Science.gov

Sample records for analyzing acoustic interactions

  1. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  2. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  3. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  4. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  5. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  6. Using Simulation to Analyze Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main projects that was worked on this semester was creating an acoustic model for the Advanced Space Suit in Comsol Multiphysics. The geometry tools built into the software were used to create an accurate model of the helmet and upper torso of the suit. After running the simulation, plots of the sound pressure level within the suit were produced, as seen below in Figure 1. These plots show significant nulls which should be avoided when placing microphones inside the suit. In the future, this model can be easily adapted to changes in the suit design to determine optimal microphone placements and other acoustic properties. Another major project was creating an acoustic diverter that will potentially be used to route audio into the Space Station's Node 1. The concept of the project was to create geometry to divert sound from a neighboring module, the US Lab, into Node 1. By doing this, no new audio equipment would need to be installed in Node 1. After creating an initial design for the diverter, analysis was performed in Comsol in order to determine how changes in geometry would affect acoustic performance, as shown in Figure 2. These results were used to produce a physical prototype diverter on a 3D printer. With the physical prototype, testing was conducted in an anechoic chamber to determine the true effectiveness of the design, as seen in Figure 3. The results from this testing have been compared to the Comsol simulation results to analyze how closely the Comsol results are to real-world performance. While the Comsol results do not seem to closely resemble the real world performance, this testing has provided valuable insight into how much trust can be placed in the results of Comsol simulations. A final project that was worked on during this tour was the Audio Interface Unit (AIU) design for the Orion program. The AIU is a small device that will be used for as an audio communication device both during launch and on-orbit. The unit will have functions

  7. Analyzing the acoustic beat with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency Δf. The resulting auditory sensation is a tone with a volume that varies periodically. Acoustic beats can be perceived repeatedly in day-to-day life and have some interesting applications. For example, string instruments are still tuned with the help of an acoustic beat, even with modern technology. If a reference tone (e.g., 440 Hz) and, for example, a slightly out-of-tune violin string produce a tone simultaneously, a beat can be perceived. The more similar the frequencies, the longer the duration of the beat. In the extreme case, when the frequencies are identical, a beat no longer arises. The string is therefore correctly tuned. Using the Oscilloscope app,4 it is possible to capture and save acoustic signals of this kind and determine the beat frequency fS of the signal, which represents the difference in frequency Δf of the two overlapping tones (for Android smartphones, the app OsciPrime Oscilloscope can be used).

  8. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  9. Metamaterials for opto-acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael J. A.; Wolff, Christian; Lapine, Mikhail; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Poulton, Christopher G.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the use of metamaterials for the creation and enhancement of opto-acoustic interactions. We show that both photo-elastic and the roto-optic components of the opto-acoustic response can be greatly enhanced as a result of artificial terms that arise directly from the interaction of the sub-elements of the structure. This work has important implications for the creation of new photonic devices that are able to efficiently harness Stimulated Brillouin Scattering.

  10. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-07-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein-protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the 'proteins': connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the 'interactions': number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain-domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/apid/.

  11. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein–protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the ‘proteins’: connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the ‘interactions’: number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain–domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at . PMID:16845013

  12. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  13. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Mihel, Josip; Šikić, Mile; Tomić, Sanja; Jeren, Branko; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer) was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm) for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites. PMID:18400099

  14. Peculiarities of hearing impairment depending on interaction with acoustic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Myshchenko, Iryna; Nazarenko, Vasyl; Kolganov, Anatoliy; Tereshchenko, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The functional state of the auditory analyzer of several operators groups was study. The objective of this study was to determine some characteristics of hearing impairment in relation with features of acoustic stimuli and informative significance of noise. Materials and Methods: 236 employees (middle age 35.4 ± 0.74 years) were divided into four groups according to features of noise perception at the workplaces. The levels of permanent shifts of acoustic thresholds were estimated using audiometric method. Statistical Analysis Used: Common statistical methods were used in research. Mean quantity and mean absolute errors were calculated. Statistical significance between operators' groups was calculated with 0.05 confidential intervals. Results: The peculiarities of hearing impairment in observed groups were different. Operators differentiating acoustic signals had peak of hearing impairment in the field of language frequencies, while the employees who work with noise background at the workplaces had maximal hearing threshold on the 4000 Hz frequency (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Hearing impairment depends both on energy and human interaction with acoustic irritant. The distinctions in hearing impairment may be related with the necessity of recognizing of acoustic signals and their frequency characteristics. PMID:26957812

  15. Theoretical and experimental study on the acoustic wave energy after the nonlinear interaction of acoustic waves in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chao-feng; Li, Feng-chen; Chen, Huan; Lu, Di; Yang, De-sen; Zhang, Meng

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Burgers equation and Manley-Rowe equation, the derivation about nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves has been done in this paper. After nonlinear interaction among the low-frequency weak waves and the pump wave, the analytical solutions of acoustic waves' amplitude in the field are deduced. The relationship between normalized energy of high-frequency and the change of acoustic energy before and after the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves is analyzed. The experimental results about the changes of the acoustic energy are presented. The study shows that new frequencies are generated and the energies of the low-frequency are modulated in a long term by the pump waves, which leads the energies of the low-frequency acoustic waves to change in the pulse trend in the process of the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves. The increase and decrease of the energies of the low-frequency are observed under certain typical conditions, which lays a foundation for practical engineering applications.

  16. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  17. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOEpatents

    Beller, L.S.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

  18. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, L.S.

    1995-12-31

    A method and apparatus are described for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  19. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  20. Investigation of Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kin Loong

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure to formulate and analyze vibration problems of structural-acoustic coupled system has been established. At first, free vibration analysis of the acoustic system by the modal expansion method was applied for elliptic cavities, then the system equations of structure -acoustic coupled systems are formulated utilizing the concept of the equivalent mass source. The modal expansion method and a matrix transformation technique are used to solve the free and forced vibration problems. The final formulation of this method in the free vibration problems gives rise to a standard eigenvalue problem. The validity of the procedure is verified by comparing its results with the exact solutions for a one-dimensional coupled system. Parameters dictating coupling effects are also identified and discussed. In the final part of the dissertation, a new solution method was introduced to solve the forced response of acoustic -structure coupled system, which includes damping and absorbing elements. The new method proposed here does not require any matrix inversion as has been used in conventional methods. The method proposed here also has a better numerical efficiency. The other advantage of the method is that the effect of the absorbing material on the system response can be modeled as a virtual sound source with its own magnitude and phase. The system frequency response functions can be expressed as a summation of the uncoupled component modes of the system, The procedure for the forced response solution was again confirmed by comparing its results with the exact solution available for the one dimensional case. Possible applications of the method are also discussed.

  1. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  2. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  3. On the acoustic director interaction in the smectic A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, Josefina; Aguirre, Luis E.; Revelli, Jorge; Anoardo, Esteban

    2007-12-01

    A model was previously proposed for the interaction energy between an acoustic field and the local nematic director. The consistency of this model was verified through nuclear magnetic relaxation and optical experiments. The model was later extended to the smectic A phase, despite the fact that the smectic essence of the problem was never included in the interaction process. In this work we investigate details of this interaction through the inclusion of elemental features of the smectic phase. We show that the acoustic-director interaction can be enhanced if the external acoustic field matches an eigenmode of the smectic system.

  4. On the Interaction of a Premixed Flame with an Acoustic Disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to analyze the effect of acoustic disturbances on a premixed flame and determine their role in the onset of combustion instabilities. Computations for the one-dimensional, unsteady combustion of a lean premixed methane-air mixture are performed. An acoustic excitation is introduced in the chamber and interacts with the flame front. Our results indicate that as the amplitude of the acoustic excitation is increased, the flame front position fluctuates rapidly. This phenomenon is even more intense when the frequency of the acoustic disturbance matches the fundamental frequency of the chamber. Our results suggest that the interactions between the flame and the acoustic excitation may result in flame extinguishment. In addition various passive control devices are tested and we found that the Helmholtz resonator with rounded inlet corners is the most efficient.

  5. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  6. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  7. Plant-bacterium interactions analyzed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Amber; Zahur, Muzna; Zeeshan, Nadia; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the plant immune response has resulted in a highly effective defense system that is able to resist potential attack by microbial pathogens. The primary immune response is referred to as pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity and has evolved to recognize common features of microbial pathogens. In response to the delivery of pathogen effector proteins, plants acquired R proteins to fight against pathogen attack. R-dependent defense response is important in understanding the biochemical and cellular mechanisms and underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches for crops with increased biotic resistance. Proteomic analyses are particularly useful for understanding the mechanisms of host plant against the pathogen attack. Recent advances in the field of proteome analyses have initiated a new research area, i.e., the analysis of more complex microbial communities and their interaction with plant. Such areas hold great potential to elucidate, not only the interactions between bacteria and their host plants, but also of bacteria-bacteria interactions between different bacterial taxa, symbiotic, pathogenic bacteria, and commensal bacteria. During biotic stress, plant hormonal signaling pathways prioritizes defense over other cellular functions. Some plant pathogens take advantage of hormone dependent regulatory system by mimicking hormones that interfere with host immune responses to promote virulence (vir). In this review, it is discussed the cross talk that plays important role in response to pathogens attack with different infection strategies using proteomic approaches. PMID:23424014

  8. Interactions of coupled acoustic and vortical instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Sohn, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the past, the acoustic combustion instability was studied independently of the hydrodynamic instability induced by vortex motions. This paper is intended to combine the two different sources of energy everywhere within the spatial domain and determine the effect of one upon the other. This can be achieved by calculating the mean flow velocities and vorticities and their fluctuating parts of velocities and vortices, as well as the fluctuating pressure. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is utilized to determine the wavenumbers and unsteady stream functions from which vortically coupled acoustic instability growth constants are calculated. This process demonstrates that there are two different frequencies, acoustic and hydrodynamic, various combinations of which contribute to either damping or amplification. It is found that stability boundaries for coupled acoustic and vortical oscillations are somewhat similar to the classical hydrodynamic stability boundaries, but they occur in the form of multiple islands.

  9. Bottom Interaction in Ocean Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    seamounts and ridges, on the stability, statistics, spatial distribution and predictability of broadband acoustic signals..." (quote from the Ocean...Experiment in the North Pacific Ocean, in addition to predicted ocean acoustic arrivals and deep shadow zone arrivals (leaking below turning points), we...for deep shadow zone arrivals would use similar processing and displays to our analysis of the NPAL04 data (time compression, stacking, record

  10. Vector Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer for high-order acoustic modes.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Michel; Bacquet, Denis; Szriftgiser, Pascal

    2010-11-15

    Thanks to a double-frequency phase modulation scheme, we report a vector Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer (BOTDA). This BOTDA has a high immunity level to noise, and it features a phase spectrogram capability. It is well suited for complex situations involving several acoustic resonances, such as high-order longitudinal modes. It has notably been used to characterize a dispersion-shifted fiber, allowing us to report spectrograms with multiple acoustic resonances. A very high 57 dB dynamic range is also reported for 100-ns-long pulses simultaneously with a 16 cm numerical resolution.

  11. Interaction of acoustic waves generated by coupled plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    When two substructures are coupled, the acoustic field generated by the motion of each of the substructures will interact with the motion of the other substructure. This would be the case of a structure enclosing an acoustic cavity. A technique to model the interaction of the generated sound fields from the two components of a coupled structure, and the influence of this interaction on the vibration of the structural components is presented. Using a mobility power flow approach, each element of the substructure is treated independently both when developing the structural response and when determining the acoustic field generated by this component. The presence of the other substructural components is introduced by assuming these components to be rigid baffles. The excitation of one of the substructures is assumed to be by an incident acoustic wave which is dependent of the motion of the substructure. The sound field generated by the motion of the substructure is included in the solution of the response.

  12. Acoustic-wave generation in the process of CO2-TEA-laser-radiation interaction with metal targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Ileana; Teodorescu, G.; Serbanescu-Oasa, Anca; Dragulinescu, Dumitru; Chis, Ioan; Stoian, Razvan

    1995-03-01

    Laser radiation interaction with materials is a complex process in which creation of acoustic waves or stress waves is a part of it. As a function of the laser radiation energy and intensity incident on steel target surface ultrasound signals were registered and studied. Thermoelastic, ablation and breakdown mechanisms of generation of acoustic waves were analyzed.

  13. Interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in a stochastic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, N.; Frankel, M. S.; Peterson, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves where a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) is operated in a stochastic environment characterized by turbulence, winds and mean-temperature gradients. It has been shown that for a RASS operating at acoustic frequencies below a few kilohertz propagating under typical atmospheric conditions, turbulence has little effect on the strength of the received radio signal scattered from the pulse at heights up to a few kilometers. This result implies that the received RF signal level (power) is primarily a function of sound intensity which decreases as x exp minus 2 where x is the altitude.

  14. Role of acoustics in flame/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Macaraeg, Michele G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of acoustics in flame/vortex interactions is examined via asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation. The model consists of a one-step, irreversible Arrhenius reaction between initially unmixed species occupying adjacent half-planes which are allowed to mix and react by convection and diffusion in the presence of an acoustic field or a time-varying pressure field of small amplitude. The main emphasis is on the influence of the acoustics on the ignition time and flame structure as a function of vortex Reynolds number and initial temperature differences of the reactants.

  15. Bottom Interaction in Ocean Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    seamounts and ridges, on the stability, statistics, spatial distribution and predictability of broadband acoustic signals..." (quote from the Ocean...2013) attributed some of these arrivals to bottom-diffracted, surface-reflected (BDSR) energy that scattered from a seamount near the Deep VLA and...identified four seafloor diffractors (Figure 1). Three of these (A-C) correspond to small seamounts on the seafloor. Diffractor D however does not

  16. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  17. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  18. Interaction of surface plasmon polaritons and acoustic waves inside an acoustic cavity.

