Science.gov

Sample records for analyzing acoustic interactions

  1. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  2. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  3. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  4. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  5. Using Simulation to Analyze Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main projects that was worked on this semester was creating an acoustic model for the Advanced Space Suit in Comsol Multiphysics. The geometry tools built into the software were used to create an accurate model of the helmet and upper torso of the suit. After running the simulation, plots of the sound pressure level within the suit were produced, as seen below in Figure 1. These plots show significant nulls which should be avoided when placing microphones inside the suit. In the future, this model can be easily adapted to changes in the suit design to determine optimal microphone placements and other acoustic properties. Another major project was creating an acoustic diverter that will potentially be used to route audio into the Space Station's Node 1. The concept of the project was to create geometry to divert sound from a neighboring module, the US Lab, into Node 1. By doing this, no new audio equipment would need to be installed in Node 1. After creating an initial design for the diverter, analysis was performed in Comsol in order to determine how changes in geometry would affect acoustic performance, as shown in Figure 2. These results were used to produce a physical prototype diverter on a 3D printer. With the physical prototype, testing was conducted in an anechoic chamber to determine the true effectiveness of the design, as seen in Figure 3. The results from this testing have been compared to the Comsol simulation results to analyze how closely the Comsol results are to real-world performance. While the Comsol results do not seem to closely resemble the real world performance, this testing has provided valuable insight into how much trust can be placed in the results of Comsol simulations. A final project that was worked on during this tour was the Audio Interface Unit (AIU) design for the Orion program. The AIU is a small device that will be used for as an audio communication device both during launch and on-orbit. The unit will have functions

  6. Analyzing the acoustic beat with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency Δf. The resulting auditory sensation is a tone with a volume that varies periodically. Acoustic beats can be perceived repeatedly in day-to-day life and have some interesting applications. For example, string instruments are still tuned with the help of an acoustic beat, even with modern technology. If a reference tone (e.g., 440 Hz) and, for example, a slightly out-of-tune violin string produce a tone simultaneously, a beat can be perceived. The more similar the frequencies, the longer the duration of the beat. In the extreme case, when the frequencies are identical, a beat no longer arises. The string is therefore correctly tuned. Using the Oscilloscope app,4 it is possible to capture and save acoustic signals of this kind and determine the beat frequency fS of the signal, which represents the difference in frequency Δf of the two overlapping tones (for Android smartphones, the app OsciPrime Oscilloscope can be used).

  7. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  8. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  9. A NEW STATISTIC FOR ANALYZING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Eckel, J.; Mehta, K.; Metchnik, M.; Pinto, P.; White, M.; Padmanabhan, N.; Seo, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a new statistic {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) for measuring and analyzing large-scale structure and particularly the baryon acoustic oscillations. {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) is a band-filtered, configuration space statistic that is easily implemented and has advantages over the traditional power spectrum and correlation function estimators. Unlike these estimators, {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) can localize most of the acoustic information into a single dip at the acoustic scale while avoiding sensitivity to the poorly constrained large-scale power (i.e., the integral constraint) through the use of a localized and compensated filter. It is also sensitive to anisotropic clustering through pair counting and does not require any binning of data. We measure the shift in the acoustic peak due to nonlinear effects using the monopole {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) derived from subsampled dark matter (DM) catalogs as well as from mock galaxy catalogs created via halo occupation distribution modeling. All of these are drawn from 44 realizations of 1024{sup 3} particle DM simulations in a 1 h {sup -1} Gpc box at z = 1. We compare these shifts with those obtained from the power spectrum and conclude that the results agree. We therefore expect that distance measurements obtained from {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) and P(k) will be consistent with each other. We also show that it is possible to extract the same amount of acoustic information by fitting over a finite range using either {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) or P(k) derived from equal volume surveys.

  10. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  11. Thermal acoustic interaction and flow phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, E. W.; Baroth, E.; Chan, C. K.; Wang, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    In containerless science for material processing, the acoustic fields is used to levitate and to control the position of a heated or cooled sample. The interaction between the temperature and the acoustic fields leads to complicated fluid flow phenomena, resulting in the perturbation of the sample position and the heat transfer process. The physical mechanisms in this thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry and thermometry. Of particular interest was the heat transfer rate from the sample associated with the sound intensities, normal frequencies of the acoustic standing wave field, and gravitational effects. For metallic spheres with high thermal conductivity, the surface temperature was found to be uniform. The thermal flow phenomenon, which is associated with the circulating flow inside the resonant chamber, was recorded. The heat transfer coefficient at the sample surface was correlated with the acoustic and the gravitational parameters, based on the classical theory of convective heat transfer. These correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer from a spherical object in a zero-gravity environment.

  12. Use of an acoustic helium analyzer for measuring lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Krumpe, P E; MacDannald, H J; Finley, T N; Schear, H E; Hall, J; Cribbs, D

    1981-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of an acoustic gas analyzer (AGA) for the measurement of total lung capacity (TLC) by single-breath helium dilution. The AGA has a rapid response time (0-90% response = 160 ms for 10% He), is linear for helium concentration of 0.1-10%, is stable over a wide range of ambient temperatures, and is small and portable. We plotted the output of the AGA vs. expired lung volume after a vital capacity breath of 10% He. However, since the AGA is sensitive to changes in speed of sound relative to air, the AGA output signal also reports an artifact due to alveolar gases. We corrected for this artifact by replotting a single-breath expiration after a vital capacity breath of room air. Mean alveolar helium concentration (HeA) was then measured by planimetry, using this alveolar gas curve as the base line. TLC was calculated using the HeA from the corrected AGA output and compared with TLC calculated from HeA simultaneously measured using a mass spectrometer (MS). In 12 normal subjects and 9 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) TLC-AGA and TLC-MS were compared by linear regression analysis; correlation coefficient (r) was 0.973 for normals and 0.968 for COPD patients (P less than 0.001). This single-breath; estimation of TLC using the corrected signal of the AGA vs. Expired volume seems ideally suited for the measurement of subdivisions of lung volume in field studies. PMID:7204187

  13. A methodology for analyzing an acoustic scene in sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hong; Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2007-10-01

    Presented here is a novel clustering method for Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and its application in acoustic scene analysis. In this method, HMMs are clustered based on a similarity measure for stochastic models defined as the generalized probability product kernel (GPPK), which can be efficiently evaluated according to a fast algorithm introduced by Chen and Man (2005) [1]. Acoustic signals from various sources are partitioned into small frames. Frequency features are extracted from each of the frames to form observation vectors. These frames are further grouped into segments, and an HMM is trained from each of such segments. An unknown segment is categorized with a known event if its HMM has the closest similarity with the HMM from the corresponding labeled segment. Experiments are conducted on an underwater acoustic dataset from Steven Maritime Security Laboratory, Data set contains a swimmer signature, a noise signature from the Hudson River, and a test sequence with a swimmer in the Hudson River. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully associate the test sequence with the swimmer signature at very high confidence, despite their different time behaviors.

  14. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, L.S.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

  15. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  16. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process. PMID:25904176

  17. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  18. Analyzing antibody-Fc-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2008-01-01

    Cellular receptors for immunoglobulins (Fc-receptors; FcR) are central mediators of antibody-triggered effector functions. Immune complex (IC) binding to FcRs results in a variety of reactions such as the release of inflammatory mediators, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis of ICs. Analyzing antibody-FcR (Ab-FcR) interactions in vitro is essential to determine the effector mechanisms, binding characteristics and affinity parameters that will impact and predict antibody activity in vivo. The methods described in this chapter include the generation of ICs and soluble FcR variants, as well as ELISA and FACS-based assays to study Ab-FcR interactions.

  19. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  20. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  1. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  2. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Glauber T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the interparticle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe the acoustic interaction force in an emulsion of oil droplets in water.

  3. On the Interaction of a Premixed Flame with an Acoustic Disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to analyze the effect of acoustic disturbances on a premixed flame and determine their role in the onset of combustion instabilities. Computations for the one-dimensional, unsteady combustion of a lean premixed methane-air mixture are performed. An acoustic excitation is introduced in the chamber and interacts with the flame front. Our results indicate that as the amplitude of the acoustic excitation is increased, the flame front position fluctuates rapidly. This phenomenon is even more intense when the frequency of the acoustic disturbance matches the fundamental frequency of the chamber. Our results suggest that the interactions between the flame and the acoustic excitation may result in flame extinguishment. In addition various passive control devices are tested and we found that the Helmholtz resonator with rounded inlet corners is the most efficient.

  4. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  5. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  6. Confined Mesoscopic Fluid-like Films Analyzed with Frequency Modulation and Acoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Rodriguez, Rodolfo

    Complete understanding of the physics underlying the changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like systems undergo at solid-liquid interfaces or under confinement remains one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Moreover, studies of confined mesoscopic fluid films are relevant to technological areas like adhesion, wetting processes and nanotribology. This thesis addresses the interaction between two sliding solids interfaces separated by a nanometer sized gap, with emphasis on the role of the mesoscopic fluid film trapped between them. For this purpose we integrated two acoustic techniques, recently introduced by our group, into a sub-nanometer precision and thermal drift corrected scanning probe microscope (SPM): the shear-force/acoustic near-field Microscope (SANM) and the whispering gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS). The SANM monitors the sound waves originating in the probe-layer interaction while the motion of the probe is monitored by the WGAS. Additionally, we decouple the interaction forces by using frequency modulation and measure the local tunneling current to help establish the location of the substrate. Our results show a strong correlation between the elastic component of the probe's interaction and the SANM amplitude, as well as between the phase lag response of the fluid relative to the probe's excitation (represented by the SANM phase) and the onset of the probe-sample contact region. Frequency modulation SANM-WGAS brings a new acoustic sensing mechanism to the challenging characterization of fluid-like physical systems at the nanometer scale.

  7. Interaction of acoustic waves generated by coupled plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    When two substructures are coupled, the acoustic field generated by the motion of each of the substructures will interact with the motion of the other substructure. This would be the case of a structure enclosing an acoustic cavity. A technique to model the interaction of the generated sound fields from the two components of a coupled structure, and the influence of this interaction on the vibration of the structural components is presented. Using a mobility power flow approach, each element of the substructure is treated independently both when developing the structural response and when determining the acoustic field generated by this component. The presence of the other substructural components is introduced by assuming these components to be rigid baffles. The excitation of one of the substructures is assumed to be by an incident acoustic wave which is dependent of the motion of the substructure. The sound field generated by the motion of the substructure is included in the solution of the response.

  8. Interactive word cloud for analyzing reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, HyunRyong

    2013-12-01

    A five-star quality rating is one of the most widely used systems for evaluating items. However, it has two fundamental limitations: 1) the rating for one item cannot describe crucial information in detail; 2) the rating is not on an absolute scale that can be used to compare items. Because of these limitations, users cannot make an optimal decision. In this paper, we introduce our sophisticated approach to extract useful information from user reviews using collapsed dependencies and sentiment analysis. We propose an interactive word cloud that can show grammatical relationships among words, explore reviews efficiently, and display positivity or negativity on a sentence. In addition, we introduce visualization for comparing multiple word clouds and illustrate the usage through test cases.

  9. The Bergen multifrequency analyzer (BMA): A new toolbox for acoustic categorization and species identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ona, Egil; Korneliussen, Rolf; Knudsen, Hans Petter; Rang, Kjell; Eliassen, Inge; Heggelund, Yngve; Patel, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    Multifrequency split-beam echo sounders with nearly identical and overlapping acoustic beams have been regularly used in acoustic surveys for fish stock abundance estimation. Calibrated raw data from up to six simultaneously working echo sounders at 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, and 364 kHz were applied for developing a new processing tool for real-time acoustic target categorization and acoustic species identification. The system now handles raw data from the Simrad EK500 and EK60 split-beam echo sounders, and performs a stepwise, modular sequence of analysis, like bottom detection, noise quantification and removal, target categorization, and school detection in near-real time. Direct generation of new, synthetic echograms, based upon the measured frequency response of the targets, is also one of the most useful features of the system. This information may significantly increase the accuracy of acoustic survey estimates of fish and zooplankton. New routines for noise removal, target categorization, and school detection will be presented, as well as new methods for training and building the artificial experience of the analyzer.

  10. Role of acoustics in flame/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Macaraeg, Michele G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of acoustics in flame/vortex interactions is examined via asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation. The model consists of a one-step, irreversible Arrhenius reaction between initially unmixed species occupying adjacent half-planes which are allowed to mix and react by convection and diffusion in the presence of an acoustic field or a time-varying pressure field of small amplitude. The main emphasis is on the influence of the acoustics on the ignition time and flame structure as a function of vortex Reynolds number and initial temperature differences of the reactants.

  11. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  12. PRASA: an integrated web server that analyzes protein interaction types.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen-Yu; Bai, Yi-Han; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Yao, Tsung-Ju; Chiang, Wen-Hao; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2013-04-10

    This work presents the Protein Association Analyzer (PRASA) (http://zoro.ee.ncku.edu.tw/prasa/) that predicts protein interactions as well as interaction types. Protein interactions are essential to most biological functions. The existence of diverse interaction types, such as physically contacted or functionally related interactions, makes protein interactions complex. Different interaction types are distinct and should not be confused. However, most existing tools focus on a specific interaction type or mix different interaction types. This work collected 7234058 associations with experimentally verified interaction types from five databases and compiled individual probabilistic models for different interaction types. The PRASA result page shows predicted associations and their related references by interaction type. Experimental results demonstrate the performance difference when distinguishing between different interaction types. The PRASA provides a centralized and organized platform for easy browsing, downloading and comparing of interaction types, which helps reveal insights into the complex roles that proteins play in organisms.

  13. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  14. Perceptual Technologies: Analyzing the Who, What, Where of Human Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiefelhagen, Rainer

    To enable the vision of user-centered context-aware and proactive smart environments, such environments need to be able to automatically acquire information about the room, the people in it, and their interactions. Thus, a wide range of audiovisual perceptual technologies is needed that can deliver the relevant information about what is going on in the scene based on the analysis of acoustic and visual sensors. This includes information about the number of people, their identities, locations, postures, gestures, body and head orientations, and the words they utter, among other things.

  15. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  16. [New potentials in assessment of the acoustic analyzer in occupational selection and certification of drivers].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B; Tavartkiladze, G A; Mukhamedova, G R

    2007-01-01

    As there is a need now in modern, informative and objective methods of diagnosis of early changes in the acoustic analyzer of drivers exposed to intensive occupational noise. To develop such methods, we studied parameters of evoked otoacoustic emission with reference to age of the drivers and duration of occupational exposure to noise. We established characteristics of delayed evoked otoacoustic emission and evoked distortion product otoacoustic emission. These parameters can be used in occupational selection and certification of transport drivers as markers of initial signs of a negative noise effect on the hearing organ.

  17. What Perception Implies about Implementation of Interactive Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Virtual acoustics, also known as 3-D sound and auralization, is the simulation of the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener within an environment. Going beyond the simple intensity panning of normal stereo techniques, the goal is to process sounds so that they appear to come from particular positions in three-dimensional space. Current techniques use digital signal processing to synthesize the acoustical properties that people use to localize a sound source. This paper briefly reviews these techniques as well as the results of a number of psychoacoustical studies designed to validate the synthesis. In particular, the relationship between the results of recent perceptual studies on the role of head motion to the implementation of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  18. Acoustic Interaction Forces and Torques Acting on Suspended Spheres in an Ideal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J Henrique; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Silva, Glauber T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N objects suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. We utilize the partial-wave expansion method with translational addition theorem and re-expansion of multipole series to solve the related multiple scattering problem. We show that the acoustic interaction force and torque can be obtained using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets' radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e., Mie scattering regime). The results show that the acoustic interaction forces present an oscillatory spatial distribution which follows the pattern formed by interference between the external and rescattered waves. In addition, acoustic interaction torques arise on the absorbing droplets whenever a nonsymmetric wavefront is formed by the external and rescattered waves' interference.

  19. Acoustic mimicry in a predator–prey interaction

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jesse R.; Conner, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Mimicry of visual warning signals is one of the keystone concepts in evolutionary biology and has received substantial research attention. By comparison, acoustic mimicry has never been rigorously tested. Visualizing bat–moth interactions with high-speed, infrared videography, we provide empirical evidence for acoustic mimicry in the ultrasonic warning sounds that tiger moths produce in response to echolocating bats. Two species of sound-producing tiger moths were offered successively to naïve, free-flying red and big brown bats. Noctuid and pyralid moth controls were also offered each night. All bats quickly learned to avoid the noxious tiger moths first offered to them, associating the warning sounds with bad taste. They then avoided the second sound-producing species regardless of whether it was chemically protected or not, verifying both Müllerian and Batesian mimicry in the acoustic modality. A subset of the red bats subsequently discovered the palatability of the Batesian mimic, demonstrating the powerful selective force these predators exert on mimetic resemblance. Given these results and the widespread presence of tiger moth species and other sound-producing insects that respond with ultrasonic clicks to bat attack, acoustic mimicry complexes are likely common components of the acoustic landscape. PMID:17517637

  20. Acoustic mimicry in a predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Conner, William E

    2007-05-29

    Mimicry of visual warning signals is one of the keystone concepts in evolutionary biology and has received substantial research attention. By comparison, acoustic mimicry has never been rigorously tested. Visualizing bat-moth interactions with high-speed, infrared videography, we provide empirical evidence for acoustic mimicry in the ultrasonic warning sounds that tiger moths produce in response to echolocating bats. Two species of sound-producing tiger moths were offered successively to naïve, free-flying red and big brown bats. Noctuid and pyralid moth controls were also offered each night. All bats quickly learned to avoid the noxious tiger moths first offered to them, associating the warning sounds with bad taste. They then avoided the second sound-producing species regardless of whether it was chemically protected or not, verifying both Müllerian and Batesian mimicry in the acoustic modality. A subset of the red bats subsequently discovered the palatability of the Batesian mimic, demonstrating the powerful selective force these predators exert on mimetic resemblance. Given these results and the widespread presence of tiger moth species and other sound-producing insects that respond with ultrasonic clicks to bat attack, acoustic mimicry complexes are likely common components of the acoustic landscape.

  1. Using Facebook Data to Analyze Learner Interaction during Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Although study abroad is viewed as an ideal environment for interaction in the target language, research in this area has relied mostly upon self-reported data, which pose challenges regarding recall bias and participant commitment. This article shows how Facebook data can be used to analyze naturally occurring learner interactions during study…

  2. An on-line acoustic fluorocarbon coolant mixture analyzer for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Botelho-Direito, J.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Egorov, K.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker community foresees an upgrade from the present octafluoro-propane (C{sub 3}F{sub 8}) evaporative cooling fluid - to a composite fluid with a probable 10-20% admixture of hexafluoro-ethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}). Such a fluid will allow a lower evaporation temperature and will afford the tracker silicon substrates a better safety margin against leakage current-induced thermal runaway caused by cumulative radiation damage as the luminosity profile at the CERN Large Hadron Collider increases. Central to the use of this new fluid is a new custom-developed speed-of-sound instrument for continuous real-time measurement of the C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} mixture ratio and flow. An acoustic vapour mixture analyzer/flow meter with new custom electronics allowing ultrasonic frequency transmission through gas mixtures has been developed for this application. Synchronous with the emission of an ultrasound 'chirp' from an acoustic transmitter, a fast readout clock (40 MHz) is started. The clock is stopped on receipt of an above threshold sound pulse at the receiver. Sound is alternately transmitted parallel and anti-parallel with the vapour flow for volume flow measurement from transducers that can serve as acoustic transmitters or receivers. In the development version, continuous real-time measurement of C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow and calculation of the mixture ratio is performed within a graphical user interface developed in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The described instrument has numerous potential applications - including refrigerant leak detection, the analysis of hydrocarbons, vapour mixtures for semiconductor manufacture and anesthetic gas mixtures. (authors)

  3. Modulation instability of ion acoustic waves, solitons, and their interactions in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiefang; Wang Yueyue; Wu Lei

    2009-06-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves in plasmas composed of ions, positrons, and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated. By means of the reduction perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived and the modulation instability of ion acoustic wave is analyzed, where the nonthermal parameter is found to be of significant importance. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the bright and dark solitons are obtained, and the interaction of multiple solitons is discussed.

  4. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOEpatents

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  5. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOEpatents

    Spates, James J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  6. Acoustic intensity in the interaction region of a parametric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; Gabrielson, T. B.; van Tol, D. J.; Kottke, N. F.; McConnell, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure acoustic intensity in the strong interaction region of a parametric source in order to obtain a clear definition of the source-generation region and to separate the local generation (the reactive field) from propagation (the real or active field). The acoustic intensity vector was mapped in the interaction region of a parametric projector at Lake Seneca. The source was driven with primary signals at 22 kHz and 27 kHz. Receiving sensors were located 8.5 meters from the projector. At that range, the secondary at 5 kHz was between 40 and 45 dB below either primary. For the primary levels used, the plane-wave shock inception distance would have been at least 14 meters. Furthermore, the Rayleigh distance for the projector was about 4 meters so the measurements at 8.5 meters were in the strong interaction region but not in saturation. Absorption was negligible over these ranges. The intensity measurements were made at fixed range but varying azimuth angle and varying depth thus developing a two-dimensional cross-section of the secondary beam. Measurements of both the active and reactive intensity vectors will be presented along with a discussion of measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code 321SS.

  7. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length.

  8. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzer in measuring concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted from feedlot soil/manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzers (PIMAs) are being increasingly utilized to measure concentrations and fluxes of greenhouse gases (i.e., N2O, CO2, and CH4) at the soil surface because of their low cost, portability, and ease of operation. This research evaluated a PIMA in combination with ...

  10. Acoustic environment resulting in interaction of launch vehicle main engines jets with a launch pad having closed long ducts like a tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. V.; Safronov, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    Paper deals with elaboration of semiempirical technique for prediction of broadband acoustic field generated at interaction of launch vehicle main engines jets with a launch pad having closed long ducts like a tunnel. Approach to a problem is based on analysis of jet interaction with typical deflectors, extraction of characteristic noise generation regions, and substitution of each region of noise generation by a system of independent acoustic sources with prescribed acoustic power and spectrum of acoustic radiation. Comparisons of calculated results with experimental data indicate that the technique allows to make reliable estimations of acoustical field characteristics as a function of geometrical and gasdynamic parameters and to analyze different means for reduction of acoustic loading at lift-off. Use of elaborated technique for multibody launch vehicles with clustered engines and multiduct launch pads is considered.

  11. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought. PMID:27475174

  12. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise. PMID:19275292

  13. Acoustic-Structure Interaction in Rocket Engines: Validation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Joji, Scott S.; Parks, Russel A.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    While analyzing a rocket engine component, it is often necessary to account for any effects that adjacent fluids (e.g., liquid fuels or oxidizers) might have on the structural dynamics of the component. To better characterize the fully coupled fluid-structure system responses, an analytical approach that models the system as a coupled expansion of rigid wall acoustic modes and in vacuo structural modes has been proposed. The present work seeks to experimentally validate this approach. To experimentally observe well-coupled system modes, the test article and fluid cavities are designed such that the uncoupled structural frequencies are comparable to the uncoupled acoustic frequencies. The test measures the natural frequencies, mode shapes, and forced response of cylindrical test articles in contact with fluid-filled cylindrical and/or annular cavities. The test article is excited with a stinger and the fluid-loaded response is acquired using a laser-doppler vibrometer. The experimentally determined fluid-loaded natural frequencies are compared directly to the results of the analytical model. Due to the geometric configuration of the test article, the analytical model is found to be valid for natural modes with circumferential wave numbers greater than four. In the case of these modes, the natural frequencies predicted by the analytical model demonstrate excellent agreement with the experimentally determined natural frequencies.

  14. Interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with a cavity-backed circular orifice and tonal acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic liners are effective reducers of jet exhaust and core noise and work by converting acoustic-bound energy into non-radiating, vorticity-bound energy through scattering, viscous, and non-linear processes. Modern liners are designed using highly-calibrated semi-empirical models that will not be effective for expected parameter spaces on future aircraft. The primary model limitation occurs when a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) grazes the liner; there are no physics-based methods for predicting the sound-liner interaction. We thus utilize direct numerical simulations to study the interaction of a Mach 0.5 zero pressure gradient TBL with a cavity-backed circular orifice under acoustic excitation. Acoustic field frequencies span the energy-containing range within the TBL and amplitudes range from 6 to 40 dB above the turbulent fluctuations. Impedance predictions are in agreement with NASA Langley-measured data and the simulation databases are analyzed in detail. A physics-based reduced-order model is proposed that connects the turbulence-vorticity-acoustic interaction and its accuracy and limitations are discussed. This work is funded by Aeroacoustics Research Consortium.

  15. Investigating the interaction between acoustically stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2012-11-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles can potentiate thrombolysis, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to gain a more fundamental understanding of how acoustically stimulated microbubbles interact with and potentially degrade fibrin clots. Owing to their optical transparency, the use of fibrin clots allowed to optically observe microbubbles interacting with the clot boundary and any resultant disruption of the fluorescently tagged fibrin network. It was found that microbubbles could readily penetrate into fibrin clots with velocities up to 0.2 m/s and to depths related to the number of pulses applied. At lower pressures (0.2-0.55 MPa), microbubbles as small as 3μm were observed to penetrate, whereas higher pressures (>0.9 MPa) caused the penetration of larger microbubbles (10-30μm), formed by coalescence prior to entry. In some cases, patent 'tunnels' remained along the path taken by penetrating microbubbles. Tunnel diameters ranged between 9-35μm depending largely on pressure and pulse duration. Two-photon microscopy indicated either patent tunnels or paths of disrupted fibers consistent with collapsed tunnel. Fluid flow within the clot was observed to accompany penetrating microbubbles, which may have implications for lytic enzyme penetration.

  16. A Framework for Conceptualizing, Representing, and Analyzing Distributed Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthers, Daniel D.; Dwyer, Nathan; Medina, Richard; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between interaction and learning is a central concern of the learning sciences, and analysis of interaction has emerged as a major theme within the current literature on computer-supported collaborative learning. The nature of technology-mediated interaction poses analytic challenges. Interaction may be distributed across actors,…

  17. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Greens function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Greens function decreases with increasing source frequency andor jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Greens function in the absence of the surface, and flight effect are also investigated.

  18. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  19. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  20. Innovative techniques for analyzing the three-dimensional behavioral results from acoustically tagged fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, Tracey W.; Timko, Mark A.

    2005-04-01

    Acoustic tags were used to monitor the swimming patterns of downstream migrating salmon smolts approaching various dams on the Columbia River, USA. Downstream migrating yearling chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), and sub-yearling chinook smolts were surgically implanted with acoustic tags. Fish were tracked in three-dimensions as they approached and passed into the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances at the dams during the 2004 spring and summer outmigrations. A number of advances in the analysis techniques and software have been made over the past few years. Some of these improvements include the development of various fish density algorithms, stream trace modeling analysis, and advances of three-dimensional animation programs. Three-dimensional tracks of fish approaching the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances will be presented. Concentrations of fish passage will be presented as three-dimensional fish densities superimposed over dam structures. Stream trace modeling animation will be presented showing predicted fish passage routes.

  1. Interaction of surface acoustic waves with moving vortex structures in superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Gutlyansky, E. D.

    2007-07-15

    A method is proposed for describing a moving film vortex structure and its interaction with surface acoustic waves. It is shown that the moving vortex structure can amplify (generate) surface acoustic waves. In contrast to a similar effect in semiconductor films, this effect can appear when the velocity of the vortex structure is much lower than the velocity of the surface acoustic waves. A unidirectional collective mode is shown to exist in the moving vortex structure. This mode gives rise to an acoustic analogue of the diode effect that is resonant in the velocity of the vortex structure. This acoustic effect is manifested as an anomalous attenuation of the surface acoustic waves in the direction of the vortex-structure motion and as the absence of this attenuation for the propagation in the opposite direction.

  2. A Framework to Describe, Analyze and Generate Interactive Motor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    While motor interaction between a robot and a human, or between humans, has important implications for society as well as promising applications, little research has been devoted to its investigation. In particular, it is important to understand the different ways two agents can interact and generate suitable interactive behaviors. Towards this end, this paper introduces a framework for the description and implementation of interactive behaviors of two agents performing a joint motor task. A taxonomy of interactive behaviors is introduced, which can classify tasks and cost functions that represent the way each agent interacts. The role of an agent interacting during a motor task can be directly explained from the cost function this agent is minimizing and the task constraints. The novel framework is used to interpret and classify previous works on human-robot motor interaction. Its implementation power is demonstrated by simulating representative interactions of two humans. It also enables us to interpret and explain the role distribution and switching between roles when performing joint motor tasks. PMID:23226231

  3. Electric-acoustic interactions in the hearing cochlea: single fiber recordings.

    PubMed

    Tillein, J; Hartmann, R; Kral, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates interactions of simultaneous electric and acoustic stimulation in single auditory nerve fibers in normal hearing cats. First, the auditory nerve was accessed with a microelectrode and response areas of single nerve fibers were determined for acoustic stimulation. Second, response thresholds to extracochlear sinusoidal electric stimulation using ball electrodes positioned at the round window were measured. Third, interactions that occurred with combined electric-acoustic stimulation were investigated in two areas: (1) the spectral domain (frequency response areas) and (2) the temporal domain (phase-locking to each stimulus) at moderate stimulus intensities (electric: 6 dB re threshold, acoustic: 20-40 dB re threshold at the characteristic frequency, CF). For fibers responding to both modalities responses to both electric and acoustic stimulation could be clearly identified. CFs, thresholds, and bandwidth (Q10dB) of acoustic responses were not significantly affected by simultaneous electric stimulation. Phase-locking of electric responses decreased in the presence of acoustic stimulation. Indication for electric stimulation of inner hair cells with 125 and 250 Hz were observed. However, these did not disturb the acoustic receptive fields of auditory nerve fibers. There was a trade-off between these responses when the intensities of the stimulation were varied: Relatively more intense stimulation dominated less intense stimulation. The scarcity of interaction between the different stimulus modalities demonstrates the ability of electric-acoustic stimulation to transfer useful information through both stimulation channels at the same time despite cochlear electrophonic effects. Application of 30 Hz electric stimulation resulted in a strong suppression of acoustic activity in the anodic phase of the stimulus. An electric stimulation like this might thus be used to control acoustic responses. This article is part of a Special Issue

  4. Anisotropic acousto-optic interaction in tellurium crystal with acoustic walk-off.

    PubMed

    Balakshy, Vladimir; Voloshin, Andrey

    2016-06-10

    The influence of the acoustic beam energy walk-off on characteristics of anisotropic Bragg diffraction of light is studied theoretically by the example of a tellurium single crystal. Calculations for wide ranges of Bragg angles and ultrasound frequencies are produced on the basis of an original solution of the acousto-optic (AO) interaction problem, which takes into consideration the acoustic walk-off. It is established that the walk-off can substantially change the region of AO interaction, resulting in narrowing or broadening of the frequency characteristic depending on the crystal cut, acoustic frequency, incident light polarization, and walk-off angle sign. PMID:27409010

  5. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  6. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  7. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices. PMID:26346448

  8. Learning to Analyze and Code Accounting Transactions in Interactive Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentz, William F.; Ambler, Eric E.

