within ZrO2 nanocrystallites up to 100 nm in size, which is 16 times larger than the previously reported critical size of 6 nm.

  8. Streptomyces sp. TEM 33 possesses high lipolytic activity in solid-state fermentation in comparison with submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cadirci, Bilge Hilal; Yasa, Ihsan; Kocyigit, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) is a bioprocess that doesn't need an excess of free water, and it offers potential benefits for microbial cultivation for bioprocesses and product development. In comparing the antibiotic production, few detailed reports could be found with lipolytic enzyme production by Streptomycetes in SSF. Taking this knowledge into consideration, we prefer to purify Actinomycetes species as a new source for lipase production. The lipase-producing strain Streptomyces sp. TEM 33 was isolated from soil and lipase production was managed by solid-state fermentation (SSF) in comparison with submerged fermentation (SmF). Bioprocess-affecting factors like initial moisture content, incubation time, and various carbon and nitrogen additives and the other enzymes secreted into the media were optimized. Lipase activity was measured as 1.74 ± 0.0005 U/g dry substrate (gds) by the p-nitrophenylpalmitate (pNPP) method on day 6 of fermentation with 71.43% final substrate moisture content. In order to understand the metabolic priority in SSF, cellulase and xylanase activity of Streptomyces sp. TEM33 was also measured. The microorganism degrades the wheat bran to its usable form by excreting cellulases and xylanases; then it secretes the lipase that is necessary for degrading the oil in the medium.

  9. High-Resolution and Analytical TEM Investigation of Space Radiation Processing Effects in Primitive Solar System Materials and Airless Planetary Surface Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Dukes, C.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic ions present in the diverse plasma conditions in space play a significant role in the formation and modification of solid phases found in environments ranging from the interstellar medium (ISM) to the surfaces of airless bodies such as asteroids and the Moon. These effects are often referred to as space radiation processing, a term that encompasses changes induced in natural space-exposed materials that may be only structural, such as in radiation-induced amorphization, or may involve ion-induced nanoscale to microscale chemical changes, as occurs in preferential sputtering and ion-beam mixing. Ion sputtering in general may also be responsible for partial or complete erosion of space exposed materials, in some instances possibly bringing about the complete destruction of free-floating solid grains in the ISM or in circumstellar nebular dust clouds. We report here on two examples of the application of high-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to problems in space radiation processing. The first problem concerns the role of space radiation processing in controlling the overall fate of Fe sulfides as hosts for sulfur in the ISM. The second problem concerns the known, but as yet poorly quantified, role of space radiation processing in lunar space weathering.

  10. Comparison of different sample preparation techniques in TEM observation of microstructure of INCONEL alloy 783 subjected to prolonged isothermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Longzhou

    2004-01-01

    INCONEL alloy 783 was annealed and aged following the standard heat treatment procedure. One set of specimens was then isothermally exposed at 500 degrees C for 3000 h. Mechanical properties were measured at room temperature and 650 degrees C, and the results showed the prolonged exposure increased the strength and decreased elongation of alloy 783. The microstructures of as-produced and exposed material were examined using optical microscope, SEM and TEM, respectively. Three techniques, jet electro-polishing, ion milling, and focused ion beam, were employed to prepare the TEM samples to observe the variation of microstructure of alloy 783 due to isothermal exposure. TEM images of samples prepared by different methods were analyzed and compared. The results indicate that the jet electro-polishing technique allows the detail microstructure of alloy 783 subjected to different treatments to be well revealed, and thereby the TEM images can be used to explain the enhancement of strength of alloy 783 caused by isothermal exposure.

  11. Comparison of analytical error and sampling error for contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Björn; Luthbom, Karin; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2006-11-16

    Investigation of soil from contaminated sites requires several sample handling steps that, most likely, will induce uncertainties in the sample. The theory of sampling describes seven sampling errors that can be calculated, estimated or discussed in order to get an idea of the size of the sampling uncertainties. With the aim of comparing the size of the analytical error to the total sampling error, these seven errors were applied, estimated and discussed, to a case study of a contaminated site. The manageable errors were summarized, showing a range of three orders of magnitudes between the examples. The comparisons show that the quotient between the total sampling error and the analytical error is larger than 20 in most calculation examples. Exceptions were samples taken in hot spots, where some components of the total sampling error get small and the analytical error gets large in comparison. Low concentration of contaminant, small extracted sample size and large particles in the sample contribute to the extent of uncertainty.

  12. Comparison of open-source visual analytics toolkits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harger, John R.; Crossno, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the first stage of a two-stage evaluation of open source visual analytics packages. This stage is a broad feature comparison over a range of open source toolkits. Although we had originally intended to restrict ourselves to comparing visual analytics toolkits, we quickly found that very few were available. So we expanded our study to include information visualization, graph analysis, and statistical packages. We examine three aspects of each toolkit: visualization functions, analysis capabilities, and development environments. With respect to development environments, we look at platforms, language bindings, multi-threading/parallelism, user interface frameworks, ease of installation, documentation, and whether the package is still being actively developed.

  13. Comparison between analytical and numerical solution of mathematical drying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahari, N.; Rasmani, K.; Jamil, N.

    2016-02-01

    Drying is often related to the food industry as a process of shifting heat and mass inside food, which helps in preserving food. Previous research using a mass transfer equation showed that the results were mostly concerned with the comparison between the simulation model and the experimental data. In this paper, the finite difference method was used to solve a mass equation during drying using different kinds of boundary condition, which are equilibrium and convective boundary conditions. The results of these two models provide a comparison between the analytical and the numerical solution. The result shows a close match between the two solution curves. It is concluded that the two proposed models produce an accurate solution to describe the moisture distribution content during the drying process. This analysis indicates that we have confidence in the behaviour of moisture in the numerical simulation. This result demonstrated that a combined analytical and numerical approach prove that the system is behaving physically. Based on this assumption, the model of mass transfer was extended to include the temperature transfer, and the result shows a similar trend to those presented in the simpler case.

  14. Benchmark Comparison of Cloud Analytics Methods Applied to Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Little, Mike; Huang, Thomas; Jacob, Joseph; Yang, Phil; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to bring high performance computing capabilities to the average science researcher. However, in order to take full advantage of cloud capabilities, the science data used in the analysis must often be reorganized. This typically involves sharding the data across multiple nodes to enable relatively fine-grained parallelism. This can be either via cloud-based file systems or cloud-enabled databases such as Cassandra, Rasdaman or SciDB. Since storing an extra copy of data leads to increased cost and data management complexity, NASA is interested in determining the benefits and costs of various cloud analytics methods for real Earth Observation cases. Accordingly, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and Earth Science Data and Information Systems project have teamed with cloud analytics practitioners to run a benchmark comparison on cloud analytics methods using the same input data and analysis algorithms. We have particularly looked at analysis algorithms that work over long time series, because these are particularly intractable for many Earth Observation datasets which typically store data with one or just a few time steps per file. This post will present side-by-side cost and performance results for several common Earth observation analysis operations.

  15. Comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minderman, Donald J.; Schultz, Larry L.

    1989-01-01

    The following analysis is a comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind load pressures. The analytical methods specified in ASCE Paper No. 3269, ANSI A58.1-1982, the Standard Building Code, and the Uniform Building Code were analyzed using various hurricane speeds to determine the differences in the calculated results. The winds used for the analysis ranged from 100 mph to 125 mph and applied inland from the shoreline of a large open body of water (i.e., an enormous lake or the ocean) a distance of 1500 feet or ten times the height of the building or structure considered. For a building or structure less than or equal to 250 feet in height acted upon by a wind greater than or equal to 115 mph, it was determined that the method specified in ANSI A58.1-1982 calculates a larger wind load pressure than the other methods. For a building or structure between 250 feet and 500 feet tall acted upon by a wind rangind from 100 mph to 110 mph, there is no clear choice of which method to use; for these cases, factors that must be considered are the steady-state or peak wind velocity, the geographic location, the distance from a large open body of water, and the expected design life and its risk factor.

  16. COMPARISON BETWEEN DISCRETE AND SEMI-CONTINUOUS LAYERED MODELS OF SUPERCONDUCTING VORTICES IN HIGH TC MATERIALS FOR TEM OBSERVATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI,G.; TONOMURA,A.

    2004-08-01

    In order to interpret Transmission Electron Microscopy observations of superconducting vortices in anisotropic or layered materials we have found the analytical solution for the Fourier transform of the electron optical phase shift for the case of a straight vortex piercing the specimen at arbitrary angle. The layered case suffered from the shortcoming that only a limited number of pancakes; up to 7, is allowed by the discrete approach followed. Seven layers, however, are scarcely representative of the real stack of pancake vortices, especially when the core pierces the specimen at large angles with respect to the specimen normal. In fact, in these conditions, the pancake discrete structure may no longer be buried in the diffraction fringes of the Fresnel image. Moreover, a small number of layers is a limiting factor when more exotic vortex structures with no straight cores are investigated. This drawback has been overcome by a semi-continuous approach, where each pancake layer is considered singularly, and the discrete structure of the other pancakes is substituted by a superconducting continuous medium that carries supercurrent only parallel to the layers, as proposed by Clem and further developed by Coffey and Phipps. The solution for the vector potential has been found by Fourier methods, connecting the general solutions in the vacuum with those in the superconducting regions. The presence of a vortex in the layer is taken into account by considering the layer as an additional superconducting region of negligible thickness. Once the vector potential is found, the electron optical phase shift can be calculated by integrating the vector potential along a straight trajectory suitably chosen in order to take correctly into account the overall geometry of the experimental set-up, including a tilt of the specimen with respect to the electron beam.

  17. Surface NMR sounding and inversion to detect groundwater in key aquifers in England: comparisons with VES TEM methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meju, Max A.; Denton, Paul; Fenning, Peter

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes pilot experiments to assess the potential of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sounding and inversion for detecting groundwater at several sites in built-up, industrial and intensively cultivated regions in England where it is difficult to deploy large transmitter loops. The targets represent near-surface (ca. 1 m below the surface) and deep (>30 m) aquiferous (chalk, sand and gravel) deposits. The NUMIS field system was used in all the experiments and has infield processing and regularised one-dimensional (1D) inversion capabilities. All the sites were characterised by high noise levels and NMR depth soundings could only be effected using a small figure-of-eight loop for which the maximum depth of investigation was approximately 40-50 m. For comparison, conventional inductive and galvanic resistivity depth soundings were performed at these sites and the data have been inverted to yield the respective subsurface resistivity distributions. At two sites with shallow water levels, the location of the water deduced from inversion of NMR data corresponded with the water level measured in the nearby boreholes. For the site where the data quality is highest, the inverted profile of decay constants also corresponded with the known geology and the geoelectrical model. The NMR data from the other five sites are noisy and it is difficult to ascertain what aspects of the inversion models are correlatable to geoelectrical and geological data. The geoelectrical inversion results correlate with lithological and fluid content variations in the subsurface. It would appear that surface NMR (SNMR) sounding with figure-of-eight loop may be effective only when the ambient noise is less than 900 nV in the UK setting.

  18. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honey: comparison of analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Wittig, M; Reinhard, A; von der Ohe, K; Blacquière, T; Raezke, K-P; Michel, R; Schreier, P; Beuerle, T

    2011-03-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are a structurally diverse group of toxicologically relevant secondary plant metabolites. Currently, two analytical methods are used to determine PA content in honey. To achieve reasonably high sensitivity and selectivity, mass spectrometry detection is demanded. One method is an HPLC-ESI-MS-MS approach, the other a sum parameter method utilising HRGC-EI-MS operated in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). To date, no fully validated or standardised method exists to measure the PA content in honey. To establish an LC-MS method, several hundred standard pollen analysis results of raw honey were analysed. Possible PA plants were identified and typical commercially available marker PA-N-oxides (PANOs). Three distinct honey sets were analysed with both methods. Set A consisted of pure Echium honey (61-80% Echium pollen). Echium is an attractive bee plant. It is quite common in all temperate zones worldwide and is one of the major reasons for PA contamination in honey. Although only echimidine/echimidine-N-oxide were available as reference for the LC-MS target approach, the results for both analytical techniques matched very well (n = 8; PA content ranging from 311 to 520 µg kg(-1)). The second batch (B) consisted of a set of randomly picked raw honeys, mostly originating from Eupatorium spp. (0-15%), another common PA plant, usually characterised by the occurrence of lycopsamine-type PA. Again, the results showed good consistency in terms of PA-positive samples and quantification results (n = 8; ranging from 0 to 625 µg kg(-1) retronecine equivalents). The last set (C) was obtained by consciously placing beehives in areas with a high abundance of Jacobaea vulgaris (ragwort) from the Veluwe region (the Netherlands). J. vulgaris increasingly invades countrysides in Central Europe, especially areas with reduced farming or sites with natural restorations. Honey from two seasons (2007 and 2008) was sampled. While only trace amounts of

  19. Learning through Case Comparisons: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfieri, Louis; Nokes-Malach, Timothy J.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been much research on how people learn from case comparisons. This work has implemented comparison activities in a variety of different ways across a wide range of laboratory and classroom contexts. In an effort to assess the overall effectiveness of case comparisons across this diversity of implementation and…

  20. Selecting Evaluation Comparison Groups: A Cluster Analytic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Todd Mclin; McLean, James E.

    A persistent problem in the evaluation of field-based projects is the lack of no-treatment comparison groups. Frequently, potential comparison groups are confounded by socioeconomic, racial, or other factors. Among the possible methods for dealing with this problem are various matching procedures, but they are cumbersome to use with multiple…

  1. Wake redirection: comparison of analytical, numerical and experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangang; Bottasso, Carlo L.; Campagnolo, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on wake redirection techniques for wind farm control. Two control strategies are investigated: yaw misalignment and cyclic pitch control. First, analytical formulas are derived for both techniques, with the goal of providing a simple physical interpretation of the behavior of the two methods. Next, more realistic results are obtained by numerical simulations performed with CFD and by experiments conducted with scaled wind turbine models operating in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Comparing the analytical, numerical and experimental models allows for a cross-validation of the results and a better understanding of the two wake redirection techniques. Results indicate that yaw misalignment is more effective than cyclic pitch control in displacing the wake laterally, although the latter may have positive effects on wake recovery.

  2. Nanofluidic ionic diodes. Comparison of analytical and numerical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vlassiouk, Ivan; Smirnov, Sergei; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2008-08-01

    Recently reported experimental and theoretical studies of nanofluidic nonlinear devices, such as bipolar and unipolar ionic diodes, have yet to answer the question about the possibility of their further miniaturization. In this Article, we theoretically investigate the effects of size reduction, applied bias, and solution ionic strength in such devices. We compare the numerical solutions of the Poisson, Nernst-Planck (PNP), and Navier-Stokes (NS) equations with their one-dimensional, analytical approximations. We demonstrate that the contribution of electroosmosis is insignificant and find analytical approximations to PNP for bipolar and unipolar diodes that are in good agreement with numerical 3D solutions. We identify the minimal dimensions for such diodes that demonstrate ion current rectification behavior and demonstrate the importance of the edge effect in very short diodes.

  3. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  4. Experimental Hypervelocity Dust Impact in Olivine: FIB/TEM Characterization of Micron-Scale Craters with Comparison to Natural and Laser-Simulated Small-Scale Impact Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Rahman, Z.; Dukes, C.; IMPACT Team

    2017-01-01

    The space weathering of regoliths on airless bodies and the formation of their exospheres is driven to a large extent by hypervelocity impacts from the high relative flux of micron to sub-micron meteoroids that comprise approximately 90 percent of the solar system meteoroid population. Laboratory hypervelocity impact experiments are crucial for quantifying how these small impact events drive space weathering through target shock, melting and vaporization. Simulating these small scale impacts experimentally is challenging because the natural impactors are both very small and many have velocities above the approximately 8 kilometers-per-second limit attainable by conventional chemical/light gas accelerator technology. Electrostatic "dust" accelerators, such as the one recently developed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS), allow the experimental velocity regime to be extended up to tens of kilometers-per-second. Even at these velocities the region of latent target damage created by each impact, in the form of microcraters or pits, is still only about 0.1 to 10 micrometers in size. Both field-emission analytical scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and advanced field-emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FE-STEM) are uniquely suited for characterizing the individual dust impact sites in these experiments. In this study, we have used both techniques, along with focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation, to characterize the micrometer to nanometer scale effects created by accelerated dust impacts into olivine single crystals. To our knowledge this work presents the first TEM-scale characterization of dust impacts into a key solar system silicate mineral using the CCLDAS facility. Our overarching goal for this work is to establish a basis to compare with our previous results on natural dust-impacted lunar olivine and laser-irradiated olivine.

  5. Comparison between methods of analytical continuation for bosonic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schött, J.; van Loon, E. G. C. P.; Locht, I. L. M.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Di Marco, I.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we perform a critical assessment of different known methods for the analytical continuation of bosonic functions, namely, the maximum entropy method, the non-negative least-squares method, the non-negative Tikhonov method, the Padé approximant method, and a stochastic sampling method. Four functions of different shape are investigated, corresponding to four physically relevant scenarios. They include a simple two-pole model function; two flavors of the tight-binding model on a square lattice, i.e., a single-orbital metallic system and a two-orbital insulating system; and the Hubbard dimer. The effect of numerical noise in the input data on the analytical continuation is discussed in detail. Overall, the stochastic method by A. S. Mishchenko et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, 6317 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevB.62.6317] is shown to be the most reliable tool for input data whose numerical precision is not known. For high-precision input data, this approach is slightly outperformed by the Padé approximant method, which combines a good-resolution power with a good numerical stability. Although none of the methods retrieves all features in the spectra in the presence of noise, our analysis provides a useful guideline for obtaining reliable information of the spectral function in cases of practical interest.

  6. Comparison of analytical eddy current models using principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, S.; Luloff, M.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring the gap between the pressure tube (PT) and the calandria tube (CT) in CANDU® fuel channels is essential, as contact between the two tubes can lead to delayed hydride cracking of the pressure tube. Multifrequency transmit-receive eddy current non-destructive evaluation is used to determine this gap, as this method has different depths of penetration and variable sensitivity to noise, unlike single frequency eddy current non-destructive evaluation. An Analytical model based on the Dodd and Deeds solutions, and a second model that accounts for normal and lossy self-inductances, and a non-coaxial pickup coil, are examined for representing the response of an eddy current transmit-receive probe when considering factors that affect the gap response, such as pressure tube wall thickness and pressure tube resistivity. The multifrequency model data was analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), a statistical method used to reduce the data set into a data set of fewer variables. The results of the PCA of the analytical models were then compared to PCA performed on a previously obtained experimental data set. The models gave similar results under variable PT wall thickness conditions, but the non-coaxial coil model, which accounts for self-inductive losses, performed significantly better than the Dodd and Deeds model under variable resistivity conditions.

  7. Smoke of cigarettes and little cigars: an analytical comparison.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, D; Wynder, E L

    1972-12-15

    Chemical data are presented from a comparison study of the smoke of cigarettes and little cigars. The tobacco products and their mainstream smokes were analyzed for a number of toxic constituents in an effort to define "smoke inhalability." This issue has particular public health importance because the difference in the inhalability of cigar and cigarette smoke is generally assumed to account for the differences in the health risk to the individual smoker.

  8. Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Performance for Contoured Endwall Stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Haas, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Comparisons between predicted and experimental stator losses showed that the analysis was able to predict the change in stator loss when contoured endwalls with highly three dimensional passage geometry were used. The level of loss was predicted to within 75 percent of that measured. The predicted loss was due only to profile loss and boundary layer growth on the endwalls. The 25 percent difference was approximately 0.015 at design pressure ratio. The analysis was shown to predict the trend in stator flow angle, even for small stator geometries.

  9. A comparison of three classical analytical theories for the motion of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, R. A.; Mistreets, G. D.; Watson, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Motivated by the heavy reliance upon the analytic orbit theory in orbit determination operations at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a comparison study is performed for three classical analytical theories of artificial satellite motion about an oblate earth. The three analytical theories are: (1) Brouwer, (2) a modified Brouwer, i.e., Brouwer-Lyddane and Cohen, and (3) Vinti. Comparison results for each theory are produced for a number of representative satellites of current or past interest which proved amenable to analytic theory application. The uniformity of these results has significant implications for current and future mission operations and planning activities. Subsidiary topics arising from the results of this study which relate to the optimum usage of the individual theories are also discussed

  10. An experimental/analytical comparison of strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-11-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study of strains developed in encapsulated assemblies during casting, curing and thermal excursions is described. The experimental setup, designed to measure in situ strains, consisted of thin, closed-end, Kovar tubes that were instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples before being over-cast with a polymeric encapsulant. Four bisphenol A (three diethanolamine cured and one anhydride cured) epoxy-based materials and one urethane elastomeric material were studied. After cure of the encapsulant, tube strains were measured over the temperature range of {minus}55{degrees}C to 90{degrees}C. The thermal excursion experiments were then numerically modeled using finite element analyses and the computed strains were compared to the experimental strains. The predicted strains were over estimated (conservative) when a linear, elastic, temperature-dependent material model was assumed for the encapsulant and the stress free temperature T{sub i} was assumed to correspond to the cure temperature {Tc} of the encapsulant. Very good agreement was obtained with linear elastic calculations provided that the stress free temperature corresponded to the onset of the glassy-to-rubbery transition range of the encapsulant. Finally, excellent agreement was obtained in one of the materials (828/DEA) when a viscoelastic material model was utilized and a stress free temperature corresponding to the cure temperature was assumed. 13 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A Comparison of Intensive Behavior Analytic and Eclectic Treatments for Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jane S.; Sparkman, Coleen R.; Cohen, Howard G.; Green, Gina; Stanislaw, Harold

    2005-01-01

    We compared the effects of three treatment approaches on preschool-age children with autism spectrum disorders. Twenty-nine children received intensive behavior analytic intervention (IBT; 1:1 adult:child ratio, 25-40 h per week). A comparison group (n=16) received intensive ''eclectic'' intervention (a combination of methods, 1:1 or 1:2 ratio, 30…

  12. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NON-VIABLE BIOLOGICAL PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a preliminary research effort to develop a methodology for the measurement of non-viable biologically based particulate matter (PM), analyzing for mold, dust mite, and ragweed antigens and endotoxins. Using a comparison of analytical methods, the research obj...

  13. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  14. Comparison of analytic and numerical bond-order potentials for W and Mo.

    PubMed

    Čák, M; Hammerschmidt, T; Drautz, R

    2013-07-03

    Bond-order potentials (BOPs) are derived from the tight-binding approximation and provide a linearly-scaling computation of the energy and forces for a system of interacting atoms. While the numerical BOPs involve the numerical integration of the response (Green's) function, the expressions for the energy and interatomic forces are analytical within the formalism of the analytic BOPs. In this paper we present a detailed comparison of numerical and analytic BOPs. We use established parametrizations for the bcc refractory metals W and Mo and test structural energy differences; tetragonal, trigonal, hexagonal and orthorhombic deformation paths; formation energies of point defects as well as phonon dispersion relations. We find that the numerical and analytic BOPs generally are in very good agreement for the calculation of energies. Different from the numerical BOPs, the forces in the analytic BOPs correspond exactly to the negative gradients of the energy. This makes it possible to use the analytic BOPs in dynamical simulations and leads to improved predictions of defect energies and phonons as compared to the numerical BOPs.

  15. Comparison of ultramicrotomy and focused-ion-beam for the preparation of TEM and STEM cross section of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corazza, Michael; Simonsen, Søren B.; Gnaegi, Helmut; Thydén, Karl T. S.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2016-12-01

    The challenge of preparing cross sections of organic photovoltaics (OPV) suitable for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) is addressed. The samples were polymer solar cells fabricated using roll-to-roll (R2R) processing methods on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Focused ion beam (FIB) and ultramicrotomy were used to prepare the cross sections. The differences between the samples prepared by ultramicrotomy and FIB are addressed, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. The sample prepared by ultramicrotomy yielded good resolution, enabling further studies of phase separation of P3HT:PCBM by means of energy filtered TEM (EFTEM). The sample prepared by FIB shows good structure preservation, but reduced resolution due to non-optimal thicknesses achieved after treatment. Degradation studies of samples prepared by ultramicrotomy are further discussed, which reveal particular effects of the ISOS-L-3 aging test (85 °C, 50% R.H., 0.7 Sun) onto the sample, especially pronounced in the silver layer.

  16. A comparison of analytic models for estimating dose equivalent rates in shielding with beam spill measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, S.C.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Macek, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.A.

    1992-12-31

    A comparison of 800-MeV proton beam spill measurements at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) with analytical model calculations of neutron dose equivalent rates (DER) show agreement within factors of 2-3 for simple shielding geometries. The DER estimates were based on a modified Moyer model for transverse angles and a Monte Carlo based forward angle model described in the proceeding paper.

  17. An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds is reported. A FORTRAN computer program was written for the computation of the thermal performance of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds. Arrays constructed from two example solar thermal collectors are computated. Typical external manifold sizes and thermal insulations are presented graphically and are compared with the thermal performance of the collector alone.

  18. A comparison of analytical results for 20 K LOX/hydrogen instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1990-01-01

    Test data from NASA Lewis' Effect of Thrust Per Element on Combustion Stability Characteristics of Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Engines test program are used to validate two recently released stability analysis tools. The first tool is a design methodology called ROCCID (ROCket Combustor Interactive Design). ROCCID is an interactive design and analysis methodology that uses existing performance and combustion stability analysis codes. The second tool is HICCIP (High frequency Injection Coupled Combustion Instability Program). HICCIP is a recently developed combustion stability analysis model. Using a matrix of models, results from analytic comparisons with 20 K LOX/H2 experimental data are presented.

  19. Detection of TEM-induced reciprocal translocations in F/sub 1/ sons of CD-1 male mice: comparison of sequential fertility evaluation and cytogenetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Kodell, R.L.; Domon, O.E.; Bishop, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the positive and negative classification error rates associated with the HTA in our laboratory, F/sub 1/ sons of TEM-exposed CD-1 male mice were evaluated by the sequential fertility method with subsequent cytogenetic analysis. Males who sired three litters of size 10 or less when mated to primiparous females from either the B6C3F/sub 1/ or the BCF/sub 1/ strain were classified as partial steriles. When meiotic chromosomes analyses revealed the presence of at least two cells containing multivalent figures, males were classified as translocation heterozygotes. When the fertility evaluation and the cytogenetic analysis were compared, normal fertility was observed on 5 of 83 (6.02%) translocation-bearing F/sub 1/ males mated to B6C3F/sub 1/ tester females and on 3 of 83 (3.61%) F/sub 1/ males mated to BCF/sub 1/ tester females. Thus, the false-negative error rates were 6.02% and 3.61% with these two tester strains. Multivalent figures were not observed in the meiotic chromosomes of 410 F/sub 1/ males. The false-positive error rates with these two tester strains were 2.93% for the B6C3F/sub 1/ strain and 1.71% for the BCF/sub 1/ strain. The results indicate that nonzero error rates, both false-positive and false-negative, are associated with the sequential mating method HTA. In addition, the magnitude of these error rates was influenced not only by the tester female strain but also by the genotype of the F/sub 1/ male.

  20. Comparisons of the five analytic reference lines of the horizontal lip position: their consistency and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, B S

    1993-10-01

    One-hundred ten lateral facial profiles were judged to be attractive and were selected from 1000 Taiwanese pupils by a panel of four men and three women from different educational backgrounds. The 110 in the attractive group were analyzed by using five analytic reference lines: Ricketts E line, Holdaway's H line, Steiner's S1 line, Burstone's B line, and Sushner's S2 line. Comparisons of the "consistency" (the smaller coefficient of variation the better the consistency) and the "sensitivity" (the power to differentiate the attractive lateral facial profiles from the unattractive ones) of the five analytic lines were performed. The B line was found to be best in terms of both consistency and sensitivity. From the point of view of convenience, the E line is of great value because its anterior location makes it convenient for the clinician to use. However, the B line appears best from the perspective of the value of reference. This study found that those analytic reference lines that do not transverse an anatomic landmark of the nose most likely have poor consistency and sensitivity. This finding is consistent with the idea that the nose should be taken into consideration when a line is to be used as a reference for beauty on the lateral facial profile.

  1. Direct noise simulation of a canonical high lift device and comparison with an analytical model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Pablo; Fauquembergue, Guillaume; Moreau, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    The noise of a canonical main-element/flap high-lift device (HLD) is computed directly using compressible wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulation. An experimental database for the chosen configuration allows us to successfully validate the chosen numerical approach. Both the noise sources and the far-field acoustic pressure are shown to be well predicted. Although the two elements trailing-edge noise can be observed in the near field, the flap remains as the dominant source in the far-field. The simplicity of the studied configuration enables the comparison of the validated numerical results with a recently developed analytical model that takes into account the diffraction of the flap noise by the main-element. A two-dimensional (2D) (with and without Kutta condition) and a three-dimensional (without Kutta correction) analytical formulations are compared with the numerical results. All formulations compare favorably with the numerical reference in terms of noise levels and directivities. However, the 2D formulation with a Kutta correction provides the best quantitative agreement as expected from the narrow span of the numerical domain. The recently developed analytical model is therefore a good predictive tool for HLD, showing that it can properly account for the diffraction effect of the main element on the flap main noise source.

  2. Comparison of the analytical capabilities of the BAC Datamaster and Datamaster DMT forensic breath testing devices.

    PubMed

    Glinn, Michele; Adatsi, Felix; Curtis, Perry

    2011-11-01

    The State of Michigan uses the Datamaster as an evidential breath testing device. The newest version, the DMT, will replace current instruments in the field as they are retired from service. The Michigan State Police conducted comparison studies to test the analytical properties of the new instrument and to evaluate its response to conditions commonly cited in court defenses. The effects of mouth alcohol, objects in the mouth, and radiofrequency interference on paired samples from drinking subjects were assessed on the DMT. The effects of sample duration and chemical interferents were assessed on both instruments, using drinking subjects and wet-bath simulators, respectively. Our testing shows that Datamaster and DMT results are essentially identical; the DMT gave accurate readings as compared with measurements made using simulators containing standard ethanol solutions and that the DMT did not give falsely elevated breath alcohol results from any of the influences tested.

  3. [Analytical quality of assays and comparison of procedures for the sweat test].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Borgard, Jean-Pierre; Marchand, Martine; Sitruk-Khalfon, Dominique; Feuillet, Marie-Noëlle; Feldmann, Delphine; Vassault, Anne; Rota, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    Sweat test measuring the chloride ion (Cl(-)) concentration in sweat is a tool for the cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. We evaluated analytical criteria of different available methods and compared them into five hospitals and throught a national quality control program. Sweat tests were performed by stimulation using pilocarpine iontophoresis, sweat collection and measurement of sweat Cl(-) (mmol/L) by titration (colorimetric or coulometric end-point) or by in situ direct potentiometry using a chloride-selective electrode. Indirect determination by sweat conductivity measurement was expressed in mmol/L sodium chloride (NaCl) equivalents (Eq). Linearity range was demonstrated for all measurement procedures in the range 10 to 120 mmol/L. Intra-laboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) were <5% for values between 10 and 100 mmol/L. Inter-laboratory CVs were <3% only for conductivity measurement whatever the range. The comparison of results obtained for a same sweat sample, simultaneously by coulometric and conductivity measurements, demonstrated a first degree linear distribution between 30 to 60 mmol/L Cl(-) allowing us to establish an analytical correspondence table for this range. Thus, calculated values for 30, 40 and 60 mmol/L Cl(-) were respectively 57, 66 and 84 mmol/L NaCl Eq. In conclusion, comparison of methods highlighted that the less the sweat test is automatically controlled, the more the operator influence on results quality is important. Our study supports that sweat test result <50 mmol/L NaCl Eq is unlikely with CF diagnosis in absence of clinical arguments.

  4. Comparison of methods for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for an analytical method for sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Dabalus Islam, M; Schweikert Turcu, M; Cannavan, A

    2008-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive liquid chromatographic method for the determination of seven sulphonamides in animal tissues was validated. The measurement uncertainty of the method was estimated using two approaches: a 'top-down' approach based on in-house validation data, which used either repeatability data or intra-laboratory reproducibility; and a 'bottom-up' approach, which included repeatability data from spiking experiments. The decision limits (CCalpha) applied in the European Union were calculated for comparison. The bottom-up approach was used to identify critical steps in the analytical procedure, which comprised extraction, concentration, hexane-wash and HPLC-UV analysis. Six replicates of porcine kidney were fortified at the maximum residue limit (100 microg kg(-1)) at three different stages of the analytical procedure, extraction, evaporation, and final wash/HPLC analysis, to provide repeatability data for each step. The uncertainties of the gravimetric and volumetric measurements were estimated and integrated in the calculation of the total combined uncertainties by the bottom-up approach. Estimates for systematic error components were included in both approaches. Combined uncertainty estimates for the seven compounds using the 'top-down' approach ranged from 7.9 to 12.5% (using reproducibility) and from 5.4 to 9.5% (using repeatability data) and from 5.1 to 9.0% using the bottom-up approach. CCalpha values ranged from 105.6 to 108.5 microg kg(-1). The major contributor to the combined uncertainty for each analyte was identified as the extraction step. Since there was no statistical difference between the uncertainty values obtained by either approach, the analyst would be justified in applying the 'top-down' estimation using method validation data, rather than performing additional experiments to obtain uncertainty data.

  5. Comparison of experimental and analytical results for free vibration of laminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Maryuama, Koichi; Narita, Yoshihiro; Ichinomiya, Osamu

    1995-11-01

    Fibrous composite materials are being increasingly employed in high performance structures, including pressured vessel and piping applications. These materials are usually used in the form of laminated flat or curved plates, and the understanding of natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes is essential to a reliable structural design. Although many references have been published on analytical study of laminated composite plates, a limited number of experimental studies have appeared for dealing with vibration characteristics of the plates. This paper presents both experimental and analytical results for the problems. In the experiment, the holographic interferometry is used to measure the resonant frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of six-layered CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) composite plates. The material constants of a lamina are calculated from fiber and matrix material constants by using some different composite rules. With the calculated constants, the natural frequencies of the laminated CFRP plates are theoretically determined by the Ritz method. From the comparison of two sets of the results, the effect of choosing different composite rules is discussed in the vibration study of laminated composite plates.

  6. Comparison of five analytical methods for the determination of peroxide value in oxidized ghee.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bhavbhuti M; Darji, V B; Aparnathi, K D

    2015-10-15

    In the present study, a comparison of five peroxide analytical methods was performed using oxidized ghee. The methods included the three iodometric titration viz. Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS), Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) and American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS), and two colorimetric methods, the ferrous xylenol orange (FOX) and ferric thiocyanate (International Dairy Federation, IDF) methods based on oxidation of iron. Six ghee samples were stored at 80 °C to accelerate deterioration and sampled periodically (every 48 h) for peroxides. Results were compared using the five methods for analysis as well as a flavor score (9 point hedonic scale). The correlation coefficients obtained using the different methods were in the order: FOX (-0.836) > IDF (-0.821) > AOCS (-0.798) > AOAC (-0.795) > BIS (-0.754). Thus, among the five methods used for determination of peroxide value of ghee during storage, the highest coefficient of correlation was obtained for the FOX method. The high correlations between the FOX and flavor data indicated that FOX was the most suitable method tested to determine peroxide value in oxidized ghee.

  7. An analytical solution for the consideration of the effect of adjacent fuel assemblies; comparison of rectangular and hexagonal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, B.; Rohde, U.

    2012-07-01

    A new analytical method is described to deal with the Leakage Environmental Effect. The method is based on the analytical solution of the two-group diffusion equation for two adjacent fuel assemblies. The quality of the results for this highly efficient method is demonstrated for square fuel assemblies. In additional tests the transferability of the concept to hexagonal VVER-440-type fuel assemblies is shown and a comparison between the results for rectangular and hexagonal assemblies is given. (authors)

  8. An experimental comparison of fuzzy logic and analytic hierarchy process for medical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Uzoka, Faith-Michael Emeka; Obot, Okure; Barker, Ken; Osuji, J

    2011-07-01

    The task of medical diagnosis is a complex one, considering the level vagueness and uncertainty management, especially when the disease has multiple symptoms. A number of researchers have utilized the fuzzy-analytic hierarchy process (fuzzy-AHP) methodology in handling imprecise data in medical diagnosis and therapy. The fuzzy logic is able to handle vagueness and unstructuredness in decision making, while the AHP has the ability to carry out pairwise comparison of decision elements in order to determine their importance in the decision process. This study attempts to do a case comparison of the fuzzy and AHP methods in the development of medical diagnosis system, which involves basic symptoms elicitation and analysis. The results of the study indicate a non-statistically significant relative superiority of the fuzzy technology over the AHP technology. Data collected from 30 malaria patients were used to diagnose using AHP and fuzzy logic independent of one another. The results were compared and found to covary strongly. It was also discovered from the results of fuzzy logic diagnosis covary a little bit more strongly to the conventional diagnosis results than that of AHP.

  9. A comparison of intensive behavior analytic and eclectic treatments for young children with autism.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jane S; Sparkman, Coleen R; Cohen, Howard G; Green, Gina; Stanislaw, Harold

    2005-01-01

    We compared the effects of three treatment approaches on preschool-age children with autism spectrum disorders. Twenty-nine children received intensive behavior analytic intervention (IBT; 1:1 adult:child ratio, 25-40 h per week). A comparison group (n=16) received intensive "eclectic" intervention (a combination of methods, 1:1 or 1:2 ratio, 30 h per week) in public special education classrooms (designated the AP group). A second comparison group (GP) comprised 16 children in non-intensive public early intervention programs (a combination of methods, small groups, 15 h per week). Independent examiners administered standardized tests of cognitive, language, and adaptive skills to children in all three groups at intake and about 14 months after treatment began. The groups were similar on key variables at intake. At follow-up, the IBT group had higher mean standard scores in all skill domains than the AP and GP groups. The differences were statistically significant for all domains except motor skills. There were no statistically significant differences between the mean scores of the AP and GP groups. Learning rates at follow-up were also substantially higher for children in the IBT group than for either of the other two groups. These findings are consistent with other research showing that IBT is considerably more efficacious than "eclectic" intervention.

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Aged AISI 316L Stainless Steel Sensitization to Intergranular Corrosion: Comparison Between Microstructural Electrochemical and Analytical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Sahlaoui, H.; Braham, C.

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of the degree of sensitization (DOS) to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of a commercial AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel aged at temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 800 °C during 100 to 80,000 hours was carried out using three different assessment methods. (1) The microstructural method coupled with the Strauss standard test (ASTM A262). This method establishes the kinetics of the precipitation phenomenon under different aging conditions, by transmission electronic microscope (TEM) examination of thin foils and electron diffraction. The subsequent chromium-depleted zones are characterized by X-ray microanalysis using scanning transmission electronic microscope (STEM). The superimposition of microstructural time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) and ASTM A262 time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams provides the relationship between aged microstructure and IGC. Moreover, by considering the chromium-depleted zone characteristics, sensitization and desensitization criteria could be established. (2) The electrochemical method involving the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The operating conditions of this test were initially optimized using the experimental design method on the bases of the reliability, the selectivity, and the reproducibility of test responses for both annealed and sensitized steels. The TTS diagram of the AISI 316L stainless steel was established using this method. This diagram offers a quantitative assessment of the DOS and a possibility to appreciate the time-temperature equivalence of the IGC sensitization and desensitization. (3) The analytical method based on the chromium diffusion models. Using the IGC sensitization and desensitization criteria established by the microstructural method, numerical solving of the chromium diffusion equations leads to a calculated AISI 316L TTS diagram. Comparison of these three methods gives a clear advantage to the nondestructive DL-EPR test when it is

  11. In situ TEM of radiation effects in complex ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, L M; Sun, Kai; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-03-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been extensively applied to study radiation effects in a wide variety of materials, such as metals, ceramics and semiconductors and is an indispensable tool in obtaining a fundamental understanding of energetic beam-matter interactions, damage events, and materials' behavior under intense radiation environments. In this article, in situ TEM observations of radiation effects in complex ceramics (e.g., oxides, silicates, and phosphates) subjected to energetic ion and electron irradiations have been summarized with a focus on irradiation-induced microstructural evolution, changes in microchemistry, and the formation of nanostructures. New results for in situ TEM observation of radiation effects in pyrochlore, A(2)B(2)O(7), and zircon, ZrSiO(4), subjected to multiple beam irradiations are presented, and the effects of simultaneous irradiations of alpha-decay and beta-decay on the microstructural evolution of potential nuclear waste forms are discussed. Furthermore, in situ TEM results of radiation effects in a sodium borosilicate glass subjected to electron-beam exposure are introduced to highlight the important applications of advanced analytical TEM techniques, including Z-contrast imaging, energy filtered TEM (EFTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in studying radiation effects in materials microstructural evolution and microchemical changes. By combining ex situ TEM and advanced analytical TEM techniques with in situ TEM observations under energetic beam irradiations, one can obtain invaluable information on the phase stability and response behaviors of materials under a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  12. Thick Plate Rolling—a Numerical Approach in Comparison with Analytics and Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prommer, Hannes; Bojahr, Manuel; Tschullik, Ralf; Kaeding, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Today, wind turbines are mostly made of glass or carbon fibre. The manufacturing process leads to high precision and quality of the final product. Nevertheless, this fabrication method of rotor blades is very cost intensive and its production technology is not the best in terms of recyclability. In addition to its good recyclability, the handling of steel is well known and its fabrication is inexpensive. Due to these facts an idea of foils to be produced from steel arose. In cooperation with a metal forming company the 3-Dimensional rolling concept came up. Initially, rolling experiments with cold lead plates in a scale of 1:4 are made to simulate the later on used hot steel plates. Such an approach has to be accompanied by fundamental research. This paper sketches the lead rolling experiment and gives an assessment if it is applicable for a hot rolling process with steel. For this purpose, the lead test data are interpreted, the numerical model is explained and results are presented. Furthermore, an analytical flat rolling approach is used to calculate process parameters like stamping force of the upper roll and necessary friction. The applicability and precision of the analytical results are discussed in comparison with the results of the FEM model and the experimental data. Concluding the paper, validity and pitfalls of this concept are outlined and a short outlook for further research is given. The purpose of these considerations is to get closer to process parameters for an experiment in full scale for hot rolling of a rotor blade.

  13. Comparison of thermal analytic model with experimental test results for 30-sentimeter-diameter engineering model mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglebay, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A thermal analytic model for a 30-cm engineering model mercury-ion thruster was developed and calibrated using the experimental test results of tests of a pre-engineering model 30-cm thruster. A series of tests, performed later, simulated a wide range of thermal environments on an operating 30-cm engineering model thruster, which was instrumented to measure the temperature distribution within it. The modified analytic model is described and analytic and experimental results compared for various operating conditions. Based on the comparisons, it is concluded that the analytic model can be used as a preliminary design tool to predict thruster steady-state temperature distributions for stage and mission studies and to define the thermal interface bewteen the thruster and other elements of a spacecraft.

  14. An Analytical Comparison of the Acoustic Analogy and Kirchhoff Formulation for Moving Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    1997-01-01

    The Lighthill acoustic analogy, as embodied in the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation, is compared with the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces. A comparison of the two governing equations reveals that the main Kirchhoff advantage (namely nonlinear flow effects are included in the surface integration) is also available to the FW-H method if the integration surface used in the FW-H equation is not assumed impenetrable. The FW-H equation is analytically superior for aeroacoustics because it is based upon the conservation laws of fluid mechanics rather than the wave equation. This means that the FW-H equation is valid even if the integration surface is in the nonlinear region. This is demonstrated numerically in the paper. The Kirchhoff approach can lead to substantial errors if the integration surface is not positioned in the linear region. These errors may be hard to identify. Finally, new metrics based on the Sobolev norm are introduced which may be used to compare input data for both quadrupole noise calculations and Kirchhoff noise predictions.

  15. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  16. Comparison of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Incomplete Analytic Hierarchy Process for identifying customer preferences in the Texas retail energy provider market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher

    The competitive market for retail energy providers in Texas has been in existence for 10 years. When the market opened in 2002, 5 energy providers existed, offering, on average, 20 residential product plans in total. As of January 2012, there are now 115 energy providers in Texas offering over 300 residential product plans for customers. With the increase in providers and product plans, customers can be bombarded with information and suffer from the "too much choice" effect. The goal of this praxis is to aid customers in the decision making process of identifying an energy provider and product plan. Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), a hierarchical decomposition decision making tool, and the Incomplete Analytic Hierarchy Process (IAHP), a modified version of AHP, customers can prioritize criteria such as price, rate type, customer service, and green energy products to identify the provider and plan that best meets their needs. To gather customer data, a survey tool has been developed for customers to complete the pairwise comparison process. Results are compared for the Incomplete AHP and AHP method to determine if the Incomplete AHP method is just as accurate, but more efficient, than the traditional AHP method.

  17. Semi-analytic models for the CANDELS survey: comparison of predictions for intrinsic galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Croton, Darren; Porter, Lauren; Primack, Joel; Moody, Chris; Behroozi, Peter S.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng; Finlator, Kristian; Castellano, Marco; Sommariva, Veronica E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2014-11-10

    We compare the predictions of three independently developed semi-analytic galaxy formation models (SAMs) that are being used to aid in the interpretation of results from the CANDELS survey. These models are each applied to the same set of halo merger trees extracted from the 'Bolshoi' high-resolution cosmological N-body simulation and are carefully tuned to match the local galaxy stellar mass function using the powerful method of Bayesian Inference coupled with Markov Chain Monte Carlo or by hand. The comparisons reveal that in spite of the significantly different parameterizations for star formation and feedback processes, the three models yield qualitatively similar predictions for the assembly histories of galaxy stellar mass and star formation over cosmic time. Comparing SAM predictions with existing estimates of the stellar mass function from z = 0-8, we show that the SAMs generally require strong outflows to suppress star formation in low-mass halos to match the present-day stellar mass function, as is the present common wisdom. However, all of the models considered produce predictions for the star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities of low-mass galaxies that are inconsistent with existing data. The predictions for metallicity-stellar mass relations and their evolution clearly diverge between the models. We suggest that large differences in the metallicity relations and small differences in the stellar mass assembly histories of model galaxies stem from different assumptions for the outflow mass-loading factor produced by feedback. Importantly, while more accurate observational measurements for stellar mass, SFR and metallicity of galaxies at 1 < z < 5 will discriminate between models, the discrepancies between the constrained models and existing data of these observables have already revealed challenging problems in understanding star formation and its feedback in galaxy formation. The three sets of models are being used to construct catalogs of mock

  18. Verification of a magnetic island in gyro-kinetics by comparison with analytic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzoso, D. Casson, F. J.; Poli, E.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.

    2015-02-15

    A rotating magnetic island is imposed in the gyrokinetic code GKW, when finite differences are used for the radial direction, in order to develop the predictions of analytic tearing mode theory and understand its limitations. The implementation is verified against analytics in sheared slab geometry with three numerical tests that are suggested as benchmark cases for every code that imposes a magnetic island. The convergence requirements to properly resolve physics around the island separatrix are investigated. In the slab geometry, at low magnetic shear, binormal flows inside the island can drive Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which prevent the formation of the steady state for which the analytic theory is formulated.

  19. Comparison of analytic Whipple bumper shield ballistic limits with CTH simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A series of CTH simulations were conducted to assess the feasibility of using the hydrodynamic code for debris cloud formation and to predict any damage due to the subsequent loading on rear structures. Six axisymmetric and one 3-dimensional simulations were conducted for spherical projectiles impacting Whipple bumper shields. The projectile diameters were chosen to correlate with two well known analytic expressions for the ballistic limit of a Whipple bumper shield. It has been demonstrated that CTH can be used to simulate the debris cloud formation, the propagation of the debris across a void region, and the secondary impact of the debris against a structure. In addition, the results from the CTH simulations were compared to the analytic estimates of the ballistic limit. At impact velocities of 10 km/s or less, the CTH predicted ballistic limit lays between the two analytic estimates. However, for impact velocities greater than 10 km/s, CTH simulations predicted a ballistic limit larger than both analytical estimates. The differences at high velocities are not well understood. Structural failure at late times due to the time integrated loading of a very diffuse debris cloud has not been considered in the CTH model. In addition, the analytic predictions are extrapolated from relatively low velocity data and the extrapolation technique may not be valid. The discrepancy between the two techniques should be investigated further.

  20. A comparison between observed and analytical velocity dispersion profiles of 20 nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad S.; Abdullah, Mohamed H.; Ali, Gamal B.

    2014-05-01

    We derive analytical expression for the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters, using the statistical mechanical approach. We compare the observed velocity dispersion profiles for 20 nearby ( z≤0.1) galaxy clusters with the analytical ones. It is interesting to find that the analytical results closely match with the observed velocity dispersion profiles only if the presence of the diffuse matter in clusters is taken into consideration. This takes us to introduce a new approach to detect the ratio of diffuse mass, M diff , within a galaxy cluster. For the present sample, the ratio f= M diff / M, where M the cluster's total mass is found to has an average value of 45±12 %. This leads us to the result that nearly 45 % of the cluster mass is impeded outside the galaxies, while around 55 % of the cluster mass is settled in the galaxies.

  1. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Morais, Jorge E.; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one’s passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer’s status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures. PMID:26207364

  2. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Morais, Jorge E; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one's passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer's status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures.

  3. A comparison of numerical and semi-analytical methods for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parand, K.; Rad, J. A.; Ahmadi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Natural convective heat transfer in porous media which is of importance in the design of canisters for nuclear waste disposal has received considerable attention during the past few decades. This paper presents a comparison between two different analytical and numerical methods, i.e. pseudospectral and Adomian decomposition methods. The pseudospectral approach makes use of the orthogonal rational Jacobi functions; this method reduces the solution of the problem to a solution of a system of algebraic equations. Numerical results are compared with each other, showing that the pseudospectral method leads to more accurate results and is applicable on similar problems.

  4. Inter-comparison exercises on dissolved gases for groundwater dating (GDAT 2012) : analytical uncertainties, apparent ages and other derived parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labasque, Thierry; Aquilina, Luc; Visser, Ate; Vergnaud, Virginie

    2014-05-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise dedicated to environmental tracers used for groundwater dating was organized in 2012 in France. The goal was to compare sampling and analytical protocols through results obtained by the community of groundwater dating laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols were compared through three different exercises on various supports : (1) on groundwater from a homogeneous aquifer, (2) on groundwater from a fractured heterogeneous aquifer and (3) on an air standard. The two tests allowed 31 Laboratories from 14 countries to compare their protocols for both sampling and analyses. It allows discussing the uncertainties related to sampling protocols issuing from each laboratory methods. The results show a good agreement between laboratories on the aquifers and the air standard. The dispersion of SF6 results in air standard is low (rsd 2%) compared to CFCs (rsd 3 to 7%), even if its concentration is two orders of magnitude lower. Results obtained in recent groundwater (recharge after 1980) show that the uncertainty on groundwater dating with SF6 is between 3 and 4 years. This large uncertainty is mainly due to sampling and/or analytical problems. For CFCs, uncertainties obtained over all the laboratories are less than 2 years for groundwater with recharge between 1965 and 1996. The goal of the inter-laboratory comparison exercise was also to quantify the analytical uncertainty of the 3H and noble gas measurements and to assess whether they meet the requirements for 3H/3He dating and noble gas paleotemperature reconstruction. The reproducibility of the tritium measurements was 13.5%. The reproducibility of the 3He/4He ratio and 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe concentrations was 1.4%, 1.8%, 1.5%, 2.2%, 2.9%, and 2.4%. The propagated uncertainty of the tritium and noble gas measurements meets the desired precision for typical 3H/3He dating applications. However, the measurement uncertainties for the noble gas concentrations are insufficient to

  5. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  6. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo in Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several numerical and analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo were compared for solar light reflection by sea water. The study incorporated the simplest case, that being a semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel absorbing and scattering...