    PubMed

    Khokhlov, Nikolai; Knyazev, Grigoriy; Glavin, Boris; Shtykov, Yakov; Romanov, Oleg; Belotelov, Vladimir

    2017-09-15

    In this Letter, we introduce an approach for manipulation of active plasmon polaritons via acoustic waves at sub-terahertz frequency range. The acoustic structures considered are designed as phononic Fabry-Perot microresonators where mirrors are presented with an acoustic superlattice and the structure's surface, and a plasmonic grating is placed on top of the acoustic cavity so formed. It provides phonon localization in the vicinity of the plasmonic grating at frequencies within the phononic stop band enhancing phonon-light interaction. We consider phonon excitation by shining a femtosecond laser pulse on the plasmonic grating. Appropriate theoretical model was used to describe the acoustic process caused by the pump laser pulse in the GaAs/AlAs-based acoustic cavity with a gold grating on top. Strongest modulation is achieved upon excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons and hybridization of propagating and localized plasmons. The relative changes in the optical reflectivity of the structure are more than an order of magnitude higher than for the structure without the plasmonic film.

  19. Evaluation of resources for analyzing drug interactions*†

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Risha I.; Beckett, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research sought to evaluate seven drug information resources, specifically designed for analyzing drug interactions for scope, completeness, and ease of use, and determine the consistency of content among the seven resources. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted where 100 drug-drug and drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed using 7 drug information resources: Lexicomp Interactions module, Micromedex Drug Interactions, Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report, Facts & Comparisons eAnswers, Stockley's Drug Interactions (10th edition), Drug Interactions Analysis and Management (2014), and Drug Interaction Facts (2015). The interaction sample was developed based on published resources and peer input. Two independent reviewers gathered data for each interaction from each of the 7 resources using a common form. Results Eighty-two drug-drug and 18 drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed. Scope scores were higher for Lexicomp Interactions (97.0%), Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report (97.0%), and Micromedex Drug Interactions (93.0%) compared to all other resources (p<0.05 for each comparison). Overall completeness scores were higher for Micromedex Drug Interactions (median 5, interquartile range [IQR] 4 to 5) compared to all other resources (p<0.01 for each comparison) and were higher for Lexicomp Interactions (median 4, IQR 4 to 5), Facts & Comparisons eAnswers (median 4, IQR 4 to 5), and Drug Interaction Facts (4, IQR 4 to 5) compared to all other resources, except Micromedex (p<0.05 for each comparison). Ease of use, in terms of time to locate information and time to gather information, was similar among resources. Consistency score was higher for Micromedex (69.9%) compared to all other resources (p<0.05 for each comparison). Conclusions Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report, Lexicomp Interactions, and Micromedex Drug Interactions scored highest in scope. Micromedex Drug Interactions and Lexicomp

  20. Acoustic interactions in broods of nestling birds (Tachycineta bicolor).

    PubMed

    Horn, Andrew G; Leonard, Marty L

    2008-08-01

    Studies of acoustic interactions in animal groups, such as chorusing insects, anurans, and birds, have been invaluable in showing how cooperation and competition shape signal structure and use. The begging calls of nestling birds are ideal for such studies, because they function both as a cooperative signals of the brood's needs and as competitive signals for parental allocation within the brood. Nonetheless, studies of acoustic interactions among nestlings are rare. Here we review our work on acoustic interactions in nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), especially how calls are used in competition for parental feedings. Nestlings attracted parental attention and responded to acoustic interference mainly by increasing call output. However, nestlings also gave more similar calls when they called together and decreased their call bandwidth when exposed to elevated noise. We suggest that these competitive uses of calls might intensify the cooperative brood signal, affecting both parental provisioning and vocal development. Given their tremendous variation across species, begging calls offer promising opportunities for developmental and comparative studies of acoustic signaling. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Combustion Chamber Acoustics and Its Interaction with LOX/H2- and LOX/CH4-Spray Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschwald, Michael; Knapp, Bernhard; Sliphorst, Mark; Marpert, Mark

    The acoustics of combustion chambers and the interaction of acoustics and combustion is investigated in a model combustor operated with LOX/H2 and LOX/CH4. Acoustic excitations are induced by a siren during hot fire tests and the response of atomization and combustion is recorded with dynamic pressure sensors and high speed OH-imaging is applied. By analyzing the temporal and spatial distribution of the flame response the question is addressed, whether in the experiments the coupling of acoustics to combustion is via pressure or velocity sensitive processes. In the experiments it appeared that the acoustic eigenmodes of the combustor are characteristically deviating from cylinder modes. The results obtained can be explained by a modal analyses of the combustor geometry. These investigations have been extended to study the influence of absorbers and absorber rings on the acoustics of combustion chambers and resonance frequencies predicted by modal analysis and experimental results are presented.

  2. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  3. An extension of the transfer matrix method to analyzing acoustic resonators with gradually varying cross-sectional area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qi; He, Wan-Quan; Wang, Quan-Biao; Tian, Jia-Jin

    2016-11-01

    The transfer matrix method was used to analyze the acoustical properties of stepped acoustic resonator in the previous paper. The present paper extends the application of the transfer matrix method to analyzing acoustic resonators with gradually varying cross-sectional area. The transfer matrices and the resonant conditions are derived for acoustic resonators with four different kinds of gradually varying geometric shape: tapered, trigonometric, exponential and hyperbolic. Based on the derived transfer matrices, the acoustic properties of these resonators are derived, including the resonant frequency, phase and radiation impedance. Compared with other analytical methods based on the wave equation and boundary conditions, the transfer matrix method is simple to implement and convenient for computation.

  4. Acoustics and dynamics of coaxial interacting vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony; Zabusky, Norman J.; Ferziger, Joel H.

    1988-01-01

    Using a contour dynamics method for inviscid axisymmetric flow we examine the effects of core deformation on the dynamics and acoustic signatures of coaxial interacting vortex rings. Both 'passage' and 'collision' (head-on) interactions are studied for initially identical vortices. Good correspondence with experiments is obtained. A simple model which retains only the elliptic degree of freedom in the core shape is used to explain some of the calculated features.

  5. What Perception Implies about Implementation of Interactive Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Virtual acoustics, also known as 3-D sound and auralization, is the simulation of the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener within an environment. Going beyond the simple intensity panning of normal stereo techniques, the goal is to process sounds so that they appear to come from particular positions in three-dimensional space. Current techniques use digital signal processing to synthesize the acoustical properties that people use to localize a sound source. This paper briefly reviews these techniques as well as the results of a number of psychoacoustical studies designed to validate the synthesis. In particular, the relationship between the results of recent perceptual studies on the role of head motion to the implementation of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  6. Acoustic mimicry in a predator–prey interaction

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jesse R.; Conner, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Mimicry of visual warning signals is one of the keystone concepts in evolutionary biology and has received substantial research attention. By comparison, acoustic mimicry has never been rigorously tested. Visualizing bat–moth interactions with high-speed, infrared videography, we provide empirical evidence for acoustic mimicry in the ultrasonic warning sounds that tiger moths produce in response to echolocating bats. Two species of sound-producing tiger moths were offered successively to naïve, free-flying red and big brown bats. Noctuid and pyralid moth controls were also offered each night. All bats quickly learned to avoid the noxious tiger moths first offered to them, associating the warning sounds with bad taste. They then avoided the second sound-producing species regardless of whether it was chemically protected or not, verifying both Müllerian and Batesian mimicry in the acoustic modality. A subset of the red bats subsequently discovered the palatability of the Batesian mimic, demonstrating the powerful selective force these predators exert on mimetic resemblance. Given these results and the widespread presence of tiger moth species and other sound-producing insects that respond with ultrasonic clicks to bat attack, acoustic mimicry complexes are likely common components of the acoustic landscape. PMID:17517637

  7. Acoustic mimicry in a predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Conner, William E

    2007-05-29

    Mimicry of visual warning signals is one of the keystone concepts in evolutionary biology and has received substantial research attention. By comparison, acoustic mimicry has never been rigorously tested. Visualizing bat-moth interactions with high-speed, infrared videography, we provide empirical evidence for acoustic mimicry in the ultrasonic warning sounds that tiger moths produce in response to echolocating bats. Two species of sound-producing tiger moths were offered successively to naïve, free-flying red and big brown bats. Noctuid and pyralid moth controls were also offered each night. All bats quickly learned to avoid the noxious tiger moths first offered to them, associating the warning sounds with bad taste. They then avoided the second sound-producing species regardless of whether it was chemically protected or not, verifying both Müllerian and Batesian mimicry in the acoustic modality. A subset of the red bats subsequently discovered the palatability of the Batesian mimic, demonstrating the powerful selective force these predators exert on mimetic resemblance. Given these results and the widespread presence of tiger moth species and other sound-producing insects that respond with ultrasonic clicks to bat attack, acoustic mimicry complexes are likely common components of the acoustic landscape.

  8. Using Facebook Data to Analyze Learner Interaction during Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Although study abroad is viewed as an ideal environment for interaction in the target language, research in this area has relied mostly upon self-reported data, which pose challenges regarding recall bias and participant commitment. This article shows how Facebook data can be used to analyze naturally occurring learner interactions during study…

  9. Using Facebook Data to Analyze Learner Interaction during Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Although study abroad is viewed as an ideal environment for interaction in the target language, research in this area has relied mostly upon self-reported data, which pose challenges regarding recall bias and participant commitment. This article shows how Facebook data can be used to analyze naturally occurring learner interactions during study…

  10. Analyzing Interaction Techniques Using Mouse and Keyboard for Preschool Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünzweil, Bettina; Haller, Michael

    Nowadays, even very young children begin to use software applications - mostly playing games. Not surprisingly, both skills and abilities of preschool children differ not only from adults, but also from older children. In this paper, we analyzed preschool children in the kindergarten to show the most effective ways of interacting with an application. In contrast to related work, we mainly focus on how preschool children interact with applications using various interaction metaphors and devices.

  11. An on-line acoustic fluorocarbon coolant mixture analyzer for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Botelho-Direito, J.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Egorov, K.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker community foresees an upgrade from the present octafluoro-propane (C{sub 3}F{sub 8}) evaporative cooling fluid - to a composite fluid with a probable 10-20% admixture of hexafluoro-ethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}). Such a fluid will allow a lower evaporation temperature and will afford the tracker silicon substrates a better safety margin against leakage current-induced thermal runaway caused by cumulative radiation damage as the luminosity profile at the CERN Large Hadron Collider increases. Central to the use of this new fluid is a new custom-developed speed-of-sound instrument for continuous real-time measurement of the C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} mixture ratio and flow. An acoustic vapour mixture analyzer/flow meter with new custom electronics allowing ultrasonic frequency transmission through gas mixtures has been developed for this application. Synchronous with the emission of an ultrasound 'chirp' from an acoustic transmitter, a fast readout clock (40 MHz) is started. The clock is stopped on receipt of an above threshold sound pulse at the receiver. Sound is alternately transmitted parallel and anti-parallel with the vapour flow for volume flow measurement from transducers that can serve as acoustic transmitters or receivers. In the development version, continuous real-time measurement of C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow and calculation of the mixture ratio is performed within a graphical user interface developed in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The described instrument has numerous potential applications - including refrigerant leak detection, the analysis of hydrocarbons, vapour mixtures for semiconductor manufacture and anesthetic gas mixtures. (authors)

  12. Nonlinear interactions among solar acoustic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Goldreich, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The rates at which nonlinear interactions transfer energy among the normal modes of a plane-parallel, stratified atmosphere are evaluated. It is shown that every p-mode in the 5-minute band is involved in many near-resonant triplets, and, as a consequence, the energy transfer rates are independent of the mode line widths. It is also found that nonlinear mode coupling cannot limit the growth of overstable p-modes, which favors the hypothesis that the sun's p-modes are stochastically excited by turbulent convection.

  13. Modulation instability of ion acoustic waves, solitons, and their interactions in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiefang; Wang Yueyue; Wu Lei

    2009-06-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves in plasmas composed of ions, positrons, and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated. By means of the reduction perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived and the modulation instability of ion acoustic wave is analyzed, where the nonthermal parameter is found to be of significant importance. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the bright and dark solitons are obtained, and the interaction of multiple solitons is discussed.

  14. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOEpatents

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  15. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOEpatents

    Spates, James J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  16. Collecting, Transcribing, Analyzing and Presenting Plurilingual Interactional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Emilee; Llompart, Júlia

    2017-01-01

    Interactional data is often central to research in plurilingual learning environments. However, getting a grip on the processes of collecting, organizing, transcribing, analyzing and presenting audio and/or visual data is possibly the most exciting, but also one of the most challenging things about learning to do qualitative research. Although the…

  17. A Framework for Analyzing Reader-Text Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Margaret

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a framework for analyzing verbal report data, attempting to integrate Fillmore's levels of envisionment and Galda's differentiation between reader and text-centered responses. It examines the extent to which readers rely on text based, reader-based, or interactive processes to understand text. Case study data is presented.…

  18. Regeneration of commercial Biacore chips to analyze biomolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yong J.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2011-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance is particularly important due to the ability of biomolecules of interest to interact with a specific binding partner, and may therefore be more informative than generic measurement techniques. A growing number of robust and reproducible immobilized surfaces chips are available from Biacore, allowing us to analyze various biomolecular interactions. Here we describe a protocol by which the Biacore chips may be reused multiple times to analyze biomolecular interactions without interfering analysis from previously used surfaces or analytes. This procedure will not only help to extend the lifetime of these chips but at the same time render them to be more commercially affordable, especially in a resource-poor setting. The time range for the entire protocol is ~1 day, including stripping off previously immobilized materials and re-functionalization of gold surface.