    An interactive computer-assisted instructional (CAI) system, called CODE, is used to teach transactional analysis, or coding, in elementary accounting. The first major component of CODE is TEACH, a program which controls student input and output. Following the statement of a financial position on a cathode ray tube, TEACH describes an event to…

  9. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  10. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  11. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion acoustic waves in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Over the years, coronal heating has been the most fascinating question among the scientific community. In the present article, a heating mechanism has been proposed based on the wave-wave interaction. Under this wave-wave interaction, the high frequency kinetic Alfvén wave interacts with the low frequency ion acoustic wave. These waves are three dimensionally propagating and nonlinearly coupled through ponderomotive nonlinearity. A numerical code based on pseudo-spectral technique has been developed for solving these normalized dynamical equations. Localization of kinetic Alfvén wave field has been examined, and magnetic power spectrum has also been analyzed which shows the cascading of energy to higher wavenumbers, and this cascading has been found to have Kolmogorov scaling, i.e., k-5 /3 . A breakpoint appears after Kolmogorov scaling and next to this spectral break; a steeper scaling has been obtained. The presented nonlinear interaction for coronal loops plasmas is suggested to generate turbulent spectrum having Kolmogorov scaling in the inertial range and steepened scaling in the dissipation range. Since Kolmogorov turbulence is considered as the main source for coronal heating; therefore, the suggested mechanism will be a useful tool to understand the mystery of coronal loop heating through Kolmogorov turbulence and dissipation.

  12. Closing remarks on Faraday Discussion 107: Interactions of acoustic waves with thin films and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    The papers in this Faraday Discussion represent the state-of-the-art in using acoustic devices to measure the properties of thin films and interfaces. Sauerbrey first showed that the mass sensitivity of a quartz crystal could be used to measure the thickness of vacuum-deposited metals. Since then, significant progress has been made in understanding other interaction mechanisms between acoustic devices and contacting media. Bruckenstein and Shay and Kanazawa and Gordon showed that quartz resonators could be operated in a fluid to measure surface mass accumulation and fluid properties. The increased understanding of interactions between acoustic devices and contacting media has allowed new information to be obtained about thin films and interfaces. These closing remarks will summarize the current state of using acoustic techniques to probe thin films and interfaces, describe the progress reported in this Faraday Discussion, and outline some remaining problems. Progress includes new measurement techniques, novel devices, new applications, and improved modeling and data analysis.

  13. Analyzing Groundwater-Vegetation Interactions using a Dynamic Agroecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, M. E.; Kucharik, C. J.; Loheide, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is a crucial source of water for vegetation, especially in arid and semiarid environments in many regions around the world and its availability controls the distribution and the physiology of plant species. However, the impact of groundwater on vegetation is not completely understood mainly due to the limited ability of current models to simulate groundwater and vegetation interactions. Existing land surface models (LSM) simulate water and energy fluxes among soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems in a process-based way, but lack a detailed simulation of soil water movement in the unsaturated zone, particularly when groundwater is present. Furthermore, there are only a few available LSM and/or process based vegetation models that can simulate agroecosystems, which are as important to understand as natural ecosystems considering they occupy approximately 40% of the global land surface. On the other hand, current physically-based, variably-saturated soil water flux models are able to accurately simulate water movement in the unsaturated zone. However, they often lack a detailed plant physiology component making it difficult to understand plant responses to both variations in energy fluxes and upward capillary fluxes in shallow groundwater environments. To connect these two different model types, the objectives of this study are (1) to incorporate an advanced dynamic agroecosystem model (Agro-IBIS) and a variably saturated soil water flow model (Hydrus-1D) into a single framework that is capable of simulating groundwater and plant/crop system interactions in a fully, physically-based fashion, and (2) to apply this model using observed climate records to better understand the responses of managed and natural ecosystems to varied water table depths under inter-annual climate forcing conditions. The model results show that as the water table becomes shallower, (1) soil temperature decreases due to the moisture content driven effects on the thermal diffusivity of

  14. Analyzing wind turbine flow interaction through vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; D'Elia, Gianluca; Astolfi, Davide; Mucchi, Emiliano; Giorgio, Dalpiaz; Terzi, Ludovico

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines commonly undergo non-stationary flow and, not rarely, even rather extreme phenomena. In particular, rough terrains represent a challenging testing ground, because of the combination of terrain-driven flow and wakes. It is therefore crucial to assess the impact of dynamic loads on the turbines. In this work, tower and drive-train vibrations are analyzed, from a subcluster of four turbines of a wind farm sited in a very complex terrain. The main outcome of the study is that it is possible to start from the analysis of wind conditions and interpret how wakes manifest in the vibrations of the turbines, both at structural level (tower vibrations) and at the drive-train level. This wind to gear approach therefore allows to build a connection between a flow phenomenon and a mechanical phenomenon (vibrations) and can be precious to assess loads in different working conditions.

  15. Analysis of the Role of Update Rate and System Latency in Interactive Virtual Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Technical Monitor); Johnson, Gerald (Technical Monitor); Frey, Mary Anne (Technical Monitor); Schneider, Victor S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of virtual acoustics is to simulate the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener freely moving around within an environment. This paper discusses some of the engineering constraints that may be faced during implementation and the perceptual consequences of these constraints. In particular, the perceptual impact of parameters like the update rate and overall system latency of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  16. Investigation of combustion chamber acoustics and its interaction with LOX/H2 spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschwald, M.; Knapp, B.

    2009-09-01

    Acoustics of combustion chambers is investigated experimentally in cold flow and hot fire tests. The performance of absorber elements is analyzed in respect to their effect on combustion chamber eigenfrequencies as well as to their damping characteristics. It is shown that predictions of numerical modal analysis of chamber acoustics are in very good agreement with measurements. In hot fire tests, a burning LOX/H2 spray is acoustically excited with a siren wheel and combustion response is recorded with dynamic pressure sensors and by high-speed visualization of the spray and the flame. Although no combustion instability could be observed, analyzing the temporal and spatial distribution of flame response allowed addressing the question, whether the coupling of acoustics to combustion is via pressure or velocity sensitive processes.

  17. Influence of Acoustic Field Structure on Polarization Characteristics of Acousto-optic Interaction in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromets, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    Influence of acoustic field structure on polarization characteristics of acousto-optic interaction is investigated. It is shown that inhomogeneity of acoustic field and mechanism of ultrasound excitation causes changes in values of acousto-optic figure of merit for ordinary and extraordinary light beams in comparison with theoretic values. The theoretic values were derived under assumption that acoustic wave is homogeneous. Experimental analysis was carried out in acousto-optic cell based on lithium niobate crystal where the acoustic wave propagates at the angle 13 degrees to Z axis of the crystal. We used three different methods of ultrasound generation in the crystal: by means of external piezotransducer, by interdigital transducer and by two sets of electrodes placed on top of the crystal surface. In the latter case, the first pair of the electrodes was directed along X crystal axis, while the second pair of the electrodes was directed orthogonally to X crystal axis and the direction of ultrasound. Obtained values for diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary polarized optical beams were qualitatively different which may be caused by spatial inhomogeneity of the generated acoustic waves in the crystal. Structure of acoustic field generated by these sets of electrodes was examined by laser probing. We performed the analysis of the acoustic field intensity using acousto-optic method. A relation of diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary light waves was measured during each iteration of the laser probing.

  18. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  19. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-01

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  20. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-21

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  1. Helicopter blade-vortex interaction locations: Scale-model acoustics and free-wake analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a model rotor acoustic test in the Langley 4by 7-Meter Tunnel are used to evaluate a free-wake analytical technique. An acoustic triangulation technique is used to locate the position in the rotor disk where the blade-vortex interaction noise originates. These locations, along with results of the rotor free-wake analysis, are used to define the geometry of the blade-vortex interaction noise phenomena as well as to determine if the free-wake analysis is a capable diagnostic tool. Data from tests of two teetering rotor systems are used in these analyses.

  2. Tail formation by nonresonant interaction of ions with ion-acoustic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert, K.; Vaclavik, J.

    1981-09-01

    The quasilinear evolution of ion-acoustic turbulence induced by a constant current in a two-temperature plasma (with electron temperature much greater than ion temperature) is considered. The pertinent equations, which include both resonant and nonresonant wave-particle interactions, are discretized by a finite element method and solved numerically. If is shown first that the nonresonant interaction provides a powerful mechanism for ion tail formation. It is then shown that linear Landau damping on the high-energy ion tail so formed may quench the ion-acoustic instability as proposed by Dum et al. (1974) when interpreting their particle-in-cell simulation results.

  3. Interaction of surface and bulk acoustic waves with a two-dimensional semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, V. M. Chaplik, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    The interaction of a surface elastic Rayleigh wave with an electron-hole plasma in a two-dimensional semimetal has been theoretically studied as determined by the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms. Dispersion equations describing the coupled plasmon-acoustic modes for both types of interaction are derived, and damping of the Rayleigh wave is calculated. The damping of the acoustic and optical plasmon modes, which is related to the sound emission by plasma oscillations into the substrate volume, is calculated and it is shown that this sound emission is predominantly determined by the acoustic plasmon mode in the case of a deformation potential mechanism and by the optical mode in the case of a piezoelectric mechanism.

  4. Frequency spectrum of the noise emitted by two interacting cavitation bubbles in strong acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Fengbing; Chen, Haosheng; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics and acoustic emission of two interacting cavitation bubbles exposed to strong acoustic fields with a frequency of 515 KHz are investigated numerically in this paper. After comparing the dynamics of a single bubble excited by the given pressure waves, bubbles with ambient radii of 2 and 5 μm were chosen to be studied to discuss the influence of the mutual bubble-bubble interaction on the dynamic behaviors and acoustic emission of the bubbles. The results show that, aside from the external driving pressure waves, the interaction between the bubbles imposes an extra nonlinear effect on the oscillations of the bubbles and that the dynamics of the smaller bubble could be suppressed gradually with the enhancement of this mutual interaction by decreasing the distance between the bubbles. Moreover, the improvement in the oscillation nonlinearity of the bubbles due to the change in the ambient circumstance could readily be observed from the frequency spectra of the bubbles' acoustic emission, which interprets the change by exhibiting an appropriate development of the subharmonics, the ultraharmonics, and the broadband component.

  5. Evidence for acoustic-wave coupling in the magnetostatic-wave-optical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilaniuk, Nykolai; Stancil, Daniel D.

    1990-05-01

    We have observed the collinear interaction between optical guided modes and magnetostatic forward-volume waves in a film of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with microwave frequencies between 500 MHz and 12 GHz. The interaction occurred in one of two 5.3-μm films of YIG on either side of a 470-μm substrate of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). The intensity of the diffracted optical beam was measured as the microwave frequency was swept about the center frequency, with magnetic bias field held constant. We refer to this measurement as the interaction passband. Below 1 GHz, we observed absorption notches in the interaction passband with a regular period of 3.7 MHz. These are interpreted as evidence of coupling to transverse acoustic resonances through the sample thickness. This spacing agrees with a simple calculation based on transverse acoustic velocities in YIG of 3843 m/s and GGG of 3568 m/s.

  6. Transformation of phase dislocations under acousto-optic interaction of optical and acoustical Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyi, V. N.; Khilo, P. A.; Kazak, N. S.; Khilo, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The generation of wavefront phase dislocations of vortex Bessel light beams under acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in uniaxial crystals has been investigated. For the first time the process of AO interaction is studied with participation of Bessel acoustic beams instead of plane waves. A mathematical description of AO interaction is provided, which supposes the satisfaction of two types of phase-matching condition. The acousto-optic processes of transferring optical singularities onto the wavefront of BLBs are investigated and the generation of high-order optical vortices is considered at the interaction of optical and acoustical Bessel beams. The change of Bessel function order or phase dislocation order is explained as a result of the spin–orbital interaction under acousto-optic diffraction of vortex Bessel beams.

  7. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  8. Long-range acoustic interactions in insect swarms: an adaptive gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-07-01

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which are thought to interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges’ acoustic sensing, we show that our ‘adaptive gravity’ model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. Additionally, the adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  9. Numerical investigation of acoustic radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legault, Anne; Ji, Minsuk; Wang, Meng

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of vortices interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat-plate airfoil at zero angle of attack are carried out to assess the applicability and accuracy of classical theories. Unsteady lift and sound are computed and compared with the predictions by theories of Sears and Amiet, which assume a thin-plate airfoil in an inviscid flow. A Navier-Stokes solver is used in the simulations, and therefore viscous effects are taken into consideration. For the thin-plate airfoil, the effect of viscosity is negligible. For a NACA 0012 airfoil, the viscous contribution to the unsteady lift and sound mainly comes from coherent vortex shedding in the wake of the airfoil and the interaction of the incoming vortices with the airfoil wake, which become stronger at higher Reynolds numbers for a 2-D laminar flow. When the flow is turbulent at chord Reynolds number of 4 . 8 ×105 , however, the viscous contribution becomes negligible as coherent vortex shedding is not present. Sound radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction at turbulent Reynolds numbers is computed numerically via Lighthill's theory and the result is compared with the predictions of Amiet and Curle. The effect of the airfoil thickness is also examined. Supported by ONR Grant N00014-09-1-1088.

  10. Phonon-electron interactions in piezoelectric semiconductor bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Vikrant J; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-07-08

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q.

  11. Phonon-Electron Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductor Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Vikrant J.; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q. PMID:25001100

  12. Phonon-Electron Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductor Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Vikrant J.; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-07-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q.

  13. Capturing and Analyzing Verbal and Physical Collaborative Learning Interactions at an Enriched Interactive Tabletop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Maldonado, Roberto; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Martinez-Monés, Alejandra; Kay, Judy; Yacef, Kalina

    2013-01-01

    Interactive tabletops can be used to provide new ways to support face-to-face collaborative learning. A little explored and somewhat hidden potential of these devices is that they can be used to enhance teachers' awareness of students' progress by exploiting captured traces of interaction. These data can make key aspects of collaboration…

  14. Effect of strong electrostatic interactions of microparticles on the dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Nosenko, V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-10-15

    It is shown that strong electrostatic interaction of highly charged microparticles (which is common for many laboratory experiments) can significantly modify the behavior of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma giving rise to their transition, at large wave numbers, into a new regime similar to the dust thermal mode. Examples of the dispersion curves are calculated for realistic complex plasma parameters and a comparison with a recent experiment is presented. Excellent agreement is found between the theory and the experiment.

  15. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  16. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  17. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15-to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual…

  18. Modality interactions alter the shape of acoustic mate preference functions in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2015-09-01

    Sexual selection takes place in complex environments where females evaluating male mating signals are confronted with stimuli from multiple sources and modalities. The pattern of expression of female preferences may be influenced by interactions between modalities, changing the shape of female preference functions, and thus ultimately altering the selective landscape acting on male signal evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the responses of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to acoustic male advertisement calls are affected by interactions with visual stimuli. We measured preference functions for several call traits under two experimental conditions: unimodal (only acoustic signals presented), and multimodal (acoustic signals presented along with a video-animated calling male). We found that females were more responsive to multimodal stimulus presentations and, compared to unimodal playbacks, had weaker preferences for temporal call characteristics. We compared the preference functions obtained in these two treatments to the distribution of male call characteristics to make inferences on the strength and direction of selection expected to act on male calls. Modality interactions have the potential to influence the course of signal evolution and thus are an important consideration in sexual selection studies. PMID:26282702

  19. Novel Acoustic Technology for Studying Free-Ranging Shark Social Behaviour by Recording Individuals' Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guttridge, Tristan L.; Gruber, Samuel H.; Krause, Jens; Sims, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Group behaviours are widespread among fish but comparatively little is known about the interactions between free-ranging individuals and how these might change across different spatio-temporal scales. This is largely due to the difficulty of observing wild fish groups directly underwater over long enough time periods to quantify group structure and individual associations. Here we describe the use of a novel technology, an animal-borne acoustic proximity receiver that records close-spatial associations between free-ranging fish by detection of acoustic signals emitted from transmitters on other individuals. Validation trials, held within enclosures in the natural environment, on juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris fitted with external receivers and transmitters, showed receivers logged interactions between individuals regularly when sharks were within 4 m (∼4 body lengths) of each other, but rarely when at 10 m distance. A field trial lasting 17 days with 5 juvenile lemon sharks implanted with proximity receivers showed one receiver successfully recorded association data, demonstrating this shark associated with 9 other juvenile lemon sharks on 128 occasions. This study describes the use of acoustic underwater proximity receivers to quantify interactions among wild sharks, setting the scene for new advances in understanding the social behaviours of marine animals. PMID:20174465

  20. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  1. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  2. Interactions between a spherical elastic shell and acoustic waves from a water-entry moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.

    2004-05-01

    A possible interaction between the acoustic waves, which are generated from a water-entry body (moving source), and a submerged elastic shell is investigated theoretically within the scope of linear theory. The incident wave is defined from the ballistic wave model. The transient interaction is solved through extension of a method formulated for the excitation from a stationary source in an infinite domain. Numerical examples for the incident wave forms and corresponding shell responses are given to illustrate the effect of a moving source on the structure response.

  3. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  4. On Acoustic Source Specification for Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Caesy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of measured source data to assess the effects of acoustic source specification on rotor-stator interaction noise predictions. Specifically, the acoustic propagation and radiation portions of a recently developed coupled computational approach are used to predict tonal rotor-stator interaction noise from a benchmark configuration. In addition to the use of full measured data, randomization of source mode relative phases is also considered for specification of the acoustic source within the computational approach. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to investigate the effects of various source descriptions on both inlet and exhaust predictions. The inclusion of additional modal source content is shown to have a much greater influence on the inlet results. Reasonable agreement between predicted and measured levels is achieved for the inlet, as well as the exhaust when shear layer effects are taken into account. For the number of trials considered, phase randomized predictions follow statistical distributions similar to those found in previous statistical source investigations. The shape of the predicted directivity pattern relative to measurements also improved with phase randomization, having predicted levels generally within one standard deviation of the measured levels.

  5. The acoustic interaction of voices in ensemble: An inquiry into the phenomenon of voice matching and the perception of unaltered vocal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Neal Wayne

    It was the purpose of this study to examine and quantify the acoustic interaction of voices in ensemble, with specific consideration to the differences between placement (how voices respond to adjacent voices) and spacing (how voices respond to differences in the space between adjacent voices). This study, further, investigated whether there was any discernible acoustic phenomenon that delineated or defined when a vocal match was made, or if a vocal match was merely a matter of conductor preference. The acoustic data, further, were to be compared with the blend preferences of choral directors and voice teachers, and the preferences of the individual singers used. Information was collected concerning the acoustic appearance of choral blend. A reductionist approach regarding the variables for the study permitted detailed, quantifiable data pertinent to these aims. Two groups of three male singers were formed. Both groups were recorded in each possible solo, duet, and trio formation. The results were acoustically analyzed, anonymously considered by choral directors and voice teachers, and considered by the individual singers; the combination of acoustic analysis, auditor preference, and singer preference revealed specific trends with regard to both blend and vocal function. For Group 1, the combination of placement and lateral spacing provided the best alliance of acoustic analysis and auditor/singer preference, at a rate of 54% for placement/lateral spacing and 46% for placement/close spacing. Attention to acoustic placement alone was shown to be superior to spacing alone, and the combination of acoustic placement and spacing was only slightly more successful than placement alone. For Group 2, acoustic placement alone provided the best alliance of acoustic analysis and auditor/singer preference, at a rate of 50% each for close and lateral spacing. Attention to acoustic placement alone was shown to be superior to spacing alone, and the combination of acoustic

  6. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model.

  7. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model. PMID:25920865

  8. A Two-dimensional Cartesian and Axisymmetric Study of Combustion-acoustic Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a study of a lean premixed (LP) methane-air combustion wave in a two-dimensional Cartesian and axisymmetric coordinate system. Lean premixed combustors provide low emission and high efficiency; however, they are susceptible to combustion instabilities. The present study focuses on the behavior of the flame as it interacts with an external acoustic disturbance. It was found that the flame oscillations increase as the disturbance amplitude is increased. Furthermore, when the frequency of the disturbance is at resonance with a chamber frequency, the instabilities increase. For the axisymmetric geometry, the flame is found to be more unstable compared to the Cartesian case. In some cases, these instabilities were severe and led to flame extinction. In the axisymmetric case, several passive control devices were tested to assess their effectiveness. It is found that an acoustic cavity is better able at controlling the pressure fluctuations in the chamber.

  9. Analyzing Carbohydrate-Protein Interaction Based on Single Plasmonic Nanoparticle by Conventional Dark Field Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Na; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-06-10

    We demonstrated a practical method to analyze carbohydrate-protein interaction based on single plasmonic nanoparticles by conventional dark field microscopy (DFM). Protein concanavalin A (ConA) was modified on large sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and dextran was conjugated on small sized AuNPs. As the interaction between ConA and dextran resulted in two kinds of gold nanoparticles coupled together, which caused coupling of plasmonic oscillations, apparent color changes (from green to yellow) of the single AuNPs were observed through DFM. Then, the color information was instantly transformed into a statistic peak wavelength distribution in less than 1 min by a self-developed statistical program (nanoparticleAnalysis). In addition, the interaction between ConA and dextran was proved with biospecific recognition. This approach is high-throughput and real-time, and is a convenient method to analyze carbohydrate-protein interaction at the single nanoparticle level efficiently. PMID:25985863

  10. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  11. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  12. Limitation of degree information for analyzing the interaction evolution in online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ke-Ke; Yan, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Ke

    2014-04-01

    Previously many studies on online social networks simply analyze the static topology in which the friend relationship once established, then the links and nodes will not disappear, but this kind of static topology may not accurately reflect temporal interactions on online social services. In this study, we define four types of users and interactions in the interaction (dynamic) network. We found that active, disappeared, new and super nodes (users) have obviously different strength distribution properties and this result also can be revealed by the degree characteristics of the unweighted interaction and friendship (static) networks. However, the active, disappeared, new and super links (interactions) only can be reflected by the strength distribution in the weighted interaction network. This result indicates the limitation of the static topology data on analyzing social network evolutions. In addition, our study uncovers the approximately stable statistics for the dynamic social network in which there are a large variation for users and interaction intensity. Our findings not only verify the correctness of our definitions, but also helped to study the customer churn and evaluate the commercial value of valuable customers in online social networks.

  13. Opto-acoustic interactions in gravitational wave detectors: Comparing flat-top beams with Gaussian beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gras, S.; Blair, D. G.; Ju, L.

    2010-02-15

    To reduce the thermal noise in the future generation of gravitational wave detectors, flat-top beams have been proposed to replace conventional Gaussian beams, so as to obtain better averaging over the Brownian motion of the test masses. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the unwanted opto-acoustic interactions in such interferometers, which can lead to the phenomenon of parametric instability. Our results show that the increased overlap of the Mesa beams with the test masses leads to approximately 3 times as many unstable modes in comparison to a similar interferometer with Gaussian beams.

  14. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R. |

    1995-03-27

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions.

  15. Analyzing Dynamic Pendulum Motion in an Interactive Online Environment Using Flash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezrailson, Cathy Mariotti; Allen, G. Donald; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2004-01-01

    A pendulum "engine" with dynamic parameters can be created and pendulum functions manipulated and analyzed using interactive elements in Flash. The effects of changing the damping (convergence) properties, initial release angle and initial velocity conditions can be explored. The motions then can be digitized using the Flash Digitizer 1.1,…

  16. Bayesian Methods for Analyzing Structural Equation Models with Covariates, Interaction, and Quadratic Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of interaction among latent variables has received much attention. This article introduces a Bayesian approach to analyze a general structural equation model that accommodates the general nonlinear terms of latent variables and covariates. This approach produces a Bayesian estimate that has the same statistical optimal properties as a…

  17. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  18. Acoustic measurements from a rotor blade-vortex interaction noise experiment in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ruth M.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from a 40 percent scale model of the 4-bladed BO-105 helicopter main rotor, measured in the large European aeroacoustic wind tunnel, the DNW. Rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data in the low speed flight range were acquired using a traversing in-flow microphone array. The experimental apparatus, testing procedures, calibration results, and experimental objectives are fully described. A large representative set of averaged acoustic signals is presented.

  19. Divergence of Acoustic Signals in a Widely Distributed Frog: Relevance of Inter-Male Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Nelson A.; Opazo, Daniel; Díaz, Javier; Penna, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Divergence of acoustic signals in a geographic scale results from diverse evolutionary forces acting in parallel and affecting directly inter-male vocal interactions among disjunct populations. Pleurodema thaul is a frog having an extensive latitudinal distribution in Chile along which males' advertisement calls exhibit an important variation. Using the playback paradigm we studied the evoked vocal responses of males of three populations of P. thaul in Chile, from northern, central and southern distribution. In each population, males were stimulated with standard synthetic calls having the acoustic structure of local and foreign populations. Males of both northern and central populations displayed strong vocal responses when were confronted with the synthetic call of their own populations, giving weaker responses to the call of the southern population. The southern population gave stronger responses to calls of the northern population than to the local call. Furthermore, males in all populations were stimulated with synthetic calls for which the dominant frequency, pulse rate and modulation depth were varied parametrically. Individuals from the northern and central populations gave lower responses to a synthetic call devoid of amplitude modulation relative to stimuli containing modulation depths between 30–100%, whereas the southern population responded similarly to all stimuli in this series. Geographic variation in the evoked vocal responses of males of P. thaul underlines the importance of inter-male interactions in driving the divergence of the acoustic traits and contributes evidence for a role of intra-sexual selection in the evolution of the sound communication system of this anuran. PMID:24489957

  20. SeismicCanvas: Interactive software for accessing and analyzing seismic waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    SeismicCavas, a cross-platform, graphically interactive application for accessing and analyzing waveform data is presented. Unlike command-line driven packages like SAC and MatSeis, SeismicCanvas adopts a graphically interactive interface to minimize the learning curve for classroom and laboratory application. The menu structure is patterned after common desktop word processing and spreadsheet applications. Direct graphical interaction with traces adopts a "select, then operate" paradigm used in familiar desktop graphics packages. Viewing options include arbitrary arrangement of traces, seismic sections, spectra and spectrograms. Operations include stacking, filtering, windowing and tapering. Interactive picking and measurement of times and amplitudes and WYSIWYG printing are implemented. SeismicCanvas can import data from local files, or through the new web services interface of the IRIS Data Management System. We invite feedback including suggestions for changes to the user interface or additional capabilities that will allow SeismicCanvas to support classroom and laboratory use of digital seismic data.

  1. Three Dimensional Viscous Finite Element Formulation For Acoustic Fluid Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang’s 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman’s thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable. PMID:20174602

  2. Electron-acoustic phonon interaction and mobility in stressed rectangular silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin-Li

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of pre-stress and surface tension on the electron-acoustic phonon scattering rate and the mobility of rectangular silicon nanowires. With the elastic theory and the interaction Hamiltonian for the deformation potential, which considers both the surface energy and the acoustoelastic effects, the phonon dispersion relation for a stressed nanowire under spatial confinement is derived. The subsequent analysis indicates that both surface tension and pre-stress can dramatically change the electron-acoustic phonon interaction. Under a negative (positive) surface tension and a tensile (compressive) pre-stress, the electron mobility is reduced (enhanced) due to the decrease (increase) of the phonon energy as well as the deformation-potential scattering rate. This study suggests an alternative approach based on the strain engineering to tune the speed and the drive current of low-dimensional electronic devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472243, 11302189, and 11321202), the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175), the Zhejiang Provincial Qianjiang Talent Program, China (Grant No. QJD1202012), and the Educational Commission of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y201223476).

  3. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions Throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-04-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15- to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual enactment influences students' learning progressions. This article presents the design principles which elicit the structure and types of modeling and inquiry activities designed to promote students' development of three conceptual models. Some of these activities are enhanced by the use of ICT such as sound level meters connected to data capture systems, which facilitate the measurement of the intensity level of sound emitted by a sound source and transmitted through different materials. Framing this study within the design-based research paradigm, it consists of the experimentation of the designed teaching sequence with two groups of students ( n = 29) in their science classes. The analysis of students' written productions together with classroom observations of the implementation of the teaching sequence allowed characterizing students' development of the conceptual models. Moreover, we could evidence the influence of different modeling and inquiry activities on students' development of the conceptual models, identifying those that have a major impact on students' modeling processes. Having evidenced different levels of development of each conceptual model, our results have been interpreted in terms of the attributes of each conceptual model, the distance between students' preliminary mental models and the intended conceptual models, and the instructional design and enactment.