  7. Comparison of input parameters regarding rock mass in analytical solution and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasitli, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Characteristics of stress redistribution around a tunnel excavated in rock are of prime importance for an efficient tunnelling operation and maintaining stability. As it is a well known fact that rock mass properties are the most important factors affecting stability together with in-situ stress field and tunnel geometry. Induced stresses and resultant deformation around a tunnel can be approximated by means of analytical solutions and application of numerical modelling. However, success of these methods depends on assumptions and input parameters which must be representative for the rock mass. However, mechanical properties of intact rock can be found by laboratory testing. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of proper representation of rock mass properties as input data for analytical solution and numerical modelling. For this purpose, intact rock data were converted into rock mass data by using the Hoek-Brown failure criterion and empirical relations. Stress-deformation analyses together with yield zone thickness determination have been carried out by using analytical solutions and numerical analyses by using FLAC3D programme. Analyses results have indicated that incomplete and incorrect design causes stability and economic problems in the tunnel. For this reason during the tunnel design analytical data and rock mass data should be used together. In addition, this study was carried out to prove theoretically that numerical modelling results should be applied to the tunnel design for the stability and for the economy of the support.

  8. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H; Dowdell, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend

  9. On the new analytical solution for a well in Cartesian coordinates with MODFLOW comparisons.

    PubMed

    Batu, Vedat

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the comparison process of Batu (2012) generalized three-dimensional well hydraulics solution for confined aquifers in Cartesian coordinates with MODFLOW is presented. First, a brief description of Batu (2012) solution along with the governing equations and some of its key features are described. The final average drawdown expression in an observation well is given with the conversion expressions from Cartesian to radial coordinates. A generalized comparison using Batu (2012), Hantush (1964), and MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al. 2000), for vertical wells in horizontally isotropic aquifers, that is, ayx  = Ky /Kx  = 1, is presented. Comparisons are also presented with Batu (2012) and MODFLOW for horizontally anisotropic aquifers, that is, ayx  ≠ 1. After that comparisons are presented for horizontal wells between Batu (2012) and MODFLOW.

  10. Comparison of analytical and flight test identified aerodynamic derivatives for a tandem-rotor transport helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Flight tests for verifying an analytical aerodynamic derivative model of a CH-47 helicopter were conducted for low cruise speeds and transition to hover portions of curved, decelerating landing approach trajectories. All testing was performed on a closed loop basis with the stability augmentation system of the helicopter operating, and response data were obtained using both manual and computer generated input maneuvers. The results indicate some differences between the measured response time histories and those predicted by both analytical and flight test identified derivatives. With some exceptions the discrepancies are not severe, and the overall agreement between the measured and computed time histories is reasonably good. No adverse effects attributable to closed loop testing were noted, and the use of computer generated inputs proved to be superior to manual ones.

  11. Slow rarefied gas flow past a cylinder: Analytical solution in comparison to the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerkamp, Armin; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    In the variety of approaches to tackle the challenges of rarefied gas flows, the regularized 13-moment equations (R13) have become a very promising contender. The equations are based on moment approximations in kinetic gas theory which can be interpreted as a non-linear discretization of the Boltzmann equation in the velocity space. In order to get a deeper insight into rarefaction effects, an analytic solution for the flow around a sphere has been constructed in [M. Torrilhon, Phys. Fluids. 22, 072001:1-16 (2010)]. In the present work, an analytic solution for the flow past a cylinder is derived, which is another very important text book problem. Again, the investigation is restricted to slow flows (Ma ≪ 1), which means a linearized system of the original R13 equations is analyzed. The results for the sphere and the cylinder are then compared and typical rarefaction effects are pointed out.

  12. A comparison of analytical approaches for wellbore heat transmission in layered formations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents an analytical method for determining wellbore heat transmission during liquid or gas flow along the tubing. The mathematical model describes the heat transfer between the flowing fluid in the wellbore and in the surrounding formation as one whole physical system. The transient heat transfer equations in the two regions with coupling at the sandface are solved simultaneously. Non-homogeneous formations are treated which consist of several layers with different physical properties and arbitrary initial temperature distributions in the vertical direction. Closed form analytical solutions are obtained in real space and in Laplace space, which can be used to calculate the temperature distribution along the wellbore and in the formation, and to evaluate heat transfer rate and cumulative heat exchange between wellbore and formation. A more accurate formula is given for the widely-used transient heat conduction function f(t{sub D}) of thermal resistance. 14 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Comparison of the analytical performance of electrophoresis microchannels fabricated in PDMS, glass, and polyester-toner

    PubMed Central

    Coltro, Wendell Karlos Tomazelli; Lunte, Susan M.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the analytical performance of microchannels fabricated in PDMS, glass, and polyester-toner for electrophoretic separations. Glass and PDMS chips were fabricated using well-established photolithographic and replica-molding procedures, respectively. PDMS channels were sealed against three different types of materials: native PDMS, plasma-oxidized PDMS, and glass. Polyester-toner chips were micromachined by a direct-printing process using an office laser printer. All microchannels were fabricated with similar dimensions according to the limitations of the direct-printing process (width/depth 150 μm/12 μm). LIF was employed for detection to rule out any losses in separation efficiency due to the detector configuration. Two fluorescent dyes, coumarin and fluorescein, were used as model analytes. Devices were evaluated for the following parameters related to electrophoretic separations: EOF, heat dissipation, injection reproducibility, separation efficiency, and adsorption to channel wall. PMID:19025869

  14. A multigroup radiation diffusion test problem: Comparison of code results with analytic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Harte, J A; Bolstad, J H; Offner, S R

    2006-12-21

    We consider a 1D, slab-symmetric test problem for the multigroup radiation diffusion and matter energy balance equations. The test simulates diffusion of energy from a hot central region. Opacities vary with the cube of the frequency and radiation emission is given by a Wien spectrum. We compare results from two LLNL codes, Raptor and Lasnex, with tabular data that define the analytic solution.

  15. Comparison of the single channel and multichannel (multivariate) concepts of selectivity in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dorkó, Zsanett; Verbić, Tatjana; Horvai, George

    2015-07-01

    Different measures of selectivity are in use for single channel and multichannel linear analytical measurements, respectively. It is important to understand that these two measures express related but still distinctly different features of the respective measurements. These relationships are clarified by introducing new arguments. The most widely used selectivity measure of multichannel linear methods (which is based on the net analyte signal, NAS, concept) expresses the sensitivity to random errors of a determination where all bias from interferents is computationally eliminated using pure component spectra. The conventional selectivity measure of single channel linear measurements, on the other hand, helps to estimate the bias caused by an interferent in a biased measurement. In single channel methods expert knowledge about the samples is used to limit the possible range of interferent concentrations. The same kind of expert knowledge allows improved (lower mean squared error, MSE) analyte determinations also in "classical" multichannel measurements if those are intractable due to perfect collinearity or to high noise inflation. To achieve this goal bias variance tradeoff is employed, hence there remains some bias in the results and therefore the concept of single channel selectivity can be extended in a natural way to multichannel measurements. This extended definition and the resulting selectivity measure can also be applied to the so-called inverse multivariate methods like partial least squares regression (PLSR), principal component regression (PCR) and ridge regression (RR).

  16. A comparison of numerical simulations and analytical theory of the dynamics of interacting magnetic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Asmat-Uceda, Martin; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Cheng, Xuemei; Wang, Xiao; Clarke, David J.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2015-03-28

    Magnetostatic interactions between vortices in closely spaced planar structures are important for applications including vortex-based magnonic crystals and spin torque oscillator networks. Analytical theories that include magnetostatic interaction effects have been proposed but have not yet been rigorously tested. Here, we compare micromagnetic simulations of the dynamics of magnetic vortices confined in three disks in an equilateral triangle configuration to analytical theories that include coupling. Micromagnetic simulations show that the magnetostatic coupling between the disks leads to splitting of the gyrotropic resonance into three modes and that the frequency splitting increases with decreasing separation. The temporal profiles of the magnetization depend on the vortex polarities and chiralities; however, the frequencies depend only on the polarity combinations and will fall into one of two categories: all polarities equal or one polarity opposite to the others, where the latter leads to a larger frequency splitting. Although the magnitude of the splitting observed in the simulations is larger than what is expected based on purely dipolar interactions, a simple analytical model that assumes dipole-dipole coupling captures the functional form of the frequency splitting and the motion patterns just as well as more complex models.

  17. A Comparison of Analytical and Experimental Data for a Magnetic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Bloodgood, V. Dale, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental force-displacement and force-current data are compared for two configurations of a simple horseshoe, or bipolar, magnetic actuator. One configuration utilizes permanent magnet wafers to provide a bias flux and the other configuration has no source of bias flux. The theoretical data are obtained from two analytical models of each configuration. One is an ideal analytical model which is developed under the following assumptions: (1) zero fringing and leakage flux, (2) zero actuator coil mmf loss, and (3) infinite permeability of the actuator core and suspended element flux return path. The other analytical model, called the extended model, is developed by adding loss and leakage factors to the ideal model. The values of the loss and leakage factors are calculated from experimental data. The experimental data are obtained from a magnetic actuator test fixture, which is described in detail. Results indicate that the ideal models for both configurations do not match the experimental data very well. However, except for the range around zero force, the extended models produce a good match. The best match is produced by the extended model of the configuration with permanent magnet flux bias.

  18. Predicting playing frequencies for clarinets: A comparison between numerical simulations and simplified analytical formulas.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Whitney L; Guillemain, Philippe; Kergomard, Jean; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    When designing a wind instrument such as a clarinet, it can be useful to be able to predict the playing frequencies. This paper presents an analytical method to deduce these playing frequencies using the input impedance curve. Specifically there are two control parameters that have a significant influence on the playing frequency, the blowing pressure and reed opening. Four effects are known to alter the playing frequency and are examined separately: the flow rate due to the reed motion, the reed dynamics, the inharmonicity of the resonator, and the temperature gradient within the clarinet. The resulting playing frequencies for the first register of a particular professional level clarinet are found using the analytical formulas presented in this paper. The analytical predictions are then compared to numerically simulated results to validate the prediction accuracy. The main conclusion is that in general the playing frequency decreases above the oscillation threshold because of inharmonicity, then increases above the beating reed regime threshold because of the decrease of the flow rate effect.

  19. Electron-Vibrational Energy Exchange in Nitrogen-Containing Plasma: a Comparison Between an Analytical Approach and a Kinetic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the electron-vibrational (e-V) energy exchange in nitrogen-containing plasma, which is very efficient in the case of gas discharge and high speed flow. Based on Harmonic oscillator approximation and the assumption of the e-V relaxation through a continuous series of Boltzmann distributions over the vibrational states, an analytic approach is derived from the proposed scaling relation of e-V transition rates. A full kinetic model is then investigated by numerically solving the state-to-state master equation for all vibrational levels. The analytical approach leads to a Landau-Teller (LT)-type equation for relaxation of vibrational energy, and predicts the relaxation time on the right order of magnitude. By comparison with the kinetic model, the LT-type equation is valid in typical electron temperatures in gas discharge. However, the analytical approach is not capable of describing the vibrational distribution function during the e-V process in which a full kinetic model is required. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11505015) and the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)

  20. Comparison of distance measures in spatial analytical modeling for health service planning

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Several methodological approaches have been used to estimate distance in health service research. In this study, focusing on cardiac catheterization services, Euclidean, Manhattan, and the less widely known Minkowski distance metrics are used to estimate distances from patient residence to hospital. Distance metrics typically produce less accurate estimates than actual measurements, but each metric provides a single model of travel over a given network. Therefore, distance metrics, unlike actual measurements, can be directly used in spatial analytical modeling. Euclidean distance is most often used, but unlikely the most appropriate metric. Minkowski distance is a more promising method. Distances estimated with each metric are contrasted with road distance and travel time measurements, and an optimized Minkowski distance is implemented in spatial analytical modeling. Methods Road distance and travel time are calculated from the postal code of residence of each patient undergoing cardiac catheterization to the pertinent hospital. The Minkowski metric is optimized, to approximate travel time and road distance, respectively. Distance estimates and distance measurements are then compared using descriptive statistics and visual mapping methods. The optimized Minkowski metric is implemented, via the spatial weight matrix, in a spatial regression model identifying socio-economic factors significantly associated with cardiac catheterization. Results The Minkowski coefficient that best approximates road distance is 1.54; 1.31 best approximates travel time. The latter is also a good predictor of road distance, thus providing the best single model of travel from patient's residence to hospital. The Euclidean metric and the optimal Minkowski metric are alternatively implemented in the regression model, and the results compared. The Minkowski method produces more reliable results than the traditional Euclidean metric. Conclusion Road distance and travel time

  1. Analysis of plant gums and saccharide materials in paint samples: comparison of GC-MS analytical procedures and databases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saccharide materials have been used for centuries as binding media, to paint, write and illuminate manuscripts and to apply metallic leaf decorations. Although the technical literature often reports on the use of plant gums as binders, actually several other saccharide materials can be encountered in paint samples, not only as major binders, but also as additives. In the literature, there are a variety of analytical procedures that utilize GC-MS to characterize saccharide materials in paint samples, however the chromatographic profiles are often extremely different and it is impossible to compare them and reliably identify the paint binder. Results This paper presents a comparison between two different analytical procedures based on GC-MS for the analysis of saccharide materials in works-of-art. The research presented here evaluates the influence of the analytical procedure used, and how it impacts the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of paint samples that contain saccharide materials. The procedures have been developed, optimised and systematically used to characterise plant gums at the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI) and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI). The main steps of the analytical procedures and their optimisation are discussed. Conclusions The results presented highlight that the two methods give comparable sugar profiles, whether the samples analysed are simple raw materials, pigmented and unpigmented paint replicas, or paint samples collected from hundreds of centuries old polychrome art objects. A common database of sugar profiles of reference materials commonly found in paint samples was thus compiled. The database presents data also from those materials that only contain a minor saccharide fraction. This database highlights how many sources of saccharides can be found in a paint sample, representing an important step forward in the problem of

  2. Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Tooth Bending Stress of Aerospace Spiral Bevel Gears

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    location. These stress values were found for the output torque on the gear equaling 1073 N*m (9500 in*lb). B - Experimental Results. Testing was... 1073 N*m (9500 in*lb) of gear shaft torque. Note that the results are the same with respect to relative magnitudes between the regions of the fillet as...torque equal to 1073 N*m (9500 in*lb) at a pinion rotational speed equal to 14400 RPM. The analytical results were taken for the mid-face results from

  3. Deceleration of CMEs in the interplanetary medium: comparison of different analytic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.

    2011-12-01

    We study the evolution of fast CMEs from near the Sun to 1 AU. There are several analytic models to describe the CME's propagation and to predict the 1 AU transit times and arrival velocities. In this work we compare the drag force (Vrsnak & Gopalswamy [2002], Cargill [2004]), mass piling up (Canto et al. [2005], Tappin [2006]) and viscous and turbulent force (Borgazzi et al. [2009]) deceleration models. We present a few study cases applying the different models and comparing the results with observations. We discuss the similarities and differences between the models.

  4. A comparison of analytical and numerical models for steadily driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Priest, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of boundary conditions in both analytical and numerical solutions of steadily driven reconnection on the reconnection of antiparallel magnetic fields is considered, with special attention given to the mathematical problem of properly specifying boundary conditions for the MHD equation. A unified formulation developed by Priest and Forbes (1986) for steady state reconnection, which includes the Petschek solution and the Sonnerup (1970) solution as special cases, is used to reinterpret the previous numerical experiments of steadily driven reconnection. It is shown that many contradictory features of these experiments were caused by the use of boundary conditions which are different from those required by Petschek's (1964) theory.

  5. Comparison of three sampling and analytical methods for the determination of airborne hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Boiano, J M; Wallace, M E; Sieber, W K; Groff, J H; Wang, J; Ashley, K

    2000-08-01

    A field study was conducted with the goal of comparing the performance of three recently developed or modified sampling and analytical methods for the determination of airborne hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The study was carried out in a hard chrome electroplating facility and in a jet engine manufacturing facility where airborne Cr(VI) was expected to be present. The analytical methods evaluated included two laboratory-based procedures (OSHA Method ID-215 and NIOSH Method 7605) and a field-portable method (NIOSH Method 7703). These three methods employ an identical sampling methodology: collection of Cr(VI)-containing aerosol on a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filter housed in a sampling cassette, which is connected to a personal sampling pump calibrated at an appropriate flow rate. The basis of the analytical methods for all three methods involves extraction of the PVC filter in alkaline buffer solution, chemical isolation of the Cr(VI) ion, complexation of the Cr(VI) ion with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide, and spectrometric measurement of the violet chromium diphenylcarbazone complex at 540 nm. However, there are notable specific differences within the sample preparation procedures used in three methods. To assess the comparability of the three measurement protocols, a total of 20 side-by-side air samples were collected, equally divided between a chromic acid electroplating operation and a spray paint operation where water soluble forms of Cr(VI) were used. A range of Cr(VI) concentrations from 0.6 to 960 microg m(-3), with Cr(VI) mass loadings ranging from 0.4 to 32 microg, was measured at the two operations. The equivalence of the means of the log-transformed Cr(VI) concentrations obtained from the different analytical methods was compared. Based on analysis of variance (ANOVA) results, no statistically significant differences were observed between mean values measured using each of the three methods. Small but statistically significant differences were observed between

  6. Comparison of FDTD numerical computations and analytical multipole expansion method for plasmonics-active nanosphere dimers.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Anuj; Norton, Stephen J; Gerhold, Michael D; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-06-08

    This paper describes a comparative study of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and analytical evaluations of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of dimers of metallic nanospheres of plasmonics-active metals. The results of these two computational methods, to determine electromagnetic field enhancement in the region often referred to as "hot spots" between the two nanospheres forming the dimer, were compared and a strong correlation observed for gold dimers. The analytical evaluation involved the use of the spherical-harmonic addition theorem to relate the multipole expansion coefficients between the two nanospheres. In these evaluations, the spacing between two nanospheres forming the dimer was varied to obtain the effect of nanoparticle spacing on the electromagnetic fields in the regions between the nanostructures. Gold and silver were the metals investigated in our work as they exhibit substantial plasmon resonance properties in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regimes. The results indicate excellent correlation between the two computational methods, especially for gold nanosphere dimers with only a 5-10% difference between the two methods. The effect of varying the diameters of the nanospheres forming the dimer, on the electromagnetic field enhancement, was also studied.

  7. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  8. Analytical and experimental comparisons of electromechanical vibration response of a piezoelectric bimorph beam for power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumentut, M. F.; Howard, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Power harvesters that extract energy from vibrating systems via piezoelectric transduction show strong potential for powering smart wireless sensor devices in applications of health condition monitoring of rotating machinery and structures. This paper presents an analytical method for modelling an electromechanical piezoelectric bimorph beam with tip mass under two input base transverse and longitudinal excitations. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equations were used to model the piezoelectric bimorph beam. The polarity-electric field of the piezoelectric element is excited by the strain field caused by base input excitation, resulting in electrical charge. The governing electromechanical dynamic equations were derived analytically using the weak form of the Hamiltonian principle to obtain the constitutive equations. Three constitutive electromechanical dynamic equations based on independent coefficients of virtual displacement vectors were formulated and then further modelled using the normalised Ritz eigenfunction series. The electromechanical formulations include both the series and parallel connections of the piezoelectric bimorph. The multi-mode frequency response functions (FRFs) under varying electrical load resistance were formulated using Laplace transformation for the multi-input mechanical vibrations to provide the multi-output dynamic displacement, velocity, voltage, current and power. The experimental and theoretical validations reduced for the single mode system were shown to provide reasonable predictions. The model results from polar base excitation for off-axis input motions were validated with experimental results showing the change to the electrical power frequency response amplitude as a function of excitation angle, with relevance for practical implementation.

  9. Cerebellar areas dedicated to social cognition? A comparison of meta-analytic and connectivity results.

    PubMed

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Baetens, Kris; Mariën, Peter; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2015-08-01

    A recent meta-analysis explored the role of the cerebellum in social cognition and documented that this part of the brain is critically implicated in social cognition, especially in more abstract and complex forms of mentalizing. The authors found an overlap with clusters involved in sensorimotor (during mirror and self-judgment tasks) as well as in executive processes (across all tasks) documented in earlier nonsocial cerebellar meta-analyses, and hence interpreted their results in terms of a domain-general function of the cerebellum. However, these meta-analytic results might be interpreted in a different, complementary way. Indeed, the results reveal a striking overlap with the parcellation of cerebellar topography offered by a recent functional connectivity analysis. In particular, the majority of social cognitive activity in the cerebellum can also be explained as located within the boundaries of a default/mentalizing network of the cerebellum, with the exception of the involvement of primary and integrative somatomotor networks for self-related and mirror tasks, respectively. Given the substantial overlap, a novel interpretation of the meta-analytic findings is put forward suggesting that cerebellar activity during social judgments might reflect a more domain-specific mentalizing functionality in some areas of the cerebellum than assumed before.

  10. Comparison of ISS Power System Telemetry with Analytically Derived Data for Shadowed Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, H. James

    2002-01-01

    Accurate International Space Station (ISS) power prediction requires the quantification of solar array shadowing. Prior papers have discussed the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) ISS power system tool SPACE (System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation) and its integrated shadowing algorithms. On-orbit telemetry has become available that permits the correlation of theoretical shadowing predictions with actual data. This paper documents the comparison of a shadowing metric (total solar array current) as derived from SPACE predictions and on-orbit flight telemetry data for representative significant shadowing cases. Images from flight video recordings and the SPACE computer program graphical output are used to illustrate the comparison. The accuracy of the SPACE shadowing capability is demonstrated for the cases examined.

  11. Determination of proline in honey: comparison between official methods, optimization and validation of the analytical methodology.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Annibaldi, Anna; Illuminati, Silvia; Finale, Carolina; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The study compares official spectrophotometric methods for the determination of proline content in honey - those of the International Honey Commission (IHC) and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) - with the original Ough method. Results show that the extra time-consuming treatment stages added by the IHC method with respect to the Ough method are pointless. We demonstrate that the AOACs method proves to be the best in terms of accuracy and time saving. The optimized waiting time for the absorbance recording is set at 35min from the removal of reaction tubes from the boiling bath used in the sample treatment. The optimized method was validated in the matrix: linearity up to 1800mgL(-1), limit of detection 20mgL(-1), limit of quantification 61mgL(-1). The method was applied to 43 unifloral honey samples from the Marche region, Italy.

  12. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  13. A Comparison of Analytical and Data Preprocessing Methods for Spectral Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    LUTHRIA, DEVANAND L.; MUKHOPADHYAY, SUDARSAN; LIN, LONG-ZE; HARNLY, JAMES M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral fingerprinting, as a method of discriminating between plant cultivars and growing treatments for a common set of broccoli samples, was compared for six analytical instruments. Spectra were acquired for finely powdered solid samples using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Fourier transform near-infrared (NIR) spectrometry. Spectra were also acquired for unfractionated aqueous methanol extracts of the powders using molecular absorption in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (VIS) regions and mass spectrometry with negative (MS−) and positive (MS+) ionization. The spectra were analyzed using nested one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to statistically evaluate the quality of discrimination. All six methods showed statistically significant differences between the cultivars and treatments. The significance of the statistical tests was improved by the judicious selection of spectral regions (IR and NIR), masses (MS+ and MS−), and derivatives (IR, NIR, UV, and VIS). PMID:21352644

  14. Comparison of a two-dimensional adaptive-wall technique with analytical wall interference correction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional airfoil model was tested in the adaptive wall test section of the NASA Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) and in the ventilated test section of the National Aeronautical Establishment Two Dimensional High Reynold Number Facility (HRNF). The primary goal of the tests was to compare different techniques (adaptive test section walls and classical, analytical corrections) to account for wall interference. Tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8 at chord Reynolds numbers of 10 x 10(exp 6), 15 x 10(exp 6), and 20 x 10(exp 6). The angle of attack was varied from about 12 degrees up to stall. Movement of the top and bottom test section walls was used to account for the wall interference in the HRNF tests. The test results are in good agreement.

  15. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes the rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide insight

  16. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; ...

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes themore » rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide

  17. Default network activation during episodic and semantic memory retrieval: A selective meta-analytic comparison.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongkeun

    2016-01-08

    It remains unclear whether and to what extent the default network subregions involved in episodic memory (EM) and semantic memory (SM) processes overlap or are separated from one another. This study addresses this issue through a controlled meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies involving healthy participants. Various EM and SM task paradigms differ widely in the extent of default network involvement. Therefore, the issue at hand cannot be properly addressed without some control for this factor. In this regard, this study employs a two-stage analysis: a preliminary meta-analysis to select EM and SM task paradigms that recruit relatively extensive default network regions and a main analysis to compare the selected task paradigms. Based on a within-EM comparison, the default network contributed more to recollection/familiarity effects than to old/new effects, and based on a within-SM comparison, it contributed more to word/pseudoword effects than to semantic/phonological effects. According to a direct comparison of recollection/familiarity and word/pseudoword effects, each involving a range of default network regions, there were more overlaps than separations in default network subregions involved in these two effects. More specifically, overlaps included the bilateral posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex, left inferior parietal lobule, and left anteromedial prefrontal regions, whereas separations included only the hippocampal formation and the parahippocampal cortex region, which was unique to recollection/familiarity effects. These results indicate that EM and SM retrieval processes involving strong memory signals recruit extensive and largely overlapping default network regions and differ mainly in distinct contributions of hippocampus and parahippocampal regions to EM retrieval.

  18. A comparison of observed and analytically derived remote sensing penetration depths for turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. D.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Guraus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The depth to which sunlight will penetrate in turbid waters was investigated. The tests were conducted in water with a single scattering albedo range, and over a range of solar elevation angles. Two different techniques were used to determine the depth of light penetration. It showed little change in the depth of sunlight penetration with changing solar elevation angle. A comparison of the penetration depths indicates that the best agreement between the two methods was achieved when the quasisingle scattering relationship was not corrected for solar angle. It is concluded that sunlight penetration is dependent on inherent water properties only.

  19. Visual Analytics for Comparison of Ocean Model Output with Reference Data: Detecting and Analyzing Geophysical Processes Using Clustering Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Köthur, Patrick; Sips, Mike; Dobslaw, Henryk; Dransch, Doris

    2014-12-01

    Researchers assess the quality of an ocean model by comparing its output to that of a previous model version or to observations. One objective of the comparison is to detect and to analyze differences and similarities between both data sets regarding geophysical processes, such as particular ocean currents. This task involves the analysis of thousands or hundreds of thousands of geographically referenced temporal profiles in the data. To cope with the amount of data, modelers combine aggregation of temporal profiles to single statistical values with visual comparison. Although this strategy is based on experience and a well-grounded body of expert knowledge, our discussions with domain experts have shown that it has two limitations: (1) using a single statistical measure results in a rather limited scope of the comparison and in significant loss of information, and (2) the decisions modelers have to make in the process may lead to important aspects being overlooked. In this article, we propose a Visual Analytics approach that broadens the scope of the analysis, reduces subjectivity, and facilitates comparison of the two data sets. It comprises three steps: First, it allows modelers to consider many aspects of the temporal behavior of geophysical processes by conducting multiple clusterings of the temporal profiles in each data set. Modelers can choose different features describing the temporal behavior of relevant processes, clustering algorithms, and parameterizations. Second, our approach consolidates the clusterings of one data set into a single clustering via a clustering ensembles approach. The consolidated clustering presents an overview of the geospatial distribution of temporal behavior in a data set. Third, a visual interface allows modelers to compare the two consolidated clusterings. It enables them to detect clusters of temporal profiles that represent geophysical processes and to analyze differences and similarities between two data sets. This work is

  20. Final report of the key comparison CCQM-K72: Purity of zinc with respect to six defined metallic analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Jochen; Kipphardt, Heinrich; del Rocío Arvizu Torres, María; Manzano, Judith Velina Lara; Marques Rodrigues, Janaína; Caciano de Sena, Rodrigo; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Heo, Sung Woo; Zhou, Tao; Turk, Gregory C.; Winchester, Michael; Yu, Lee L.; Miura, Tsutomu; Methven, B.; Sturgeon, Ralph; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Tunç, Murat; Zühtü Can, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    High purity elements can serve as a realization of the SI unit amount of substance for the specific element. Solutions prepared from high purity metals by applying gravimetric preparation and the concept of molar mass are used as 'calibration' solutions in many fields of analytical chemistry and provide the metrological basis in elemental analysis. Since ideal purity does not exist for real materials, the actual purity of the high purity material must be known with a specified uncertainty. As required uncertainties around 10-4 relative on the purity statement are not accessible in almost all cases by a direct measurement of the element in itself, the indirect approach is followed, where all elements excepting the matrix element itself are measured and their sum is subtracted from the value for ideal purity, which is 1 kg/kg. It was the aim of this comparison to demonstrate the capability of national metrology institutes and designated institutes to determine the purity of pure elements. In order to limit the effort within this comparison, only six metallic impurities (Ag, Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, Tl) in the low mg/kg range are considered in a zinc matrix. It has to be underlined here that the task was to measure the purity of zinc based on the determination of six analytes. The task is not trace analysis of specific analytes in zinc. This subtle distinction defines different measurands. The sample, pure Zn, was cut in pieces of cubic geometry for wet chemical analysis or of pin geometry for GDMS analysis and was sent to the participants. The comparison was run under the auspices of the Inorganic analysis Working Group (IAWG) of the CCQM and was piloted by the BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin, Germany. The majority of the participants applied ICP-MS techniques and only two participants used additionally atomic absorption spectrometry. GDMS was used only by one participant. The observed spreads for the measurement results reported by the

  1. Flight investigation of approach and flare from simulated breakout altitude of a subsonic jet transport and comparison with analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheny, N. W.

    1974-01-01

    Satisfactory and optimum flare windows are defined from pilot ratings and comments. Maximum flare normal accelerations, touchdown rates of sink, and total landing maneuver time increments are summarized as a function of approach airspeed margin (with respect to reference airspeed) and flare initiation altitude. The effects of two thrust management techniques are investigated. Comparisons are made with predictions from three analytical models and the results of a simulator study. The approach speed margin was found to have a greater influence on the flare initiation altitude than the absolute airspeed. The optimum airspeed was between the reference airspeed and the reference airspeed plus 10 knots. The optimum flare initiation altitude range for unrestricted landings was from 11 meters to 20 meters (36 feet to 66 feet), and the landing time in the optimum window was 8 seconds. The duration of the landing maneuver increased with increasing flare initiation altitude and with increasing speed margins on the approach.

  2. Comparison of Analytical Methods for the Determination of Uranium in Seawater Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Jordana R.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Choe, Key-Young

    2016-04-20

    Trace element determinations in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are analytically challenging due to the typically very low concentrations of the trace elements and the potential interference of the salt matrix. In this study, we did a comparison for uranium analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Sequim Bay seawater samples and three seawater certified reference materials (SLEW-3, CASS-5 and NASS-6) using seven different analytical approaches. The methods evaluated include: direct analysis, Fe/Pd reductive precipitation, standard addition calibration, online automated dilution using an external calibration with and without matrix matching, and online automated pre-concentration. The method which produced the most accurate results was the method of standard addition calibration, recovering uranium from a Sequim Bay seawater sample at 101 ± 1.2%. The on-line preconcentration method and the automated dilution with matrix-matched calibration method also performed well. The two least effective methods were the direct analysis and the Fe/Pd reductive precipitation using sodium borohydride

  3. Comparison of behavior analytic and eclectic early interventions for young children with autism after three years.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jane S; Stanislaw, Harold; Green, Gina; Sparkman, Coleen R; Cohen, Howard G

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study, we compared the effects of just over one year of intensive behavior analytic intervention (IBT) provided to 29 young children diagnosed with autism with two eclectic (i.e., mixed-method) interventions (Howard, Sparkman, Cohen, Green, & Stanislaw, 2005). One eclectic intervention (autism programming; AP) was designed specifically for children with autism and was intensive in that it was delivered for an average of 25-30 h per week (n = 16). The other eclectic intervention (generic programming; GP) was delivered to 16 children with a variety of diagnoses and needs for an average of 15-17 h per week. This paper reports outcomes for children in all three groups after two additional years of intervention. With few exceptions, the benefits of IBT documented in our first study were sustained throughout Years 2 and 3. At their final assessment, children who received IBT were more than twice as likely to score in the normal range on measures of cognitive, language, and adaptive functioning than were children who received either form of eclectic intervention. Significantly more children in the IBT group than in the other two groups had IQ, language, and adaptive behavior test scores that increased by at least one standard deviation from intake to final assessment. Although the largest improvements for children in the IBT group generally occurred during Year 1, many children in that group whose scores were below the normal range after the first year of intervention attained scores in the normal range of functioning with one or two years of additional intervention. In contrast, children in the two eclectic treatment groups were unlikely to attain scores in the normal range after the first year of intervention, and many of those who had scores in the normal range in the first year fell out of the normal range in subsequent years. There were no consistent differences in outcomes at Years 2 and 3 between the two groups who received eclectic interventions

  4. Comparison of analytical methods for profiling N- and O-linked glycans from cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Togayachi, Akira; Azadi, Parastoo; Ishihara, Mayumi; Geyer, Rudolf; Galuska, Christina; Geyer, Hildegard; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Jin, Chunsheng; Kato, Koichi; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kondo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Kolarich, Daniel; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Nakano, Miyako; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kurimoto, Ayako; Wada, Yoshinao; Tajiri, Michiko; Yang, Pengyuan; Cao, Weiqian; Li, Hong; Rudd, Pauline M.; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    The Human Disease Glycomics/Proteome Initiative (HGPI) is an activity in the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) supported by leading researchers from international institutes and aims at development of disease-related glycomics/glycoproteomics analysis techniques. Since 2004, the initiative has conducted three pilot studies. The first two were N- and O-glycan analyses of purified transferrin and immunoglobulin-G and assessed the most appropriate analytical approach employed at the time. This paper describes the third study, which was conducted to compare different approaches for quantitation of N- and O-linked glycans attached to proteins in crude biological samples. The preliminary analysis on cell pellets resulted in wildly varied glycan profiles, which was probably the consequence of variations in the pre-processing sample preparation methodologies. However, the reproducibility of the data was not improved dramatically in the subsequent analysis on cell lysate fractions prepared in a specified method by one lab. The study demonstrated the difficulty of carrying out a complete analysis of the glycome in crude samples by any single technology and the importance of rigorous optimization of the course of analysis from preprocessing to data interpretation. It suggests that another collaborative study employing the latest technologies in this rapidly evolving field will help to realize the requirements of carrying out the large-scale analysis of glycoproteins in complex cell samples. PMID:26511985

  5. Neutron noise calculations in a hexagonal geometry and comparison with analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H. N.; Demaziere, C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a neutronic and kinetic solver for hexagonal geometries. The tool is developed based on the diffusion theory with multi-energy groups and multi-groups of delayed neutron precursors allowing the solutions of forward and adjoint problems of static and dynamic states, and is applicable to both thermal and fast systems with hexagonal geometries. In the dynamic problems, the small stationary fluctuations of macroscopic cross sections are considered as noise sources, and then the induced first order noise is calculated fully in the frequency domain. Numerical algorithms for solving the static and noise equations are implemented with a spatial discretization based on finite differences and a power iterative solution. A coarse mesh finite difference method has been adopted for speeding up the convergence. Since no other numerical tool could calculate frequency-dependent noise in hexagonal geometry, validation calculations have been performed and benchmarked to analytical solutions based on a 2-D homogeneous system with two-energy groups and one-group of delayed neutron precursor, in which point-like perturbations of thermal absorption cross section at central and non-central positions are considered as noise sources. (authors)

  6. Comparison of three prospective analytical methods for benzene analysis in jet-fuel environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    Accurate analysis of benzene in jet fuel has been a concern over the past several years. The method we have been using to analyze benzene in jet fuel is the NIOSH 1501 method, a method specifically designed for aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene. However, the method is not designed for analysis of benzene in jet fuel environments. At the present time there is no approved (either by NIOSH or OSHA) method for analysis of benzene in fuel environments. At the request of HQ AAC/SGPB, we recently conducted a study to compare three prospective analytical methods (NIOSH method 1501 (GC/FID wtih packed column) modified NIOSH 1501 method (GC/FID with capillary column), and High Pressure Liquid Chromatography with Ultraviolet Detection (HPLC/UV)). In this study spiked charcoal tube samples as well as air samples of known concentrations of benzene in JP-4 and Stoddard Solvents were analyzed by all three methods. The test results showed that modified NIOSH 1501 and HPLC methods had good correlation between spiked and measured amount of benzene in JP-4 and Stoddard Solvent mixtures. The NIOSH 1501 method utilizing packed column over estimated the test benzene concentration indicating positive interference from other hydrocarbons present in JP 4 and Stoddard Solvents.

  7. Quantification of camalexin, a phytoalexin from Arabidopsis thaliana: a comparison of five analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Beets, Caryn; Dubery, Ian

    2011-12-15

    Camalexin is a phytoalexin of Arabidopsis thaliana and an important component of inducible defenses. Accurate quantification of low concentrations suffers from interference by structurally related metabolites. A. thaliana plants were induced with silver nitrate and camalexin was extracted using methanol and identified and quantified by (i) TLC as a blue fluorescent band, (ii) microtiter plate-based fluorescence spectroscopy, (iii) GC on a midpolar column coupled to flame ionization detection, (iv) C(18) HPLC coupled to a photodiode detector, and (v) UPLC coupled to a mass spectrometer detector. Standard curves over the range of 0.1-15 μg ml(-1) gave R(2) values from 0.996 to 0.999. The different methods were compared and evaluated for their ability to detect and quantify increasing concentrations (<0.4-8 μgg(-1) FW) of camalexin. Each of the techniques presented advantages and disadvantages with regard to accuracy, precision, interference, analytical sensitivity, and limits of detection. TLC is a good qualitative technique for the identification of camalexin and fluorescence spectroscopy is subject to quenching when performed on crude extracts. Comparable results were obtained with GC-FID, HPLC-PDA, and UPLC-MS, with UPLC-MS having the added advantage of short analysis times and detection based on accurate mass.

  8. Comparison of thyroid analytes in dogs aggressive to familiar people and in non-aggressive dogs.

    PubMed

    Radosta, Lisa A; Shofer, Frances S; Reisner, Ilana R

    2012-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed in order to examine the association between canine aggression to familiar people and serum concentrations of total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroxine autoantibodies (T4AA), total triiodothyronine (TT3), free triiodothyronine (fT3), triiodothyronine autoantibodies (T3AA), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAA). The subjects were 31 dogs historically aggressive to familiar people and 31 dogs with no history of aggression. Behavioral evaluation and physical examination were completed for each dog in addition to a complete blood count, serum chemistry panel, TT4, fT4 by equilibrium dialysis, TT3, fT3, TgAA, T3AA, and T4AA. Significant differences were found between the two groups with respect to only T4AA, which was increased in the aggressive group, but the concentrations for both groups were within the normal reference range. There were no differences between the two groups in the thyroid analytes most commonly measured by veterinary practitioners evaluating thyroid function in dogs. The results of this study revealed no significant difference between aggressive and non-aggressive dogs in the thyroid concentrations most commonly used to diagnose canine hypothyroidism.

  9. Analysis of plasticizers in PVC medical devices: Performance comparison of eight analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Bourdeaux, D; Pereira, B; Azaroual, N; Barthélémy, C; Breysse, C; Chennell, P; Cueff, R; Dine, T; Eljezi, T; Feutry, F; Genay, S; Kambia, N; Lecoeur, M; Masse, M; Odou, P; Radaniel, T; Simon, N; Vaccher, C; Verlhac, C; Yessad, M; Décaudin, B; Sautou, V

    2017-01-01

    A wide variety of medical devices (MDs) used in hospitals are made of flexible plasticized polyvinylchloride (PVC). Different plasticizers are present in variable amounts in the PVC matrix of the devices and can leach out into the infused solutions and may enter into contact with the patients. The ARMED(1) project aims to assess the migration of these plasticizers from medical devices and therefore the level of exposure in patients. For the first task of the project, eight methods were developed to directly detect and quantify the plasticizers in the PVC matrix of the MDs. We compared the overall performances of the analytical methods using standardized and validated criteria in order to provide the scientific community with the guidance and the technical specifications of each method for the intended application. We have shown that routine rapid screening could be performed directly on the MDs using the FTIR technique, with cost-effective analyses. LC techniques may also be used, but with limits and only with individual quantification of the main plasticizers expected in the PVC matrix. GC techniques, especially GC-MS, are both more specific and more sensitive than other techniques. NMR is a robust and specific technique to precisely discriminate all plasticizers in a MD but is limited by its cost and its low ability to detect and quantify plasticizer contamination, e.g. by DEHP. All these results have been confirmed by a real test, called the " blind test " carried out on 10 MD samples.

  10. Comparison between different tests and their combination for prediction of difficult intubation: An analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Basunia, Sandip Roy; Ghosh, Sarmila; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Saha, Indranil; Biswas, Atanu; Prasad, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is an impelling need for accurate tests to predict difficult intubation, as failure to achieve endotracheal intubation causes significant morbidity and mortality in anesthetic practice. Aim: To calculate the validity of the different tests along with their combination and agreement when compared with endotracheal intubation in predicting difficult intubation. Settings and Design: Operation theaters, analytical study. Materials and Methods: Three hundred patients aged between 16 and 60 years of American society of anesthesiologist (ASA) physical status I and II, scheduled for elective surgical procedures requiring endotracheal intubation were studied during January-July 2012. Mallampati grade (MP), sternomental distance (SMD), thyromental distance (TMD), and Delilkan and Calder test were recorded for every patient. Endotracheal intubation was performed by an experienced anesthesiologist blinded to the measurements and recorded grading of intubation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), likelihood ratio (LR), odds ratio (OR), and kappa coefficient of tests individually and in combination were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: IBM SPSS software (version 16.0) and Epi-info software (version 3.2). Results: Difficult and failed intubation was 13.3% and 0.6%, respectively. Difficult intubation increased with age. TMD and Calder test showed highest sensitivity individually and Dellilkan's test showed least sensitivity. Among the combination of tests, MP with SMD and MP with Calder test had the highest sensitivity. Conclusion: Among individual test TMD and Calder are better predictive tests in terms of sensitivity. Combination of tests increases the chance of prediction of difficult intubation. PMID:25885730

  11. Comparison of limited measurements of the OTEC-1 plume with analytical-model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) requires significant amounts of warm surface waters and cold deep waters for power production. Because these waters are returned to the ocean as effluents, their behavior may affect plant operation and impact the environment. The OTEC-1 facility tested 1-MWe heat exchangers aboard the vessel Ocean Energy Converter moored off the island of Hawaii. The warm and cold waters used by the OTEC-1 facility were combined prior to discharge from the vessel to create a mixed discharge condition. A limited field survey of the mixed discharge plume using fluorescent dye as a tracer was conducted on April 11, 1981, as part of the environmental studies at OTEC-1 coordinated by the Marine Sciences Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Results of that survey were compared with analytical model predictions of plume behavior. Although the predictions were in general agreement with the results of the plume survey, inherent limitations in the field measurements precluded complete description of the plume or detailed evaluation of the models.

  12. Differential linear scan voltammetry: analytical performance in comparison with pulsed voltammetry techniques.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Disha B; Gratzl, Miklós

    2013-06-01

    We report here on differential linear scan voltammetry, DLSV, that combines the working principles of linear scan voltammetry, LSV, and the numerous existing pulsed voltammetry techniques. DLSV preserves the information from continuous interrogation in voltage and high accuracy that LSV provides about electrochemical processes, and the much better sensitivity of differential pulsed techniques. DLSV also minimizes the background current compared to both LSV and pulsed voltammetry. An early version of DLSV, derivative stationary electrode polarography, DSEP, had been proposed in the 1960s but soon abandoned in favor of the emerging differential pulsed techniques. Relative to DSEP, DLSV takes advantage of the flexibility of discrete smoothing differentiation that was not available to early investigators. Also, DSEP had been explored in pure solutions and with reversible electrochemical reactions. DLSV is tested in this work in more challenging experimental contexts: the measurement of oxygen with a carbon fiber microelectrode in buffer, and with a gold microdisc electrode exposed to a live biological preparation. This work compares the analytical performance of DLSV and square wave voltammetry, the most popular pulsed voltammetry technique.

  13. Oxygen-enriched diesel engine performance: A comparison of analytical and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Assanis, D.N. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Use of oxygen-enriched combustion air in diesel engines can lead to significant improvements in power density, as well as reductions in particulate emissions, but at the expense of higher NO{sub x} emissions. Oxygen enrichment would also lead to lower ignition delays and the opportunity to burn lower grade fuels. Analytical and experimental studies are being conducted in parallel to establish the optimal combination of oxygen level and diesel fuel properties. In this paper, cylinder pressure data acquired on a single-cylinder engine are used to generate heat release rates for operation under various oxygen contents. These derived heat release rates are in turn used to improve the combustion correlation -- and thus the prediction capability -- of the simulation code. It is shown that simulated and measured cylinder pressures and other performance parameters are in good agreement. The improved simulation can provide sufficiently accurate predictions of trends and magnitudes to be useful in parametric studies assessing the effects of oxygen enrichment and water injection on diesel engine performance. Measured ignition delays, NO{sub x} emissions, and particulate emissions are also compared with previously published data. The measured ignition delays are slightly lower than previously reported. Particulate emissions measured in this series of tests are significantly lower than previously reported. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) test was a full-scale, full duration static test firing of a high performance motor-configuration solid rocket motor with nozzle vectoring. The final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-7. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations included in the report are complete and final except for the TEM-7 fixed housing unbond investigation. A presentation and discussion of TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107, Rev A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) Static Fire Test Plan are included.

  15. Analysis of hydroponic fertilizer matrixes for perchlorate: comparison of analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Collette, Timothy W; Williams, Ted L; Urbansky, Edward T; Magnuson, Matthew L; Hebert, Gretchen N; Strauss, Steven H

    2003-01-01

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), normal Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy using an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR-FTIR) coated with a thin film of an organometallic ion-exchange compound. Three of the five solid products were found by all techniques to contain perchlorate at the level of approximately 100-350 mg kg(-1). The remaining products did not contain perchlorate above the detection level of any of the techniques. Comparative analysis using several analytical techniques that depend on different properties of perchlorate allow for a high degree of certainty in both the qualitative and quantitative determinations. This proved particularly useful for these samples, due to the complexity of the matrix. Analyses of this type, including multiple spectroscopic confirmations, may also be useful for other complicated matrixes (e.g., biological samples) or in forensic/regulatory frameworks where data are likely to be challenged. While the source of perchlorate in these hydroponic products is not known, the perchlorate-to-nitrate concentration ratio (w/w) in the aqueous extracts is generally consistent with the historical weight percent of water soluble components in caliche, a nitrate-bearing ore found predominantly in Chile. This ore, which is the only well-established natural source of perchlorate, is mined and used, albeit minimally, as a nitrogen source in some fertilizer products.

  16. A Multilaboratory Comparison of Calibration Accuracy and the Performance of External References in Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Alfonso, Carlos; Arisaka, Fumio; Attali, Ilan; Bain, David L.; Bakhtina, Marina M.; Becker, Donald F.; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Besong, Tabot M. D.; Birck, Catherine; Brautigam, Chad A.; Brennerman, William; Byron, Olwyn; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Chaton, Catherine T.; Cölfen, Helmut; Connaghan, Keith D.; Crowley, Kimberly A.; Curth, Ute; Daviter, Tina; Dean, William L.; Díez, Ana I.; Ebel, Christine; Eckert, Debra M.; Eisele, Leslie E.; Eisenstein, Edward; England, Patrick; Escalante, Carlos; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Fairman, Robert; Finn, Ron M.; Fischle, Wolfgang; de la Torre, José García; Gor, Jayesh; Gustafsson, Henning; Hall, Damien; Harding, Stephen E.; Cifre, José G. Hernández; Herr, Andrew B.; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Isaac, Richard S.; Jao, Shu-Chuan; Jose, Davis; Kim, Soon-Jong; Kokona, Bashkim; Kornblatt, Jack A.; Kosek, Dalibor; Krayukhina, Elena; Krzizike, Daniel; Kusznir, Eric A.; Kwon, Hyewon; Larson, Adam; Laue, Thomas M.; Le Roy, Aline; Leech, Andrew P.; Lilie, Hauke; Luger, Karolin; Luque-Ortega, Juan R.; Ma, Jia; May, Carrie A.; Maynard, Ernest L.; Modrak-Wojcik, Anna; Mok, Yee-Foong; Mücke, Norbert; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Narlikar, Geeta J.; Noda, Masanori; Nourse, Amanda; Obsil, Tomas; Park, Chad K.; Park, Jin-Ku; Pawelek, Peter D.; Perdue, Erby E.; Perkins, Stephen J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Peterson, Craig L.; Peverelli, Martin G.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Prag, Gali; Prevelige, Peter E.; Raynal, Bertrand D. E.; Rezabkova, Lenka; Richter, Klaus; Ringel, Alison E.; Rosenberg, Rose; Rowe, Arthur J.; Rufer, Arne C.; Scott, David J.; Seravalli, Javier G.; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Song, Renjie; Staunton, David; Stoddard, Caitlin; Stott, Katherine; Strauss, Holger M.; Streicher, Werner W.; Sumida, John P.; Swygert, Sarah G.; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Tessmer, Ingrid; Toth, Ronald T.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Uchiyama, Susumu; Uebel, Stephan F. W.; Unzai, Satoru; Gruber, Anna Vitlin; von Hippel, Peter H.; Wandrey, Christine; Wang, Szu-Huan; Weitzel, Steven E.; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Wolberger, Cynthia; Wolff, Martin; Wright, Edward; Wu, Yu-Sung; Wubben, Jacinta M.; Schuck, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a first principles based method to determine absolute sedimentation coefficients and buoyant molar masses of macromolecules and their complexes, reporting on their size and shape in free solution. The purpose of this multi-laboratory study was to establish the precision and accuracy of basic data dimensions in AUC and validate previously proposed calibration techniques. Three kits of AUC cell assemblies containing radial and temperature calibration tools and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) reference sample were shared among 67 laboratories, generating 129 comprehensive data sets. These allowed for an assessment of many parameters of instrument performance, including accuracy of the reported scan time after the start of centrifugation, the accuracy of the temperature calibration, and the accuracy of the radial magnification. The range of sedimentation coefficients obtained for BSA monomer in different instruments and using different optical systems was from 3.655 S to 4.949 S, with a mean and standard deviation of (4.304 ± 0.188) S (4.4%). After the combined application of correction factors derived from the external calibration references for elapsed time, scan velocity, temperature, and radial magnification, the range of s-values was reduced 7-fold with a mean of 4.325 S and a 6-fold reduced standard deviation of ± 0.030 S (0.7%). In addition, the large data set provided an opportunity to determine the instrument-to-instrument variation of the absolute radial positions reported in the scan files, the precision of photometric or refractometric signal magnitudes, and the precision of the calculated apparent molar mass of BSA monomer and the fraction of BSA dimers. These results highlight the necessity and effectiveness of independent calibration of basic AUC data dimensions for reliable quantitative studies. PMID:25997164

  17. A multilaboratory comparison of calibration accuracy and the performance of external references in analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Alfonso, Carlos; Arisaka, Fumio; Attali, Ilan; Bain, David L; Bakhtina, Marina M; Becker, Donald F; Bedwell, Gregory J; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Besong, Tabot M D; Birck, Catherine; Brautigam, Chad A; Brennerman, William; Byron, Olwyn; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Chaires, Jonathan B; Chaton, Catherine T; Cölfen, Helmut; Connaghan, Keith D; Crowley, Kimberly A; Curth, Ute; Daviter, Tina; Dean, William L; Díez, Ana I; Ebel, Christine; Eckert, Debra M; Eisele, Leslie E; Eisenstein, Edward; England, Patrick; Escalante, Carlos; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Fairman, Robert; Finn, Ron M; Fischle, Wolfgang; de la Torre, José García; Gor, Jayesh; Gustafsson, Henning; Hall, Damien; Harding, Stephen E; Cifre, José G Hernández; Herr, Andrew B; Howell, Elizabeth E; Isaac, Richard S; Jao, Shu-Chuan; Jose, Davis; Kim, Soon-Jong; Kokona, Bashkim; Kornblatt, Jack A; Kosek, Dalibor; Krayukhina, Elena; Krzizike, Daniel; Kusznir, Eric A; Kwon, Hyewon; Larson, Adam; Laue, Thomas M; Le Roy, Aline; Leech, Andrew P; Lilie, Hauke; Luger, Karolin; Luque-Ortega, Juan R; Ma, Jia; May, Carrie A; Maynard, Ernest L; Modrak-Wojcik, Anna; Mok, Yee-Foong; Mücke, Norbert; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Narlikar, Geeta J; Noda, Masanori; Nourse, Amanda; Obsil, Tomas; Park, Chad K; Park, Jin-Ku; Pawelek, Peter D; Perdue, Erby E; Perkins, Stephen J; Perugini, Matthew A; Peterson, Craig L; Peverelli, Martin G; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Prag, Gali; Prevelige, Peter E; Raynal, Bertrand D E; Rezabkova, Lenka; Richter, Klaus; Ringel, Alison E; Rosenberg, Rose; Rowe, Arthur J; Rufer, Arne C; Scott, David J; Seravalli, Javier G; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Song, Renjie; Staunton, David; Stoddard, Caitlin; Stott, Katherine; Strauss, Holger M; Streicher, Werner W; Sumida, John P; Swygert, Sarah G; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Tessmer, Ingrid; Toth, Ronald T; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Uchiyama, Susumu; Uebel, Stephan F W; Unzai, Satoru; Gruber, Anna Vitlin; von Hippel, Peter H; Wandrey, Christine; Wang, Szu-Huan; Weitzel, Steven E; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Wolberger, Cynthia; Wolff, Martin; Wright, Edward; Wu, Yu-Sung; Wubben, Jacinta M; Schuck, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a first principles based method to determine absolute sedimentation coefficients and buoyant molar masses of macromolecules and their complexes, reporting on their size and shape in free solution. The purpose of this multi-laboratory study was to establish the precision and accuracy of basic data dimensions in AUC and validate previously proposed calibration techniques. Three kits of AUC cell assemblies containing radial and temperature calibration tools and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) reference sample were shared among 67 laboratories, generating 129 comprehensive data sets. These allowed for an assessment of many parameters of instrument performance, including accuracy of the reported scan time after the start of centrifugation, the accuracy of the temperature calibration, and the accuracy of the radial magnification. The range of sedimentation coefficients obtained for BSA monomer in different instruments and using different optical systems was from 3.655 S to 4.949 S, with a mean and standard deviation of (4.304 ± 0.188) S (4.4%). After the combined application of correction factors derived from the external calibration references for elapsed time, scan velocity, temperature, and radial magnification, the range of s-values was reduced 7-fold with a mean of 4.325 S and a 6-fold reduced standard deviation of ± 0.030 S (0.7%). In addition, the large data set provided an opportunity to determine the instrument-to-instrument variation of the absolute radial positions reported in the scan files, the precision of photometric or refractometric signal magnitudes, and the precision of the calculated apparent molar mass of BSA monomer and the fraction of BSA dimers. These results highlight the necessity and effectiveness of independent calibration of basic AUC data dimensions for reliable quantitative studies.