  19. Interactive nuclear plant analyzer for VVER-440 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shier, W.; Horak, W.; Kennett, R.

    1992-05-01

    This document discusses an interactive nuclear plant analyzer (NPA) which has been developed for a VVER-440, Model 213 reactor for use in the training of plant personnel, the development and verification of plant operating procedures, and in the analysis of various anticipated operational occurrences and accident scenarios. This NPA is operational on an IBM RISC-6000 workstation and utilizes the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code for the calculation of the VVER-440 reactor response to the interactive commands initiated by the NPA operator.

  20. A Conventional Liner Acoustic/Drag Interaction Benchmark Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has become a significant topic in the design of such for aircraft noise applications. In order to evaluate the benefits of concepts designed to reduce liner drag, it is necessary to establish the baseline performance of liners employing the typical design features of conventional configurations. This paper details a set of experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of a number of perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of M=0.3 and 0.5. These conventional liners are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of the resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 Hz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 dB. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the interaction between acoustic performance and drag.

  1. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length.

  2. Interaction of electric and acoustic vibrations in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Sadikov, K. G.; Mitrofanov, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the interaction of electrical discharges in the acoustic oscillations in the combustion of isobutane are presented in the article. Electric discharges were created using a pulsed high voltage source at specified intervals. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of using electrical pulse action to control combustion. The study was conducted on the specifically designed pattern of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of periodic pulsed electrical influences can be used to control the combustion in the combustion chamber model. There is a steady increase in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber model. Effects due to the mechanism of interaction of acoustic waves and oscillations heat release from the combustion zone. Estimated physical mechanism is a periodic change in the concentration of ions in the interaction of the combustion zone with the electric field of high potential. The proposed control method is advantageous in terms of energy costs.

  3. Acoustic intensity in the interaction region of a parametric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; Gabrielson, T. B.; van Tol, D. J.; Kottke, N. F.; McConnell, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure acoustic intensity in the strong interaction region of a parametric source in order to obtain a clear definition of the source-generation region and to separate the local generation (the reactive field) from propagation (the real or active field). The acoustic intensity vector was mapped in the interaction region of a parametric projector at Lake Seneca. The source was driven with primary signals at 22 kHz and 27 kHz. Receiving sensors were located 8.5 meters from the projector. At that range, the secondary at 5 kHz was between 40 and 45 dB below either primary. For the primary levels used, the plane-wave shock inception distance would have been at least 14 meters. Furthermore, the Rayleigh distance for the projector was about 4 meters so the measurements at 8.5 meters were in the strong interaction region but not in saturation. Absorption was negligible over these ranges. The intensity measurements were made at fixed range but varying azimuth angle and varying depth thus developing a two-dimensional cross-section of the secondary beam. Measurements of both the active and reactive intensity vectors will be presented along with a discussion of measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code 321SS.

  4. Increasing process understanding by analyzing complex interactions in experimental data.

    PubMed

    Naelapää, Kaisa; Allesø, Morten; Kristensen, Henning G; Bro, Rasmus; Rantanen, Jukka; Bertelsen, Poul

    2009-05-01

    There is a recognized need for new approaches to understand unit operations with pharmaceutical relevance. A method for analyzing complex interactions in experimental data is introduced. Higher-order interactions do exist between process parameters, which complicate the interpretation of experimental results. In this study, experiments based on mixed factorial design of coating process were performed. Drug release was analyzed by traditional analysis of variance (ANOVA) and generalized multiplicative ANOVA (GEMANOVA). GEMANOVA modeling is introduced in this study as a new tool for increased understanding of a coating process. It was possible to model the response, that is, the amount of drug released, using both mentioned techniques. However, the ANOVA model was difficult to interpret as several interactions between process parameters existed. In contrast to ANOVA, GEMANOVA is especially suited for modeling complex interactions and making easily understandable models of these. GEMANOVA modeling allowed a simple visualization of the entire experimental space. Furthermore, information was obtained on how relative changes in the settings of process parameters influence the film quality and thereby drug release.

  5. Modal decomposition of exterior acoustic-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Peters, Herwig; Kessissoglou, Nicole; Marburg, Steffen

    2013-05-01

    A modal decomposition technique to analyze individual modal contributions to the sound power radiated from an externally excited structure submerged in a heavy fluid is presented. The fluid-loaded structural modes are calculated by means of a polynomial approximation and symmetric linearization of the underlying nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of a fluid loaded sphere with and without internal structures are presented. The modal sound power contributions using both fluid-loaded structural modes and acoustic radiation modes are presented. The results for the resistive and reactive sound power obtained from the superposition of the individual modal sound power contributions are compared to the harmonic solution of the forced problem.

  6. Spin-electron acoustic soliton and exchange interaction in separate spin evolution quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2016-01-15

    Separate spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics is generalized to include the Coulomb exchange interaction, which is considered as interaction between the spin-down electrons being in quantum states occupied by one electron. The generalized model is applied to study the non-linear spin-electron acoustic waves. Existence of the spin-electron acoustic soliton is demonstrated. Contributions of concentration, spin polarization, and exchange interaction to the properties of the spin electron acoustic soliton are studied.

  7. Evaluation of photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzer in measuring concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted from feedlot soil/manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzers (PIMAs) are being increasingly utilized to measure concentrations and fluxes of greenhouse gases (i.e., N2O, CO2, and CH4) at the soil surface because of their low cost, portability, and ease of operation. This research evaluated a PIMA in combination with ...

  8. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  9. Acoustic environment resulting in interaction of launch vehicle main engines jets with a launch pad having closed long ducts like a tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. V.; Safronov, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    Paper deals with elaboration of semiempirical technique for prediction of broadband acoustic field generated at interaction of launch vehicle main engines jets with a launch pad having closed long ducts like a tunnel. Approach to a problem is based on analysis of jet interaction with typical deflectors, extraction of characteristic noise generation regions, and substitution of each region of noise generation by a system of independent acoustic sources with prescribed acoustic power and spectrum of acoustic radiation. Comparisons of calculated results with experimental data indicate that the technique allows to make reliable estimations of acoustical field characteristics as a function of geometrical and gasdynamic parameters and to analyze different means for reduction of acoustic loading at lift-off. Use of elaborated technique for multibody launch vehicles with clustered engines and multiduct launch pads is considered.

  10. Acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joumaa, H.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    2013-09-01

    This research explores the acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media. The analysis discusses the direct coupling of two constitutive models under dynamic loading: a continuous solid and an isotropic fractal medium. We consider two situations where in the first, the fractal medium is enclosed within a thin spherical shell (interior problem), while in the second, the fractal medium extends infinitely outside the shell (exterior problem). The two problems are simulated analytically, and the exact solution for the shell displacement is expressed in closed form in the Laplace domain. The formulation of the radiation condition for infinite fractal media is essential to derive the exterior problem's solution. This study represents a meaningful idealization of real-application problems involving the interaction of multi-constitutive media, e.g. the human brain, whereby fractal features affect the response of this body under various excitations.

  11. Acoustically mediated long-range interaction among multiple spherical particles exposed to a plane standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Mudi; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the acoustically mediated interaction forces among multiple well-separated spherical particles trapped in the same node or antinode plane of a standing wave. An analytical expression of the acoustic interaction force is derived, which is accurate even for the particles beyond the Rayleigh limit. Interestingly, the multi-particle system can be decomposed into a series of independent two-particle systems described by pairwise interactions. Each pairwise interaction is a long-range interaction, as characterized by a soft oscillatory attenuation (at the power exponent of n = -1 or -2). The vector additivity of the acoustic interaction force, which is not well expected considering the nonlinear nature of the acoustic radiation force, is greatly useful for exploring a system consisting of a large number of particles. The capability of self-organizing a big particle cluster can be anticipated through such acoustically controllable long-range interaction.

  12. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise.

  13. Acoustic-Structure Interaction in Rocket Engines: Validation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Joji, Scott S.; Parks, Russel A.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    While analyzing a rocket engine component, it is often necessary to account for any effects that adjacent fluids (e.g., liquid fuels or oxidizers) might have on the structural dynamics of the component. To better characterize the fully coupled fluid-structure system responses, an analytical approach that models the system as a coupled expansion of rigid wall acoustic modes and in vacuo structural modes has been proposed. The present work seeks to experimentally validate this approach. To experimentally observe well-coupled system modes, the test article and fluid cavities are designed such that the uncoupled structural frequencies are comparable to the uncoupled acoustic frequencies. The test measures the natural frequencies, mode shapes, and forced response of cylindrical test articles in contact with fluid-filled cylindrical and/or annular cavities. The test article is excited with a stinger and the fluid-loaded response is acquired using a laser-doppler vibrometer. The experimentally determined fluid-loaded natural frequencies are compared directly to the results of the analytical model. Due to the geometric configuration of the test article, the analytical model is found to be valid for natural modes with circumferential wave numbers greater than four. In the case of these modes, the natural frequencies predicted by the analytical model demonstrate excellent agreement with the experimentally determined natural frequencies.

  14. Analyzing the applicability of miniature ultra-high sensitivity Fabry-Perot acoustic sensor using a nanothick graphene diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Gao, Xiangyang; Guo, Tingting; Xiao, Jun; Fan, Shangchun; Jin, Wei

    2015-08-01

    A miniature Fabry-Perot interferometric acoustic sensor with an ultra-high pressure sensitivity was constructed by using approximately 13 layers of graphene film as the diaphragm. The extremely thin diaphragm was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule, which had an inner diameter of 125 μm, and van der Waals interactions between the graphene diaphragm and its substrate created a low finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer with a cavity length of 98 μm. Acoustic testing demonstrated a pressure-induced deflection of 2380 nm kPa-1 and a noise equivalent acoustic signal level of ~2.7 mPa/Hz1/2 for a 3 dB bandwidth with a center frequency of 15 kHz. The sensor also exhibited a dynamic frequency response between 1 and 20 kHz, which conformed well to the result obtained by a reference microphone. The use of a suspended graphene diaphragm has potential applications in highly sensitive pressure/acoustic sensors.

  15. Interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with a cavity-backed circular orifice and tonal acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic liners are effective reducers of jet exhaust and core noise and work by converting acoustic-bound energy into non-radiating, vorticity-bound energy through scattering, viscous, and non-linear processes. Modern liners are designed using highly-calibrated semi-empirical models that will not be effective for expected parameter spaces on future aircraft. The primary model limitation occurs when a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) grazes the liner; there are no physics-based methods for predicting the sound-liner interaction. We thus utilize direct numerical simulations to study the interaction of a Mach 0.5 zero pressure gradient TBL with a cavity-backed circular orifice under acoustic excitation. Acoustic field frequencies span the energy-containing range within the TBL and amplitudes range from 6 to 40 dB above the turbulent fluctuations. Impedance predictions are in agreement with NASA Langley-measured data and the simulation databases are analyzed in detail. A physics-based reduced-order model is proposed that connects the turbulence-vorticity-acoustic interaction and its accuracy and limitations are discussed. This work is funded by Aeroacoustics Research Consortium.

  16. Analyzing the validity of a DFT-based improved acoustic OFDM transmission along rotating simulated drillstring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li; Jinfeng, Chang; Shangchun, Fan; Jun, Yang

    2016-12-01

    In the oil industry, drillstring can be used as a transmission medium to send downhole information via a modulated compressional acoustic wave. However, the accompanied reverberation is a major constraint in the transmission rate and distance because of the multipath fading caused by the heterogeneous drillstring. In combination with discrete Fourier transform-spread (DFT-S) mapping/demapping, high-power amplitude squeezing and DFT-based least squares channel estimation methods, an improved orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme is proposed in this paper to overcome the symbol interference inherent in the drillstring multipath channel and reduce the peak-to-average power ratio of the signal. Then an experimental rig is established by using a rotatable electromagnetic vibration exciter and a piezoelectric accelerometer arranged at the position closer to acoustic impedance terminal along a 6.3-m periodic simulated drillstring. The OFDM data sequences at a data rate of 200 bit/s over a limited bandwidth of 140 Hz are applied to the rotating simulated drillstring. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme using QPSK modulation can offer an error-free acoustic communication at rotation speeds up to 90 r/min.

  17. Imaging and analyzing the elasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells by atomic force acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Qian; Chen, Ming; Yao, Wengang; Qian, Menglu; Hu, Bing

    2012-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in the good performance of the vasculature. To study the surface, intracellular structure and elasticity of VSMCs, atomic force acoustic microscope (AFAM) was used for imaging VSMCs from A7r5 rat aorta arteries. The topography images of VSMCs were obtained in contact mode and the acoustic images were obtained by AFAM in sample vibration mode. Then, the force curve measurement derived using Young's modulus of the interested areas was used for evaluating elasticity properties. The acoustic images were found in higher resolution with more information than the topography images. The force curves showed the difference in Young's modulus of the different parts of VSMC. These findings demonstrate that AFAM is useful for displaying the surface, structure and elasticity property of VSMCs clearly, with short scanning time, negligible harm or damage to cell and nanometer-level resolution. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Framework for Conceptualizing, Representing, and Analyzing Distributed Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthers, Daniel D.; Dwyer, Nathan; Medina, Richard; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between interaction and learning is a central concern of the learning sciences, and analysis of interaction has emerged as a major theme within the current literature on computer-supported collaborative learning. The nature of technology-mediated interaction poses analytic challenges. Interaction may be distributed across actors,…

  19. Investigating the interaction between acoustically stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2012-11-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles can potentiate thrombolysis, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to gain a more fundamental understanding of how acoustically stimulated microbubbles interact with and potentially degrade fibrin clots. Owing to their optical transparency, the use of fibrin clots allowed to optically observe microbubbles interacting with the clot boundary and any resultant disruption of the fluorescently tagged fibrin network. It was found that microbubbles could readily penetrate into fibrin clots with velocities up to 0.2 m/s and to depths related to the number of pulses applied. At lower pressures (0.2-0.55 MPa), microbubbles as small as 3μm were observed to penetrate, whereas higher pressures (>0.9 MPa) caused the penetration of larger microbubbles (10-30μm), formed by coalescence prior to entry. In some cases, patent 'tunnels' remained along the path taken by penetrating microbubbles. Tunnel diameters ranged between 9-35μm depending largely on pressure and pulse duration. Two-photon microscopy indicated either patent tunnels or paths of disrupted fibers consistent with collapsed tunnel. Fluid flow within the clot was observed to accompany penetrating microbubbles, which may have implications for lytic enzyme penetration.