  4. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  5. Prototype partial one-third octave band spectrum analyzer for acoustic, vibration and other wideband data for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design refinement of a compact frequency analyzer for measurement and analysis on board flight vehicles is discussed. The analyzer has been constructed in a partial one-third octave band configuration with six filters and detectors spaced by the square root of 10 from 316 Hz to 100,000 Hz and a broadband detector channel. The analyzer has been tested over a temperature range of 40 to 120 F at a pressure of one atmosphere, and at a temperature of 75 F at an absolute pressure of 0.000001 torr, and has demonstrated at least 60 db of dynamic range.

  6. Acoustic streaming induced elimination of nonspecifically bound proteins from a surface acoustic wave biosensor: Mechanism prediction using fluid-structure interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Singh, Reetu; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.

    2010-11-01

    Biosensors typically operate in liquid media for detection of biomarkers and suffer from fouling resulting from nonspecific binding of protein molecules to the device surface. In the current work, using a coupled field finite element fluid-structure interaction simulation, we have identified that fluid motion induced by high intensity sound waves, such as those propagating in these sensors, can lead to the efficient removal of the nonspecifically bound proteins thereby eliminating sensor fouling. We present a computational analysis of the acoustic-streaming phenomenon induced biofouling elimination by surface acoustic-waves (SAWs) propagating on a lithium niobate piezoelectric crystal. The transient solutions generated from the developed coupled field fluid solid interaction model are utilized to predict trends in acoustic-streaming induced forces for varying design parameters such as voltage intensity, device frequency, fluid viscosity, and density. We utilize these model predictions to compute the various interaction forces involved and thereby identify the possible mechanisms for removal of nonspecifically-bound proteins. For the range of sensor operating conditions simulated, our study indicates that the SAW motion acts as a body force to overcome the adhesive forces of the fouling proteins to the device surface whereas the acoustic-streaming induced hydrodynamic forces prevent their reattachment. The streaming velocity fields computed using the finite element models in conjunction with the proposed particle removal mechanism were used to identify the optimum conditions that lead to improved removal efficiency. We show that it is possible to tune operational parameters such as device frequency and input voltage to achieve effective elimination of biofouling proteins in typical biosensing media. Our simulation results agree well with previously reported experimental observations. The findings of this work have significant implications in designing reusable

  7. A multi-parametric flow cytometric assay to analyze DNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Arbab, Mandana; Mahony, Shaun; Cho, Hyunjii; Chick, Joel M.; Rolfe, P. Alexander; van Hoff, John Peter; Morris, Viveca W.S.; Gygi, Steven P.; Maas, Richard L.; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between DNA and transcription factors (TFs) guide cellular function and development, yet the complexities of gene regulation are still far from being understood. Such understanding is limited by a paucity of techniques with which to probe DNA–protein interactions. We have devised magnetic protein immobilization on enhancer DNA (MagPIE), a simple, rapid, multi-parametric assay using flow cytometric immunofluorescence to reveal interactions among TFs, chromatin structure and DNA. In MagPIE, synthesized DNA is bound to magnetic beads, which are then incubated with nuclear lysate, permitting sequence-specific binding by TFs, histones and methylation by native lysate factors that can be optionally inhibited with small molecules. Lysate protein–DNA binding is monitored by flow cytometric immunofluorescence, which allows for accurate comparative measurement of TF-DNA affinity. Combinatorial fluorescent staining allows simultaneous analysis of sequence-specific TF-DNA interaction and chromatin modification. MagPIE provides a simple and robust method to analyze complex epigenetic interactions in vitro. PMID:23143268

  8. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  9. Interactions of surface plasmons with surface acoustic waves and the study of the properties of Ag films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Shiokawa, S.; Matsui, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the interactions of surface plasmons with surface acoustic waves have been carried out. Surface acoustic waves were generated on the hypotenuse face of a LiNbO3 prism at f0=85 MHz and 3f0=255 MHz, respectively, which acted as ``dynamic'' gratings for the conversion of incident light into surface plasmons. The experiment results demonstrated excellent agreement with theoretical calculations based on Fresnel's formulas for a layered structure and the theory for light diffraction in association with surface acoustic waves. Furthermore, interesting changes in the interaction spectra were observed that have been related to the Ag film's oxidization. From these observations, variations in Ag film properties have been evaluated.

  10. On the interaction of a vibrating plate with an acoustic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Koval, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of a vibrating plate with an adjacent acoustic medium is important in problems involving the radiation of sound from panels, in problems involving the transmission of sound through walls of buildings, aircraft, or launch vehicles; and in problems involving the estimation of damping and the stress amplitude of vibration for panel-fatigue predictions. There appear to have been no systematic studies of the effects on the plate of fluid coupling for an arbitrary fluid-mass/plate-mass loading ratio. An attempt is made to determine this effect for a wide range of fluid-plate mass ratios without resorting to the usual simplifications of light or heavy fluid loading. Emphasis is with the plate motion rather than the radiation of sound.

  11. Parametric amplification of orbital angular momentum beams based on light-acoustic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wei E-mail: zhuzhihandd@sina.com; Mu, Chunyuan; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Hongwei; Zhu, Zhihan E-mail: zhuzhihandd@sina.com

    2015-07-27

    A high fidelity amplification of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is very crucial for OAM multiplexing and other OAM-based applications. Here, we report a demonstration of stimulated Brillouin amplification for OAM beams, and the energy conversion efficiency of photon-phonon coupling and the phase structure of amplified signals are investigated in collinear and noncollinear frame systems, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the OAM signals can be efficiently amplified without obvious noise introduced, and the modes of output signal are independent of the pump modes or the geometrical frames. Meanwhile, an OAM state depending on the optical modes and the geometrical frames is loaded into phonons by coherent light-acoustic interaction, which reveals more fundamental significance and a great application potential in OAM-multiplexing.

  12. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  13. OmicsVis: an interactive tool for visually analyzing metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Philip; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Wei; Ebert, David S

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing metabolomics data, cancer care researchers are searching for differences between known healthy samples and unhealthy samples. By analyzing and understanding these differences, researchers hope to identify cancer biomarkers. Due to the size and complexity of the data produced, however, analysis can still be very slow and time consuming. This is further complicated by the fact that datasets obtained will exhibit incidental differences in intensity and retention time, not related to actual chemical differences in the samples being evaluated. Additionally, automated tools to correct these errors do not always produce reliable results. This work presents a new analytics system that enables interactive comparative visualization and analytics of metabolomics data obtained by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-MS). The key features of this system are the ability to produce visualizations of multiple GC × GC-MS data sets, and to explore those data sets interactively, allowing a user to discover differences and features in real time. The system provides statistical support in the form of difference, standard deviation, and kernel density estimation calculations to aid users in identifying meaningful differences between samples. These are combined with novel transfer functions and multiform, linked visualizations in order to provide researchers with a powerful new tool for GC × GC-MS exploration and bio-marker discovery.

  14. Magnetic acoustic resonance immunoassay (MARIA): a multifrequency acoustic approach for the non-labelled detection of biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Araya-Kleinsteuber, Bernardita; Roque, Ana C A; Kioupritzi, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2006-01-01

    A unique sensing platform, comprising an electromagnetic field detector and an acoustic resonator, has been used as a wireless system for remote sensing of biorecognition events. The MARS (Magnetic Acoustic Resonator Sensor) technique has proven useful for detecting the formation of protein multilayers derived from specific binding phenomena. The technique enables multifrequency analysis, without the need of electrodes attached to the sensing element, and also facilitates the in situ surface modification of the substrate for antibody attachment. The MARS sensor was utilized as the platform on which a standard immunoassay was carried out. Two different conditions for the attachment of the first antibody to the quartz surface were tested: (i) Adsorption of the antibody onto the surface of a bare quartz disc; (ii) covalent immobilization of the antibody to a chemically modified quartz surface. Both methods can be successfully utilized for the 'label-less' detection of the biorecognition event between goat IgG and anti-goat IgG by analysis of the multifrequency spectrum. Covalent attachment of the primary antibody results in a more efficient immobilization, with higher surface density, and a consistently enhanced response for the binding of the secondary antibody. This approach will be of interest to life scientists and biochemists that require high performance assay methodologies that do not use chemical labels.

  15. Use of gel retardation to analyze protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D; Prentki, P; Chandler, M

    1992-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions are crucial in the regulation of many fundamental cellular processes. The nature of these interactions is susceptible to analysis by a variety of methods, but the combination of high analytical power and technical simplicity offered by the gel retardation (band shift) technique has made this perhaps the most widely used such method over the last decade. This procedure is based on the observation that the formation of protein-nucleic complexes generally reduces the electrophoretic mobility of the nucleic acid component in the gel matrix. This review attempts to give a simplified account of the physical basis of the behavior of protein-nucleic acid complexes in gels and an overview of many of the applications in which the technique has proved especially useful. The factors which contribute most to the resolution of the complex from the naked nucleic acid are the gel pore size, the relative mass of protein compared with nucleic acid, and changes in nucleic acid conformation (bending) induced by binding. The consequences of induced bending on the mobility of double-strand DNA fragments are similar to those arising from sequence-directed bends, and the latter can be used to help characterize the angle and direction of protein-induced bends. Whether a complex formed in solution is actually detected as a retarded band on a gel depends not only on resolution but also on complex stability within the gel. This is strongly influenced by the composition and, particularly, the ionic strength of the gel buffer. We discuss the applications of the technique to analyzing complex formation and stability, including characterizing cooperative binding, defining binding sites on nucleic acids, analyzing DNA conformation in complexes, assessing binding to supercoiled DNA, defining protein complexes by using cell extracts, and analyzing biological processes such as transcription and splicing. Images PMID:1480106

  16. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  17. Reaction norm model with unknown environmental covariate to analyze heterosis by environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Madsen, P; Lund, M S

    2009-05-01

    Crossbreeding is currently increasing in dairy cattle production. Several studies have shown an environment-dependent heterosis [i.e., an interaction between heterosis and environment (H x E)]. An H x E interaction is usually estimated from a few discrete environment levels. The present study proposes a reaction norm model to describe H x E interaction, which can deal with a large number of environment levels using few parameters. In the proposed model, total heterosis consists of an environment-independent part, which is described as a function of heterozygosity, and an environment-dependent part, which is described as a function of heterozygosity and environmental value (e.g., herd-year effect). A Bayesian approach is developed to estimate the environmental covariates, the regression coefficients of the reaction norm, and other parameters of the model simultaneously in both linear and nonlinear reaction norms. In the nonlinear reaction norm model, the H x E is approximated using linear splines. The approach was tested using simulated data, which were generated using an animal model with a reaction norm for heterosis. The simulation study includes 4 scenarios (the combinations of moderate vs. low heritability and moderate vs. low herd-year variation) of H x E interaction in a nonlinear form. In all scenarios, the proposed model predicted total heterosis very well. The correlation between true heterosis and predicted heterosis was 0.98 in the scenarios with low herd-year variation and 0.99 in the scenarios with moderate herd-year variation. This suggests that the proposed model and method could be a good approach to analyze H x E interactions and predict breeding values in situations in which heterosis changes gradually and continuously over an environmental gradient. On the other hand, it was found that a model ignoring H x E interaction did not significantly harm the prediction of breeding value under the simulated scenarios in which the variance for environment

  18. The solar wind interaction with Mars as seen by the Viking retarding potential analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.

    1982-01-01

    Both energy spectra and continuous monitoring periods of the total flux above 15 eV are available, from Viking retarding potential analyzer measurements of electron fluxes not exceeding 75 eV out to 16,000 km above the Mars surface. Although the mean electron current at energies above 15 eV increases monotonically by almost two orders of magnitude from 9000 to 700 km in Viking 1 data, no clear signature of the bow shock is seen. Total current wave power shows a peak near 1700 km altitude. It is suggested that there may be a highly turbulent shock structure masking a clear signature of the bow shock in the time-averaged data, and it is concluded that the interaction model consistent with the bow shock at 1700 km, together with ionosphere measurements, indicates a permanent magnetic field able to stand off the solar wind during the Viking 1 entry.

  19. The solar wind interaction with Mars as seen by the Viking retarding potential analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.

    1982-06-01

    Both energy spectra and continuous monitoring periods of the total flux above 15 eV are available, from Viking retarding potential analyzer measurements of electron fluxes not exceeding 75 eV out to 16,000 km above the Mars surface. Although the mean electron current at energies above 15 eV increases monotonically by almost two orders of magnitude from 9000 to 700 km in Viking 1 data, no clear signature of the bow shock is seen. Total current wave power shows a peak near 1700 km altitude. It is suggested that there may be a highly turbulent shock structure masking a clear signature of the bow shock in the time-averaged data, and it is concluded that the interaction model consistent with the bow shock at 1700 km, together with ionosphere measurements, indicates a permanent magnetic field able to stand off the solar wind during the Viking 1 entry.

  20. Investigation of acoustic beam reflection influence on the collinear acousto-optic interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mantsevich, S N

    2016-08-01

    Significant part of acousto-optic devices apply the acoustic beam reflection to arouse the desired type of acoustic mode propagating along the required direction in crystal. The influence of acoustic beam reflection process on the ultrasound field structure in the acousto-optic cell and the collinear acousto-optic diffraction characteristics is examined in this paper. The investigation is carried on the example of the collinear acousto-optic filter fabricated on the base of calcium molybdate crystal. It is shown that the reflection process changes the acoustic field structure and affects the acousto-optic filter transmission function shape and diffraction efficiency.

  1. Investigation of acoustic beam reflection influence on the collinear acousto-optic interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mantsevich, S N

    2016-08-01

    Significant part of acousto-optic devices apply the acoustic beam reflection to arouse the desired type of acoustic mode propagating along the required direction in crystal. The influence of acoustic beam reflection process on the ultrasound field structure in the acousto-optic cell and the collinear acousto-optic diffraction characteristics is examined in this paper. The investigation is carried on the example of the collinear acousto-optic filter fabricated on the base of calcium molybdate crystal. It is shown that the reflection process changes the acoustic field structure and affects the acousto-optic filter transmission function shape and diffraction efficiency. PMID:27153373

  2. An Interactive Method of Characteristics Java Applet to Design and Analyze Supersonic Aircraft Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The Method of Characteristics (MOC) is a classic technique for designing supersonic nozzles. An interactive computer program using MOC has been developed to allow engineers to design and analyze supersonic nozzle flow fields. The program calculates the internal flow for many classic designs, such as a supersonic wind tunnel nozzle, an ideal 2D or axisymmetric nozzle, or a variety of plug nozzles. The program also calculates the plume flow produced by the nozzle and the external flow leading to the nozzle exit. The program can be used to assess the interactions between the internal, external and plume flows. By proper design and operation of the nozzle, it may be possible to lessen the strength of the sonic boom produced at the rear of supersonic aircraft. The program can also calculate non-ideal nozzles, such as simple cone flows, to determine flow divergence and nonuniformities at the exit, and its effect on the plume shape. The computer program is written in Java and is provided as free-ware from the NASA Glenn central software server.

  3. StavroX—A Software for Analyzing Crosslinked Products in Protein Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Michael; Pettelkau, Jens; Schaks, Sabine; Bosse, Konstanze; Ihling, Christian H.; Krauth, Fabian; Fritzsche, Romy; Kühn, Uwe; Sinz, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking in combination with mass spectrometry has matured into an alternative approach to derive low-resolution structural information of proteins and protein complexes. Yet, one of the major drawbacks of this strategy remains the lack of software that is able to handle the large MS datasets that are created after chemical crosslinking and enzymatic digestion of the crosslinking reaction mixtures. Here, we describe a software, termed StavroX, which has been specifically designed for analyzing highly complex crosslinking datasets. The StavroX software was evaluated for three diverse biological systems: (1) the complex between calmodulin and a peptide derived from Munc13, (2) an N-terminal ß-laminin fragment, and (3) the complex between guanylyl cyclase activating protein-2 and a peptide derived from retinal guanylyl cyclase. We show that the StavroX software is advantageous for analyzing crosslinked products due to its easy-to-use graphical user interface and the highly automated analysis of mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data resulting in short times for analysis. StavroX is expected to give a further push to the chemical crosslinking approach as a routine technique for protein interaction studies.

  4. The Acoustic Field Generated by Interaction of a Shear-Layer Instability Wave with the Downstream Lip of a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschen, E. J.

    1997-11-01

    High amplitude acoustic resonances may develop in cavities that are exposed to high-speed flows. These resonances arise from a feedback loop which involves a downstream-propagating instability wave in the shear layer across the open face of the cavity, and an upstream-propagating acoustic field inside the cavity. These two wave fields are coupled by the interactions at the edges of the cavity. A theory is presented for the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a shear-layer instability wave with a thin overhanging downstream lip of a cavity. The theory addresses the case of a supersonic free stream and utilizes the vortex-sheet approximation for the shear layer. The linearized unsteady flow is described by a mixed boundary value problem which is solved utilizing the Wiener-Hopf technique. The upstream-propagating acoustic field within the cavity is expressed as a eigenfunction series in terms of the leaky-cavity modes. Results for the pressure distribution along the bottom surface of the cavity are presented for a representative case. For shallow cavities, the feedback to the upstream lip is dominated by the first few leaky-cavity modes.

  5. Influence of acoustic anisotropy in paratellurite on quasicollinear acousto-optic interaction.

    PubMed

    Mantsevich, S N; Balakshy, V I; Molchanov, V Ya; Yushkov, K B

    2015-12-01

    The influence of paratellurite acoustic anisotropy on the quasicollinear acousto-optic diffraction characteristics was examined. In the presented case the quasicollinear geometry of acousto-optic diffraction is realized with the use of acoustic beam reflection from one of the crystal surfaces. The simulations were based on the solution of acoustic beams propagation problem for anisotropic media previously presented in Balakshy and Mantsevich (2012). It is shown that media inhomogeneity affects the distribution of the acoustic energy in the ultrasound beam and the shape of wave fronts. The acoustic beam structure influences the characteristics of quasicollinear acousto-optic diffraction causing transformation of acousto-optic device transmission function shape and reducing the diffraction efficiency. PMID:26118495

  6. Equations of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of weakly nonspherical gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davletshin, A. I.; Khalitova, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field taking into account small deformations of their surfaces is proposed. It is a system of ordinary differential equations of the second order in radii of the bubbles, the position vectors of their centers and the amplitudes of deviation of their shape from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics. The equations derived are of the first order of accuracy in A / R and of the fourth order in R / D, where R is the characteristic radius of the bubbles, A is the amplitude of characteristic deviation of their surface from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics, D is the characteristic distance between bubbles. The derivation of the equations is carried out by the method of spherical functions with the use of the Bernoulli integral, the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions on the surface of the bubbles. The effects of viscosity and compressibility of the liquid are considered approximately, the gas in the bubbles is assumed homobaric.

  7. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B. |; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the {ital acoustic} {ital Faraday} {ital effect}: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Speech intelligibility in rooms: Effect of prior listening exposure interacts with room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    There is now converging evidence that a brief period of prior listening exposure to a reverberant room can influence speech understanding in that environment. Although the effect appears to depend critically on the amplitude modulation characteristic of the speech signal reaching the ear, the extent to which the effect may be influenced by room acoustics has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study seeks to fill this gap in knowledge by testing the effect of prior listening exposure or listening context on speech understanding in five different simulated sound fields, ranging from anechoic space to a room with broadband reverberation time (T60) of approximately 3 s. Although substantial individual variability in the effect was observed and quantified, the context effect was, on average, strongly room dependent. At threshold, the effect was minimal in anechoic space, increased to a maximum of 3 dB on average in moderate reverberation (T60 = 1 s), and returned to minimal levels again in high reverberation. This interaction suggests that the functional effects of prior listening exposure may be limited to sound fields with moderate reverberation (0.4 ≤ T60 ≤ 1 s). PMID:27475133

  9. Quasi-static acoustic mapping of helicopter blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Gaurav

    This research extends the applicability of storage-based noise prediction techniques to slowly maneuvering flight. The quasi-static equivalence between longitudinal decelerating flight and steady-state longitudinal descent flight, and its application to the estimation of BVI noise radiation under slow longitudinal maneuvering flight conditions, is investigated through various orders of flight dynamics modeling. The entire operating state of the helicopter is shown to be similar during equivalent flight conditions at the same flight velocity. This equivalence is also applied to the prediction of control requirements during longitudinal maneuvers. Inverse simulation based flight dynamics models of lower order are seen to capture many important trends associated with slow maneuvers, when compared with higher order modeling. The lower order flight dynamics model is used to design controlled maneuvers that may be practically flown during descent operations or as part of research flight testing. A version of a storage-based acoustic mapping technique, extended to slowly maneuvering longitudinal flight, is implemented for helicopter main rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Various approach trajectories are formulated and analytical estimates of the BVI noise radiation characteristics associated with a full-scale two-bladed rotor are mapped to the ground using this quasi-static mapping approach. Multi-segment decelerating descent approaches are shown to be effective in ground noise abatement. The effects of steady longitudinal winds are investigated on radiated and ground noise. Piloting trim choices are seen to dominate the noise radiation under these flight conditions.

  10. Analyzing Systolic-Diastolic Interval Interaction Characteristics in Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohammad Hasan; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN), one of the major complications in diabetes, if detected at the subclinical stage allows for effective treatment and avoiding further complication including cardiovascular pathology. Surface ECG (Electrocardiogram)-based diagnosis of CAN is useful to overcome the limitation of existing cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests traditionally used for CAN identification in clinical settings. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes in the mechanical function of the ventricles in terms of systolic-diastolic interval interaction (SDI) from a surface ECG to assess the severity of CAN progression [no CAN, early CAN (ECAN) or subclinical CAN, and definite CAN (DCAN) or clinical CAN]. ECG signals recorded in supine resting condition from 72 diabetic subjects without CAN (CAN-) and 70 diabetic subjects with CAN were analyzed in this paper. The severity of CAN was determined by Ewing’s Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Fifty-five subjects of the CAN group had ECAN and 15 subjects had DCAN. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the SDI parameter (i.e., TQ/RR interval ratio) measured from the electrical diastolic interval (i.e., TQ interval) and the heart rate interval (i.e., RR interval). The performance of the proposed SDI measure was compared with the performance of the existing SDI measure (i.e., QT/TQ interval ratio). The proposed SDI parameter showed significant differences among three groups (no CAN, ECAN, and DCAN). In addition, the proposed SDI parameter was found to be more sensitive in detecting CAN progression than other ECG interval-based features traditionally used for CAN diagnosis. The modified SDI parameter might be used as an alternative measure for the Ewing autonomic reflex tests to identify CAN progression for those subjects who are unable to perform the traditional tests. These findings could also complement the echocardiographic findings of the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by providing

  11. Design of the Coordinate Transformation Function for Cylindrical Acoustic Cloaks with a Quantity of Discrete Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long; Lu, Zhi-Miao; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic cloak based on coordinate transformation is of great topical interest and has promise in potential applications such as sound transparency and insulation. The frequency response of acoustic cloaks with a quantity of discrete homogeneous layers is analyzed by the acoustic scattering theory. The effect of coordinate transformation function on the acoustic total scattering cross section is discussed to achieve low scattering with only a few layers of anisotropic metamaterials. Also, the physics of acoustic wave interaction with the interfaces between the discrete layers inside the cloak shell is discussed. These results provide a better way of designing a multilayered acoustic cloak with fewer layers.

  12. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  13. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  14. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Gerard S B; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front. PMID:26565329

  15. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering.

  16. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  17. A FORTRAN Program for Analyzing the Results of Flander's Interaction Matrix: An Updated Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racioppo, Vincent; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a revised and updated version of a FORTRAN program which computes all indices used in the Flanders' Interaction Matrix. The new program has added another form of data input which simplifies data entry. The new version also has the capability of interactive terminal use. (Author)

  18. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  19. The interaction between two planar and nonplanar quantum electron acoustic solitary waves in dense electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Labany, S. K.; El-Mahgoub, M. G.; EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2012-06-15

    The interaction between two planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) quantum electron acoustic solitary waves (QEASWs) in quantum dense electron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain planar and nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two QEASWs. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for QEASWs due to the effect of the different geometries, the quantum corrections of diffraction, and the cold electron-to-hot electron number density ratio are discussed. It is shown that the interaction of the QEASWs in planar geometry, cylindrical geometry, and spherical geometry are different. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two planar and nonplanar QEASWs that may occur in the quantum plasmas found in laser-produced plasmas as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  20. The interaction between two planar and nonplanar quantum electron acoustic solitary waves in dense electron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; EL-Shamy, E. F.; El-Mahgoub, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between two planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) quantum electron acoustic solitary waves (QEASWs) in quantum dense electron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain planar and nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two QEASWs. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for QEASWs due to the effect of the different geometries, the quantum corrections of diffraction, and the cold electron-to-hot electron number density ratio are discussed. It is shown that the interaction of the QEASWs in planar geometry, cylindrical geometry, and spherical geometry are different. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two planar and nonplanar QEASWs that may occur in the quantum plasmas found in laser-produced plasmas as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and

  2. A simple guide to biochemical approaches for analyzing protein–lipid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain many different membrane compartments with characteristic shapes, lipid compositions, and dynamics. A large fraction of cytoplasmic proteins associate with these membrane compartments. Such protein–lipid interactions, which regulate the subcellular localizations and activities of peripheral membrane proteins, are fundamentally important for a variety of cell biological processes ranging from cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking to intracellular signaling. Reciprocally, many membrane-associated proteins can modulate the shape, lipid composition, and dynamics of cellular membranes. Determining the exact mechanisms by which these proteins interact with membranes will be essential to understanding their biological functions. In this Technical Perspective, we provide a brief introduction to selected biochemical methods that can be applied to study protein–lipid interactions. We also discuss how important it is to choose proper lipid composition, type of model membrane, and biochemical assay to obtain reliable and informative data from the lipid-interaction mechanism of a protein of interest. PMID:22848065

  3. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  4. Contact studies of weak adhesive interactions in water with membrane enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, David Alan

    The measurement of weak adhesive energies has previously been difficult to obtain. To measure these energies, I designed a technique that uses the combined sensitivities of both a quartz crystal resonator and the inflation of an elastomeric polymer membrane. The surfaces of the quartz crystal and/or the membrane are modified with water swollen polymer brushes, which are used to eliminate nonspecific adhesion. These brushes are then end-modified with adhesive functional groups. An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator as the membrane layer is placed in contact with the surface of these swollen brushes. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. The calculated shift decreases substantially for increases in the brush thickness of ten to twenty nanometers, giving a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the resonant frequency shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. Detailed calculations are presented for the specific case of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes swollen by water and capped by a poly(styrene-ethylene/butene-styrene) (SEBS) elastomeric, water-permeable membrane. These calculations show that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer. This surface acoustic wave technique was coupled with an inflation method that enabled quantification of the adhesion between the membrane and the brush coated surface. This adhesive interaction is obtained from the contact angle made between the quartz and membrane surfaces and the tension on the membrane. An analysis of the membrane profile based on the numerical solution of the axisymmetric Laplace equation is developed and used to investigate both adhesive and non-adhesive situations with both an

  5. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  6. Quantum Analogies in the Interaction between Acoustic Waves and Bubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrales, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Analogies between quantum mechanical and acoustical propagation phenomena have a great interest in academic research due to their ability to shed light on some complex quantum effects, which are impossible to visualize directly in the macroscopic world. In this talk, we describe a number of these analogies concerning the acoustic behavior of bubble clouds. Firstly, we show that the structure of the collective oscillation modes of a spherical bubble cloud resembles that of the atomic orbitals of a hydrogen atom. Secondly, we present an analogy between some perturbation methods used in quantum-electrodynamics and the computation of the acoustic response of the randomly distributed bubble cloud by considering the contribution to the total scattered pressure of the multiple scattering paths that take place inside the clouds. As an application of this analogy, we obtain the scattering cross-section of a diluted cloud, which remarkably mimics the quantum scattering of an neutron wave when passing through an atomic nucleus. Finally, we numerically reproduce the behavior of an electron in a covalent bond between two hydrogen atoms by simulating the acoustic wave propagation through two neighboring spherical bubble assemblages. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Grants DPI2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI2011-28356-C03-02.

  7. Combining many interaction networks to predict gene function and analyze gene lists.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Sara; Morris, Quaid

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review how interaction networks can be used alone or in combination in an automated fashion to provide insight into gene and protein function. We describe the concept of a "gene-recommender system" that can be applied to any large collection of interaction networks to make predictions about gene or protein function based on a query list of proteins that share a function of interest. We discuss these systems in general and focus on one specific system, GeneMANIA, that has unique features and uses different algorithms from the majority of other systems.

  8. Photoelastic stiffening by z-directed acoustic-wave-induced electric fields as extra control of optic interaction in BaTiO₃.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wontae

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic waves in ferroelectrics are well known to induce both strain and electric field by propagating through the medium and to perturb the refractive index by the photoelastic effect. In this paper, the strain and strain-induced electric field associated with the longitudinal acoustic waves propagating in the xz plane of ferroelectric BaTiO3 crystal is applied to the perturbation theory of the acousto-optic interactions to examine the effect of the photoelastic tensor stiffening by z-directed acoustic-wave-induced electric fields on the effective photoelastic constant as extra control of optic wave interaction with x-directed acoustic waves in the crystal. The tensorial photoelastic coupling is suggested to have a great potential for development of low voltage and tunable acousto-optic devices by using the strain-induced electric field and tuning the strain magnitude. PMID:26067050

  9. Photoelastic stiffening by z-directed acoustic-wave-induced electric fields as extra control of optic interaction in BaTiO₃.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wontae

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic waves in ferroelectrics are well known to induce both strain and electric field by propagating through the medium and to perturb the refractive index by the photoelastic effect. In this paper, the strain and strain-induced electric field associated with the longitudinal acoustic waves propagating in the xz plane of ferroelectric BaTiO3 crystal is applied to the perturbation theory of the acousto-optic interactions to examine the effect of the photoelastic tensor stiffening by z-directed acoustic-wave-induced electric fields on the effective photoelastic constant as extra control of optic wave interaction with x-directed acoustic waves in the crystal. The tensorial photoelastic coupling is suggested to have a great potential for development of low voltage and tunable acousto-optic devices by using the strain-induced electric field and tuning the strain magnitude.