  18. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of novel phthalocyanines against Escherichia coli--comparison of analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Premysl; Kalhotka, Libor; Jancula, Daniel; Zezulka, Stepan; Korinkova, Radka; Cerny, Jiri; Marsalek, Blahoslav; Toman, Petr

    2014-09-05

    We analyzed antibacterial effects of several novel phthalocyanines against Escherichia coli and evaluated the suitability of flow cytometry for the detection of antibacterial effects of phthalocyanines in comparison with routinely used cultivation. After 3h of exposure under cool white light eight cationic phthalocyanines showed very high antibacterial activity in the concentration of 2.00 mg L(-1) and four of them were even efficient in the concentration of 0.20 mg L(-1). Antibacterial activity of neutral and anionic compounds was considerably lower or even negligible. No antibacterial effect was detected when bacteria were exposed without illumination. Binding affinity to bacterial cells was found to represent an important parameter influencing phthalocyanine antibacterial activity that can be modified by total charge of peripheral substituents and by the presence of suitable functional groups inside them. Agglomeration of cells observed in suspensions treated with a higher concentration of certain cationic phthalocyanines (the strongest binders to bacterial membrane) affected cytometric measurements of total cell counts, thus without appropriate pretreatment of the sample before analysis this parameter seems not to be fully valid in the evaluation of phthalocyanine antibacterial activity. Cytometric measurement of cell membrane integrity appears to be a suitable and even more sensitive parameter than cultivation.

  19. New analytical method for solving Burgers' and nonlinear heat transfer equations and comparison with HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Erfani, E.

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we present a numerical comparison between the differential transform method (DTM) and the homotopy analysis method (HAM) for solving Burgers' and nonlinear heat transfer problems. The first differential equation is the Burgers' equation serves as a useful model for many interesting problems in applied mathematics. The second one is the modeling equation of a straight fin with a temperature dependent thermal conductivity. In order to show the effectiveness of the DTM, the results obtained from the DTM is compared with available solutions obtained using the HAM [M.M. Rashidi, G. Domairry, S. Dinarvand, Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14 (2009) 708-717; G. Domairry, M. Fazeli, Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14 (2009) 489-499] and whit exact solutions. The method can easily be applied to many linear and nonlinear problems. It illustrates the validity and the great potential of the differential transform method in solving nonlinear partial differential equations. The obtained results reveal that the technique introduced here is very effective and convenient for solving nonlinear partial differential equations and nonlinear ordinary differential equations that we are found to be in good agreement with the exact solutions.

  20. Comparison of analytical and numerical analysis of the reference region model for DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsang; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D; Platt, Simon; Kent, Marc; Zhao, Qun

    2014-09-01

    This study compared three methods for analyzing DCE-MRI data with a reference region (RR) model: a linear least-square fitting with numerical analysis (LLSQ-N), a nonlinear least-square fitting with numerical analysis (NLSQ-N), and an analytical analysis (NLSQ-A). The accuracy and precision of estimating the pharmacokinetic parameter ratios KR and VR, where KR is defined as a ratio between the two volume transfer constants, K(trans,TOI) and K(trans,RR), and VR is the ratio between the two extracellular extravascular volumes, ve,TOI and ve,RR, were assessed using simulations under various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and temporal resolutions (4, 6, 30, and 60s). When no noise was added, the simulations showed that the mean percent error (MPE) for the estimated KR and VR using the LLSQ-N and NLSQ-N methods ranged from 1.2% to 31.6% with various temporal resolutions while the NLSQ-A method maintained a very high accuracy (<1.0×10(-4) %) regardless of the temporal resolution. The simulation also indicated that the LLSQ-N and NLSQ-N methods appear to underestimate the parameter ratios more than the NLSQ-A method. In addition, seven in vivo DCE-MRI datasets from spontaneously occurring canine brain tumors were analyzed with each method. Results for the in vivo study showed that KR (ranging from 0.63 to 3.11) and VR (ranging from 2.82 to 19.16) for the NLSQ-A method were both higher than results for the other two methods (KR ranging from 0.01 to 1.29 and VR ranging from 1.48 to 19.59). A temporal downsampling experiment showed that the averaged percent error for the NLSQ-A method (8.45%) was lower than the other two methods (22.97% for LLSQ-N and 65.02% for NLSQ-N) for KR, and the averaged percent error for the NLSQ-A method (6.33%) was lower than the other two methods (6.57% for LLSQ-N and 13.66% for NLSQ-N) for VR. Using simulations, we showed that the NLSQ-A method can estimate the ratios of pharmacokinetic parameters more accurately and precisely than the NLSQ-N and

  1. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  2. Genome Wide Association for Addiction: Replicated Results and Comparisons of Two Analytic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Hess, Judith; Nino, Michelle; Uhl, George R.

    2010-01-01

    likely to complement classical, “template” GWA approaches in which “genome wide” levels of significance are sought for SNP data from single case vs control comparisons. PMID:20098672

  3. Multicenter Comparison of Three Different Analytical Systems for Evaluation of DNA Banding Patterns from Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Gianluigi; Martini, Alessandro; Preziosi, Roberta; Bistoni, Francesco; Baldelli, Franco

    2002-01-01

    The enormous improvement of molecular typing techniques for epidemiological and clinical studies has not always been matched by an equivalent effort in applying optimal criteria for the analysis of both phenotypic and molecular data. In spite of the availability of a large collection of statistical and phylogenetic methods, the vast majority of commercial packages are limited by using only the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean algorithm to construct trees and by considering electrophoretic pattern only as migration distances. The latter method has serious drawbacks when different runs (separate gels) of the same molecular analysis are to be compared. This work presents a multicenter comparison of three different systems of banding pattern analysis on random amplified polymorphic DNA, (GACA)4, and contour-clamped homogeneous electric field patterns from strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans isolated in different clinical and geographical situations and a standard Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain employed as an outgroup. The systems considered were evaluated for their actual ability to(i) recognize identities, (ii) define complete differences (i.e., the ability to place S. cerevisiae out of the C. neoformans cluster), and (iii) estimate the extent of similarity among different strains. The ability to cluster strains according to the patient from which they were isolated was also evaluated. The results indicate that different algorithms do indeed produce divergent trees, both in overall topology and in clustering of individual strains, thus suggesting that care must be taken by individual investigators to use the most appropriate procedure and by the scientific community in defining a consensus system. PMID:12037071

  4. Adhesive contact of rough surfaces: Comparison between numerical calculations and analytical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, G.; Scaraggi, M.; Tartaglino, U.

    2009-09-01

    The authors have employed a numerical procedure to analyse the adhesive contact between a soft elastic layer and a rough rigid substrate. The solution to the problem, which belongs to the class of the free boundary problems, is obtained by calculating Green’s function which links the pressure distribution to the normal displacements at the interface. The problem is then formulated in the form of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind with a logarithmic kernel. The boundaries of the contact area are calculated by requiring the energy of the system to be stationary. This methodology has been employed to study the adhesive contact between an elastic semi-infinite solid and a randomly rough rigid profile with a self-affine fractal geometry. We show that, even in the presence of adhesion, the true contact area still linearly depends on the applied load. The numerical results are then critically compared with the predictions of an extended version of Persson’s contact mechanics theory, which is able to handle anisotropic surfaces, as 1D interfaces. It is shown that, for any given load, Persson’s theory underestimates the contact area by about 50% in comparison with our numerical calculations. We find that this discrepancy is larger than for 2D rough surfaces in the case of adhesionless contact. We argue that this increased difference might be explained, at least partially, by considering that Persson’s theory is a mean-field theory in spirit, so it should work better for 2D rough surfaces rather than for 1D rough surfaces. We also observe that the predicted value of separation is in agreement with our numerical results as well as the exponents of the power spectral density of the contact pressure distribution and of the elastic displacement of the solid. Therefore, we conclude that Persson’s theory captures almost exactly the main qualitative behaviour of the rough contact phenomena. in here

  5. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) was static fired on 27 Apr. 1993 at the Thiokol Corporation full-scale motor static test bay, T-24. This final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-10. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations contained are final. Included is a presentation and discussion of TEM-10 performance, anomalies, and test results in concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0110, Revision D, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) Static Fire Test Plan.

  6. In situ TEM electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Bernal, Rodrigo A; Filleter, Tobin

    2012-11-05

    The emergence of one-dimensional nanostructures as fundamental constituents of advanced materials and next-generation electronic and electromechanical devices has increased the need for their atomic-scale characterization. Given its spatial and temporal resolution, coupled with analytical capabilities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been the technique of choice in performing atomic structure and defect characterization. A number of approaches have been recently developed to combine these capabilities with in-situ mechanical deformation and electrical characterization in the emerging field of in-situ TEM electromechanical testing. This has enabled researchers to establish unambiguous synthesis-structure-property relations for one-dimensional nanostructures. In this article, the development and latest advances of several in-situ TEM techniques to carry out mechanical and electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes are reviewed. Through discussion of specific examples, it is shown how the merging of several microsystems and TEM has led to significant insights into the behavior of nanowires and nanotubes, underscoring the significant role in-situ techniques play in the development of novel nanoscale systems and materials.

  7. Assessment of TEM Cells for Whole Aircraft EMV Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    known to be due to cavity resonances within the cell. A novel method of active mode cancellation has been developed through CEM modelling together with...TEM Cell, OATS and Free Space Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.3.1 FEKO Models...accredited EMC test houses. The EMC/EMI characteristics of a box forms the basis of analysis at the system level once installed in the aircraft. The intra

  8. New TEM variant (TEM-92) produced by Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates.

    PubMed

    de Champs, C; Monne, C; Bonnet, R; Sougakoff, W; Sirot, D; Chanal, C; Sirot, J

    2001-04-01

    The sequences of the bla(TEM) genes encoding TEM-92 in Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates were determined and were found to be identical. Except for positions 218 (Lys-6) and 512 (Lys-104), the nucleotide sequence of bla(TEM-92) was identical to that of bla(TEM-20), including the sequence of the promoter region harboring a 135-bp deletion combined with a G-162-->T substitution. The deduced amino acid sequence of TEM-92 differed from that of TEM-52 by the presence of a substitution (Gln-6-->Lys) in the peptide signal.

  9. OBSERVATION OF DIPOLAR FERROMAGNETISM BY TEM TECHNIQUES.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA, M.ZHU,Y.TANDON,S.ET AL.

    2004-08-01

    Magnetostatic interactions play a central role in determining the magnetic response of an array of patterned magnetic elements or magnetized nanoparticles of given shape. The Fourier space approach recently introduced for the analytical computation of the demagnetizing tensor, field and energy for particles of arbitrary shape [1], has been recently extended to cover interactions between elements [2]. The main achievement has been the definition of a generalized dipole-dipole interaction for cylindrical objects, which takes into account the influence of shape anisotropy without resorting to,any kind of approximations [3]. Once the interaction energy is available, it becomes possible to evaluate the minimum energy state of the system for a given set of external parameters (such as applied field, aspect ratio, distance between elements). It turns out that, below a critical combination of aspect ratios and distances, the system undergoes a phase transition, changing abruptly from a closure domain state, with zero net magnetization, to a dipolar ferromagnetic state with a net magnetization which depends on the interaction strength between the elements. In order to observe this phenomenon by TEM, it is necessary to estimate the feasibility of the experiment by a series of simulations. Figure 1 shows the electron optical phase shifts for the system of three weakly (a-c) and strongly (d) interacting disks. The elements have a radius of 50 nm, a thickness of 5 nm (aspect ratio 1/20), and are uniformly magnetized at 2 T. By comparing Fig.1 (c) and (d), it can be seen that the fingerprint of the transition is the presence of fringing fields around the elements, revealed by the cosine fringes which resemble a dipole-like field in (d). When the system is in the closure-domain state, as in (a-c), no fringing field can be observed on a large scale. Figure 2 shows a set of Fresnel images, calculated for the same configurations as in Fig.1. As the Fresnel technique is scarcely

  10. Technical Evaluation Motor no. 5 (TEM-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 5 (TEM-5) was static test fired at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. TEM-5 was a full scale, full duration static test fire of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM). The primary purpose of TEM static tests is to recover SRM case and nozzle hardware for use in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) flight program. Inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-5 static test firing was successful. The ambient temperature during the test was 41 F and the propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was 72 F. Ballistics performance values were within the specified requirements. The overall performance of the TEM-5 components and test equipment was nominal. Dissembly inspection revealed that joint putty was in contact with the inner groove of the inner primary seal of the ignitor adapter-to-forward dome (inner) joint gasket; this condition had not occurred on any previous static test motor or flight RSRM. While no qualification issues were addressed on TEM-5, two significant component changes were evaluated. Those changes were a new vented assembly process for the case-to-nozzle joint and the installation of two redesigned field joint protection systems. Performance of the vented case-to-nozzle joint assembly was successful, and the assembly/performance differences between the two field joint protection system (FJPS) configurations were compared.

  11. Visualizing DNA Nanoparticle Motion under Graphene Liquid Cell TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica; Park, Jungwon; Lee, Somin; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, Paul

    2013-03-01

    We think of a simple colloidal nanocrystal as one type of artificial atoms. They mutually interact, cluster into artificial molecules, and further arrange into macroscopically functional artificial solids. The ``atomic'' resolution dynamics of this bottom-up strategy in materials design is studied here in a system of artificial molecules composed of DNA and nanoparticle. The observation of dynamics in their liquid environment is recently enabled by graphene liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In comparison to conventional TEM, wherein the assembled 3D artificial structures are dried out during sample preparation and thus are collapsed, this graphene liquid cell introduces a special local liquid structure that retains the conformations as well as the dynamics of the assemblies. In situ imaging of correlated motions of DNA and nanoparticle provides insights into the design principles of artificial nanocrystal molecules and solids linked by DNA.

  12. Comparison Between a Rapid Biological Screening Method (EPA 4425) for TCDDs/TCDFs and Chemical Analytical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jack W.; Jones, Jennifer M.; McCoy, Daniel L.; Fujita, Akira; Yamamoto, Taichi; Iijima, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    Seven polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ten polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) as well as twelve polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are collectively referred to as dioxin-like compounds. The World Health Organization toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for these persistent chlorinated organic compounds and their measured concentrations are used to produce the toxic equivalency quotient (TEQ) of a sample. TEF values are partially based on a common mechanism involving binding of the chemical to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Biological methods for the determination of TEQs are based on the assumption that all dioxin-related compounds act through the Ah receptor signal transduction pathway. Based on the biochemical response of CYP1A activation via the AhR, in vitro systems that utilize a reporter gene under transcriptional control of CYP1A have been developed. Several investigations have reported on the success of utilizing biological test systems to detect PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs in environmental samples. The P450 Human Reporter Gene System assay (EPA Method 4425) utilizes a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) in which a plasmid containing the human CYP1A1 promoter and 5'-flanking sequences with three xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) fused to the luciferase reporter gene. The enzyme luciferase is produced in the presence of compounds that bind the XREs, and can be detected by a simple assay that measures relative light units with a luminometer. Method 4425, used by Columbia Analytical Services (CAS), has gained acceptance as a rapid and inexpensive approach for screening solvent extracts of environmental samples of soil, sediment, tissue, and water to detect compounds that activate the AhR. Investigations in the U. S. and Japan comparing the results of 4425 and standard high-resolution GC/MS (HRGC/HRMS) will be reported here. The purpose of making these comparisons is to determine if risk assessments for large dioxin sites both before and after remediation

  13. TEM-STM for Novel Nanotechnological Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Joel

    2005-03-01

    We present the design and construction of a miniature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to be used inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In our system, the entire STM head is fitted inside the TEM sample holder, which allows for both TEM imaging/diffraction and STM-tip indentation experiments. The positioning of STM-tip over the desired sample locations can be guided through the real time TEM images. In addition to the nano indentation experiments, the STM program also allows the state-of-the-art control of atom/molecule manipulation procedures [1]. This hybrid TEM-STM system can be used for nanoscale manipulation, electrical characterization and mechanical strength examination of various nanomaterials including nanowires, nanotubes and quantum dots. [1]. S.-W. Hla, K.-F. Braun, V. Iancu, A. Deshpande, Nano Lett. 4 (2004) 1997-2001. This work is financially supported by the NSF-NIRT grant no. DMR- 0304314 and the US-DOE grant no. DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  14. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugh, Phil

    1991-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor Number 7 (TEM-7) was a full scale, full-duration static test firing of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM) with nozzle vectoring. The static test fire occurred on 11 December 1990 at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. Documented here are the procedures, performance, and results available through 22 January 1991. Critical post test hardware activities and assessment of the test data are not complete. A completed test report will be submitted 60 days after the test date. Included here is a presentation and discussion of the TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107 Revision A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor number 7 (TEM-07) Static Fire Test Plan.

  15. Problems at the Leading Edge of Space Weathering as Revealed by TEM Combined with Surface Science Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Analytical field-emission TEM techniques cross-correlated with surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provides a unique two-prong approach for characterizing how solar wind ion processing contributes to space weathering.

  16. Design and Characterization of a Lens TEM Horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, W. S.; Farr, E. G.; Bowen, L. H.; Ellibee, D. E.; Lawry, D. I.

    We investigate an approach for obtaining smaller UWB antennas with lower sidelobes than those offered by current designs. In support of this, we built and tested a lens TEM horn employing a collimating polyethylene aperture lens. It was thought that the lens TEM horn, with a more uniformly illuminated aperture field, might lead to higher gain with lower sidelobes than a comparably sized reflector IRA. That hypothesis is tested here. The lens horn, with a 30-cm aperture, has a maximum realized gain on boresight of 23 dB at 10 GHz. The normalized antenna impulse response is a clean peak with a full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of 35 ps. For comparison, a highly optimized reflector IRA with 46-cm diameter achieves a maximum realized gain of 28 dB at 19 GHz and an impulse response with a FWHM of 30 ps. From theory, we expected the lens horn to exhibit lower sidelobes than the IRA. However, we did not observe that behavior in our experimental model. We suggest refinements which might lead to reduced sidelobes and increased gain in lens TEM horns.

  17. Silver Trees: Chemistry on a TEM Grid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The copper/carbon substrate of a TEM grid reacted with aqueous silver nitrate solution within minutes to yield spectacular tree-like silver dendrites, without using any added capping or reducing reagents. These results demonstrate a facile, aqueous, room temperature synthesis of...

  18. Design of a TEM cell EMP simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevat, Pete

    1991-06-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulators are designed to simulate the EMP generated by a nuclear weapon and are used to harden equipment against the effects of EMP. A transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell is a square or rectangular coaxial transmission line tapered at each end to form a closed cell. The cell is fed at one end with a signal generator, a continuous wave or pulse generator, and terminated at the other end with a resistor equal to the characteristic impedance of the line. An advantage of the TEM cell is that the field is well characterized and reasonably uniform. A small, symmetric, TEM cell EMP simulator is described which is intended for applications such as susceptibility testing of small equipment, calibration of sensors, design and testing of countermeasures, measurement of transfer functions, and research and development. A detailed design is presented for a 50 ohm and 100 ohm TEM cell with an inner volume of 4 m(exp 3) and a test volume of 0.24 m(exp 3). The pulse generator and terminating network are integrated into the cell to form a completely shielded structure. In this way no interference from the inside of the cell to the outside, or vice versa, will occur.

  19. Final report on EURAMET.QM-S9/1212: Supplementary comparison of analytical capabilities for synthetic natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valková, M.; Mirt, M.; Beranek, J.; Bárta, M.; Žamberova, I.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Ziel, P. R.; Augusto, C. R.; Ribeiro, C. C.; Teixeira, D. C. G. S.; Oudwater, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The EURAMET supplementary comparison EURAMET.QM-S9 involves standard gas mixtures of synthetic natural gas. It is similar to key comparison CCQM-K16 (2001-2002). Analysed were gas mixtures of synthetic natural gas containing nitrogen, carbon dioxide and the alkanes up to hexane with a total of 10 components. Four laboratories (CMI, Czech Republic; INMETRO, Brazil; SMU, Slovakia; and VSL, The Netherlands) participated in this supplementary comparison. All of the participants, except CMI, have established facilities for natural gas analysis, and have existing claims for their Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) for natural gas mixtures. The agreement of the results in this supplementary comparison is very good. All the results with their reported uncertainties are in agreement with the reference values for all the participants. SMU and VSL participated in the key comparison CCQM-K16. VSL obtained very good results in both the supplementary comparison and the CCQM-K16 comparison. SMU obtained better results in the supplementary comparison than in CCQM-K16. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM.

  20. Whispering gallery modes at the rim of an axisymmetric optical resonator: analytical versus numerical description and comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Breunig, I; Sturman, B; Sedlmeir, F; Schwefel, H G L; Buse, K

    2013-12-16

    Optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of mm-sized axisymmetric resonators are well localized at the equator. Employing this distinctive feature, we obtain simple analytical relations for the frequencies and eigenfunctions of WGMs which include the major radius of the resonator and the curvature radius of the rim. Being compared with results of finite-element simulations, these relations show a high accuracy and practicability. High-precision free-spectral-range measurements with a millimeter-sized disc resonator made of MgF(2) allow us to identify the WGMs and confirm the applicability of our analytical description.

  1. Replica extraction method on nanostructured gold coatings and orientation determination combining SEM and TEM techniques.

    PubMed

    Bocker, Christian; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2014-12-01

    In the field of electron microscopy the replica technique is known as an indirect method and also as an extraction method that is usually applied on metallurgical samples. This contribution describes a fast and simple transmission electron microscopic (TEM) sample preparation by complete removal of nanoparticles from a substrate surface that allows the study of growth mechanisms of nanostructured coatings. The comparison and combination of advanced diffraction techniques in the TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide possibilities for operators with access to both facilities. The analysis of TEM-derived diffraction patterns (convergent beam electron diffraction) in the SEM/electron backscatter diffraction software simplifies the application, especially when the patterns are not aligned along a distinct zone axis. The study of the TEM sample directly by SEM and transmission Kikuchi diffraction allows cross-correlation with the TEM results.

  2. The analytic element method for rectangular gridded domains, benchmark comparisons and application to the High Plains Aquifer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundwater studies face computational limitations when providing local detail (such as well drawdown) within regional models. We adapt the Analytic Element Method (AEM) to extend separation of variable solutions for a rectangle to domains composed of multiple interconnected rectangular elements. Ea...

  3. Quantification of small, convex particles by TEM.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sigmund J; Holme, Børge; Marioara, Calin D

    2008-07-01

    It is shown how size distributions of arbitrarily oriented, convex, non-overlapping particles extracted from conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images may be determined by a variation of the Schwartz-Saltykov method. In TEM, particles cut at the surfaces have diminished projections, which alter the observed size distribution. We represent this distribution as a vector and multiply it with the inverse of a matrix comprising thickness-dependent Scheil or Schwartz-Saltykov terms. The result is a corrected size distribution of the projections of uncut particles. It is shown how the real (3D) distribution may be estimated when particle shape is considered. Computer code to generate the matrix is given. A log-normal distribution of spheres and a real distribution of pill-box-shaped dispersoids in an Al-Mg-Si alloy are given as examples. The errors are discussed in detail.

  4. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  5. Radial averages of astigmatic TEM images.

    PubMed

    Fernando, K Vince

    2008-10-01

    The Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) of an image, which modulates images taken from a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), is usually determined from the radial average of the power spectrum of the image (Frank, J., Three-dimensional Electron Microscopy of Macromolecular Assemblies, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006). The CTF is primarily defined by the defocus. If the defocus estimate is accurate enough then it is possible to demodulate the image, which is popularly known as the CTF correction. However, it is known that the radial average is somewhat attenuated if the image is astigmatic (see Fernando, K.V., Fuller, S.D., 2007. Determination of astigmatism in TEM images. Journal of Structural Biology 157, 189-200) but this distortion due to astigmatism has not been fully studied or understood up to now. We have discovered the exact mathematical relationship between the radial averages of TEM images with and without astigmatism. This relationship is determined by a zeroth order Bessel function of the first kind and hence we can exactly quantify this distortion in the radial averages of signal and power spectra of astigmatic images. The argument to this Bessel function is similar to an aberration function (without the spherical aberration term) except that the defocus parameter is replaced by the differences of the defoci in the major and minor axes of astigmatism. The ill effects due this Bessel function are twofold. Since the zeroth order Bessel function is a decaying oscillatory function, it introduces additional zeros to the radial average and it also attenuates the CTF signal in the radial averages. Using our analysis, it is possible to simulate the effects of astigmatism in radial averages by imposing Bessel functions on idealized radial averages of images which are not astigmatic. We validate our theory using astigmatic TEM images.

  6. Technical note: Determination of acidity in whole raw milk: comparison of results obtained by two different analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Fabro, M A; Milanesio, H V; Robert, L M; Speranza, J L; Murphy, M; Rodríguez, G; Castañeda, R

    2006-03-01

    In Argentina, one analytical method is usually carried out to determine acidity in whole raw milk: the Instituto Nacional de Racionalización de Materiales standard (no. 14005), based on the Dornic method of French origin. In a national and international regulation, the Association of Official Analytical Chemists International method (no. 947.05) is proposed as the standard method of analysis. Although these methods have the same foundation, there is no evidence that results obtained using the 2 methods are equivalent. The presence of some trends and discordant data lead us to perform a statistical study to verify the equivalency of the obtained results. We analyzed 266 samples and the existence of significant differences between the results obtained by both methods was determined.

  7. Light Scattering by Coated Sphere Immersed in Absorbing Medium: A Comparison between the FDTD and Analytic Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed finite-difference time domain scheme is examined using the exact analytic solutions for light scattering by a coated sphere immersed in an absorbing medium. The relative differences are less than 1% in the extinction, scattering, and absorption efficiencies and less than 5% in the scattering phase functions. The definition of apparent single-scattering properties is also discussed. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A TEM analysis of nanoparticulates in a Polar ice core

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, E.V.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    This paper explores the prospect for analyzing nanoparticulates in age-dated ice cores representing times in antiquity to establish a historical reference for atmospheric particulate regimes. Analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were utilized to observe representative ice-melt water drops dried down on carbon/formvar or similar coated grids. A 10,000-year-old Greenland ice core was melted, and representative water drops were transferred to coated grids in a clean room environment. Essentially, all particulates observed were aggregates and either crystalline or complex mixtures of nanocrystals. Especially notable was the observation of carbon nanotubes and related fullerene-like nanocrystal forms. These observations are similar with some aspects of contemporary airborne particulates including carbon nanotubes and complex nanocrystal aggregates.

  9. Novel TEM-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-134, in a Citrobacter koseri clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Mariagrazia; Mugnaioli, Claudia; Luzzaro, Francesco; Fiore, Marianna; Stefani, Stefania; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Amicosante, Gianfranco

    2005-04-01

    A new natural TEM derivative with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase activity, TEM-134, was identified in a ceftazidime-resistant clinical isolate of Citrobacter koseri. Compared to TEM-1, TEM-134 contains the following mutations: Q39K, E104K, R164H, and G238S. The bla(TEM-134) gene was not transferable by conjugation and, apparently, was chromosomally encoded. Expression studies with Escherichia coli revealed efficient cefotaximase and ceftazidimase activity for TEM-134.

  10. Application of surface plasmon resonance for the detection of carbohydrates, glycoconjugates, and measurement of the carbohydrate-specific interactions: a comparison with conventional analytical techniques. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Safina, Gulnara

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrates (glycans) and their conjugates with proteins and lipids contribute significantly to many biological processes. That makes these compounds important targets to be detected, monitored and identified. The identification of the carbohydrate content in their conjugates with proteins and lipids (glycoforms) is often a challenging task. Most of the conventional instrumental analytical techniques are time-consuming and require tedious sample pretreatment and utilising various labeling agents. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been intensively developed during last two decades and has received the increasing attention for different applications, from the real-time monitoring of affinity bindings to biosensors. SPR does not require any labels and is capable of direct measurement of biospecific interaction occurring on the sensing surface. This review provides a critical comparison of modern analytical instrumental techniques with SPR in terms of their analytical capabilities to detect carbohydrates, their conjugates with proteins and lipids and to study the carbohydrate-specific bindings. A few selected examples of the SPR approaches developed during 2004-2011 for the biosensing of glycoforms and for glycan-protein affinity studies are comprehensively discussed.

  11. Analytical and numerical quantification and comparison of the local electric field in the tissue for different electrode configurations

    PubMed Central

    Čorović, Selma; Pavlin, Mojca; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2007-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer are novel promising treatments employing locally applied high electric pulses to introduce chemotherapeutic drugs into tumor cells or genes into target cells based on the cell membrane electroporation. The main focus of this paper was to calculate analytically and numerically local electric field distribution inside the treated tissue in two dimensional (2D) models for different plate and needle electrode configurations and to compare the local electric field distribution to parameter U/d, which is widely used in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer studies. We demonstrate the importance of evaluating the local electric field distribution in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer. Methods We analytically and numerically analyze electric field distribution based on 2D models for electrodes and electrode configurations which are most widely used in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer. Analytical calculations were performed by solving the Laplace equation and numerical calculations by means of finite element method in two dimensions. Results We determine the minimal and maximal E inside the target tissue as well as the maximal E over the entire treated tissue for the given electrode configurations. By comparing the local electric field distribution calculated for different electrode configurations to the ratio U/d, we show that the parameter U/d can differ significantly from the actual calculated values of the local electric field inside the treated tissue. By calculating the needed voltage to obtain E > U/d inside the target tissue, we showed that better electric field distribution can be obtained by increasing the number and changing the arrangement of the electrodes. Conclusion Based on our analytical and numerical models of the local electric field distribution we show that the applied voltage, configuration of the electrodes and electrode position need to be chosen specifically for

  12. Comparison of analytical and predictive methods for water, protein, fat, sugar, and gross energy in marine mammal milk.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, O T; Eisert, R; Barrell, G K

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian milks may differ greatly in composition from cow milk, and these differences may affect the performance of analytical methods. High-fat, high-protein milks with a preponderance of oligosaccharides, such as those produced by many marine mammals, present a particular challenge. We compared the performance of several methods against reference procedures using Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) milk of highly varied composition (by reference methods: 27-63% water, 24-62% fat, 8-12% crude protein, 0.5-1.8% sugar). A microdrying step preparatory to carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen (CHN) gas analysis slightly underestimated water content and had a higher repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) than did reference oven drying at 100°C. Compared with a reference macro-Kjeldahl protein procedure, the CHN (or Dumas) combustion method had a somewhat higher RSDr (1.56 vs. 0.60%) but correlation between methods was high (0.992), means were not different (CHN: 17.2±0.46% dry matter basis; Kjeldahl 17.3±0.49% dry matter basis), there were no significant proportional or constant errors, and predictive performance was high. A carbon stoichiometric procedure based on CHN analysis failed to adequately predict fat (reference: Röse-Gottlieb method) or total sugar (reference: phenol-sulfuric acid method). Gross energy content, calculated from energetic factors and results from reference methods for fat, protein, and total sugar, accurately predicted gross energy as measured by bomb calorimetry. We conclude that the CHN (Dumas) combustion method and calculation of gross energy are acceptable analytical approaches for marine mammal milk, but fat and sugar require separate analysis by appropriate analytic methods and cannot be adequately estimated by carbon stoichiometry. Some other alternative methods-low-temperature drying for water determination; Bradford, Lowry, and biuret methods for protein; the Folch and the Bligh and Dyer methods for fat; and enzymatic and reducing

  13. Power of Latent Growth Modeling for Detecting Linear Growth: Number of Measurements and Comparison with Other Analytic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; Fan, Xiaotao

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated 2 issues concerning the power of latent growth modeling (LGM) in detecting linear growth: the effect of the number of repeated measurements on LGM's power in detecting linear growth and the comparison between LGM and some other approaches in terms of power for detecting linear growth. A Monte Carlo simulation design was…

  14. Fatty acid desaturation index in human plasma: comparison of different analytical methodologies for the evaluation of diet effects.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jost; Bek, Stephan; Zakaria, Marjorie; Zeng, Chenhui; Hornberger, Andrea; Gilbert, Richard; Shokati, Touraj; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Boernsen, K Olaf

    2014-10-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) plays a role in the development of obesity and related conditions, such as insulin resistance, and potentially also in neurological and heart diseases. The activity of SCD1 can be monitored using the desaturation index (DI), the ratio of product (16:1n-7 and 18:1n-9) to precursor (16:0 and 18:0) fatty acids. Here, different analytical strategies were applied to identify the method which best supports SCD1 biology. A novel effective approach was the use of the SCD1-independent fatty acid (16:1n-10) as a negative control. The first approach was based on a simple extraction followed by neutral loss triglyceride fatty acid analysis. The second approach was based on the saponification of triglycerides followed by fatty acid analysis (specific for the position of the double bond within monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)). In addition to the analytical LC-MS assays, different matrices (plasma total triglyceride fraction and the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fraction) were investigated to identify the best for studying changes in SCD1 activity. Samples from volunteers on a high-carbohydrate diet were analyzed. Both ultra HPLC (UHPLC)-MS-based assays showed acceptable accuracies (75-125% of nominal) and precisions (<20%) for the analysis of DI-specific fatty acids in VLDL and plasma. The most specific assay for the analysis of the liver SCD activity was then validated for specificity and selectivity, intra- and interday accuracy and precision, matrix effects, dilution effects, and analyte stability. After 3 days of high-carbohydrate diet, only the specific fatty acids in human plasma VLDL showed a significant increase in DI and associated SCD1 activity.

  15. Comparison of Cluster, Slab, and Analytic Potential Models for the Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP)/TiO2 (110) Intermolecular Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Tunega, Daniel; Xu, Lai; Govind, Niranjan; Sun, Rui; Taylor, Ramona; Lischka, Hans; De Jong, Wibe A.; Hase, William L.

    2013-08-29

    In a previous study (J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 12403) cluster models for the TiO2 rutile (110) surface and MP2 calculations were used to develop an analytic potential energy function for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) interacting with this surface. In the work presented here, this analytic potential and MP2 cluster models are compared with DFT "slab" calculations for DMMP interacting with the TiO2 (110) surface and with DFT cluster models for the TiO2 (110) surface. The DFT slab calculations were performed with the PW91 and PBE functionals. The analytic potential gives DMMP/ TiO2 (110) potential energy curves in excellent agreement with those obtained from the slab calculations. The cluster models for the TiO2 (110) surface, used for the MP2 calculations, were extended to DFT calculations with the B3LYP, PW91, and PBE functional. These DFT calculations do not give DMMP/TiO2 (110) interaction energies which agree with those from the DFT slab calculations. Analyses of the wave functions for these cluster models show that they do not accurately represent the HOMO and LUMO for the surface, which should be 2p and 3d orbitals, respectively, and the models also do not give an accurate band gap. The MP2 cluster models do not accurately represent the LUMO and that they give accurate DMMP/TiO2 (110) interaction energies is apparently fortuitous, arising from their highly inaccurate band gaps. Accurate cluster models, consisting of 7, 10, and 15 Ti-atoms and which have the correct HOMO and LUMO properties, are proposed. The work presented here illustrates the care that must be taken in "constructing" cluster models which accurately model surfaces.

  16. Investigation and comparison of analytical, numerical, and experimentally measured coupling losses for multi-step index optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Durana, Gaizka; Zubia, Joseba; Arrue, Jon; Poisel, Hans; Losada, María

    2005-05-30

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the coupling losses in multi-step index (MSI) fibres. Their light power acceptance properties are investigated to obtain the corresponding analytical expressions taking into account longitudinal, transverse, and angular misalignments. For this purpose, a uniform power distribution is assumed. In addition, we perform several experimental measurements and computer simulations in order to calculate the coupling losses for two different MSI polymer optical fibres (MSI-POFs). These results serve us to validate the theoretical expressions we have obtained.

  17. E240V substitution increases catalytic efficiency toward ceftazidime in a new natural TEM-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-149, from Enterobacter aerogenes and Serratia marcescens clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Mariagrazia; Celenza, Giuseppe; De Santis, Francesca; Pellegrini, Cristina; Forcella, Chiara; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Stefani, Stefania; Amicosante, Gianfranco

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a novel extended-spectrum beta-lactamase that belongs to the TEM family, the TEM-149 enzyme, and that was isolated from the urine of two hospitalized patients from different hospitals in southern Italy. The peculiarity of this enzyme was the finding of a valine residue at position 240. The array of amino acid substitutions found in TEM-149 was as follows: E104K, R164S, M182T, and E240V. A reversion of a threonine residue at position 182 was also performed to create a new mutant, TEM-149 T182M, in order to assess the contribution of this substitution on the kinetic profile and the stability of TEM-149. The bla TEM-149 and bla TEM-149/T182M genes were cloned into pBC-SK, and the corresponding enzymes were purified from recombinant Escherichia coli HB101 by the same procedure. Both enzymes hydrolyzed all beta-lactams tested, with a preference for ceftazidime, which was found to be the best substrate. By comparison of the kinetic parameters of the TEM-149 and the TEM-149 T182M enzymes, a reduction of the catalytic efficiency for the TEM-149 T182M mutant was observed against all substrates tested except benzylpenicillin, cefotaxime, and aztreonam. Tazobactam, clavulanic acid, and sulbactam were good inhibitors of the TEM-149 beta-lactamase.

  18. Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of spheres: Analytical comparison between coupled phase model and multiple scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of small spheres is studied using two models: a hydrodynamic model based on the coupled phase equations and an acoustic model based on the ECAH (ECAH: Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley) multiple scattering theory. The aim is to compare both models through the study of three fundamental kinds of particles: rigid particles, elastic spheres, and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic model is based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation generalized to elastic spheres and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic forces for elastic spheres are introduced by analogy with those of droplets. The ECAH theory is also modified in order to take into account the velocity of rigid particles. Analytical calculations performed for long wavelength, low dilution, and weak absorption in the ambient fluid show that both models are strictly equivalent for the three kinds of particles studied. The analytical calculations show that dilatational and translational mechanisms are modeled in the same way by both models. The effective parameters of dilute suspensions are also calculated.

  19. Comparison of analytical protein separation characteristics for three amine-based capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuwei; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber stationary phases are finding utility in the realms of protein analytics as well as downstream processing. We have recently described the modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) C-CP fibers to affect amine-rich phases for the weak anion-exchange (WAX) separation of proteins. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is covalently coupled to the PET surface, with subsequent cross-linking imparted by treatment with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BUDGE). These modifications yield vastly improved dynamic binding capacities over the unmodified fibers. We have also previously employed native (unmodified) nylon 6 C-CP fibers as weak anion/cation-exchange (mixed-mode) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) phases for protein separations. Polyamide, nylon 6, consists of amide groups along the polymer backbone, with primary amines and carboxylic acid end groups. The analytical separation characteristics of these three amine-based C-CP fiber phases are compared here. Each of the C-CP fiber columns in this study was shown to be able to separate a bovine serum albumin/hemoglobin/lysozyme mixture at high mobile phase linear velocity (∼70 mm s(-1)) but with different elution characteristics. These differences reflect the types of protein-surface interactions that are occurring, based on the active group composition of the fiber surfaces. This study provides important fundamental understanding for the development of surface-modified C-CP fiber columns for protein separation.

  20. Multivariate statistical comparison of analytical procedures for benzene and phenol determination with respect to their environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Tsakovski, Stefan; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    The study describes the possibility of application of self-organizing maps technique to assess the greenness of analytical methodologies. The metrological and "environmental impact" parameters of procedures for benzene and phenol determination in water samples were sets of input data for chemometric analysis. Totally 47 objects and 8 variables formed the data used for analysis. The major factors responsible for non-green character of the methodology are the amount of organic solvent and amount of solid wastes formed. The results of the assessment methods with NEMI symbols and Eco-scale are in good agreement. Greener procedures for benzene and phenol determination are those based on SPME. In case of phenol the methodologies based on GC separation are much greener than those based on LC. The results also show that it is easier to apply green methodologies for benzene, as a compound with lower polarity and hence with less affinity to, than for phenol. The SOM assessment methodology can be useful in choosing the proper analytical procedures.

  1. Body image of children and adolescents with chronic illness: a meta-analytic comparison with healthy peers.

    PubMed

    Pinquart, M

    2013-03-01

    This meta-analysis integrates results from 330 studies on differences between body image of children and adolescents with and without chronic physical illness. Young people with a chronic illness had a less positive body image than their healthy peers although the average size of differences was small (g=-.30 standard deviation units). A comparison of diseases showed that young people with obesity (g=-.79), cystic fibrosis (g=-.50), scoliosis (g=-.41), asthma (g=-.37), growth hormone deficits (g=-.35), spina bifida (g=-.23), cancer (g=-.20), and diabetes (g=-.17) evaluated their body less positively than their healthy peers. Furthermore, levels of body dissatisfaction varied by age at onset of the disease, method for assessing body image, ethnicity, year of publication, and comparison group. Recommendations are stated for reducing effects of chronic illness on the body image of people with chronic illness.

  2. Analytical Comparisons of Tree Ring Data, Greenland Ice Core Temperatures and Temperature Fluctuations of the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, James; Roberts, Jim; Dahiya, Jai

    2012-10-01

    Embedded in various events on Earth are data that allow us to map the temperature of the Earth over many years. In this work we have chosen the temperature fluctuations in the Sargasso sea, the changing patterns in tree ring growth and temperature fluctuations in Greenland ice core samples for comparison with a goal to understanding the patterns in global warming. Signatures have been identified that predate the Industrial Revolution, which had been blamed for much of global warming, that indicate that Earth temperatures have enjoyed numerous intervals of both global warming and global cooling. The intention of this work is not to stir controversy but to make comparisons of scientific data and processes rather than rely on popular opinion or deduction by ``experts'' in climatology to explain global warming.

  3. Graphene nanoscrolls and live TEM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokkapati, Venkata; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Matsudaira, Paul; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros; Graphene research laboratory Team; Centerbio-imaging sciences/Mechanobiology institute Team

    2013-03-01

    It has been theoretically hypothesized and predicted that graphene when in contact with water, wraps itself around the droplets and forms graphene nanoscrolls. Studying the applications of these nanoscrolls can open a new area of research especially in the bio-medical field. Here we present a method where partially suspended graphene nanoscrolls were fabricated on carbon mesh attached to a gold TEM grid. The process involves sandwiching of two graphene layers with water being encapsulated within these nanoscrolls. Gold nanoparticles were encapsulated and live imaging of water and gold nanoparticles was carried out under the TEM. The dynamics of the encapsulated water and nanobubbles is being studied. The encapsulated water within these graphene nanoscrolls lasted for more than three months (till the date of publication). It was also realized that the formation/abundance of these nanoscrolls is concentration dependent of the etching solution (Ammonium persulfate) with a saturation point. Large area, uniform, monolayer graphene films can also be produced by varying the concentration of Ammonium persulfate. Further studies are being carried out to live image TMV/protein and liposome encapsulated drugs using nanoscrolls and films respectively. The authors would like to acknowledge A*Star for funding this research

  4. Technical Evaluation Motor 3 (TEM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane

    1989-01-01

    A primary objective of the technical evaluation motor program is to recover the case, igniter and nozzle hardware for use on the redesigned solid rocket motor flight program. Two qualification objectives were addressed and met on TEM-3. The Nylok thread locking device of the 1U100269-03 leak check port plug and the 1U52295-04 safe and arm utilizing Krytox grease on the barrier-booster shaft O-rings were both certified. All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-3 static test firing conducted 23 May 1989 was successful. The test was conducted at ambient conditions with the exception of the field joints (set point of 121 F, with a minimum of 87 F at the sensors), igniter joint (set point at 122 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors) and case-to-nozzle joint (set point at 114 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors). Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. The nozzle and the case joint temperatures were maintained at the heaters controlling set points while electrical power was supplied. The water and the CO2 quench systems prevented damage to the metal hardware. All other test equipment performed as planned, contributing to a successful motor firing. All indications are that the test was a success, and all expected hardware will be refurbished for the RSRM program.

  5. Comparison of the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey with the Munich semi-analytical model. I. Magnitude counts, redshift distribution, colour bimodality, and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, S.; Meneux, B.; De Lucia, G.; Blaizot, J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Garilli, B.; Cucciati, O.; Mellier, Y.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pelló, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This paper presents a detailed comparison between high-redshift observations from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) and predictions from the Munich semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. In particular, we focus this analysis on the magnitude, redshift, and colour distributions of galaxies, as well as their clustering properties. Methods: We constructed 100 quasi-independent mock catalogues, using the output of the semi-analytical model presented in De Lucia & Blaizot (2007, MNRAS, 375, 2). We then applied the same observational selection function of the VVDS-Deep survey, so as to carry out a fair comparison between models and observations. Results: We find that the semi-analytical model reproduces well the magnitude counts in the optical bands. It tends, however, to overpredict the abundance of faint red galaxies, in particular in the i' and z' bands. Model galaxies exhibit a colour bimodality that is only in qualitative agreement with the data. In particular, we find that the model tends to overpredict the number of red galaxies at low redshift and of blue galaxies at all redshifts probed by VVDS-Deep observations, although a large fraction of the bluest observed galaxies is absent from the model. In addition, the model overpredicts by about 14 per cent the number of galaxies observed at 0.2 < z < 1 with IAB < 24. When comparing the galaxy clustering properties, we find that model galaxies are more strongly clustered than observed ones at all redshift from z = 0.2 to z = 2, with the difference being less significant above z ≃ 1. When splitting the samples into red and blue galaxies, we find that the observed clustering of blue galaxies is well reproduced by the model, while red model galaxies are much more clustered than observed ones, being principally responsible for the strong global clustering found in the model. Conclusions: Our results show that the discrepancies between Munich semi-analytical model predictions and VVDS-Deep observations

  6. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  7. TEM investigations on the local microstructure of electrodeposited galfenol nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, D.; Damm, C.; Pohl, D.; Schultz, L.; Schlörb, H.

    2016-01-01

    The local microstructure of Fe-Ga nanowires is investigated considering dependence on the deposition technique. Using a complexed electrolyte, smooth and homogeneous Fe80Ga20 nanowires are deposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates by either applying pulse potential or potentiostatic deposition technique. At optimized deposition conditions the wires show the desired composition of Fe80±2Ga20±2 without a gradient along the growth direction. Composition distribution, structure and microstructure are examined in detail and reveal only minor differences. Line EELS and crystal lattice measurements reveal a negligible oxygen content for both preparation routines. Neither Fe/Ga oxides nor hydroxides were found. Both potentiostatically deposited as well as pulse deposited nanowires exhibit a preferred <110> orientation, the latter with slightly larger crystals. Different contrast patterns were found by TEM that appear more pronounced in the case of pulse deposited wires. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison of differently prepared focused ion beam lamellas reveal that these contrasts are caused by defects in the alternating potential deposition itself and are not induced during the TEM preparation process. The alternating potential mode causes periodic growth thereby inducing different layers with reduced wire thickness/defects at the layer interfaces.

  8. Gas chromatography – mass spectrometry of JWH-018 metabolites in urine samples with direct comparison to analytical standards

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Beth; Durham, Bill; Gidden, Jennifer; Lay, Jackson O.

    2013-01-01

    JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole) is one of numerous potential aminoalkylindoles contained in products marketed as ‘K2’ or ‘Spice’. Investigation of the urinary metabolites from consumption of these compounds is important because they are banned in the United States and many European countries. An efficient extraction procedure and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method were developed for detection of ‘K2’ metabolites in urine from individuals suspected of using these products. Analytical standards were used to elucidate the structure-specific mass spectral fragmentations and retention properties to confirm proposed identifications and support quantitative studies. A procedure for the synthesis of one of these metabolites (5-hydroxypentyl JWH-018) was also developed. Results are comparable to existing LC-MS/MS methods, with the same primary metabolites detected. The specific metabolite hydrolysis products include 4-hydroxpentyl, 5-hydroxypentyl, and N-pentanoic acid derivatives. PMID:23683902

  9. Matrix Factorizations at Scale: a Comparison of Scientific Data Analytics in Spark and C+MPI Using Three Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gittens, Alex; Devarakonda, Aditya; Racah, Evan; Ringenburg, Michael; Gerhardt, Lisa; Kottalam, Jey; Liu, Jialin; Maschhoff, Kristyn; Canon, Shane; Chhugani, Jatin; Sharma, Pramod; Yang, Jiyan; Demmel, James; Harrell, Jim; Krishnamurthy, Venkat; Mahoney, Michael; Prabhat, Mr

    2016-05-12

    We explore the trade-offs of performing linear algebra using Apache Spark, compared to traditional C and MPI implementations on HPC platforms. Spark is designed for data analytics on cluster computing platforms with access to local disks and is optimized for data-parallel tasks. We examine three widely-used and important matrix factorizations: NMF (for physical plausibility), PCA (for its ubiquity) and CX (for data interpretability). We apply these methods to 1.6TB particle physics, 2.2TB and 16TB climate modeling and 1.1TB bioimaging data. The data matrices are tall-and-skinny which enable the algorithms to map conveniently into Spark’s data parallel model. We perform scaling experiments on up to 1600 Cray XC40 nodes, describe the sources of slowdowns, and provide tuning guidance to obtain high performance.