  20. An electromagnetic finite difference time domain analog treatment of small signal acoustic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, K.; Steich, D.; Lewis, K.; Landrum, C.; Barth, M.

    1994-03-25

    Hyperbolic partial differential equations encompass an extremely important set of physical phenomena including electromagnetics and acoustics. Small amplitude acoustic interactions behave much the same as electromagnetic interactions for longitudinal acoustic waves because of the similar nature of the governing hyperbolic equations. Differences appear when transverse acoustic waves are considered, nonetheless the strong analogy between the acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena prompted the development of a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) acoustic analog to the existing electromagnetic FDTD technique. The advantage of an acoustic FDTD (AFDTD) code are as follows: (1) Boundary condition-free treatment of the acoustic scatterer -- only the intrinsic properties of the scatterer`s material are needed, no shell treatment or other set of special equations describing the macroscopic behavior of a sheet of material or a junction, etc. are required; this allows completely general geometries and materials in the model. (2) Advanced outer radiation boundary condition analogs -- in the electromagnetics arena, highly absorbing outer radiation boundary conditions have been developed that can be applied with little modification to the acoustics arena with equal success. (3) A suite of preexisting capabilities related to electromagnetic modeling -- this includes automated model generation and interaction visualization as its most important components and is best exemplified by the capabilities of the LLNL generated TSAR electromagnetic FDTD code.

  1. A domain decomposition method for analyzing a coupling between multiple acoustical spaces (L).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuehua; Jin, Guoyong; Liu, Zhigang

    2017-05-01

    This letter presents a domain decomposition method to predict the acoustic characteristics of an arbitrary enclosure made up of any number of sub-spaces. While the Lagrange multiplier technique usually has good performance for conditional extremum problems, the present method avoids involving extra coupling parameters and theoretically ensures the continuity conditions of both sound pressure and particle velocity at the coupling interface. Comparisons with the finite element results illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the present predictions and the effect of coupling parameters between sub-spaces on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the overall enclosure is revealed.

  2. Innovative techniques for analyzing the three-dimensional behavioral results from acoustically tagged fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, Tracey W.; Timko, Mark A.

    2005-04-01

    Acoustic tags were used to monitor the swimming patterns of downstream migrating salmon smolts approaching various dams on the Columbia River, USA. Downstream migrating yearling chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), and sub-yearling chinook smolts were surgically implanted with acoustic tags. Fish were tracked in three-dimensions as they approached and passed into the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances at the dams during the 2004 spring and summer outmigrations. A number of advances in the analysis techniques and software have been made over the past few years. Some of these improvements include the development of various fish density algorithms, stream trace modeling analysis, and advances of three-dimensional animation programs. Three-dimensional tracks of fish approaching the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances will be presented. Concentrations of fish passage will be presented as three-dimensional fish densities superimposed over dam structures. Stream trace modeling animation will be presented showing predicted fish passage routes.

  3. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Greens function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Greens function decreases with increasing source frequency andor jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Greens function in the absence of the surface, and flight effect are also investigated.

  4. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  5. Controlling cell–cell interactions using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B.; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells. PMID:25535339

  6. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  7. A Framework to Describe, Analyze and Generate Interactive Motor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    While motor interaction between a robot and a human, or between humans, has important implications for society as well as promising applications, little research has been devoted to its investigation. In particular, it is important to understand the different ways two agents can interact and generate suitable interactive behaviors. Towards this end, this paper introduces a framework for the description and implementation of interactive behaviors of two agents performing a joint motor task. A taxonomy of interactive behaviors is introduced, which can classify tasks and cost functions that represent the way each agent interacts. The role of an agent interacting during a motor task can be directly explained from the cost function this agent is minimizing and the task constraints. The novel framework is used to interpret and classify previous works on human-robot motor interaction. Its implementation power is demonstrated by simulating representative interactions of two humans. It also enables us to interpret and explain the role distribution and switching between roles when performing joint motor tasks. PMID:23226231

  8. A framework to describe, analyze and generate interactive motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    While motor interaction between a robot and a human, or between humans, has important implications for society as well as promising applications, little research has been devoted to its investigation. In particular, it is important to understand the different ways two agents can interact and generate suitable interactive behaviors. Towards this end, this paper introduces a framework for the description and implementation of interactive behaviors of two agents performing a joint motor task. A taxonomy of interactive behaviors is introduced, which can classify tasks and cost functions that represent the way each agent interacts. The role of an agent interacting during a motor task can be directly explained from the cost function this agent is minimizing and the task constraints. The novel framework is used to interpret and classify previous works on human-robot motor interaction. Its implementation power is demonstrated by simulating representative interactions of two humans. It also enables us to interpret and explain the role distribution and switching between roles when performing joint motor tasks.

  9. Analyzing Learner-Hypermedia Interaction: An Overview of Online Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouet, Jean-Francois; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    1999-01-01

    Examines the potential of online methods for hypermedia research that allow the recording, analysis, and interpretation of learner/hypermedia interaction. Discusses discourse comprehension research, comprehension of printed text, reading time, verbal protocols, event-related potentials, and interaction protocols in hypermedia research. Contains 56…

  10. Electric-acoustic interactions in the hearing cochlea: single fiber recordings.

    PubMed

    Tillein, J; Hartmann, R; Kral, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates interactions of simultaneous electric and acoustic stimulation in single auditory nerve fibers in normal hearing cats. First, the auditory nerve was accessed with a microelectrode and response areas of single nerve fibers were determined for acoustic stimulation. Second, response thresholds to extracochlear sinusoidal electric stimulation using ball electrodes positioned at the round window were measured. Third, interactions that occurred with combined electric-acoustic stimulation were investigated in two areas: (1) the spectral domain (frequency response areas) and (2) the temporal domain (phase-locking to each stimulus) at moderate stimulus intensities (electric: 6 dB re threshold, acoustic: 20-40 dB re threshold at the characteristic frequency, CF). For fibers responding to both modalities responses to both electric and acoustic stimulation could be clearly identified. CFs, thresholds, and bandwidth (Q10dB) of acoustic responses were not significantly affected by simultaneous electric stimulation. Phase-locking of electric responses decreased in the presence of acoustic stimulation. Indication for electric stimulation of inner hair cells with 125 and 250 Hz were observed. However, these did not disturb the acoustic receptive fields of auditory nerve fibers. There was a trade-off between these responses when the intensities of the stimulation were varied: Relatively more intense stimulation dominated less intense stimulation. The scarcity of interaction between the different stimulus modalities demonstrates the ability of electric-acoustic stimulation to transfer useful information through both stimulation channels at the same time despite cochlear electrophonic effects. Application of 30 Hz electric stimulation resulted in a strong suppression of acoustic activity in the anodic phase of the stimulus. An electric stimulation like this might thus be used to control acoustic responses. This article is part of a Special Issue

  11. Electrical circuit modeling and analysis of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Qian; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-05-01

    Numerical study of microwave imaging and microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging utilizes finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis for simulation of microwave and acoustic interaction with biological tissues, which is time consuming due to complex grid-segmentation and numerous calculations, not straightforward due to no analytical solution and physical explanation, and incompatible with hardware development requiring circuit simulator such as SPICE. In this paper, instead of conventional FDTD numerical simulation, an equivalent electrical circuit model is proposed to model the microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues for fast simulation and quantitative analysis in both one and two dimensions (2D). The equivalent circuit of ideal point-like tissue for microwave-acoustic interaction is proposed including transmission line, voltage-controlled current source, envelop detector, and resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) network, to model the microwave scattering, thermal expansion, and acoustic generation. Based on which, two-port network of the point-like tissue is built and characterized using pseudo S-parameters and transducer gain. Two dimensional circuit network including acoustic scatterer and acoustic channel is also constructed to model the 2D spatial information and acoustic scattering effect in heterogeneous medium. Both FDTD simulation, circuit simulation, and experimental measurement are performed to compare the results in terms of time domain, frequency domain, and pseudo S-parameters characterization. 2D circuit network simulation is also performed under different scenarios including different sizes of tumors and the effect of acoustic scatterer. The proposed circuit model of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissue could give good agreement with FDTD simulated and experimental measured results. The pseudo S-parameters and characteristic gain could globally evaluate the performance of tumor detection. The 2D circuit network

  12. Acoustic emission at interaction of gliding deformation with point obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, V. V.; Panin, I. G.

    2017-08-01

    The mathematical model of dislocation glide movement is used to calculate the signal of acoustic emission that accompanies the defect overcoming in a crystal. The elastic stress in the emitted signal is estimated. It is established that the acoustic emission signal in the case of dislocation separation from a defect substantially exceeds the signal in the case of deceleration of a gliding dislocation on a defect. The shapes of these signals also differ.

  13. Analyzing models for interactions of aptamers to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Dilson; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2014-10-01

    We have devised an experimental and theoretical model, based on fluorescent spectroscopy and molecular modelling, to describe the interaction of aptamer (selected against various protein targets) with proteins and albumins in particular. This model, described in this work, has allowed us to decipher the nature of the interactions between aptamers and albumins, the binding site of the aptamers to albumins, the potential role of primer binding to the albumin and expand to the ability of albumin to carry aptamers in the bloodstream, providing data to better understand the level of free aptamer for target binding. We are presenting the study of a variety of aptamers, including those against the MUC1 tumour marker, heparanase and human kallikrein 6 with bovine and human serum albumins and the effect these interactions may have on the bioavailability of the aptamer for target-specific binding and therapeutic activity.

  14. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.D.

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  15. Interaction of acoustic and vortical waves with an annular cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Igor V.

    Noise generated by a turbofan engine has both tonal and broadband noise components. It is shown in this thesis that a computationally efficient method for tonal noise can be applied for broadband noise as well. In the thesis, both types of noise are studied using linearized three-dimensional Euler equations model. First, a numerical method for tonal noise calculation is formulated using a high accuracy implicit scheme for the spatial derivatives and the assumption that the flow variables depend on time in a periodic fashion. The system of equations is then solved in frequency domain using time-marching technique. The high accuracy approximation allows to reduce the number of grid points while, due to factoring out of the time variable, grid-dependent time step can be used. In order to verify the method, comparison with existing codes is made for a number of geometries. Several acceleration techniques are tested, including parallel computing, grid clustering, and multigrid. Second, for an annular cascade with zero blade loading the results show that the mean flow swirl changes the physics of scattering in three major ways: (i) it modifies the number of acoustic modes in the duct, (ii) it changes their duct radial profile, and (iii) it causes significant amplitude and radial phase variations of the incident disturbances. The method is also applied toward loaded cascades and the results indicate significant effect of thickness at high frequency for cases of non-zero stagger and camber. Finally, a three-dimensional model is presented for fan broadband interaction noise based on spectral representation of the impinging upstream turbulence and a multiple scale analysis for the evolution of turbulence in a nonuniform swirling flow. Comparison of the radiated noise spectra for three-dimensional and two-dimensional cascades is presented.

  16. Analyzing Collaborative Interactions: Divergence, Shared Understanding and Construction of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puntambekar, Sadhana

    2006-01-01

    One of the most important facets of collaborative learning is the interaction between individual and collaborative learning activities--between divergent perspectives and shared knowledge building. Individuals bring divergent ideas into a collaborative environment. While individuals bring their own unique knowledge and perspectives, the second…

  17. Learning to Analyze and Code Accounting Transactions in Interactive Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentz, William F.; Ambler, Eric E.

    An interactive computer-assisted instructional (CAI) system, called CODE, is used to teach transactional analysis, or coding, in elementary accounting. The first major component of CODE is TEACH, a program which controls student input and output. Following the statement of a financial position on a cathode ray tube, TEACH describes an event to…

  18. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  19. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  20. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-09-08

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices.

  1. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices. PMID:26346448

  2. Use of interactive graphics to analyze QUICK-geometry: Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of using interactive computer graphics to display aircraft geometry to aid in detection and analysis of errors are described. The QUICK geometry system is reviewed and the Quick Interactive Graphics Analysis (QUIAGA) program is described. This QUIAGA program was developed to exercise the QUICK geometry subroutines to examine in several modes on a graphics terminal. Its use in the detection and analysis of errors in the QUICK geometry definition can be of great assistance in speedily arriving at a correct analytical geometry description for flow field computation. Experience with the program in developing a QUICK geometry model of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter is used to show some of its features. Appendixes giving details of program usage and an example session are included.

  3. Interactive interface for visualizing and analyzing multispectral solar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Neal E.; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    1997-03-01

    We present an interactive software tool for manipulating image data, especially high resolution multi-spectral solar movies and images from several different instruments. This tool contains procedures for distortion removal for ground based solar movies, correlation tracking, image alignments, data compression, 3D FOurier filtering, interactive viewing of space/time slices in movies, and browsing through data cubes. This is a compete public domain package based on X windows and Unix which is currently running on Silicon Graphics and Digital Equipment workstations. These software tools are freely available to the international solar community. Many components are also applicable to image an movie analysis in astrophysics, space physics, and earth sciences. They are available with documentation via our web pages under http://www.space.lockheed.com.