  10. Non-linear Alfvén wave interaction leading to resonant excitation of an acoustic mode in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, S.; Carter, T. A.

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear three-wave interaction process at the heart of the parametric decay process is studied by launching counter-propagating Alfvén waves from antennas placed at either end of the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. A resonance in the beat wave response produced by the two launched Alfvén waves is observed and is identified as a damped ion acoustic mode based on the measured dispersion relation. Other properties of the interaction including the spatial profile of the beat mode and response amplitude are also consistent with theoretical predictions for a three-wave interaction driven by a nonlinear ponderomotive force. A simple damped, driven oscillator model making use of the MHD equations well-predicts most of the observations, but the width of the resonance curve is still under investigation.

  11. Non-linear Alfvén wave interaction leading to resonant excitation of an acoustic mode in the laboratorya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Carter, T. A.

    2015-05-01

    The nonlinear three-wave interaction process at the heart of the parametric decay process is studied by launching counter-propagating Alfvén waves from antennas placed at either end of the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. A resonance in the beat wave response produced by the two launched Alfvén waves is observed and is identified as a damped ion acoustic mode based on the measured dispersion relation. Other properties of the interaction including the spatial profile of the beat mode and response amplitude are also consistent with theoretical predictions for a three-wave interaction driven by a nonlinear ponderomotive force. A simple damped, driven oscillator model making use of the MHD equations well-predicts most of the observations, but the width of the resonance curve is still under investigation.

  12. Assessment of temporal state-dependent interactions between auditory fMRI responses to desired and undesired acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Olulade, O; Hu, S; Gonzalez-Castillo, J; Tamer, G G; Luh, W-M; Ulmer, J L; Talavage, T M

    2011-07-01

    A confounding factor in auditory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is the presence of the acoustic noise inherently associated with the echo planar imaging acquisition technique. Previous studies have demonstrated that this noise can induce unwanted neuronal responses that can mask stimulus-induced responses. Similarly, activation accumulated over multiple stimuli has been demonstrated to elevate the baseline, thus reducing the dynamic range available for subsequent responses. To best evaluate responses to auditory stimuli, it is necessary to account for the presence of all recent acoustic stimulation, beginning with an understanding of the attenuating effects brought about by interaction between and among induced unwanted neuronal responses, and responses to desired auditory stimuli. This study focuses on the characterization of the duration of this temporal memory and qualitative assessment of the associated response attenuation. Two experimental parameters--inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and repetition time (TR)--were varied during an fMRI experiment in which participants were asked to passively attend to an auditory stimulus. Results present evidence of a state-dependent interaction between induced responses. As expected, attenuating effects of these interactions become less significant as TR and ISI increase and in contrast to previous work, persist up to 18s after a stimulus presentation. PMID:21426929

  13. Surface acoustic wave biosensor as a tool to study the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide model membranes.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Böhling, Arne; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Schlecht, Ulrich; Perpeet, Markus; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2008-08-19

    Surface acoustic wave biosensors are a powerful tool for the study of biomolecular interactions. The modulation of a surface-confined acoustic wave is utilized here for the analysis of surface binding. Phase and amplitude of the wave correspond roughly to mass loading and viscoelastic properties of the surface, respectively. We established a procedure to reconstitute phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide bilayers on the surface of a modified gold sensor chip to study the mode of action of membrane-active peptides. The procedure included the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol, covalent coupling of carboxymethyl-dextran, and subsequent coating with a poly- l-lysine layer. The lipid coverage of the surface is highly reproducible and homogeneous as demonstrated in atomic force micrographs. Ethanol/triton treatment removed the lipids completely, which provided the basis for continuous sequences of independent experiments. The setup was applied to investigate the binding of human cathelicidin-derived peptide LL32, as an example for antimicrobial peptides, to immobilized phosphatidylserine membranes. The peptide-membrane interaction results in a positive phase shift and an increase in amplitude, indicating a mass increase along with a loss in viscosity. This suggests that the bilayer becomes more rigid upon interaction with LL32. PMID:18605705

  14. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  15. Surface acoustic wave biosensor as a tool to study the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide model membranes.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Böhling, Arne; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Schlecht, Ulrich; Perpeet, Markus; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2008-08-19

    Surface acoustic wave biosensors are a powerful tool for the study of biomolecular interactions. The modulation of a surface-confined acoustic wave is utilized here for the analysis of surface binding. Phase and amplitude of the wave correspond roughly to mass loading and viscoelastic properties of the surface, respectively. We established a procedure to reconstitute phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide bilayers on the surface of a modified gold sensor chip to study the mode of action of membrane-active peptides. The procedure included the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol, covalent coupling of carboxymethyl-dextran, and subsequent coating with a poly- l-lysine layer. The lipid coverage of the surface is highly reproducible and homogeneous as demonstrated in atomic force micrographs. Ethanol/triton treatment removed the lipids completely, which provided the basis for continuous sequences of independent experiments. The setup was applied to investigate the binding of human cathelicidin-derived peptide LL32, as an example for antimicrobial peptides, to immobilized phosphatidylserine membranes. The peptide-membrane interaction results in a positive phase shift and an increase in amplitude, indicating a mass increase along with a loss in viscosity. This suggests that the bilayer becomes more rigid upon interaction with LL32.

  16. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  17. Nonparametric Tests for Analyzing Interactions among Intra-Block Ranks in Multiple Group Repeated Measures Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, T. Mark

    2000-01-01

    Developed an extension of the Hollander and Sethuraman (M. Hollander and J. Sethuraman, 1978) statistic (B squared) for testing discordance among intra-block rankings of K elements for multiple groups of raters. Simulation results confirmed the usefulness of B squared as an omnibus test of interaction among intra-block ranks and demonstrated its…

  18. AOIPS/2 - An interactive system to process, analyze, and display meteorological data sets for nowcasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Desjardins, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    A description of AOIPS/2, an interactive hardware and software system to process, integrate, and display meteorological data is presented. The AOIPS/2 objectives and functional specifications are given. The hardware system architecture and work stations and the software architecture and special features are described. A summary is given of the software system and its main menu.

  19. Analyzing Conflict Dynamics with the Aid of an Interactive Microworld Simulator of a Fishing Dispute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperman, Ranan D.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from a research project that uses an interactive simulator of an imaginary fishing dispute. Subjects operating the simulator play the role of a state leader, while the computer program controls the behavior of a contending state as well as provides all the environmental data associated with the conflict. The…

  20. Analyzing User Interaction to Design an Intelligent e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Richa

    2011-01-01

    Building intelligent course designing systems adaptable to the learners' needs is one of the key goals of research in e-learning. This goal is all the more crucial as gaining knowledge in an e-learning environment depends solely on computer mediated interaction within the learner group and among the learners and instructors. The patterns generated…

  1. Application of Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA) in Analyzing Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Sima; Ketabi, Saeed; Tavakoli, Mansoor; Sadeghi, Moslem

    2012-01-01

    As an area of classroom research, Interaction Analysis developed from the need and desire to investigate the process of classroom teaching and learning in terms of action-reaction between individuals and their socio-cultural context (Biddle, 1967). However, sole reliance on quantitative techniques could be problematic, since they conceal more than…

  2. Using Interactive Visualization to Analyze Solid Earth Data and Geodynamics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Billen, M. I.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Rundle, J. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. Major projects such as EarthScope and GeoEarthScope are producing the data needed to characterize the structure and kinematics of Earth's surface and interior at unprecedented resolution. At the same time, high-performance computing enables high-precision and fine- detail simulation of geodynamics processes, complementing the observational data. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these datasets, to evaluate models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool allowing active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for accelerated scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. Our approach to VR takes advantage of the specialized skills of geoscientists who are trained to interpret geological and geophysical data generated from field observations. Interactive tools allow the scientist to explore and interpret geodynamic models, tomographic models, and topographic observations, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulations or field observations. The use of VR technology enables us to improve our interpretation of crust and mantle structure and of geodynamical processes. Mapping tools based on computer visualization allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions, and an interactive tool allows us to construct digital fault models for use in numerical models. Using the interactive tools on a high-end platform such as an immersive virtual reality

  3. High Performance Flexible Actuator of Urchin-Like ZnO Nanostructure/Polyvinylenefluoride Hybrid Thin Film with Graphene Electrodes for Acoustic Generator and Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Oug Jae; Lee, James S; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-05-01

    A bass frequency response enhanced flexible polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based thin film acoustic actuator is successfully fabricated. High concentrations of various zinc oxide (ZnO) is embedded in PVDF matrix, enhancing the β phase content and the dielectric property of the composite thin film. ZnO acts as a nucleation agent for the crystallization of PVDF. A chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is used as electrodes, enabling high electron mobility for the distortion free acoustic signals. The frequency response of the fabricated acoustic actuator is studied as a function of the film thickness and filler content. The optimized film has a thickness of 80 μm with 30 wt% filler content and shows 72% and 42% frequency response enhancement in bass and midrange compared to the commercial PVDF, respectively. Also, the total harmonic distortion decreases to 82% and 74% in the bass and midrange regions, respectively. Furthermore, the composite film shows a promising potential for microphone applications. Most of all, it is demonstrated that acoustic actuator performance is strongly influenced by degree of PVDF crystalline.

  4. High Performance Flexible Actuator of Urchin-Like ZnO Nanostructure/Polyvinylenefluoride Hybrid Thin Film with Graphene Electrodes for Acoustic Generator and Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Oug Jae; Lee, James S; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-05-01

    A bass frequency response enhanced flexible polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based thin film acoustic actuator is successfully fabricated. High concentrations of various zinc oxide (ZnO) is embedded in PVDF matrix, enhancing the β phase content and the dielectric property of the composite thin film. ZnO acts as a nucleation agent for the crystallization of PVDF. A chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is used as electrodes, enabling high electron mobility for the distortion free acoustic signals. The frequency response of the fabricated acoustic actuator is studied as a function of the film thickness and filler content. The optimized film has a thickness of 80 μm with 30 wt% filler content and shows 72% and 42% frequency response enhancement in bass and midrange compared to the commercial PVDF, respectively. Also, the total harmonic distortion decreases to 82% and 74% in the bass and midrange regions, respectively. Furthermore, the composite film shows a promising potential for microphone applications. Most of all, it is demonstrated that acoustic actuator performance is strongly influenced by degree of PVDF crystalline. PMID:27028524

  5. Analyzing Teachers' Professional Interactions in a School as Social Capital: A Social Network Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Riel, Margaret; Krause, Ann E.; Frank, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Researchers have proposed a number of lenses for analyzing teacher professional communities in recent years. These lenses have been useful in describing key dynamics of professional communities; however, none provides a compelling approach to how to integrate data from the school as a whole with case study data on individual…

  6. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  7. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J.; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900’s at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases. PMID:26777674

  8. Molecular interactions and trafficking of influenza A virus polymerase proteins analyzed by specific monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Bussey, Kendra A.; Desmet, Emily A.; Kim, Baek; Takimoto, Toru

    2012-04-25

    The influenza polymerase complex composed of PA, PB1 and PB2, plays a key role in viral replication and pathogenicity. Newly synthesized components must be translocated to the nucleus, where replication and transcription of viral genomes take place. Previous studies suggest that while PB2 is translocated to the nucleus independently, PA and PB1 subunits could not localize to the nucleus unless in a PA-PB1 complex. To further determine the molecular interactions between the components, we created a panel of 16 hybridoma cell lines, which produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each polymerase component. We showed that, although PB1 interacts with both PA and PB2 individually, nuclear localization of PB1 is enhanced only when co-expressed with PA. Interestingly, one of the anti-PA mAbs reacted much more strongly with PA when co-expressed with PB1. These results suggest that PA-PB1 interactions induce a conformational change in PA, which could be required for its nuclear translocation.

  9. Analyzing Interactions by an IIS-Map-Based Method in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Yang, Kaicheng; Huang, Ronghuai

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a new method named the IIS-map-based method for analyzing interactions in face-to-face collaborative learning settings. This analysis method is conducted in three steps: firstly, drawing an initial IIS-map according to collaborative tasks; secondly, coding and segmenting information flows into information items of IIS; thirdly,…

  10. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  11. Static shape of an acoustically levitated drop with wave-drop interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. P.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Wang, T. G.

    1994-11-01

    The static shape of a drop levitated and flattened by an acoustic standing wave field in air is calculated, requiring self-consistency between the drop shape and the wave. The wave is calculated for a given shape using the boundary integral method. From the resulting radiation stress on the drop surface, the shape is determined by solving the Young-Laplace equation, completing an iteration cycle. The iteration is continued until both the shape and the wave converge. Of particular interest are the shapes of large drops that sustain equilibrium, beyond a certain degree of flattening, by becoming more flattened at a decreasing sound pressure level. The predictions for flattening versus acoustic radiation stress, for drops of different sizes, compare favorably with experimental data.

  12. LOCAL HELIOSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ACOUSTIC WAVES AND A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaguru, S. P.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using a high-cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (Fe I 6173 A) and insensitive (Fe I 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination-angle-dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction-dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

  13. Biophysical and computational methods to analyze amino acid interaction networks in proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Gorman, Scott D; Boehr, David D

    2016-01-01

    Globular proteins are held together by interacting networks of amino acid residues. A number of different structural and computational methods have been developed to interrogate these amino acid networks. In this review, we describe some of these methods, including analyses of X-ray crystallographic data and structures, computer simulations, NMR data, and covariation among protein sequences, and indicate the critical insights that such methods provide into protein function. This information can be leveraged towards the design of new allosteric drugs, and the engineering of new protein function and protein regulation strategies. PMID:27441044

  14. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning.

    PubMed

    Fais, A; Johnson, M; Wilson, M; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P T

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1-2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  15. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Fais, A.; Johnson, M.; Wilson, M.; Aguilar Soto, N.; Madsen, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1–2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  16. Voice acoustic measures of depression severity and treatment response collected via interactive voice response (IVR) technology

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, James C.; Snyder, Peter J.; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Chappie, Kara; Geralts, Dayna S.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to develop more effective depression treatments are limited by assessment methods that rely on patient-reported or clinician judgments of symptom severity. Depression also affects speech. Research suggests several objective voice acoustic measures affected by depression can be obtained reliably over the telephone. Thirty-five physician-referred patients beginning treatment for depression were assessed weekly, using standard depression severity measures, during a six-week observational study. Speech samples were also obtained over the telephone each week using an IVR system to automate data collection. Several voice acoustic measures correlated significantly with depression severity. Patients responding to treatment had significantly greater pitch variability, paused less while speaking, and spoke faster than at baseline. Patients not responding to treatment did not show similar changes. Telephone standardization for obtaining voice data was identified as a critical factor influencing the reliability and quality of speech data. This study replicates and extends previous research with a larger sample of patients assessing clinical change associated with treatment. The feasibility of obtaining voice acoustic measures reflecting depression severity and response to treatment using computer-automated telephone data collection techniques is also established. Insight and guidance for future research needs are also identified. PMID:21253440

  17. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning.

    PubMed

    Fais, A; Johnson, M; Wilson, M; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P T

    2016-06-24

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1-2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes.

  18. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  19. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug–drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  20. Analyzing interaction of electricity markets and environmental policies using equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihsu

    Around the world, the electric sector is evolving from a system of regulated vertically-integrated monopolies to a complex system of competing generation companies, unregulated traders, and regulated transmission and distribution. One emerging challenge faced by environmental policymakers and electricity industry is the interaction between electricity markets and environmental policies. The objective of this dissertation is to examine these interactions using large-scale computational models of electricity markets based on noncooperative game theory. In particular, this dissertation is comprised of four essays. The first essay studies the interaction of the United States Environmental Protection Agency NOx Budget Program and the mid-Atlantic electricity market. This research quantifies emissions, economic inefficiencies, price distortions, and overall social welfare under various market assumptions using engineering-economic models. The models calculate equilibria for imperfectly competitive markets---Cournot oligopoly---considering the actual landscape of power plants and transmission lines, and including the possibility of market power in the NOx allowances market. The second essay extends the results from first essay and models imperfectly competitive markets using a Stackelberg or leader-follower formulation. A leader in the power and NO x markets is assumed to have perfect foresight of its rivals' responses. The rivals' best response functions are explicitly embedded in the leader's constraints. The solutions quantify the extent to which a leader in the markets can extract economic rents on the expense of its followers. The third essay investigates the effect of implementing the European Union (EU) CO2 Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) on wholesale power prices in the Western European electricity market. This research uses theoretical and computational modeling approaches to quantify the degree to which CO2 costs were passed on to power prices, and quantifies the

  1. Aviation Safety: Modeling and Analyzing Complex Interactions between Humans and Automated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Brat, Guillaume; Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Raimondi, Franco; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The on-going transformation from the current US Air Traffic System (ATS) to the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NextGen) will force the introduction of new automated systems and most likely will cause automation to migrate from ground to air. This will yield new function allocations between humans and automation and therefore change the roles and responsibilities in the ATS. Yet, safety in NextGen is required to be at least as good as in the current system. We therefore need techniques to evaluate the safety of the interactions between humans and automation. We think that current human factor studies and simulation-based techniques will fall short in front of the ATS complexity, and that we need to add more automated techniques to simulations, such as model checking, which offers exhaustive coverage of the non-deterministic behaviors in nominal and off-nominal scenarios. In this work, we present a verification approach based both on simulations and on model checking for evaluating the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation. Models are created using Brahms (a multi-agent framework) and we show that the traditional Brahms simulations can be integrated with automated exploration techniques based on model checking, thus offering a complete exploration of the behavioral space of the scenario. Our formal analysis supports the notion of beliefs and probabilities to reason about human behavior. We demonstrate the technique with the Ueberligen accident since it exemplifies authority problems when receiving conflicting advices from human and automated systems.

  2. Using Electronic Properties of Adamantane Derivatives to Analyze their Ion Channel Interactions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacum, Jason

    2013-03-01

    The derivatives of adamantane, which is a cage-like diamondoid structure, can be used as pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These drugs interact with ion channels, and they act by electronically and physically hindering the ion transport. The electronic properties of each compound influence the location and level of ion channel hindrance, and the specific use of each compound depends on the functional groups that are attached to the adamantane base chain. Computational analysis and molecular simulations of these different derivatives and the ion channels can provide useful insight into the effect that the functional groups have on the properties of the compounds. Using this information, conclusions can be made about the pharmaceutical mechanisms, as well as how to improve them or create new beneficial compounds. Focusing on the electronic properties, such as the dipole moments of the derivatives and amino acids in the ion channels, can provide more efficient predictions of how these drugs work and how they can be enhanced. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER46304

  3. A New and Improved Carbon Dioxide Isotope Analyzer for Understanding Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Berman, E. S.; Owano, T. G.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Still, C. J.; Gardner, A.; Baer, D. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotopes provide information on biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. While δ13C measurement can provide information on the sources of the CO2, be it photosynthesis, natural gas combustion, other fossil fuel sources, landfills or other sources, δ18O, and δ17O are thought to be determined by the hydrological cycling of the CO2. Though researchers have called for analytical tools for CO2 isotope measurements that are reliable and field-deployable, developing such instrument remains a challenge. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This new and improved analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (150-2500 ppm). The laboratory precision is ±200 ppb (1σ) in CO2 at 1 s, with a long-term (2 min) precision of ±20 ppb. The 1-second precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.7 ‰, and for δ17O is 1.8 ‰. The long-term (2 min) precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.08 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.18 ‰. The instrument has improved precision, stability and user interface over previous LGR CO2 isotope instruments and can be easily programmed for periodic referencing and sampling from different sources when coupled with LGR's multiport inlet unit (MIU). We have deployed two of these instruments at two different field sites, one at Twitchell Island in Sacramento County, CA to monitor the CO2 isotopic fluxes from an alfalfa field from 6/29/2015-7/13/2015, and the other at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington to monitor primarily the oxygen isotopes of CO2 within the canopy from 8/4/2015 through mid-November 2015. Methodology, laboratory development and testing and field performance are presented.

  4. Interaction of dust-ion acoustic solitary waves in nonplanar geometry with electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan Ghosh, Uday; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2012-11-15

    The head-on collisions between nonplanar dust-ion acoustic solitary waves are dealt with by an extended version of Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method, for a plasma having stationary dust grains, inertial ions, and nonextensive electrons. The nonplanar geometry modified analytical phase-shift after a head-on collision is derived. It is found that as the nonextensive character of the electrons becomes important, the phase-shift decreases monotonically before levelling-off at a constant value. This leads us to think that nonextensivity may have a stabilizing effect on the phase-shift.

  5. Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderegg, F.; Driscoll, C. F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2009-03-06

    Electron acoustic waves (EAW) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma thermal velocity are observed on pure ion plasma columns. At low excitation amplitudes, the EAW frequencies agree with theory, but at moderate excitation the EAW is more frequency variable than typical Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the wave-coherent ion velocity distribution show phase reversals and wave-particle trapping plateaus at {+-}v{sub ph}, as expected, and corroborate the unusual role of kinetic pressure in the EAW.

  6. Development of a Nonlinear Acoustic Phased Array and its Interaction with Thin Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzel, Paul; Donahue, Carly; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    Numerous technologies are based on the principle of focusing acoustic energy. We propose a new device to focus sound waves which exploits highly nonlinear dynamics. The advantages of this device are the capability of generating very highly powerful acoustic pulses and potential operation in high-temperature environments where traditional piezoelectrics may fail. This device is composed of rows of ball bearings placed in contact with a medium of interest and with an actuator on the top. Elastic spherical particles have a contact force that grows with their relative displacement to the three-halves power (Hertzian contact). When several spheres are placed in a row, the particles support the propagation of ``solitary waves''--strong, compact stress-wave pulses whose tendency to disperse is counteracted by the nonlinearity of the sphere's contact force. We present results regarding the experimental operation of the device and its comparison to theory and numerical simulations. We will show how well this system is capable of focusing energy at various locations in the medium, and the limits imposed by pre-compression. Finally, the effects of timing error on energy focusing will be demonstrated. This research has been supported by a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  7. Development of interactive digital scientific acoustic systems for monitoring and assessment of physical and biological variables from ocean observatory platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Robert; Acker, Tim; Dawson, James; Ebrahim, Assad E. K.

    2005-04-01

    Scientific echosounders are in regular use for measurement of fish and plankton distribution and abundance, fish behavior, submersed aquatic vegetation, bottom sediment classification and water mass interface characteristics. Both fixed-aspect and mobile acoustic data are commonly collected from surface-deployed echosounders. Advancements in digital scientific echosounder technology and integration of other technologies has moved the capabilities of advanced echosounder systems into the realm of new applications and deployment possibilities. These advancements make possible the deployment of a new generation of integrated and interactive sensors which can provide high resolution, continuous, extended duration, recording, intelligent processing, and reliable monitoring and assessment of both biological and physical parameters of the ocean environment. Deployments from cabled observatories, moored and drifting buoys, manned and unmanned mobile platforms, and fully autonomous installations are all now reality. The deployment of these quality scientific instrument suites hold unlimited potential for research, resource management, and education. Existing and planned implementation of advanced digital scientific echosounder applications on observatories as well as considerations in design, deployment, and integration with other observatory and oceanic acoustic activities are discussed.

  8. Compensation for a lip-tube perturbation in 4-year-olds: Articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual data analyzed in comparison with adults.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Lucie; Perrier, Pascal; Aubin, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the speech goal in children was investigated in a study of compensation strategies for a lip-tube perturbation. Acoustic, articulatory, and perceptual analyses of the vowels /y/ and /u/ produced by ten 4-year-old French speakers and ten adult French speakers were conducted under two conditions: normal and with a large tube inserted between the lips. Ultrasound and acoustic recordings of isolated vowels were made in the normal condition before any perturbation, for each of the trials in the perturbed condition, and in the normal condition after the perturbed trials. Data revealed that adult participants moved their tongues in the perturbed condition more than children did. The perturbation was generally at least partly compensated for during the perturbed trials in adults, but children did not show a typical learning effect. In particular, unsystematic improvements were observed during the sequence of perturbed trials, and after-effects were not clear in the articulatory domain. This suggests that children may establish associative links between multisensory phonemic representations and articulatory maneuvers, but those links may mainly rely on trial-to-trial, error-based feedback correction mechanisms rather than on the internal model of the speech production apparatus, as they are in adults. PMID:27250147

  9. Compensation for a lip-tube perturbation in 4-year-olds: Articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual data analyzed in comparison with adults.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Lucie; Perrier, Pascal; Aubin, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the speech goal in children was investigated in a study of compensation strategies for a lip-tube perturbation. Acoustic, articulatory, and perceptual analyses of the vowels /y/ and /u/ produced by ten 4-year-old French speakers and ten adult French speakers were conducted under two conditions: normal and with a large tube inserted between the lips. Ultrasound and acoustic recordings of isolated vowels were made in the normal condition before any perturbation, for each of the trials in the perturbed condition, and in the normal condition after the perturbed trials. Data revealed that adult participants moved their tongues in the perturbed condition more than children did. The perturbation was generally at least partly compensated for during the perturbed trials in adults, but children did not show a typical learning effect. In particular, unsystematic improvements were observed during the sequence of perturbed trials, and after-effects were not clear in the articulatory domain. This suggests that children may establish associative links between multisensory phonemic representations and articulatory maneuvers, but those links may mainly rely on trial-to-trial, error-based feedback correction mechanisms rather than on the internal model of the speech production apparatus, as they are in adults.

  10. The effects of Bohm potential on ion-acoustic solitary waves interaction in a nonplanar quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Chang

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in a nonplanar unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, and ions are studied by employing the quantum hydrodynamic model and the Korteweg-de Vries description. We provide the theoretical predictions about the phase shifts for the compressive IASWs and the rarefactive IASWs collisions, respectively. The effects of the positron to electron Fermi temperature ratio, the positron to ion number density ratio, and the quantum Bohm potential on phase shift are investigated. It is found that these factors can significantly modify the properties of the IASWs collisions. In particular, we find that the variations of phase shifts with quantum Bohm potential for two types of IASWs are apparently different. The validity of the results of present study is also pointed out.

  11. Interactions of nonlinear electron-acoustic solitary waves with vortex electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Demiray, Hilmi

    2015-02-15

    In the present work, based on a one dimensional model, we consider the head-on-collision of nonlinear electron-acoustic waves in a plasma composed of a cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a trapped/vortex-like distribution, and stationary ions. The analysis is based on the use of extended Poincare, Lighthill-Kuo method [C. H. Su and R. M. Mirie, J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980); R. M. Mirie and C. H. Su, J. Fluid Mech. 115, 475 (1982)]. It is shown that, for the first order approximation, the waves propagating in opposite directions are characterized by modified Korteweg-de Vries equations. In contrary to the results of previous investigations on this subject, we showed that the phase shifts are functions of both amplitudes of the colliding waves. The numerical results indicate that the waves with larger amplitude experience smaller phase shifts. Such a result seems to be plausible from physical considerations.

  12. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  13. Active noise reduction systems: Their interaction with very low frequency acoustical energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, R. Brian

    1994-08-01

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is used for reducing noise at the ears of an observer through the action of interfering sound waves. Noise sensed by a microphone built into the observer's headset or helmet is processed and reintroduced into the ear cup cavity out of phase with the original sound, thus cancelling the noise at the ear. Recent field experience has shown that system exposure to very high amplitude low-frequency sound, such as during the operation of helicopters, can lead to saturation or overload of the ANR electronics. Experiments using acoustical maniquins were conducted to assess the low-frequency behavior of ANR equipment. Results of measurement of the threshold of overload indicated large differences in the saturation thresholds among systems tested. Performance strongly depended on the integrity of the ear seal. Those systems offering active attenuation into the infrasound region tended to saturate most easily, but did create the best listening condition for the user when operated below the saturation threshold.