  10. Comparison of experimental results with analytical solutions and two dimensional model of oak drying in an evacuated kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Audebert, P.; Temmar, A.

    1997-05-01

    In continuation of a series of tests, the original results of oak drying in an evacuated kiln are presented here for different plate temperatures and for various pressures in the kiln. These results include more particularly the drying curves, the evolution of temperature, of moisture and of pressure in and on the wood. They evidence the pressure and the levels of temperature occurring in the wood during the drying period. These results also allow the development of two types of drying models: a simple monodimensional model of drying curves from the analytical solutions of the equations of water diffusion in the wood and, moreover, a model, in two dimensions, of temperature, moisture and pressure fields in the wood by applying the finite element method. The boundary conditions of the second model can be fixed with precision thanks to the results of the first model. In both cases, the proposed solutions are justified by experimental results.

  11. Toward Rigorous Idiographic Research in Prevention Science: Comparison Between Three Analytic Strategies for Testing Preventive Intervention in Very Small Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pineo, Thomas Z.; Maldonado Molina, Mildred M.; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial prevention research lacks evidence from intensive within-person lines of research to understand idiographic processes related to development and response to intervention. Such data could be used to fill gaps in the literature and expand the study design options for prevention researchers, including lower-cost yet rigorous studies (e.g., for program evaluations), pilot studies, designs to test programs for low prevalence outcomes, selective/indicated/ adaptive intervention research, and understanding of differential response to programs. This study compared three competing analytic strategies designed for this type of research: autoregressive moving average, mixed model trajectory analysis, and P-technique. Illustrative time series data were from a pilot study of an intervention for nursing home residents with diabetes (N=4) designed to improve control of blood glucose. A within-person, intermittent baseline design was used. Intervention effects were detected using each strategy for the aggregated sample and for individual patients. The P-technique model most closely replicated observed glucose levels. ARIMA and P-technique models were most similar in terms of estimated intervention effects and modeled glucose levels. However, ARIMA and P-technique also were more sensitive to missing data, outliers and number of observations. Statistical testing suggested that results generalize both to other persons as well as to idiographic, longitudinal processes. This study demonstrated the potential contributions of idiographic research in prevention science as well as the need for simulation studies to delineate the research circumstances when each analytic approach is optimal for deriving the correct parameter estimates. PMID:23299558

  12. Tidally averaged circulation in Puget Sound sub-basins: Comparison of historical data, analytical model, and numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Kim, Tae Yun; Roberts, Mindy

    2011-07-20

    Through extensive field data collection and analysis efforts conducted since the 1950s, researchers have established an understanding of the characteristic features of circulation in Puget Sound. The pattern ranges from the classic fjordal behavior in some basins, with shallow brackish outflow and compensating inflow immediately below, to the typical two-layer flow observed in many partially mixed estuaries with saline inflow at depth. An attempt at reproducing this behavior by fitting an analytical formulation to past data is presented, followed by the application of a three-dimensional circulation and transport numerical model. The analytical treatment helped identify key physical processes and parameters, but quickly reconfirmed that response is complex and would require site-specific parameterization to include effects of sills and interconnected basins. The numerical model of Puget Sound, developed using unstructured-grid finite volume method, allowed resolution of the sub-basin geometric features, including presence of major islands, and site-specific strong advective vertical mixing created by bathymetry and multiple sills. The model was calibrated using available recent short-term oceanographic time series data sets from different parts of the Puget Sound basin. The results are compared against (1) recent velocity and salinity data collected in Puget Sound from 2006 and (2) a composite data set from previously analyzed historical records, mostly from the 1970s. The results highlight the ability of the model to reproduce velocity and salinity profile characteristics, their variations among Puget Sound subbasins, and tidally averaged circulation. Sensitivity of residual circulation to variations in freshwater inflow and resulting salinity gradient in fjordal sub-basins of Puget Sound is examined.

  13. Analytical inversions in remote sensing of particle size distributions. IV - Comparison of Fymat and Box-McKellar solutions in the anomalous diffraction approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.; Smith, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the inverse analytical solutions, provided separately by Fymat and Box-McKellar, for reconstructing particle size distributions from remote spectral transmission measurements under the anomalous diffraction approximation can be derived using a cosine and a sine transform, respectively. Sufficient conditions of validity of the two formulas are established. Their comparison shows that the former solution is preferable to the latter in that it requires less a priori information (knowledge of the particle number density is not needed) and has wider applicability. For gamma-type distributions, and either a real or a complex refractive index, explicit expressions are provided for retrieving the distribution parameters; such expressions are, interestingly, proportional to the geometric area of the polydispersion.

  14. Sale of raw milk in northern Italy: food safety implications and comparison of different analytical methodologies for detection of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Federica; Serraino, Andrea; Finazzi, Guido; Daminelli, Paolo; Losio, Marina N; Arrigoni, Norma; Piva, Silvia; Florio, Daniela; Riu, Raffaela; Zanoni, Renato G

    2012-04-01

    The safety of raw milk sold in Northern Italy was investigated in relation to hygiene quality parameters and presence of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, thermotolerant Campylobacter, and Verocytotoxin producing Escherichia coli O157:H7. The performance of different analytical methods used-official culture method (ISO), modified Bacteriological Analytical Manual cultural method (mBAM), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-was evaluated. The presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) was investigated only by PCR. All samples met regulations for alkaline phosphatase and inhibitory substance, while 18% and 44.8% of samples collected from vending machines had, respectively, somatic cell count (SCC) >300,000/mL and total bacterial count (TBC) >50,000 CFU/mL. The correlation between hygienic quality parameters in samples collected from bulk tank and vending machines showed a significant increase of TBC in vending machines meaning that raw milk was mishandled during distribution and sale. All pathogens investigated were detected in raw milk sold at vending machines; a total of five samples (5%) had at least one pathogen, of which two were detected by PCR and three by mBAM. None of the samples was positive by cultural ISO methods. Even if the comparison of analytical methods showed that none performs significantly better than the others, testing a higher volume of milk (25 versus 210 mL) affects significantly the detection rate of pathogens. Three samples (3%) were positive for Map, suggesting that raw milk is a significant source of Map exposure for consumers. The observed TBC increase and the detection of several pathogenic bacteria pose questions on the safety of raw milk; the use of ISO seems inefficient in detecting a low contamination level of pathogens in milk and consequently not appropriate as official method for testing. In order to ensure consumer's safety, a new approach for the raw milk chain is required.

  15. Analytical procedure for the simultaneous voltammetric determination of trace metals in food and environmental matrices. Critical comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    An analytical procedure fit for the simultaneous determination of copper (II), chromium(VI), thallium(I), lead(II), tin(II), antimony(III), and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in three interdependent environmental matrices involved in foods and food chain as meals, cereal plants and soils is described. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 (meals and cereal plants) and HCl-HNO3 (soils) acidic attack mixtures. 0.1 mol/L dibasic ammonium citrate pH 8.5 was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using, as working electrode, a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and a platinum electrode and an Ag/AgCl/KClsat electrode as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The analytical procedure was verified by the analyses of the standard reference materials: Wholemeal BCR-CRM 189, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Montana Soil Moderately Elevated Traces NIST-SRM 2711. For all the elements in the certified matrix, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (Sr %) was lower than 5%. The accuracy, expressed as percentage relative error (e %) was of the order of 3-7%, while the detection limits were in the range 0.015-0.103 microg/g. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to commercial meal samples, cereal plants and soils samples drawn in sites devoted to agricultural practice. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed.

  16. Comparison of first and second generation analytical silica monoliths by pore-scale simulations of eddy dispersion in the bulk region.

    PubMed

    Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Hormann, Kristof; Höltzel, Alexandra; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2013-08-16

    We present the first quantitative comparison of eddy dispersion in the bulk macropore (flow-through) space of 1st and 2nd generation analytical silica monoliths. Based on samples taken from the bulk region of Chromolith columns, segments of the bulk macropore space were physically reconstructed by confocal laser scanning microscopy to serve as models in pore-scale simulations of flow and dispersion. Our results cover details of the 3D velocity field, macroscopic Darcy permeability, transient and asymptotic dispersion behavior, and chromatographic band broadening, and thus correlate morphological, microscopic, and macroscopic properties. A complete set of parameters for the individual eddy dispersion contributions in the bulk was obtained from a Giddings analysis of the simulated plate height data. The identified short-range structural heterogeneities correspond to the average domain size of the respective monoliths. Our plate height curves show that structural improvements in the bulk morphology of 2nd generation monoliths play only a minor role for the observed improvement in overall column efficiency. The results also indicate a topological dissimilarity between 1st and 2nd generation analytical silica monoliths, which raises the question how the domain size of silica monoliths can be further decreased without compromising the structural homogeneity of the bed.

  17. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  18. Acute, intermediate intensity exercise, and speed and accuracy in working memory tasks: a meta-analytical comparison of effects.

    PubMed

    McMorris, Terry; Sproule, John; Turner, Anthony; Hale, Beverley J

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, using meta-analytic techniques, the effect of acute, intermediate intensity exercise on the speed and accuracy of performance of working memory tasks. It was hypothesized that acute, intermediate intensity exercise would have a significant beneficial effect on response time and that effect sizes for response time and accuracy data would differ significantly. Random-effects meta-analysis showed a significant, beneficial effect size for response time, g=-1.41 (p<0.001) but a significant detrimental effect size, g=0.40 (p<0.01), for accuracy. There was a significant difference between effect sizes (Z(diff)=3.85, p<0.001). It was concluded that acute, intermediate intensity exercise has a strong beneficial effect on speed of response in working memory tasks but a low to moderate, detrimental one on accuracy. There was no support for a speed-accuracy trade-off. It was argued that exercise-induced increases in brain concentrations of catecholamines result in faster processing but increases in neural noise may negatively affect accuracy.

  19. Use of the Relaxometry Technique for Quantification of Paramagnetic Ions in Aqueous Solutions and a Comparison with Other Analytical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Burato, Juliana Soares da Silva; Silva Lobo, Carlos Manuel; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the relaxometry technique is very efficient to quantify paramagnetic ions during in situ electrolysis measurements. Therefore, the goal of this work was to validate the relaxometry technique in the determination of the concentration of the ions contained in electrolytic solutions, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, and Mn2+, and compare it with other analytical methods. Two different NMR spectrometers were used: a commercial spectrometer with a homogeneous magnetic field and a home-built unilateral sensor with an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Without pretreatment, manganese ions do not have absorption bands in the UV-Visible region, but it is possible to quantify them using relaxometry (the limit of quantification is close to 10−5 mol L−1). Therefore, since the technique does not require chemical indicators and is a cheap and robust method, it can be used as a replacement for some conventional quantification techniques. The relaxometry technique could be applied to evaluate the corrosion of metallic surfaces. PMID:27293437

  20. State-dependent anisotrophy--Comparison of quasi-analytical solutions with stochastic results for steady gravity drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Timothy R.; Freyberg, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Anisotropy in large-scale unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of layered soils changes with the moisture state. Here, state-dependent anisotropy is computed under conditions of large-scale gravity drainage. Soils represented by Gardner's exponential function are perfectly stratified, periodic, and inclined. Analytical integration of Darcy’s law across each layer results in a system of nonlinear equations that is solved iteratively for capillary suction at layer interfaces and for the Darcy flux normal to layering. Computed fluxes and suction profiles are used to determine both upscaled hydraulic conductivity in the principal directions and the corresponding “state-dependent” anisotropy ratio as functions of the mean suction. Three groups of layered soils are analyzed and compared with independent predictions from the stochastic results of Yeh et al. (1985b). The small-perturbation approach predicts appropriate behaviors for anisotropy under nonarid conditions. However, the stochastic results are limited to moderate values of mean suction; this limitation is linked to a Taylor series approximation in terms of a group of statistical and geometric parameters. Two alternative forms of the Taylor series provide upper and lower bounds for the state-dependent anisotropy of relatively dry soils.

  1. Production of neutrons in laminated barriers of radiotherapy rooms: comparison between the analytical methodology and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    da Silva Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio Ribeiro; Facure, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    The necessity to build or adapt radiotherapy rooms in reduced areas leads to the search for unconventional solutions for shielding projects. In most cases, adding metals to the primary barriers is the best alternative to shield rooms properly. However, when photons with energies equal or higher than 10 MV interact with high atomic number nuclei, neutrons are ejected and may result in a radioprotection problem for both outside and inside the room. Currently, the most widely used mathematical model to estimate the neutron dose equivalents, beyond the barriers composed by concrete and metal, is applicable only in very specific conditions. Moreover, a validation work of this model had not yet been performed. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to check the validity of the aforementioned mathematical model for cases of primary barriers containing steel or lead sheets, considering the existence of linear accelerators of 15 or 18 MV. The results of the study showed that over 80% of the values obtained by computational simulations revealed deviations above a factor of 2, when compared to the analytical formula. This led to the conclusion that the McGinley method cannot be considered an adequate mathematical model to describe the mentioned physical phenomenon. PACS numbers: 87.56.bd, 02.70.Uu.

  2. Production of neutrons in laminated barriers of radiotherapy rooms: comparison between the analytical methodology and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva; Da Rosa, Luiz Antonio Ribeiro; Facure, Alessandro

    2014-11-08

    The necessity to build or adapt radiotherapy rooms in reduced areas leads to the search for unconventional solutions for shielding projects. In most cases, adding metals to the primary barriers is the best alternative to shield rooms properly. However, when photons with energies equal or higher than 10 MV interact with high atomic number nuclei, neutrons are ejected and may result in a radioprotec- tion problem for both outside and inside the room. Currently, the most widely used mathematical model to estimate the neutron dose equivalents, beyond the barriers composed by concrete and metal, is applicable only in very specific conditions. Moreover, a validation work of this model had not yet been performed. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to check the validity of the aforementioned mathematical model for cases of primary barriers containing steel or lead sheets, considering the existence of linear accelerators of 15 or 18 MV. The results of the study showed that over 80% of the values obtained by computational simulations revealed deviations above a factor of 2, when compared to the analytical formula. This led to the conclusion that the McGinley method cannot be considered an adequate mathematical model to describe the mentioned physical phenomenon. 

  3. Comparison of several analytical methods for the determination of tin in geochemical samples as a function of tin speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Evans, J.R.; Jackson, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate and precise determinations of tin in geological materials are needed for fundamental studies of tin geochemistry, and for tin prospecting purposes. Achieving the required accuracy is difficult because of the different matrices in which Sn can occur (i.e. sulfides, silicates and cassiterite), and because of the variability of literature values for Sn concentrations in geochemical reference materials. We have evaluated three methods for the analysis of samples for Sn concentration: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HGA-AAS) following iodide extraction, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. Two of these methods (HGA-AAS and ICP-OES) required sample decomposition either by acid digestion or fusion, while the third (EDXRF) was performed directly on the powdered sample. Analytical details of all three methods, their potential errors, and the steps necessary to correct these errors were investigated. Results showed that similar accuracy was achieved from all methods for unmineralized samples, which contain no known Sn-bearing phase. For mineralized samples, which contain Sn-bearing minerals, either cassiterite or stannous sulfides, only EDXRF and fusion ICP-OES methods provided acceptable accuracy. This summary of our study provides information which helps to assure correct interpretation of data bases for underlying geochemical processes, regardless of method of data collection and its inherent limitations. ?? 1989.

  4. Comparison of experimental and analytical temperatures achieved by DT-18 and PC-1 shipping containers during hypothetical thermal accident tests

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Temperatures were monitored at various locations on DT-18 and PC-1 shipping packages during furnace tests at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The furnace tests are intended to simulate hypothetical thermal accident conditions specified in Title 10 CFR, Pt. 71.73 (c)(3). Maximum temperatures of the outer containers ranged from 750 to 965{degrees}C while typical maximum temperatures recorded on the inner containers were 60 to 77{degrees}C. One exceptionally high temperature of 196{degrees}C occurred on the PC-1 inner container. Heating 7.1 models of both the DT-18 and PC-1 packages were developed. Models with and without heat generation in the inner containers were developed for each shipping package. The models with heat generation are intended to simulate condensation and convection of hot vapors generated during the heating of the Celotex{trademark} insulating material used in the packages. In general, the analytical models calculate temperatures for the outer containers which agree well with the test data. The HEATING models with and without heat generation bound the inner container test data. These findings are significant in that they lead to the conclusion that heat is transferred to the inner containers through a mechanism other than conduction alone. The high temperature of 196{degrees}C recorded at the PC-1 inner container is within 4{degrees}C of the maximum temperature calculated by the PC-1 HEATING model with heat generation.

  5. Comparison of Three Analytical Methods for the Quantitation of Mercury in Environmental Samples from the Volta Lake, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kwaansa-Ansah, Edward Ebow; Adimado, Anthony Apeke; Nriagu, Jerome Okon; Basu, Niladri

    2016-11-01

    Three analytical methods using automatic mercury analyzer (AMA), direct mercury analyzer (DMA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied to determine mercury in fish and sediment samples from the Volta Lake in Ghana with the aim of comparing their accuracy, precision, and limit of quantifications. There was statistically no significant difference (p < 0.05) between the concentrations recorded by the methods. This indicates their suitability for the accurate determination of mercury. Limit of quantification was found to be in the order; ICP-MS (0.053 ng/g) < DMA (0.527 ng/g) < AMA (2.193 ng/g). Though each of the three methods has a suitable ability in determining accurately the concentrations of mercury in fish and sediment, for the determination of very low concentrations of mercury ICP-MS should be preferred considering the order of the detection limit which follows the trend ICP-MS (0.016 ng/g) < DMA (0.158 ng/g) < AMA (0.509 ng/g).

  6. Interaction of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves with Vortex Density Structures: Comparison of Analytical and LSP Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of flute type vortex density structures and interaction of high frequency electromagnetic waves used for surveillance and communication with such structures. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics (HEDP), and in many other applications. We will present PIC simulation results of EM scattering on vortex type density structures using the LSP code and compare them with analytical results. Two cases will be analyzed. In the first case electromagnetic wave scattering will take place in the ionospheric plasma. In the second case laser probing in a high-beta Z-pinch plasma will be presented. This work was supported by the Air Force Research laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Naval Research Laboratory and NNSA/DOE Grant No. DE-FC52-06NA27616 at the University of Nevada at Reno.

  7. Quantification of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulosic biomass using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy and comparison with other analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Barnette, Anna L; Lee, Christopher; Bradley, Laura C; Schreiner, Edward P; Park, Yong Bum; Shin, Heenae; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H

    2012-07-01

    The non-centrosymmetry requirement of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy allows the detection and quantification of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulose biomass without spectral interferences from hemicelluloses and lignin. This paper shows a correlation between the amount of crystalline cellulose in biomass and the SFG signal intensity. Model biomass samples were prepared by mixing commercially available cellulose, xylan, and lignin to defined concentrations. The SFG signal intensity was found sensitive to a wide range of crystallinity, but varied non-linearly with the mass fraction of cellulose in the samples. This might be due to the matrix effects such as light scattering and absorption by xylan and lignin, as well as the non-linear density dependence of the SFG process itself. Comparison with other techniques such as XRD, FT-Raman, FT-IR and NMR demonstrate that SFG can be a complementary and sensitive tool to assess crystalline cellulose in biomass.

  8. Quantifying Nonspecific TEM β-Lactamase (blaTEM) Genes in a Wastewater Stream▿

    PubMed Central

    Lachmayr, Karen L.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Ford, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    To control the antibiotic resistance epidemic, it is necessary to understand the distribution of genetic material encoding antibiotic resistance in the environment and how anthropogenic inputs, such as wastewater, affect this distribution. Approximately two-thirds of antibiotics administered to humans are β-lactams, for which the predominant bacterial resistance mechanism is hydrolysis by β-lactamases. Of the β-lactamases, the TEM family is of overriding significance with regard to diversity, prevalence, and distribution. This paper describes the design of DNA probes universal for all known TEM β-lactamase genes and the application of a quantitative PCR assay (also known as Taqman) to quantify these genes in environmental samples. The primer set was used to study whether sewage, both treated and untreated, contributes to the spread of these genes in receiving waters. It was found that while modern sewage treatment technologies reduce the concentrations of these antibiotic resistance genes, the ratio of blaTEM genes to 16S rRNA genes increases with treatment, suggesting that bacteria harboring blaTEM are more likely to survive the treatment process. Thus, β-lactamase genes are being introduced into the environment in significantly higher concentrations than occur naturally, creating reservoirs of increased resistance potential. PMID:18997031

  9. Comparison Of The Global Analytic Models Of The Main Geomagnetic Field With The Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Data 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Filippov, S.; Frunze, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three global analytical models of a main geomagnetic field constructed by satellite data are used: model IGRF, Daily Mean Spherical Harmonic Models (DMSHM), and model EMM/2010, and also scalar data of geomagnetic field and its gradients, received in stratospheric balloon gradient magnetic surveys at altitudes of ~30 km. At these altitudes the regional magnetic field is formed from all sources of the Earth's crust. It enables to receive along lengthy routes of surveys the fullest data on regional and longwave-lenght magnetic anomalies. Model DMSHM is used at extracting of magnetic anomalies for elimination of a secular variation up to significant value 0,2 nT. The model can be constructed within the limits of ± 1 months from the moment stratospheric balloon surveys with beneficial day terms with magnetic activity up to Kp <20, that leads to an error of representation of main MFE equal ±5 нТл. It is possible at presence acting for the period of stratospheric balloon magnetic survey of the satellite, for example, Swarm. On stratospheric balloon data it is shown, that model EMM/2010 unsatisfactorily displays MFE at altitude of 30 km. Hence, the qualitative model of the constant (main and anomaly) magnetic field cannot be constructed only with use of satellite and ground data. The improved model constant MFE, constructed according to satellite and stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys, developed up to a degree and the order m=n=720, will have a reliable data about regional crust magnetic field, hence, and about deep magnetic structure of the Earth's crust. The use gradient magnetic surveys aboard stratospheric balloons allows to find the places alternating approximately through 3000 km in which there are no magnetic anomalies. In these places probably to supervise satellite magnetic models for a range of altitude of 20-40 km, timed to stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys.

  10. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line.

  11. HELIOSPHERIC PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL WSA-ENLIL+CONE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL DRAG-BASED MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Dumbović, M.; Temmer, M.; Möstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Odstrčil, D. E-mail: tzic@geof.hr E-mail: manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at E-mail: m.leila.mays@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Real-time forecasting of the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at Earth, based on remote solar observations, is one of the central issues of space-weather research. In this paper, we compare arrival-time predictions calculated applying the numerical ''WSA-ENLIL+Cone model'' and the analytical ''drag-based model'' (DBM). Both models use coronagraphic observations of CMEs as input data, thus providing an early space-weather forecast two to four days before the arrival of the disturbance at the Earth, depending on the CME speed. It is shown that both methods give very similar results if the drag parameter Γ = 0.1 is used in DBM in combination with a background solar-wind speed of w = 400 km s{sup –1}. For this combination, the mean value of the difference between arrival times calculated by ENLIL and DBM is Δ-bar =0.09±9.0 hr with an average of the absolute-value differences of |Δ|-bar =7.1 hr. Comparing the observed arrivals (O) with the calculated ones (C) for ENLIL gives O – C = –0.3 ± 16.9 hr and, analogously, O – C = +1.1 ± 19.1 hr for DBM. Applying Γ = 0.2 with w = 450 km s{sup –1} in DBM, one finds O – C = –1.7 ± 18.3 hr, with an average of the absolute-value differences of 14.8 hr, which is similar to that for ENLIL, 14.1 hr. Finally, we demonstrate that the prediction accuracy significantly degrades with increasing solar activity.

  12. Introducing process analytical technology (PAT) in filamentous cultivation process development: comparison of advanced online sensors for biomass measurement.

    PubMed

    Rønnest, Nanna Petersen; Stocks, Stuart M; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Gernaey, Krist V

    2011-10-01

    The recent process analytical technology (PAT) initiative has put an increased focus on online sensors to generate process-relevant information in real time. Specifically for fermentation, however, introduction of online sensors is often far from straightforward, and online measurement of biomass is one of the best examples. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare the performance of various online biomass sensors, and secondly to demonstrate their use in early development of a filamentous cultivation process. Eight Streptomyces coelicolor fed-batch cultivations were run as part of process development in which the pH, the feeding strategy, and the medium composition were varied. The cultivations were monitored in situ using multi-wavelength fluorescence (MWF) spectroscopy, scanning dielectric (DE) spectroscopy, and turbidity measurements. In addition, we logged all of the classical cultivation data, such as the carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) and the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Prediction models for the biomass concentrations were estimated on the basis of the individual sensors and on combinations of the sensors. The results showed that the more advanced sensors based on MWF and scanning DE spectroscopy did not offer any advantages over the simpler sensors based on dual frequency DE spectroscopy, turbidity, and CER measurements for prediction of biomass concentration. By combining CER, DE spectroscopy, and turbidity measurements, the prediction error was reduced to 1.5 g/l, corresponding to 6% of the covered biomass range. Moreover, by using multiple sensors it was possible to check the quality of the individual predictions and switch between the sensors in real time.

  13. A comparison of sampling and analytical methods for assessing occupational exposure to diesel exhaust in a railroad work environment

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, D.K.; Shaw, L.; Julian, J.; Smolynec, K.; Wood, C.; Shaw, D.

    1999-10-01

    Methods of assessing occupational exposure to diesel exhaust were evaluated in a railroad work environment. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH{reg_sign})-recommended elemental carbon and respirable combustible dust methods of sampling and analysis for assessing diesel exhaust were included in the study. A total of 215 personal and area samples were collected using both size-selective and non-size-selective samplers. The results demonstrate that the elemental carbon method is suitable for the railroad environment and the respirable combustible dust method is not. All elemental carbon concentrations measured were below the proposed ACG1H Threshold Limit Value (TLV{reg_sign}) of 0.15 mg/m{sup 3}. The concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide) were also found to be below their respective TLVs. There is no correlation between elemental carbon or respirable combustible dust and the oxides of nitrogen. The elemental carbon as fraction of total carbon is about 13%, except for onboard locomotives where it is about 24%. Comparison of elemental carbon and respirable combustible dust measurements showed consistent relationships for most sampling locations with respirable combustible dust concentrations 12 to 53 times higher than the elemental carbon levels.

  14. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatisation measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, X.; Lewis, A. C.; Rickard, A. R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Adams, T. J.; Ball, S. M.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Monks, P. S.; Peppe, S.; Ródenas García, M.; Sánchez, P.; Muñoz, A.

    2014-02-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatisation technique has been developed to measure part per billion (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method is compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2, 3, 4, 5, 6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatisation reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor resulted in a fast and highly efficient derivatisation reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatised under optimal reaction conditions. The analytical performance shows good accuracy (6.6% for GLY and 7.5% for MGLY), suitable precision (<12.0%) with method detection limits (MDLs) of 75 pptV for GLY and 185 pptV for MGLY, with a time resolution of 30 min. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations of these compounds observed in ambient air. The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology to quantify α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in the EUPHORE chamber. Good correlations were found between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR) with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.84, Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) (r2 = 0.75), solid phase micro extraction (SPME) (r2 = 0.89), and a photochemical chamber box modelling calculation (r2 = 0.79) for GLY measurements. For MGLY measurements, the microfluidic technique showed good agreement with BBCEAS (r2 = 0.87), SPME (r2 = 0.76), and the modeling simulation (r2 = 0.83), FTIR

  15. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatisation measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair; Rickard, Andrew R.; Baeza-Romero, Maria Teresa; Adams, Thomas J.; Ball, Stephen M.; Goodall, Iain C. A.; Monks, Paul S.; Peppe, Salvatore; Ródenas García, Milagros; Sánchez, Pilar; Muñoz, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatisation technique has been developed to measure part per billion (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method is compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatisation reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor result in a fast and highly efficient derivatisation reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatised under optimal reaction conditions. The analytical performance shows good accuracy (6.6 % for GLY and 7.5 % for MGLY), suitable precision (< 12.0 %) and method detection limits (MDLs) (75 pptV for GLY and 185 pptV for MGLY) with a time resolution of 30 minutes. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations of these compounds observed in ambient air. The microfluidic derivatisation technique would be appropriate for ambient α-dicarbonyl measurements in a range of field environments based on its performance in a large-scale outdoor atmospheric simulation chamber (EUPHORE). The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology to quantify of α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in the EUPHORE chamber. Good correlations were found between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR) with the correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.84, Broad Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) (r2 = 0.75), solid phase micro extraction (SPME) (r2 = 0.89), and a

  16. TEM Study of SAFARI-2000 Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our research was to obtain data on the chemical and physical properties of individual aerosol particles from biomass smoke plume s in southern Africa and from air masses in the region that are affec ted by the smoke. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM), including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and ele ctron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and field-emission electron microscopy (FESEM) to study aerosol particles from several smoke and haz e samples and from a set of cloud samples.

  17. SIMS and TEM Analysis of Niobium Bicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P; Griffis, D P; Stevie, F A; Zhou, C; Ciovati, G; Myneni, R; Spradlin, J K; Rigsbee, M

    2011-07-01

    The behaviour of interstitial impurities(C,O,N,H) on the Nb surface with respect to grain boundaries may affect cavity performance. Large grain Nb makes possible the selection of bicrystal samples with a well defined grain boundary. In this work, Dynamic SIMS was used to analyze two Nb bicrystal samples, one of them heat treated and the other non heat treated (control). H levels were found to be higher for the non heat treated sample and a difference in the H intensity and sputtering rate was also observed across the grain boundary for both the samples. TEM results showed that the bicrystal interface showed no discontinuity and the oxide layer was uniform across the grain boundary for both the samples. TOF-SIMS imaging was also performed to analyze the distribution of the impurities across the grain boundary in both the samples. C was observed to be segregated along the grain boundary for the control sample, while H and O showed a difference in signal intensity across the grain boundary. Crystal orientation appears to have an important role in the observed sputtering rate and impurity ion signal differences both across the grain boundary and between samples

  18. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  19. Multicenter Comparison Study of both Analytical and Clinical Performance across Four Roche Hepatitis C Virus RNA Assays Utilizing Different Platforms.

    PubMed

    Vermehren, Johannes; Stelzl, Evelyn; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Michel-Treil, Veronique; Berkowski, Caterina; Marins, Ed G; Paxinos, Ellen E; Marino, Enrique; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Kessler, Harald H

    2017-04-01

    The efficacy of antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is determined by measuring HCV RNA at specific time points throughout therapy using highly sensitive and accurate HCV RNA assays. This study compared the performances of two recently developed real-time PCR HCV RNA assays, cobas HCV for use on the cobas 6800/8800 systems (cobas 6800/8800 HCV) and cobas HCV for use on the cobas 4800 system (cobas 4800 HCV), with those of two established assays, the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV quantitative test, version 2 (CAP/CTM v2) and the Cobas TaqMan HCV test, version 2 for use with the High Pure system (HPS/CTM v2). The limits of detection (LODs) and linearity at lower concentrations (5 to 1000 IU/ml) were assessed for cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV using WHO standard traceable panels representing HCV genotypes (GT) 1 to 4. Pairwise assay comparisons were also performed using 245 clinical samples representing HCV GT 1 to GT 4. Results from cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV were linear at low HCV RNA concentrations (<0.3 log10 IU/ml difference between expected and observed results) with LODs of 8.2 IU/ml and 11.7 IU/ml, respectively, for GT 1. The new assays showed excellent agreement with results from CAP/CTM v2 and HPS/CTM v2 in samples with quantifiable viral loads. The concordances using the 6 million IU/ml cutoff were high among all four assays (90 to 94%). In conclusion, the cobas 6800/8800 HCV and cobas 4800 HCV tests are sensitive and linear and correlate well with the established Roche assays used in clinical practice.

  20. Ultrasonographic differentiation of malignant from benign breast lesions: a meta-analytic comparison of elasticity and BIRADS scoring.

    PubMed

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Neal, Colleen H; Dwamena, Ben A

    2012-05-01

    There has been controversy regarding the accuracy of breast ultrasound elastography (USE) compared to conventional B-mode Ultrasound (USB). The purpose of this study was to conduct a direct comparative effectiveness analysis of USB versus USE or their combination in differentiating breast lesions through systematically reviewing recent literature. An extensive literature search of PubMed and other medical and general purpose databases from inception through August 2011 was conducted. Published studies that reported a direct comparison of the diagnostic performance of USE, using elasticity score versus USB, using breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) for characterization of focal breast lesions were included. Summary diagnostic performance measures were assessed for each of the tests and their combination using bivariate generalized linear mixed modeling. The two tests were combined as: (1) conjunctive, where the outcome of the combination of tests is positive only if both test results are positive; (2) disjunctive, where the outcome of a combination of tests is negative only if both tests are negative. Twenty nine studies provided relevant information on 5,511 breast masses (2,065 cancers, 3,446 benign lesions). Sensitivity of USB, USE, and their conjunctive and disjunctive combinations were 96% (95% credible interval (CrI), 93-98%), 79% (95% CrI, 74-83%), 73% (95% CrI, 67-78%), and 99% (95% CrI, 98-99%), respectively. Specificity of USB, USE, and their conjunctive and disjunctive combinations were 70% (95% CrI, 55-83%), 88% (95% CrI, 82-92%), 97% (95% CrI, 95-99%), and 56% (95% CrI, 43-69%), respectively. The application of USE as a single test is not superior to USB alone. However, in low risk patients it is recommended to perform an USE following a positive USB result to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies.

  1. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  2. Joint use of TEM and MRS methods in a complex geological setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, Anatoly; Ezersky, Michael; Camerlynck, Christian; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Chalikakis, Konstantinos

    2009-10-01

    Transient Electromagnetic (TEM), known also as Time Domain Electromagnetic (TDEM) and Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) methods were applied jointly to investigate variations in lithology and groundwater salinity in the Nahal Hever South area (Dead Sea coast of Israel). The subsurface in this area is highly heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers over a salt formation, which is partly karstified. Groundwater is very saline, with a chloride concentration of 100-225 g/l. TEM is known as an efficient tool for investigating electrically conductive targets like saline water, but it is sensitive to both the salinity of groundwater and the porosity of rocks. MRS, however, is sensitive primarily to groundwater volume, but it also allows delineating of lithological variations in water-saturated formations. MRS is much less sensitive to variations in groundwater salinity in comparison with TEM. We show that MRS enables us to resolve the fundamental uncertainty in TEM interpretation caused by the equivalence between groundwater resistivity and lithology. Combining TEM and MRS, we found that the sandy Dead Sea aquifer filled with Dead Sea brine is characterized by a bulk resistivity of ρx > 0.4 Ωm, whereas zones with silt and clay in the subsurface are characterized by a bulk resistivity of ρx < 0.4 Ωm. These observations are confirmed by calibration of the TEM method performed near 18 boreholes.

  3. How to improve the performances of Fecal Immunological Tests (FIT): Need for standardization of the sampling and pre-analytical phases and revision of the procedures for comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rapi, Stefano; Rubeca, Tiziana; Fraser, Callum G

    2015-02-24

    Lack of reference materials and standard procedures, on faecal tests leads to major problems in harmonisation of methods and do not allow the comparison of outcome data. In particular the absence of standardisation of pre-analytical characteristic was noted for faecal test methods for haemoglobin since different manufacturers have developed different sampling procedures and report units. Moreover the physical characteristics of the faecal specimen and the designs of specimen collection devices do not allow analysis of samples on different systems in consequence, faecal tests cannot be compared using standard evaluation protocols. To improve the harmonization of results generated using different analytical systems and the overall performances of test on faecal materials we propose the introduction of standard procedures for sampling and pre-analytical phase and the adoption of specific procedures based on the use of artificial biological samples for comparison of methods. Harmonization of sampling devices with the use of a standard design for pickers and a standard ratio between analyte and buffer for different manufacturers represent a mandatory step in the roadmap for harmonization of clinical laboratory measurement on faecal materials and can allow a significant standardisation of results generated by different devices.The creation of specific protocols for the evaluation and comparison of analytical methods for analyse of faeces could lead to a significant improvement in the performance of methods and systems.

  4. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  5. Compositional and Microstructural Evolution of Olivine Under Multiple-Cycle Pulsed Laser Irradiation as Revealed by FIB/Field-Emission TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of pulsed laser irradiation to simulate the short duration, high-energy conditions characteristic of micrometeorite impacts is now an established approach in experimental space weathering studies. The laser generates both melt and vapor deposits that contain nanophase metallic Fe (npFe(sup 0)) grains with size distributions and optical properties similar to those in natural impact-generated melt and vapor deposits. There remains uncertainty, however, about how well lasers simulate the mechanical work and internal (thermal) energy partitioning that occurs in actual impacts. We are currently engaged in making a direct comparison between the products of laser irradiation and experimental/natural hypervelocity impacts. An initial step reported here is to use analytical SEM and TEM is to attain a better understanding of how the microstructure and composition of laser deposits evolve over multiple cycles of pulsed laser irradiation.

  6. Functional comparisons between unimodal and bimodal analytical relationships in terms of water balance predictions for the case study of the Vesuvius volcanic area (Naples, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Nunzio; Nasta, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Optimal performance of large-scale numerical modeling of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere (SVA) system mandates accurate assessment and description of the soil hydraulic properties, namely the water retention (WRF) and hydraulic conductivity (HCF) functions. These functions are commonly described by simple unimodal analytical relations that guarantee mathematical flexibility with few parameters in the majority of soil types. However, other soils, like volcanic soils, are characterized by a complex structure yielding a bimodal or even a multimodal distribution of pore sizes. In these cases, reliable hydrologic predictions can be obtained resorting to more complex hydraulic functions, yet more accurate and robust ones. To overcome some drawbacks of the classic unimodal hydraulic relationships, Romano et al. (2011) have developed closed-form bimodal lognormal relations for improving the description of both WRF and HCF. However, the reliability of this description of the soil hydraulic behavior is often tested at the curve fitting level only. Comparisons between unimodal and bimodal soil hydraulic relationships are more effective and informative when performed in functional terms. Therefore, as the primary objective of this study, we used a hydrological balance model to quantify and compare soil moisture flow and storage regimes for 14 years (1999-2012), when characterized by unimodal or bimodal approximations of 39 measured soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity characteristics collected in volcanic Vesuvian soil located in the Campania Region Plain (Naples, Southern Italy).

  7. Analytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90° rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  8. Analytic materials.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  9. Multielement trace determination in SiC powders: assessment of interlaboratory comparisons aimed at the validation and standardization of analytical procedures with direct solid sampling based on ETV ICP OES and DC arc OES.

    PubMed

    Matschat, Ralf; Hassler, Jürgen; Traub, Heike; Dette, Angelika

    2005-12-01

    The members of the committee NMP 264 "Chemical analysis of non-oxidic raw and basic materials" of the German Standards Institute (DIN) have organized two interlaboratory comparisons for multielement determination of trace elements in silicon carbide (SiC) powders via direct solid sampling methods. One of the interlaboratory comparisons was based on the application of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry with electrothermal vaporization (ETV ICP OES), and the other on the application of optical emission spectrometry with direct current arc (DC arc OES). The interlaboratory comparisons were organized and performed in the framework of the development of two standards related to "the determination of mass fractions of metallic impurities in powders and grain sizes of ceramic raw and basic materials" by both methods. SiC powders were used as typical examples of this category of material. The aim of the interlaboratory comparisons was to determine the repeatability and reproducibility of both analytical methods to be standardized. This was an important contribution to the practical applicability of both draft standards. Eight laboratories participated in the interlaboratory comparison with ETV ICP OES and nine in the interlaboratory comparison with DC arc OES. Ten analytes were investigated by ETV ICP OES and eleven by DC arc OES. Six different SiC powders were used for the calibration. The mass fractions of their relevant trace elements were determined after wet chemical digestion. All participants followed the analytical requirements described in the draft standards. In the calculation process, three of the calibration materials were used successively as analytical samples. This was managed in the following manner: the material that had just been used as the analytical sample was excluded from the calibration, so the five other materials were used to establish the calibration plot. The results from the interlaboratory comparisons were summarized and

  10. The Structural Bases of Antibiotic Resistance in the Clinically Derived Mutant beta-Lactamases TEM-30, TEM-32, and TEM-34

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Widespread use of {beta}-lactam antibiotics has promoted the evolution of {beta}-lactamase mutant enzymes that can hydrolyze ever newer classes of these drugs. Among the most pernicious mutants are the inhibitor-resistant TEM {beta}-lactamases (IRTs), which elude mechanism-based inhibitors, such as clavulanate. Despite much research on these IRTs, little is known about the structural bases of their action. This has made it difficult to understand how many of the resistance substitutions act as they often occur far from Ser-130. Here, three IRT structures, TEM-30 (R244S), TEM-32 (M69I/M182T), and TEM-34 (M69V), are determined by x-ray crystallography at 2.00, 1.61, and 1.52 {angstrom}, respectively. In TEM-30, the Arg-244 {yields} Ser substitution (7.8 {angstrom} from Ser-130) displaces a conserved water molecule that usually interacts with the {beta}-lactam C3 carboxylate. In TEM-32, the substitution Met-69 {yields} Ile (10 {angstrom} from Ser-130) appears to distort Ser-70, which in turn causes Ser-130 to adopt a new conformation, moving its O{gamma} further away, 2.3 {angstrom} from where the inhibitor would bind. This substitution also destabilizes the enzyme by 1.3 kcal/mol. The Met-182 {yields} Thr substitution (20 {angstrom} from Ser-130) has no effect on enzyme activity but rather restabilizes the enzyme by 2.9 kcal/mol. In TEM-34, the Met-69 {yields} Val substitution similarly leads to a conformational change in Ser-130, this time causing it to hydrogen bond with Lys-73 and Lys-234. This masks the lone pair electrons of Ser-130 O{gamma}, reducing its nucleophilicity for cross-linking. In these three structures, distant substitutions result in accommodations that converge on the same point of action, the local environment of Ser-130. TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the predominant source of resistance to {beta}-lactams, such as the penicillins. TEM-1 and related class A {beta}-lactamases confer resistance by hydrolyzing the {beta}-lactam ring of these antibiotics

  11. Updated Sequence Information for TEM β-Lactamase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goussard, Sylvie; Courvalin, Patrice

    1999-01-01

    The sequences of the promoter regions and of the structural genes for 13 penicillinase, extended-spectrum, and inhibitor-resistant TEM-type β-lactamases have been determined, and an updated blaTEM gene nomenclature is proposed. PMID:9925535

  12. Recognition and Resistance in TEM [superscript beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Blazquez, Jesus; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Developing antimicrobials that are less likely to engender resistance has become an important design criterion as more and more drugs fall victim to resistance mutations. One hypothesis is that the more closely an inhibitor resembles a substrate, the more difficult it will be to develop resistant mutations that can at once disfavor the inhibitor and still recognize the substrate. To investigate this hypothesis, 10 transition-state analogues, of greater or lesser similarity to substrates, were tested for inhibition of TEM-1 beta-lactamase, the most widespread resistance enzyme to penicillin antibiotics. The inhibitors were also tested against four characteristic mutant enzymes: TEM-30, TEM-32, TEM-52, and TEM-64. The inhibitor most similar to the substrate, compound 10, was the most potent inhibitor of the WT enzyme, with a K(i) value of 64 nM. Conversely, compound 10 was the most susceptible to the TEM-30 (R244S) mutant, for which inhibition dropped by over 100-fold. The other inhibitors were relatively impervious to the TEM-30 mutant enzyme. To understand recognition and resistance to these transition-state analogues, the structures of four of these inhibitors in complex with TEM-1 were determined by X-ray crystallography. These structures suggest a structural basis for distinguishing inhibitors that mimic the acylation transition state and those that mimic the deacylation transition state; they also suggest how TEM-30 reduces the affinity of compound 10. In cell culture, this inhibitor reversed the resistance of bacteria to ampicillin, reducing minimum inhibitory concentrations of this penicillin by between 4- and 64-fold, depending on the strain of bacteria. Notwithstanding this activity, the resistance of TEM-30, which is already extant in the clinic, suggests that there can be resistance liabilities with substrate-based design.

  13. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  14. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations and morphology analysis of TEM imaged PVDF nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiayuan; Reneker, Darrell; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    With the goal of elucidating the structure of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed, and the results compared with structures observed in high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at the molecular level. Simulation shows that the stability of the β-phase component in a PVDF nanofiber is influenced by its thickness and processing history. When exposed to irradiation, as in a TEM observation, the structure is then further modified by the effects of chain scission. The transformation from the β phase into a paraelectric phase can explain the spindle formation and serpentine motion of molecular segments observed by Zhong et al. (Polymer, 54, 2013, 3745-3756) in irradiated PVDF nanofibers. From a comparison between simulated and experimental TEM images it was possible to identify numerous features that are useful in unveiling the inherent structure of PVDF nanofibers. The experimental TEM images appear to match well with those predicted by a model based on α-phase PVDF, while also being consistent with an alternative model (Nanoscale 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01619c). Work supported by the Petroleum Research Fund of the ACS.

  16. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  17. Preparation of carbon-free TEM microgrids by metal sputtering.

    PubMed

    Janbroers, S; de Kruijff, T R; Xu, Q; Kooyman, P J; Zandbergen, H W

    2009-08-01

    A new method for preparing carbon-free, temperature-stable Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids is presented. An 80% Au/20% Pd metal film is deposited onto a 'holey' microgrid carbon supported on standard mixed-mesh Au TEM grids. Subsequently, the carbon film is selectively removed using plasma cleaning. In this way, an all-metal TEM film is made containing the 'same' microgrid as the original carbon film. Although electron transparency of the foil is reduced significantly, the open areas for TEM inspection of material over these areas are maintained. The metal foil can be prepared with various thicknesses and ensures good electrical conductivity. The new Au/Pd grids are stable to at least 775K under vacuum conditions.

  18. TEM Study of Internal Crystals in Supernova Graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Bernatowicz, T.; Stadermann, F. J.; Messenger, S.; Amari, S.

    2003-03-01

    A coordinated TEM and isotopic study of ten supernova (SN) graphites from the Murchison meteorite has revealed many internal grains, mostly titanium carbides (TiCs) and TiC-kamacite composite grains, which were accreted during the graphite growth.

  19. Appendix B: Summary of TEM Particle Size Distribution Datasets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As discussed in the main text (see Section 5.3.2), calculation of the concentration of asbestos fibers in each of the bins of potential interest requires particle size distribution data derived using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  20. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  1. Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography Hyphenated with Mass Spectrometry: A Powerful Analytical Tool for the Comparison of Originator and Biosimilar Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies at the Middle-up Level of Analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, Valentina; Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Lauber, Matthew; Guillarme, Davy

    2017-02-07

    The development and approval processes of biosimilar mAbs depend on their comparability to originators. Therefore, analytical comparisons are required to assess structural features and post-translational modifications (PTM) and thereby minimize the risk of being clinically meaningful differences between biosimilar and originator drug products. The glycosylation pattern of mAbs is considered to be an important critical quality attribute (CQA), and several analytical approaches have been proposed that facilitate characterizing and monitoring a glycosylation profile, albeit mainly at a glycan and glycopeptide level of analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) hyphenated with mass spectrometry (MS) for the qualitative profiling of glycosylation patterns at the protein level, by comparing originator and biosimilars mAbs (Remicade/Remsina/Inflectra, Herceptin/Trastuzumab B, and Erbitux/Cetuximab B) using a middle-up approach. We demonstrate the ability of HILIC to resolve hydrophilic variants of protein biopharmaceuticals at the middle-up level of analysis, its complementarity to reversed phase liquid chromatography, and its hyphenation to MS. HILIC features combined to MS make a powerful analytical tool for the comparison of originator and biosimilar mAbs that could eventually be applied in routine analyses for quality control.

  2. A High-Power Reflector Impulse Antenna with Dual-Tem Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chen; Zhang, An-Xue; Wu, Hui; Jiang, Yan-Sheng; Wang, Wen-Bing

    2008-09-01

    There are different demands on radiation efficiency and direction pattern according to various ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and high power applications. To obtain more radiating gain on bore-sight of paraboloidal reflector and centralized radiating direction, a novel feeding structure called dual-TEM source has been designed and applied in half-paraboloidal reflector impulse radiating antenna (IRA) applications. Simulation results proved that this proposed half-paraboloidal reflector IRA with dual-TEM source provided greater radiation performance on bore-sight as a result of the synthesized power in the aperture space of paraboloid. Moreover, lots of simulation work and comparison have been done in different feeding models to summarize a relative optimal feeding structure.

  3. Lidar returns from multiply scattering media in multiple-field-of-view and CCD lidars with polarization devices: comparison of semi-analytical solution and Monte Carlo data.

    PubMed

    Chaikovskaya, Ludmila I; Zege, Eleonora P; Katsev, Iosif L; Hirschberger, Markus; Oppel, Ulrich G

    2009-01-20

    Quite recently, a semi-analytical approach to the sounding of multiply scattering media (clouds, seawaters) using multiple-field-of-view and CCD lidars with polarization devices was developed. The angular distributions of polarized components of the lidar returns from multiply scattering media computed on the basis of this theory using the small-angle approximation are presented and discussed. The semi-analytical nature of the solution makes the computation procedure faster. The obtained data are compared with results provided by the most advanced Monte Carlo algorithms for simulation of modern lidar performance. The good agreement between data provided by the semi-analytical approach and Monte Carlo computations assures one that these approaches can serve as a reliable theoretical base for interpretation and inversion of cloud lidar sounding data obtained with polarized lidars, including polarized multiple-field-of-view and CCD lidars.