  4. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  5. Interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in a stochastic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, N.; Peterson, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    In the Stanford radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) an electromagnetic signal is made to scatter from a moving acoustic pulse train. Under a Bragg-scatter condition maximum electromagnetic scattering occurs. The scattered radio signal contains temperature and wind information as a function of the acoustic-pulse position. In this investigation RASS performance is assessed in an atmosphere characterized by the presence of turbulence and mean atmospheric parameters. The only assumption made is that the electromagnetic wave is not affected by stochastic perturbations in the atmosphere. It is concluded that the received radio signal depends strongly on the intensity of turbulence for altitudes of the acoustic pulse greater than the coherence length of propagation. The effect of mean vertical wind and mean temperature on the strength of the received signal is also demonstrated to be insignificant. Mean horizontal winds, however, shift the focus of the reflected electromagnetic energy from its origin, resulting in a decrease in received signal level when a monostatic radio-frequency (RF) system is used. For a bistatic radar configuration with space diversified receiving antennas, the shifting of the acoustic pulse makes possible the remote measurement of the horizontal wind component.

  6. Acoustic effects at interaction of laser radiation with a liquid accompanied by optical breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, A. V.; Nagorny, I. G.

    2012-09-04

    The experimental researches of acoustic emission from optical breakdown in liquids are presented. Spectral characteristics and power of the acoustic waves generated in a liquid by optical breakdown at interaction of laser radiation with the wavelength of 532 nanometers were studied. It is shown, that two spectral maxima characterizing acoustic emission are observed. The shift of low-frequency maximum depending on the laser energy pulse is observed. As a whole, the linear dependence of acoustic pressure on the energy of laser pulse is observed. It is shown, that using acoustic data it is possible to reproduce function R(t) which will be in accord with characteristic dependences R(t), obtained from optical data. The last is especially important for breakdown studying in opaque environments.

  7. A numerical analysis of tonal acoustics in rotor-stator interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangwalla, A. A.; Rai, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the unsteady, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a system of patched grids for a rotor-stator configuration of an axial turbine. The study focuses on the plurality of spinning modes that are present in such an interaction. The propagation of these modes in the upstream and downstream regions is analyzed and compared with numerical results. It was found that the numerically calculated tonal acoustics could be affected by the type of numerical boundary conditions employed at the inlet and exit of the computational boundaries and the grid spacing in the upstream and downstream regions. Results in the form of surface pressure amplitudes and the spectra of turbine tones and their far field behavior are presented. Numerical results and experimental data are compared wherever possible. The 'mode-content' for different harmonics of blade-passage frequency is shown to conform with that predicted by a kinematical analysis.

  8. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  9. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  10. Analyzing Groundwater-Vegetation Interactions using a Dynamic Agroecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, M. E.; Kucharik, C. J.; Loheide, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is a crucial source of water for vegetation, especially in arid and semiarid environments in many regions around the world and its availability controls the distribution and the physiology of plant species. However, the impact of groundwater on vegetation is not completely understood mainly due to the limited ability of current models to simulate groundwater and vegetation interactions. Existing land surface models (LSM) simulate water and energy fluxes among soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems in a process-based way, but lack a detailed simulation of soil water movement in the unsaturated zone, particularly when groundwater is present. Furthermore, there are only a few available LSM and/or process based vegetation models that can simulate agroecosystems, which are as important to understand as natural ecosystems considering they occupy approximately 40% of the global land surface. On the other hand, current physically-based, variably-saturated soil water flux models are able to accurately simulate water movement in the unsaturated zone. However, they often lack a detailed plant physiology component making it difficult to understand plant responses to both variations in energy fluxes and upward capillary fluxes in shallow groundwater environments. To connect these two different model types, the objectives of this study are (1) to incorporate an advanced dynamic agroecosystem model (Agro-IBIS) and a variably saturated soil water flow model (Hydrus-1D) into a single framework that is capable of simulating groundwater and plant/crop system interactions in a fully, physically-based fashion, and (2) to apply this model using observed climate records to better understand the responses of managed and natural ecosystems to varied water table depths under inter-annual climate forcing conditions. The model results show that as the water table becomes shallower, (1) soil temperature decreases due to the moisture content driven effects on the thermal diffusivity of

  11. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Simulation of Vocalization of a Non-song Bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian; Have Rasmussen, Jeppe; Elemans, Coen; Complex Flow Modeling; Simulation Lab Team; Elemans Lab Team

    2016-11-01

    The myoelastic-aerodynamic mechanism of vocalization was recently evidenced in birds across a wide range of taxa, which, for a long time, was believed to generate sound based on the aerodynamic whistle mechanism. The objective of the current study is to: (1) develop a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics (FSA) interaction computational model of a non-song bird (rock pigeon); (2) strongly validate the computational model by comparing to the experimental data on the same bird model; (3) examine the data so as to generate new insights into the physics of vocalization of birds. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the air flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the LVM(lateral vibratory mass) vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. Geometric structure of the syrinx, including syringeal lumen, LVM, position of tracheal rings, is based on CT scan of a rock pigeon. The LVM is simulated as isotropic material according to the experimental measurements. Simulation setup about the bronchial pressure, static deformation due to air sac pressure also follows the setup in the experiments. Results including the fundamental frequency, air flow rate, gap, vibration shape will be analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

  12. Analyzing Interactive QA Dialogues Using Logistic Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Manuel; Bernardi, Raffaella; Baroni, Marco; Dinh, Le Thanh

    With traditional Question Answering (QA) systems having reached nearly satisfactory performance, an emerging challenge is the development of successful Interactive Question Answering (IQA) systems. Important IQA subtasks are the identification of a dialogue-dependent typology of Follow Up Questions (FU Qs), automatic detection of the identified types, and the development of different context fusion strategies for each type. In this paper, we show how a system relying on shallow cues to similarity between utterances in a narrow dialogue context and other simple information sources, embedded in a machine learning framework, can improve FU Q answering performance by implicitly detecting different FU Q types and learning different context fusion strategies to help re-ranking their candidate answers.

  13. Analyzing wind turbine flow interaction through vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; D'Elia, Gianluca; Astolfi, Davide; Mucchi, Emiliano; Giorgio, Dalpiaz; Terzi, Ludovico

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines commonly undergo non-stationary flow and, not rarely, even rather extreme phenomena. In particular, rough terrains represent a challenging testing ground, because of the combination of terrain-driven flow and wakes. It is therefore crucial to assess the impact of dynamic loads on the turbines. In this work, tower and drive-train vibrations are analyzed, from a subcluster of four turbines of a wind farm sited in a very complex terrain. The main outcome of the study is that it is possible to start from the analysis of wind conditions and interpret how wakes manifest in the vibrations of the turbines, both at structural level (tower vibrations) and at the drive-train level. This wind to gear approach therefore allows to build a connection between a flow phenomenon and a mechanical phenomenon (vibrations) and can be precious to assess loads in different working conditions.

  14. A theoretical prediction of the acoustic pressure generated by turbulence-flame front interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of momentum annd continuity are combined and linearized yielding the one dimensional nonhomogeneous acoustic wave equation. Three terms in the non-homogeneous equation act as acoustic sources and are taken to be forcing functions acting on the homogeneous wave equation. The three source terms are: fluctuating entropy, turbulence gradients, and turbulence-flame interactions. Each source term is discussed. The turbulence-flame interaction source is used as the basis for computing the source acoustic pressure from the Fourier transformed wave equation. Pressure fluctuations created in turbopump gas generators and turbines may act as a forcing function for turbine and propellant tube vibrations in Earth to orbit space propulsion systems and could reduce their life expectancy. A preliminary assessment of the acoustic pressure fluctuations in such systems is presented.

  15. A theoretical prediction of the acoustic pressure generated by turbulence-flame front interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of momentum and continuity are combined and linearized yielding the one dimensional nonhomogeneous acoustic wave equation. Three terms in the non-homogeneous equation act as acoustic sources and are taken to be forcing functions acting on the homogeneous wave equation. The three source terms are: fluctuating entropy, turbulence gradients, and turbulence-flame interactions. Each source term is discussed. The turbulence-flame interaction source is used as the basis for computing the source acoustic pressure from the Fourier transformed wave equation. Pressure fluctuations created in turbopump gas generators and turbines may act as a forcing function for turbine and propellant tube vibrations in earth to orbit space propulsion systems and could reduce their life expectancy. A preliminary assessment of the acoustic pressure fluctuations in such systems is presented.

  16. Use of interactive graphics to analyze QUICK-geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The QUICK InterActive Graphics Analysis (QUIAGA) program and its advantages for displaying aircraft QUICK-geometry to aid in detection and analysis of errors are described. The QUICK-geometry system generates a completely analytical aircraft geometry description for use by finite-difference flow codes. The QUIAGA program was developed to exercise the QUICK-geometry subroutines to examine the analytic definition of a configuration by plotting cross sections and body lines on a graphics terminal. A number of options are available, including multiple cross-section views, hidden-line removal, and display of control point locations. Use of these options for the detection and analysis of errors in the QUICK-geometry definition can be of great assistance in speedily arriving at a correct analytical geometry description for flow-field computation. The QUIAGA program has been used in developing a QUICK-geometry model of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter, and examples from this experience are given to show some of the program's features. Details of program usage and an example session are given in the appendixes.

  17. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion acoustic waves in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Over the years, coronal heating has been the most fascinating question among the scientific community. In the present article, a heating mechanism has been proposed based on the wave-wave interaction. Under this wave-wave interaction, the high frequency kinetic Alfvén wave interacts with the low frequency ion acoustic wave. These waves are three dimensionally propagating and nonlinearly coupled through ponderomotive nonlinearity. A numerical code based on pseudo-spectral technique has been developed for solving these normalized dynamical equations. Localization of kinetic Alfvén wave field has been examined, and magnetic power spectrum has also been analyzed which shows the cascading of energy to higher wavenumbers, and this cascading has been found to have Kolmogorov scaling, i.e., k-5 /3 . A breakpoint appears after Kolmogorov scaling and next to this spectral break; a steeper scaling has been obtained. The presented nonlinear interaction for coronal loops plasmas is suggested to generate turbulent spectrum having Kolmogorov scaling in the inertial range and steepened scaling in the dissipation range. Since Kolmogorov turbulence is considered as the main source for coronal heating; therefore, the suggested mechanism will be a useful tool to understand the mystery of coronal loop heating through Kolmogorov turbulence and dissipation.

  18. Analysis of the Role of Update Rate and System Latency in Interactive Virtual Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Technical Monitor); Johnson, Gerald (Technical Monitor); Frey, Mary Anne (Technical Monitor); Schneider, Victor S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of virtual acoustics is to simulate the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener freely moving around within an environment. This paper discusses some of the engineering constraints that may be faced during implementation and the perceptual consequences of these constraints. In particular, the perceptual impact of parameters like the update rate and overall system latency of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  19. Analyzing Human-Landscape Interactions: Tools That Integrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvoleff, Alex; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Humans have transformed much of Earth's land surface, giving rise to loss of biodiversity, climate change, and a host of other environmental issues that are affecting human and biophysical systems in unexpected ways. To confront these problems, environmental managers must consider human and landscape systems in integrated ways. This means making use of data obtained from a broad range of methods (e.g., sensors, surveys), while taking into account new findings from the social and biophysical science literatures. New integrative methods (including data fusion, simulation modeling, and participatory approaches) have emerged in recent years to address these challenges, and to allow analysts to provide information that links qualitative and quantitative elements for policymakers. This paper brings attention to these emergent tools while providing an overview of the tools currently in use for analysis of human-landscape interactions. Analysts are now faced with a staggering array of approaches in the human-landscape literature—in an attempt to bring increased clarity to the field, we identify the relative strengths of each tool, and provide guidance to analysts on the areas to which each tool is best applied. We discuss four broad categories of tools: statistical methods (including survival analysis, multi-level modeling, and Bayesian approaches), GIS and spatial analysis methods, simulation approaches (including cellular automata, agent-based modeling, and participatory modeling), and mixed-method techniques (such as alternative futures modeling and integrated assessment). For each tool, we offer an example from the literature of its application in human-landscape research. Among these tools, participatory approaches are gaining prominence for analysts to make the broadest possible array of information available to researchers, environmental managers, and policymakers. Further development of new approaches of data fusion and integration across sites or disciplines

  20. Analyzing human-landscape interactions: tools that integrate.

    PubMed

    Zvoleff, Alex; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Humans have transformed much of Earth's land surface, giving rise to loss of biodiversity, climate change, and a host of other environmental issues that are affecting human and biophysical systems in unexpected ways. To confront these problems, environmental managers must consider human and landscape systems in integrated ways. This means making use of data obtained from a broad range of methods (e.g., sensors, surveys), while taking into account new findings from the social and biophysical science literatures. New integrative methods (including data fusion, simulation modeling, and participatory approaches) have emerged in recent years to address these challenges, and to allow analysts to provide information that links qualitative and quantitative elements for policymakers. This paper brings attention to these emergent tools while providing an overview of the tools currently in use for analysis of human-landscape interactions. Analysts are now faced with a staggering array of approaches in the human-landscape literature--in an attempt to bring increased clarity to the field, we identify the relative strengths of each tool, and provide guidance to analysts on the areas to which each tool is best applied. We discuss four broad categories of tools: statistical methods (including survival analysis, multi-level modeling, and Bayesian approaches), GIS and spatial analysis methods, simulation approaches (including cellular automata, agent-based modeling, and participatory modeling), and mixed-method techniques (such as alternative futures modeling and integrated assessment). For each tool, we offer an example from the literature of its application in human-landscape research. Among these tools, participatory approaches are gaining prominence for analysts to make the broadest possible array of information available to researchers, environmental managers, and policymakers. Further development of new approaches of data fusion and integration across sites or disciplines pose

  1. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  2. Simulation of the Acoustic Pulse Expected from the Interaction of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos and Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Acoustic Ultra-high energy Neutrino Detection (SAUND), that uses existing hydrophone arrays to detect UHE neutrinos from the acoustic pulse generated by...Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino and seawater. When a neutrino interacts with seawater, the reaction creates a long, narrow shower of sub-atomic...particles. The energy from this reaction causes nearly instantaneous heating of the seawater on an acoustic timescale. The acoustic pulse created by the

  3. Comparison of experimental and analytical predictions of rotor blade-vortex interactions using model scale acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Elliott, J. W.; Hoad, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is studied using a model scale rotor acoustic data base and an analytical rotor wake prediction method. The variation of BVI acoustic levels with vehicle flight conditions (forward speed and disk attitude) is presented. Calculations of probable BVI locations on the rotor disk are made for a range of operating conditions using the measured acoustic signals and an acoustic ray tracing technique. Analytical predictions of possible BVI locations on the rotor disk are made using a generalized distorted wake analysis program. Comparisons of the interaction locations are made with the results of both the analytic approach and the acoustic ray tracing technique.