  14. Biotin-streptavidin binding interactions of dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonators for smart label-free biochemical sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Amir; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Park, Woo-Tae; Su, Pei-Chen; Miao, Jianmin; Lin, Julius Tsai Ming; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Sensor performance of a dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonator type label-free biosensor is verified with biotin-streptavidin binding interactions as a model system. The mass sensor is a micromachined silicon square plate with a dielectric filled capacitive excitation mechanism. The resonance frequency of the biotin modified resonator decreased 315 ppm when exposed to streptavidin solution for 15 min with a concentration of 10(-7) M, corresponding to an added mass of 3.43 ng on the resonator surface. An additional control is added by exposing a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-covered device to streptavidin in the absence of the attached biotin. No resonance frequency shift was observed in the control experiment, which confirms the specificity of the detection. The sensor-to-sensor variability is also measured to be 4.3%. Consequently, the developed sensor can be used to observe in biotin-streptavidin interaction without the use of labelling or molecular tags. In addition, biosensor can be used in a variety of different immunoassay tests. PMID:24608003

  15. Biotin-Streptavidin Binding Interactions of Dielectric Filled Silicon Bulk Acoustic Resonators for Smart Label-Free Biochemical Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Amir; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Park, Woo-Tae; Su, Pei-Chen; Miao, Jianmin; Lin, Julius Tsai Ming; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Sensor performance of a dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonator type label-free biosensor is verified with biotin-streptavidin binding interactions as a model system. The mass sensor is a micromachined silicon square plate with a dielectric filled capacitive excitation mechanism. The resonance frequency of the biotin modified resonator decreased 315 ppm when exposed to streptavidin solution for 15 min with a concentration of 10−7 M, corresponding to an added mass of 3.43 ng on the resonator surface. An additional control is added by exposing a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-covered device to streptavidin in the absence of the attached biotin. No resonance frequency shift was observed in the control experiment, which confirms the specificity of the detection. The sensor-to-sensor variability is also measured to be 4.3%. Consequently, the developed sensor can be used to observe in biotin-streptavidin interaction without the use of labelling or molecular tags. In addition, biosensor can be used in a variety of different immunoassay tests. PMID:24608003

  16. A statistical framework for analyzing hypothesized interactions between cells imaged using multispectral microscopy and multiple immunohistochemical markers

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Chris J.; Naidoo, Khimara; Clay, Vanessa; Linton, Kim; Radford, John A.; Byers, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multispectral microscopy and multiple staining can be used to identify cells with distinct immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. We present here a method called hypothesized interaction distribution (HID) analysis for characterizing the statistical distribution of pair-wise spatial relationships between cells with particular IHC characteristics and apply it to clinical data. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from a study of 26 follicular lymphoma patients in which sections were stained for CD20 and YY1. HID analysis, using leave-one-out validation, was used to assign patients to one of two groups. We tested the null hypothesis of no difference in Kaplan–Meier survival curves between the groups. Results: Shannon entropy of HIDs assigned patients to groups that had significantly different survival curves (median survival was 7.70 versus 110 months, P = 0.00750). Hypothesized interactions between pairs of cells positive for both CD20 and YY1 were associated with poor survival. Conclusions: HID analysis provides quantitative inferences about possible interactions between spatially proximal cells with particular IHC characteristics. In follicular lymphoma, HID analysis was able to distinguish between patients with poor versus good survival, and it may have diagnostic and prognostic utility in this and other diseases. PMID:23766940

  17. Aggregation property of glycyrrhizic acid and its interaction with cyclodextrins analyzed by dynamic light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Izutani, Yusuke; Kanaori, Kenji; Oda, Masayuki

    2014-06-17

    The structural properties of glycyrrhizic acid, a sweet-tasting constituent of Glycyrrhiza glabra, and its interaction with cyclodextrins were analyzed using dynamic light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR. The dynamic light scattering and NMR studies showed that glycyrrhizic acid forms a water-soluble aggregate that disperses upon the addition of γ-cyclodextrin. The high sweetness of glycyrrhizic acid can be closely correlated with this aggregation, because the multimers of glycyrrhizic acid can simultaneously bind to the sweet taste receptors on the human tongue. The isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that γ-cyclodextrin binds to glycyrrhizic acid more strongly than β-cyclodextrin, however, both reactions are accompanied by a favorable change in binding entropy. Considering the large negative change in heat capacity that is observed during the binding of γ-cyclodextrin, the main driving force for the binding is hydrophobic interactions with dehydration, which is typical for inclusion complex. NMR experiments showed that γ-cyclodextrin interacts with the central part of the aglycone moiety, not the glucuronic acid moieties, resulting in high binding affinity. It should also be noted that the two distinct complexes of glycyrrhizic acid with γ-cyclodextrin would exist in aqueous solution.

  18. A Photoactivatable Nanopatterned Substrate for Analyzing Collective Cell Migration with Precisely Tuned Cell-Extracellular Matrix Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Boehm, Heike; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Spatz, Joachim P.; Nakanishi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML), and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K) and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions. PMID:24632806

  19. Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans’ communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans’ behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  20. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  1. Pitch Contour Matching and Interactional Alignment across Turns: An Acoustic Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorisch, Jan; Wells, Bill; Brown, Guy J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the influence of context on the phonetic design of talk-in-interaction, we investigated the pitch characteristics of short turns (insertions) that are produced by one speaker between turns from another speaker. We investigated the hypothesis that the speaker of the insertion designs her turn as a pitch match to the prior turn…

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  3. Experimental investigation of geodesic acoustic mode spatial structure, intermittency, and interaction with turbulence in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.

    2012-02-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flows are nonlinearly driven, axisymmetric (m=0andn=0) E ×B flows, which are thought to play an important role in establishing the saturated level of turbulence in tokamaks. Results are presented showing the GAM's observed spatial scales, temporal scales, and nonlinear interaction characteristics, which may have implications for the assumptions underpinning turbulence models towards the tokamak edge (r /a>rsim0.75). Measurements in the DIII-D tokamak [Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have been made with multichannel Doppler backscattering systems at toroidal locations separated by 180∘; analysis reveals that the GAM is highly coherent between the toroidally separated systems (γ>0.8) and that measurements are consistent with the expected m =0andn=0 structure. Observations show that the GAM in L-mode plasmas with ~2.5-4.5 MW auxiliary heating occurs as a radially coherent eigenmode, rather than as a continuum of frequencies as occurs in lower temperature discharges; this is consistent with theoretical expectations when finite ion Larmor radius effects are included. The intermittency of the GAM has been quantified, revealing that its autocorrelation time is fairly short, ranging from about 4 to about 15 GAM periods in cases examined, a difference that is accompanied by a modification to the probability distribution function of the E ×B velocity at the GAM frequency. Conditionally-averaged bispectral analysis shows the strength of the nonlinear interaction of the GAM with broadband turbulence can vary with the magnitude of the GAM. Data also indicate a wavenumber dependence to the GAM's interaction with turbulence.

  4. Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering to Analyze the Interactions of Protein Receptors with Bacterial Quorum Sensing Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many members of the LuxR family of quorum sensing (QS) transcriptional activators, including LasR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are believed to require appropriate acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) ligands to fold into an active conformation. The failure to purify ligand-free LuxR homologues in nonaggregated form at the high concentrations required for their structural characterization has limited the understanding of the mechanisms by which QS receptors are activated. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopy technique that can be applied to study proteins at extremely low concentrations in their active state. The high sensitivity of SERS has allowed us to detect molecular interactions between the ligand-binding domain of LasR (LasRLBD) as a soluble apoprotein and modulators of P. aeruginosa QS. We found that QS activators and inhibitors produce differential SERS fingerprints in LasRLBD, and in combination with molecular docking analysis provide insight into the relevant interaction mechanism. This study reveals signal-specific structural changes in LasR upon ligand binding, thereby confirming the applicability of SERS to analyze ligand-induced conformational changes in proteins. PMID:25927541

  5. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  6. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  7. Treatment of acoustic fluid-structure interaction by Localized Lagrange Multipliers and comparison to alternative interface coupling methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Sprague, Michael A.; Ross, Michael R.; Park, K. C.

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a sequel on the topic of localized Lagrange multipliers (LLM) for applications of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between finite-element models of an acoustic fluid and an elastic structure. The prequel paper formulated the spatial-discretization methods, the LLM interface treatment, the time-marching partitioned analysis procedures, and the application to 1D benchmark problems. Here, we expand on formulation aspects required for successful application to more realistic 2D and 3D problems. Additional topics include duality relations at the fluid-structure interface, partitioned vibration analysis, reduced-order modeling, handling of curved interface surfaces, and comparison of LLM with other coupling methods. Emphasis is given to non-matching fluid-structure meshes. We present benchmark examples that illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of competing interface treatments. Realistic application problems involving the seismic response of two existing dams are considered. These include 2D modal analyses of the Koyna gravity dam, transient-response analyses of that dam with and without reduced-order modeling, incorporation of nonlinear cavitation effects, and the 3D transient-response analysis of the Morrow Point arch dam.

  8. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  9. Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  10. Study of the blade/vortex interaction: Acoustics, aerodynamics and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnemmi, P.; Haertig, J.; Johe, C.; Schaffar, M.

    1992-04-01

    A program for calculating the load noise of a helicopter rotor was developed. The method, which requires the knowledge of the local blade load values, was extended to calculate the two dimensional flow around a foil in a field of vortices. A three dimensional method based on the lifting surface theory was developed to simulate the turbulent field developed by a pitch oscillating foil and interacting with another foil placed downstream. The calculated and the measured lift evolution values were compared. The flow velocity was measured by laser velocimetry and the configuration of the rotational flow field was obtained.

  11. Acoustic, Thermal and Molecular Interactions of Polyethylene Glycol (2000, 3000, 6000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatramanan, K.; Padmanaban, R.; Arumugam, V.

    Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a condensation polymer of ethylene oxide and water. PEG find its application as emulsifying agents, detergents, soaps, plasticizers, ointments, etc. Though the chemical and physical properties of PEG are known, still because of their uses in day to day life, it becomes necessary to study few physical properties like ultrasonic velocity, viscosity and hence adiabatic compressibility, free length, etc. In the present study, an attempt has been made to compute the activation energy and hence to analyse the molecular interactions of aqueous solutions of Polyethylene Glycol of molar mass 2000, 3000 and 6000 at different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10%) at different temperatures (303K, 308K, 313K, 318K) by determining relative viscosity, ultrasonic velocity and density. Various parameters like adiabatic compressibility, viscous relaxation time, inter molecular free length, free volume, internal pressure, etc are calculated at 303K and the results are discussed in the light of polymer-solvent interaction. This study helps to understand the behavior of macro-molecules with respect to changing concentration and temperature. Furthermore, viscosity and activation energy results are correlated to understand the increased entanglement of the polymer chains due to the increase in the concentration of a polymer solution that leads to an increase in viscosity and an increase in the activation energy of viscous flow.

  12. Sound reduction by metamaterial-based acoustic enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shanshan; Li, Pei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-12-15

    In many practical systems, acoustic radiation control on noise sources contained within a finite volume by an acoustic enclosure is of great importance, but difficult to be accomplished at low frequencies due to the enhanced acoustic-structure interaction. In this work, we propose to use acoustic metamaterials as the enclosure to efficiently reduce sound radiation at their negative-mass frequencies. Based on a circularly-shaped metamaterial model, sound radiation properties by either central or eccentric sources are analyzed by numerical simulations for structured metamaterials. The parametric analyses demonstrate that the barrier thickness, the cavity size, the source type, and the eccentricity of the source have a profound effect on the sound reduction. It is found that increasing the thickness of the metamaterial barrier is an efficient approach to achieve large sound reduction over the negative-mass frequencies. These results are helpful in designing highly efficient acoustic enclosures for blockage of sound in low frequencies.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  14. Computational Analysis of the Flow and Acoustic Effects of Jet-Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.; Pao, S. Paul; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Massey, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Computational simulation and prediction tools were used to understand the jet-pylon interaction effect in a set of bypass-ratio five core/fan nozzles. Results suggest that the pylon acts as a large scale mixing vane that perturbs the jet flow and jump starts the jet mixing process. The enhanced mixing and associated secondary flows from the pylon result in a net increase of noise in the first 10 diameters of the jet s development, but there is a sustained reduction in noise from that point downstream. This is likely the reason the pylon nozzle is quieter overall than the baseline round nozzle in this case. The present work suggests that focused pylon design could lead to advanced pylon shapes and nozzle configurations that take advantage of propulsion-airframe integration to provide additional noise reduction capabilities.

  15. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  16. Signal Analysis of Helicopter Blade-Vortex-Interaction Acoustic Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Dai, Renshou

    1998-01-01

    Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) produces annoying high-intensity impulsive noise. NASA Ames collected several sets of BVI noise data during in-flight and wind tunnel tests. The goal of this work is to extract the essential features of the BVI signals from the in-flight data and examine the feasibility of extracting those features from BVI noise recorded inside a large wind tunnel. BVI noise generating mechanisms and BVI radiation patterns an are considered and a simple mathematical-physical model is presented. It allows the construction of simple synthetic BVI events that are comparable to free flight data. The boundary effects of the wind tunnel floor and ceiling are identified and more complex synthetic BVI events are constructed to account for features observed in the wind tunnel data. It is demonstrated that improved recording of BVI events can be attained by changing the geometry of the rotor hub, floor, ceiling and microphone. The Euclidean distance measure is used to align BVI events from each blade and improved BVI signals are obtained by time-domain averaging the aligned data. The differences between BVI events for individual blades are then apparent. Removal of wind tunnel background noise by optimal Wiener-filtering is shown to be effective provided representative noise-only data have been recorded. Elimination of wind tunnel reflections by cepstral and optimal filtering deconvolution is examined. It is seen that the cepstral method is not applicable but that a pragmatic optimal filtering approach gives encouraging results. Recommendations for further work include: altering measurement geometry, real-time data observation and evaluation, examining reflection signals (particularly those from the ceiling) and performing further analysis of expected BVI signals for flight conditions of interest so that microphone placement can be optimized for each condition.

  17. Influence of acoustic anisotropy of paratellurite crystal on the double acousto-optic Bragg light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2016-09-01

    Influence of acoustic anisotropy on acousto-optic interaction in optically and acoustically anisotropic media is theoretically and experimentally studied. A specific type of acousto-optic diffraction is analyzed with allowance for the phase-matching conditions for two diffraction maxima. Analytical expressions for the phase-mismatch parameters versus the angle between the phase and group velocities of acoustic wave are derived. Light intensity in the diffraction peaks is numerically calculated, and experimental data on the diffraction in the paratellurite crystal at an acoustic walk-off angle of 54° are presented.

  18. Exploring Solute-Solvent Interactions of -Amino Acids in Aqueous [] Arrangements by Volumetric, Viscometric, Refractometric, and Acoustic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Roy, Milan Chandra; Basak, Saptarshi

    2014-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, l-alanine, l-valine, and aqueous solution of ionic liquid (IL) [1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (] have been investigated by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (), viscosity -coefficient, molal refraction (), and adiabatic compressibility ( of glycine, l-alanine, and l-valine have been studied in 0.001 mol , 0.003 mol , and 0.005 mol aqueous 1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [] solutions at 298.15 K from the values of densities , viscosities (), refractive index (, and speed of sound , respectively. The extent of interaction, i.e., the solute-solvent interaction is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (, viscosity -coefficient, and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (. The limiting apparent molar volumes (, experimental slopes ( derived from the Masson equation, and viscosity - and -coefficients using the Jones-Dole equation have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions, respectively. Molal refractions ( have been calculated with the help of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The role of the solvent (aqueous IL solution) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  19. Interaction of an acoustical 2D-beam with an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location in a non-viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The classical Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) for plane waves in acoustics is generalized for the case of a 2D arbitrarily-shaped beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. The formulation is valid for an elastic (or viscoelastic) cylinder (or a cylindrical shell, a layered cylinder/shell, or a multilayered cylindrical shell, etc.) of any size and material. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered fields are derived, and numerical examples illustrate the theory. The wave-fields are expressed using a generalized PWSE involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. When the beam is shifted off the center of the cylinder, the off-axial BSCs are evaluated by performing standard numerical integration. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. The properties related to the arbitrary scattering of a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian cylindrical beam (chosen as an example) by an elastic brass cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed. Moreover, the total and resonance backscattering form function moduli are numerically computed, and the results discussed with emphasis on the contribution of the surface waves circumnavigating the cylinder circular surface to the resonance backscattering. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to derive general expressions for the axial and transverse acoustic radiation force functions for the cylinder in any 2D beam of arbitrary shape. Examples are provided for a zeroth-order quasi Gaussian cylindrical beam with different waist. Potential applications are in underwater and physical acoustics, however, ongoing research in biomedical ultrasound, non-destructive evaluation, imaging, manufacturing, instrumentation, and

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  1. The pyPHaz software, an interactive tool to analyze and visualize results from probabilistic hazard assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Selva, Jacopo; Costa, Antonio; Sandri, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic Hazard Assessment (PHA) is becoming an essential tool for risk mitigation policies, since it allows to quantify the hazard due to hazardous phenomena and, differently from the deterministic approach, it accounts for both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. On the other hand, one of the main disadvantages of PHA methods is that their results are not easy to understand and interpret by people who are not specialist in probabilistic tools. For scientists, this leads to the issue of providing tools that can be easily used and understood by decision makers (i.e., risk managers or local authorities). The work here presented fits into the problem of simplifying the transfer between scientific knowledge and land protection policies, by providing an interface between scientists, who produce PHA's results, and decision makers, who use PHA's results for risk analyses. In this framework we present pyPHaz, an open tool developed and designed to visualize and analyze PHA results due to one or more phenomena affecting a specific area of interest. The software implementation has been fully developed with the free and open-source Python programming language and some featured Python-based libraries and modules. The pyPHaz tool allows to visualize the Hazard Curves (HC) calculated in a selected target area together with different levels of uncertainty (mean and percentiles) on maps that can be interactively created and modified by the user, thanks to a dedicated Graphical User Interface (GUI). Moreover, the tool can be used to compare the results of different PHA models and to merge them, by creating ensemble models. The pyPHaz software has been designed with the features of storing and accessing all the data through a MySQL database and of being able to read as input the XML-based standard file formats defined in the frame of GEM (Global Earthquake Model). This format model is easy to extend also to any other kind of hazard, as it will be shown in the applications

  2. Analyzing acoustic phenomena with a smartphone microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes how different sound types can be explored using the microphone of a smartphone and a suitable app. Vibrating bodies, such as strings, membranes, or bars, generate air pressure fluctuations in their immediate vicinity, which propagate through the room in the form of sound waves. Depending on the triggering mechanism, it is possible to differentiate between four types of sound waves: tone, sound, noise, and bang. In everyday language, non-experts use the terms "tone" and "sound" synonymously; however, from a physics perspective there are very clear differences between the two terms. This paper presents experiments that enable learners to explore and understand these differences. Tuning forks and musical instruments (e.g., recorders and guitars) can be used as equipment for the experiments. The data are captured using a smartphone equipped with the appropriate app (in this paper we describe the app Audio Kit for iOS systems ). The values captured by the smartphone are displayed in a screen shot and then viewed directly on the smartphone or exported to a computer graphics program for printing.

  3. Kundt's Tube: An Acoustic Gas Analyzer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristov, Natasha; Habekost, Gehsa; Habekost, Achim

    2011-01-01

    A Kundt tube is normally used to measure the speed of sound in gases. Therefore, from known speeds of sound, a Kundt tube can be used to identify gases and their fractions in mixtures. In these experiments, the speed of sound is determined by measuring the frequency of a standing sound wave at a fixed tube length, temperature, and pressure. This…

  4. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  6. The existence of electron-acoustic shock waves and their interactions in a non-Maxwellian plasma with q-nonextensive distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiu-Ning; He, Yong-Lin; Han, Zhen-Hai; Dong, Guang-Xing; Nan, Ya-Gong; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2013-07-15

    We present a theoretical investigation for the nonlinear interaction between electron-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive two-electron plasma. The interaction is governed by a pair of Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equations. We focus on studying the colliding effects on the propagation of shock waves, more specifically, we have studied the effects of plasma parameters, i.e., the nonextensive parameter q, the “hot” to “cold” electron number density ratio α, and the normalized electron kinematic viscosity η{sub 0} on the trajectory changes (phase shifts) of shock waves. It is found that there are trajectory changes (phase shifts) for both colliding shock waves in the present plasma system. We also noted that the nonlinearity has no decisive effect on the trajectory changes, the occurrence of trajectory changes may be due to the combined role played by the dispersion and dissipation of the nonlinear structure. Our theoretical study may be beneficial to understand the propagation and interaction of nonlinear electrostatic waves and may brings a possibility to develop the nonlinear theory of electron-acoustic waves in astrophysical plasma systems.

  7. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  8. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  10. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  11. Simple model for analyzing Efimov energy and three-body recombination of three identical bosons with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Lun; Hu, Xue-Jin; Han, Yong-Chang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2016-09-01

    We construct a simple model to calculate the trimer bound state energy ET(n ) and three-body recombination rate K30 of three identical bosons with van der Waals interaction without using any two- or three-body fitting parameter. Using this simple model, we investigate the influence of the van der Waals finite-range effect on ET(n ) and K30. Our calculation shows that the finite-range effect leads to the ground trimer state energy ET(0 ) not crossing the atom-dimer threshold, and the scaled three-body recombination rate K30/a4 deviating from the universal three-body theory. The results of our simple model agree within a few percent with other theoretical works with van der Waals interaction and also the experimental data.

  12. Analyzing the Multi-scale Interactions of Tropical Waves and Tropical Cyclone Formation with the NASA CMAVis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.; Nelson, B.; Tao, W.

    2011-12-01

    Among the scenarios in the Decadal Survey (DS) Missions, the advanced data processing group at the ESTO AIST PI workshop identified "Extreme Event Warning" and "Climate Projections" as two of the top priority scenarios. Recently, we (e.g., Shen et al., 2010a,b; 2011a,b) have made attempt of addressing the first by successfully developing the NASA Coupled Advanced global multiscale Modeling and concurrent Visualization systems (CAMVis) on NASA supercomputers, and demonstrating a great potential for extending the lead time (from 5~7 days up to 20 days) of tropical cyclone (TC) prediction with improved multi-scale interactions between a TC with large-scale environmental conditions such as African Easterly Waves (AEWs), and Madden Julian Oscillation (MJOs). In order to increase our confidence in long-term TC prediction and thus TC climate projection, the predictive relationships between large-scale tropical waves and TC formation need to be further examined and verified with massive model and satellite data sets. To achieve this goal, we have conducted multiscale analysis to study the TC genesis processes, accompanied downscaling (from large-scale events) and upscaling (from small-scale events) processes, and their subsequent non-linear interactions. In this study, we first illustrate the complicated multi-scale interactions during TC genesis with our newly-developed 3D streamline packages in the NASA CAMVis system. With selected cases that include twin TCs in 2002, TC Nargis (2008) and hurricane Helene (2006), we will show that the CAMVis can provide a detailed (zoomed-in) view on hurricane physical processes and an integrative (zoomed-out) view on its interactions with environmental conditions. In the end of talk, we will discuss our future work in multiscale analysis with the Hilbert Huang Transform and improved ensemble empiric mode decomposition.

  13. Analyzing Katana referral hospital as a complex adaptive system: agents, interactions and adaptation to a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Karemere, Hermès; Ribesse, Nathalie; Marchal, Bruno; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the adaptation of Katana referral hospital in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in a changing environment that is affected for more than a decade by intermittent armed conflicts. His objective is to generate theoretical proposals for addressing differently the analysis of hospitals governance in the aims to assess their performance and how to improve that performance. The methodology applied approach uses a case study using mixed methods ( qualitative and quantitative) for data collection. It uses (1) hospital data to measure the output of hospitals, (2) literature review to identify among others, events and interventions recorded in the history of hospital during the study period and (3) information from individual interviews to validate the interpretation of the results of the previous two sources of data and understand the responsiveness of management team referral hospital during times of change. The study brings four theoretical propositions: (1) Interaction between key agents is a positive force driving adaptation if the actors share a same vision, (2) The strength of the interaction between agents is largely based on the nature of institutional arrangements, which in turn are shaped by the actors themselves, (3) The owner and the management team play a decisive role in the implementation of effective institutional arrangements and establishment of positive interactions between agents, (4) The analysis of recipient population's perception of health services provided allow to better tailor and adapt the health services offer to the population's needs and expectations. Research shows that it isn't enough just to provide support (financial and technical), to manage a hospital for operate and adapt to a changing environment but must still animate, considering that it is a complex adaptive system and that this animation is nothing other than the induction of a positive interaction between agents.

  14. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  15. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  16. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  17. Development of an inexact-variance hydrological modeling system for analyzing interactive effects of multiple uncertain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Li, Y. P.; Zhang, J. L.; Huang, G. H.

    2015-09-01

    Uncertainty assessment of hydrological model parameters has become one of the main topics due to their significant effects on prediction in arid and semi-arid river basins. Incorporation of uncertainty assessment within hydrological models can facilitate the calibration process and improve the degree of credibility to the subsequent prediction. In this study, an inexact-variance hydrological modeling system (IVHMS) is developed for assessing parameter uncertainty on modeling outputs in the Kaidu River Basin, China. Through incorporating the techniques of type-2 fuzzy analysis (T2FA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) within the semi-distributed land use based runoff processes (SLURP) model, IVHMS can quantitatively evaluate the individual and interactive effects of multiple uncertain parameters expressed as type-2 fuzzy sets in the hydrological modeling system. The modeling outputs indicate a good performance of SLURP model in describing the daily streamflow at the Dashankou hydrological station. Uncertainty analysis is conducted through sampling from fuzzy membership functions under different α-cut levels. The results show that, under a lower degree of plausibility (i.e. a lower α-cut level), intervals for peak and average flows are both wider; while intervals of peak and average flows become narrower under a higher degree of plausibility. Results based on ANOVA reveal that (i) precipitation factor (PF), one of main factors dominating the runoff processes, should be paid more attention in order to enhance the model performance; (ii) retention constant for fast store (RS) controls the amount and timing of the outflow from saturated zone and has a highly nonlinear effect on the average flow; (iii) the interaction between retention constant for fast store (RF) and maximum capacity for fast store (MF) has statistically significant (p < 0.05) effect on modeling outputs through affecting the maximum water holding capacity and the soil infiltration rate. The findings can

  18. Theory of non-collinear interactions of acoustic waves in an isotropic material with hysteretic quadratic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Vitalyi

    2002-01-01

    A particular form of the energy potential (cubic in strains) is proposed, which leads to the bow-tie behavior of the nonlinear modulus in an isotropic material with hysteresis of quadratic nonlinearity. The nonlinear scattering of a weak probe wave in the field of a strong pump wave is analyzed. It is demonstrated that collinear interactions of the shear waves are allowed in materials with nonlinearity hysteresis. Both in collinear and non-collinear frequency-mixing processes the combination frequency is composed of the probe wave frequency and one of the even harmonics of the pump wave. In general, the developed theory predicts that in the presence of the hysteretic nonlinearity the number of possible resonant scattering processes increases. In particular, if frequency-mixing processes are forbidden in the material with the elastic quadratic nonlinearity (for a fixed ratio of primary frequencies), they may be allowed in the materials with hysteretic quadratic nonlinearity. Moreover, in materials with hysteresis of the nonlinearity the resonant frequency mixing for a fixed ratio of primary frequencies may be allowed for multiple mutual orientations of the primary wave vectors. PMID:11831826

  19. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  20. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  1. Development of Proteogenomic Approaches to Analyze the Role of Virus-Microbe Interactions in Shaping Natural Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jillian; Breitbart, Mya; VerBerkmoes, Nathan

    2014-04-25

    CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) are adaptive immune systems in Bacteria and Archaea. Transcripts of the spacers that separate the repeats confer immunity through sequence identity with a targeted region (proto-spacer) in phage/viral, plasmid, or other foreign DNA. Short sequences immediately flanking the proto-spacer (proto-spacer adjacent motifs—PAMs) are important in both procuring spacers from and providing immunity to targeted sequences. New spacers are incorporated unidirectionally at the leader end of the CRISPR loci, thus recording a timeline of recent viral exposure. In the early phase of our research, we documented extremely rapid diversification of the CRISPR loci in natural populations [Tyson and Banfield, 2008] matched by high levels of sequence variation in natural viral populations [Andersson and Banfield, 2008]. Since then, in a genetically tractable model laboratory system, we have 1) tracked phage mutation and CRISPR diversification, and in a natural model system, we have 2) examined population history via over time, 3) investigated the timescale over which spacers become ineffective and the process by which ineffective spacers are removed, and 4) analyzed viral diversity. In addition to research activities, our group has organized five international CRISPR meetings, the fifth to be held at University of California, Berkeley in June 2012. Most importantly, the project provided the majority of funding support for Christine Sun (Ph.D. 2012).

  2. Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satelliteretrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirecteffect

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.; Del Genio, A.D.; Kaufman, Y.; Bennartz, R.; Koch, D.; Loeb, N.; Orlikowski, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evidence of aerosol-cloud interactions are evaluated using satellite data from MODIS, CERES, AMSR-E, reanalysis data from NCEP and data from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model. We evaluate a series of model simulations: (1) Exp N- aerosol direct radiative effects; (2) Exp C- Like Exp N but with aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus and stratus clouds; (3) Exp CN- Like Exp C but with model wind fields nudged to reanalysis data. Comparison between satellite-retrieved data and model simulations for June to August 2002, over the Atlantic Ocean indicate the following: a negative correlation between aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and cloud droplet effective radius (R{sub eff}) for all cases and satellite data, except for Exp N; a weak but negative correlation between liquid water path (LWP) and AOT for MODIS and CERES; and a robust increase in cloud cover with AOT for both MODIS and CERES. In all simulations, there is a positive correlation between AOT and both cloud cover and LWP (except in the case of LWP-AOT for Exp CN). The largest slopes are obtained for Exp N, implying that meteorological variability may be an important factor. The main fields associated with AOT variability in NCEP/MODIS data are warmer temperatures and increased subsidence for less clean cases, not well captured by the model. Simulated cloud fields compared with an enhanced data product from MODIS and AMSR-E indicate that model cloud thickness is over-predicted and cloud droplet number is within retrieval uncertainties. Since LWP fields are comparable this implies an under-prediction of R{sub eff} and thus an over-prediction of the indirect effect.

  3. Land use and disturbance interactions in dynamic arid systems: Multiscale remote sensing approaches for monitoring and analyzing riparian vegetation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Miguel L.