  4. Compositional and Microstructural Evolution of Olivine During Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Insights Based on a FIB/Field-Emission TEM Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of pulsed laser irradiation to simulate the short duration, high-energy conditions characteristic of micrometeorite impacts is now an established approach in experimental space weathering studies. The laser generates both melt and vapor deposits that contain nanophase metallic Fe (npFe(sup 0)) grains with size distributions and optical properties similar to those in natural impact-generated melt and vapor deposits. There remains uncertainty, however, about how well lasers simulate the mechanical work and internal (thermal) energy partitioning that occurs in actual impacts. We are currently engaged in making a direct comparison between the products of laser irradiation and experimental/natural hypervelocity impacts. An initial step reported here is to use analytical TEM is to attain a better understanding of how the microstructure and composition of laser deposits evolve over multiple cycles of pulsed laser irradiation. Experimental Methods: We irradiated pressed-powder pellets of San Carlos olivine (Fo(sub 90)) with up to 99 rastered pulses of a GAM ArF excimer laser. The irradiated surface of the sample were characterized by SEM imaging and areas were selected for FIB cross sectioning for TEM study using an FEI Quanta dual-beam electron/focused ion beam instrument. FIB sections were characterized using a JEOL2500SE analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) optimized for quantitative element mapping at less than 10 nm spatial resolutions. Results: In the SEM the 99 pulse pressed pellet sample shows a complex, inhomogeneous, distribution of laser-generated material, largely concentrated in narrow gaps and larger depressions between grains. Local concentrations of npFe0 spherules 0.1 to 1 micrometers in size are visible within these deposits in SEM back-scatter images. Fig. 1 shows bright-field STEM images of a FIB cross-section of a one of these deposits that continuously covers the top and sloping side of an

  5. In-situ TEM observation on STM tunneling gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhyun; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-03-01

    Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Tunneling Microscope in an ultra high vacuum environment (UHV-TEM-STM) have been combined to simultaneously perform both high resolution TEM and atomically resolved STM experiments. This system was constructed for in-situ investigation of physical property of impurity atoms embedded below semiconductor surface. To image TEM and STM at the same time, crucial requirement is that, the STM image must be acquired under the electron beam irradiation. As a preliminary test, we used HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) sample and tungsten tip as schematically shown in Fig 1(a). Fig 1(b) shows an atomic resolution STM image of HOPG obtained with 300mV sample bias and 3nA tunneling current even in the condition of the electron beam irradiation on the tip. TEM image can be simultaneously acquired by performing In-situ TEM observation on STM tunneling gap formed between the tip and a thin sample. Fig 1(a) Geometry of STM observation on STM tunneling gap Fig 1(b) STM image of HOPG obtained with 300mV sample bias and 3nA tunneling current

  6. A reference interval study for common biochemical analytes in Eastern Turkey: a comparison of a reference population with laboratory data mining

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Ozarda, Yesim; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Umudum, Fatma Zuhal; Bakan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) in a Turkish population living in Northeast Turkey (Erzurum) for 34 analytes using direct and indirect methods. In the present study, the regional RIs obtained were compared with other RI studies, primarily the nationwide study performed in Turkey. Materials and methods For the direct method, 435 blood samples were collected from a healthy group of females (N = 218) and males (N = 217) aged between 18 and 65 years. The sera were analysed in Ataturk University hospital laboratory using Roche reagents and analysers for 34 analytes. The data from 1,366,948 records were used to calculate the indirect RIs using a modified Bhattacharya method. Results Significant gender-related differences were observed for 17 analytes. There were also some apparent differences between RIs derived from indirect and direct methods particularly in some analytes (e.g. gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase, LDL-cholesterol and iron). The RIs derived with the direct method for some, but not all, of the analytes were generally comparable with the RIs reported in the nationwide study and other previous studies in Turkey.There were large differences between RIs derived by the direct method and the expected values shown in the kit insert (e.g. aspartate aminotransferase, total-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and vitamin B12). Conclusions These data provide region-specific RIs for 34 analytes determined by the direct and indirect methods. The observed differences in RIs between previous studies could be related to nutritional status and environmental factors. PMID:27346966

  7. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  8. A single-tilt TEM stereomicroscopy technique for crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Rodney J; Misra, Amit; Mitchell, Terence E; Alexander, Kathleen B

    2003-02-01

    A new single-tilt technique for performing TEM stereomicroscopy of strain fields in crystalline materials has been developed. The technique is a weak beam technique that involves changing the value of g and/or s g while tilting across a set of Kikuchi bands. The primary benefit of the technique is it can be used with single-tilt TEM specimen holders including many specialty holders such as in situ straining, heating, and cooling holders. Standard stereo-TEM techniques are almost always limited to holders allowing two degrees of rotational freedom (i.e., double-tilt or tilt/rotation holders). An additional benefit of the new technique is that it eliminates the need to focus with the specimen height control. These advantages make it useful for stereo viewing or for quantitative stereomicroscopy provided necessary consideration is given to errors that may result from the technique.

  9. Chromium and aluminum biosorption on Chryseomonas luteola TEM05.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, G; Baysal, S H

    2004-05-01

    Cr(VI) and Al(III) are environmental pollutants that are frequently encountered together in industrial wastewaters, e.g., from mining iron-steel, metal cleaning, plating, metal processing, automobile parts, and the manufacturing and dye industries. In this work, several variables that affect the capacity for chromium and aluminum biosorption by Chryseomonas luteola TEM05 were studied, particularly the effects of pH, metal concentration and contact time. Optimum adsorption pH values of Cr(VI) and Al(III) were determined as 4.0 and 5.0, respectively. The biosorption equilibrium was described by Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. The value of Qo appears to be significantly higher for the Al(III) C. luteola TEM05 system. Langmuir parameters of C. luteola TEM05 also indicated a maximum adsorption capacity of 55.2 mg g(-1) for Al(III) and 3.0 mg g(-1) for Cr(VI).

  10. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  11. Comparison of methods for measurement of organic compounds at ultra-trace level: analytical criteria and application to analysis of amino acids in extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O; Claeys-Bruno, M; Dobrijevic, M; Rodier, C; Borruat, G; Commeyras, A; Garrelly, L

    2005-02-01

    The need for criteria to compare different analytical methods for measuring extraterrestrial organic matter at ultra-trace levels in relatively small and unique samples (e.g., fragments of meteorites, micrometeorites, planetary samples) is discussed. We emphasize the need to standardize the description of future analyses, and take the first step toward a proposed international laboratory network for performance testing.

  12. The “2T” ion-electron semi-analytic shock solution for code-comparison with xRAGE: A report for FY16

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Jim Michael

    2016-10-05

    This report documents an effort to generate the semi-analytic "2T" ion-electron shock solution developed in the paper by Masser, Wohlbier, and Lowrie, and the initial attempts to understand how to use this solution as a code-verification tool for one of LANL's ASC codes, xRAGE. Most of the work so far has gone into generating the semi-analytic solution. Considerable effort will go into understanding how to write the xRAGE input deck that both matches the boundary conditions imposed by the solution, and also what physics models must be implemented within the semi-analytic solution itself to match the model assumptions inherit within xRAGE. Therefore, most of this report focuses on deriving the equations for the semi-analytic 1D-planar time-independent "2T" ion-electron shock solution, and is written in a style that is intended to provide clear guidance for anyone writing their own solver.

  13. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  14. Ab initio analytical Raman intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method in an atomic orbital basis. II. Validation and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Rérat, Michel; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we validate a new, fully analytical method for calculating Raman intensities of periodic systems, developed and presented in Paper I [L. Maschio, B. Kirtman, M. Rérat, R. Orlando, and R. Dovesi, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164101 (2013)]. Our validation of this method and its implementation in the CRYSTAL code is done through several internal checks as well as comparison with experiment. The internal checks include consistency of results when increasing the number of periodic directions (from 0D to 1D, 2D, 3D), comparison with numerical differentiation, and a test of the sum rule for derivatives of the polarizability tensor. The choice of basis set as well as the Hamiltonian is also studied. Simulated Raman spectra of α-quartz and of the UiO-66 Metal-Organic Framework are compared with the experimental data.

  15. A Survey of Jet Aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    Based upon field testing during the NASA led APEX III campaign conducted in November 2005 at the NASA Glenn Research Center in coordination with Continental Airlines and Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure mixed. Comparisons are made to more familiar laboratory flame-generated soot as a well-studied point of reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth.

  16. A survey of jet aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chung-Hsuan; Bryg, Victoria M.; Vander Wal, Randy L.

    2016-09-01

    Results are reported for sampling non-volatile particulate matter from field tests during the NASA led APEX III campaign. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using TEM. Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure is mixed. Comparisons are made to soot from a laboratory flame as a well-studied reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth with implications for atmospheric processing and climate impact.

  17. Coarsening of Pd nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere studied by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren; Skoglundh, Magnus; Helveg, Stig

    2016-06-01

    The coarsening of supported palladium nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere was studied in situ by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Specifically, the Pd nanoparticles were dispersed on a planar and amorphous Al2O3 support and were observed during the exposure to 10 mbar technical air at 650 °C. Time-resolved TEM image series reveal that the Pd nanoparticles were immobile and that a few percent of the nanoparticles grew or shrank, indicating a coarsening process mediated by the Ostwald ripening mechanism. The TEM image contrast suggests that the largest nanoparticles tended to wet the Al2O3 support to a higher degree than the smaller nanoparticles and that the distribution of projected particle sizes consequently broadens by the appearance of an asymmetric tail toward the larger particle sizes. A comparison with computer simulations based on a simple mean-field model for the Ostwald ripening process indicates that the observed change in the particle size distribution can be accounted for by wetting of the Al2O3 support by the larger Pd nanoparticles.

  18. RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

  19. Dopant profiling in the TEM, progress towards quantitative electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Truche, Robert; Chabli, Amal; Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C.; Midgley, Paul A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2007-09-26

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterise the dopant potential in GaAs p-n junctions. We show that the measured potential across the junctions is affected by both FIB specimen preparation and by charging in the TEM and suggest methods that can be used to minimise these problems.

  20. An Analytical Comparison of the Fidelity of "Large Motion" Versus "Small Motion" Flight Simulators in a Rotorcraft Side-Step Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental methodology for studying flight simulator fidelity. The task was a rotorcraft bob-up/down maneuver in which vertical acceleration constituted the motion cue. The task considered here is aside-step maneuver that differs from the bob-up one important way: both roll and lateral acceleration cues are available to the pilot. It has been communicated to the author that in some Verticle Motion Simulator (VMS) studies, the lateral acceleration cue has been found to be the most important. It is of some interest to hypothesize how this motion cue associated with "outer-loop" lateral translation fits into the modeling procedure where only "inner-loop " motion cues were considered. This Note is an attempt at formulating such an hypothesis and analytically comparing a large-motion simulator, e.g., the VMS, with a small-motion simulator, e.g., a hexapod.

  1. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding.

  2. Requisite analytic and diagnostic performance characteristics for the clinical detection of BRAF V600E in hairy cell leukemia: a comparison of 2 allele-specific PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Noah A; Weigelin, Helmut C; Bailey, Nathanael; Laliberte, Julie; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S; Betz, Bryan L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of high-frequency BRAF V600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) has important diagnostic utility. However, the requisite analytic performance for a clinical assay to routinely detect BRAF V600E mutations in HCL has not been clearly defined. In this study, we sought to determine the level of analytic sensitivity needed for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and frozen samples and to compare the performance of 2 allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Twenty-nine cases of classic HCL, including 22 FFPE bone marrow aspirates and 7 frozen specimens from blood or bone marrow were evaluated using a laboratory-developed allele-specific PCR assay and a commercially available allele-specific quantitative PCR assay-myT BRAF Ultra. Also included were 6 HCL variant and 40 non-HCL B-cell lymphomas. Two cases of classic HCL, 1 showing CD5 expression, were truly BRAF V600E-negative based on negative results by PCR and sequencing despite high-level leukemic involvement. Among the remaining 27 specimens, V600E mutations were detected in 88.9% (17/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen) and 81.5% (15/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen), for the laboratory-developed and commercial assays, respectively. No mutations were detected among the 46 non-HCL lymphomas. Both assays showed an analytic sensitivity of 0.3% involvement in frozen specimens and 5% in FFPE tissue. On the basis of these results, an assay with high analytic sensitivity is required for the clinical detection of V600E mutations in HCL specimens. Two allele-specific PCR assays performed well in both frozen and FFPE bone marrow aspirates, although detection in FFPE tissue required 5% or more involvement.

  3. An inter-laboratory comparison of different analytical methods for the determination of monomethylmercury in various soil and sediment samples: A platform for method improvement.

    PubMed

    Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H; Matsuyama, Akito; Fajon, Vesna; Horvat, Milena; Tomiyasu, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    An inter-laboratory study was conducted to compare results from different analytical methods for monomethylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in 17 soil and sediment samples. The samples were collected from mercury-contaminated areas, including Minamata Bay and Kagoshima Bay in Japan, the Idrija mercury mine in Slovenia, and an artisanal small-scale gold mining area in Indonesia. The Hg in these samples comes from several different sources: industrial waste from an acetaldehyde production facility, volcanic activity, Hg mining activity, and artisanal and small-scale gold mining activity (ASGM). MeHg concentrations in all the samples were measured in four separate laboratories, using three different determination methods: Kagoshima University (Japan), using high-performance liquid chromatography-chemiluminescence detection (HPLC-CL); National Institute for Minamata Disease (Japan), using gas chromatography-electron capture detection; and Metropolitan Council Environmental Services (USA) and Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), both using alkylation-gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. The methods gave comparable MeHg results for most of the samples tested, but for some samples, the results exhibited significant variability depending on the method used. The HPLC-CL method performed poorly when applied to samples with elevated sulfur concentrations, producing MeHg concentrations that were much lower than those from the other methods. Additional analytical work demonstrated the elimination of this sulfur interference when the method was modified to bind sulfur prior to the analytical step by using Hg(2+) as a masking agent. These results demonstrate the value of laboratory intercomparison exercises in contributing to the improvement of analytical methods.

  4. On the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient and spectra of inner radiation belt particles - Analytic solutions and comparison with numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphalen, H.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical method by which the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient may be deduced from spectral observations of the particle population at the inner edge of the earth's radiation belts is presented. This region has previously been analyzed with numerical techniques; in this report an analytical treatment that illustrates characteristic limiting cases in the L shell range where the time scale of Coulomb losses is substantially shorter than that of radial diffusion (L approximately 1-2) is given. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the particle spectra there are shaped by the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient regardless of the spectral shapes of the particle populations diffusing inward from the outer radiation zone, so that from observed spectra the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be determined. To insure realistic simulations, inner zone data obtained from experiments on the DIAL, AZUR, and ESRO 2 spacecraft have been used as boundary conditions. Excellent agreement between analytic and numerical results is reported.

  5. In situ TEM studies of carbon and gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas Garcia, Gilberto

    Properties of matter change as structures go down in size to the nanoscale, creating new possibilities for creating new functional materials with better properties than the bulk. In situ TEM techniques were used to probe the properties of two different materials: atomic carbon chains and gold nanoparticles. Carbon chains were synthesized by in situ TEM electron beam irradiation from few-layers-graphene (FLG) flakes. Several chains up to 5 nm long were observed. Aberration corrected TEM confirmed the dimerization of the linear chain as predicted by Peierls. Moreover, it was observed that two linear carbon chains can cross-bond every 9 atoms, and it was confirmed by DFT calculations. Five-fold nanoparticles are not supposed to be stable beyond 5 nm size. Here, decahedra with high index facets in the order of 300 nm were studied by TEM. It was found that the high index facets were only stable by adding a capping agent, otherwise, smooth edges were observed. In this case, a (5x1) hexagonal surface reconstruction was observed on the {001} surfaces, with the hexagonal strings along a [110] and a [410] direction. Additionally, mechanical properties of gold nanoparticles, with and without twin boundaries, under 100 nm were measured by in situ TEM compression experiments. All of the nanoparticles presented yield strengths in the order of GPa. Multi twinned nanoparticles were found to be more malleable, reaching real compressing strains of 100 %, while the single crystal nanoparticle presented less plastic flow. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the twin boundaries contribute to the malleability of the nanoparticles, at the same time it provides a mechanism to stop dislocations, hence, strain hardening the nanoparticle at later stages of compression. Finally, the behavior of a single grain boundary was studied by in situ TEM manipulation of nanoparticles. A liquid-like behavior of a grain boundary is observed after two 40 nm gold nanoparticles are brought to

  6. Analytical Comparison of In Vitro-Spiked Human Serum and Plasma for PCR-Based Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus DNA: a Study by the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Juergen; Mengoli, Carlo; Springer, Jan; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Klingspor, Lena; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Morton, C Oliver; Barnes, Rosemary A; Donnelly, J Peter; White, P Lewis

    2015-09-01

    The use of serum or plasma for Aspergillus PCR testing facilitates automated and standardized technology. Recommendations for serum testing are available, and while serum and plasma are regularly considered interchangeable for use in fungal diagnostics, differences in galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (GM-EIA) performance have been reported and are attributed to clot formation. Therefore, it is important to assess plasma PCR testing to determine if previous recommendations for serum are applicable and also to compare analytical performance with that of serum PCR. Molecular methods testing serum and plasma were compared through multicenter distribution of quality control panels, with additional studies to investigate the effect of clot formation and blood fractionation on DNA availability. Analytical sensitivity and time to positivity (TTP) were compared, and a regression analysis was performed to identify variables that enhanced plasma PCR performance. When testing plasma, sample volume, preextraction-to-postextraction volume ratio, PCR volume, duplicate testing, and the use of an internal control for PCR were positively associated with performance. When whole-blood samples were spiked and then fractionated, the analytical sensitivity and TTP were superior when testing plasma. Centrifugation had no effect on DNA availability, whereas the presence of clot material significantly lowered the concentration (P = 0.028). Technically, there are no major differences in the molecular processing of serum and plasma, but the formation of clot material potentially reduces available DNA in serum. During disease, Aspergillus DNA burdens in blood are often at the limits of PCR performance. Using plasma might improve performance while maintaining the methodological simplicity of serum testing.

  7. Comparison of the analytical and clinical performances of Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV, Hybrid Capture 2, and DNA Chip assays in gynecology patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Kang, Youjin; Kim, Dong Geun; Kim, Eui-Chong; Park, Sung Sup; Seong, Moon-Woo

    2013-08-01

    The detection of high-risk (HR) HPV in cervical cancer screening is important for early diagnosis of cervical cancer or pre-cancerous lesions. We evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of 3 HR HPV assays in Gynecology patients. A total of 991 specimens were included in this study: 787 specimens for use with a Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and 204 specimens for a HPV DNA microarray (DNA Chip). All specimens were tested using an Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV assay (Real-time HR), PGMY PCR, and sequence analysis. Clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal cytology (severe than high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) were 81.8% for Real-time HR, 77.3% for HC2, and 66.7% for DNA Chip, and clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+) were 91.7% for HC2, 87.5% for Real-time HR, and 73.3% for DNA Chip. As compared to results of the sequence analysis, HC2, Real-time HR, and DNA Chip showed concordance rates of 94.3% (115/122), 90.0% (117/130), and 61.5% (16/26), respectively. The HC2 assay and Real-time HR assay showed comparable results to each other in both clinical and analytical performances, while the DNA Chip assay showed poor clinical and analytical performances. The Real-time HR assay can be a good alternative option for HR HPV testing with advantages of allowing full automation and simultaneous genotyping of HR types 16 and 18.

  8. Comparison of clinical and analytical performance of the Abbott Realtime High Risk HPV test to the performance of hybrid capture 2 in population-based cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Ostrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja; Ucakar, Veronika; Hillemanns, Peter; Bokal, Eda Vrtacnik; Jancar, Nina; Klavs, Irena

    2011-05-01

    The clinical performance of the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV (human papillomavirus) test (RealTime) and that of the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA test (hc2) were prospectively compared in the population-based cervical cancer screening setting. In women >30 years old (n = 3,129), the clinical sensitivity of RealTime for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 (CIN2) or worse (38 cases) and its clinical specificity for lesions of less than CIN2 (3,091 controls) were 100% and 93.3%, respectively, and those of hc2 were 97.4% and 91.8%, respectively. A noninferiority score test showed that the clinical specificity (P < 0.0001) and clinical sensitivity (P = 0.011) of RealTime were noninferior to those of hc2 at the recommended thresholds of 98% and 90%. In the total study population (women 20 to 64 years old; n = 4,432; 57 cases, 4,375 controls), the clinical sensitivity and specificity of RealTime were 98.2% and 89.5%, and those of hc2 were 94.7% and 87.7%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity of RealTime in detecting targeted HPV types evaluated with the largest sample collection to date (4,479 samples) were 94.8% and 99.8%, and those of hc2 were 93.4% and 97.8%, respectively. Excellent analytical agreement between the two assays was obtained (kappa value, 0.84), while the analytical accuracy of RealTime was significantly higher than that of hc2. RealTime demonstrated high intralaboratory reproducibility and interlaboratory agreement with 500 samples retested 61 to 226 days after initial testing in two different laboratories. RealTime can be considered to be a reliable and robust HPV assay clinically comparable to hc2 for the detection of CIN2+ lesions in a population-based cervical cancer screening setting.

  9. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, W. H.; Artoli, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  10. SimulaTEM: multislice simulations for general objects.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Beltrán-Del-Río, L M; Herrera-Becerra, R

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present the program SimulaTEM for the simulation of high resolution micrographs and diffraction patterns. This is a program based on the multislice approach that does not assume a periodic object. It can calculate images from finite objects, from amorphous samples, from crystals, quasicrystals, grain boundaries, nanoparticles or arbitrary objects provided the coordinates of all the atoms can be supplied.

  11. Strain mapping in TEM using precession electron diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Taheri, Mitra Lenore; Leff, Asher Calvin

    2017-02-14

    A sample material is scanned with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) over multiple steps having a predetermined size at a predetermined angle. Each scan at a predetermined step and angle is compared to a template, wherein the template is generated from parameters of the material and the scanning. The data is then analyzed using local mis-orientation mapping and/or Nye's tensor analysis to provide information about local strain states.

  12. Label-free porous silicon immunosensor for broad detection of opiates in a blind clinical study and results comparison to commercial analytical chemistry techniques.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Lisa M; Kwong, Tai C; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate for the first time the performance of a label-free porous silicon (PSi) immunosensor assay in a blind clinical study designed to screen authentic patient urine specimens for a broad range of opiates. The PSi opiate immunosensor achieved 96% concordance with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results on samples that underwent standard opiate testing (n = 50). In addition, successful detection of a commonly abused opiate, oxycodone, resulted in 100% qualitative agreement between the PSi opiate sensor and LC-MS/MS. In contrast, a commercial broad opiate immunoassay technique (CEDIA) achieved 65% qualitative concordance with LC-MS/MS. Evaluation of important performance attributes including precision, accuracy, and recovery was completed on blank urine specimens spiked with test analytes. Variability of morphine detection as a model opiate target was <9% both within-run and between-day at and above the cutoff limit of 300 ng mL(-1). This study validates the analytical screening capability of label-free PSi opiate immunosensors in authentic patient samples and is the first semiquantitative demonstration of the technology's successful clinical use. These results motivate future development of label-free PSi technology to reduce complexity and cost of diagnostic testing particularly in a point-of-care setting.

  13. A Label-Free Porous Silicon Immunosensor for Broad Detection of Opiates in a Blind Clinical Study and Result Comparison to Commercial Analytical Chemistry Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Lisa M.; Kwong, Tai C.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we evaluate for the first time the performance of a label-free porous silicon (PSi) immunosensor assay in a blind clinical study designed to screen authentic patient urine specimens for a broad range of opiates. The PSi opiate immunosensor achieved 96% concordance with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results on samples that underwent standard opiate testing (n=50). In addition, successful detection of a commonly abused opiate, oxycodone, resulted in 100% qualitative agreement between the PSi opiate sensor and LC-MS/MS. In contrast, a commercial broad opiate immunoassay technique (CEDIA®) achieved 65% qualitative concordance with LC-MS/MS. Evaluation of important performance attributes including precision, accuracy, and recovery was completed on blank urine specimens spiked with test analytes. Variability of morphine detection as a model opiate target was < 9% both within-run and between-day at and above the cutoff limit of 300 ng ml−1. This study validates the analytical screening capability of label-free PSi opiate immunosensors in authentic patient samples and is the first semi-quantitative demonstration of the technology’s successful clinical use. These results motivate future development of PSi technology to reduce complexity and cost of diagnostic testing particularly in a point-of-care setting. PMID:21062030

  14. Characterization of some biological specimens using TEM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    The advent of novel techniques using the Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes improved observation on various biological specimens to characterize them. We studied some biological specimens using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes. We followed negative staining technique with Phosphotungstic acid using bacterial culture of Bacillus subtilis. Negative staining is very convenient technique to view the structural morphology of different samples including bacteria, phage viruses and filaments in a cell. We could observe the bacterial cell wall and flagellum very well when trapped the negative stained biofilm from bacterial culture on a TEM grid. We cut ultra thin sections from the fixed root tips of Pisum sativum (Garden pea). Root tips were pre fixed with osmium tetroxide and post fixed with uranium acetate and placed in the BEEM capsule for block making. The ultrathin sections on the grid under TEM showed the granular chromatin in the nucleus. The protein bodies and large vacuoles with the storage materials were conspicuous. We followed fixation, critical point drying and sputter coating with gold to view the tissues with SEM after placing on stubs. SEM view of the leaf surface of a dangerous weed Tragia hispida showed the surface trichomes. These trichomes when break on touching releases poisonous content causing skin irritation. The cultured tissue from in vitro culture of Albizia lebbeck, a tree revealed the regenerative structures including leaf buds and stomata on the tissue surface. SEM and TEM allow investigating the minute details characteristic morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching.

  15. Observations from TEM Analysis of Swift Creek Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Samples analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from suspended sediments in Swift Creek have unique characteristics compared to other naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) sites across the country. Our first introduction to the uniqueness of the Swift Creek site came about when we analyzed soil sediments by polarized light microscopy (PLM) and found relatively low or nonexistent levels of chrysotile asbestos. Upon submission of these samples for TEM analysis, we found that the samples were literally filled with small chrysotile fibers and bundles. We also notice a high number of dark, rounded particles which were not asbestiform. Out of curiosity, we viewed the surface features of one of these particles using scanning electron microscopy to find compacted chrysotile fibers bundled inside these particles. These particles contained the vast majority of chrysotile in the sample. This finding began our approach to provide more advanced TEM/SEM methods for identifying and characterizing complex arrangements of asbestos from NOA sites. We will present some of our experiences and methods for characterizing these types of particles common to NOA sites.

  16. Meta-analytic moderators of experimental exposure to media portrayals of women on female appearance satisfaction: Social comparisons as automatic processes.

    PubMed

    Want, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Experimental exposure to idealized media portrayals of women is thought to induce social comparisons in female viewers and thereby to be generally detrimental to female viewers' satisfaction with their own appearance. Through meta-analysis, the present paper examines the impact of moderators of this effect, some identified and updated from a prior meta-analysis and some that have hitherto received little attention. Participants' pre-existing appearance concerns and the processing instructions participants were given when exposed to media portrayals were found to significantly moderate effect sizes. With regard to processing instructions, a novel and counter-intuitive pattern was revealed; effect sizes were smallest when participants were instructed to focus on the appearance of women in media portrayals, and largest when participants processed the portrayals on a distracting, non-appearance dimension. These results are interpreted through a framework that suggests that social comparisons are automatic processes, the effects of which can be modified through conscious processing.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Study of Microbe-Carbonate-Silicate Interfaces by FIB and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Menguy, N.; Guyot, F.; Vanni, C.; Gillet, P.

    2003-12-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), chemical micro-analysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) are among the most powerful analytical techniques for studying microbe-mineral interactions, allowing to observe the microbe-mineral interface at almost the angstrom scale, to evidence transformations of the mineral structure and chemical alterations at the nanometer scale. However, the samples must be very thin and only a small area can be investigated. A key limitation for using this technique is thus to prepare natural geomicrobiological samples which combine hard minerals, preventing use of ultramicrotomy, with soft organic matter inadequate to ion milling procedures. Additionaly the areas of interest are usually restricted to few micrometer large areas which have to be selected from macroscopic samples. In this study we present two procedures : micromanipulation and FIB (Focused Ion Beam) which allow the study of microbe-mineral interfaces with TEM. The micromanipulation procedure has been presented in Benzerara et al (2003, PNAS). We have evidenced nannobacteria-like objects at the surface of the Tatahouine orthopyroxenite meteorite fallen in the tunisian desert in 1931. SEM observations suggest a complex interaction pattern between the nannobacteria-like objects, the pyroxene and microorganisms which have colonized the surface of the meteorite during its seventy years of residence on Earth. The TEM study on the very same area shows that the nannobacteria-like rods are actually well-crystallized nanometric calcite single crystals surrounded by an amorphous layer of carbonate composition. Those morphologies and structures are unusual for calcite single crystals. We discuss these observations in regard to the criteria of biogenicity i.e. biosignatures. Moreover, we examine the implications for carbonate production associated to silicate bio-weathering under aridic conditions. This work is relevant both to astrobiological and

  18. MT3FT-15OR0204122: Report on the acquisition and installation of FEI Talos F200X S/TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the installation, performance, and early results from the FCRD-funded acquisition of a new advanced analytical scanning / transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) facility.

  19. Materials science applications of a 120 kV FEG TEM/STEM: Triskaidekaphilia

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Fisher, A.T.; Kenik, E.A.; Wang, Z.L.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction by several manufacturers of 200kV transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with field emission guns affords the opportunity to assess their potential impact on materials science by examining applications of similar 100-120kV instruments that have been in use for more than a decade. This summary is based on results from a Philips EM400T/FEG configured as an analytical electron microscope (AEM) with a 6,585 scanning transmission (STEM) unit, EDAX 9100/70 or 9900 energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) systems, and Gatan 607 serial- or 666 parallel-detection electron energy-loss spectrometers (EELS). Examples in four areas that illustrate applications that are impossible or so difficult as to be impracticable with conventional thermionic electron guns are described.

  20. Comparison between a Direct-Flow SPR Immunosensor for Ampicillin and a Competitive Conventional Amperometric Device: Analytical Features and Possible Applications to Real Samples.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Mauro; Merola, Giovanni; Martini, Elisabetta; Campanella, Luigi; Sanzò, Gabriella; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco

    2017-04-10

    In this research, we developed a direct-flow surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for ampicillin to perform direct, simple, and fast measurements of this important antibiotic. In order to better evaluate the performance, it was compared with a conventional amperometric immunosensor, working with a competitive format with the aim of finding out experimental real advantages and disadvantages of two respective methods. Results showed that certain analytical features of the new SPR immunodevice, such as the lower limit of detection (LOD) value and the width of the linear range, are poorer than those of a conventional amperometric immunosensor, which adversely affects the application to samples such as natural waters. On the other hand, the SPR immunosensor was more selective to ampicillin, and measurements were more easily and quickly attained compared to those performed with the conventional competitive immunosensor.

  1. Comparison of Petrifilm Staph Express Count System with the bacteriological analytical manual direct-plating method for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in artificially contaminated hard cheese.

    PubMed

    Fedio, Willis M; Wendakoon, Chitra N; Zapata, Ruben; Carrillo, Christina; Browning, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count System was compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) direct-plate count method for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in 6 types of artificially contaminated hard cheese (Asiago, Cheddar, Gruyère, Parmesan, Romano, and Swiss). Five different samples of each cheese type were inoculated with S. aureus (ATCC 25923) to achieve low, medium, and high inoculum levels. S. aureus was enumerated by the Petrifilm and BAM methods, and the results were compared. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed no significant differences (P<0.05) between the 2 methods. The Petrifilm method compared favorably with the BAM procedure. The rapid method was more convenient to use, considerably faster, and less expensive to perform than the BAM method.

  2. Analytic signal extraction approach based on 2D Grating Interferometer and systematic comparison between 2D GI and 1D case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Z.; Wang, Y.; Li, P.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, K.; Huang, W.; Yuan, Q.; Wu, Z.; Zhu, P.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray imaging method based on 2D grating interferometer was proposed and studied recently, to overcome the limitations in signal extraction and phase retrieval when using 1D grating interferometer. In this paper, the concept of angle-signal response function is proposed, and different surfaces of different 2D setups under the condition of parallel coherent light are calculated and depicted with Matlab. Based on this concept, performance of 2D grating interferometer is systematically analyzed and an analytic 2D signal extraction approach is theoretically proposed. Besides, signal extraction, phase retrieval and feasibility of using conventional source are also briefly discussed and compared between 2D grating interferometer and 1D case.

  3. Statistical comparison of the results from six analytical chemistry laboratories of the mercury content of muscle tissue of two species of sharks.

    PubMed

    Walker, T I

    1977-01-01

    Statistical tests were carried out on the results of chemical analysis for total mercury concentrations of replicate samples of muscle tissue of school shark Galeorhinus australis (Macleay) and gummy shark Mustelus antarcticus Guenther from six independent analytical laboratories. These tests showed that one laboratory produced results 9% below the overall average of all results, another 1% below average while the other four were all 5% above average. Moreover, one laboratory had significantly lower scatter of results than the others, and the percentage scatter (standard error expressed as a percentage of the mean) in two of the laboratories tended to diminish as the magnitude of the results increased. Correction for what were concluded to be wild points indicated that the scatter for all laboratories was below 14%.

  4. Analytical model for determination of parameters of helical structures in solution by small angle scattering: comparison of RecA structures by SANS.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, D V; Baitin, D M; Islamov, A Kh; Kuklin, A I; Shalguev, V Kh; Lanzov, V A; Isaev-Ivanov, V V

    2003-02-27

    The filament structures of the self-polymers of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their complexes with ATPgammaS, phage M13 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and the tertiary complexes RecA::ATPgammaS::ssDNA were compared by small angle neutron scattering. A model was developed that allowed for an analytical solution for small angle scattering on a long helical filament, making it possible to obtain the helical pitch and the mean diameter of the protein filament from the scattering curves. The results suggest that the structure of the filaments formed by these two RecA proteins, and particularly their complexes with ATPgammaS, is conservative.

  5. Analytical comparison of the first- and second-order resonances for implementation of the dynamical Casimir effect in nonstationary circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. L. S.; Dodonov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically the nonstationary circuit QED setup in which N independent qubits interact with a single mode of the Electromagnetic field confined in a resonator. We consider the harmonic time modulation of some parameter (atomic transition frequency or the atom-field coupling strength) and derive the unitary dynamics up to the second order in the modulation depth for N = 1 and N\\gg 1. It is shown that all the resonant phenomena that occur for modulation frequencies ∼ 2{ω }0 (where {ω }0 is the cavity frequency) also occur for the halved frequencies. However, in the latter case the associated transition rates are significantly smaller and the modulation of the coupling strength is less effective. The transition rates are evaluated explicitly and the prospects of employing the second-order resonances in the phenomena related to the dynamical Casimir effect are examined.

  6. An analytical comparison of gas gain in spherical, cylindrical and hemispherical low-pressure proportional counters intended for use in experimental microdosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, David; Waker, Anthony J.

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally experimental microdosimetry has employed low pressure single cavity spherical Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPCs). Multi-Element Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (METEPCs) with numerous cylindrical cavities have been constructed in order to increase sensitivity per unit volume; however existing METEPC designs are prohibitively complex and sensitive to motion and audible noise. This work proposes a novel hemispherical element with a wire-less anode ball as a solution to these issues. The gas gain characteristics of this hemispherical METEPC element were analyzed first for a single hemispherical TEPC to evaluate performance relative to current cylindrical and spherical counter designs that have been demonstrated experimentally to perform very well. This gain analysis evaluated relative avalanche size and the uniformity in maximum gain for electrons originating throughout the gas cavities of each of the three counters. Radial gas gain distributions for each counter were determined using both theoretical potential distributions as well as analytical equipotential distributions generated with ANSYS Maxwell (V. 14.0) to solve the Townsend equation. It was found that the hemispherical counter exhibits completely uniform gas gain for electrons approaching the anode from all directions and its avalanche region occupies only 3.5×10-3% of the entire gas cavity volume, whereas in the cylindrical and spherical counters the avalanche occupies 0.6% and 0.12% of the total respective gas cavity volumes. These analytical gas gain results are promising, suggesting that the hemisphere should exhibit uniform signal amplification throughout the gas cavity and if the recommended follow-up experimental work demonstrates the hemispherical counter works as anticipated it will be ready to be incorporated into an METEPC design.

  7. Effects of in-pulse transverse relaxation in 3D ultrashort echo time sequences: analytical derivation, comparison to numerical simulation and experimental application at 3T.

    PubMed

    Springer, Fabian; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2010-09-01

    The introduction of ultrashort-echo-time-(UTE)-sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners has opened up the field of MR characterization of materials or tissues with extremely fast signal decay. If the transverse relaxation time is in the range of the RF-pulse duration, approximation of the RF-pulse by an instantaneous rotation applied at the middle of the RF-pulse and immediately followed by free relaxation will lead to a distinctly underestimated echo signal. Thus, the regular Ernst equation is not adequate to correctly describe steady state signal under those conditions. The paper presents an analytically derived modified Ernst equation, which correctly describes in-pulse relaxation of transverse magnetization under typical conditions: The equation is valid for rectangular excitation pulses, usually applied in 3D UTE sequences. Longitudinal relaxation time of the specimen must be clearly longer than RF-pulse duration, which is fulfilled for tendons and bony structures as well as many solid materials. Under these conditions, the proposed modified Ernst equation enables adequate and relatively simple calculation of the magnetization of materials or tissues. Analytically derived data are compared to numerical results obtained by using an established Runge-Kutta-algorithm based on the Bloch equations. Validity of the new approach was also tested by systematical measurements of a solid polymeric material on a 3T whole-body MR scanner. Thus, the presented modified Ernst equation provides a suitable basis for T1 measurements, even in tissues with T2 values as short as the RF-pulse duration: independent of RF-pulse duration, the 'variable flip angle method' led to consistent results of longitudinal relaxation time T1, if the T2 relaxation time of the material of interest is known as well.

  8. Comparison of Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Tau and Aß1-42 in Alzheimer’s disease and Frontotemporal Degeneration Using Two Analytical Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J.; McMillan, Corey T.; Toledo, Jon B.; Arnold, Steven E.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Wang, Li-San; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Grossman, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Objective To utilize values of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau and ß-amyloid obtained from two different analytical immunoassays to differentiate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Design CSF values of total tau (t-tau) and ß-amyloid (Aß1-42) obtained using the INNOTEST® ELISA were transformed using a linear regression model to equivalent values obtained using the INNO-BIA AlzBio3™ (xMAP Luminex) assay. Cutoff values obtained from the xMAP assay were developed in a series of autopsy-confirmed cases and cross-validated in another series of autopsy-confirmed samples using transformed ELISA values to assess sensitivity and specificity for differentiating AD from FTLD. Setting Tertiary memory disorders clinics and neuropathological and biomarker core centers. Participants 75 samples from patients with CSF data obtained from both assays were used for transformation of ELISA values. 40 autopsy-confirmed cases (30 AD, 10 FTLD) were used to establish diagnostic cutoff values, and then cross-validated in a second sample set of 21 autopsy-confirmed cases (11 AD, 10 FTLD) with transformed ELISA values. Main outcome measure Diagnostic accuracy using transformed biomarker values. Results Data obtained from both assays were highly correlated. The t-tau:Aß1-42 ratio had the highest correlation between measures (r=0.928, p<0.001) and high reliability of transformation (ICC=0.89). A cutoff of 0.34 for the t-tau:Aß1-42 ratio had 90% and 100% sensitivity and 96.7% and 91% specificity to differentiate FTLD cases in the validation and cross-validation samples, respectively. Conclusions Values from two analytical platforms can be transformed into equivalent units, which can distinguish AD from FTLD more accurately than the clinical diagnosis. PMID:22490326

  9. Comparison of analytical predictions and verification flight test results for the performance of the Spacelab environmental control and life support subsystem as obtained during the 1st mission.

    PubMed

    Loser, H

    1985-12-01

    The environmental control and life support subsystem (ECLS) of the Spacelab module provides various functions which can be assigned to its various branches as follows: Thermal insulation from the external environment is achieved by the passive thermal control subsystem (PTCS). Rejection of the heat produced by the Spacelab subsystem equipment and by the various experiments is the task of the active thermal control subsystem (ATCS). Life support in the form of cabin air ventilation, oxygen/carbon dioxide partial pressure control; total pressure and air temperature/humidity control is achieved by the life support subsystem (LSS). In the first part of the paper a brief description of the various elements and loops forming the Spacelab ECLS will be given by discussing the PTCS, ATCS and LSS in some detail. Objective of the verification flight test program--as implied in the title already--is the verification of major requirements the ECLS has to comply with. Those requirements will then be comprehensively discussed in the second part of the paper. A description of the analytical approach is given in the third part of the paper. However, only those areas will be addressed which were included in the verification flight test program. A brief description of the flight instrumentation, the data transmission and collection follows then in the fourth part of the paper. In the fifth part of the paper the approach to select and compile flight test data obtained during the first mission (Shuttle flight STS 9) from November 28 till December 8, 1983 is illustrated. Flight test data are compared with the analytical predictions in form of examples. In the sixth and last portion of the paper the actual/measured performance is compared with the requirements, and conclusions are drawn with respect to comprehensiveness/accuracy of the flight test verification and the compliance of the Spacelab actual performance with the requirements.

  10. A study of the rotor wake of a small-scale rotor model in forward flight using laser light sheet flow visualization with comparisons to analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Elliott, Joe W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the 14 by 22 ft subsonic tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center to quantify the rotor wake behind a scale model helicopter rotor in forward flight (mu = 0.15 and 0.23) at one thrust level (C sub T = 0.0064). The rotor system used in the present test consisted of a four-bladed, fully articulated hub and utilized blades of rectangular planform with a NACA-0012 airfoil section. A laser light sheet, seeded with propylene glycol smoke, was used to visualize the flow in planes parallel and perpendicular to the freestream flow. Quantitative measurements of vortex location, vertical skew angle, and vortex particle void radius were obtained for vortices in the flow; convective velocities were obtained for blade tip vortices. Comparisons were made between the experimental results and the wake geometry generated by computational predictions. The results of these comparisons show that the interaction between wake vortex structures is an important consideration for correctly predicting the wake geometry.

  11. Active compensation of aperture discontinuities for WFIRST-AFTA: analytical and numerical comparison of propagation methods and preliminary results with a WFIRST-AFTA-like pupil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    The new frontier in the quest for the highest contrast levels in the focal plane of a coronagraph is now the correction of the large diffraction artifacts introduced at the science camera by apertures of increasing complexity. Indeed, the future generation of space- and ground-based coronagraphic instruments will be mounted on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes; the design of coronagraphic instruments for such observatories is currently a domain undergoing rapid progress. One approach consists of using two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to correct for aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror. The coronagraph for the WFIRST-AFTA mission will be the first of such instruments in space with a two-DM wavefront control system. Regardless of the control algorithm for these multiple DMs, they will have to rely on quick and accurate simulation of the propagation effects introduced by the out-of-pupil surface. In the first part of this paper, we present the analytical description of the different approximations to simulate these propagation effects. In Appendix A, we prove analytically that in the special case of surfaces inducing a converging beam, the Fresnel method yields high fidelity for simulations of these effects. We provide numerical simulations showing this effect. In the second part, we use these tools in the framework of the active compensation of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) technique applied to pupil geometries similar to WFIRST-AFTA. We present these simulations in the context of the optical layout of the high-contrast imager for complex aperture telescopes, which will test ACAD on a optical bench. The results of this analysis show that using the ACAD method, an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and the performance of our current DMs, we are able to obtain, in numerical simulations, a dark hole with a WFIRST-AFTA-like. Our numerical simulation shows that we can obtain contrast better than 2×10-9 in

  12. TEM Pump With External Heat Source And Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump driven by external source of heat and by two or more heat pipe radiator heat sink(s). Thermoelectrics generate electrical current to circulate liquid metal in secondary loop of two-fluid-loop system. Intended for use with space and terrestrial dual loop liquid metal nuclear reactors. Applications include spacecraft on long missions or terrestrial beacons or scientific instruments having to operate in remote areas for long times. Design modified to include multiple radiators, converters, and ducts, as dictated by particular application.

  13. TEM studies of calcium phosphates for the understanding of biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Renlong

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) formation and bone minerals have been the focus of research for several decades because achievements in these areas could provide valuable insights into the understanding of biomineralization. In this thesis work, Ca-P formation, octacalcium phosphate (OCP) to hydroxyapatite (HA) transformation and bone minerals were systematically studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Ca-P formations on various bioceramics in simulated body fluid and in rabbit muscle sites were investigated. The bioceramics included sintered bioglass RTM, A-W glass-ceramics, HA, alpha-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), beta-TCP and HA-TCP. The comparative studies showed that OCP formation occurred on all types of bioceramic surfaces in vitro and in vivo, except on beta-TCP; however HA formation did not occur on every type of bioceramics; it less likely occurred on the surfaces of HA and alpha-TCP. These findings were contradicted to the common statements in literatures. OCP to HA transformations in vitro and in vivo were observed by high-resolution TEM (HRTEM). The in vitro transformation was induced by electron beam irradiations of in situ TEM on synthetic OCP crystals. The in vivo transformation was revealed on rod-like HA precipitates formed in dog muscle sites. Based on HRTEM examinations and image simulations, OCP/HA crystallographic orientations were determined to be OCP (010) // HA (01¯0) and OCP (001) // HA (001¯), which differed from a well known model proposed by Brown et al. The minerals of cortical bone were extracted from human tibiae and rat femurs using 10% neutral ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution. TEM examinations showed that the dominance of bone minerals was plate-like and a few were needle-like. The length of most plate-like minerals ranged from 50 to 150 nm but could be up to 200 nm. To the author's knowledge, OCP structure was for the first time, identified in a number of plate-like bone minerals by selected area

  14. Automated S/TEM metrology on advanced semiconductor gate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, M.; Arjavac, J.; Horspool, D. N.; Nakahara, K.; Deeb, C.; Hobbs, C.

    2012-03-01

    Alternate techniques for obatining metrology data from advanced semiconductor device structures may be required. Automated STEM-based dimensional metrology (CD-STEM) was developed for complex 3D geometries in read/write head metrology in teh hard disk drive industry. It has been widely adopted, and is the process of record for metrology. Fully automated S/TEM metrology on advanced semiconductor gate structures is viable, with good repeatability and robustness. Consistent automated throughput of 10 samples per hour was achieved. Automated sample preparation was developed with sufficient throughput and quality to support the automated CD-STEM.

  15. A Fast 4-D TEM System for UXO Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    eliminates the need to transport all gear back and forth between the field site and the hotel . At Aberdeen, the only piece of gear we transported back to...the hotel after work was the NT-32II transceiver. We had a problem with getting our GPS system operational and lost a few hours while we troubleshot...Orleans Mariott : U.S. Dept. of Defense. 9. Carlson, N.E., and Kenneth L. Zonge. The utility of horizontal component measurements in random-walk TEM

  16. Modeling of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsos, Dimitrios; Chew, Wilbert; Riley, A. L.; Hunt, Brian D.; Foote, Marc C.; Bajuk, Louis J.; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Cooley, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    An application of the phenomenological loss equivalence method (Lee and Itoh, 1989) in modeling the microwave behavior of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines is presented. For validation of the model, data are used from measurements of a YBCO superconducting thin-film coplanar-waveguide lowpass filter on a lanthanum aluminate substrate. Measured and modeled S-parameters of an existing superconducting coplanar waveguide lowpass filter agree to within 0.3 dB in magnitude and 0.5 radians in phase. Extracted values for penetration depth and real part of the conductivity of the superconducting film are within 10 percent of other researchers' findings.

  17. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining <2.4%. In the time domain, the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  18. Screening biological stains with qPCR versus lateral flow immunochromatographic test strips: a quantitative comparison using analytical figures of merit.

    PubMed

    Oechsle, Crystal Simson; Haddad, Sandra; Sgueglia, Joanne B; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    Biological fluid identification is an important facet of evidence examination in forensic laboratories worldwide. While identifying bodily fluids may provide insight into which downstream DNA methods to employ, these screening techniques consume a vital portion of the available evidence, are usually qualitative, and rely on visual interpretation. In contrast, qPCR yields information regarding the amount and proportion of amplifiable genetic material. In this study, dilution series of either semen or male saliva were prepared in either buffer or female blood. The samples were subjected to both lateral flow immunochromatographic test strips and qPCR analysis. Analytical figures of merit-including sensitivity, minimum distinguishable signal (MDS) and limit of detection (LOD)-were calculated and compared between methods. By applying the theory of the propagation of random errors, LODs were determined to be 0.05 μL of saliva for the RSID™ Saliva cards, 0.03 μL of saliva for Quantifiler(®) Duo, and 0.001 μL of semen for Quantifiler(®) Duo. In conclusion, quantitative PCR was deemed a viable and effective screening method for subsequent DNA profiling due to its stability in different matrices, sensitivity, and low limits of detection.

  19. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls.

  20. Studying dynamic processes in liquids by TEM/STEM/DTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James; Woehl, Taylor; Jungjohann, Katherine; Parent, Lucas; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William; Browning, Nigel; Mater. Sci. Group Team; Microsc. Group Team; Catal. Sci. Group Collaboration; Ristenpart Res. Group Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    In order to study dynamic phenomena such as corrosion or catalysis, extreme environmental conditions must be reproduced around the specimen - these include high-temperatures, high-pressures, specific oxidizing/reducing atmospheres or a liquid environment. The use of environmental stages specifically designed to fit in any transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows us to apply the distinct capabilities of each instrument to study dynamic processes. Localized gas/fluid conditions are created around the sample and separated from the high vacuum inside the microscope using hermetically sealed windowed-cells. Advanced capabilities of these techniques include spatial resolutions of ~1 Angstrom or better in aberration corrected instruments or temporal resolutions in the microsecond-nanosecond range in a dynamic TEM (DTEM). Here, unique qualities of the DTEM that benefit the in-situ experiments with gas/fluid environmental cells will be discussed. We also present our results with a liquid stage allowing atomic resolution imaging of nanomaterials in a colloidal suspension, core EEL spectra acquisition, continuous flow, controlled growth of nanocrystals and systematic calibration of the effect of the electron dose on silver nuclei formation.

  1. A modified relativistic magnetron with TEM output mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei; Ju, Jin-Chuan; Du, Guang-Xing

    2017-01-01

    A modified relativistic magnetron (RM) with TEM output mode is proposed. By setting the coupling slots at the bottom of the resonant cavities in the transmission region rather than in the interaction region, besides possessing the original RM's advantages of high power conversion efficiency and radiating the lowest order mode, the modified RM not only improves the compactness and miniaturization of the magnetic field system, which is beneficial to realize the RMs packed by a permanent magnet, but also improves the robustness of operating frequency to structural perturbations of the coupling slots, which contributes to optimize the RM performance by adjusting the coupling slot dimensions with a relatively stable operating frequency. In the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation, the modified RM with a reduction of 27.2% in the weight of the coils, 35.8% in the occupied space of the coils, and 18.6% in the operating current, can output a relatively pure TEM mode, which has been demonstrated as the dominant output mode by simulation, corresponding to an output power of 495.0 MW and a power conversion efficiency of 56.4%, at the resonant frequency of 4.30 GHz. In addition, an output power of above 2 GW can also be obtained from the RM in simulations.

  2. TEM transmission line coil with double nuclear capability.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Matthew G; Kurpad, Krishna N; Holmes, James H; Fain, Sean B

    2007-10-01

    MR imaging and spectroscopy requires RF fields of high homogeneity. Quadrature volume coils meeting this requirement include the birdcage coil and the TEM resonator. We describe here a quadrature volume coil designed around a modified coaxial transmission line in which multiple inner conductors are arrayed on a circular perimeter and surrounded by a common shield. Current antinodes are established at appropriate points on the inner conductors by series transmission line stubs, either open circuit or short circuit, which terminate the line. Quadrature phasing is generated by a novel circuit constructed from a pair of high-performance current baluns and a commercial quadrature hybrid. The coil is a "pure" TEM coil as it is simply a resonant transmission line. There is no mode structure to consider. The construction of a prototype quadrature four-element coil is described and preliminary test results from this coil in a 4.7T horizontal bore magnet are reported. A related double nuclear coil design for (3)He and (1)H in which two linear transmission line coils are arrayed on a circular perimeter and simultaneously tuned and matched to their respective frequencies is also described. Preliminary tests from this coil in a 1.5T clinical scanner are reported.

  3. Determination of medicinal and illicit drugs in post mortem dental hard tissues and comparison with analytical results for body fluids and hair samples.

    PubMed

    Klima, Miriam; Altenburger, Markus J; Kempf, Jürgen; Auwärter, Volker; Neukamm, Merja A

    2016-08-01

    In burnt or skeletonized bodies dental hard tissue sometimes is the only remaining specimen available. Therefore, it could be used as an alternative matrix in post mortem toxicology. Additionally, analysis of dental tissues could provide a unique retrospective window of detection. For forensic interpretation, routes and rates of incorporation of different drugs as well as physicochemical differences between tooth root, tooth crown and carious material have to be taken into account. In a pilot study, one post mortem tooth each from three drug users was analyzed for medicinal and illicit drugs. The pulp was removed in two cases; in one case the tooth was root canal treated. The teeth were separated into root, crown and carious material and drugs were extracted from the powdered material with methanol under ultrasonication. The extracts were screened for drugs by LC-MS(n) (ToxTyper™) and quantitatively analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS in MRM mode. The findings were compared to the analytical results for cardiac blood, femoral blood, urine, stomach content and hair. In dental hard tissues, 11 drugs (amphetamine, MDMA, morphine, codeine, norcodeine, methadone, EDDP, fentanyl, tramadol, diazepam, nordazepam, and promethazine) could be detected and concentrations ranged from approximately 0.13pg/mg to 2,400pg/mg. The concentrations declined in the following order: carious material>root>crown. Only the root canal treated tooth showed higher concentrations in the crown than in the root. In post mortem toxicology, dental hard tissue could be a useful alternative matrix facilitating a more differentiated consideration of drug consumption patterns, as the window of detection seems to overlap those for body fluids and hair.