  4. Summary of Recent Results in Acoustic Bottom Interaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-19

    higher frequencies the increased shear wave attenuation decreases the magnitude of this peak structure. At high frequencies the oscillatory structure...34Thermoviscous Regions for the Principal and Higher Sound Propagation Modes in Tubes," submitted to. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America for...apparent since terms of order A and higher are being neglected in Eq. (9) while they are being retained in Eq. (2) with the coupling coefficients. An

  5. Influence of Acoustic Field Structure on Polarization Characteristics of Acousto-optic Interaction in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromets, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    Influence of acoustic field structure on polarization characteristics of acousto-optic interaction is investigated. It is shown that inhomogeneity of acoustic field and mechanism of ultrasound excitation causes changes in values of acousto-optic figure of merit for ordinary and extraordinary light beams in comparison with theoretic values. The theoretic values were derived under assumption that acoustic wave is homogeneous. Experimental analysis was carried out in acousto-optic cell based on lithium niobate crystal where the acoustic wave propagates at the angle 13 degrees to Z axis of the crystal. We used three different methods of ultrasound generation in the crystal: by means of external piezotransducer, by interdigital transducer and by two sets of electrodes placed on top of the crystal surface. In the latter case, the first pair of the electrodes was directed along X crystal axis, while the second pair of the electrodes was directed orthogonally to X crystal axis and the direction of ultrasound. Obtained values for diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary polarized optical beams were qualitatively different which may be caused by spatial inhomogeneity of the generated acoustic waves in the crystal. Structure of acoustic field generated by these sets of electrodes was examined by laser probing. We performed the analysis of the acoustic field intensity using acousto-optic method. A relation of diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary light waves was measured during each iteration of the laser probing.

  6. Ground cross-modal impedance as a tool for analyzing ground/plate interaction and ground wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Grau, L; Laulagnet, B

    2015-05-01

    An analytical approach is investigated to model ground-plate interaction based on modal decomposition and the two-dimensional Fourier transform. A finite rectangular plate subjected to flexural vibration is coupled with the ground and modeled with the Kirchhoff hypothesis. A Navier equation represents the stratified ground, assumed infinite in the x- and y-directions and free at the top surface. To obtain an analytical solution, modal decomposition is applied to the structure and a Fourier Transform is applied to the ground. The result is a new tool for analyzing ground-plate interaction to resolve this problem: ground cross-modal impedance. It allows quantifying the added-stiffness, added-mass, and added-damping from the ground to the structure. Similarity with the parallel acoustic problem is highlighted. A comparison between the theory and the experiment shows good matching. Finally, specific cases are investigated, notably the influence of layer depth on plate vibration.

  7. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  8. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  9. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-01

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  10. Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-01-21

    The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

  11. Analogies between the measurement of acoustic impedance via the reaction on the source method and the automatic microwave vector network analyzer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert; Post, John

    2003-10-01

    One useful method of acoustic impedance measurement involves the measurement of the electrical impedance ``looking into'' the electrical port of a reciprocal electroacoustic transducer. This reaction on the source method greatly facilitates the measurement of acoustic impedance by borrowing highly refined techniques to measure electrical impedance. It is also well suited for in situ acoustic impedance measurements. In order to accurately determine acoustic impedance from the measured electrical impedance, the characteristics of the transducer must be accurately known, i.e., the characteristics of the transducer must be ``removed'' completely from the data. The measurement of acoustic impedance via the measurement of the reaction on the source is analogous to modern microwave measurements made with an automatic vector network analyzer. The action of the analyzer is described as de-embedding the desired data (such as acoustic impedance) from the raw data. Such measurements are fundamentally substitution measurements in that the transducer's characteristics are determined by measuring a set of reference standards. The reaction on the source method is extended to take advantage of improvements in microwave measurement techniques which allow calibration via imperfect standard loads. This removes one of the principal weaknesses of the method in that the requirement of high-quality reference standards is relaxed.

  12. Vector network analyzer measurement of the amplitude of an electrically excited surface acoustic wave and validation by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, I. S.; Croset, B.; Largeau, L.; Rovillain, P.; Thevenard, L.; Duquesne, J.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves are used in magnetism to initiate magnetization switching, in microfluidics to control fluids and particles in lab-on-a-chip devices, and in quantum systems like two-dimensional electron gases, quantum dots, photonic cavities, and single carrier transport systems. For all these applications, an easy tool is highly needed to measure precisely the acoustic wave amplitude in order to understand the underlying physics and/or to optimize the device used to generate the acoustic waves. We present here a method to determine experimentally the amplitude of surface acoustic waves propagating on Gallium Arsenide generated by an interdigitated transducer. It relies on Vector Network Analyzer measurements of S parameters and modeling using the Coupling-Of-Modes theory. The displacements obtained are in excellent agreement with those measured by a very different method based on X-ray diffraction measurements.

  13. A hierarchical generalization of the acoustic reciprocity theorem involving higher-order derivatives and interaction quantities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju; Li, Jie; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Ning

    2016-10-01

    An acoustic reciprocity theorem is generalized, for a smoothly varying perturbed medium, to a hierarchy of reciprocity theorems including higher-order derivatives of acoustic fields. The standard reciprocity theorem is the first member of the hierarchy. It is shown that the conservation of higher-order interaction quantities is related closely to higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Then integral reciprocity theorems are obtained by applying Gauss's divergence theorem, which give explicit integral representations connecting higher-order interactions and higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Some possible applications to an inverse problem are also discussed.

  14. Acousto-Optic Interaction in Surface Acoustic Waves and Its Application to Real Time Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-30

    ACOUSTO - OPTIC INTERACTION IN SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVES AND ITS APP--ETC(U) DEC 77 0 SCHUMER, P DAS NOOOIJ -75-C-0772 NCLASSIFIED MA-ONR-30 Nt.EE E’h...CHART NAT*NAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1-63- ACOUSTO - OPTIC INTERACTION IN SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVES AND ITS APPLICATION TO REAL TIME SIGNAL PROCESSING By 00 D... Acousto - optics , Integrated optics, Optical Signal Processing. 20. AbSKTRACT (Continue an reverse side it neceary and idewnt& by block mum ber) The

  15. Helicopter blade-vortex interaction locations: Scale-model acoustics and free-wake analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a model rotor acoustic test in the Langley 4by 7-Meter Tunnel are used to evaluate a free-wake analytical technique. An acoustic triangulation technique is used to locate the position in the rotor disk where the blade-vortex interaction noise originates. These locations, along with results of the rotor free-wake analysis, are used to define the geometry of the blade-vortex interaction noise phenomena as well as to determine if the free-wake analysis is a capable diagnostic tool. Data from tests of two teetering rotor systems are used in these analyses.

  16. A Model of the Acoustic Interactions Occurring Under Arctic Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-22

    04 0) 4 p (d o U to4 Cr) 0u0E-4 Vo oo Qin w Ac4o *Q V *. >(29.4 C9) CH * -4(I H~H *dD)cO’O 0~4 040)) H 44H a) Cr o n U) . *) 0U )~ Q 0 4r d) -H toCi0Q...Applications International Corporation ( SAIC ) has developed a scaling model for the Arctic environment, termed the SAIC Interim Scattering Model for... Yu . Lysanov, 1982, Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics, Springer-Verlag. Brekhovskikh, L., 1980, Waves in Layered Media, Academic Press, Inc. Browne, M. J

  17. Interaction of surface and bulk acoustic waves with a two-dimensional semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, V. M. Chaplik, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    The interaction of a surface elastic Rayleigh wave with an electron-hole plasma in a two-dimensional semimetal has been theoretically studied as determined by the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms. Dispersion equations describing the coupled plasmon-acoustic modes for both types of interaction are derived, and damping of the Rayleigh wave is calculated. The damping of the acoustic and optical plasmon modes, which is related to the sound emission by plasma oscillations into the substrate volume, is calculated and it is shown that this sound emission is predominantly determined by the acoustic plasmon mode in the case of a deformation potential mechanism and by the optical mode in the case of a piezoelectric mechanism.

  18. Acoustic pulse interaction with a submerged functionally graded material hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Abbasion, Saeed; Mirzaei, Yaser

    2011-01-01

    A detailed study is undertaken to analyze the two-dimensional transient fluid-structure interaction of a plane acoustic pressure pulse with an arbitrarily thick, isotropic, functionally graded, hollow cylinder of infinite length, submerged in and filled with non-viscous compressible fluids. A laminate approximate model is adopted to deal with the assumed power-law variation of the constituents' volume fractions across the thickness of the inhomogeneous cylinder. The problem solution is obtained by employing the classical method of modal expansion in conjunction with the powerful Transfer matrix solution technique and Durbin's numerical Laplace inversion algorithm. Detailed numerical examples for the transient responses of water-filled and submerged thick-walled TiC-Al FGM cylinders with ceramic or metal rich material compositional gradient profiles under wideband and narrowband Gaussian incident shock loadings are presented and discussed. Many of the interesting dynamic features in the transient shell-shock interaction are addressed through appropriate plots of the internal/external pressure field as well as the induced dynamic stress concentrations within the shell material. Also, the response curves for the FGM cylinders are compared with those of equivalent bi-laminate shells containing comparable total volume fractions of constituent materials. A limiting case is considered and the validity of the work is established by comparison with the data obtained with the aid of a commercial finite element package.

  19. Interactions of acoustic and somatosensory evoked responses in a polysensory cortex of the cat.

    PubMed

    Toldi, J; Fehér, O

    1987-01-01

    Interactions of acoustic and somatosensory evoked potentials were studied in the anterior suprasylvian gyrus of the cat. The interactions showed dynamic changes and were susceptible to different kinds of influences. The interactions could be influenced by synchronous activation of the acoustic and somatosensory inputs with 2 Hz frequency, or by elevating the stimulus frequency. Interactions could be influenced by amphetamine and gamma-glutamyl-taurine, drugs known as capable of influencing the arousal level of the brain. The antagonists of amphetamine prevented this effect. Drugs acting on the cortical GABA-ergic system proved also to be decisive in the interactions of evoked potentials of different origins. In some experiments unit activity was recorded parallel with evoked potentials.

  20. Interaction of High Frequency Acoustic Waves and Optical Waves Propagating in Single Mode Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Ramon Perez

    This paper develops a frequency dependent model for the acousto-optic interaction with a single mode fiber of acoustic waves having wavelengths comparable to the fiber diameter. This paper also presents optical techniques for experimental observation and measurement of such effects. The acoustic waves are both normally and obliquelly incident on the fiber. The solutions to the elastic problem studied here are constructed using scalar and vector potentials. The principal strains induced by a plane wave propagating in a fluid is calculated through the solution of the wave equation and the associated boundary condition. The optical beam propagation is analyzed starting with Maxwell's, equations and the required solution for single mode (degenerate double mode) propagation is presented. For the perturbed fiber the anisotropic solution is discussed. The optical indicatrix is derived from the electric energy density, with the major axis parallel to the induced principal strains obtained from the solution of the elastic problem. The solution of the optical indicatrix equation (index ellipsoid) yields two independent propagation modes that are linear polarized plane waves with two different propagation velocities. The induced phase shift and birefringence are calculated from the index ellipsoid. The birefringence and phase shift are also measured experimentally using a fiber optic interferometer and a fiber optic polariscope. The experimental apparatus is discussed in detail and the techniques used to make the measurements are presented. The results are separated into two parts: first, the results for ultrasonic waves of normal incidence are presented, theoretical and experimental results are discussed, and the two compared; second, the results for angular incidence are presented in the same format as above, and compared with the results for perpendicular incidence.

  1. Moisture adsorption desorption characteristics of stainless steel tubing measured by ball surface acoustic wave trace moisture analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Toshishiro; Akao, Shingo; Oizumi, Toru; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2017-07-01

    A ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture analyzer (TMA) was applied to measuring the adsorption and desorption (AD) characteristics of a stainless steel tube. For the first time, two-frequency measurement for precise temperature compensation was attempted at intervals of 3 s using a burst waveform undersampling circuit. We succeeded in measuring the variations of moisture transit time and dry-down dynamics caused by inner surface treatments such as bright annealing (BA), electropolishing (EP), and electrochemical buffing (ECB) using a sample-tube length of only 100 mm at a flow rate of 0.1 L/min. Net moisture adsorption was evaluated from the measured adsorption subtracted by the background adsorption. As a result, it was found that the adsorption on the ECB tube was smaller than those on EP and BA tubes by 1/3 and 1/4, respectively, at a baseline concentration of 13 ppbv. From these results, it was demonstrated that the ball SAW TMA could be used for measuring the AD characteristics of stainless steel tubes with various surface treatments.