    Riparian systems are comprised of interacting aquatic and terrestrial elements that contribute distinctively to the natural capital of arid landscapes. Riparian vegetation is a major component of riparian systems, providing the ecosystem services required to support watershed health. The spatial and temporal distributions of riparian vegetation are influenced by hydrologic and disturbance processes operating at scales from local to regional. I believe both these processes are well suited to monitoring using synoptic and multitemporal approaches. The research in this dissertation is presented as 3 related studies. The first study focused on historical riparian dynamics related to natural disturbance and land use. Using current and historical riparian vegetation maps, we examined vegetation change within catchments of varying land use intensity. Results suggest that land use activities and wastewater subsidy affect the rate of development and diversity of riparian community types. The second study used moderate resolution satellite imagery to monitor changes in riparian structure and pattern within a land cover change framework. We classified Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery of the Upper Santa Cruz River watershed using Classification and Regression Tree (CART) models. We tested the ability of our models to capture change at landscape, floodplain, and catchment scales, centering our change detection efforts on a riparian tree die-off episode and found they can be used to describe both general landscape dynamics and disturbance-related riparian change. The third study examined historical and environmental factors contributing to spatial patterns of vegetation following two riparian tree die-offs. We used high resolution aerial imagery to map locations of individual live and dead trees and collected a suite of environmental variables and historical variables related directly and indirectly to land use and disturbance history. We tested for differences between

  4. A model using marginal efficiency of investment to analyze carbon and nitrogen interactions in terrestrial ecosystems (ACONITE Version 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are coupled in terrestrial ecosystems through multiple processes including photosynthesis, tissue allocation, respiration, N fixation, N uptake, and decomposition of litter and soil organic matter. Capturing the constraint of N on terrestrial C uptake and storage has been a focus of the Earth System Modeling community. However, there is little understanding of the trade-offs and sensitivities of allocating C and N to different tissues in order to optimize the productivity of plants. Here we describe a new, simple model of ecosystem C-N cycling and interactions (ACONITE), that builds on theory related to plant economics in order to predict key ecosystem properties (leaf area index, leaf C : N, N fixation, and plant C use efficiency) based on the outcome of assessments of the marginal change in net C or N uptake associated with a change in allocation of C or N to plant tissues. We simulated and evaluated steady-state ecosystem stocks and fluxes in three different forest ecosystems types (tropical evergreen, temperate deciduous, and temperate evergreen). Leaf C : N differed among the three ecosystem types (temperate deciduous < tropical evergreen < temperature evergreen), a result that compared well to observations from a global database describing plant traits. Gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) estimates compared well to observed fluxes at the simulation sites. Simulated N fixation at steady-state, calculated based on relative demand for N and the marginal return on C investment to acquire N, was an order of magnitude higher in the tropical forest than in the temperate forest, consistent with observations. A sensitivity analysis revealed that parameterization of the relationship between leaf N and leaf respiration had the largest influence on leaf area index and leaf C : N. A parameter governing how photosynthesis scales with day length had the largest influence on total vegetation C, GPP, and NPP

  5. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  6. Comment on ``The effects of Bohm potential on ion-acoustic solitary waves interaction in a nonplanar quantum plasma'' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082307 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, Li [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082307 (2010)] has studied the effects of Bohm potential on interaction of nonplanar ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion quantum plasma. In his work the extended reductive perturbation technique has been employed to reduce the basic quantum hydrodynamics plasma equations to Korteweg-de Vries evolution equations (one for each wave) as well as other coupled differential equations describing the phase variation of the resulting solitary waves. The calculated collisional phase-shifts are then numerically evaluated in terms of plasma parameters such as the fractional positron to ion number-density p, relative electron to positron Fermi-temperature σ and the quantum diffraction parameter H. We show that in the chosen plasma model, the parameters p and σ are not independent quantum plasma parameters which has important consequences on the graphical interpretations presented in the mentioned article.

  7. Comment on 'The effects of Bohm potential on ion-acoustic solitary waves interaction in a nonplanar quantum plasma' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082307 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2010-11-15

    Recently, Li [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082307 (2010)] has studied the effects of Bohm potential on interaction of nonplanar ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion quantum plasma. In his work the extended reductive perturbation technique has been employed to reduce the basic quantum hydrodynamics plasma equations to Korteweg-de Vries evolution equations (one for each wave) as well as other coupled differential equations describing the phase variation of the resulting solitary waves. The calculated collisional phase-shifts are then numerically evaluated in terms of plasma parameters such as the fractional positron to ion number-density p, relative electron to positron Fermi-temperature {sigma} and the quantum diffraction parameter H. We show that in the chosen plasma model, the parameters p and {sigma} are not independent quantum plasma parameters which has important consequences on the graphical interpretations presented in the mentioned article.

  8. Effects of strong electrostatic interaction on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of strong electrostatic interaction among highly charged dust on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma by small- k perturbation expansion method have been investigated. We found that a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation governs the evolution of obliquely propagating small amplitude DA solitary waves in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The parametric regimes for which the obliquely propagating DA solitary waves become unstable are identified. The basic properties, viz., amplitude, width, instability criterion, and growth rate, of these obliquely propagating DA solitary structures are found to be significantly modified by the effects of different physical strongly coupled dusty plasma parameters. The implications of our results in some space/astrophysical plasmas and some future laboratory experiments are briefly discussed.

  9. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  10. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  11. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound. PMID:25567545

  12. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  13. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  14. Fiber-optic, cantilever-type acoustic motion velocity hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A; Kirkendall, C K

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between fluid loaded fiber-optic cantilevers and a low frequency acoustic wave is investigated as the basis for an acoustic vector sensor. The displacements of the prototype cantilevers are measured with an integrated fiber laser strain sensor. A theoretical model predicting the frequency dependent shape of acoustically driven planar and cylindrical fiber-optic cantilevers incorporating effects of fluid viscosity is presented. The model demonstrates good agreement with the measured response of two prototype cantilevers, characterized with a vibrating water column, in the regime of Re ≥ 1. The performance of each cantilever geometry is also analyzed. Factors affecting the sensor performance such as fluid viscosity, laser mode profile, and support motion are considered. The planar cantilever is shown to experience the largest acoustically induced force and hence the highest acoustic responsivity. However, the cylindrical cantilever exhibits the smoothest response in water, due to the influence of viscous fluid damping, and is capable of two axis particle velocity measurement. These cantilevers are shown to be capable of achieving acoustic resolutions approaching the lowest sea-state ocean noise. PMID:22779459

  15. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  16. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  17. Unsteady Analysis of Inlet-Compressor Acoustic Interactions Using Coupled 3-D and 1-D CFD Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Cole, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamic response of a mixed compression supersonic inlet is very sensitive to the boundary condition imposed at the subsonic exit (engine face) of the inlet. In previous work, a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) inlet code (NPARC) was coupled at the engine face to a 3-D turbomachinery code (ADPAC) simulating an isolated rotor and the coupled simulation used to study the unsteady response of the inlet. The main problem with this approach is that the high fidelity turbomachinery simulation becomes prohibitively expensive as more stages are included in the simulation. In this paper, an alternative approach is explored, wherein the inlet code is coupled to a lesser fidelity 1-D transient compressor code (DYNTECC) which simulates the whole compressor. The specific application chosen for this evaluation is the collapsing bump experiment performed at the University of Cincinnati, wherein reflections of a large-amplitude acoustic pulse from a compressor were measured. The metrics for comparison are the pulse strength (time integral of the pulse amplitude) and wave form (shape). When the compressor is modeled by stage characteristics the computed strength is about ten percent greater than that for the experiment, but the wave shapes are in poor agreement. An alternate approach that uses a fixed rise in duct total pressure and temperature (so-called 'lossy' duct) to simulate a compressor gives good pulse shapes but the strength is about 30 percent low.

  18. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  20. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  1. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  2. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  3. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  4. Strategies for Analyzing Tone Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupe, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of auditory and acoustic analysis for determining the tonemes of a language starting from scratch, drawing on the author's experience of recording and analyzing tone languages of north-east India. The methodology is applied to a preliminary analysis of tone in the Thang dialect of Khiamniungan, a virtually undocumented…

  5. Impact of turbulence on the prediction of linear aeroacoustic interactions: Acoustic response of a turbulent shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikadi, Jannis; Föller, Stephan; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    A powerful model to predict aeroacoustic interactions in the linear regime is the perturbed compressible linearized Navier-Stokes equations. Thus far, the frequently employed derivation suggests that the effect of turbulence and its associated Reynolds stresses is neglected and a quasi-laminar model is employed. In this paper, dynamic perturbation equations are derived incorporating the effect of turbulence and its interaction with perturbation quantities. This is done by employing a triple decomposition of the instantaneous variables. The procedure results in a closure problem for the Reynolds stresses for which a linear eddy-viscosity model is proposed. The resulting perturbation equations are applied to a grazing flow in a T-joint for which strong shear layer instabilities at certain frequencies are experimentally observed. Passive scattering properties of the grazing flow are validated against the experiments performed by Karlsson and Åbom and perturbation equations being quasi-laminar. We find that prediction models must include the effect of Reynolds stresses to capture the aeroacoustic interaction effects correctly. Neglecting its effect naturally results in the over prediction of vortex growth at the frequencies of shear layer instability and therewith in an over prediction of aeroacoustic interactions.

  6. Effect of noncovalent interactions on the n-butylbenzene...Ar cluster studied by mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy and ab initio computations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Cerný, Jirí; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2008-07-01

    Clusters of Ar bound to isomers of the aromatic hydrocarbon n-butylbenzene (BB) have been studied using two-color REMPI (resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization) and MATI (mass analyzed threshold ionization) spectroscopy to explore noncovalent vdW interactions between these two moieties. Blue shifts of excitation energy were observed for gauche-BB...Ar clusters, and red shifts for anti-BB...Ar clusters were observed. Adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) of the conformer BB-I...Ar and BB-V...Ar were determined as 70052 and 69845 +/- 5 cm (-1), respectively. Spectral features and vibrational modes were interpreted with the aid of UMP2/cc-pVDZ ab initio calculations. Data of complexation shifts of the alkyl-benzenes and their argon clusters were collected and discussed. Using the CCSD(T) method at complete basis set (CBS) level, interaction energies for the neutral ground states of BB-I...Ar and BB-V...Ar were obtained as 650 and 558 cm (-1), respectively. Combining the CBS calculation results and the REMPI and MATI spectra allowed further the determination of the interaction energies and the energetics of BB...Ar in the excited neutral S 1 and the D 0 cationic ground states.

  7. Effect of noncovalent interactions on the n-butylbenzene...Ar cluster studied by mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy and ab initio computations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Cerný, Jirí; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2008-07-01

    Clusters of Ar bound to isomers of the aromatic hydrocarbon n-butylbenzene (BB) have been studied using two-color REMPI (resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization) and MATI (mass analyzed threshold ionization) spectroscopy to explore noncovalent vdW interactions between these two moieties. Blue shifts of excitation energy were observed for gauche-BB...Ar clusters, and red shifts for anti-BB...Ar clusters were observed. Adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) of the conformer BB-I...Ar and BB-V...Ar were determined as 70052 and 69845 +/- 5 cm (-1), respectively. Spectral features and vibrational modes were interpreted with the aid of UMP2/cc-pVDZ ab initio calculations. Data of complexation shifts of the alkyl-benzenes and their argon clusters were collected and discussed. Using the CCSD(T) method at complete basis set (CBS) level, interaction energies for the neutral ground states of BB-I...Ar and BB-V...Ar were obtained as 650 and 558 cm (-1), respectively. Combining the CBS calculation results and the REMPI and MATI spectra allowed further the determination of the interaction energies and the energetics of BB...Ar in the excited neutral S 1 and the D 0 cationic ground states. PMID:18533640

  8. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  9. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ChemScan UV-6100 is a spectrometry system originally developed by Biotronics Technologies, Inc. under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. It is marketed to the water and wastewater treatment industries, replacing "grab sampling" with on-line data collection. It analyzes the light absorbance characteristics of a water sample, simultaneously detects hundreds of individual wavelengths absorbed by chemical substances in a process solution, and quantifies the information. Spectral data is then processed by ChemScan analyzer and compared with calibration files in the system's memory in order to calculate concentrations of chemical substances that cause UV light absorbance in specific patterns. Monitored substances can be analyzed for quality and quantity. Applications include detection of a variety of substances, and the information provided enables an operator to control a process more efficiently.

  10. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  11. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  13. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  14. Defibrillator analyzers.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Defibrillator analyzers automate the inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) testing of defibrillators. They need to be able to test at least four basic defibrillator performance characteristics: discharge energy, synchronized-mode operation, automated external defibrillation, and ECG monitoring. We prefer that they also be able to test a defibrillator's external noninvasive pacing function--but this is not essential if a facility already has a pacemaker analyzer that can perform this testing. In this Evaluation, we tested seven defibrillator analyzers from six suppliers. All seven units accurately measure the energies of a variety of discharge wave-forms over a wide range of energy levels--from 1 J for use in a neonatal intensive care unit to 360 J for use on adult patients requiring maximum discharge energy. Most of the analyzers are easy to use. However, only three of the evaluated units could perform the full range of defibrillator tests that we prefer. We rated these units Acceptable--Preferred. Three more units could perform four of the five tests, they could not test the pacing feature of a defibrillator. These units were rated Acceptable. The seventh unit could perform only discharge energy testing and synchronized-mode testing and was difficult to use. We rate that unit Acceptable--Not Recommended. PMID:10604089

  15. Depression Diagnoses and Fundamental Frequency-Based Acoustic Cues in Maternal Infant-Directed Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, Laura L.; Zinser, Michael C.; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Kaplan, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    F[subscript 0]-based acoustic measures were extracted from a brief, sentence-final target word spoken during structured play interactions between mothers and their 3- to 14-month-old infants and were analyzed based on demographic variables and DSM-IV Axis-I clinical diagnoses and their common modifiers. F[subscript 0] range (?F[subscript 0]) was…

  16. Interactions between self-assembled monolayers and an organophosphonate: A detailed study using surface acoustic wave-based mass analysis, polarization modulation-FTIR spectroscopy, and ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, R.M.; Yang, H.C.; McEllistrem, L.J.

    1997-06-24

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having surfaces terminated in the following functional groups: -CH{sub 3}, -OH, -COOH, and (COO{sup -}){sub 2}Cu{sup 2+} (MUA-Cu{sup 2+}) have been prepared and examined as potential chemically sensitive interfaces. Mass measurements made using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices indicate that these surfaces display different degrees of selectivity and sensitivity to a range of analytes. The response of the MUA-Cu{sup 2+} SAM to the nerve-agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) is particularly intriguing. Exposure of this surface to 50%-of-saturation DIMP yields a surface concentration equivalent to about 20 DIMP monolayers. Such a high surface concentration in equilibrium with a much lower-than-saturation vapor pressure has not previously been observed. Newly developed analytical tools have made it possible to measure the infrared spectrum of the chemically receptive surface during analyte dosing. Coupled with in-situ SAW/ellipsometry measurements, which permit simultaneous measurement of mass and thickness with nanogram and Angstrom resolution, respectively, it has been possibly to develop a model for the surface chemistry leading to the unusual behavior of this system. The results indicate that DIMP interacts strongly with surface-confined Cu{sup 2+} adduct that nucleates growth of semi-ordered crystallites having substantially lower vapor pressure than the liquid.

  17. Molecular interactions in β-alanine-water-methanol solutions at 308.15 K on volumetric, viscometeric, and acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Balwinder; Rani, Bindu; Bamezai, Rajinder K.

    2014-01-01

    The density, viscosity and ultrasonic velocity for β-alanine solutions in aqueous and aqueous methanol medium at different concentrations has been determined at 308.15 K. The experimentally obtained data were used to evaluate the apparent molal volume and apparent molal adiabatic compressibility. The related thermodynamic parameters like partial molal volume as well as partial molal adiabatic compressibility at infinite dilution along with their corresponding constants S v and S k , respectively, give an insight to the nature of molecular interactions. The viscosity coefficient has also been calculated using Jones-Dole equation.

  18. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  19. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Axiomatics Corporation developed a shunting Dielectric Sensor to determine the nutrient level and analyze plant nutrient solutions in the CELSS, NASA's space life support program. (CELSS is an experimental facility investigating closed-cycle plant growth and food processing for long duration manned missions.) The DiComp system incorporates a shunt electrode and is especially sensitive to changes in dielectric property changes in materials at measurements much lower than conventional sensors. The analyzer has exceptional capabilities for predicting composition of liquid streams or reactions. It measures concentrations and solids content up to 100 percent in applications like agricultural products, petrochemicals, food and beverages. The sensor is easily installed; maintenance is low, and it can be calibrated on line. The software automates data collection and analysis.

  20. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  1. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  2. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  3. Novel synthetic ester of Brassicasterol, DFT investigation including NBO, NLO response, reactivity descriptor and its intramolecular interactions analyzed by AIM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Prakash, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, Brassicasterol (compound 1) isolated from Allamanda Violacea reacted with the well known NSAID ibuprofen by Steglich esterification yielding a novel steroidal ester, 3β-(2-(4-isobutyl phenyl) propionoxy) 24 methyl cholest-5, 22-dien (compound 2). Identity of synthetic derivative (compound 2) was done with the help of modern spectroscopic techniques like, 1H NMR, IR and UV as well as mass spectrometry. Molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of compound 2 were calculated using density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) and 6-31(d,p) basis set. NMR chemical shifts of the compound were calculated with GIAO method. Electronic properties such as HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with the help of time dependent DFT method. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to study hyperconjugative interactions. Non linear optical (NLO) response of compound 2 was also evaluated. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface has been used to indicate nucleophilic and electrophilic sites. Global reactivity descriptors of compound 1 and 2 were also calculated. Intramolecular interactions were analyzed using Atoms in molecule (AIM) theory.

  4. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing & transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  5. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Rajkumar S. Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  6. The acoustic correlates of valence depend on emotion family.

    PubMed

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The voice expresses a wide range of emotions through modulations of acoustic parameters such as frequency and amplitude. Although the acoustics of individual emotions are well understood, attempts to describe the acoustic correlates of broad emotional categories such as valence have yielded mixed results. In the present study, we analyzed the acoustics of emotional valence for different families of emotion. We divided emotional vocalizations into "motivational," "moral," and "aesthetic" families as defined by the OCC (Ortony, Clore, and Collins) model of emotion. Subjects viewed emotional scenarios and were cued to vocalize congruent exclamations in response to them, for example, "Yay!" and "Damn!". Positive valence was weakly associated with high-pitched and loud vocalizations. However, valence interacted with emotion family for both pitch and amplitude. A general acoustic code for valence does not hold across families of emotion, whereas family-specific codes provide a more accurate description of vocal emotions. These findings are consolidated into a set of "rules of expression" relating vocal dimensions to emotion dimensions.

  7. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  8. Stress Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    SPATE 900 Dynamic Stress Analyzer is an acronym for Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission. It detects stress-induced temperature changes in a structure and indicates the degree of stress. Ometron, Inc.'s SPATE 9000 consists of a scan unit and a data display. The scan unit contains an infrared channel focused on the test structure to collect thermal radiation, and a visual channel used to set up the scan area and interrogate the stress display. Stress data is produced by detecting minute temperature changes, down to one-thousandth of a degree Centigrade, resulting from the application to the structure of dynamic loading. The electronic data processing system correlates the temperature changes with a reference signal to determine stress level.

  9. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  10. Synchrony during acoustic interactions in the bushcricket Mecopoda 'Chirper' (Tettigoniidae:Orthoptera) is generated by a combination of chirp-by-chirp resetting and change in intrinsic chirp rate.

    PubMed

    Nityananda, Vivek; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2007-01-01

    In several bushcricket species, individual males synchronise their chirps during acoustic interactions. Synchrony is imperfect with the chirps of one male leading or lagging the other by a few milliseconds. Imperfect synchrony is believed to have evolved in response to female preferences for leading chirps. We investigated the mechanism underlying synchrony in the bushcricket species Mecopoda 'Chirper' from Southern India using playback experiments and simulations of pairwise interactions. We also investigated whether intrinsic chirp period is a good predictor of leading probability during interactions between males. The mechanism underlying synchrony in this species differs from previously reported mechanisms in that it involves both a change in the oscillator's intrinsic rate and resetting on a chirp-by-chirp basis. The form of the phase response curve differs from those of previously reported firefly and bushcricket species including the closely related Malaysian species Mecopoda elongata. Simulations exploring oscillator properties showed that the outcome of pairwise interactions was independent of initial phase and alternation was not possible. Solo intrinsic chirp period was a relatively good predictor of leading probability. However, changing the intrinsic period during interactions could enable males with longer periods to lead during acoustic interactions. PMID:16983544

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  13. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  14. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  15. On the acoustic radiation of a pitching airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the acoustic far field of a thin elastic airfoil, immersed in low-Mach non-uniform stream flow, and actuated by small-amplitude sinusoidal pitching motion. The near-field fluid-structure interaction problem is analyzed using potential thin-airfoil theory, combined with a discrete vortex model to describe the evolution of airfoil trailing edge wake. The leading order dipole-sound signature of the system is investigated using Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. Compared with a pitching rigid airfoil, the results demonstrate a two-fold effect of structure elasticity on airfoil acoustic field: at actuation frequencies close to the system least stable eigenfrequency, elasticity amplifies airfoil motion amplitude and associated sound levels; however, at frequencies distant from this eigenfrequency, structure elasticity acts to absorb system kinetic energy and reduce acoustic radiation. In the latter case, and with increasing pitching frequency ωp, a rigid-airfoil setup becomes significantly noisier than an elastic airfoil, owing to an ω _p^{5/2} increase of its direct motion noise component. Unlike rigid airfoil signature, it is shown that wake sound contribution to elastic airfoil radiation is significant for all ωp. Remarkably, this contribution contains, in addition to the fundamental pitching frequency, its odd multiple harmonics, which result from nonlinear interactions between the airfoil and the wake. The results suggest that structure elasticity may serve as a viable means for design of flapping flight noise control methodologies.

  16. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  17. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  18. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  19. An acoustic intensity-based method and its aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao

    of elliptic equations. Hence the AIBM is more stable and the reconstructed acoustic pressure is less dependent on the locations of the input acoustic data. The solution of the modified Helmholtz equation in the frequency domain is approximated by finite linear combination of basis functions. The coefficients associated with the basis functions are obtained by matching the assumed general solution to the given input data over an open control surface. The details on the optimization method, the instability issue and the numerical implementation of the AIBM have been discussed in the dissertation. To verify the AIBM model, several acoustic radiation examples are solved, e.g. multiple sources radiation. The analytical acoustic pressure and its normal derivative on a partial spherical control surface are used as the input for the AIBM. The reconstructed acoustic field is obtained then compared with the analytical acoustic field. Excellent agreement is achieved and demonstrated. Some affecting factors on the AIBM, e.g. input locations and the signal-to-noise ratio, are also investigated. In addition, the potential of AIBM in broad-band noise prediction is examined in vortex/trailing edge interaction problem. Furthermore, a series of real world model problems are chosen to demonstrate the capability and potential of AIBM in CAA applications. Two important aircraft noises: turbofan noise and airframe noise, are studied in detail. Both the permeable surface FW-H equation method and the AIBM are used to evaluate the radiated field. The prediction results obtained from the AIBM and the FW-H integral method are compared with the solution from the CFD/CAA method. The accuracy and efficiency of both the AIBM and the FW-H integral method are analyzed. In summary, the "open surface" AIBM makes up the drawbacks of traditional "closed surface" approaches. It provides an effective alternative for the far-field acoustic prediction of practical aeroacoustic problems.

  20. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  1. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions. PMID:27586767

  2. Proanthocyanidins in wild sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries analyzed by reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with UV and MS detection.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Wei; Liu, Pengzhan; Yang, Baoru

    2014-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for profiling of proanthocyanidins (PAs) of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries was established based on aqueous, acidified acetone extraction. The extract was purified by Sephadex column chromatography and analyzed using reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in single ion recording (SIR) and full scan modes combined with UV detection were used to define the combinations and ratios of PA oligomer classes. PAs with degree of polymerization from 2 to 11 were detected by HILIC-ESI-MS. Quantification of dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric PAs was carried out with ESI-MS-SIR, and their molar proportions were 40, 40, and 20%, respectively. Only B-type PAs were found, and (epi)gallocatechins were the main monomeric units. More than 60 combinations of (epi)catechins and (epi)gallocatechins of proanthocyanidin dimers and trimers were found. A majority of the PAs were shown to be higher polymers based on the HILIC-UV analysis.

  3. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  4. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  5. Modeling of thermo-acoustic instabilities in counterflow flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, Andrea C.

    Under certain operating conditions, many combustion systems in aerospace propulsion and land-based power generation exhibit large-amplitude pressure oscillations coupled with unsteadiness in the combustion processes. This unsteady multi-scale phenomenon is generally referred to as thermo-acoustic instability. Recently, model-based active control approaches are being pursued to suppress the potentially destructive instability and for this purpose a fundamental understanding of the coupling mechanisms between the dynamics of the flame and acoustics is critical. In the present investigation, a numerical model is developed to study the interaction of longitudinal acoustic waves with planar flames in the simplified counterflow configuration. The mathematical formulation of quasi one-dimensional, fully unsteady, laminar counterflow flames is derived and the governing equations are integrated numerically based on a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, with the inclusion of detailed transport and finite-rate chemistry. In order to accurately represent perfect and partial reflection of acoustic waves at the boundaries, Navier-Stokes characteristic boundary conditions are implemented. The focus of the investigation is on the linear regime of thermo-acoustic instabilities associated with planar flames. Specifically, coupling mechanisms intrinsic to the dynamics of the flame are addressed, such as flow compressibility effects, which may be responsible for the initial triggering of thermo-acoustic instabilities, and finite-rate chemistry effects. For well-resolved simulations, the occurrence of the self-sustained amplification of pressure fluctuations is analyzed in both non-premixed and premixed methane-air flames for a range of flow strain rates and flame locations, and employing different chemical kinetic models. A detailed analysis of the characteristic time-scales associated with convection, diffusion, chemistry and acoustics is performed together with an analysis of the

  6. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  7. Acoustic Inspection Device V1.0

    2002-01-16

    The Acoustic Inspection Device (AID) is an instrument used to interrogate materials with ultrasonic acoustic waves. The AID application software program runs under the Microsoft Windows 98 or Windows 2000 operating system. Is serves as the instrument controller and provides the user interface for the instrument known as the Acoustic Inspection Device (AID). The program requests, acquires, and analyzes acoustic waveforms from the AID hardware (pulser/receiver module, digitizer, and communications link). Graphical user displays ofmore » the AID application program include the real-time display of ultrasonic acoustic waveforms and analytical results including acoustic time-of-flight, velocity, and material identification. This program utilizes a novel algorithm, developed at PNNL, that automatically extracts the time-of-flight and amplitude data from the raw waveform and compares the extracted data to a material database.« less

  8. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  9. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  10. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  11. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  13. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  14. The Interaction Affinity between Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4) Analyzed by Quantitative FRET

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Han; Karmenyan, Artashes; Chiou, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), a member of integrin superfamily, interacts with its major counter ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and plays an important role in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and immunological synapse formation. However, irregular expressions of these proteins may also lead to several autoimmune diseases and metastasis cancer. Thus, quantifying the interaction affinity of the VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction is of fundamental importance in further understanding the nature of this interaction and drug discovery. In this study, we report an ‘in solution’ steady state organic fluorophore based quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay to quantify this interaction in terms of the dissociation constant (Kd). We have used, in our FRET assay, the Alexa Fluor 488-VLA-4 conjugate as the donor, and Alexa Fluor 546-VCAM-1 as the acceptor. From the FRET signal analysis, Kd of this interaction was determined to be 41.82 ± 2.36 nM. To further confirm our estimation, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique to obtain Kd = 39.60 ± 1.78 nM, which is in good agreement with the result obtained by FRET. This is the first reported work which applies organic fluorophore based ‘in solution’ simple quantitative FRET assay to obtain the dissociation constant of the VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction, and is also the first quantification of this interaction. Moreover, the value of Kd can serve as an indicator of abnormal protein-protein interactions; hence, this assay can potentially be further developed into a drug screening platform of VLA-4/VCAM-1 as well as other protein-ligand interactions. PMID:25793408

  15. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  16. [The acoustic indicator of saliva under stress].

    PubMed

    Shalenkova, M A; Mikhaĭlova, Z D; Klemin, V A; Korkotashvili, L V; Abanin, A M; Klemina, A V; Dolgov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The situation of stress affects various organs and systems that results in development of functional disorders and/or somatic diseases. As a result, different noninvasive, including salivary, techniques of diagnostic of stress conditions are in the process of development. The dynamics of acoustic indicator of saliva is studied during the period of passing the exams. The relationship of indicator with levels of potassium, sodium, glucose and protein of saliva was analyzed. The sampling consisted of 102 students of 5 and 6 academic years of medical university. To detect the acoustic indicator of saliva acoustic analyzer AKBa-01- "BIOM" was applied. The level of potassium and sodium in saliva was detected using method of flame photometry. The level of glucose in saliva was detected by glucose oxydase technique using analyzer "EXAN-G". The protein in saliva was detected by biuretic technique. The correlation between acoustic indicator of saliva and analyzed indicators of saliva was established. PMID:25080785

  17. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  18. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  1. Correlations between the in situ acoustic properties and geotechnical parameters of sediments in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baohua; Han, Tongcheng; Kan, Guangming; Li, Guanbao

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about the marine sediment acoustic properties is a key to understanding wave propagation in sediments and is very important for military oceanography and ocean engineering. We developed a hydraulic-drived self-contained in situ sediment acoustic measurement system, and measured for the first time the in situ acoustic properties of sediments on 78 stations in the Yellow Sea, China, by employing this system. The relationships between the in situ measured acoustic properties and the onboard or laboratory determined geotechnical parameters were analyzed. Porosity was found to be the dominant factor in reducing velocity in a quadratic fashion; velocity showed an increment with bulk density and a decrement with mean grain size and clay content both with a nonlinear dependence; acoustic attenuation showed a bell-shaped correlation with porosity and mean grain size but reduced with clay content of the sediments. The attenuation results indicate that intergrain friction rather than viscous interactions between pore fluid and solid grains is the dominant loss mechanism in our marine sediments. The relationships established would be used to predict the geotechnical parameters from in situ measured acoustic properties and vice versa, as well as being an indicator of the seafloor processes, potential gas bubbles hazard and gas hydrates resources or other suitable targets of acoustic surveys.