  4. Modeling of slender laminated piezoelastic beams with resistive electrodes—comparison of analytical results with three-dimensional finite element calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchberger, G.; Schoeftner, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this work a theory for a slender piezoelectric laminated beam taking into account lossy electrodes is developed. For the modeling of the bending behavior of the beam with conductivity, the kinematical assumptions of Bernoulli-Euler and a simplified form of the Telegraph equations are used. Applying d’Alembert’s principle, Gauss’ law of electrostatics and Kirchhoff’s voltage and current rules, the partial differential equations of motion are derived, describing the bending vibrations of the beam and the voltage distribution and current flow along the resistive electrodes. The theory is valid for applications that are used for actuation and for sensing. In the first case the voltage at a certain location on the electrodes is prescribed and the beam is deformed, whereas in the second case the structure is excited by a distributed external load and the voltage distribution is a result of the structural deformation. For a bimorph with constant width and constant material properties the beam is governed by two coupled partial differential equations for the elastic deformation and for the voltage distribution: the first one is an extension of the Bernoulli-Euler equation of an elastic beam, the second one is a diffusion equation for the voltage. The analytical results of the developed theory are validated by means of three-dimensional electromechanically coupled finite element simulations with ANSYS 11.0. Different mechanical and electrical boundary conditions and resistances of the electrodes are considered in the numerical case study. Eigenfrequencies are compared and the frequency responses of the mechanical and electrical quantities show a good agreement between the proposed beam theory and FE results.

  5. The transfer of analytical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J; Limberger, M; Lis, K; Wätzig, H

    2013-11-01

    Analytical method transfers are certainly among the most discussed topics in the GMP regulated sector. However, they are surprisingly little regulated in detail. General information is provided by USP, WHO, and ISPE in particular. Most recently, the EU emphasized the importance of analytical transfer by including it in their draft of the revised GMP Guideline. In this article, an overview and comparison of these guidelines is provided. The key to success for method transfers is the excellent communication between sending and receiving unit. In order to facilitate this communication, procedures, flow charts and checklists for responsibilities, success factors, transfer categories, the transfer plan and report, strategies in case of failed transfers, tables with acceptance limits are provided here, together with a comprehensive glossary. Potential pitfalls are described such that they can be avoided. In order to assure an efficient and sustainable transfer of analytical procedures, a practically relevant and scientifically sound evaluation with corresponding acceptance criteria is crucial. Various strategies and statistical tools such as significance tests, absolute acceptance criteria, and equivalence tests are thoroughly descibed and compared in detail giving examples. Significance tests should be avoided. The success criterion is not statistical significance, but rather analytical relevance. Depending on a risk assessment of the analytical procedure in question, statistical equivalence tests are recommended, because they include both, a practically relevant acceptance limit and a direct control of the statistical risks. However, for lower risk procedures, a simple comparison of the transfer performance parameters to absolute limits is also regarded as sufficient.

  6. High-resolution methane emission estimates using the InTEM inversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, S.; Manning, A.; Robinson, A. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; O'Doherty, S.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. In response to this, an inversion approach, InTEM, was adapted to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model (NAME) were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. Emission estimates were produced at varying spatial resolutions, for annual and seasonal time frames . We present results indicating the optimum number of observation sites required for this region, and how this can affect our uncertainty estimates. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. To our knowledge, no inversion technique has been implemented on such a fine spatial resolution. This is a pilot project which, given proof of concept, could be scaled up as an alternative method for producing national scale emission inventories.

  7. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  8. Analytical framework for screening long-time and large-scale soil moisture variability and its comparison with GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrot, Lucile; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a central component of the hydrologic cycle and its spatiotemporal variability offers a great challenge in assessing large-scale hydrological processes. As this variability depends greatly on prevailing hydro-climate, along with soil texture and its primarily spatial heterogeneity, soil moisture may be relatively easily constrained by large-scale water balance consideration in time and knowledge of soil property distribution in space. We have developed a relatively simple soil moisture model that relies on explicit account of spatial soil hydraulics parameters and catchment-wise organized hydro-climatic data and their variation in time. The current state of field techniques does not allow the retrieval of large-scale soil moisture data for direct comparison with model results. However, the recent GRACE satellite data provides for the first time large-scale directly comparative of large-scale water storage variability. This study compares the developed soil moisture model's ability to reproduce main variability dynamics in long-term data series of unsaturated water content and groundwater table position at the catchment scale with GRACE data, for a set of large tropical catchments.

  9. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  10. Development, evaluation and comparison of two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde vapors and condensation aerosols in air† ‡

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in air have been developed, evaluated and compared (1) a reagent-coated solid sorbent HPLC-UV method and (2) an impinger-fluorescence method. In the first method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L min−1 with a sampler containing 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). After sampling, excess DNPH in ethyl acetate is added to the sampler prior to storage for 68 hours. The OPA-DNPH derivative is eluted with 4.0 mL of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for measurement by HPLC with a UV detector set at 3S5 nm. The estimated detection limit is 0.016 µg per sample or 0.067 µg m−3 (0.012 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of vapor spikes at levels of 1.2 to 6.2 µg were 96 to 101%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapor and condensation aerosols were 97 to 100%. In the second method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L mm−1 with a midget impinger containing 10 mL of DMSO solution containing N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. The fluorescence reading is taken 80 min after the completion of air sampling. Since the time of taking the fluorescence reading is critical, the reading is taken with a portable fluorometer. The estimated detection limit is 0.024 µg per sample or 0.1 µg m−3 (0.018 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of OPA vapor spikes at levels of 1.4 to 5.0 µg per sample were 97 to 105%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapors and condensation aerosols were 95 to 99%. The collection efficiency for a mixture of vapor and condensation aerosol was 99.4%. The two methods were compared side-by-side in a generation system constructed for producing controlled atmospheres of OPA vapor in air. Average air concentrations of OPA vapor found by both methods agreed within ±10%. PMID:26346658

  11. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients’ relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants’ demographic data, the participants’ opinions regarding their support for the family’s presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants’ attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients’ families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities

  12. Comparison of analytical procedures to estimate CH4 and N2O fluxes from a two-year ecosystem study in a constructed wetland system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J., Jr.; Chapman, E. J.; Weller, N.; Susanto, P.; Childers, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    estimated only by linear regression. Our results highlight the importance of weather conditions, vegetation, and nutrient loading on GHG fluxes in a CWS. Finally, it is important to establish long-term ecosystem-wide studies and at the same time, maintain a constant evaluation of analytical methods available for calculating GHG flux estimates.

  13. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  14. Comparison of sample types and analytical methods for the detection of highly campylobacter-colonized broiler flocks at different stages in the poultry meat production chain.

    PubMed

    Seliwiorstow, Tomasz; Duarte, Alexandra; Baré, Julie; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Dierick, Katelijne; Uyttendaele, Mieke; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-05-01

    Exclusion of broiler batches, highly colonized with Campylobacter (>7.5 log10 colony-forming units/g), from the fresh poultry meat market might decrease the risk of human campylobacteriosis. The objective of this study was to compare different sample types (both at the farm and the slaughterhouse) and methods (direct culture, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction [qPCR], propidium monoazide [PMA]-qPCR) applied for the quantification of the Campylobacter colonization level. In addition, the applicability of the lateral flow-based immunoassay, Singlepath(®) Direct Campy Poultry test (Singlepath(®) test), was evaluated as a rapid method for the qualitative detection of Campylobacter in highly colonized broiler batches. Campylobacter counts differed significantly between sample types collected at farm level (cecal droppings, feces, boot swabs) and at slaughterhouse level (cecal content, fecal material from crates). Furthermore, comparison of Campylobacter counts obtained by different methods (direct culture, qPCR, PMA-qPCR) in cecal droppings revealed significant differences, although this was not observed for cecal-content samples. Evaluation of the Singlepath(®) test on cecal droppings and cecal-content samples revealed an acceptable level of sensitivity and specificity. In conclusion, cecal droppings and cecal content are proposed as the most representative sample types for quantification of Campylobacter colonization level of broilers at farm and slaughterhouse, respectively. Direct culture and qPCR are equally sensitive for quantification of Campylobacter in fresh cecal-content samples. PMA treatment before qPCR inhibits the signal from dead Campylobacter cells. Consequently, when samples are extensively stored and/or transported, qPCR is preferred to direct culture and PMA-qPCR. Furthermore, the Singlepath(®) test offers a convenient alternative method for rapid detection of Campylobacter in highly colonized broiler batches.

  15. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure. PMID:20672104

  16. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan Yuan; Ding, Gu Qiao; Ding, Jian Ning; Yuan, Ning Yi

    2010-04-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure.

  17. Correlation Analysis of TEM Images of Nanocrystal Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine; Zanchet, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-21

    Quantitative characterizataion of images of naocrystals and nanostructures is a challenging but important task. The development and optimization of methods for the construction of complex nanostructures rely on imaging techniques. Computer programs were developed to quantify TEM images of nanocrystal/DNA nanostructures, and results are presented for heterodimers annd trimers of gold nanocrystals. The programs presented here have also been used to analyze more complex trimers and tetramers linked by branched DNA, as well as for structures made from attaching gold nanocrystals to CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots. This work has the additional goal of enabling others to quickly and easily adapt the methods for their own use.

  18. Examination of subaerially altered basaltic glass with TEM and EELS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.-S.

    1998-06-17

    We have examined the weathered surfaces of 720 year old Hawaiian basalt glasses that were recovered from a subaerial environment with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy filtered imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques. Whereas the alteration products (palagonite) were physically detached from the underlying glass in most samples, a gel-like amorphous layer was observed adjacent to the glass in a few samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gel layer has been observed on weathered basalt. This is significant because analogous gel layers have been observed on nuclear waste glasses reacted in laboratory tests, and this demonstrates an important similarity in the mechanisms of the weathering of basalt and the corrosion of waste glasses.

  19. Understanding Business Analytics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Business Analytics, Decision Analytics, Business Intelligence, Advanced Analytics, Data Science. . . to a certain degree, to label is to limit - if only... Business Analytics. 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 Figure 1: Google trending of daily searches for various analytic disciplines “The limits of my

  20. Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Biological processes occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales: from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on these very fast and very small scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast X-ray or electron pulses are expected to reveal novel mechanistic details for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by 3D crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize small protein samples such as single particles or 2D crystals that mimic the target protein's native environment. These samples are not typically amenable to X-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy into a dynamic regime using pump-probe imaging. A new second-generation DTEM, which is currently being constructed, has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on micro- and nanosecond timescales. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to enable direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment and visualize reactions propagating in real time. PMID:23315566

  1. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  2. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  3. Comparison and validation of Logistic Regression and Analytic Hierarchy Process models of landslide susceptibility in monoclinic regions. A case study in Moldavian Plateau, N-E Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprian Margarint, Mihai; Niculita, Mihai

    2014-05-01

    , were chosen. As measures of validation for the fit of the model, we have used AUROC value, cross-validation estimates of predictive accuracy and the percent of mapping units correctly classified. For the same sample, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach was applied for landslide susceptibility assessment, using 7 predictors (slope angle, slope aspect, plan and profile curvature, distance to river network, distance to roads, and land use). The validation of the LR and AHP approaches was assessed using the inventories with active landslides for 1978 and 2010 situations. For estimating the level of replicability of the results, an extra-domain sample it was used, situated in the vicinity of the first area, having the same size (90 km2). For the extra-domain area, the same weights obtained for LR approach and the same predictors and weights assigned for the AHP approaches, were used in the modelling. The extra-domain resulted AUROC values are closed with the ones from the original area, but there is small variance, a decrease by 0.07% for LR and by 0.05% for AHP approach. These results allow us to consider that applying both quantitative (LR) and semi-quantitative (AHP) methods for landslide susceptibility assessment at medium scale, in regions with high level of geomorphologic uniformity, such as monoclinic areas, could be applied with good results. Using these two methods for an extra-domain area, we can assess the sensitivity of the input covariates. Also, two maps showing the differences between the two models of landslide susceptibility, both for the first and for the extra-domain sample, were carried out and interpreted.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM).

    PubMed

    Mu, X; Kobler, A; Wang, D; Chakravadhanula, V S K; Schlabach, S; Szabó, D V; Norby, P; Kübel, C

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy range from low-loss to core-loss) and a STEM diffraction technique (automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM)), were applied to map the lithiation of the same location in the same sample. This enabled a direct comparison of the results. The maps obtained by all methods showed excellent agreement with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter three are crucial for the design of in-situ experiments with beam sensitive Li-ion battery materials. Furthermore, we demonstrated the power of STEM diffraction (ACOM-STEM) providing additional crystallographic information, which can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the LFP/FP interface properties such as statistical information on phase boundary orientation and misorientation between domains.

  5. Analytical Relativity of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    The successful detection and analysis of gravitational wave (GW) signals from coalescing binary black holes necessitates the accurate prior knowledge of the form of the GW signals. This knowledge can be acquired through a synergy between Analytical Relativity (AR) methods and Numerical Relativity (NR) ones. We describe here the most promising AR formalism for describing the motion and radiation of coalescing binary black holes, the Effective One Body (EOB) method, and discuss its comparison with NR simulations.

  6. Quantitative chemical analysis of ocular melanosomes in the TEM.

    PubMed

    Eibl, O; Schultheiss, S; Blitgen-Heinecke, P; Schraermeyer, U

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes in retinal tissues of a human, monkey and rat were analyzed by EDX in the TEM. Samples were prepared by ultramicrotomy at different thicknesses. The material was mounted on Al grids and samples were analyzed in a Zeiss 912 TEM equipped with an Omega filter and EDX detector with ultrathin window. Melanosomes consist of C and O as main components, mole fractions are about 90 and 3-10 at.%, respectively, and small mole fraction ratios, between 2 and 0.1 at.%, of Na, Mg, K, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca. All elements were measured quantitatively by standardless EDX with high precision. Mole fractions of transition metals Fe, Cu and Zn were also measured. For Fe a mole fraction ratio of less than 0.1at.% was found and gives the melanin its paramagnetic properties. Its mole fraction is however close to or below the minimum detectable mass fraction of the used equipment. Only in the human eye and only in the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) the mole fractions of Zn (0.1 at.% or 5000 microg/g) and Cu were clearly beyond the minimum detectable mass fraction. In the rat and monkey eye the mole fraction of Zn was at or below the minimum detectable mass fraction and could not be measured quantitatively. The obtained results yielded the chemical composition of the melanosomes in the choroidal tissue and the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) of the three different species. The results of the chemical analysis are discussed by mole fraction correlation diagrams. Similarities and differences between the different species are outlined. Correlation behavior was found to hold over species, e.g. the Ca-O correlation. It indicates that Ca is bound to oxygen rich sites in the melanin. These are the first quantitative analyses of melanosomes by EDX reported so far. The quantitative chemical analysis should open a deeper understanding of the metabolic processes in the eye that are of central importance for the understanding of a large number of eye-related diseases. The chemical analysis also

  7. Duplex Oxide Formation during Transient Oxidation of Cu-5%Ni(001) Investigated by In situ UHV-TEM and XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.C.; Starr, D.; Kang, Y.; Luo, L.; Tong, X.; Zhou, G.

    2012-05-20

    The transient oxidation stage of a model metal alloy thin film was characterized with in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytic high-resolution TEM. We observed the formations of nanosized NiO and Cu{sub 2}O islands when Cu-5a5%Ni(100) was exposed to oxygen partial pressure, pO{sub 2} = 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr and various temperatures in situ. At 350 C epitaxial Cu{sub 2}O islands formed initially and then NiO islands appeared on the surface of the Cu{sub 2}O island, whereas at 750 C NiO appeared first. XPS and TEM was used to reveal a sequential formation of NiO and then Cu{sub 2}O islands at 550 C. The temperature-dependant oxide selection may be due to an increase of the diffusivity of Ni in Cu with increasing temperature.

  8. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  9. Aquifer characterisation in East Timor, with ground TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley-Cooper, A.

    2011-12-01

    An assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Groundwater Resources in East Timor led by Geosciences Australia is aimed at assisting East Timor's government to better understand and manage their groundwater resources. Form the current known information most aquifers in Timor-Leste are recharged by rainfall during the wet season. There is a concern that without a regular recharge, the stored groundwater capacity will decrease. Timor's population increase has caused a higher demand for groundwater which is currently been met by regulated pumping bores which are taped into deep aquifers, plus the sprouting of unregulated spear point bores in the shallow aquifers . Both groundwater recharge and the aquifers morphology need to be better understood in order to ensure supply and so groundwater can be managed for the future. Current weather patterns are expected to change and this could cause longer periods of drought or more intense rainfall, which in turn, would affect the availability and quality of groundwater. Salt water intrusions pose a threat on the low-lying aquifers as sea level rises. Australia's CSIRO has undertaken a series hydrogeophysical investigations employing ground TEM to assist in the characterisation of three aquifers near Dili, Timor Leste's capital. Interpreting ground water chemistry and dating; jointly with EM data has enhanced the understanding of the aquifers architecture, groundwater quality and helped identify potential risks of seawater intrusions.

  10. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature with no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.

  11. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    DOE PAGES

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; ...

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature withmore » no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.« less

  12. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  13. Let's Talk... Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  14. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  15. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas.

  16. TEM Study of Manganese Biosorption by Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Bilskis, Christina L.; Kennedy, David W.

    2006-09-01

    The capture of solar energy and its conversion into chemical energy in photosynthetic organisms involves a series of charge reactions across photosynthetic membranes. Oxygen is generated by a proton-electron coupling in photosystem II (PSII) during a water oxidation process where hydrogen is extracted from water terminally bound to a Mn4Ca1Clx inorganic cluster [1]. Manganese is, therefore, an essential catalytic element for photosynthetic growth in cyanobacteria and plants. Since bioavailability of this micronutrient largely depends on the Mn concentration in natural environments, cells have to manage its uptake in order to endure Mn fluctuations. Previous studies have shown that metal biosorption in cyanobacteria can occur by passive adsorption to their outer membrane (pool A), and by metabolically mediated internal uptake [2]. The fresh water cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 has been widely used as a model organism for studying photosynthetic processes. This Gram-negative organism has an intricate architecture of internal thylakoid membranes where photosynthetic electron transfer takes place. Here we report on the spatial distribution of Mn biosorbed by cells in both external pool A and intracellular pool B, as observed and analyzed by methods of TEM. The Synechocystis 6803 cells were cultured in BG11 medium at 30 C with continuous irradiance and constant air bubbling. To determine the influence of solid or liquid Mn substrate and its oxidation state on the cell biosorption ability, cells were exposed to two Mn substrates: 1mM solution of MnCl2, and 0.5mM suspension of nanocrystalline MnO2. Cells were incubated with the respective Mn solutions for 48 hours, harvested, and processed using a modified protocol for plastic embedding of bacterial samples containing minerals that was developed in our laboratory [3]. In order to preserve the fragile redox conditions within the cells, all the common heavy metal-based fixatives and stains were omitted, resulting in

  17. Three Dimensional TEM Forward Modeling Using FDTD Accelerated by GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional inversion of transient electromagnetic (TEM) data is still challenging. The inversion speed mostly depends on the forward modeling. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the popular forward modeling scheme. In an explicit type, which is based on the Du Fort-Frankel scheme, the time step is under the constraint of quasi-static approximation. Often an upward-continuation boundary condition (UCBC) is applied on the earth-air surface to avoid time stepping in the model air. However, UCBC is not suitable for models with topography and has a low parallel efficiency. Modeling without UCBC may cause a much smaller time step because of the resistive attribute of the air and the quasi-static constraint, which may also low the efficiency greatly. Our recent research shows that the time step in the model air is not needed to be constrained by the quasi-static approximation, which can let the time step without UCBC much closer to that with UCBC. The parallel performance of FDTD is then largely released. On a computer with a 4-core CPU, this newly developed method is obviously faster than the method using UCBC. Besides, without UCBC, this method can be easily accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). On a computer with a CPU of 4790k@4.4GHz and a GPU of GTX 970, the speed accelerated by CUDA is almost 10 times of that using CPU only. For a model with a grid size of 140×140×130, if the conductivity of the model earth is 0.02S/m, and the minimal space interval is 15m, it takes only 80 seconds to evolve the field from excitation to 0.032s.

  18. In-situ TEM characterization of Copper Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelberg, Daniel T.

    In-situ liquid experiments in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) allow dynamic phenomena to be imaged at the nanoscale. This opens the opportunity to view electrochemical depositions at the nano scale in real time. However, there are a number of issues regarding in situ imaging that prevent a straightforward approach. This thesis addresses two issues regarding in-situ experiments; the fabrication of electron transparent windows and the nucleation of a metal from an electrolyte as a result of beam damage. Silicon chips that were 2.6mm x 2.6mm with 50mum x 50mum windows consisting of 50nm S3N 4 were fabricated with the goal of minimizing fabrication complexity at a cost significantly below commercial prices. These silicon nitride windows were used to sandwich a small volume of CuSO4 solution and observe copper nucleation as a result of the radiolysis damage of water due to the electron beam. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to image growth, and reducing species are shown to diffuse on the order of hundreds of nanometers in solution. Copper nanoparticle growth was compared to Oswald ripening, and diffusion limited growth was observed at high electron dose rates. The diffusion limited growth was suppressed and led to a slower growth rate, with a calculated diffusion coefficient for Cu 2+ of 2 x 10--10 m2/s. Low electron dose rates corresponding to low magnifications in STEM yielded kinetic limited or mixed growth and yielded faceted nanoparticles. Atomic resolution was achieved in copper film deposited at low magnifications, and lattice fringes corresponding to the copper <111> were observed.

  19. Analytical comparison of three stiffened panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Jill M.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Robinson, James C.

    1995-01-01

    Three stiffened panel concepts are evaluated to find optimized designs for integral stiffeners in the barrels of Reusable Launch Vehicle fuel tanks. The three panel concepts considered are a T-stiffened panel, a panel with one blade stiffener centered between each pair of T-stiffeners, and a panel with two blade stiffeners equally spaced between each pair of T-stiffeners. The panels are optimized using PASCO for a range of compressive loads, and the computed areal weight for each panel is used to compare the concepts and predict tank weights. The areal weight of the T-stiffened panel with one blade is up to seven-percent lower than the other panel concepts. Two tank construction methods are compared for a representative tank design with three barrels. In the first method, 45-degree circumferential sections of a barrel are each designed to carry the same maximum load in the barrel. In the second method, each barrel section is designed for the maximum load in that section. Representative tanks designed with the first method are over 250 lb heavier than tanks designed using the second method. Optimized panel designs and areal weights are also computed for variation of the nominal panel length and skin thickness.

  20. Optimisation of an analytical method and results from the inter-laboratory comparison of the migration of regulated substances from food packaging into the new mandatory European Union simulant for dry foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Natalia; Beldì, Giorgia; Peychès Bach, Aurélie; Simoneau, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of the development, optimisation and validation at European Union level of an analytical method for using poly(2,6-diphenyl phenylene oxide--PPPO), which is stipulated in Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011, as food simulant E for testing specific migration from plastics into dry foodstuffs. Two methods for fortifying respectively PPPO and a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film with surrogate substances that are relevant to food contact were developed. A protocol for cleaning the PPPO and an efficient analytical method were developed for the quantification of butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), benzophenone (BP), diisobutylphthalate (DiBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) and 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, diisononyl ester (DINCH) from PPPO. A protocol for a migration test from plastics using small migration cells was also developed. The method was validated by an inter-laboratory comparison (ILC) with 16 national reference laboratories for food contact materials in the European Union. This allowed for the first time data to be obtained on the precision and laboratory performance of both migration and quantification. The results showed that the validation ILC was successful even when taking into account the complexity of the exercise. The results showed that the method performance was 7-9% repeatability standard deviation (rSD) for most substances (regardless of concentration), with 12% rSD for the high level of BHT and for DiBP at very low levels. The reproducibility standard deviation results for the 16 European Union laboratories were in the range of 20-30% for the quantification from PPPO (for the three levels of concentrations of the five substances) and 15-40% from migration experiments from the fortified plastic at 60°C for 10 days and subsequent quantification. Considering the lack of data previously available in the literature, this work has demonstrated that the validation of a method is possible both for migration from a film and for

  1. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  2. Evolution of the Mobile Information SysTem (MIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Thompson, Shelby; Archer, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    The Mobile Information SysTem (MIST) had its origins in the need to determine whether commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies could improve intervehicular activities (IVA) on International Space Station (ISS) crew maintenance productivity. It began with an exploration of head mounted displays (HMDs), but quickly evolved to include voice recognition, mobile personal computing, and data collection. The unique characteristic of the MIST lies within its mobility, in which a vest is worn that contains a mini-computer and supporting equipment, and a headband with attachments for a HMD, lipstick camera, and microphone. Data is then captured directly by the computer running Morae(TM) or similar software for analysis. To date, the MIST system has been tested in numerous environments such as two parabolic flights on NASA's C-9 microgravity aircraft and several mockup facilities ranging from ISS to the Altair Lunar Sortie Lander. Functional capabilities have included its lightweight and compact design, commonality across systems and environments, and usefulness in remote collaboration. Human Factors evaluations of the system have proven the MIST's ability to be worn for long durations of time (approximately four continuous hours) with no adverse physical deficits, moderate operator compensation, and low workload being reported as measured by Corlett Bishop Discomfort Scale, Cooper-Harper Ratings, and the NASA Total Workload Index (TLX), respectively. Additionally, through development of the system, it has spawned several new applications useful in research. For example, by only employing the lipstick camera, microphone, and a compact digital video recorder (DVR), we created a portable, lightweight data collection device. Video is recorded from the participants point of view (POV) through the use of the camera mounted on the side of the head. Both the video and audio is recorded directly into the DVR located on a belt around the waist. This data is then transferred to

  3. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 2: Derivation of finite-element equations and comparisons with analytical solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    MODFE, a modular finite-element model for simulating steady- or unsteady-state, area1 or axisymmetric flow of ground water in a heterogeneous anisotropic aquifer is documented in a three-part series of reports. In this report, part 2, the finite-element equations are derived by minimizing a functional of the difference between the true and approximate hydraulic head, which produces equations that are equivalent to those obtained by either classical variational or Galerkin techniques. Spatial finite elements are triangular with linear basis functions, and temporal finite elements are one dimensional with linear basis functions. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining units; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, or areally; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or head-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining units combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The matrix equations produced by the finite-element method are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified incomplete-Cholesky conjugate-gradient method. The direct method can be efficient for small- to medium-sized problems (less than about 500 nodes), and the iterative method is generally more efficient for larger-sized problems. Comparison of finite-element solutions with analytical solutions for five example problems demonstrates that the finite-element model can yield accurate solutions to ground-water flow problems.

  4. A comparison of the BAX system method to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual and International Organization for Standardization reference methods for the detection of Salmonella in a variety of soy ingredients.

    PubMed

    Belete, Tamrat; Crowley, Erin; Bird, Patrick; Gensic, Joseph; Wallace, F Morgan

    2014-10-01

    The performances of two DuPont BAX System PCR assays for detecting Salmonella on a variety of low-moisture soy ingredients were evaluated against the U. S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA BAM) method or the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579 reference method. These evaluations were conducted as a single laboratory validation at an ISO 17025 accredited third-party laboratory. Validations were conducted on five soy ingredients: isolated soy protein (ISP), soy fiber, fluid soy lecithin, deoiled soy lecithin, and soy nuggets, using a paired-study design. The ISP was analyzed as both 25- and 375-g composite test portions, whereas all other sample matrices were analyzed as 375-g composite test portions. To evaluate 25-g test portions of ISP, the test material was inoculated using Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Mbandaka (Q Laboratories isolate 11031.1). Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Tennessee (Q Laboratories isolate 11031.3) was used for all other trials. For each trial of the method comparison, 25 samples were analyzed for each matrix: 5 uninoculated controls and 20 samples inoculated at low levels (0.2 to 2 CFU per test portion) that were targeted to achieve fractionally positive results (25 to 75%). Using McNemar's chi-square analysis, no significant difference at P ≥ 0.05 (χ(2) ≤ 3.84) was observed between the number of positives obtained by the BAX System and the reference methods for all five test matrices evaluated. These studies indicate that the BAX System PCR assays, in combination with the single buffered peptone water primary enrichment and subsequent brain heart infusion regrowth step, demonstrate equivalent sensitivity and robustness compared with the FDA BAM and ISO reference methods for both 25- and 375-g composite samples. Moreover, there was no observed reduction of sensitivity in the larger 375-g composite samples for all five matrices.

  5. Relativistic effects in elastic scattering of electrons in TEM.

    PubMed

    Rother, Axel; Scheerschmidt, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy typically works with highly accelerated thus relativistic electrons. Consequently the scattering process is described within a relativistic formalism. In the following, we will examine three different relativistic formalisms for elastic electron scattering: Dirac, Klein-Gordon and approximated Klein-Gordon, the standard approach. This corresponds to a different consideration of spin effects and a different coupling to electromagnetic potentials. A detailed comparison is conducted by means of explicit numerical calculations. For this purpose two different formalisms have been applied to the approaches above: a numerical integration with predefined boundary conditions and the multislice algorithm, a standard procedure for such simulations. The results show a negligibly small difference between the different relativistic equations in the vicinity of electromagnetic potentials, prevailing in the electron microscope. The differences between the two numeric approaches are found to be small for small-angle scattering but eventually grow large for large-angle scattering, recorded for instance in high-angle annular dark field.

  6. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  7. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  8. NanoRelease: Pilot interlaboratory comparison of a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A major use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is as functional fillers embedded in a solid matrix, such as plastics or coatings. Weathering and abrasion of the solid matrix during use can lead to environmental releases of the MWCNTs. Here we focus on a protocol to identify and quantify the primary release induced by weathering, and assess reproducibility, transferability, and sensitivity towards different materials and uses. We prepared 132 specimens of two polymer-MWCNT composites containing the same grade of MWCNTs used in earlier OECD hazard assessments but without UV stabilizer. We report on a pilot inter-laboratory comparison (ILC) with four labs (two US and two EU) aging by UV and rain, then shipping for analysis. Two labs (one US and one EU) conducted the release sampling and analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Inductively Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Ultraviolet–Visible Spectroscopy (UV–Vis), Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC), and Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4). We compare results between aging labs, between analysis labs and between materials. Surprisingly, we found quantitative agreement between analysis labs for TEM, ICP-MS, UV–Vis; low variation between aging labs by all methods; and consistent rankings of release between TEM, ICP-MS, UV–Vis, AUC. Significant disagreement was related primarily to differences in aging, but even these cases remained within a factor of two. Published in t

  9. Quench in superconducting magnets. 2: Analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajii, A.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1994-09-01

    A set of analytic solutions for the Quencher model, as described in Part 1 (Shajii and Freidberg, 1994), is presented in this paper. These analytic solutions represent the first such results that remain valid for the long time scales of interest during a quench process. The assumptions and the resulting simplifications that lead to the analytic solutions are discussed, and the regimes of validity of the various approximations are specified. The predictions of the analytic results are shown to be in very good agreement with numerical as well as experimental results. Important analytic scaling relations are verified by such comparisons, and the consequences of some of these scalings on currently designed superconducting magnets are discussed.

  10. The Lactamase Engineering Database: a critical survey of TEM sequences in public databases

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Quan Ke; Bös, Fabian; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background TEM β-lactamases are the main cause for resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. Sequence information about TEM β-lactamases is mainly found in the NCBI peptide database and TEM mutation table at . While the TEM mutation table is manually curated by experts in the lactamase field, who guarantee reliable and consistent information, the rapidly growing sequence and annotation information from the NCBI peptide database is sometimes inconsistent. Therefore, the Lactamase Engineering Database has been developed to collect the TEM β-lactamase sequences from the NCBI peptide database and the TEM mutation table, systematically compare sequence information and naming, identify inconsistencies, and thus provide a versatile tool for reconciliation of data and for an investigation of the sequence-function relationship. Description The LacED currently provides 2399 sequence entries and 37 structure entries. Sequence information on 150 different TEM β-lactamases was derived from the TEM mutation table which provides a unique number to each protein classified as TEM β-lactamase. 293 TEM-like proteins were found in the NCBI protein database, but only 113 TEM β-lactamase were common to both data sets. The 180 TEM β-lactamases from the NCBI protein database which have not yet been assigned to a TEM number fall in three classes: (1) 89 proteins from microbial organisms and 35 proteins from cloning or expression vectors had a new mutation profile; (2) 55 proteins had inconsistent annotation in terms of TEM assignment or reported mutation profile; (3) 39 proteins are fragments. The LacED is web accessible at and contains multisequence alignments, structure information and reconciled annotation of TEM β-lactamases. The LacED is weekly updated and supplies all data for download. Conclusion The Lactamase Engineering Database enables a systematic analysis of TEM β-lactamase sequence and annotation data from different data sources, and thus provides a valuable tool to

  11. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  12. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  13. The dependence of TEM turbulence on magnetic geometry in the HSX stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoniewski, J.; Faber, B. J.; Pueschel, M. J.; Likin, K. M.; Deng, C. B.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2016-10-01

    The Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) is equipped with a set of auxiliary coils that can modify the designed Quasi-Helical Symmetry (QHS), and is well suited to probe the effect of geometry on turbulence. Configuration optimization to reduce turbulent transport could provide the next big confinement improvement in fusion devices. The first step towards optimization is to develop a predictive understanding of the relevant physics. Particularly in the case of density-gradient-driven TEM turbulence relevant to HSX scenarios, quasilinear models fail to predict transport. Here, moving beyond linear physics, nonlinear Gene simulations in the large density gradient region are compared in the QHS configuration, and in a configuration where the symmetry is broken by the addition of mirror terms to the magnetic spectrum. Investigations into zonal flow physics provide another perspective into differences between geometries. In parallel, power balance on experimental profiles in each configuration provides a scaling of electron thermal diffusivity χe with electron temperature and density gradient as a first step towards direct comparison to experimental fluctuation measurements. Supported by US DoE Award DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  14. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  15. OSCE vs. TEM: Different Approaches to Assess Clinical Skills of Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Jelly, Prasuna; Sharma, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses are trained with specific clinical skills, and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) could be a better approach to assess clinical skills of nursing students. Materials and Methods: A comparative study was conducted by observational checklist regarding antenatal care and opinionnaire on the usefulness of OSCE and tradition evaluation method (TEM) was used to assess the clinical skills and to get opinion. Results: The mean score of OSCE was more than TEM and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The opinion of students regarding the usefulness of OSCE was higher than TEM. Conclusions: The study concluded that implementing OSCE will overweigh the advantages of the TEM.

  16. An AEM-TEM study of nanometer-scale mineral associations in an aquifer sand: Implications for colloid mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Christopher H.; Ulery, April L.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1997-02-01

    Analytical and transmission electron microscopy (AEM-TEM) techniques were used to identify mineral juxtapositions at the nanometer-scale in the interstitial matrix of a shallow, Southeastern Coastal plain aquifer sand (Georgetown, South Carolina, USA). In doing so, we sought to infer particle-particle interaction mechanisms holding the matrix intact. The aquifer is a fine-to-medium quartz sand with approximately 12% by weight <63 μm size fraction composing the interstitial matrix. The clay-size fraction contains kaolinite, goethite, gibbsite, and vermiculite. The arrangement of the clay minerals is that of a framework of face-associated domains. Selective extraction revealed that goethite constituted 95% by weight of the free iron oxyhydroxides in the <63 μm size fraction, but AEM-TEM and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) indicated that the goethite occurred only in discrete aggregates among the clays. Conversely, the remaining 5% of the free iron oxyhydroxides comprised an amorphous iron phase which was found to be distributed throughout the matrix and directly associated with the clay particles. This evidence suggests that the amorphous iron oxyhydroxide phase could act as an effective binding intermediary among the clay-clay associations, possibly electrostatically or through bond linkages with the clay surfaces. In addition, HRTEM indicated the presence of another amorphous phase which appeared to hold the clay particle aggregates in a cementitious web. AEM suggested that this amorphous phase was silicon enriched, probably biogenic opal. This evidence suggests that instigating dissolution of the opaline silica phase may be necessary to induce substantial colloid mobilization in this aquifer sediment.

  17. Using Analytic Hierarchy Process in Textbook Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) in English language teaching materials evaluation, focusing in particular on its potential for systematically integrating different components of evaluation criteria in a variety of teaching contexts. AHP is a measurement procedure wherein pairwise comparisons are made…

  18. Analytical Chemistry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zolotov, Yuri

    2016-09-06

    Research in Russian analytical chemistry (AC) is carried out on a significant scale, and the analytical service solves practical tasks of geological survey, environmental protection, medicine, industry, agriculture, etc. The education system trains highly skilled professionals in AC. The development and especially manufacturing of analytical instruments should be improved; in spite of this, there are several good domestic instruments and other satisfy some requirements. Russian AC has rather good historical roots.

  19. Ceftazidime and aztreonam resistance in Providencia stuartii: characterization of a natural TEM-derived extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-60.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, N; Perilli, M; Segatore, B; Setacci, D; Amicosante, G; Mazzariol, A; Cornaglia, G

    1998-06-01

    A plasmid-encoded beta-lactamase produced from a clinical strain of Providencia stuartii has been purified and characterized. The gene coding for the beta-lactamase was cloned and sequenced. It appears to be a new natural TEM-derived enzyme, named TEM-60. Point mutations (Q39K, L51P, E104K, and R164S) are present with respect to the TEM-1 enzyme; the mutation L51P has never been previously reported, with the exception of the chromosomally encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamase PER-1. Kinetic parameters relative to penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams other than mechanism-based inactivators were related to the in vitro susceptibility phenotype.

  20. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  1. Quantitative In Situ TEM Studies of Small-Scale Plasticity in Irradiated and Unirradiated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Claire

    effectively simplified to its matrix strain. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of fully strain mapping, in four dimensions, any in-situ TEM experiment. The final set of experiments with this model FCC structural material shows the attempted correlation of defect interactions and deformation behavior at the nano-scale. Experimental comparison of mechanical behavior from quantitative in-situ TEM tensile tests of focused ion beam (FIB) shaped, He1+ implanted, and FIB-shaped He1+ implanted Au thin-film show a wide range of behavior that could not be directly linked to irradiation condition. This is due to the large role that overall microstructural features, such as grain boundary orientation and texture, play in mechanical behavior at this size scale. However, these tests are some of the first to in-situ TEM mechanically strain single grain-boundaries free of FIB-damage. It is expected that, with well-defined grain orientations and boundaries, real conclusions can be made.

  2. TEM/AEM characterization of fine-grained clay minerals in very-low-grade rocks: Evaluation of contamination by EMPA involving celadonite family minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gejing; Peacor, D.R.; Coombs, D.S.; Kawachi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) have led to many new insights into the structural and chemical characteristics of very fine-grained, optically homogeneous mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks. Chemical compositions obtained by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) on such materials have been shown by TEM/AEM to result from beam overlap on contaminant phases on a scale below resolution of EMPA, which in turn can lead to errors in interpretation and determination of formation conditions. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the relation between AEM and EMPA data, which leads also to the definition of new mineral phases, and demonstrate the resolution power of AEM relative to EMPA in investigations of very fine-grained mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks.

  3. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  4. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  5. Learning Analytics Considered Harmful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is written to present a prospective stance on how learning analytics, as a core evaluative approach, must help instructors uncover the important trends and evidence of quality learner data in the online course. A critique is presented of strategic and tactical issues of learning analytics. The approach to the critique is taken through…

  6. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  7. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  8. Validating Analytical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  9. The analysis on IP signals in TEM response based on SVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chuan-Tao; Liu, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Yang, De-Yi; Li, Zi-Hong

    2013-03-01

    During transient electromagnetic method (TEM) exploration of a copper mine, we detected the late-channel TEM signal reversal phenomenon (a voltage change from positive to negative) caused by the influence of the induced polarization (IP) effect, which affects the depth and precision of the TEM detection. The conventional inversion method is inefficient because it is difficult to process the data. In this paper, the Cole-Cole model is adopted to analyze the effect of Dc resistivity, chargeability, time constant, and frequency exponent on the TEM response in an homogeneous half space model. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is used to invert the measured TEM data, and the Dc resistivity, chargeability, time constant and frequency exponent were extracted from the measured TEM data in the mine area. The extracted parameters are used for interpreting the detection result as a supplement. This reveals why the TEM data acquired in the area has a low resolution. It was found that the DC resistivity and time constant do not significantly change the results, however, the chargeability and frequency exponent have a significant effect. Because of these influences, the SVD method is more accurate than the conventional method in the apparent resistivity profile. The area of the copper mine is confined accurately based on the SVD inverted data. The conclusion has been verified by drill and is identical to the practical geological situation.

  10. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  11. An analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Skachkov, E. V.; Belyaev, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes an analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector. The model can be useful for scintillation detector development since it allows to make quick calculations with different parameters. Comparison of the analytical model and Geant4 calculation results has been done. The comparison of the analytical model calculation results and experimental measurements have been done. Both comparisons show model validity and a capability to be used in the research.

  12. Analytic computation of average energy of neutrons inducing fission

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Alexander Rich

    2016-08-12

    The objective of this report is to describe how I analytically computed the average energy of neutrons that induce fission in the bare BeRP ball. The motivation of this report is to resolve a discrepancy between the average energy computed via the FMULT and F4/FM cards in MCNP6 by comparison to the analytic results.

  13. TEM observations of Ag-Ti bilayers after thermal aging treatment in a reducing ambient[Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amali, A.I.; Mayer, J.W.; Zeng, Y.; Zou, Y.L.; Alford, T.L.; Deng, F.; Lau, S.S.

    1997-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in both cross sectional and plan view is used to study the effect of annealing Ag-Ti bilayers deposited on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates in an NH{sub 3} ambient. The resulting structure, texture and grain size are investigated. Comparisons are made between films annealed at 400, 500 and 600 C. Silver films show increasingly strong <111> texture with annealing temperature while exhibiting a bamboo-like grain structure at 600 C. Considerable grain growth with lateral grain sizes of up to 5 times the thickness of the Ag film is observed at 600 C. The grains typically extend through the Ag film thickness. The Ti/SiO{sub 2} interface uniformity and the absence of voids at the substrate surface are positive indicators of the role of titanium as a good adhesion promoter. At 600 C, a uniform TiN encapsulation layer is observed on the Ag surface.

  14. VenUS IV (Venous leg Ulcer Study IV) - compression hosiery compared with compression bandaging in the treatment of venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial, mixed-treatment comparison and decision-analytic model.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Rebecca L; Gabe, Rhian; Ali, Shehzad; Saramago, Pedro; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Adderley, Una; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky A; Dumville, Jo C; Iglesias, Cynthia P; Kang'ombe, Arthur R; Soares, Marta O; Stubbs, Nikki C; Torgerson, David J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Compression is an effective and recommended treatment for venous leg ulcers. Although the four-layer bandage (4LB) is regarded as the gold standard compression system, it is recognised that the amount of compression delivered might be compromised by poor application technique. Also the bulky nature of the bandages might reduce ankle or leg mobility and make the wearing of shoes difficult. Two-layer compression hosiery systems are now available for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Two-layer hosiery (HH) may be advantageous, as it has reduced bulk, which might enhance ankle or leg mobility and patient adherence. Some patients can also remove and reapply two-layer hosiery, which may encourage self-management and could reduce costs. However, little robust evidence exists about the effectiveness of two-layer hosiery for ulcer healing and no previous trials have compared two-layer hosiery delivering 'high' compression with the 4LB. OBJECTIVES Part I To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HH and 4LB in terms of time to complete healing of venous leg ulcers. Part II To synthesise the relative effectiveness evidence (for ulcer healing) of high-compression treatments for venous leg ulcers using a mixed-treatment comparison (MTC). Part III To construct a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of high-compression treatments for venous leg ulcers. DESIGN Part I A multicentred, pragmatic, two-arm, parallel, open randomised controlled trial (RCT) with an economic evaluation. Part II MTC using all relevant RCT data - including Venous leg Ulcer Study IV (VenUS IV). Part III A decision-analytic Markov model. SETTINGS Part I Community nurse teams or services, general practitioner practices, leg ulcer clinics, tissue viability clinics or services and wound clinics within England and Northern Ireland. PARTICIPANTS Part I Patients aged ≥ 18 years with a venous leg ulcer, who were willing and able to tolerate high

  15. TEM characterization of Au-based alloys to join YSZ to steel for SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kun-Lin; Singh, Mrityunjay; Asthana, Rajiv

    2012-01-15

    The microstructures of two gold-based alloys with compositions (in wt.%) of 96.4Au-3Ni-0.6Ti and 97.5Au-0.75Ni-1.75V following oxidation at 850 Degree-Sign C for 200 min were characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy and by scanning electron microscopy. In the oxidized 96.4Au-3Ni-0.6Ti interlayer, a dense scale composed of nickel oxide (NiO) and nickel titanate (NiTiO{sub 3}) formed at the alloy surface. No evidence of titanium oxide was found because there was not enough Ti present to form titanium oxide. In the oxidized 97.5Au-0.75Ni-1.75V interlayer, loose vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and nickel vanadate (Ni{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}) formed and were distributed within the oxidized 97.5Au-0.75Ni-1.75V interlayer. Similarly, because of the low Ni content in the alloys, no NiO formed. The oxide products in the 96.4Au-3Ni-0.6Ti and 97.5Au-0.75Ni-1.75V interlayers after oxidation are consistent with the Pilling-Bedworth (PB) ratio considerations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two commercial Au-based reactive metallic interlayers were oxidized at 850 Degree-Sign C for 200 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxidized products at the surface were characterized by TEM/EDS and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO and NiTiO{sub 3} formed at the oxidized 96.4Au-3Ni-0.6Ti interlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ni{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7} were found in the oxidized 97.5Au-0.75Ni-1.75V interlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These oxide products are consistent with the Pilling-Bedworth (PB) ratio considerations.

  16. TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser by side-pumping a grooved rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vistas, Cláudia R.; Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Guillot, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    A simple TEM00 mode solar laser system with a grooved Nd:YAG rod pumped through a heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. The radiation coupling capacity of a fused silica tube lens was combined with the multipass pumping ability of a 2 V-shaped cavity to provide efficient side-pumping along a 4.0 mm diameter grooved Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. TEM00 mode solar laser power of 3.4 W was measured by adopting an asymmetric large-mode laser resonant cavity. Record TEM00 mode solar laser collection efficiency of 3.4 W/m2and slope efficiency of 1.9% was achieved, which corresponds to 1.8 and 2.4 times more than the previous TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser using the PROMES-CNRS heliostat-parabolic mirror system, respectively.

  17. Preparation of GaN-based cross-sectional TEM specimens by laser lift-off.

    PubMed

    Zilan, Li; Xiaodong, Hu; Ke, Chen; Ruijuan, Nie; Xuhui, Luo; Xiaoping, Zhang; Tongjun, Yu; Bei, Zhang; Song, Chen; Zhijian, Yang; Zhizhong, Chen; Guoyi, Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Laser lift-off (LLO) technology is successfully used to prepare GaN-based TEM cross-sectional specimens. Detailed procedures of the method to prepare the specimens are demonstrated. Large thin areas suitable for TEM analysis were obtained. TEM images of the resulting GaN interface are studied, and the changes in structural quality are confined to approximately the first 250 nm of the epilayer. Clear TEM images of the whole epilayer and the InGaN quantum wells and the HRTEM images of the superlattice layer are demonstrated, showing that LLO is a quick and ideal method to study the crystal structure of the epilayer, especially if only the upper layers are of interest.

  18. Genomic sequence of temperate phage TEM126 isolated from wild type S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Duck; Chang, Hyo-Ihl; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2011-04-01

    Bacteriophage TEM126, a newly isolated temperate phage from a mitomycin-C-induced lysate of wild-type Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food, has an isometric head, a noncontractile tail, and a double-stranded DNA genome with a length of 33,540 bp and a G+C content of 33.94%. Bioinformatics analysis of the phage genome revealed 44 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Predicted protein products of the ORFs were determined and described. Temperate phage TEM126 can be classified as a member of the family Siphoviridae by morphology and genome structure. Temperate phage TEM126 showed 84% similarity with Staphylococcus phage phiNM1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genomic sequencing and characterization of temperate phage TEM126 from a wild-type S. aureus isolated from foods in Korea.

  19. TEM Study of Alteration Assemblages in the Nakhlites: Variation with Burial Depth on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changela, H. C.; Bridges, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    TEM study of nakhlites shows a variation in secondary minerals between different meteorites. Lafayette from the greatest depth on Mars shows coarse crystalline Ca-Mn-Mg siderite and phyllosilicate whereas Y-000593 veins are amorphous silicate gel.

  20. Visual Analytics 101

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Burtner, Edwin R.; Cook, Kristin A.

    2016-06-13

    This course will introduce the field of Visual Analytics to HCI researchers and practitioners highlighting the contributions they can make to this field. Topics will include a definition of visual analytics along with examples of current systems, types of tasks and end users, issues in defining user requirements, design of visualizations and interactions, guidelines and heuristics, the current state of user-centered evaluations, and metrics for evaluation. We encourage designers, HCI researchers, and HCI practitioners to attend to learn how their skills can contribute to advancing the state of the art of visual analytics

  1. Development of 124I-Immuno-PET Targeting Tumor Vascular TEM1/Endosialin

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Madhura; Mikitsh, John L.; Hu, Jia; Hou, Catherine; Grasso, Luigi; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Coukos, George

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1/endosialin) is a tumor vascular marker highly overexpressed in multiple human cancers with minimal expression in normal adult tissue. In this study, we report the preparation and evaluation of 124I-MORAb-004, a 124I-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody targeting an extracellular epitope of human TEM1 (hTEM1), for its ability to specifically and sensitively detect vascular cells expressing hTEM1 in vivo. Methods MAb MORAb-004 was directly iodinated with 125I and 124I, and in vitro binding and internalization parameters were characterized. The in vivo behavior of radioiodinated-MORAb-004 was characterized in mice bearing subcutaneous ID8 tumors enriched with mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, or control tumors, by biodistribution studies and small animal immuno-PET studies. Results MORAb-004 was radiolabeled with high efficiency and isolated in high purity. In vitro studies demonstrated specific and sensitive binding of MORAb-004 to MS1 mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, with no binding to control MS1 cells. 125I-MORAb-004 and 124I MORAb-004 both had an immunoreactivity of approximately 90%. In vivo biodistribution experiments revealed rapid, highly specific and sensitive uptake of MORAb-004 in MS1-TEM1 tumors at 4 h (153.2 ± 22.2 percent of injected dose per gram [%ID/g]), 24 h (127.1 ± 42.9 %ID/g), 48 h (130.3 ± 32.4 %ID/g), 72 h (160.9 ± 32.1 %ID/g), and 6 d (10.7 ± 1.8 %ID/g). Excellent image contrast was observed with 124I-immuno-PET. MORAb-004 uptake was statistically higher in TEM1-positive tumors versus control tumors, as measured by biodistribution and immuno-PET studies. Binding specificity was confirmed by blocking studies using excess nonlabeled MORAb-004. Conclusion In our preclinical model, with hTEM1 exclusively expressed on engineered murine endothelial cells that integrate into the tumor vasculature, 124I-MORAb-004 displays high tumor–to–background tissue contrast fordetection of hTEM1 in

  2. The role of Poisson's binomial distribution in the analysis of TEM images.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Arturo; den Dekker, Arnold J

    2011-11-01

    Frank's observation that a TEM bright-field image acquired under non-stationary conditions can be modeled by the time integral of the standard TEM image model [J. Frank, Nachweis von objektbewegungen im lichtoptis- chen diffraktogramm von elektronenmikroskopischen auf- nahmen, Optik 30 (2) (1969) 171-180.] is re-derived here using counting statistics based on Poisson's binomial distribution. The approach yields a statistical image model that is suitable for image analysis and simulation.