  2. Interaction of the acoustic boundary layer with turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehler, G.

    Sound attenuation in flow ducts with rigid walls was examined. A pure shear wave with large acoustic boundary layer thickness was excited by streamwise oscillations of the wall of an oil tunnel carrying a two dimensional fully developed turbulent flow with a thick viscous sublayer. A hot-film probe measured the streamwise component of the velocity. Relative to the oscillating wall, a phase averaging procedure gives magnitude and phase of the fluctuating velocity of the shear wave propagating into the turbulent flow. Dividing the shear stress by the shear rate yields the 'effective' viscosity, which consists of the molecular viscosity and the eddy viscosity. Further information is obtained by calculating the turbulent component of the oscillating shear stress. The modulation of bursts by the shear wave plays a dominant role in the production and propagation of the oscillating part of the turbulent shear stress.

  3. Fluid-acoustic interactions and their impact on pathological voiced speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by vibration of the vocal fold structures. Vocal fold dynamics arise from aerodynamic pressure loadings, tissue properties, and acoustic modulation of the driving pressures. Recent speech science advancements have produced a physiologically-realistic fluid flow solver (BLEAP) capable of prescribing asymmetric intraglottal flow attachment that can be easily assimilated into reduced order models of speech. The BLEAP flow solver is extended to incorporate acoustic loading and sound propagation in the vocal tract by implementing a wave reflection analog approach for sound propagation based on the governing BLEAP equations. This enhanced physiological description of the physics of voiced speech is implemented into a two-mass model of speech. The impact of fluid-acoustic interactions on vocal fold dynamics is elucidated for both normal and pathological speech through linear and nonlinear analysis techniques. Supported by NSF Grant CBET-1036280.

  4. Thermo-acoustical molecular interaction study in binary mixtures of glycerol and ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Juglan, K. C.; Kumar, Harsh

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity are measured over the entire composition range for binary liquid mixtures of glycerol (CH2OH-CHOH-CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) at different temperatures and constant frequency of 2MHz using ultrasonic interferometer, specific gravity bottle and viscometer respectively. Measured experimental values are used to obtained various acoustical parameters such as adiabatic compressibility, acoustic impedance, intermolecular free length, relaxation time, ultrasonic attenuation, effective molar weight, free volume, available volume, molar volume, Wada's constant, Rao's constant, Vander Waal's constant, internal pressure, Gibb's free energy and enthalpy. The variation in acoustical parameters are interpreted in terms of molecular interactions between the components of molecules of binary liquid mixtures.

  5. Resonant mode interactions and the bifurcation of combustion-driven acoustic oscillations in resonance tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, S.B. . Combustion Research Facility)

    1994-12-01

    Acoustic oscillations in practical combustion devices such as pulse combustors and rocket motors, whether desirable or not, are properly interpreted as combustion instabilities. A nonlinear stability analysis of the corresponding fluid motions than shows that the nonsteady behavior is governed by infinitely coupled systems of nonlinear evolution equations for the amplitudes of the classical acoustic modes. However, under certain conditions, it has been conjectured that relatively low-order truncations can give qualitatively correct physical results. In the present work, one particular model of a pulse combustor is considered, and a parameter regime in the neighborhood of a primary acoustic bifurcation where either one or a pair of purely longitudinal acoustic modes achieves a positive linear growth rate is focused upon. In the first case, it is formally shown that a decoupling occurs such that a two-mode approximation consisting of the linearly unstable mode and its first resonant harmonic completely determines the dynamics of the oscillation. In the later case, it is again demonstrated that a decoupling occurs, and although mode interactions require the retention of additional modes besides the two linearly unstable modes and their first resonant harmonics, a relatively low-order dynamical system still governs the bifurcation behavior. The presence of two linearly unstable modes is then shown to lead to more complicated dynamics, including the stable secondary bifurcation of a multiperiodic acoustic oscillation from one of the single-period primary branches.

  6. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented.

  7. Capturing the acoustic response of historical spaces for interactive music performance and recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woszczyk, Wieslaw; Martens, William

    2004-10-01

    Performers engaged in musical recording while they are located in relatively dry recording studios generally find their musical performance facilitated when they are provided with synthetic reverberation. This well established practice is extended in the project described here to include highly realistic virtual acoustic recreation of original rooms in which Haydn taught his students to play pianoforte. The project has two primary components, the first of which is to capture for posterity the acoustic response of such historical rooms that may no longer be available or functional for performance. The project's second component is to reproduce as accurately as possible the virtual acoustic interactions between a performer and the re-created acoustic space, as performers, during their performance, move relative to their instrument and the boundaries of surrounding enclosure. In the first of two presentations on this ongoing project, the method for measurement of broadband impulse responses for these historical rooms is described. The test signal is radiated by a group of omnidirectional loudspeakers approximating the layout and the complex directional radiation pattern of the pianoforte, and the room response is sampled by a spaced microphone array. The companion presentation will describe the method employed for virtual acoustic reproduction for the performer.

  8. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  9. Acoustic interaction of humpback whales and whale-watching boats.

    PubMed

    Au, W W; Green, M

    2000-06-01

    The underwater acoustic noise of five representative whale-watching boats used in the waters of west Maui was measured in order to study the effects of boat noise on humpback whales. The first set of measurements were performed on 9 and 10 March, close to the peak of the whale season. The ambient noise was relatively high with the major contribution from many chorusing humpback whales. Measurements of boat sounds were contaminated by this high ambient background noise. A second set of measurements was performed on 28 and 29 April, towards the end of the humpback whale season. In both sets of measurements, two of the boats were inflatables with outboard engines, two were larger coastal boats with twin inboard diesel engines and the fifth was a small water plane area twin hull (SWATH) ship with inter-island cruise capabilities. The inflatable boats with outboard engines produced very complex sounds with many bands of tonal-like components. The boats with inboard engines produced less intense sounds with fewer tonal bands. One-third octave band measurements of ambient noise measured on 9 March indicated a maximum sound pressure level of about 123 dB re 1 microPa at 315 Hz. The maximum sound pressure level of 127 dB at 315 Hz was measured for the SWATH ship. One of the boats with outboard engines produced sounds between 2 and 4 kHz that were about 8-10 dB greater than the level of background humpback whale sounds at the peak of the whale season. We concluded that it is unlikely that the levels of sounds produced by the boats in our study would have any grave effects on the auditory system of humpback whales.

  10. FE Modelling of the Fluid-Structure-Acoustic Interaction for the Vocal Folds Self-Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švancara, Pavel; Horáček, J.; Hrůza, V.

    The flow induced self-oscillation of the human vocal folds in interaction with acoustic processes in the simplified vocal tract model was explored by three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. Developed FE model includes vocal folds pretension before phonation, large deformations of the vocal fold tissue, vocal folds contact, fluid-structure interaction, morphing the fluid mesh according the vocal folds motion (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach), unsteady viscous compressible airflow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and airflow separation during the glottis closure. Iterative partitioned approach is used for modelling the fluid-structure interaction. Computed results prove that the developed model can be used for simulation of the vocal folds self-oscillation and resulting acoustic waves. The developed model enables to numerically simulate an influence of some pathological changes in the vocal fold tissue on the voice production.

  11. Using degenerate parametric interaction of intense acoustic beams to amplify weak signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbatov, S. N.; Derybin, M. S.; Kas'yanov, D. A.; Kurin, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The paper considers the degenerate parametric interaction of an intense acoustic pumping beam and a weak signal beam at the subharmonic. The use of a special emitter system with independent signal emission at the harmonic and subharmonic made it possible to study the features of nonlinear interaction both for different amplitude levels and arbitrary phase relations of the fields at these frequencies. Just as predicted in the theory, the experiment showed that signal amplification at the subharmonic hardly occurs at all. It is shown that the use of odd field harmonics, which are absent for a zero amplitude of the signal wave, makes it possible to substantially increase the efficiency of isolating a weak signal wave. The interaction of beams for large and small acoustic Reynolds numbers of the signal wave is studied.

  12. Long-range acoustic interactions in insect swarms: an adaptive gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-07-01

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which are thought to interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges’ acoustic sensing, we show that our ‘adaptive gravity’ model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. Additionally, the adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  13. Observed Polarization Dependence Of The Surface Acoustic Wave(Saw) Acousto-Optic (A-0) Interaction In Lithium Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, D. K.; Garvin, C.

    1987-11-01

    A polarization sensitivity was observed in the bandwidth and interaction efficiency during the investigation of the SAW acousto-optic (AO) interaction in lithium niobate. It was observed that input light linearly polarized along the propagation direction of the acoustic beam allowed an increased interaction bandwidth when compared with input illumination polarized orthogonal to the acoustic propagation direction. The polarization of the optical beam remained unchanged to within one part in 10,000. Experimental findings show that this polarization sensitivity was parameterized by acoustic wavelength. Results of the wavelength parameterization are reported and comparisons drawn to theoretical work performed in the Johns Hopkins University study funded by Harry Diamond Laboratories.

  14. Phonon-Electron Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductor Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Vikrant J.; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q. PMID:25001100

  15. Numerical investigation of acoustic radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legault, Anne; Ji, Minsuk; Wang, Meng

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of vortices interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat-plate airfoil at zero angle of attack are carried out to assess the applicability and accuracy of classical theories. Unsteady lift and sound are computed and compared with the predictions by theories of Sears and Amiet, which assume a thin-plate airfoil in an inviscid flow. A Navier-Stokes solver is used in the simulations, and therefore viscous effects are taken into consideration. For the thin-plate airfoil, the effect of viscosity is negligible. For a NACA 0012 airfoil, the viscous contribution to the unsteady lift and sound mainly comes from coherent vortex shedding in the wake of the airfoil and the interaction of the incoming vortices with the airfoil wake, which become stronger at higher Reynolds numbers for a 2-D laminar flow. When the flow is turbulent at chord Reynolds number of 4 . 8 ×105 , however, the viscous contribution becomes negligible as coherent vortex shedding is not present. Sound radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction at turbulent Reynolds numbers is computed numerically via Lighthill's theory and the result is compared with the predictions of Amiet and Curle. The effect of the airfoil thickness is also examined. Supported by ONR Grant N00014-09-1-1088.

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Non-Linear Interactions in Lithium Niobate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    X and Y, Z lithium niobate were investigated for two different angles of interaction. The mixed frequency was at least 8. 5 dB weaker than the...Introduction ............................ 165 5.2 Results for Y,Z LiNb0 3 with w1/w,22.6o ........................ 0............ 166 5.3 Results for 38, X ...LiNbO 3 with 11/w20.41 .................................... 173 *5.14 Results for 38, X LiNbO3 with (-1/’ 2 2.44 .. . . . ...... .. .. ...... 179 i Vi

  17. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15-to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual…

  18. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15-to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual…

  19. Tsunami mitigation by resonant triad interaction with acoustic-gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Usama

    2017-01-01

    Tsunamis have been responsible for the loss of almost a half million lives, widespread long lasting destruction, profound environmental effects, and global financial crisis, within the last two decades. The main tsunami properties that determine the size of impact at the shoreline are its wavelength and amplitude in the ocean. Here, we show that it is in principle possible to reduce the amplitude of a tsunami, and redistribute its energy over a larger space, through forcing it to interact with resonating acoustic-gravity waves. In practice, generating the appropriate acoustic-gravity modes introduces serious challenges due to the high energy required for an effective interaction. However, if the findings are extended to realistic tsunami properties and geometries, we might be able to mitigate tsunamis and so save lives and properties. Moreover, such a mitigation technique would allow for the harnessing of the tsunami's energy.

  20. Electronic transport in disordered chains mediated by interactions with acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, A. Ranciaro; Sales, M. O.; Moura, F. A. B. F. de

    2016-03-01

    We considered the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional disordered chains under the effect of electron-phonon interaction and an acoustic wave's pumping. Our procedure consists of a quantum mechanics formalism for the electron transport and a classical Harmonic Hamiltonian model for lattice vibrations. We also introduce an electron-lattice interaction by assuming electron energy transfer between neighboring atoms as an exponential function of its effective distance. In our model, the electron was initially localized at the first site of the chain and we also added pumping of an acoustic wave at the zeroth site. We solved numerically the dynamic equations for the electron and lattice performing calculations for the spreading of an electronic wave-packet. We report numerical evidences with regard to the sub-diffusive transport.

  1. Enhancement and suppression of opto-acoustic parametric interactions using optical feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhongyang; Zhao Chunnong; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    2010-01-15

    A three mode opto-acoustic parametric amplifier (OAPA) is created when two orthogonal optical modes in a high finesse optical cavity are coupled via an acoustic mode of the cavity mirror. Such interactions are predicted to occur in advanced long baseline gravitational wave detectors. They can have high positive gain, which leads to strong parametric instability. Here we show that an optical feedback scheme can enhance or suppress the parametric gain of an OAPA, allowing exploration of three-mode parametric interactions, especially in cavity systems that have insufficient optical power to achieve spontaneous instability. We derive analytical equations and show that optical feedback is capable of controlling predicted instabilities in advanced gravitational wave detectors within a time scale of 13approx10 s.