  2. Methods for reconstructing acoustic quantities based on acoustic pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the acoustic imaging methods developed over the past three decades that enable one to reconstruct all acoustic quantities based on the acoustic pressure measurements taken around a target source at close distances. One such method that has received the most attention is known as near-field acoustical holography (NAH). The original NAH relies on Fourier transforms that are suitable for a surface containing a level of constant coordinate in a source-free region. Other methods are developed to reconstruct the acoustic quantities in three-dimensional space and on an arbitrary three-dimensional source surface. Note that there is a fine difference between Fourier transform based NAH and other methods that is largely overlooked. The former can offer a wave number spectrum, thus enabling visualization of various structural waves of different wavelengths that travel on the surface of a structure; the latter cannot provide such information, which is critical to acquire an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between structural vibrations and sound radiation. All these methods are discussed in this paper, their advantages and limitations are compared, and the need for further development to analyze the root causes of noise and vibration problems is discussed.

  3. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  4. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode. PMID:25402086

  5. System and method for generating micro-seismic events and characterizing properties of a medium with non-linear acoustic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-12-29

    A method and system includes generating a first coded acoustic signal including pulses each having a modulated signal at a central frequency; and a second coded acoustic signal each pulse of which includes a modulated signal a central frequency of which is a fraction d of the central frequency of the modulated signal for the corresponding pulse in the first plurality of pulses. A receiver detects a third signal generated by a non-linear mixing process in the mixing zone and the signal is processed to extract the third signal to obtain an emulated micro-seismic event signal occurring at the mixing zone; and to characterize properties of the medium or creating a 3D image of the properties of the medium, or both, based on the emulated micro-seismic event signal.

  6. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode.

  7. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  8. RELAPS desktop analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Grush, W.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Snider, D.M.; Wagner, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The previously mainframe bound RELAP5 reactor safety computer code has been installed on a microcomputer. A simple color-graphic display driver has been developed to enable the user to view the code results as the calculation advances. In order to facilitate future interactive desktop applications, the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), also previously mainframe bound, is being redesigned to encompass workstation applications. The marriage of RELAP5 simulation capabilities with NPA interactive graphics on a desktop workstation promises to revolutionize reactor safety analysis methodology. 8 refs.

  9. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  10. Perturbation measurement of waveguides for acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic thermometers normally embed small acoustic transducers in the wall bounding a gas-filled cavity resonator. At high temperature, insulators of transducers loss electrical insulation and degrade the signal-to-noise ratio. One essential solution to this technical trouble is to couple sound by acoustic waveguides between resonator and transducers. But waveguide will break the ideal acoustic surface and bring perturbations(Δf+ig) to the ideal resonance frequency. The perturbation model for waveguides was developed based on the first-order acoustic theory in this paper. The frequency shift Δf and half-width change g caused by the position, length and radius of waveguides were analyzed using this model. Six different length of waveguides (52˜1763 mm) were settled on the cylinder resonator and the perturbation (Δf+ig) were measured at T=332 K and p=250˜500 kPa. The experiment results agreed with the theoretical prediction very well.

  11. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Feiveson, Alan H.; Shackelford, Linda; Rianon, Nahida; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Done Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift, The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values ( < 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  12. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  13. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters.

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  16. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    purposes (students, co-workers). On goal is to establish a real-time frequency transformation into the audio range to avoid time consuming visual data processing during the experiments. It is also the intention to analyze the signals using psycho-acoustic methods with the help of specialists from electrical engineering. Reference: Raith, Manuel (2013). "Schallemissionsanalyse bei Pulloutexperimenten an Verbunddübeln" Masterarbeit. Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung. Malm, Fabian (2012). "Schallemissionsanalyse am humanen Femur" Masterarbeit. Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung. Richter R. (2009): Einsatz der Schallemissionsanalyse zur Detektion des Riss und Abplatzungsverhaltens von Beton unter Brandeinwirkung. Diplomarbeit. Materialprüfungsanstalt Universität Stuttgart Keywords: Acoustic emission, bonded anchors, femur, pullout test, fire-spalling

  17. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  18. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  19. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  20. Prediction of drilling site-specific interaction of industrial acoustic stimuli and endangered whales: Beaufort Sea (1985). Final report, July 1985-March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, P.R.; Malme, C.I.; Shepard, G.W.; Richardson, W.J.; Bird, J.E.

    1986-10-01

    Research was performed during the first year (1985) of the two-year project investigating potential responsiveness of bowhead and gray whales to underwater sounds associated with offshore oil-drilling sites in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. The underwater acoustic environment and sound propagation characteristics of five offshore sites were determined. Estimates of industrial noise levels versus distance from those sites are provided. LGL Ltd. (bowhead) and BBN (gray whale) jointly present zones of responsiveness of these whales to typical underwater sounds (drillship, dredge, tugs, drilling at gravel island). An annotated bibliography regarding the potential effects of offshore industrial noise on bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea is included.

  1. Quenching of acoustic bandgaps by flow noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnady, T.; Elsabbagh, A.; Akl, W.; Mohamady, O.; Garcia-Chocano, V. M.; Torrent, D.; Cervera, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.

    2009-03-01

    We report an experimental study of acoustic effects produced by wind impinging on noise barriers based on two-dimensional sonic crystals with square symmetry. We found that the attenuation strength of sonic-crystal bandgaps decreases for increasing values of flow speed. A quenching of the acoustic bandgap appears at a certain speed value that depends of the barrier filling ratio. For increasing values of flow speed, the data indicate that the barrier becomes a sound source because of its interaction with the wind. We conclude that flow noise should be taken into account in designing acoustic barriers based on sonic crystals.

  2. Lipid Vesicle-mediated Affinity Chromatography using Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (LIMACS): a Novel Method to Analyze Protein-lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of lipid protein interaction is difficult because lipids are embedded in cell membranes and therefore, inaccessible to most purification procedures. As an alternative, lipids can be coated on flat surfaces as used for lipid ELISA and Plasmon resonance spectroscopy. However, surface coating lipids do not form microdomain structures, which may be important for the lipid binding properties. Further, these methods do not allow for the purification of larger amounts of proteins binding to their target lipids. To overcome these limitations of testing lipid protein interaction and to purify lipid binding proteins we developed a novel method termed lipid vesicle-mediated affinity chromatography using magnetic-activated cell sorting (LIMACS). In this method, lipid vesicles are prepared with the target lipid and phosphatidylserine as the anchor lipid for Annexin V MACS. Phosphatidylserine is a ubiquitous cell membrane phospholipid that shows high affinity to the protein Annexin V. Using magnetic beads conjugated to Annexin V the phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles will bind to the magnetic beads. When the lipid vesicles are incubated with a cell lysate the protein binding to the target lipid will also be bound to the beads and can be co-purified using MACS. This method can also be used to test if recombinant proteins reconstitute a protein complex binding to the target lipid. We have used this method to show the interaction of atypical PKC (aPKC) with the sphingolipid ceramide and to co-purify prostate apoptosis response 4 (PAR-4), a protein binding to ceramide-associated aPKC. We have also used this method for the reconstitution of a ceramide-associated complex of recombinant aPKC with the cell polarity-related proteins Par6 and Cdc42. Since lipid vesicles can be prepared with a variety of sphingo- or phospholipids, LIMACS offers a versatile test for lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles closely that of the cell membrane

  3. ICAP: An Interactive Cluster Analysis Procedure for analyzing remotely sensed data. [to classify the radiance data to produce a thematic map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    An Interactive Cluster Analysis Procedure (ICAP) was developed to derive classifier training statistics from remotely sensed data. The algorithm interfaces the rapid numerical processing capacity of a computer with the human ability to integrate qualitative information. Control of the clustering process alternates between the algorithm, which creates new centroids and forms clusters and the analyst, who evaluate and elect to modify the cluster structure. Clusters can be deleted or lumped pairwise, or new centroids can be added. A summary of the cluster statistics can be requested to facilitate cluster manipulation. The ICAP was implemented in APL (A Programming Language), an interactive computer language. The flexibility of the algorithm was evaluated using data from different LANDSAT scenes to simulate two situations: one in which the analyst is assumed to have no prior knowledge about the data and wishes to have the clusters formed more or less automatically; and the other in which the analyst is assumed to have some knowledge about the data structure and wishes to use that information to closely supervise the clustering process. For comparison, an existing clustering method was also applied to the two data sets.

  4. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Flores-Olmedo, E.; Báez, G.; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results.

  5. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  7. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  8. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  9. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  10. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  11. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  12. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  13. Acoustic coupling in capacitive microfabricated ultrasonic transducers: modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Caronti, Alessandro; Savoia, Alessandro; Caliano, Giosuè; Pappalardo, Massimo

    2005-12-01

    In the design of low-frequency transducer arrays for active sonar systems, the acoustic interactions that occur between the transducer elements have received much attention. Because of these interactions, the acoustic loading on each transducer depends on its position in the array, and the radiated acoustic power may vary considerably from one element to another. Capacitive microfabricated ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are made of a two-dimensional array of metallized micromembranes, all electrically connected in parallel, and driven into flexural motion by the electrostatic force produced by an applied voltage. The mechanical impedance of these membranes is typically much lower than the acoustic impedance of water. In our investigations of acoustic coupling in CMUTs, interaction effects between the membranes in immersion were observed, similar to those reported in sonar arrays. Because CMUTs have many promising applications in the field of medical ultrasound imaging, understanding of cross-coupling mechanisms and acoustic interaction effects is especially important for reducing cross-talk between array elements, which can produce artifacts and degrade image quality. In this paper, we report a finite-element study of acoustic interactions in CMUTs and experimental results obtained by laser interferometry measurements. The good agreement found between finite element modeling (FEM) results and optical displacement measurements demonstrates that acoustic interactions through the liquid represent a major source of cross coupling in CMUTs.

  14. The distance temperature map as method to analyze the optical properties of Fresnel lenses and their interaction with multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Thorsten; Kiefel, Peter; Nitz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The optical efficiency of Fresnel lens based solar concentrators varies with the temperature of the Fresnel lens. The dependency of any quantity of interest (e.g. optical efficiency) on Fresnel lens temperature can be visualized by 2d color plots that simultaneously show it as a function of the distance between solar cell and Fresnel lens and as a function of Fresnel lens temperature. This visualization, which is called DTmap, strongly facilitates the analysis of the thermal behavior of a Fresnel lens and the optimization of module height. Based on DTmaps we reveal and discuss serveral details of the thermal behavior of silicone on glass (SOG) Fresnel lenses. In addition, the DTmap is shown for the efficiency of a system consisting of a Fresnel lens and a lattice matched three-junction and a four-junction solar cell. The results demonstrate that the interaction of the concentrator optics and the solar cell is not trivial and may also be studied using DTmaps.

  15. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  16. Rapid geo-acoustic characterization from a surface ship of opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaney, Kevin D.

    2002-05-01

    The recent shift from deep water antisubmarine warfare to the littoral has brought about a dramatic change in the requirements of our understanding of the acoustic environment. In particular, shallow water acoustic propagation is dominated by the interaction of sound with the bottom and is therefore very sensitive to the geo-acoustic parameters of the local sea-floor. The rapid geo-acoustic characterization (RGC) algorithm is presented, that determines a geo-acoustic model that best matches the general acoustic propagation parameters. Using data from a passing surface ship, the time spread, TL versus range and striation slope are measured at various frequencies. These are then matched to a simple two-layer geo-acoustic model based on the empirical curves of Hamilton and Bachman. The resulting estimate does reproduce the global features of the acoustic field that are relevant to acoustic prediction. This method is robust, rapid, and produces the relevant acoustic predictions.

  17. Effect of noncovalent interactions on conformers of the n-butylbenzene monomer studied by mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy and basis-set convergent ab initio computations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Cerný, Jirí; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2008-07-01

    Two conformational isomers of the aromatic hydrocarbon n-butylbenzene have been studied using two-color MATI (mass analyzed threshold ionization) spectroscopy to explore the effect of conformation on ionization dynamics. Cationic states of g auche-conformer III and anti- conformers IV were selectively produced by two-color excitation via the respective S 1 origins. Adiabatic ionization potentials of the gauche- and anti-conformations were determined to be 70146 and 69872 +/- 5 cm (-1) respectively. Spectral features and vibrational modes are interpreted with the aid of MP2/cc-pVDZ ab initio calculations, and ionization-induced changes in the molecular conformations are discussed. Complete basis set (CBS) ab initio studies at MP2 level reveal reliable energetics for all four n-butylbenzene conformers observed in earlier two-color REMPI (resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization) spectra. For the S 0 state, the energies of conformer III, IV and V are above conformer I by 130, 289, 73 cm (-1), respectively. Furthermore, the combination of the CBS calculations with the measured REMPI, MATI spectra allowed the determination of the energetics of all four conformers in the S 1 and D 0 states.

  18. Effect of noncovalent interactions on conformers of the n-butylbenzene monomer studied by mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy and basis-set convergent ab initio computations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Cerný, Jirí; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2008-07-01

    Two conformational isomers of the aromatic hydrocarbon n-butylbenzene have been studied using two-color MATI (mass analyzed threshold ionization) spectroscopy to explore the effect of conformation on ionization dynamics. Cationic states of g auche-conformer III and anti- conformers IV were selectively produced by two-color excitation via the respective S 1 origins. Adiabatic ionization potentials of the gauche- and anti-conformations were determined to be 70146 and 69872 +/- 5 cm (-1) respectively. Spectral features and vibrational modes are interpreted with the aid of MP2/cc-pVDZ ab initio calculations, and ionization-induced changes in the molecular conformations are discussed. Complete basis set (CBS) ab initio studies at MP2 level reveal reliable energetics for all four n-butylbenzene conformers observed in earlier two-color REMPI (resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization) spectra. For the S 0 state, the energies of conformer III, IV and V are above conformer I by 130, 289, 73 cm (-1), respectively. Furthermore, the combination of the CBS calculations with the measured REMPI, MATI spectra allowed the determination of the energetics of all four conformers in the S 1 and D 0 states. PMID:18533642

  19. The algorithm and program complex for splitting on a parts the records of acoustic waves recorded during the work of plasma actuator flush-mounted in the model plane nozzle with the purpose of analyzing their robust spectral and correlation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernousov, A. D.; Malakhov, D. V.; Skvortsova, N. N.

    2014-03-01

    Currently acute problem of developing new technologies by reducing the noise of aircraft engines, including the directional impact on the noise on the basis of the interaction of plasma disturbances and sound generation pulsations. One of the devices built on this principle being developed in GPI RAS. They are plasma actuators (group of related to each other gaps, built on the perimeter of the nozzle) of various shapes and forms. In this paper an algorithm was developed which allows to separate impulses from the received experimental data, acquired during the work of plasma actuator flush-mounted in the model plane nozzle. The algorithm can be adjusted manually under a variety of situations (work of actuator in a nozzle with or without airflow, adjustment to different frequencies and pulse duration of the actuator). And program complex is developed on the basis of MatLab software, designed for building sustainable robust spectral and autocovariation functions of acoustic signals recorded during the experiments with the model of a nozzle with working actuator.

  20. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  1. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  2. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  3. Analyzing the Effect of Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability and Land Cover on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions During the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TenHoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are utilized to examine the impact of aerosols on clouds during the Amazonian biomass burning season in Rondnia, Brazil. It is found that increasing background column water vapor (CWV) throughout this transition season between the Amazon dry and wet seasons exerts a strong effect on cloud properties. As a result, aerosol-cloud correlations should be stratified by column water vapor to achieve a more accurate assessment of the effect of aerosols on clouds. Previous studies ignored the systematic changes to meteorological factors during the transition season, leading to possible misinterpretation of their results. Cloud fraction is shown generally to increase with aerosol optical depth (AOD) for both low and high values of column water vapor, whereas the relationship between cloud optical depth (COD) and AOD exhibits a different relationship. COD increases with AOD until AOD approx. 0.25 due to the first indirect (microphysical) effect. At higher values of AOD, COD is found to decrease with increasing AOD, which may be due to: (1) the inhibition of cloud development by absorbing aerosols (radiative effect) and/or (2) a retrieval artifact in which the measured reflectance in the visible is less than expected from a cloud top either from the darkening of clouds through the addition of carbonaceous biomass burning aerosols or subpixel dark surface contamination in the measured cloud reflectance. If (1) is a contributing mechanism, as we suspect, then a linear relationship between the indirect effect and increasing AOD, assumed in a majority of GCMs, is inaccurate since these models do not include treatment of aerosol absorption in and around clouds. The effect of aerosols on both column water vapor and clouds over varying land surface types is also analyzed. The study finds that the difference in column water vapor between forest and

  4. One sensor acoustic emission localization in plates.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R; Zwimpfer, F; Dual, J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emissions are elastic waves accompanying damage processes and are therefore used for monitoring the health state of structures. Most of the traditional acoustic emission techniques use a trilateration approach requiring at least three sensors on a 2D domain in order to localize sources of acoustic emission events. In this paper, we present a new approach which requires only a single sensor to identify and localize the source of acoustic emissions in a finite plate. The method proposed makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive nature of the flexural wave mode in a suitable frequency band. The signal shape of the transverse velocity response contains information about the propagated paths of the incoming elastic waves. This information is made accessible by a numerical time reversal simulation. The effect of dispersion is reversed and the original shape of the flexural wave is restored at the origin of the acoustic emission. The time reversal process is analyzed first for an infinite Mindlin plate, then by a 3D FEM simulation which in combination results in a novel acoustic emission localization process. The process is experimentally verified for different aluminum plates for artificially generated acoustic emissions (Hsu-Nielsen source). Good and reliable localization was achieved for a homogeneous quadratic aluminum plate with only one measurement. PMID:26372509

  5. Pressure distribution based optimization of phase-coded acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haixiang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yafei; Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong

    2014-02-28

    Based on the acoustic radiation of point source, the physical mechanism of phase-coded acoustical vortices is investigated with formulae derivations of acoustic pressure and vibration velocity. Various factors that affect the optimization of acoustical vortices are analyzed. Numerical simulations of the axial, radial, and circular pressure distributions are performed with different source numbers, frequencies, and axial distances. The results prove that the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices is linearly proportional to the source number, and lower fluctuations of circular pressure distributions can be produced for more sources. With the increase of source frequency, the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices increases accordingly with decreased vortex radius. Meanwhile, increased vortex radius with reduced acoustic pressure is also achieved for longer axial distance. With the 6-source experimental system, circular and radial pressure distributions at various frequencies and axial distances have been measured, which have good agreements with the results of numerical simulations. The favorable results of acoustic pressure distributions provide theoretical basis for further studies of acoustical vortices.

  6. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  7. Physiological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  8. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  9. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  10. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  11. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  12. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  13. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  14. Self-induced acoustic transparency of three-component longitudinal-transverse pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, S. V.; Ustinov, N. V.

    2012-04-15

    The features of the nonlinear dynamics of three-component elastic pulses in a low-temperature crystal containing paramagnetic impurities of electron and nuclear spins have been analyzed in the slowly varying envelope approximation. The presence of the electron spin subsystem makes it possible to equate the velocities of longitudinal sound and transverse acoustic waves; as a result, all components of the strain field efficiently interact with each other through the nuclear spin subsystem. The system of equations for envelopes of harmonics of the components of the strain field and the spin variables has been derived. The relations between the amplitudes and phases of the components have been obtained, the spectral composition has been analyzed, and the regimes of acoustic transparency of three-component longitudinal-transverse pulses have been discussed.

  15. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  16. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  17. Finite element prediction of vibro-acoustic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipol, Philip J.

    1989-09-01

    An efficient analytical methodology has been developed with the finite element method which may be used to predict the low frequency vibro-acoustic environment within an aerospace flight vehicle. This methodology includes general purpose capabilities for solving problems involving the effects of structure/acoustic interaction and random excitation pressure fields. Computational efficiency is enhanced by decoupling the structure from the acoustic volume, and taking advantage of reciprocity in the random vibration and vibro-acoustic formulations. The application of the analytical methodology to an example problem found good agreement with previous research, demonstrating the feasibility of the methodology described herein.

  18. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  19. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  20. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  1. Interaction of a turbulent vortex with a lifting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.; Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise due to blade-vortex-interaction is analyzing in the time domain for the extreme case when the blade cuts through the center of the vortex core with the assumptions of no distortion of the vortex path or of the vortex core. An analytical turbulent vortex core model, described in terms of the tip aerodynamic parameters, is used and its effects on the unsteady loading and maximum acoustic pressure during the interaction are determined.

  2. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  3. Acoustic Measurement Of Periodic Motion Of Levitated Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1992-01-01

    Some internal vibrations, oscillations in position, and rotations of acoustically levitated object measured by use of microphone already installed in typical levitation chamber for tuning chamber to resonance and monitoring operation. Levitating acoustic signal modulated by object motion of lower frequency. Amplitude modulation detected and analyzed spectrally to determine amplitudes and frequencies of motions.

  4. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  5. Using the Acoustic Emission Technique for Estimating Body Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, J. L.; Sanchis-Sabater, A.; Sosa-Aquino, M.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Vargas-Luna, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Huerta-Franco, R.

    2003-09-01

    This work proposes a new technique for estimation of body composition by using acoustic emission. A simple apparatus for the acoustic emission is proposed.The estimation of the body composition is made by analyzing the correlation between a set of acoustic resonance and skinfold measurements. One device was designed to measure the position and width of the acoustic resonances and a caliper was used to measure the skinfolds. The results show the plausibility of application of the method to measurement the human body fat.

  6. Study on acoustic resonance and its damping of BWR steam dome

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuka, Masaya; Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Shirou; Hirokawa, Fumihito; Tsubaki, Masaaki

    2006-07-01

    Acoustic resonance characteristics in a BWR steam dome are investigated analytically and experimentally to evaluate the acoustic vibration of a steam dryer. Acoustic modes and frequencies of the ABWR, which represents the BWRs in this study, are calculated by the SYSNOISE code. The lowest mode (32 Hz) is a half stand wave anti-symmetric mode to the center line of the steam dome at normal condition. Acoustic pressure distributions and phases on the steam dryer surface are analyzed for evaluating the vibration driving force of the structure. Acrylic 1/11 scale model tests are performed to verify the acoustic analysis and to develop the acoustic damping system. The experimental frequencies and modes agree with analysis ones for low frequencies. Experimentally, the acoustic pressure amplitude is significantly lowered using the Helmholtz resonators after tuning up the acoustic resonant frequency of the resonator to the acoustic resonant frequency of the main system. (authors)

  7. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  8. A study of acoustic source generation mechanism of Magnetoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Zhang, Shunqi; Ma, Ren; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic Tomography (MAT) is a non-invasive imaging modality for electrical conductivity with good contrast and high spatial resolution. We have analyzed the acoustic source generation mechanism of MAT and presented its physical model, including the simulations and experiments in this paper. In MAT, acoustic sources are generated in a conductive object placed in a static magnetic field. Pulsed current is injected into the object and produces a Lorentz force due to the static magnetic filed. Acoustic vibration was excited by the Lorentz force, and hence, ultrasound waves propagate in all directions and are collected with transducers placed around the object. The conductivity image can then be reconstructed with acoustic waves using some reconstruction algorithms. Because the acoustic source generation mechanism of MAT is the key problem of forward and inverse problems, we analyzed the physical process of acoustic source generation and presented the acoustic dipole source model according to the Lorentz force imposed on the object. In addition, computer simulations and experiments were also conducted. The results of simulations applying an acoustic dipole source model are consistent with experimental results. This study has cardinal significance for the accurate algorithm of MAT and provides a methodology and reference for acoustic source problems.

  9. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  10. Properties of acoustic sources in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    The power spectrum of solar acoustic oscillations shows peaks extending out to frequencies much greater than the acoustic cutoff frequency of approximately 5.3 mHz, where waves are no longer trapped. Kumar & Lu (1991) proposed that these peaks arise from the interference of traveling waves which are generated by turbulent convection. According to this model, the frequencies of the peaks in the power spectrum depend on the static structure of the Sun as well as the radial location of the sources. Kumar & Lu used this idea to determine the depth of the acoustic sources. However, they ignored dissipative effects and found that the theoretically computed power spectrum was falling off much more rapidly than the observed spectrum. In this paper, we include the interaction of radiation with acoustic waves in the computation of the power spectrum. We find that the theoretically calculated power spectra, when radiative damping is included are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectra over the entire observed frequency range of 5.3 to 7.5 mHz above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Moreover, by matching the peak frequencies in the observed and theoretical spectra we find the mean depth of acoustic sources to be 140 +/- 60 km below the photosphere. We show that the spectrum of solar turbulence near the top of the solar convection zone is consistent with the Kolmogorov spectrum, and that the observed high frequency power spectrum provides strong evidence that the acoustic sources in the Sun are quadrupolar. The data, in fact, rules out dipole sources as significant contributors to acoustic wave generation in the Sun. The radial extent of the sources is poorly determined and is estimated to be less than about 550 km.

  11. Review of Combustion-acoustic Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyediran, Ayo; Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1995-01-01

    Combustion-acoustic instabilities occur when the acoustic energy increase due to the unsteady heat release of the flame is greater than the losses of acoustic energy from the system. The problem of combustion-acoustic instability is a concern in many devices for various reasons, as each device may have a unique mechanism causing unsteady heat release rates and many have unique boundary conditions. To accurately predict and quantify combustion-acoustic stabilities, the unsteady heat release rate and boundary conditions need to be accurately determined. The present review brings together work performed on a variety of practical combustion devices. Many theoretical and experimental investigations of the unsteady heat release rate have been performed, some based on perturbations in the fuel delivery system particularly for rocket instabilities, while others are based on hydrodynamic processes as in ramjet dump combustors. The boundary conditions for rocket engines have been analyzed and measured extensively. However, less work has been done to measure acoustic boundary conditions in many other combustion systems.

  12. Acoustic manipulation of oscillating spherical bodies: Emergence of axial negative acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, emergence of negative axial acoustic radiation force on a rigid oscillating spherical body is investigated for acoustic manipulation purposes. The problem of plane acoustic wave scattering from an oscillating spherical body submerged in an ideal acoustic fluid medium is solved. For the case of oscillating direction collinear with the wave propagation wave number vector (desired path), it has been shown that the acoustic radiation force, as a result of nonlinear acoustic wave interaction with bodies can be expressed as a linear function of incident wave field and the oscillation properties of the oscillator (i.e., amplitude and phase of oscillation). The negative (i.e., pulling effects) and positive (i.e., pushing effects) radiation force situations are divided in oscillation complex plane with a specific frequency-dependant straight line. This characteristic line defines the radiation force cancellation state. In order to investigate the stability of the mentioned manipulation strategy, the case of misaligned oscillation of sphere with the wave propagation direction is studied. The proposed methodology may suggest a novel concept of single-beam acoustic handling techniques based on smart carriers.

  13. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  14. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  15. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  16. Resonant triad interactions of acoustc-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Akylas, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    Surface-acoustic wave disturbances in water of constant depth over a rigid bottom, due to the combined action of gravity and compressibility, are studied. In the linear theory, apart from free-surface (gravity) waves, there is also a countable infinity of acoustic (compression) modes. As the sound speed in water, typically, far exceeds the maximum gravity wave phase speed, these two types of modes feature vastly different spatial and/or temporal scales, and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to realize significant energy exchange between gravity and acoustic waves via nonlinear interactions. This scenario is analyzed for resonant wave triads that comprise two counter-propagating gravity waves and a long-crested acoustic mode. Owing to this disparity in length scales, the interaction time scale as well as the form of the amplitude evolution equations differ from those of a standard resonant triad. In the case of a perfectly tuned triad of uniform monochromatic wave trains, nearly all the energy initially in the gravity waves can be transferred to the acoustic wave. This mechanism, however, is less efficient when the interacting waves are modulated wavepackets.

  17. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  18. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  19. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  20. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  1. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  2. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  3. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  4. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  5. Parametric acoustic arrays: A state of the art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenlon, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the concept of parametric acoustic interactions, the basic properties of parametric transmitting and receiving arrays are considered in the light of conceptual advances resulting from experimental and theoretical investigations that have taken place since 1963.

  6. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  7. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  8. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  9. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  10. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.

  11. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specificallymore » designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.« less

  12. Mobility power flow analysis of an L-shaped plate structure subjected to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation based on the Mobility Power Flow method is presented for the determination of the vibrational response and power flow for two coupled flat plate structures in an L-shaped configuration, subjected to acoustical excitation. The principle of the mobility power flow method consists of dividing the global structure into a series of subsystems coupled together using mobility functions. Each separate subsystem is analyzed independently to determine the structural mobility functions for the junction and excitation locations. The mobility functions, together with the characteristics of the junction between the subsystems, are then used to determine the response of the global structure and the power flow. In the coupled plate structure considered here, mobility power flow expressions are derived for excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the structure and the fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure.