  3. Analytical study of twin-jet shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the refinement and evaluation of an analytical jet shielding model are summarized. The model consists of a point noise source impinging on a cylinder of heated flow in which the temperature and velocity are uniform across the cross section of the jet. The shielding jet is infinite in extent along the jet axis and the radius of the jet is constant. The analytical model was compared to experimental data for a point noise source impinging on an ambient temperature, subsonic jet and on a subsonic simulated hot jet using helium as the flow medium. Results of these comparisons are discussed.

  4. Applications of the FIB lift-out technique for TEM specimen preparation.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzi, L A; Drown, J L; Brown, S R; Irwin, R B; Stevie, F A

    1998-05-15

    A site-specific technique for cross-section transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation of difficult materials is presented. A focused ion beam was used to slice an electron transparent membrane from a specific area of interest within a bulk sample. Micromanipulation lift-out procedures were then used to transport the electron-transparent specimen to a carbon-coated copper grid for subsequent TEM analysis. The FIB (focused ion beam) lift-out technique is a fast method for the preparation of site-specific TEM specimens. The versatility of this technique is demonstrated by presenting cross-sectioned TEM specimens from several types of materials systems, including a multi-layered integrated circuit on a Si substrate, a galvanized steel, a polycrystalline SiC ceramic fiber, and a ZnSe optical ceramic. These specimens have both complex surface geometry and interfaces with complex chemistry. FIB milling was performed sequentially through different layers of cross-sectioned materials so that preferential sputtering was not a factor in preparing TEM specimens. The FIB lift-out method for TEM analysis is a useful technique for the study of complex materials systems for TEM analysis.

  5. Analytical techniques: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation, containing articles on a number of analytical techniques for quality control engineers and laboratory workers, is presented. Data cover techniques for testing electronic, mechanical, and optical systems, nondestructive testing techniques, and gas analysis techniques.

  6. Identification of TEM-135 β-Lactamase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Carrying African and Toronto Plasmids in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gianecini, R.; Oviedo, C.; Littvik, A.; Mendez, E.; Piccoli, L.; Montibello, S.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred forty-three penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) isolates obtained in Argentina from 2008 and 2012 were examined to detect blaTEM-135 genes and to investigate plasmid profiles and multiantigen sequence types. Forty-two PPNG isolates were found to carry TEM-135, and two contained a new TEM derivative characterized as TEM-220. The blaTEM-135 allele was carried by the Toronto/Rio and African plasmids. Molecular epidemiology revealed that two blaTEM-135 isolates were related to previously described isolates from Thailand and China, indicating a common evolutionary origin. PMID:25367903

  7. Identification of TEM-135 β-lactamase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains carrying African and Toronto plasmids in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gianecini, R; Oviedo, C; Littvik, A; Mendez, E; Piccoli, L; Montibello, S; Galarza, P

    2015-01-01

    One hundred forty-three penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) isolates obtained in Argentina from 2008 and 2012 were examined to detect blaTEM-135 genes and to investigate plasmid profiles and multiantigen sequence types. Forty-two PPNG isolates were found to carry TEM-135, and two contained a new TEM derivative characterized as TEM-220. The blaTEM-135 allele was carried by the Toronto/Rio and African plasmids. Molecular epidemiology revealed that two blaTEM-135 isolates were related to previously described isolates from Thailand and China, indicating a common evolutionary origin.

  8. Quantification of free and total desmosine and isodesmosine in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: a comparison of the surrogate-analyte and the surrogate-matrix approach for quantitation.

    PubMed

    Ongay, Sara; Hendriks, Gert; Hermans, Jos; van den Berge, Maarten; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van de Merbel, Nico C; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-24

    In spite of the data suggesting the potential of urinary desmosine (DES) and isodesmosine (IDS) as biomarkers for elevated lung elastic fiber turnover, further validation in large-scale studies of COPD populations, as well as the analysis of longitudinal samples is required. Validated analytical methods that allow the accurate and precise quantification of DES and IDS in human urine are mandatory in order to properly evaluate the outcome of such clinical studies. In this work, we present the development and full validation of two methods that allow DES and IDS measurement in human urine, one for the free and one for the total (free+peptide-bound) forms. To this end we compared the two principle approaches that are used for the absolute quantification of endogenous compounds in biological samples, analysis against calibrators containing authentic analyte in surrogate matrix or containing surrogate analyte in authentic matrix. The validated methods were employed for the analysis of a small set of samples including healthy never-smokers, healthy current-smokers and COPD patients. This is the first time that the analysis of urinary free DES, free IDS, total DES, and total IDS has been fully validated and that the surrogate analyte approach has been evaluated for their quantification in biological samples. Results indicate that the presented methods have the necessary quality and level of validation to assess the potential of urinary DES and IDS levels as biomarkers for the progression of COPD and the effect of therapeutic interventions.

  9. Visual Analytics: Building a Vibrant and Resilient National Science

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Thomas, James J.

    2009-09-20

    Five years after the science of visual analytics was formally established, we attempt to use two different studies to assess the current state of the community and evaluate the progress the community has made in the past few years. The first study involves a comparison analysis of intellectual and scholastic accomplishments recently made by the visual analytics community. The second one aims to measure the degree of community reach and internet penetration of visual-analytics-related resources. This paper describes our efforts to harvest the study data, conduct analysis, and make interpretations based on parallel comparisons with five other established computer science areas.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Within the scope of a number of emerging contaminant issues in environmental analysis, one area that has received a great deal of public interest has been the assessment of the role of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as stressors and agents of change in ecosystems as well as their role in unplanned human exposure. The relationship between personal actions and the occurrence of PPCPs in the environment is clear-cut and comprehensible to the public. In this overview, we attempt to examine the separations aspect of the analytical approach to the vast array of potential analytes among this class of compounds. We also highlight the relationship between these compounds and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and between PPCPs and EDCs and the more traditional environmental analytes such as the persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Although the spectrum of chemical behavior extends from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the current focus has shifted to moderately and highly polar analytes. Thus, emphasis on HPLC and LC/MS has grown and MS/MS has become a detection technique of choice with either electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. This contrasts markedly with the bench mark approach of capillary GC, GC/MS and electron ionization in traditional environmental analysis. The expansion of the analyte list has fostered new vigor in the development of environmental analytical chemistry, modernized the range of tools appli

  11. Improvement of microtome cutting process of carbon nanotube composite sample preparation for TEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayner, Sarah

    As research progresses towards nanoscale materials, there has become a need for a more efficient and effective way to obtain ultra-thin samples for imaging under transmission electron microscope (TEM) for atomic resolution analysis. There are various methods used to obtain thin samples (<50 nm in thickness). However, most of the resultant TEM images of soft materials, such as CNT/epoxy composites, are of poor quality due to the sample cutting difficulties. Such poor quality samples are characterized by uneven sample thicknesses, objective overlapping, overall darkness due to large thickness, and defects such as cutting scratches. This research is a continuous effort to study and improve the ultra-microtome cutting technique to provide an effective and reliable approach of obtaining an ultra-thin (25-50 nm) cross section of a CNT/polymer composite for high resolution TEM analysis. Improvements were achieved by studying the relationships between the chosen cutting parameters, sample characteristics and TEM image quality. From this information, a cutting protocol was established so that ultra-thin sample slices can be achieved by different microtome operators for high resolution TEM analysis. In addition, a custom tool was created to aid in the sample collection process. In this research, three composite samples were studied for both microtome cutting and TEM analysis: 1) Unidirectional (UD) IM7/BMI composite; 2) Single-layer CNT buckypaper (BP)/epoxy nanocomposite; 3) 3-layer CNT BP/BMI nanocomposite. The resultant TEM images revealed a clear microstructure consisting of amorphous resin and graphite crystalline packing. UD IM7/BMI composite TEM results did not reveal an interfacial region resulting in a need for even thinner sliced cross sections. TEM results for the single-layer CNT BP/epoxy nanocomposite revealed the alignment direction of the nanotubes and numerous stacks of CNT bundles. In addition, there was visible flattening of CNT packing into dumbbell shapes

  12. TEM-1-encoding small plasmids impose dissimilar fitness costs on Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Lund, Marianne; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Only two beta-lactamases, TEM-1 and ROB-1, have been observed in Haemophilus influenzae, while four different TEM but no ROB enzymes have been found in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the dissemination of small beta-lactamase-encoding plasmids in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae, we assessed the fitness cost of three TEM-1- (pPN223, pA1209, pA1606), one TEM-15- (pSF3) and one ROB-1-bearing (pB1000) plasmid when expressed in either bacterial species. All plasmids were stable in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae except pB1000, which showed on average (sample mean) 76% curing in H. parainfluenzae after 5  days of subculture. Competition assays between isogenic strains with and without plasmid showed no competitive disadvantage of pPN223 and pA1606 in H. influenzae, or of pA1209 in H. parainfluenzae. In contrast, pSF3 and pB1000 were associated with significant competitive disadvantages in both species. Some of the competitive disadvantages may be related to differences in plasmid copy number and mRNA expression of the beta-lactamase genes, as revealed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, plasmids encoding TEM beta-lactamases isolated from H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae can be stably transferred between species. The fast curing of pB1000 in H. parainfluenzae observed in this study correlates to the fact that ROB-1 has never been reported for this species. TEM-1-encoding plasmids are associated with the lowest level of fitness cost, but different TEM-1 plasmids confer different levels of fitness cost on the two hosts.

  13. In-line TEM sample preparation and wafer return strategy for rapid yield learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicaïs-Lépinay, N.; André, F.; Brevers, S.; Guyader, P.; Trouiller, C.; Kwakman, L. F. Tz.; Pokrant, S.; Verkleij, D.; Schampers, R.; Ithier, L.; Sicurani, E.; Wyon, C.

    2006-03-01

    Full wafer dual beam FIB-SEM systems have received a lot of industrial interest in the last years and by now are operational in several 200mm and 300mm fabs. These tools offer a 3D-physical characterization capability of defects and device structures and as such allow for more rapid yield learning and increased process control. Moreover, if SEM resolution is insufficient to reveal defect origin or the necessary process details, it is now also possible to prepare TEM samples using a controlled, easy to learn in-situ process and to efficiently continue the characterization with a high resolution TEM inspection. Thanks to latest hardware developments and the high degree of automation of this TEM sample preparation process, wafers no longer need to be broken and remain essentially free from contamination. Hence, the TEM lamella process can be considered as non-destructive and wafers may continue the fabrication process flow. In this paper we examine the SEM and TEM application capabilities offered by in-line dual beam systems. To qualify the wafer return strategy, the particle contamination generated by the system hardware as well as the process-induced contamination have been investigated. The particle levels measured are fully acceptable to adopt the wafer return strategy. Ga-contamination does exist but is sufficiently low and localized so that the wafer return strategy can be applied safely in the back-end of line process. Yield analysis has confirmed that there is no measurable impact on device yield. Although yet to be proven for the frond-end of line processes, the wafer return strategy has been demonstrated as a valuable one already in the backend of line processes. The as developed non-destructive 3-D SEM-TEM characterization capability does offer value added data that allow to determine the root cause of critical process defects in almost real-time and this for both standard (SEM) and more advanced (TEM) technologies.

  14. Evaluation of analytical performance based on partial order methodology.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars; Bruggemann, Rainer; Kenessova, Olga; Erzhigitov, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Classical measurements of performances are typically based on linear scales. However, in analytical chemistry a simple scale may be not sufficient to analyze the analytical performance appropriately. Here partial order methodology can be helpful. Within the context described here, partial order analysis can be seen as an ordinal analysis of data matrices, especially to simplify the relative comparisons of objects due to their data profile (the ordered set of values an object have). Hence, partial order methodology offers a unique possibility to evaluate analytical performance. In the present data as, e.g., provided by the laboratories through interlaboratory comparisons or proficiency testings is used as an illustrative example. However, the presented scheme is likewise applicable for comparison of analytical methods or simply as a tool for optimization of an analytical method. The methodology can be applied without presumptions or pretreatment of the analytical data provided in order to evaluate the analytical performance taking into account all indicators simultaneously and thus elucidating a "distance" from the true value. In the present illustrative example it is assumed that the laboratories analyze a given sample several times and subsequently report the mean value, the standard deviation and the skewness, which simultaneously are used for the evaluation of the analytical performance. The analyses lead to information concerning (1) a partial ordering of the laboratories, subsequently, (2) a "distance" to the Reference laboratory and (3) a classification due to the concept of "peculiar points".

  15. TEM observations and finite element modelling of channel deformation in pre-irradiated austenitic stainless steels - Interactions with free surfaces and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzay, Maxime; Bavard, Karine; Karlsen, Wade

    2010-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations show that dislocation channel deformation occurs in pre-irradiated austenitic stainless steels, even at low stress levels (˜175 MPa, 290 °C) in low neutron dose (˜0.16 dpa, 185 °C) material. The TEM observations are utilized to design finite element (FE) meshes that include one or two "soft" channels (i.e. low critical resolved shear stress (CRSS)) of particular aspect ratio (length divided by thickness) embedded at the free surface of a "hard" matrix (i.e. high CRSS). The CRSS are adjusted using experimental data and physically based models from the literature. For doses leading to hardening saturation, the computed surface slips are as high as 100% for an applied stress close to the yield stress, when the observed channel aspect ratio is used. Surface slips are much higher than the grain boundary slips because of matrix constraint effect. The matrix CRSS and the channel aspect ratio are the most influential model parameters. Predictions based on an analytical formula are compared with surface slips computed by the FE method. Predicted slips, either in surface or bulk channels, agree reasonably well with either atomic force microscopy measures reported in the literature or measures based on our TEM observations. Finally, it is shown that the induced surface slip and grain boundary stress concentrations strongly enhance the kinetics of the damage mechanisms possibly involved in IASCC.

  16. Freeze/thaw processes in complex permafrost landscapes of northern Siberia simulated using the TEM ecosystem model: impact of thermokarst ponds and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Wischnewski, K.; Langer, M.; Muster, S.; Boike, J.

    2014-08-01

    Freeze/thaw (F/T) processes can be quite different under the various land surface types found in the complex tundra of the Arctic, such as polygonal tundra (wet center and dry rims), ponds, and thermokarst lakes. Proper simulation of these different processes is essential for accurate prediction of the release of greenhouse gases under a warming climate scenario. In this study we have incorporated the water layer into a dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM), having first verified and validated the model. Results showed that (1) the DOS-TEM was very efficient and its results compared well with analytical solutions for idealized cases, and (2) despite a number of limitations and uncertainties in the modeling, the simulations compared reasonably well with in situ measurements from polygon rims, polygon centers (with and without water), and lakes on Samoylov Island, Siberia, indicating the suitability of the DOS-TEM for simulating the various F/T processes. Sensitivity tests were performed on the effects of water depth and our results indicated that both water and snow cover are very important in the simulated thermal processes, for both polygon centers and lakes. We therefore concluded that the polygon rims and polygon centers (with various maximum water depths) should be considered separately, and that the dynamics of water depth in both polygons and lakes should be taken into account when simulating thermal processes for methane emission studies.

  17. Lessons from the organization of a proficiency testing program in food microbiology by interlaboratory comparison: analytical methods in use, impact of methods on bacterial counts and measurement uncertainty of bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Jean-Christophe; Carlier, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    The proficiency testing program in food microbiology RAEMA (Réseau d'Analyses et d'Echanges en Microbiologie des Aliments), created in 1988, currently includes 450 participating laboratories. This interlaboratory comparison establishes proficiency in detection of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, as well as enumeration of aerobic micro-organisms, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, beta-glucuronidase-positive Escherichia coli, anaerobic sulfito-reducing bacteria, Clostridium perfringens, coagulase-positive staphylococci, and L. monocytogenes. Twice a year, five units samples are sent to participants to assess their precision and trueness for enumeration and detection of micro-organisms. Most of participating laboratories use standard or validated alternative methods, they were 50-70% in 1994 and, for 5 years, they are 95%. An increasing use of alternative methods was also observed. This phenomenon is all the more significant as standard methods are laborious and time consuming; thus, 50% of the laboratories use alternative methods for the detection of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes. More and more laboratories use ready-to-use media and although the percentage is variable according to the microflora, we can consider that, today, 50-60% of the laboratories participating to the proficiency program only use ready-to-use media. The internal quality assurance programs lead also to an increasing use of media quality controls. The impact of analytical methods on bacterial counts was assessed by grouping together the results obtained by participating laboratories during the 10 last testing schemes from 1999 to 2003. The identified significant factors influencing enumeration results are variable from one microflora to another. Some of them significantly influence many microflora: the plating method (spiral plating or not) is influential for aerobic micro-organisms, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, and staphylococci, the type of culture medium and the medium manufacturer is

  18. Novel techniques of preparing TEM samples for characterization of irradiation damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H K; Long, F; Yao, Z; Daymond, M R

    2013-12-01

    Focus ion beam preparation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples has become increasingly popular due to the relative ease of extraction of TEM foils from specific locations within a larger sample. However the sputtering damage induced by Ga ion bombardment in focus ion beam means that traditional electropolishing may be a preferable method. First, we describe a special electropolishing method for the preparation of irregular TEM samples from ex-service nuclear reactor components, spring-shaped spacers. This method has also been used to prepare samples from a nonirradiated component for a TEM in situ heavy ion irradiation study. Because the specimen size is small (0.7 × 0.7 × 3 mm), a sandwich installation is adopted to obtain high quality polishing. Second, we describe some modifications to a conventional TEM cross-section sample preparation method that employs Ni electroplating. There are limitations to this method when preparing cross-section samples from either (1) metals which are difficult to activate for electroplating, or (2) a heavy ion irradiated foil with a very shallow damage layer close to the surface, which may be affected by the electroplating process. As a consequence, a novel technique for preparing cross-section samples was developed and is described.

  19. TEM Analysis of Interfaces in Diffusion-Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics Joined Using Metallic Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozaki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Mori, S.; Asthana R.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a promising material for thermo-structural applications due to its excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, oxidation resistance, and thermal stability. However, joining and integration technologies are indispensable for this material in order to fabricate large size and complex shape components with desired functionalities. Although diffusion bonding techniques using metallic interlayers have been commonly utilized to bond various SiC ceramics, detailed microstructural observation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the bonded area has not been carried out due to difficulty in preparing TEM samples. In this study, we tried to prepare TEM samples from joints of diffusion bonded SiC ceramics by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and carefully investigated the interfacial microstructure by TEM analysis. The samples used in this study were SiC fiber bonded ceramics (SA-Tyrannohex: SA-THX) diffusion bonded with metallic interlayers such as Ti, TiMo, and Mo-B. In this presentation, the result of microstructural analysis obtained by TEM observations and the influence of metallic interlayers and fiber orientation of SA-THX on the joint microstructure will be discussed.

  20. Structure and Output Characteristics of a TEM Array Fitted to a Fin Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Chen, L. N.; Chen, Z. J.; Xiao, G. Q.; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-06-01

    In the design of a thermoelectric generator, both the heat transfer area and the number of thermoelectric modules (TEMs) should be increased accordingly as the generator power increases; crucially, both aspects need to be coordinated. A kilowatt thermoelectric generator with a fin heat exchanger is proposed for use in a constant-speed diesel generator unit. Interior fins enhance convective heat transfer, whereas an exterior fin segment increases the heat transfer area. The heat transfer surface is double that of a plane heat exchanger, and the temperature field over the exterior fins is constrained to a one-dimensional distribution. Between adjoining exterior fins, there is a cooling water channel with trapezoid cross-section, enabling compact TEMs and cooling them. Hence, more TEMs are built as a series-parallel array of TEMs with lower resistance and more stable output current. Under nonuniform conditions, to prevent circulation and energy loss, bypass diodes and antidiodes are added. Experiments and numerical calculations show that, with matching and optimization of the heat exchanger and TEM array, a stable maximum output power is obtainable from the interior of the thermoelectric generator system, which can be connected to an external maximum power point tracking system.

  1. The Tem1 small GTPase controls actomyosin and septin dynamics during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Shannon, K B; Shou, W; Deshaies, R J; Li, R

    2001-04-01

    Cytokinesis in budding yeast involves an actomyosin-based ring which assembles in a multistepped fashion during the cell cycle and constricts during cytokinesis. In this report, we have investigated the structural and regulatory events that occur at the onset of cytokinesis. The septins, which form an hour-glass like structure during early stages of the cell cycle, undergo dynamic rearrangements prior to cell division: the hourglass structure splits into two separate rings. The contractile ring, localized between the septin double rings, immediately undergoes contraction. Septin ring splitting is independent of actomyosin ring contraction as it still occurs in mutants where contraction fails. We hypothesize that septin ring splitting may remove a structural barrier for actomyosin ring to contract. Because the Tem1 small GTPase (Tem1p) is required for the completion of mitosis, we investigated its role in regulating septin and actomyosin ring dynamics in the background of the net1-1 mutation, which bypasses the anaphase cell cycle arrest in Tem1-deficient cells. We show that Tem1p plays a specific role in cytokinesis in addition to its function in cell cycle progression. Tem1p is not required for the assembly of the actomyosin ring but controls actomyosin and septin dynamics during cytokinesis.

  2. Structural characterization of amphiphilic homopolymer micelles using light scattering, SANS, and cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Moughton, Adam O.; Robin, Mathew; Lu, Annhelen; Colombani, Olivier; Chassenieux, Christophe; Cheung, David; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2013-01-01

    We report the aqueous solution self-assembly of a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers end-functionalized with a hydrophobic sulfur-carbon-sulfur (SCS) pincer ligand. Although the hydrophobic ligand accounted for <5 wt% of the overall homopolymer mass, the polymers self-assembled into well-defined spherical micelles in aqueous solution, and these micelles are potential precursors to solution-assembled nanoreactors for small molecule catalysis applications. The micelle structural details were investigated using light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Radial density profiles extracted from the cryo-TEM micrographs suggested that the PNIPAM chains formed a diffuse corona with a radially decreasing corona density profile and provided valuable a priori information about the micelle structure for SANS data modeling. SANS analysis indicated a similar profile in which the corona surrounded a small hydrophobic core containing the pincer ligand. The similarity between the SANS and cryo-TEM results demonstrated that detailed information about the micelle density profile can be obtained directly from cryo-TEM and highlighted the complementary use of scattering and cryo-TEM in the structural characterization of solution-assemblies, such as the SCS pincer-functionalized homopolymers described here. PMID:24058209

  3. Structural characterization of amphiphilic homopolymer micelles using light scattering, SANS, and cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Joseph P; Kelley, Elizabeth G; Murphy, Ryan P; Moughton, Adam O; Robin, Mathew; Lu, Annhelen; Colombani, Olivier; Chassenieux, Christophe; Cheung, David; Sullivan, Millicent O; Epps, Thomas H; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-08-13

    We report the aqueous solution self-assembly of a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers end-functionalized with a hydrophobic sulfur-carbon-sulfur (SCS) pincer ligand. Although the hydrophobic ligand accounted for <5 wt% of the overall homopolymer mass, the polymers self-assembled into well-defined spherical micelles in aqueous solution, and these micelles are potential precursors to solution-assembled nanoreactors for small molecule catalysis applications. The micelle structural details were investigated using light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Radial density profiles extracted from the cryo-TEM micrographs suggested that the PNIPAM chains formed a diffuse corona with a radially decreasing corona density profile and provided valuable a priori information about the micelle structure for SANS data modeling. SANS analysis indicated a similar profile in which the corona surrounded a small hydrophobic core containing the pincer ligand. The similarity between the SANS and cryo-TEM results demonstrated that detailed information about the micelle density profile can be obtained directly from cryo-TEM and highlighted the complementary use of scattering and cryo-TEM in the structural characterization of solution-assemblies, such as the SCS pincer-functionalized homopolymers described here.

  4. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  5. Developing of an environmental cell TEM holder for dynamic in situ observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataineh, Khaled M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the subject of "in situ" development of environmental-transmission electron microscope (E-TEM) holder assemblies. In E-TEM, the sample is continuously subjected to gases as opposed to conventional TEM where the sample is under high vacuum. E-TEM offers the possibility of achieving a new level of material analysis. E-TEM allows obtaining information about chemical information during the reaction at atomic level. Rarefied gas dynamics analysis is used to assess the proposed design. The analysis is focused on determining the molecular distribution inside the vacuum chamber and calculating the impingement rate on the target surface of the specimen. Simulations are performed to predict the molecular interaction with the specimen at given pressures to determine the proper position of a specimen within a vacuum chamber to optimize and predict reaction characteristics. Results of direct simulation Monte Carlo show that the two sides of the sample operate at different temperatures due to the gas flow and experience different molecular distributions.

  6. 1D Cole-Cole inversion of TEM transients influenced by induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Marc; Tezkan, Bülent

    2017-03-01

    Effects of induced polarization (IP) can have an impact on time-domain electromagnetic measurements (TEM) and may lead to sign reversals in the recorded transients. To study these IP effects on TEM data, a new 1D inversion algorithm was developed for both, the central-loop and the separate-loop TEM configurations using the Cole-Cole relaxation model. 1D forward calculations for a homogeneous half-space were conducted with the aim of analyzing the impacts of the Cole-Cole parameters on TEM transients with respect to possible sign reversals. The forward modelings showed that the variation of different parameters have comparable effects on the TEM transients. This leads to an increasing number of equivalent models as a result of inversion calculations. Subsequently, 1D inversions of synthetic data were performed to study the potentials and limitations of the algorithm regarding the resolution of the Cole-Cole parameters. In order to achieve optimal inversion results, it was essential to error-weight the data points in the direct vicinity of sign reversals. The obtained findings were eventually adopted on the inversion of real field data which contained considerable IP signatures such as sign reversals. One field data set was recorded at the Nakyn kimberlite field in Western Yakutiya, Russia, in the central-loop configuration. Another field data set originates from a waste site in Cologne, Germany, and was measured utilizing the separate-loop configuration.

  7. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  8. Competing on talent analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise.

  9. Monitoring the analytic surface.

    PubMed

    Spence, D P; Mayes, L C; Dahl, H

    1994-01-01

    How do we listen during an analytic hour? Systematic analysis of the speech patterns of one patient (Mrs. C.) strongly suggests that the clustering of shared pronouns (e.g., you/me) represents an important aspect of the analytic surface, preconsciously sensed by the analyst and used by him to determine when to intervene. Sensitivity to these patterns increases over the course of treatment, and in a final block of 10 hours shows a striking degree of contingent responsivity: specific utterances by the patient are consistently echoed by the analyst's interventions.

  10. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  11. Two-in-one sample preparation for plan-view TEM.

    PubMed

    Sáfrán, György; Szász, Noémi; Sáfrán, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation requires special skills, it is time consuming and costly, hence, an increase of the efficiency is of primary importance. This article describes a method that duplicates the yield of the conventional mechanical and ion beam preparation of plan-view TEM samples. As a modification of the usual procedures, instead of one two different samples are comprised in a single specimen. The two pre-cut slabs, one from each samples, are embedded side by side in the window of a 3 mm dia Ti disk and the specimen is thinned mechanically and by ion milling until perforation that occurs at the interface of the two different slabs. That, with proper implementation, provides acceptable size thin area for the TEM study of both samples. The suitability of the two-in-one method has been confirmed through examples.

  12. Generation of entangled TEM01 modes with periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong-Guo, Yang; Jing-jing, Wang; Jing, Zhang; Heng-Xin, Sun

    2016-07-01

    Spatial quantum optics based on the high-order transverse mode is important for the super-resolution measurement and quantum image beyond the shot noise level. Quantum entanglement of the transverse plane Hermite-Gauss TEM01 mode has been demonstrated experimentally in this paper. Two squeezed TEM01 modes, which are generated by a pair of degenerate optical parametric amplifiers (DOPA) with the nonlinear crystals of periodically poled KTiOPO4, have been combined to produce TEM01 mode entanglement using a beam splitter. The 1.5 dB for the sum of amplitude and 1.2 dB for the difference of phase below shot-noise level is achieved with the measurement system of a Bell state detection. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504218 and 61108003) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013021005-2).

  13. An automatic algorithm for determination of the nanoparticles from TEM images using circular hough transform.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohsen; Rafsanjani, Hossein Khodabakhshi

    2017-02-28

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology, and the size distribution of nanoparticles is one of the most important statistical properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction is commonly used for the characterization and measuring particle size distributions, but manual analysis of the micrographs is extremely labor-intensive. Here, we have developed an image processing algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of overlapped particles and uneven background. The approach is based on the modified circular Hough transform, and pre and post processing techniques on TEM image to improve the accuracy and increase the detection rate of the nano particles. Its application is presented through several images with different noises, uneven backgrounds and over lapped particles. The merits of this robust quantifying method are demonstrated by comparing the results with the data obtained through manual measurement. The algorithm allows particles to be detected and characterized with high accuracy.

  14. TEM measurement in a low resistivity overburden performed by using low temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanju; Du, Shangyu; Xie, Lijun; Chang, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoming; Wang, Yuan; Lin, Jun; Rong, Liangliang

    2016-12-01

    Exploration of areas with thick low resistivity overburden is still a challenge for time domain transient electromagnetic method (TEM). We report modeling of a sandwich-layered earth by simulating the B field response with different conductive target layer thicknesses, thus obtaining a relationship between the resolution of the B field and the exploration depth. A low temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) is an ideal sensor for measuring the secondary magnetic field B in TEM measurements, because its sensitivity of several fT/√Hz is independent of frequency. In our TEM experiments, we utilized two different coils as receivers, a simple SQUID system, and a large transmitter loop of 200 × 200 m2 to compare the detected decay curves. At some measurement points, a decay signal of more than 300 ms duration was obtained by using the SQUID. Apparent resistivity profiles of about 9 km length are presented.

  15. Graphene oxide single sheets as substrates for high resolution cryoTEM.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Patterson, Joseph P; Bomans, Paul H H; Wilson, Neil R; Friedrich, Heiner; van Benthem, Rolf A T M; de With, Gijsbertus; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    CryoTEM is an important tool in the analysis of soft matter, where generally defocus conditions are used to enhance the contrast in the images, but this is at the expense of the maximum resolution that can be obtained. Here, we demonstrate the use of graphene oxide single sheets as support for the formation of 10 nm thin films for high resolution cryoTEM imaging, using DNA as an example. With this procedure, the overlap of objects in the vitrified film is avoided. Moreover, in these thin films less background scattering occurs and as a direct result, an increased contrast can be observed in the images. Hence, imaging closer to focus as compared with conventional cryoTEM procedures is achieved, without losing contrast. In addition, we demonstrate an ~1.8 fold increase in resolution, which is crucial for accurate size analysis of nanostructures.

  16. TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED U3SI2/AL DISPERSION FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. Miller; D. Keiser; A. Robinson; P. Medvedev; D. Wachs

    2010-10-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U3Si2/Al has been recognized as a reasonably good performance fuel for nuclear research and test reactors except that it requires the use of high enrichment uranium. An irradiated U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel (~75% enrichment) from the high flux side of a RERTR-8 (U0R040) plate was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel plate was irradiated in the advanced test reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately ~110 degrees C and 5.4 x 10-21 f/cm3. The characterization was performed using a 200KV TEM with a LaB6 filament. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of this silicide fuel are discussed.

  17. Characterization of crystallite morphology for doped strontium fluoride nanophosphors by TEM and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, J. H.; Lee, M. E.; Yagoub, M. Y. A.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallite morphology for Eu-doped and undoped SrF2 nanophosphors have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The values for average crystallite size obtained by the application of the Scherrer equation and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for XRD peaks are compared to the results obtained using the hollow cone dark field (HCDF) TEM imaging technique. In the case of the TEM analysis, a bimodal crystallite size distribution was revealed with one of the distributions having a measured range of crystallite sizes which was in good agreement with the XRD data. HCDF in combination with FIB specimen preparation was found to be a promising technique for the determination of crystallite size distributions in nanophosphors which might facilitate a better understanding of their scintillation properties.

  18. Resolution Improvement in Aberration-Corrected Low- Voltage TEM with Monochromator at 60 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, S.; Mukai, M.; Sasaki, T.; Suenaga, K.; Sawada, H.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a low-voltage electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and Delta-type Cs correctors, which shows atomic resolution at accelerating voltages of 60, 30 and 15 kV. In theory, resolution of TEM images at 60 kV is severely affected by chromatic aberration, which is proven by our calculations of contrast transfer functions and multi-slice image simulation taking chromatic aberration into account with experimental conditions. Experimentally, TEM images of gold nano-particles were observed with non-monochromated and monochromated electron sources at 60 kV. Detectable spatial frequency in the image with the monochromated source was higher than that with non- monochromated source. We have demonstrated that the TEM image resolution at the low- voltage is improved by using a monochromated electron source, which reduce the energy spread of the electron source.

  19. In-Situ TEM Electrochemistry of Individual Nanowire and Nanoparticle Electrodes in a Li-Ion Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianyu

    2012-02-01

    Recently, we created the first Li-ion electrochemical cell inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and observed, in real time with atomic scale resolution, the lithiation/delithiation processes. This experiment opened the door for a suite of experimental studies involving in-situ TEM characterization of Li-ion battery materials. In this presentation, I'll first review our latest progress of using the in-situ electrochemical cell setup inside the TEM to reveal the intrinsic electrochemistry of several high energy density anode materials such as SnO2, ZnO, Si, Ge, Al nanowires, Si nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Several electrochemical mechanisms were observed and characterized in real-time, including lithiation induced stress, volume changes, phase transformations, pulverization, cracking, embrittlement, and mechanical failure in anode materials. These results indicate the strong material, size and crystallographic orientation dependent electrochemical behavior and degradation mechanisms that occur in Li-ion battery anodes. In the future, we will need further advancements in in-situ characterization for understanding important processes in Li-ion batteries. For example, liquid cells are required in order to examine the electrochemical reactions between battery materials and the standard battery electrolytes, which are ethylene carbonate-based. Furthermore, in-situ studies need to be correlated with electrochemical studies performed on bulk electrodes. I will present a comparison between our in-situ results and electrochemical studies on conventional battery electrodes and highlight how in-situ studies can have important impact on the design of Li-ion batteries. Finally I will discuss outstanding challenging issues and opportunities in the field of Li-ion battery research. [4pt] References: Science 330, 1515 (2010); 330, 1485 (2010); Nano Lett. Doi: 10.1021/nl200412p, 10.1021/nl2024118, 10.1021/nl201684d, 10.1021/nl202088h, ACS Nano, doi: 10

  20. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  1. SANS and TEM studies of carbide precipitation and creep damage in type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Ogle, J.C.; Schneibel, J.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were performed to characterize the carbide (M/sub 23/C/sub 6/) precipitation and creep damage induced in type 304 stainless steel in the primary creep stage. The size distribution of matrix carbides evaluated from SANS analyses was consistent with TEM data, and the expected accelerated kinetics of precipitation under applied stress was confirmed. Additional SANS measurements after the postcreep solution annealing were made in order to differentiate cavities from the carbides. Potential advantages and difficulties associated with characterization of creep-induced cavitation by the SANS techniques are discussed.

  2. Investigating Processes of Materials Formation via Liquid Phase and Cryogenic TEM

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, James J.; Sommerdijk, Nico

    2016-06-14

    The formation of materials in solutions is a widespread phenomenon in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems, occurring through dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth, and coarsening. The recent advent of liquid phase TEM and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of these phenomena by providing new insights into the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms. The techniques have been applied to metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, geochemical and biological minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and selfassembling systems, both organic and inorganic. New instrumentation and methodologies currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  3. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the TEM

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning-transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200 μm × 200 μm. PMID:26650072

  4. Composite fillings microleakage after TEM00 Er: YAG laser texturing of human tooth enamel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Fedotov, D. Y.

    2010-11-01

    The results of comparative investigation of methylene-blue microleakage between tooth enamel surface and light-cure composites various fluidity are presented. An enamel surface was treated by traditional methods or laser method (laser texturing). The role of adhesive systems is investigated at enamel texturing by the TEM00 Er: YAG radiation. It is shown, that microleakage was not observed when enamel was textured by the TEM00 Er: YAG laser radiation and covered with flowable composite "Revolution" (Kerr) without adhesive system. It is established, that for laser textured surfaces methylene-blue microleakage depends on distance between microcraters.

  5. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Shane; Nigbor, Mike; Hillman, Daniel

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  6. Analytics: Changing the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2013-01-01

    In this third and concluding discussion on analytics, the author notes that we live in an information culture. We are accustomed to having information instantly available and accessible, along with feedback and recommendations. We want to know what people think and like (or dislike). We want to know how we compare with "others like me."…

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  8. Social Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers.…

  9. [The Raman Spectroscopy (RS): A new tool for the analytical quality control of injectable in health settings. Comparison of RS technique versus HPLC and UV/Vis-FTIR, applied to anthracyclines as anticancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Bourget, P; Amin, A; Moriceau, A; Cassard, B; Vidal, F; Clement, R

    2012-12-01

    The study compares the performances of three analytical methods devoted to Analytical Quality Control (AQC) of therapeutic solutions formed into care environment, we are talking about Therapeutics Objects(TN) (TOs(TN)). We explored the pharmacological model of two widely used anthracyclines i.e. adriamycin and epirubicin. We compared the performance of the HPLC versus two vibrational spectroscopic techniques: a tandem UV/Vis-FTIR on one hand and Raman Spectroscopy (RS) on the other. The three methods give good results for the key criteria of repeatability, of reproducibility and, of accuracy. A Spearman and a Kendall correlation test confirms the noninferiority of the vibrational techniques as an alternative to the reference method (HPLC). The selection of bands for characterization and quantification by RS is the results of a gradual process adjustment, at the intercept of matrix effects. From the perspective of a AQC associated to release of TOs, RS displays various advantages: (a) to decide quickly (~2min), simultaneously and without intrusion or withdrawal on both the nature of a packaging than on a solvant and this, regardless of the compound of interest; it is the founder asset of the method, (b) to explore qualitatively and quantitatively any kinds of TOs, (c) operator safety is guaranteed during production and in the laboratory, (d) the suppression of analytical releases or waste contribute to protects the environment, (e) the suppression.of consumables, (f) a negligible costs of maintenance, (g) a small budget of technicians training. These results already show that the SR technology is potentially a strong contributor to the safety of the medication cycle and fight against the iatrogenic effects of drugs.

  10. Simple and rapid methods for SEM observation and TEM immunolabeling of rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Adya P; Wi, Seung Gon; Kang, Hunseung; Chung, Gap Chae; Kim, Yoon Soo

    2003-08-01

    We developed a method involving air-drying of a rubber suspension after fixation in glutaraldehyde-tannic acid and postfixation in osmium tetroxide for SEM observation. For TEM immunolabeling the suspension was air-dried after osmium-only fixation. Whereas conventional methods failed to satisfactorily stabilize rubber particles, the methods described here proved successful in preserving their integrity.

  11. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  12. Occurrence of Siliceous Impact Melt in Netschaëvo IIE? A FIB-TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, C.; Van Roosbroek, N.; Greshake, A.; Pittarello, L.; Hecht, L.; Debaille, V.; Wirth, R.; Claeys, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    A silicate inclusion in a sample of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite was studied with FIB-TEM. We present petrographic features indicating that this inclusion is quenched impact melt and suggest that Netschaëvo is an impact melt breccia.

  13. Bonding and structure of a reconstructed (001) surface of SrTiO3 from TEM.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2012-10-18

    The determination of the atomic structure and the retrieval of information about reconstruction and bonding of metal oxide surfaces is challenging owing to the highly defective structure and insulating properties of these surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers extremely high spatial resolution (less than one ångström) and the ability to provide systematic information from both real and reciprocal space. However, very few TEM studies have been carried out on surfaces because the information from the bulk dominates the very weak signals originating from surfaces. Here we report an experimental approach to extract surface information effectively from a thickness series of electron energy-loss spectra containing different weights of surface signals, using a wedge-shaped sample. Using the (001) surface of the technologically important compound strontium titanate, SrTiO(3) (refs 4-6), as a model system for validation, our method shows that surface spectra are sensitive to the atomic reconstruction and indicate bonding and crystal-field changes surrounding the surface Ti cations. Very good agreement can be achieved between the experimental surface spectra and crystal-field multiplet calculations based on the proposed atomic surface structure optimized by density functional calculations. The distorted TiO(6-x) units indicated by the proposed model can be viewed directly in our high-resolution scanning TEM images. We suggest that this approach be used as a general method to extract valuable spectroscopic information from surface atoms in parallel with high-resolution images in TEM.

  14. Critical hydrogen bonding by serine 235 for cephalosporinase activity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, U; Manavathu, E K; Lerner, S A; Mobashery, S

    1993-01-01

    The role of Ser-235 in the catalytic mechanism of the TEM-1 beta-lactamase has been explored by the study of a mutant enzyme in which Ser-235 has been substituted by alanine (Ala-235 mutant enzyme). A comparative kinetic analysis of both the wild-type and the Ala-235 TEM-1 enzymes revealed little effect of this substitution of residue 235 on the turnover of penicillins but a greater effect on the turnover of cephalosporins. Susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli strains harboring the wild-type TEM-1 beta-lactamase and the Ala-235 mutant enzyme revealed an effect of the mutation similar to that observed in the enzymological studies. The MICs of two representative cephalosporins for the strain containing the mutant enzyme were much lower than those for the isogenic strain bearing the wild-type TEM-1 beta-lactamase. On the other hand, the strain with the mutant enzyme was still highly resistant to penicillins. PMID:8285630

  15. XAS and HR-TEM Analyses of the Nakhlite Hydrothermal Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2012-09-01

    We use Fe-K XANES and EXAFS, with HR-TEM observations, to show that the phyllosilicate minerals found in the Lafayette nakhlite are saponite and serpentine. An increase in ferric/ferrous ratio is identified as part of the hydrothermal activity.

  16. Thinning of large mammalian cells for cryo-TEM characterization by cryo-FIB milling.

    PubMed

    Strunk, K M; Wang, K; Ke, D; Gray, J L; Zhang, P

    2012-09-01

    Focused ion beam milling at cryogenic temperatures (cryo-FIB) is a valuable tool that can be used to thin vitreous biological specimens for subsequent imaging and analysis by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) in a frozen-hydrated state. This technique offers the potential benefit of eliminating the mechanical artefacts that are typically found with cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, due to the additional complexity in transferring samples in and out of the FIB, contamination and devitrification of the amorphous ice is commonly encountered. To address these problems, we have designed a sample cryo-shuttle that directly and specifically accepts Polara TEM cartridges to simplify the transfer process between FIB and TEM. We optimized several parameters in the cryo-FIB and cryo-TEM processes using the quality of the samples' ice as an indicator and demonstrated high-quality milling with large mammalian cells. By comparing the results from HeLa cells to those from Escherichia coli cells, we discuss some of the artefacts and challenges we have encountered using this technique.

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures. In-situ TEM Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  18. Aberration-corrected STEM/TEM imaging at 15kV.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takeo; Sawada, Hidetaka; Hosokawa, Fumio; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-10-01

    The performance of aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) at an accelerating voltage of 15kV was evaluated in a low-voltage microscope equipped with a cold-field emission gun and a higher-order aberration corrector. Aberrations up to the fifth order were corrected by the aberration measurement and auto-correction system using the diffractogram tableau method in TEM and Ronchigram analysis in STEM. TEM observation of nanometer-sized particles demonstrated that aberrations up to an angle of 50mrad were compensated. A TEM image of Si[110] exhibited lattice fringes with a spacing of 0.192nm, and the power spectrum of the image showed spots corresponding to distances of 0.111nm. An annular dark-field STEM image of Si[110] showed lattice fringes of (111) and (22¯0) planes corresponding to lattice distances of 0.314nm and 0.192nm, respectively. At an accelerating voltage of 15kV, the developed low-voltage microscope achieved atomic-resolution imaging with a small chromatic aberration and a large uniform phase.

  19. Development and Application of Operando TEM to a Ruthenium Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Benjamin Kyle

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an extension of in-situ TEM in which the performance of the material being observed is measured simultaneously. This is of great value, since structure-performance relationships lie at the heart of materials science. For catalyst materials, like the SiO2-supported Ru nanoparticles studied, the important performance metric, catalyst activity, is measured inside the microscope by determining the gas composition during imaging. This is accomplished by acquisition of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of the gas in the environmental TEM while catalysis is taking place. In this work, automated methods for rapidly quantifying low-loss and core-loss EELS of gases were developed. A new sample preparation method was also established to increase catalytic conversion inside a differentially-pumped environmental TEM, and the maximum CO conversion observed was about 80%. A system for mixing gases and delivering them to the environmental TEM was designed and built, and a method for locating and imaging nanoparticles in zone axis orientations while minimizing electron dose rate was determined. After atomic resolution images of Ru nanoparticles observed during CO oxidation were obtained, the shape and surface structures of these particles was investigated. A Wulff model structure for Ru particles was compared to experimental images both by manually rotating the model, and by automatically determining a matching orientation using cross-correlation of shape signatures. From this analysis, it was determined that most Ru particles are close to Wulff-shaped during CO oxidation. While thick oxide layers were not observed to form on Ru during CO oxidation, thin RuO2 layers on the surface of Ru nanoparticles were imaged with atomic resolution for the first time. The activity of these layers is discussed in the context of the literature on the subject, which has thus far been inconclusive. We conclude that disordered oxidized ruthenium

  20. Requirements for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-03-01

    It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

  1. Multifunctional nanoparticles: analytical prospects.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Alejandro Simón; Díaz-García, Marta Elena

    2010-05-07

    Multifunctional nanoparticles are among the most exciting nanomaterials with promising applications in analytical chemistry. These applications include (bio)sensing, (bio)assays, catalysis and separations. Although most of these applications are based on the magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties of multifunctional nanoparticles, other aspects such as the synergistic effect of the functional groups and the amplification effect associated with the nanoscale dimension have also been observed. Considering not only the nature of the raw material but also the shape, there is a huge variety of nanoparticles. In this review only magnetic, quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon and inorganic nanotubes as well as silica, titania and gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are addressed. This review presents a narrative summary on the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for analytical applications, along with a discussion on some critical challenges existing in the field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  2. Avatars in Analytical Gaming

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Cowell, Amanda K.

    2009-08-29

    This paper discusses the design and use of anthropomorphic computer characters as nonplayer characters (NPC’s) within analytical games. These new environments allow avatars to play a central role in supporting training and education goals instead of planning the supporting cast role. This new ‘science’ of gaming, driven by high-powered but inexpensive computers, dedicated graphics processors and realistic game engines, enables game developers to create learning and training opportunities on par with expensive real-world training scenarios. However, there needs to be care and attention placed on how avatars are represented and thus perceived. A taxonomy of non-verbal behavior is presented and its application to analytical gaming discussed.

  3. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  4. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  5. Analytic Modeling of Insurgencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    influenced by interests and utilities. 4.1 Carrots and Sticks An analytic model that captures the aforementioned utilitarian aspect is presented in... carrots ” x. A dynamic utility-based model is developed in [26] in which the state variables are the fractions of contrarians (supporters of the...Unanticipated Political Revolution," Public Choice, vol. 61, pp. 41-74, 1989. [26] M. P. Atkinson, M. Kress and R. Szechtman, " Carrots , Sticks and Fog

  6. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  7. Competing on analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated.

  8. Analytic Derivatives of Quartic-Scaling Doubly Hybrid XYGJ-OS Functional: Theory, Implementation, and Benchmark Comparison with M06-2X and MP2 Geometries for Nonbonded Compelexes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyunjun; Shao, Yihan; Goddard, William A.; Jung, Yousung

    2013-01-01

    Analytic first derivative expression of opposite-spin (OS) ansatz adapted quartic scaling doubly hybrid XYGJ-OS functional is derived and implemented into Q-Chem. The resulting algorithm scales quartically with system size as in OS-MP2 gradient, by utilizing the combination of Laplace transformation and density fitting technique. The performance of XYGJ-OS geometry optimization is assessed by comparing the bond lengths and the intermolecular properties in reference coupled cluster methods. For the selected nonbonded complexes in the S22 and S66 dataset used in the present benchmark test, it is shown that XYGJ-OS geometries are more accurate than M06-2X and RI-MP2, the two quantum chemical methods widely used to obtain accurate geometries for practical systems, and comparable to CCSD(T) geometries. PMID:23671408

  9. Fabricating Cotton Analytical Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shang-Chi; Hsu, Min-Yen; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-08-30

    A robust, low-cost analytical device should be user-friendly, rapid, and affordable. Such devices should also be able to operate with scarce samples and provide information for follow-up treatment. Here, we demonstrate the development of a cotton-based urinalysis (i.e., nitrite, total protein, and urobilinogen assays) analytical device that employs a lateral flow-based format, and is inexpensive, easily fabricated, rapid, and can be used to conduct multiple tests without cross-contamination worries. Cotton is composed of cellulose fibers with natural absorptive properties that can be leveraged for flow-based analysis. The simple but elegant fabrication process of our cotton-based analytical device is described in this study. The arrangement of the cotton structure and test pad takes advantage of the hydrophobicity and absorptive strength of each material. Because of these physical characteristics, colorimetric results can persistently adhere to the test pad. This device enables physicians to receive clinical information in a timely manner and shows great potential as a tool for early intervention.

  10. Comparison between external and internal standard calibration in the validation of an analytical method for 1-hydroxypyrene in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pigini, D; Cialdella, A M; Faranda, P; Tranfo, G

    2006-01-01

    1-Hydroxypyrene is a metabolite of pyrene, a member of the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) whose toxic properties in some cases include carcinogenicity. The determination of 1-hydroxypyrene in human urine is used as a biological indicator for exposure to PAHs, which is related to the combustion of organic materials, like smoking, living in urban environments, and eating grilled or smoked food. The determination of 1-hydroxypyrene by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection has very good sensitivity but it is not highly specific: this can reduce accuracy in the quantitative determination of low levels of analyte in a complex matrix like urine. An HPLC method that uses triple quadrupole mass detection has been validated with the objective both to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and to achieve the maximum specificity for the analyte in those urine samples that are richer in possible inteferents. The calibration range for 1-hydroxypyrene is from 0.005-0.1 microg/L in the urine of non-smoking healthy volunteers. After solid-phase extraction, samples were analyzed by HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. In order to obtain reliable results quantitative analysis must be performed by means of the internal standard method (we used deuterium-labelled 1-hydroxypyrene): the method accuracy is not less than 85%. The S/N ratio at a concentration of 0.1 microg/L is about 10, and therefore this can be considered the lowest limit of quantitation. The method performance does not change if urine samples are measured using a calibration curve prepared in methanol, thus reducing the time of analysis and costs.

  11. Novel TEM approaches to imaging of microstructures in carbonates: Clues to growth mechanisms in calcite and dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, J.; Vali, H.; Mountjoy, E.