  13. Characterization of compressed earth blocks using low frequency guided acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Mohamed; Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Soukaina Cherif, Amel; Jelidi, Ahmed; Ben Jabrallah, Sadok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to analyze the influence of compaction pressure on the intrinsic acoustic parameters (porosity, tortuosity, air-flow resistivity, viscous, and thermal characteristic lengths) of compressed earth blocks through their identification by solving an inverse acoustic wave transmission problem. A low frequency acoustic pipe (60-6000 Hz of length 22 m, internal diameter 3.4 cm) was used for the experimental characterization of the samples. The parameters were identified by the minimization of the difference between the transmissions coefficients data obtained in the pipe with that from an analytical interaction model in which the compressed earth blocks were considered as having rigid frames. The viscous and thermal effects in the pores were accounted for by employing the Johnson-Champoux-Allard-Lafarge model. The results obtained by inversion for high-density compressed earth blocks showed some discordance between the model and experiment especially for the high frequency limit of the acoustic characteristics studied. This was as a consequence of applying high compaction pressure rendering them very highly resistive therefore degrading the signal-to-noise ratios of the transmitted waves. The results showed that the airflow resistivity was very sensitive to the degree of the applied compaction pressure used to form the blocks. PMID:27250150

  14. Characterization of compressed earth blocks using low frequency guided acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Mohamed; Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Soukaina Cherif, Amel; Jelidi, Ahmed; Ben Jabrallah, Sadok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to analyze the influence of compaction pressure on the intrinsic acoustic parameters (porosity, tortuosity, air-flow resistivity, viscous, and thermal characteristic lengths) of compressed earth blocks through their identification by solving an inverse acoustic wave transmission problem. A low frequency acoustic pipe (60-6000 Hz of length 22 m, internal diameter 3.4 cm) was used for the experimental characterization of the samples. The parameters were identified by the minimization of the difference between the transmissions coefficients data obtained in the pipe with that from an analytical interaction model in which the compressed earth blocks were considered as having rigid frames. The viscous and thermal effects in the pores were accounted for by employing the Johnson-Champoux-Allard-Lafarge model. The results obtained by inversion for high-density compressed earth blocks showed some discordance between the model and experiment especially for the high frequency limit of the acoustic characteristics studied. This was as a consequence of applying high compaction pressure rendering them very highly resistive therefore degrading the signal-to-noise ratios of the transmitted waves. The results showed that the airflow resistivity was very sensitive to the degree of the applied compaction pressure used to form the blocks.

  15. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  16. Analysis of acousto-optic interaction based on forward stimulated Brillouin scattering in hybrid phononic-photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiwen; Chen, Guodong; Sun, Junqiang

    2016-06-13

    We present the generation of forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (FSBS) in hybrid phononic-photonic waveguides. To confine the optical and acoustic waves simultaneously, a hybrid waveguide is designed by embedding the silicon line defect in the silicon nitride phononic crystal slab. By taking into account three kinds hybrid waveguide, the appropriate structural parameters are obtained to enhance the acousto-optic interaction. We fabricate the honeycomb hybrid waveguide with a CMOS compatible technology. The forward Brillouin frequency shift is measured up to 2.425 GHz and the acoustic Q-factor of the corresponding acoustic mode is 1100. The influences of pump power, acoustic loss, nonlinear optical loss and lattice constant on the acousto-optic interaction in FSBS are analyzed and discussed. The proposed approach has important potential applications in on-chip all-optical signal processing. PMID:27410324

  17. Ensemble averaging of acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program called Ensemble Averaging of Acoustic Data is documented. The program samples analog data, analyzes the data, and displays them in the time and frequency domains. Hard copies of the displays are the program's output. The documentation includes a description of the program and detailed user instructions for the program. This software was developed for use on the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel's Dynamic Analysis System consisting of a PDP-11/45 computer, two RK05 disk drives, a tektronix 611 keyboard/display terminal, and FPE-4 Fourier Processing Element, and an analog-to-digital converter.

  18. Waveform-preserved unidirectional acoustic transmission based on impedance-matched acoustic metasurface and phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ai-Ling; Chen, Tian-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le

    2016-08-01

    The waveform distortion happens in most of the unidirectional acoustic transmission (UAT) devices proposed before. In this paper, a novel type of waveform-preserved UAT device composed of an impedance-matched acoustic metasurface (AMS) and a phononic crystal (PC) structure is proposed and numerically investigated. The acoustic pressure field distributions and transmittance are calculated by using the finite element method. The subwavelength AMS that can modulate the wavefront of the transmitted wave at will is designed and the band structure of the PC structure is calculated and analyzed. The sound pressure field distributions demonstrate that the unidirectional acoustic transmission can be realized by the proposed UAT device without changing the waveforms of the output waves, which is the distinctive feature compared with the previous UAT devices. The physical mechanism of the unidirectional acoustic transmission is discussed by analyzing the refraction angle changes and partial band gap map. The calculated transmission spectra show that the UAT device is valid within a relatively broad frequency range. The simulation results agree well with the theoretical predictions. The proposed UAT device provides a good reference for designing waveform-preserved UAT devices and has potential applications in many fields, such as medical ultrasound, acoustic rectifiers, and noise insulation.

  19. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency.

  20. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  1. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  2. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  3. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  4. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-11-01

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  5. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  6. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  7. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  8. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  9. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  10. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  11. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  12. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  13. Particle Cloud Flames in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Ross, H.; Facca, L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a study of flames supported by clouds of particles suspended in air, at pressures about 100 times lower than normal. In the experiment, an acoustic driver (4-in speaker) placed at one end of a closed tube, 0.75-m long and 0.05 m in diameter, disperses a cloud of lycopodium particles during a 0.5-sec powerful acoustic burst. Properties of the particle cloud and the flame were recorded by high-speed motion pictures and optical transmission detectors. Novel flame structures were observed, which owe their features to partial confinement, which encourages flame-acoustic interactions, segregation of particle clouds into laminae, and penetration of the flame's radiative flux density into the unburned particle-cloud regimes. Results of these experiments imply that, for particles in confined spaces, uncontrolled fire and explosion may be a threat even if the Phi(0) values are below some apparent lean limit.

  14. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor (Yamamoto, 1982; Stiassnie, 2010) and triad wave-wave interaction (Longuet-Higgins 1950; Kadri and Stiassnie 2013; Kadri and Akylas 2016), in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible application to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory (Chwang, 1983), the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also derived for the potential amplitude of the gravity, evanescent, and acoustic-gravity waves, as well as the surface elevation, velocity distribution, and pressure for AGWs. Both theories reduce to previous results for incompressible flow when the compressibility is negligible. We also show numerical examples for AGW generated in a wave flume as well as in deep ocean. Our current study sets the theoretical background towards remote sensing by AGWs, for optimized deep ocean wave-power harnessing, among others. References Chwang, A.T. 1983 A porous-wavemaker theory. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 132, 395- 406. Kadri, U., Stiassnie, M. 2013 Generation of an acoustic-gravity wave by two gravity waves, and their subsequent mutual interaction. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R6. Kadri U., Akylas T.R. 2016 On resonant triad interactions of acoustic-gravity waves. J

  15. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  16. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  17. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  18. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platinum Sponsors More from this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  20. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  1. Multimode Acoustic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1985-01-01

    There is a need for high temperature containerless processing facilities that can efficiently position and manipulate molten samples in the reduced gravity environment of space. The goal of the research is to develop sophisticated high temperature manipulation capabilities such as selection of arbitrary axes rotation and rapid sample cooling. This program will investigate new classes of acoustic levitation in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical geometries. The program tasks include calculating theoretical expressions of the acoustic forces in these geometries for the excitation of up to three acoustic modes (multimodes). These calculations are used to: (1) determine those acoustic modes that produce stable levitation, (2) isolate the levitation and rotation capabilities to produce more than one axis of rotation, and (3) develop methods to translate samples down long tube cylindrical chambers. Experimental levitators will then be constructed to verify the stable levitation and rotation predictions of the models.

  2. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  3. Ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery: acoustic pressure as determinant for uptake via membrane pores or endocytosis.

    PubMed

    De Cock, Ine; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Luan, Ying; de Jong, Nico; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2015-01-10

    Although promising results are achieved in ultrasound mediated drug delivery, its underlying biophysical mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Pore formation as well as endocytosis has been reported during ultrasound application. Due to the plethora of ultrasound settings used in literature, it is extremely difficult to draw conclusions on which mechanism is actually involved. To our knowledge, we are the first to show that acoustic pressure influences which route of drug uptake is addressed, by inducing different microbubble-cell interactions. To investigate this, FITC-dextrans were used as model drugs and their uptake was analyzed by flow cytometry. In fluorescence intensity plots, two subpopulations arose in cells with FITC-dextran uptake after ultrasound application, corresponding to cells having either low or high uptake. Following separation of the subpopulations by FACS sorting, confocal images indicated that the low uptake population showed endocytic uptake. The high uptake population represented uptake via pores. Moreover, the distribution of the subpopulations shifted to the high uptake population with increasing acoustic pressure. Real-time confocal recordings during ultrasound revealed that membrane deformation by microbubbles may be the trigger for endocytosis via mechanostimulation of the cytoskeleton. Pore formation was shown to be caused by microbubbles propelled towards the cell. These results provide a better insight in the role of acoustic pressure in microbubble-cell interactions and the possible consequences for drug uptake. In addition, it pinpoints the need for a more rational, microbubble behavior based choice of acoustic parameters in ultrasound mediated drug delivery experiments.

  4. Flowfield characteristics of an aerodynamic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Keller, J.; Pfaffenlehner, M.; Ryssel, E.; Tropea, C.

    1997-11-01

    A droplet held in a single-axis ultrasonic levitator will principally sustain a certain external blowing along the levitation axis, which introduces the possibility of investigating heat and/or mass transfer from the droplet under conditions which are not too remote from those in spray systems. The focus of the present work is on the influence of the acoustic field on the external flow. More specifically, an axisymmetric submerged gas jet in an axial standing acoustic wave is examined, both in the absence and presence of a liquid droplet. Flow visualization is first presented to illustrate the global flow effects and the operating windows of jet velocities and acoustic powers which are suitable for further study. An analytic and numeric solution, based on the parabolic boundary layer equations are then given for the case of no levitated droplet, providing quantitative estimates of the acoustic field/flow interaction. Detailed velocity measurements using a laser Doppler anemometer verify the analytic results and extend these to the case of a levitated droplet. Some unresolved discrepancy remains in predicting the maximum velocity attainable before the droplet is blown out of the levitator. Two methods are developed to estimate the sound pressure level in the levitator by comparing flowfield patterns with analytic results. These results and observations are used to estimate to what extent acoustic aerodynamic levitators can be used in the future for investigating transport properties of individual droplets.

  5. Blood Gas Analyzers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Anthony L; Waddell, Lori S

    2016-03-01

    Acid-base and respiratory disturbances are common in sick and hospitalized veterinary patients; therefore, blood gas analyzers have become integral diagnostic and monitoring tools. This article will discuss uses of blood gas analyzers, types of samples that can be used, sample collection methods, potential sources of error, and potential alternatives to blood gas analyzers and their limitations. It will also discuss the types of analyzers that are available, logistical considerations that should be taken into account when purchasing an analyzer, and the basic principles of how these analyzers work. PMID:27451046

  6. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  7. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  8. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  9. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  10. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  11. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  12. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  13. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  14. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  15. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  16. Hybrid acoustically layered foam (HALF) foam for improved low-frequency acoustic mitigation for launch fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Andrew D.; Domme, Daniel J.; Ardelean, Emil V.; Henderson, B. Kyle

    2007-04-01

    Launch vehicles produce high levels of acoustic energy and vibration loads that can severely damage satellites during launch. Because of these high loads, the satellite structure is much more robust than it needs to be for on-orbit operations. Traditionally, acoustic foam is used for acoustic mitigation; however, it is ineffective at frequencies below 500 Hz. For this reason we investigated three different modified acoustic foam concepts consisting of a thin metal foil, a semi-rigid spacer, and a melamine foam substrate to improve the low frequency acoustic performance of the melamine foam. The goal of the Hybrid Acoustically Layered Foil (HALF) Foam concept was to excite bending waves within the plane of the foil to cause inter-particle interactions thus increasing the transmission loss of the foam. To determine the performance of the system, a transmission loss tube was constructed, and the normal incidence transmission loss for each sample was measured. The tests confirm the excitation of bending waves at the target frequency of 500 Hz and a significant increase, on the order of 8 dB, in the transmission loss.

  17. Wideband digital spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. A., Jr.; Wilck, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Modular spectrum analyzer consisting of RF receiver, fast fourier transform spectrum analyzer, and data processor samples stochastic signals in 220 channels. Construction reduces design and fabrication costs of assembled unit.

  18. Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SantaMaria, O. L.; Wellman, J. B.; Conner, D. A.; Rutledge, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV- 15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research effort of the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers was to obtain a preliminary, high quality database of far-field acoustics for terminal area operations of the XV-15 at a takeoff gross weight of approximately 14,000 lbs for various glide slopes, airspeeds, rotor tip speeds, and nacelle tilt angles. The test also was used to assess the suitability of the Crows Landing complex for full scale far-field acoustic testing. This was the first acoustic flight test of the XV-15 aircraft equipped with ATB involving approach and level flyover operations. The test involved coordination of numerous personnel, facilities and equipment. Considerable effort was made to minimize potential extraneous noise sources unique to the region during the test. Acoustic data from the level flyovers were analyzed, then compared with data from a previous test of the XV-15 equipped with Standard Metal Blades

  19. Image quality analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Antoshkin, L. V.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Image quality analyzer (IQA) which used as device for efficiency analysis of adaptive optics application is described. In analyzer marketed possibility estimations quality of images on three different criterions of quality images: contrast, sharpnesses and the spectral criterion. At present given analyzer is introduced on Big Solar Vacuum Telescope in stale work that allows at observations to conduct the choice of the most contrasting images of Sun. Is it hereinafter planned use the analyzer in composition of the ANGARA adaptive correction system.

  20. A theoretical study of structural acoustic silencers for hydraulic systems.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Grosh, Karl; Dodson, John M

    2002-05-01

    Theoretical studies show that the introduction of an in-line structural acoustic silencer into a hydraulic system can achieve broadband quieting (i.e., high transmission loss). Strategies for using structural acoustic filters for simultaneously reducing reflection and transmission by tailoring the material properties are studied. A structural acoustic silencer consists of a flexible layer inserted into nominally rigid hydraulic piping. Transmission loss is achieved by two mechanisms--reflection of energy due to an impedance mismatch, and coupling of the incoming acoustic fluctuations to structural vibrations thereby allowing for the extraction of energy through losses in the structure. Structural acoustic finite element simulations are used to determine the transmission loss and evaluate designs. Results based on the interaction of orthotropic and isotropic plates with variable geometry, operating in heavy fluids like water and oil, are presented.

  1. Transverse acoustic trapping using a Gaussian focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Teh, Shia-Yen; Lee, Abraham; Kim, Hyung Ham; Lee, Changyang; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    The optical tweezer has become a popular device to manipulate particles in nanometer scales, and to study the underlying principles of many cellular or molecular interactions. Theoretical analysis was previously carried out at the authors’ laboratory, to show that similar acoustic trapping of microparticles may be possible with a single beam ultrasound. This paper experimentally presents the transverse trapping of 125 μm lipid droplets under an acoustically transparent mylar film, which is an intermediate step toward achieving acoustic tweezers in 3D. Despite the lack of axial trapping capability in the current experimental arrangement, it was found that a 30 MHz focused beam could be used to laterally direct the droplets towards the focus. The spatial range within which acoustic traps may guide droplet motion was in the range of hundreds of micrometers, much greater than that of optical traps. This suggests that this acoustic device may offer an alternative for manipulating microparticles in a wider spatial range. PMID:20045590

  2. Modulational excitation of low-frequency dust acoustic waves in the Earth's lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnin, S. I.; Popel, S. I.; Yu, M. Y.

    2007-04-01

    During the observation of Perseid, Leonid, Gemenid, and Orionid meteor showers, stable low-frequency lines in the frequency range of 20-60 Hz were recorded against the radio-frequency noise background. A physical mechanism for this effect is proposed, and it is established that the effect itself is related to the modulational interaction between electromagnetic and dust acoustic waves. The dynamics of the components of a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma with dust produced from the evolution of meteoric material is described. The conditions for the existence of dust acoustic waves in the ionosphere are considered, and the waves are shown to dissipate energy mainly in collisions of neutral particles with charged dust grains. The modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma is analyzed and is found to be driven by the nonlinear Joule heating, the ponderomotive force, and the processes governing dust charging and dynamics. The conditions for the onset of the modulational instability of electromagnetic waves, as well as its growth rate and threshold, are determined for both daytime and nighttime. It is shown that low-frequency perturbations generated in the modulational interaction are related to dust acoustic waves.

  3. Modulational excitation of low-frequency dust acoustic waves in the Earth's lower ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Popel, S. I.; Yu, M. Y.

    2007-04-15

    During the observation of Perseid, Leonid, Gemenid, and Orionid meteor showers, stable low-frequency lines in the frequency range of 20-60 Hz were recorded against the radio-frequency noise background. A physical mechanism for this effect is proposed, and it is established that the effect itself is related to the modulational interaction between electromagnetic and dust acoustic waves. The dynamics of the components of a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma with dust produced from the evolution of meteoric material is described. The conditions for the existence of dust acoustic waves in the ionosphere are considered, and the waves are shown to dissipate energy mainly in collisions of neutral particles with charged dust grains. The modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma is analyzed and is found to be driven by the nonlinear Joule heating, the ponderomotive force, and the processes governing dust charging and dynamics. The conditions for the onset of the modulational instability of electromagnetic waves, as well as its growth rate and threshold, are determined for both daytime and nighttime. It is shown that low-frequency perturbations generated in the modulational interaction are related to dust acoustic waves.

  4. Sampling environmental acoustic recordings to determine bird species richness.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Roe, Paul; Williamson, Ian

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic sensors can be used to estimate species richness for vocal species such as birds. They can continuously and passively record large volumes of data over extended periods. These data must subsequently be analyzed to detect the presence of vocal species. Automated analysis of acoustic data for large numbers of species is complex and can be subject to high levels of false positive and false negative results. Manual analysis by experienced surveyors can produce accurate results; however the time and effort required to process even small volumes of data can make manual analysis prohibitive. This study examined the use of sampling methods to reduce the cost of analyzing large volumes of acoustic sensor data, while retaining high levels of species detection accuracy. Utilizing five days of manually analyzed acoustic sensor data from four sites, we examined a range of sampling frequencies and methods including random, stratified, and biologically informed. We found that randomly selecting 120 one-minute samples from the three hours immediately following dawn over five days of recordings, detected the highest number of species. On average, this method detected 62% of total species from 120 one-minute samples, compared to 34% of total species detected from traditional area search methods. Our results demonstrate that targeted sampling methods can provide an effective means for analyzing large volumes of acoustic sensor data efficiently and accurately. Development of automated and semi-automated techniques is required to assist in analyzing large volumes of acoustic sensor data.

  5. Acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals.

    PubMed

    Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Grabar, A; Vlokh, R

    2009-07-01

    We present the results concerned with acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. The complete matrices of elastic stiffness and compliance coefficients are determined in both the crystallographic coordinate system and the system associated with eigenvectors of the elastic stiffness tensor. The acoustic slowness surfaces are constructed and the propagation and polarization directions of the slowest acoustic waves promising for acousto-optic interactions are determined on this basis. The acoustic obliquity angle and the deviation of polarization of the acoustic waves from purely transverse or longitudinal states are quantitatively analysed.

  6. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  7. Mesoscale variations in acoustic signals induced by atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Perepelkin, Vitaly; Ziemann, Astrid; Arnold, Klaus; Kniffka, Anke

    2009-02-01

    The results of acoustic tomographic monitoring of the coherent structures in the lower atmosphere and the effects of these structures on acoustic signal parameters are analyzed in the present study. From the measurements of acoustic travel time fluctuations (periods 1 min-1 h) with distant receivers, the temporal fluctuations of the effective sound speed and wind speed are retrieved along different ray paths connecting an acoustic pulse source and several receivers. By using a coherence analysis of the fluctuations near spatially distanced ray turning points, the internal wave-associated fluctuations are filtered and their spatial characteristics (coherences, horizontal phase velocities, and spatial scales) are estimated. The capability of acoustic tomography in estimating wind shear near ground is shown. A possible mechanism describing the temporal modulation of the near-ground wind field by ducted internal waves in the troposphere is proposed.

  8. Acoustic Pulse Diffraction by Curved and Planar Structures with Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin

    1990-01-01

    Efficient and accurate solutions of acoustic wave diffraction by a rigid step discontinuity and a curved half-plane are derived by the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction. These solutions can be used in seismic data processing to evaluate and, eventually, to improve the existing data processing procedures. They can also find applications in electromagnetics, microwave antenna design, acoustic design and sound engineering. The rigid step discontinuity solution given in this thesis is more accurate than the existing solutions which are based on Kirchhoff theory of diffraction. This solution removes the previous restriction on the source and the receiver arrangement. It also provides high efficiency by the use of ray theory. This solution is further generalized to two offset half-planes and an inclined wedge. Solutions for more complicated structures can be obtained by superposition of these solutions with added interactions. The complex source position method is used to extend the omnidirectional point source solution to a beam source solution. The effect of changes of the directivity and orientation of the beam source is studied. Time-domain single and double diffraction coefficients are determined through direct Fourier transforming and convolution. An infinite impulse response filter is applied to the time-domain direct computation of single diffraction. This combination achieves a total saving of 75% of computing time over the frequency-domain approach. Diffraction by a curved half-plane is analyzed with the inclusion of creeping wave diffraction and second order edge diffraction. An acoustic model of a curved half-plane is designed to verify the theory. The experimental results obtained by Mellema have verified the existence of the creeping wave diffraction and weak traces of the second order edge diffraction.

  9. Matrix methods applied to acoustic waves in multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Eric L.

    1990-11-01

    Matrix methods for analyzing the electroacoustic characteristics of anisotropic piezoelectric multilayers are described. The conceptual usefulness of the methods is demonstrated in a tutorial fashion by examples showing how formal statements of propagation, transduction, and boundary-value problems in complicated acoustic layered geometries such as those which occur in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, in multicomponent laminates, and in bulk-wave composite transducers are simplified. The formulation given reduces the electroacoustic equations to a set of first-order matrix differential equations, one for each layer, in the variables that must be continuous across interfaces. The solution to these equations is a transfer matrix that maps the variables from one layer face to the other. Interface boundary conditions for a planar multilayer are automatically satisfied by multiplying the individual transfer matrices in the appropriate order, thus reducing the problem to just having to impose boundary conditions appropriate to the remaining two surfaces. The computational advantages of the matrix method result from the fact that the problem rank is independent of the number of layers, and from the availability of personal computer software that makes interactive numerical experimentation with complex layered structures practical.

  10. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  11. The Nature of Exhibits about Acoustics in Science and Technology Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afonso, Ana S.; Gilbert, John K.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of the opportunities currently provided by interactive science and technology centres for visitors' engagement in the field of acoustics. E-mails, requesting a description of exhibits on acoustics (sound and hearing) in use, were sent to members of staff of interactive science and technology centres around the world as well as to…

  12. Species interactions and the structure of complex communication networks.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joseph A; Planqué, Robert; Cram, Dominic L; Seddon, Nathalie

    2014-01-21

    A universal challenge faced by animal species is the need to communicate effectively against a backdrop of heterospecific signals. It is often assumed that this need results in signal divergence to minimize interference among community members, yet previous support for this idea is mixed, and few studies have tested the opposing hypothesis that interactions among competing species promote widespread convergence in signaling regimes. Using a null model approach to analyze acoustic signaling in 307 species of Amazonian birds, we show that closely related lineages signal together in time and space and that acoustic signals given in temporal or spatial proximity are more similar in design than expected by chance. These results challenge the view that multispecies choruses are structured by temporal, spatial, or acoustic partitioning and instead suggest that social communication between competing species can fundamentally organize signaling assemblages, leading to the opposite pattern of clustering in signals and signaling behavior.

  13. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Shao-Sheng R.; Allen Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. This paper describes the implementation of acoustic modeling for design purposes by incrementally increasing model fidelity and validating the accuracy of the model while predicting the noise of sources under various conditions. During FY 07, a simple-geometry Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model was developed and validated using a physical mockup and acoustic measurements. A process for modeling the effects of absorptive wall treatments and the resulting reverberation environment were developed. During FY 08, a model with more complex and representative geometry of the Orion Crew Module (CM) interior was built, and noise predictions based on input noise sources were made. A corresponding physical mockup was also built. Measurements were made inside this mockup, and comparisons were made with the model and showed excellent agreement. During FY 09, the fidelity of the mockup and corresponding model were increased incrementally by including a simple ventilation system. The airborne noise contribution of the fans was measured using a sound intensity technique, since the sound power levels were not known beforehand. This is opposed to earlier studies where Reference Sound Sources (RSS) with known sound power level were used. Comparisons of the modeling result with the measurements in the mockup showed excellent results. During FY 10, the fidelity of the mockup and the model were further increased by including an ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System) wall, associated closeout panels, and the gap between ECLSS wall and mockup wall. The effect of sealing the gap and adding sound absorptive treatment to ECLSS wall were also modeled and validated.

  14. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  15. Acoustic signalling reflects personality in a social mammal

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Mary; Kunc, Hansjoerg P.; Griffin, Kym; Asher, Lucy; Collins, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions among individuals are often mediated through acoustic signals. If acoustic signals are consistent and related to an individual's personality, these consistent individual differences in signalling may be an important driver in social interactions. However, few studies in non-human mammals have investigated the relationship between acoustic signalling and personality. Here we show that acoustic signalling rate is repeatable and strongly related to personality in a highly social mammal, the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica). Furthermore, acoustic signalling varied between environments of differing quality, with males from a poor-quality environment having a reduced vocalization rate compared with females and males from an enriched environment. Such differences may be mediated by personality with pigs from a poor-quality environment having more reactive and more extreme personality scores compared with pigs from an enriched environment. Our results add to the evidence that acoustic signalling reflects personality in a non-human mammal. Signals reflecting personalities may have far reaching consequences in shaping the evolution of social behaviours as acoustic communication forms an integral part of animal societies. PMID:27429775

  16. Acoustic signalling reflects personality in a social mammal.

    PubMed

    Friel, Mary; Kunc, Hansjoerg P; Griffin, Kym; Asher, Lucy; Collins, Lisa M

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions among individuals are often mediated through acoustic signals. If acoustic signals are consistent and related to an individual's personality, these consistent individual differences in signalling may be an important driver in social interactions. However, few studies in non-human mammals have investigated the relationship between acoustic signalling and personality. Here we show that acoustic signalling rate is repeatable and strongly related to personality in a highly social mammal, the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica). Furthermore, acoustic signalling varied between environments of differing quality, with males from a poor-quality environment having a reduced vocalization rate compared with females and males from an enriched environment. Such differences may be mediated by personality with pigs from a poor-quality environment having more reactive and more extreme personality scores compared with pigs from an enriched environment. Our results add to the evidence that acoustic signalling reflects personality in a non-human mammal. Signals reflecting personalities may have far reaching consequences in shaping the evolution of social behaviours as acoustic communication forms an integral part of animal societies. PMID:27429775

  17. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a very high performance anemometer (wind gauge) for use at Mars. This instrument has great scientific as well as strategic reasons to be included on all future missions to the surface of Mars. We will discuss why we set out to develop this instrument, as well as why the previous wind sensors for Mars are insufficient to meet the scientific and strategic needs at Mars. We will also discuss how the instrument works, and how it differs from terrestrial counterparts. Additionally, we will discuss the current status of the instrument. Measuring winds at Mars is important to better understand the atmospheric circulation at Mars, as well as exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The main conduit of transport of water, and hence its current stability at any particular location on Mars is controlled by these atmospheric motions and the exchange between surface and atmosphere. Mars' large-scale winds are moderately well understood from orbital observations, but the interaction with the surface can only be addressed adequately in situ. Previous anemometers have been 2-D (with the exception of REMS on MSL) and slow response (typically <1Hz), and relatively low sensitivity/accuracy (>1 m/s). Our instrument is capable of fully 3-D measurements, with fast response (>20 Hz) and great sensitivity/accuracy (~3 cm/s). This significant step forward in performance is important for the surface-atmosphere exchanges of heat, momentum and volatiles. In particular, our instrument could directly measure the heat and momentum fluxes between surface and atmosphere using eddy-flux techniques proven terrestrially. When combined with a fast response volatile analysis instrument (e.g., a TLS) we can also measure eddy fluxes of volatile transport. Such a study would be nearly impossible to carry out with preceding anemometers sent to Mars with insufficient response time and sensitivity to adequately sample the turbulent eddies. Additionally, our instrument, using acoustics

  18. Techniques for Primary Acoustic Thermometry to 800 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, D. C.; Defibaugh, D. R.; Moldover, M. R.; Strouse, G. F.

    2003-09-01

    The NIST Primary Acoustic Thermometer will measure the difference between the International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Kelvin Thermodynamic Scale throughout the range 273 K to 800 K with uncertainties of only a few millikelvins. The acoustic thermometer determines the frequencies of the acoustic resonances of pure argon gas contained within a spherical cavity with uncertainties approaching one part in 106. To achieve this small uncertainty at these elevated temperatures we developed new acoustic transducers and new techniques for the maintenance of gas purity and for temperature control. The new electro-acoustic transducers are based on the capacitance between a flexible silicon wafer and a rigid backing plate. Without the damping usually provided by polymers, mechanical vibrations caused unstable, spurious acoustic signals. We describe our techniques for suppression of these vibrations. Our acoustic thermometer allows the argon to be continuously flushed through the resonator, thereby preventing the build up of hydrogen that evolves from the stainless-steel resonator. We describe how the argon pressure is stabilized while flushing. The argon exiting from the resonator is analyzed with a customized gas chromatograph. Because the acoustic resonator was so large—it has an outer diameter of 20 cm—a sophisticated furnace, based on surrounding the resonator with three concentric aluminum shells, was designed to maintain thermal uniformity and stability of the resonator at a level of 1 mK. We describe the design, modeling, and operational characteristics of the furnace.

  19. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  20. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.