    1999-12-01

    Relating microstructures imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to specific growth mechanisms requires imaging of both the surface microtopography on crystal faces and its corresponding microstructure in the bulk crystal. Pt-C replicas of as-grown surfaces are ideally suited to this task, as they provide a high-resolution, nearly three-dimensional image of surface topography that can be correlated with microstructures visible in sections at high angle to the as-grown surface. Ultramicrotomy enables the preparation of ultrathin sections more quickly than conventional ion-thinning and can be used to investigate chemical heterogeneities by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The authors evaluate the potential of both techniques for the study of microstructures in calcite and dolomite. (1) TEM images were obtained from Pt-C replicas of synthetic calcite. The as-grown (10{bar 1}4) face of a Mg/Mn-doped crystal growth showed growth hillocks aligned along preferred orientations. In Pb/Mn/Sr-doped calcite, sections at high angle to as-grown faces showed a uniform microstructure in {l{underscore}brace}10{bar 1}4{r{underscore}brace} sectors. The {l{underscore}brace}01{bar 1}2{r{underscore}brace} sectors contained concentric zones that alternated from striated to uniform microstructures, suggesting periodic variations in growth rate and possibly in the growth mechanism. An oscillatory-zoned Mn-doped calcite showed fine-scale banding (30--150 mm) and periodic roughening of (10{bar 1}4) surfaces that suggest repetitive transitions between growth mechanisms.(2) In sedimentary dolomites, Pt-C replicas of surfaces cleaved parallel to a (10{bar 1}4) face showed a hillocky topography or smooth (10{bar 1}4) surfaces modified by non-equivalent facets. Surfaces produced by cleavage at high angle to a (10{bar 1}4) face exposed sectors with fine-scale banding crosscut by sharp boundaries, suggestive of closely spaced growth hillocks intercalated with non-equivalent subsectors

  12. Internal standards: a source of analytical bias for volatile organic analyte determinations.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, Michael H

    2011-01-21

    The use of internal standards in the determination of volatile organic compounds as described in SW-846 Method 8260C introduces a potential for bias in results once the internal standards (ISTDs) are added to a sample for analysis. The bias is relative to the dissimilarity between the analyte and internal standard physical properties that influence how easily analytes are separated from a matrix and concentrated during analysis. Method 5032 is a vacuum distillation procedure for extracting analytes from a sample for use with Method 8260C. Vacuum distillation is also incorporated within another GC/MS analytical procedure, Method 8261A. Method 8260C/5032 and Method 8261A are experimentally identical, however, Method 8261A uses internal standards differently by relating the recovery of each compound to its boiling point and relative volatility. By processing each analysis (water, soil, and biota) using both Method 8260C and Method 8261A, the two approaches are compared on the basis of analyte bias and the failure rate of the quality controls. Analytes were grouped by how similar their boiling points and natural log of their relative volatilities (lnRVs) were to their Method 8260C recommended ISTDs. For the most similar analytes, the Method 8260C determinations yielded an average bias less than 10% and a failure to meet calibration criteria less than 7%. However, as the difference between analyte and ISTD became greater the bias increased to over 40% (matrix dependent) and its calibration failure rate approached 70%. In comparison, when the Method 8260C data were reprocessed as Method 8261A determinations, this trend for groupings was minimized with biases increasing from 6% to only 20% and the calibration failure rate went from 0% to 15%.

  13. Evaluation methodology for comparing memory and communication of analytic processes in visual analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric D; Goodall, John R

    2014-01-01

    Provenance tools can help capture and represent the history of analytic processes. In addition to supporting analytic performance, provenance tools can be used to support memory of the process and communication of the steps to others. Objective evaluation methods are needed to evaluate how well provenance tools support analyst s memory and communication of analytic processes. In this paper, we present several methods for the evaluation of process memory, and we discuss the advantages and limitations of each. We discuss methods for determining a baseline process for comparison, and we describe various methods that can be used to elicit process recall, step ordering, and time estimations. Additionally, we discuss methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses of process memory. By organizing possible memory evaluation methods and providing a meta-analysis of the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches, this paper can inform study design and encourage objective evaluation of process memory and communication.

  14. A COMPARISON OF INTER-ANALYST DIFFERENCES IN THE CLASSIFICATION OF A LANDSAT TEM+ SCENE IN SOUTH-CENTRAL VIRGINIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined inter-analyst classification variability based on training site signature selection only for six classifications from a 10 km2 Landsat ETM+ image centered over a highly heterogeneous area in south-central Virginia. Six analysts classified the image...

  15. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  16. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  17. Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchet, F.; Lis, D.; Caudano, Y.; Mani, A. A.; Peremans, A.; Champagne, B.; Guthmuller, J.

    2012-03-01

    The knowledge of the first hyperpolarizability tensor elements of molecular groups is crucial for a quantitative interpretation of the sum frequency generation (SFG) activity of thin organic films at interfaces. Here, the SFG response of the terminal methyl group of a dodecanethiol (DDT) monolayer has been interpreted on the basis of calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level of approximation. In particular, DFT calculations have been carried out on three classes of models for the aliphatic chains. The first class of models consists of aliphatic chains, containing from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, in which only one methyl group can freely vibrate, while the rest of the chain is frozen by a strong overweight of its C and H atoms. This enables us to localize the probed vibrational modes on the methyl group. In the second class, only one methyl group is frozen, while the entire remaining chain is allowed to vibrate. This enables us to analyse the influence of the aliphatic chain on the methyl stretching vibrations. Finally, the dodecanethiol (DDT) molecule is considered, for which the effects of two dielectrics, i.e. n-hexane and n-dodecane, are investigated. Moreover, DDT calculations are also carried out by using different exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in order to assess the DFT approximations. Using the DFT IR vectors and Raman tensors, the SFG spectrum of DDT has been simulated and the orientation of the methyl group has then been deduced and compared with that obtained using an analytical approach based on a bond additivity model. This analysis shows that when using DFT molecular properties, the predicted orientation of the terminal methyl group tends to converge as a function of the alkyl chain length and that the effects of the chain as well as of the dielectric environment are small. Instead, a more significant difference is observed when comparing the DFT-based results with those obtained from the analytical approach, thus indicating

  18. Analytic Empirical Potential and its Comparison to State of the Art ab initio Calculations for the 6e^- Excited b(1^3Π_u)-STATE of Li_2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2015-06-01

    Despite only having 6e^-, the most sophisticated Li_2(b,1^3Π_u) calculation has an r_e that disagrees with the empirical value by over 1500% of the latter's uncertainty, and energy spacings that disagree with those of the empirical potential by up to over 1.5cm-1. The discrepancy here is far more than for the ground state of the 5e^- system BeH, for which the best ab initio calculation gives an r_e which disagrees with the empirical value by less than 200% of the latter's uncertainty. In addition to this discrepancy, other reasons motivating the construction of an analytic empirical potential for Li_2(b,1^3Π_u) include (1) the fact that it is the most deeply bound Li_2 state, (2) it is the only Li_2 state out of the lowest five, for which no analytic empirical potential has yet been built, (3) the state it mixes with, the A(1^1σ_u)-state, is one of the most thoroughly characterized molecular states, but has a small gap of missing data in part of the region where it mixes with the b-state, and (4) it is one of the states accessible by new ultra-high precision techniques based on photoassociation. Finally (5) there is currently a discrepancy between the most sophisticated 3e- ab initio calculation, and the most current empirical value, for the first Li(^2S)-Li(^2P) interaction term (C_3), despite the latter being the most precise experimentally determined oscillator strength for any system, by an order of magnitude^e. The b-state is one of the states that has this exact C_3 interaction term. Musial & Kucharski (2014) J. Chem. Theor. Comp. 10, 1200. Dattani N. S. (2015) J. Mol. Spec. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jms.2014.09.005. Semczuk M., Li X., Gunton W., Haw M., Dattani N. S., Witz J., Mills A., Jones D. J., Madison K. W. (2013) Phys. Rev. A 87, 052505 Gunton W., Semczuk M., Dattani N. S., Madison K. W. (2013) Phys. Rev. A 88, 062510 Tang L.-Y., Yan Z.-C., Shi T.-Y., Mitroy J (2011) Phys. Rev. A 84, 052502. Le Roy R. J., Dattani N. S., Coxon J. A., Ross A. J

  19. Evaluation of analytical performance and comparison of clinical results of the new generation method AccuTnI+3 for the measurement of cardiac troponin I using both patients and quality control plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Storti, Simona; Masotti, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Franzini, Maria; Buzzi, Paola; Casagranda, Ivo; Ciofini, Enrica; Zucchelli, Gian Carlo; Ndreu, Rudina; Passino, Claudio; Clerico, Aldo

    2015-12-07

    The study aims are to evaluate the analytical performance and the clinical results of the chemiluminescent Access AccuTnI+3 immunoassay for the determination of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) with DxI 800 and Access2 platforms and to compare the clinical results obtained with this method with those of three cTnI immunoassays, recently introduced in the European market. The limits of blank (LoB), detection (LoD), and quantitation (LoQ) at 20% CV and 10% CV were 4.5 ng/L and 10.9 ng/L, 17.1 and 30.4 ng/L, respectively. The results of STAT Architect high Sensitive TnI (Abbott Diagnostics), ADVIA Centaur Troponin I Ultra (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics), ST AIA-Pack cTnI third generation (Tosoh Bioscience), and Access AccuTnI+3 (Beckman Coulter Diagnostics) showed very close correlations (R ranging from 0.901 to 0.994) in 122 samples of patients admitted to the emergency department. However, on average there was a difference up to 2.4-fold between the method measuring the highest (ADVIA method) and lowest cTnI values (AccuTnI+3 method). The consensus mean values between methods ranged from 6.2% to 29.6% in 18 quality control samples distributed in an external quality control study (cTnI concentrations ranging from 29.3 ng/L to 1557.5 ng/L). In conclusion, the results of our analytical evaluation concerning the AccuTnI+3 method, using the DxI platform, are well in agreement with those suggested by the manufacturer as well as those reported by some recent studies using the Access2 platform. Our results confirm that the AccuTnI+3 method for the Access2 and DxI 800 platforms is a clinically usable method for cTnI measurement.

  20. MERRA Analytic Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D. Q.; McInerney, M. A.; Tamkin, G. S.; Thompson, J. H.; Gill, R.; Grieg, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) is a cyberinfrastructure resource for developing and evaluating a new generation of climate data analysis capabilities. MERRA/AS supports OBS4MIP activities by reducing the time spent in the preparation of Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data used in data-model intercomparison. It also provides a testbed for experimental development of high-performance analytics. MERRA/AS is a cloud-based service built around the Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS) technology that is currently used by the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) to deliver Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) data to the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Crucial to its effectiveness, MERRA/AS's servers will use a workflow-generated realizable object capability to perform analyses over the MERRA data using the MapReduce approach to parallel storage-based computation. The results produced by these operations will be stored by the vCDS, which will also be able to host code sets for those who wish to explore the use of MapReduce for more advanced analytics. While the work described here will focus on the MERRA collection, these technologies can be used to publish other reanalysis, observational, and ancillary OBS4MIP data to ESGF and, importantly, offer an architectural approach to climate data services that can be generalized to applications and customers beyond the traditional climate research community. In this presentation, we describe our approach, experiences, lessons learned,and plans for the future.; (A) MERRA/AS software stack. (B) Example MERRA/AS interfaces.

  1. Beamforming and holography image formation methods: an analytic study.

    PubMed

    Solimene, Raffaele; Cuccaro, Antonio; Ruvio, Giuseppe; Tapia, Daniel Flores; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-04-18

    Beamforming and holographic imaging procedures are widely used in many applications such as radar sensing, sonar, and in the area of microwave medical imaging. Nevertheless, an analytical comparison of the methods has not been done. In this paper, the Point Spread Functions pertaining to the two methods are analytically determined. This allows a formal comparison of the two techniques, and to easily highlight how the performance depends on the configuration parameters, including frequency range, number of scatterers, and data discretization. It is demonstrated that the beamforming and holography basically achieve the same resolution but beamforming requires a cheaper (less sensors) configuration..

  2. Scalable pumping approach for extracting the maximum TEM(00) solar laser power.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Vistas, Cláudia R

    2014-10-20

    A scalable TEM(00) solar laser pumping approach is composed of four pairs of first-stage Fresnel lens-folding mirror collectors, four fused-silica secondary concentrators with light guides of rectangular cross-section for radiation homogenization, four hollow two-dimensional compound parabolic concentrators for further concentration of uniform radiations from the light guides to a 3 mm diameter, 76 mm length Nd:YAG rod within four V-shaped pumping cavities. An asymmetric resonator ensures an efficient large-mode matching between pump light and oscillating laser light. Laser power of 59.1 W TEM(00) is calculated by ZEMAX and LASCAD numerical analysis, revealing 20 times improvement in brightness figure of merit.

  3. Direct observation of catalytic oxidation of particulate matter using in situ TEM

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Kohei; Higuchi, Kimitaka; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Tanaka, Nobuo; Ogura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The ability to observe chemical reactions at the molecular level convincingly demonstrates the physical and chemical phenomena occurring throughout a reaction mechanism. Videos obtained through in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the oxidation of catalytic soot under practical reaction conditions. Carbon oxidation reactions using Ag/SiO2 or Cs2CO3/nepheline catalysts were performed at 330 °C under an O2 flow of 0.5 Pa in the TEM measurement chamber. Ag/SiO2 catalyzed the reaction at the interface of the mobile Ag species and carbon, while the Cs species was fixed on the nepheline surface during the reaction. In the latter case, carbon particles moved, remained attached to the Cs2CO3/nepheline surface, and were consumed at the interface by the oxidation reaction. Using this technique, we were able to visualize such mobile and immobile catalysis according to different mechanisms. PMID:26154580

  4. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  5. Modulation of synthetic parameters of cobalt nanoparticles: TEM, EDS, spectral and thermal studies.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Avdhesh

    2012-12-01

    The study focuses on the modulation of synthetic parameters in order to influence the size, structure, composition and arrangement of nanoparticles of cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by ethanolic solution of benzildiethylenetriamine in cobalt nitrate solution at 60 °C with stirring and refluxing leads to nanoparticles of cobalt. The morphology and structure of the synthesized nanoparticles of cobalt were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), QELS Data and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). Crystalline size was 20 nm determined from the sharp peak at 2θ=25 °C from the powder XRD. TEM images of cobalt nanoparticles without reducing agent having the diameter 20 nm with spherical shape and black color.

  6. Watching the dehydrogenation of alane (AlH3) in a TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Shane; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, Sean

    2008-03-01

    Alane (AlH3) is a promising candidate for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Its theoretical gravimetric capacity is 10.1 percent and decomposition is achieved with modest heating (60-200 deg C). We studied the dehydrogenation of alane, insitu, in a TEM. Alane powder was loaded into the TEM and heated at 80 deg C. We were able to `watch' the dehydrogenation of the alane to aluminum. Electron diffraction and dark fiend images are used to show how and where the aluminum crystallites grow. Although crystalline aluminum phases were successfully identified, some of the sample remained amorphous. We will discuss the nature of the amorphous material and present images clearly identifying the nature of the aluminum crystallites.

  7. Vacancy ordering and superstructure formation in dry and hydrated strontium tantalate perovskites: a TEM perspective.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Anuradha M; Haavik, Camilla; Norby, Poul; Norby, Truls; Olsen, Arne

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of Sr4(Sr2Ta2)O11 and Sr4(Sr1.92Ta2.08)O11.12, synthesized by solid state reaction technique in dry and hydrated state have been studied mainly using Transmission Electron Microscopy. Due to the lesser ability of X-rays to probe details in oxygen sublattice, the change in crystal symmetry due to ordering of oxygen vacancies could be detected better using Transmission Electron Microscopy. After detailed analysis through TEM, it was observed that no major change occurs in the cation sublattice. The TEM observations are compared with XRD data and discussed. The crystal symmetries and corresponding unit cells of all the perovskites based on the ordering of oxygen vacancies is deduced. Crystal unit cells based on the observations are proposed with ideal atomic coordinates. Finally an attempt is made to explain the water uptake behaviour of these perovskites based on the proposed crystal structure.

  8. Existing technology transfer report: analytical capabilities. Appendix B. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-06-01

    The overall objective of the on-going analytical efforts was to develop in-house expertise and analytical capability for the analysis of coal and coal-derived products in support of SRC-I process technology. The approach taken and work accomplished involved: identification of test methods and associated equipment; review and implementation of analytical facility plan; evaluation of existing instrumentation; evaluation and purchase of new instruments; training of laboratory personnel; validation or development of analytical methods; development of standard product work-up methods and development of analytical protocol for detailed characterization of SRC-I solid and liquid products. This volume contains Appendix B with the following attachments: solvent separation procedure A; Wilsonville solvent separation procedure, distillation separation procedure; solvent separation modified Wilsonville Procedure W; statistical comparison of 3 solvent separation procedures; methods development for column chromatography, and application of gas chromatography to characterization of a hydrogen donor solvent; and high performance liquid chromatographic procedure.

  9. Levetiracetam extended release and levetiracetam immediate release as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures: an indirect comparison of treatment-emergent adverse events using meta-analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Richy, Florent F; Banerjee, Soutrik; Brabant, Yves; Helmers, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    The safety profiles of once-daily adjunctive levetiracetam (LEV) extended release (XR) (1000mg/day) and adjunctive LEV immediate release (IR) (500mg twice daily) were compared using data from three randomized, placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III clinical trials in patients with partial-onset seizures. MedDRA 9.0 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were indirectly compared using meta-analytic techniques, including calculation of risk difference (RD) and mixed-effects analysis. Statistical significance was set at 10% alpha risk, the normative value for these analyses. Data from 555 patients older than 16 (204 LEV IR, 70 LEV XR, 281 PBO) were analyzed. Following adjustment for incidence of placebo TEAEs, LEV XR showed statistically significantly lower rates of TEAEs than LEV IR across nervous system disorders (RD=-18%, P=0.03), psychiatric disorders (RD=-11%, P=0.08), and metabolism and nutrition disorders (RD=-3%, P=0.08). Among nervous system disorders, the RD for headache favored LEV XR (RD=-11%, P=0.08). These results suggest that adjunctive LEV XR may be associated with a lower incidence of nervous system, psychiatric, and nutritional and metabolic TEAEs as compared with LEV IR. However, this difference was observed at a broad scale and not at a specific TEAE level except for headache.

  10. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  11. TEM and HRXRD Analysis of LP MOVPE Grown InGaP/GaAs epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Pelosi, Claudio; Bosi, Matteo; Attolini, Giovanni; Germini, Fabrizio; Frigeri, Cesare; Prutskij, Tatiana

    2007-04-10

    The diffusion phenomena at interfaces between GaAs/InGaP layers grown by low pressure MOVPE have been studied by dark field (DF) transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and High resolution X-ray Diffractometry (HRXRD). By comparing the results of the two techniques a mismatched layer containing P or P and In has been evidenced. The causes of this behavior are briefly discussed.

  12. Optimized Ar(+)-ion milling procedure for TEM cross-section sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Levin; Butz, Benjamin; Müller, Erich

    2011-11-01

    High-quality samples are indispensable for every reliable transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation. In order to predict optimized parameters for the final Ar(+)-ion milling preparation step, topographical changes of symmetrical cross-section samples by the sputtering process were modeled by two-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulations. Due to its well-known sputtering yield of Ar(+)-ions and its easiness in mechanical preparation Si was used as model system. The simulations are based on a modified parameterized description of the sputtering yield of Ar(+)-ions on Si summarized from literature. The formation of a wedge-shaped profile, as commonly observed during double-sector ion milling of cross-section samples, was reproduced by the simulations, independent of the sputtering angle. Moreover, the preparation of wide, plane parallel sample areas by alternating single-sector ion milling is predicted by the simulations. These findings were validated by a systematic ion-milling study (single-sector vs. double-sector milling at various sputtering angles) using Si cross-section samples as well as two other material-science examples. The presented systematic single-sector ion-milling procedure is applicable for most Ar(+)-ion mills, which allow simultaneous milling from both sides of a TEM sample (top and bottom) in an azimuthally restricted sector perpendicular to the central epoxy line of that cross-sectional TEM sample. The procedure is based on the alternating milling of the two halves of the TEM sample instead of double-sector milling of the whole sample. Furthermore, various other practical aspects are issued like the dependency of the topographical quality of the final sample on parameters like epoxy thickness and incident angle.

  13. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. PMID:27571919

  14. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-08-30

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires.

  15. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the TEM-1 beta-lactamase complexed with cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas; Merz, Kenneth M; Sordo, Tomás L

    2005-02-10

    Herein, we present theoretical results aimed at elucidating the origin of the kinetic preference for penicillins over cephalosporins characteristic of the TEM/SHV subgroup of class A beta-lactamases. First, we study the conformational properties of cephalothin showing that the C2-down conformer of the dihydrothiazine ring is preferred over the C2-up one by approximately 2 kcal/mol in solution (0.4-1.4 kcal/mol in the gas phase). Second, the TEM-1 beta-lactamase complexed with cephalothin is investigated by carrying out a molecular dynamics simulation. The DeltaG(binding) energy is then estimated using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) and quantum chemical PBSA (QM-PBSA) computational schemes. The preferential binding of benzylpenicillin over cephalothin is reproduced by the different energetic calculations, which predict relative DeltaDeltaG(binding) energies ranging from 1.8 to 5.7 kcal/mol. The benzylpenicillin/cephalothin DeltaDeltaG(binding) energy is most likely due to the lower efficacy of cephalosporins than that of penicillins in order to simultaneously bind the "carboxylate pocket" and the "oxyanion hole" in the TEM-1 active site.

  17. Differential Dependence on N-Glycosylation of Anthrax Toxin Receptors CMG2 and TEM8

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Sarah; Deuquet, Julie; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2015-01-01

    ANTXR 1 and 2, also known as TEM8 and CMG2, are two type I membrane proteins, which have been extensively studied for their role as anthrax toxin receptors, but with a still elusive physiological function. Here we have analyzed the importance of N-glycosylation on folding, trafficking and ligand binding of these closely related proteins. We find that TEM8 has a stringent dependence on N-glycosylation. The presence of at least one glycan on each of its two extracellular domains, the vWA and Ig-like domains, is indeed necessary for efficient trafficking to the cell surface. In the absence of any N-linked glycans, TEM8 fails to fold correctly and is recognized by the ER quality control machinery. Expression of N-glycosylation mutants reveals that CMG2 is less vulnerable to sugar loss. The absence of N-linked glycans in one of the extracellular domains indeed has little impact on folding, trafficking or receptor function of the wild type protein expressed in tissue culture cells. N-glycans do, however, seem required in primary fibroblasts from human patients. Here, the presence of N-linked sugars increases the tolerance to mutations in cmg2 causing the rare genetic disease Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome. It thus appears that CMG2 glycosylation provides a buffer towards genetic variation by promoting folding of the protein in the ER lumen. PMID:25781883

  18. Automated determination of size and morphology information from soot transmission electron microscope (TEM)-generated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Chan, Qing N.; Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yeoh, Guan H.; Medwell, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    The thermophoretic sampling of particulates from hot media, coupled with transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, is a combined approach that is widely used to derive morphological information. The identification and the measurement of the particulates, however, can be complex when the TEM images are of low contrast, noisy, and have non-uniform background signal level. The image processing method can also be challenging and time consuming, when the samples collected have large variability in shape and size, or have some degree of overlapping. In this work, a three-stage image processing sequence is presented to facilitate time-efficient automated identification and measurement of particulates from the TEM grids. The proposed processing sequence is first applied to soot samples that were thermophoretically sampled from a laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame. The parameter values that are required to be set to facilitate the automated process are identified, and sensitivity of the results to these parameters is assessed. The same analysis process is also applied to soot samples that were acquired from an externally irradiated laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame, which have different geometrical characteristics, to assess the morphological dependence of the proposed image processing sequence. Using the optimized parameter values, statistical assessments of the automated results reveal that the largest discrepancies that are associated with the estimated values of primary particle diameter, fractal dimension, and prefactor values of the aggregates for the tested cases, are approximately 3, 1, and 10 %, respectively, when compared with the manual measurements.

  19. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests of ion irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, K. H.; Swenson, M. J.; Wu, Y.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    The growing role of charged particle irradiation in the evaluation of nuclear reactor candidate materials requires the development of novel methods to assess mechanical properties in near-surface irradiation damage layers just a few micrometers thick. In situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) mechanical testing is one such promising method. In this work, microcompression pillars are fabricated from a Fe2+ ion irradiated bulk specimen of a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy. Yield strengths measured directly from TEM in situ compression tests are within expected values, and are consistent with predictions based on the irradiated microstructure. Measured elastic modulus values, once adjusted for the amount of deformation and deflection in the base material, are also within the expected range. A pillar size effect is only observed in samples with minimum dimension ≤100 nm due to the low inter-obstacle spacing in the as received and irradiated material. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests hold great promise for quantitatively determining mechanical properties of shallow ion-irradiated layers.

  20. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-08-30

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires.

  1. Method for semiautomated serial section reconstruction and visualization of neural tissue from TEM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Kevin N.; Ross, Muriel D.

    1993-07-01

    A simple method to reconstruct details of neural tissue architectures from transmission electron microscope (TEM) images will help us to increase our knowledge of the functional organization of neural systems in general. To be useful, the reconstruction method should provide high resolution, quantitative measurement, and quick turnaround. In pursuit of these goals, we developed a modern, semiautomated system for reconstruction of neural tissue from TEM serial sections. Images are acquired by a video camera mounted on TEM (Zeiss 902) equipped with an automated stage control. The images are reassembled automatically as a mosaicked section using a crosscorrelation algorithm on a Connection Machine-2 (CM-2) parallel supercomputer. An object detection algorithm on a Silicon Graphics workstation is employed to aid contour extraction. An estimated registration between sections is computed and verified by the user. The contours are then tessellated into a triangle-based mesh. At this point the data can be visualized as a wireframe or solid object, volume rendered, or used as a basis for simulations of functional activity.

  2. Novel Transrotational Solid State Order Discovered by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    Exotic thin crystals with unexpected transrotational microstructures have been discovered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for crystal growth in thin (10-100 nm) amorphous films of different chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) prepared by various methods. Primarily we use our TEM bend contour technique. The unusual phenomenon can be traced in situ in TEM column: dislocation independent regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. Such transrotation (unit cell trans lation is complicated by small rotationrealized round an axis lying in the film plane) can result in strong regular lattice orientation gradients (up to 300 degrees per micrometer) of different geometries: cylindrical, ellipsoidal, toroidal, saddle, etc. Transrotation is increasing as the film gets thinner. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. Transrotational micro crystals have been eventually recognized by other authors in some vital thin film materials, i.e. PCMs for memory, silicides, SrTiO3. Atomic model and possible mechanisms of the phenomenon are discussed. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is also proposed Support of RF Ministry of Education and Science is acknowledged.

  3. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  4. AFM-TEM observations of effect of ``melt'' time on polytetrafluoroethylene morphology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalish, J. P.; Williams, R. A.; Wang, J.; Geil, P. H.; Long, T.-C.; Xu, P.

    2006-03-01

    TEM observations of PTFE dispersion particles dispersed on glass and held at 350 C or above for various times indicates that individual, > 0.1 mm long molecules wander individually on the substrate and can, with time in the ``melt,'' aggregate and form either flat-on or on-edge, folded chain single crystals. If ``trapped'' by cooling before aggregation, on-edge, single molecule, single crystals can form. All on-edge crystals, both individually and as the shish of shish-kebabs, have a ``double-striation'' appearance, suggested to arise from nucleation of the Pt/C shadowing material, used for the TEM image, on the folds at the top edge of the crystals. AFM observations have confirmed these suggestions and, furthermore, indicate the nascent, rod-like dispersion particles of a ``nano-emulsion,'' with a volume corresponding to a single molecule, have faceted ends. Combined with the TEM and ED observations that the molecular axis is parallel with the rod axis, not only must chain-folding occur during polymerization but the chain folds must be staggered on the end surfaces. P. H. Geil, et al., Adv. Polym. Sci., 180, 89 (2005).

  5. In Situ Environmental TEM in Imaging Gas and Liquid Phase Chemical Reactions for Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Shan, Hao; Chen, Wenlong; Gu, Xin; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Gas and liquid phase chemical reactions cover a broad range of research areas in materials science and engineering, including the synthesis of nanomaterials and application of nanomaterials, for example, in the areas of sensing, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, and bio-related applications. Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) provides a unique opportunity for monitoring gas and liquid phase reactions because it enables the observation of those reactions at the ultra-high spatial resolution, which is not achievable through other techniques. Here, the fundamental science and technology developments of gas and liquid phase TEM that facilitate the mechanistic study of the gas and liquid phase chemical reactions are discussed. Combined with other characterization tools integrated in TEM, unprecedented material behaviors and reaction mechanisms are observed through the use of the in situ gas and liquid phase TEM. These observations and also the recent applications in this emerging area are described. The current challenges in the imaging process are also discussed, including the imaging speed, imaging resolution, and data management.

  6. Cross-sectional TEM analysis of porcelain fused to gold-coated titanium.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the interfacial microstructure between gold-coated titanium and low-fusing porcelain. The square surfaces of cast titanium split rods were sputter-coated with gold using a sputter coater at 40 mA for 1,000 seconds. Specimens were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by cutting and polishing two pieces of the gold-coated split-rod specimens, which were glued and embedded in Cu tubes with an epoxy adhesive. TEM observation was also conducted for the gold-coated specimens after degassing and porcelain fusing. Due to the gold coating, intermetallic compounds of Au-Ti formed under the sputtered gold layer after degassing and porcelain fusing. Ti3Au and Ti3Al layers were also observed beneath the Au-Ti intermetallic compound layer. There was good adhesion of porcelain to the Au-Ti compound and Ti oxides without any gaps or formation of a Ti-deficient intermediate layer, which is normally observed at the titanium-porcelain interface. The results of this TEM study suggested that gold-sputter-coating the cast titanium surface produced a Ti-Au intermetallic compound and suppressed the formation of a Ti-deficient intermediate layer, resulting in improved adherence between porcelain and titanium.

  7. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Iturrondobeitia, M. Okariz, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, R.; Jimbert, P.; Guraya, T.; Ibarretxe, J.

    2015-03-30

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented V{sub clay} (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite.

  8. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  9. Learning Analytics: Readiness and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the relatively new field of learning analytics, first by considering the relevant meanings of both "learning" and "analytics," and then by looking at two main levels at which learning analytics can be or has been implemented in educational organizations. Although integrated turnkey systems or…

  10. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Bunch, T. E.; Mardinly, A. J.; Echer, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Properties of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), Ames-Dec86-11, were investigated using TEM and analytical electron microscopy. The particle was found to have mineralogy and chondritic composition indicating an absence of direct kinship with known carbonaceous chondrites. The available data on the Ames-Dec86-11 suggest that at least one aqueous alteration event took place in this hydrated IDP, during which fine-grained material, possibly glass, was transformed to smectite. This event appears to be unique to hydrated IDPs.

  11. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Mardinly, A. J.; Echer, C. J.; Bunch, T. E.

    Properties of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), Ames-Dec86-11, were investigated using TEM and analytical electron microscopy. The particle was found to have mineralogy and chondritic composition indicating an absence of direct kinship with known carbonaceous chondrites. The available data on the Ames-Dec86-11 suggest that at least one aqueous alteration event took place in this hydrated IDP, during which fine-grained material, possibly glass, was transformed to smectite. This event appears to be unique to hydrated IDPs.

  12. The analytic renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  13. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Three-dimensional size and orientation of the precipitates in AZ91 magnesium alloys measured by TEM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ou; Ma, Jia-Yan; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Jia-Ping; Jin, Lei; Zhao, Dong-Shan; Wang, Ren-Hui

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of the microscopic structure, including three-dimensional (3-D) size and orientation of the precipitates, is essential to fully understand the mechanical properties of the magnesium alloys and designing the alloys with better performance. Analytical TEM with high spatial resolution offers the simultaneous measurements of 3-D size, structure, orientation, composition of the precipitates from one typical sample along an established crystallographic axis. Besides popular Burgers orientation relationship (OR), other ORs such as Pitsch-Schrader OR, Crawley OR, Potter OR and a new OR with the form of [0001]α 1.0° from [311]γ and (11bar 20)α 2.0°? from (03bar 3)γ between the magnesium matrix and the precipitate γ-Mg17Al12 are identified by TEM imaging and diffraction techniques. As a case study, the thicknesses of the individual precipitates with Burgers OR are further measured to be 100-200 nm through both electron energy-loss spectroscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy combining differential x-ray absorption and extrapolation, which are in agreement with the overall 3-D size statistic distribution results obtained through analysing various samples along various directions. Furthermore, the fabricated wedge-shape structure provides a platform on which to study the dependence of the interfacial strain on the variation of the thickness.

  14. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  15. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  16. Recent advances in analytical satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Recent work on analytical satellite perturbation theory has involved the completion of a revision to 4th order for zonal harmonics, the addition of a treatment for ocean tides, an extension of the treatment for the noninertial reference system, and the completion of a theory for direct solar-radiation pressure and earth-albedo pressure. Combined with a theory for tesseral-harmonics, lunisolar, and body-tide perturbations, these formulations provide a comprehensive orbit-computation program. Detailed comparisons with numerical integration and observations are presented to assess the accuracy of each theoretical development.

  17. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  18. VERDE Analytic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates served within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.

  19. [Analytical epidemiology of urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kodama, H; Ohno, Y

    1989-06-01

    In this paper, urolithiasis is reviewed from the standpoint of analytical epidemiology, which examines a statistical association between a given disease and a hypothesized factor with an aim of inferring its causality. Factors incriminated epidemiologically for stone formation include age, sex, occupation, social class (level of affluence), season of the year and climate, dietary and fluid intake and genetic prodisposition. Since some of these factors are interlinked, they are broadly classified into five categories and epidemiologically looked over here. Genetic predisposition is essentially endorsed by the more frequent episodes of stone formation in the family members of stone formers, as compared to non-stone formers. Nevertheless, some environmental factors (likely to be dietary habits) shared by family members are believed to be relatively more important than genetic predisposition. A hot, sunny climate may influence stone formation through inducing dehydration with increased perspiration and increased solute concentration with decreased urine volume, coupled with inadequate liquid intake, and possibly through the greater exposure to ultraviolet radiation which eventually results in an increased vitamin D production, conceivably correlated with seasonal variation in calcium and oxalate excretion to the urine. Urinary tract infections are importantly involved in the formation of magnesium ammonium phosphate stones in particular. The association with regional water hardness is still in controversy. Excessive intake of coffee, tea and alcoholic beverages seemingly increase the risk of renal calculi, though not consistently confirmed. Many dietary elements have been suggested by numerous clinical and experimental investigations, but a few elements are substantiated by analytical epidemiological investigations. An increased ingestion of animal protein and sugar and a decreased ingestion of dietary fiber and green-yellow vegetables are linked with the higher

  20. SU-E-T-481: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm with Commercial Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M; Tenn, S; Lee, C; Yang, Y; Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXB algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.2–47.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.97±2.00%, 95.07±2.07% and 95.10±2.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.03±2.26%, 3.86±2.22% and 3.85±2.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC

  1. On the structural affinity of macromolecules with different biological properties: Molecular dynamics simulations of a series of TEM-1 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Giampaolo, Alessia Di; Mazza, Fernando; Daidone, Isabella; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of TEM-1 mutants. •Mutations effects on the mechanical properties are considered. •Mutants do not significantly alter the average enzymes structure. •Mutants produce sharp alterations in enzyme conformational repertoire. •Mutants also produce changes in the active site volume. -- Abstract: Molecular Dynamics simulations have been carried out in order to provide a molecular rationalization of the biological and thermodynamic differences observed for a class of TEM β-lactamases. In particular we have considered the TEM-1(wt), the single point mutants TEM-40 and TEM-19 representative of IRT and ESBL classes respectively, and TEM-1 mutant M182T, TEM-32 and TEM-20 which differ from the first three for the additional of M182T mutation. Results indicate that most of the thermodynamic, and probably biological behaviour of these systems arise from subtle effects which, starting from the alterations of the local interactions, produce drastic modifications of the conformational space spanned by the enzymes. The present study suggests that systems showing essentially the same secondary and tertiary structure may differentiate their chemical–biological activity essentially (and probably exclusively) on the basis of the thermal fluctuations occurring in their physiological environment.

  2. Analytic integrable systems: Analytic normalization and embedding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    In this paper we mainly study the existence of analytic normalization and the normal form of finite dimensional complete analytic integrable dynamical systems. More details, we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism F(x)=Bx+f(x) in (Cn,0) with B having eigenvalues not modulus 1 and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Meanwhile, we also prove that any complete analytic integrable differential system x˙=Ax+f(x) in (Cn,0) with A having nonzero eigenvalues and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Furthermore we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism defined on an analytic manifold can be embedded in a complete analytic integrable flow. We note that parts of our results are the improvement of Moser's one in J. Moser, The analytic invariants of an area-preserving mapping near a hyperbolic fixed point, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 9 (1956) 673-692 and of Poincaré's one in H. Poincaré, Sur l'intégration des équations différentielles du premier order et du premier degré, II, Rend. Circ. Mat. Palermo 11 (1897) 193-239. These results also improve the ones in Xiang Zhang, Analytic normalization of analytic integrable systems and the embedding flows, J. Differential Equations 244 (2008) 1080-1092 in the sense that the linear part of the systems can be nonhyperbolic, and the one in N.T. Zung, Convergence versus integrability in Poincaré-Dulac normal form, Math. Res. Lett. 9 (2002) 217-228 in the way that our paper presents the concrete expression of the normal form in a restricted case.

  3. Structural Consequences of the Inhibitor-Resistant Ser130Gly Substitution in TEM β-Lactamase†‡

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Veena L.; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila; Kim, Choonkeun; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2006-01-01

    β-Lactamase confers resistance to penicillin-like antibiotics by hydrolyzing their β-lactam bond. To combat these enzymes, inhibitors covalently cross-linking the hydrolytic Ser70 to Ser130 were introduced. In turn, mutant β-lactamases have emerged with decreased susceptibility to these mechanism-based inhibitors. Substituting Ser130 with glycine in the inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) mutant TEM-76 (S130G) prevents the irreversible cross-linking step. Since the completely conserved Ser130 is thought to transfer a proton important for catalysis, its substitution might be hypothesized to result in a nonfunctional enzyme; this is clearly not the case. To investigate how TEM-76 remains active, its structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.40 Å resolution. A new water molecule (Wat1023) is observed in the active site, with two configurations located 1.1 and 1.3 Å from the missing Ser130 Oγ; this water molecule likely replaces the Ser130 side-chain hydroxyl in substrate hydrolysis. Intriguingly, this same water molecule is seen in the IRT TEM-32 (M69I/M182T), where Ser130 has moved significantly. TEM-76 shares other structural similarities with various IRTs; like TEM-30 (R244S) and TEM-84 (N276D), the water molecule activating clavulanate for cross-linking (Wat1614) is disordered (in TEM-30 it is actually absent). As expected, TEM-76 has decreased kinetic activity, likely due to the replacement of the Ser130 side-chain hydroxyl with a water molecule. In contrast to the recently determined structure of the S130G mutant in the related SHV-1 β-lactamase, in TEM-76 the key hydrolytic water (Wat1561) is still present. The conservation of similar accommodations among IRT mutants suggests that resistance arises from common mechanisms, despite the disparate locations of the various substitutions. PMID:15981999

  4. First application of time-domain electromagnetic technology (TEM) for permafrost mapping on the Arctic shelf.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshurnikov, A.; Gunar, A.; Tumskoy, V. E.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.; Valuyskiy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Different geophysical methods are used to study and map submarine permafrost on the Arctic Shelf. Due to specific features of submarine permafrost, none of geophysical methods can provide conclusive data when gas-charged sediments and taliks occur within permafrost. Experimental data show that electrical properties of frozen grounds change significantly. For example, depending on ground lithology and wetness, electrical resistivity can increase up to 103 times upon freezing. Thus, electromagnetic methods could be considered more informative and valuable tool for characterizing subsea permafrost. Investigation of submarine permafrost on the shallow Arctic Shelf requires modifications of electromagnetic methods to cover specific needs of working from the fast ice. Winter expeditions devoted to subsea permafrost investigations were performed in March-April of 2012-2015 in the near-shore area of the Laptev Sea. TEM was applied to predict permafrost down to 1 km depth. TEM systems are advantageous when many stations are required, because many short deployments can be performed in a single survey. Working from the fast ice allowed collection of few tens of stations to cover the entire polygon. Interpretation of data collected in 2012 allowed to predict position of the permafrost table near-shore near Muostakh Island, which was validated by followed up permafrost drilling. Surveys performed in 2013-2015 also confirmed good agreement between electromagnetic data and observational data obtained by drilling. Accuracy of the methods reached 3.5%. Note, that in March-April of 2014 and 2015, we used the modified TEM which allows obtaining continuous subsea permafrost table profiles.

  5. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  6. Geological Hypothesis Testing and Investigations of Coupling with Transient Electromagnetics (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. C.; Moeller, M. M.; Snyder, E.; Workman, E. J.; Urquhart, S.; Bedrosian, P.; Pellerin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in Borrego Canyon within the Santo Domingo Basin of the Rio Grande Rift, central New Mexico, during the 2014 Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) field program. TEM surveys were carried out in several regions both to investigate geologic structure and to illustrate the effects of coupling to anthropogenic structures. To determine an optimal survey configuration, 50, 100 and 200 m square transmitter loops were deployed; estimates of depth-of-investigation and logistical considerations determined that 50 m loops were sufficient for production-style measurements. A resistive (100s of ohm-m) layer was identified at a depth of 25-75 m at several locations, and interpreted as dismembered parts of one or more concealed volcanic flows, an interpretation consistent with Tertiary volcanic flows that cap the Santa Anna Mesa immediately to the south. TEM soundings were also made across an inferred fault to investigate whether fault offset is accompanied by lateral changes in electrical resistivity. Soundings within several hundred meters of the inferred fault strand were identical, indicating no resistivity contrast across the fault, and possibly an absence of recent activity. An old windmill and water tank, long-abandoned, offered an excellent laboratory to study the effect of coupling to metallic anthropogenic structures. The character of the measured data strongly suggests the water tank is in electrical contact with the earth (galvanic coupling), and an induced response was persistent to more than 1 second after current turn-off. Coupling effects could be identified at least 150 meters from the tank. Understanding the mechanism behind such coupling and the ability to identify coupled data are critical skills, as one-dimensional modeling of data is affected by such coupling producing artificial conductive layers at depth.

  7. Soot Precursor Material: Visualization Via Simultaneous LIF-LII and Characterization Via TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous combined laser-induced fluorescence and laser-induced incandescence (LIF-LII) images are presented for both a normal and inverse diffusion flame. The excitation wavelength dependence distinguishes the LIF and LII signals in images from the normal diffusion flame while the temporal decay distinguishes the signals in images of the inverse diffusion flame. Each flame presents a minimum in the combined LIF-LII intensity in a region separating the fuel pyrolysis and soot containing regions. Opacity, geometric in definition, and extent of crystallinity measured through both bright and dark field Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterizes the thermophoretically sampled material from within this minimal LIF-LII intensity region. TEM analysis reveals rather different soot processes occurring within the normal and inverse diffusion flame. In the normal diffusion flame, rapid chemical and physical coalescence of PAHs results in initial formation of soot precursor particles that are highly crystalline and evolve toward fully formed soot. In the inverse diffusion flame, rapid coalescence of pyrolysis products occurs, producing tarlike, globular structures equivalent in size to fully formed soot aggregates but with markedly less crystallinity than normal-appearing soot. These different material properties are interpreted as reflecting different relative rates of chemical and physical coalescence of fuel pyrolysis products versus carbonization. Significantly, these TEM images support qualitative photophysical arguments suggesting that, in general, this 'dark' region observed in the LIF-LII images demarcates a transitional region in which a fundamental change in the material the material chemical/physical properties occurs between solid carbonaceous soot and condensed or gaseous molecular growth material.

  8. In-Situ TEM-STM Observations of SWCNT Ropes/Tubular Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sola, F.; Lebron-Colon, M.; Ferreira, P. J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Meador, M. A.; Marin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) prepared by the HiPco process were purified using a modified gas phase purification technique. A TEM-STM holder was used to study the morphological changes of SWCNT ropes as a function of applied voltage. Kink formation, buckling behavior, tubular transformation and eventual breakdown of the system were observed. The tubular formation was attributed to a transformation from SWCNT ropes to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structures. It is likely mediated by the patching and tearing mechanism which is promoted primarily by the mobile vacancies generated due to current-induced heating and, to some extent, by electron irradiation.

  9. Tantalum oxide nanoscale resistive switching devices: TEM/EELS study (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Kate J.; Zhang, Jiaming; Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Max; Samuels, Katy; Yang, Jianhua J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-08-01

    The field of non-volatile memory devices has been boosted by resistive switching, a reversible change in electrical resistance of a dielectric layer through the application of a voltage potential. Tantalum oxide being one of the leading candidates for the dielectric component of resistance switching devices was investigated in this study. 55nm TaOx devices in all states were compared through cross sectional TEM techniques including HRTEM, EELS, and EFTEM and will be discussed in this presentation. Based on the chemical and physical features found in the cross sectioned nanodevices we will discuss the switching mechanism of these nanoscale devices.

  10. Microorganisms found in secondary cataract material of ECCE patients, a study with SEM and TEM.

    PubMed

    Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, W L; Los, L I; Worst, J G

    1993-01-01

    Globular secondary cataract material, removed from 24 patients with ECCE after ophthalmic cleaning of the anterior capsule, were investigated with SEM and TEM. Besides spherical, somewhat oval shaped bodies of various shape and size comparable with those found in cataractous lenses, (an)aerobic bacteria and yeast cells were found in approximately 70% of the cases, all of them in eyes without intra-ocular inflammation. Probably these bacteria have been transferred from the conjunctiva during IOL.-implantation and were encapsulated without starting an inflammation.

  11. Effect of displacement damage on the stability of oxide nanoparticles in model ODS alloys: TEM studies

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Sumita; Balaji, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Serruys, Yves; Robertson, C.; Ana, Alamo; Sundar, C. S.

    2012-06-05

    Model ODS alloy containing Fe-0.3% yttria was prepared by ball milling and hipping at high temperature and the effect of irradiation on stability of yttria nanoclusters in model ODS alloy is studied by dual beam ion irradiation using 5 MeV Fe{sup +} and 1.5 MeV He{sup +} ions. TEM studies on irradiated sample show that these particles are stable at 25 dpa and 40 appm He concentration. However, at 80 dpa and 360 appm He concentration Yttria particles were found to be unstable as evidenced from increase in average particle size and particle size distribution.

  12. Estimation of the electron beam energy spread for TEM information limit

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Tiemeijer, Peter C.; Sidorov, Maxim V.

    2002-02-20

    Sub-Angstrom TEM of materials requires focal-series reconstruction (FSR) or electron holography to retrieve the electron wave at the specimen exit-surface to very high resolution. As a consequence, we need to measure the microscope information limit. With a sub-Angstrom information limit, the one-Angstrom microscope (OAM) project at the NCEM has achieved sub-Angstrom resolution by FSR. We present a new method of estimating the information limit of the microscope, based on energy-spread measurements with an image filter.

  13. Thermophysical ESEM and TEM Characterization of Carbon Fibers CTE, Spectroscopy and Roughness Studies at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Ozden O.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate determination of the transverse properties of carbon fibers is important for assessment and prediction of local material as well as global structural response of composite components. However the measurements are extremely difficult due to the very small diameters of the fibers (few microns only) and must be conducted within a microscope. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to determine the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion of different carbon fibers as a function of temperature.

  14. Using Visual Analytics Tool for Improving Data Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Géryk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of animated data visualizations in comparison with static data visualizations is still inconclusive. Some researches resulted that the failure to find out the benefits of animations may relate to the way how they are constructed and perceived. In this paper, we present visual analytics (VA) tool which makes use of enhanced animated…

  15. A Meta-analytic Review of Family Structure Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A meta-analytic review examined 26 research studies on stereotypes related to family structure. Three hypotheses were explored: that married adults, parents, and children of married parents are all perceived more favorably than their single, nonparent, or child-of-single-parent counterparts. For all three comparisons, traditional nuclear family…

  16. Retained gas inventory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-05-18

    Gas volume data derived from four different analytical methods were collected and analyzed for comparison to volumes originally used in the technical basis for the Basis for Interim Operations (BIO). The original volumes came from Hodgson (1996) listed in the reference section of this document. Hodgson (1996) screened all 177 single and double-shell tanks for the presence of trapped gas in waste via two analytical methods: Surface Level Rise (SLR), and Barometric Pressure Effect (BPE). More recent gas volume projections have been calculated using different analytical techniques along with updates to the parameters used as input to the SLR and BPE models. Gas volumes derived from new analytical instruments include those as measured by the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI) and Retained Gas Sampler (RGS). The results of this comparison demonstrate that the original retained gas volumes of Hodgson (1996) used as a technical basis in developing the BIO were conservative, and were conservative from a safety analysis standpoint. These results represent only comparisons to the original reported volumes using the limited set of newly acquired data that is available.

  17. An analytical framework for optimizing variant discovery from personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Highnam, Gareth; Wang, Jason J.; Kusler, Dean; Zook, Justin; Vijayan, Vinaya; Leibovich, Nir; Mittelman, David

    2015-01-01

    The standardization and performance testing of analysis tools is a prerequisite to widespread adoption of genome-wide sequencing, particularly in the clinic. However, performance testing is currently complicated by the paucity of standards and comparison metrics, as well as by the heterogeneity in sequencing platforms, applications and protocols. Here we present the genome comparison and analytic testing (GCAT) platform to facilitate development of performance metrics and comparisons of analysis tools across these metrics. Performance is reported through interactive visualizations of benchmark and performance testing data, with support for data slicing and filtering. The platform is freely accessible at http://www.bioplanet.com/gcat. PMID:25711446

  18. Dimensional comparison theory.

    PubMed

    Möller, Jens; Marsh, Herb W

    2013-07-01

    Although social comparison (Festinger, 1954) and temporal comparison (Albert, 1977) theories are well established, dimensional comparison is a largely neglected yet influential process in self-evaluation. Dimensional comparison entails a single individual comparing his or her ability in a (target) domain with his or her ability in a standard domain (e.g., "How good am I in math compared with English?"). This article reviews empirical findings from introspective, path-analytic, and experimental studies on dimensional comparisons, categorized into 3 groups according to whether they address the "why," "with what," or "with what effect" question. As the corresponding research shows, dimensional comparisons are made in everyday life situations. They impact on domain-specific self-evaluations of abilities in both domains: Dimensional comparisons reduce self-concept in the worse off domain and increase self-concept in the better off domain. The motivational basis for dimensional comparisons, their integration with recent social cognitive approaches, and the interdependence of dimensional, temporal, and social comparisons are discussed.

  19. Experimental and analytical study of rotating cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes experimental and analytical results of rotating cavitation. There are four major sections in this paper. The first section presents the main characteristics of rotating cavitation which was found in the inducer test using a water tunnel. The second section describes the rotating cavitation which occurred in the development test of an LE-7 liquid oxygen pump for the H-II rocket. Also described in this section is how the rotating cavitation was suppressed. The rotating cavitation was the cause of both super synchronous shaft vibration and an unstable head coefficient curve. The third section presents how the theory of rotating cavitation was developed. The final section shows the measured cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor of the LE-7 pump inducer for comparison of the experimental and analytical results of the rotating cavitation of the LE-7 pump inducer. Almost all the information presented in this paper has already been reported by Kamijo et al. (1977, 1980, 1993, 1993) and by Shimura (1993). In the present paper, the authors attempt to combine and give a clear overview of the experimental and analytical results described in the previous papers to systematically show their experience and findings on rotating cavitation.

  20. Feasibility of central loop TEM method for prospecting multilayer water-filled goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shu; Xue, Gou-Qiang; Qiu, Wei-Zhong; Li, Hai; Zhong, Hua-Sen

    2016-12-01

    With deep mining of coal mines, prospecting multilayer water-filled goaf has become a new content that results from geophysical exploration in coalfields. The central loop transient electromagnetic (TEM) method is favorable for prospecting conductive layers because of the coupling relationship between its field structure and formation. However, the shielding effect of conductive overburden would not only require a longer observation time when prospecting the same depth but also weaken the anomalous response of underlying layers. Through direct time domain numerical simulation and horizontal layered earth forward modeling, this paper estimates the length of observation time required to prospect the target, and the distinguishable criterion of multilayer water-filled goaf is presented with observation error according to the effect of noise on observation data. The observed emf curves from Dazigou Coal Mine, Shanxi Province can distinguish multilayer water-filled goaf. In quantitative inversion interpretation of observed curves, using electric logging data as initial parameters restrains the equivalence caused by coal formation thin layers. The deduced three-layer and two-layer water-filled goafs are confirmed by the drilling hole. The result suggests that when observation time is long enough and with the anomalous situation of underlying layers being greater than the observation error, the use of the central loop TEM method to prospect a multilayer water-filled goaf is feasible.