  2. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  3. Modality interactions alter the shape of acoustic mate preference functions in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2015-09-01

    Sexual selection takes place in complex environments where females evaluating male mating signals are confronted with stimuli from multiple sources and modalities. The pattern of expression of female preferences may be influenced by interactions between modalities, changing the shape of female preference functions, and thus ultimately altering the selective landscape acting on male signal evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the responses of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to acoustic male advertisement calls are affected by interactions with visual stimuli. We measured preference functions for several call traits under two experimental conditions: unimodal (only acoustic signals presented), and multimodal (acoustic signals presented along with a video-animated calling male). We found that females were more responsive to multimodal stimulus presentations and, compared to unimodal playbacks, had weaker preferences for temporal call characteristics. We compared the preference functions obtained in these two treatments to the distribution of male call characteristics to make inferences on the strength and direction of selection expected to act on male calls. Modality interactions have the potential to influence the course of signal evolution and thus are an important consideration in sexual selection studies. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Novel Acoustic Technology for Studying Free-Ranging Shark Social Behaviour by Recording Individuals' Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guttridge, Tristan L.; Gruber, Samuel H.; Krause, Jens; Sims, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Group behaviours are widespread among fish but comparatively little is known about the interactions between free-ranging individuals and how these might change across different spatio-temporal scales. This is largely due to the difficulty of observing wild fish groups directly underwater over long enough time periods to quantify group structure and individual associations. Here we describe the use of a novel technology, an animal-borne acoustic proximity receiver that records close-spatial associations between free-ranging fish by detection of acoustic signals emitted from transmitters on other individuals. Validation trials, held within enclosures in the natural environment, on juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris fitted with external receivers and transmitters, showed receivers logged interactions between individuals regularly when sharks were within 4 m (∼4 body lengths) of each other, but rarely when at 10 m distance. A field trial lasting 17 days with 5 juvenile lemon sharks implanted with proximity receivers showed one receiver successfully recorded association data, demonstrating this shark associated with 9 other juvenile lemon sharks on 128 occasions. This study describes the use of acoustic underwater proximity receivers to quantify interactions among wild sharks, setting the scene for new advances in understanding the social behaviours of marine animals. PMID:20174465

  5. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  6. Acoustic interaction in animal groups: signaling in noisy and social contexts.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; Freeberg, Todd M

    2008-08-01

    It has long been known that individuals of many species vocally communicate with one another in noisy environments and in rich contexts of social interaction. It has recently become clear that researchers interested in understanding acoustic communication in animal groups must study vocal signaling in these noisy and socially complex settings. Furthermore, recent methodological advances have made it increasingly clear that the authors can tackle these more complex questions effectively. The articles in this Special Issue stem from a Symposium held at the June 2006 meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, and illustrate some of the taxonomic and methodological diversity in studies aimed at understanding how acoustic communication functions in social grouping. This introduction to the Special Issue provides a brief overview of the articles and key ideas in this field of inquiry, and suggests some future directions to take the field to help us understand how social pressures in animal groups may influence, and be influenced by, acoustic signals. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  8. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Parametric Receiving Arrays, Focused Finite Amplitude Sound, and Dispersive Nonlinear Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    TenCate , who is supported by ONR Contract NOOO I 4-84-K-0574, in the completion of work on pure tones that interact in higher order modes of a...rectangular duct.26 Through collaboration with TenCate , Lind has acquired experience with the same experimental apparatus that he will use beginning I June...34 J. Acoust. Soc. " .. Am. 65.1127-1133(1979). 36. J. A TenCate and K F. Hamilton, "Dispersive nonlinear wave interactions in a rectangular duct," In

  9. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Parametric Receiving Arrays, Focused Finite Amplitude Sound, & Noncollinear Tone-Noise Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    plane waves that propagate in different directions. This approach was followed by TenCate and Hamilton [33,34], who investigated both theoretically...75, 1383-1391 (1984). • i I ■ [33] J. A. TenCate and M. F. Hamilton, "Dispersive NonUnear Wave Interactions in a Rect- angular Duct," in...and J. A. TenCate , "Sum and Difference Frequency Generation due to Noncollinear Wave Interaction in a Rectangular Duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 81

  10. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  11. The acoustic interaction of voices in ensemble: An inquiry into the phenomenon of voice matching and the perception of unaltered vocal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Neal Wayne

    It was the purpose of this study to examine and quantify the acoustic interaction of voices in ensemble, with specific consideration to the differences between placement (how voices respond to adjacent voices) and spacing (how voices respond to differences in the space between adjacent voices). This study, further, investigated whether there was any discernible acoustic phenomenon that delineated or defined when a vocal match was made, or if a vocal match was merely a matter of conductor preference. The acoustic data, further, were to be compared with the blend preferences of choral directors and voice teachers, and the preferences of the individual singers used. Information was collected concerning the acoustic appearance of choral blend. A reductionist approach regarding the variables for the study permitted detailed, quantifiable data pertinent to these aims. Two groups of three male singers were formed. Both groups were recorded in each possible solo, duet, and trio formation. The results were acoustically analyzed, anonymously considered by choral directors and voice teachers, and considered by the individual singers; the combination of acoustic analysis, auditor preference, and singer preference revealed specific trends with regard to both blend and vocal function. For Group 1, the combination of placement and lateral spacing provided the best alliance of acoustic analysis and auditor/singer preference, at a rate of 54% for placement/lateral spacing and 46% for placement/close spacing. Attention to acoustic placement alone was shown to be superior to spacing alone, and the combination of acoustic placement and spacing was only slightly more successful than placement alone. For Group 2, acoustic placement alone provided the best alliance of acoustic analysis and auditor/singer preference, at a rate of 50% each for close and lateral spacing. Attention to acoustic placement alone was shown to be superior to spacing alone, and the combination of acoustic

  12. On Acoustic Source Specification for Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Caesy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of measured source data to assess the effects of acoustic source specification on rotor-stator interaction noise predictions. Specifically, the acoustic propagation and radiation portions of a recently developed coupled computational approach are used to predict tonal rotor-stator interaction noise from a benchmark configuration. In addition to the use of full measured data, randomization of source mode relative phases is also considered for specification of the acoustic source within the computational approach. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to investigate the effects of various source descriptions on both inlet and exhaust predictions. The inclusion of additional modal source content is shown to have a much greater influence on the inlet results. Reasonable agreement between predicted and measured levels is achieved for the inlet, as well as the exhaust when shear layer effects are taken into account. For the number of trials considered, phase randomized predictions follow statistical distributions similar to those found in previous statistical source investigations. The shape of the predicted directivity pattern relative to measurements also improved with phase randomization, having predicted levels generally within one standard deviation of the measured levels.

  13. Virtual acoustic reproduction of historical spaces for interactive music performance and recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, William; Woszczyk, Wieslaw

    2004-10-01

    For the most authentic and successful musical result, a performer engaged in recording pianoforte pieces of Haydn needs to hear the instrument as it would have sounded in historically typical room reverberation, such as that of the original room's in which Haydn taught his students to play pianoforte. After capturing the acoustic response of such historical room's, as described in the companion presentation, there remains the problem of how best to reproduce the virtual acoustical response of the room as a performer moves relative to the instrument and the rooms boundaries. This can be done with a multichannel loudspeaker array enveloping the performer, interactively presenting simulated indirect sound to generate a sense of presence in the previously captured room. The resulting interaction between live musical instrument performance and the sound of the virtual room can be captured both binaurally for the performer's subsequent evaluation, readjusted to provide the most desirable acoustic feedback to the performer, and finally remixed for distribution via conventional 5.1 channel audio media.

  14. Acoustic interaction between the right and left piriform fossae in generating spectral dips.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Hironori; Adachi, Seiji; Mokhtari, Parham; Kitamura, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    It is known that the right and left piriform fossae generate two deep dips on speech spectra and that acoustic interaction exists in generating the dips: if only one piriform fossa is modified, both the dips change in frequency and amplitude. In the present study, using a simple geometrical model and measured vocal tract shapes, the acoustic interaction was examined by the finite-difference time-domain method. As a result, one of the two dips was lower in frequency than the two independent dips that appeared when either of the piriform fossae was occluded, and the other dip was higher in frequency than the two dips. At the lower dip frequency, the piriform fossae resonated almost in opposite phase, while at the higher dip frequency, they resonated almost in phase. These facts indicate that the piriform fossae and the lower part of the pharynx can be modeled as a coupled two-oscillator system whose two normal vibration modes generate the two spectral dips. When the piriform fossae were identical, only the higher dip appeared. This is because the lower mode is not acoustically coupled to the main vocal tract enough to generate an absorption dip.

  15. Interaction between acoustics and subsonic ducted flow in a ramjet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.

    A subsonic ducted air flow was studied experimentally using a hot-wire anemometer and a high frequency response pressure transducer. The experiments were performed in three stages. A free jet, a jet discharged into an open and closed duct and a forced jet in a closed duct. The shear layer instability frequencies associated with the initial vortex shedding, first vortex merging, and jet-column instability were identified in the unforced cases. Subsequently, the interaction of the jet flow with the first longitudinal pressure mode excited in the acoustic cavity was studied. The highest response of the jet flow to the acoustic wave was obtained when the forcing frequency matched the local most amplified frequency, for example, the first vortex merging frequency in the initial shear layer or the preferred jet frequency at the end of the potential core.

  16. A Two-dimensional Cartesian and Axisymmetric Study of Combustion-acoustic Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a study of a lean premixed (LP) methane-air combustion wave in a two-dimensional Cartesian and axisymmetric coordinate system. Lean premixed combustors provide low emission and high efficiency; however, they are susceptible to combustion instabilities. The present study focuses on the behavior of the flame as it interacts with an external acoustic disturbance. It was found that the flame oscillations increase as the disturbance amplitude is increased. Furthermore, when the frequency of the disturbance is at resonance with a chamber frequency, the instabilities increase. For the axisymmetric geometry, the flame is found to be more unstable compared to the Cartesian case. In some cases, these instabilities were severe and led to flame extinction. In the axisymmetric case, several passive control devices were tested to assess their effectiveness. It is found that an acoustic cavity is better able at controlling the pressure fluctuations in the chamber.

  17. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  18. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  19. INVITED PAPER: On the interaction of a fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2010-02-01

    In the present investigation, a theoretical model is suggested to study the interaction of a fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. Firstly, the solution of an acoustic field caused by a fan stator in an infinite duct is extended to that in a finite domain with all knowns and unknowns on the interface plane. Secondly, the related numerical results for an annular cascade are compared with the data obtained by directly solving an integral equation based on the blade boundary condition, which have good agreement with each other. Finally, more emphasis is placed on studying how a fan stator interacts with both upstream and downstream acoustic treatments. It is found that the interaction has an important influence on sound attenuation. In addition, optimal sound attenuation will depend on the combined design of both acoustic treatment and the fan stator.

  20. Interaction of acoustic-gravity waves with an elastic shelf-break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to surface gravity waves that induce flow field which decays exponentially with depth, acoustic-gravity waves oscillate throughout the water column. Their oscillatory profile exerts stresses to the ground which provides a natural explanation for the earth's microseism (Longuet-Higgins, 1950). This work is an extension of the shelf-break problem by Kadri and Stiassnie (2012) who considered the sea floor and the shelf-break to be rigid, and the elastic problem by Eyov et al. (2013) who illustrated the importance of the sea-floor elasticity. In this study we formulate and solve the two-dimensional problem of an incident acoustic-gravity wave mode propagating over an elastic wall and interacting with a shelf-break in a weakly compressible fluid. As the modes approach the shelf-break, part of the energy is reflected whereas the other part is transmitted. A mathematical model is formulated by matching particular solutions for each subregion of constant depth along vertical boundaries; the resulting matrix equation is then solved numerically. The physical properties of these waves are studied, and compared with those for waves over a rigid bottom. The present work broadens our knowledge of acoustic-gravity-waves propagation in realistic environment and can potentially benefit the early detection of tsunami, generated from landslides or submarine earthquakes. References Eyov E., Klar A., Kadri U. , Stiassnie M. 2013 Progressive waves in a compressible-ocean with an elastic bottom. Wave Motion 50, 929-939. Kadri, U., and M. Stiassnie, 2012 Acoustic-Gravity waves interacting with the shelf break. J. Geophys. Res. 117, C03035. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. 1950 A theory of the origin of microseisms. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A 243, 1-35.

  1. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  2. Reconsidering the role of interaction in analyzing and reporting focus groups.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L

    2010-05-01

    In the two sections of this article, I examine aspects of the analysis and reporting of interaction in focus groups. In both sections, I argue that the essential importance of interaction for producing the data in focus groups does not correspond to any requirement that the analysis or the reporting of that data should emphasize interaction. With regard to analyzing interaction, the goals of the research should guide the analysis of the data, and those goals might or might not emphasize interaction. In particular, a great deal of focus group research is conducted for substantive and practical purposes, where the analysis typically requires little attention to the dynamics of interaction in those groups. With regard to reporting interaction, quotations from single individuals can often be the most efficient and effectives ways to accomplish an article's goals; however, I also discuss the kinds of situations where there are good reasons to report interaction among the participants. I conclude by briefly describing a different agenda for examining the importance of interaction in focus groups.

  3. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  4. Oblique Interaction of Ion-Acoustic Solitary Waves in e-p-i Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Tapas Kumar; Ghorui, Malay Kumar; Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the oblique collision of two ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a three-species plasma composed of electrons, positrons, and ions. We use the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method to derive the two-sided Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) equations and Hirota's method for soliton solutions. The effects of the ratio ( δ) of electron temperature to positron temperature and the ratio ( p) of the number density of positrons to that of electrons on the phase shift are studied. It is observed that the phase shift is significantly influenced by the parameters mentioned above. It is also observed that for some time interval during oblique collision, one practically motionless composite structure is formed, i.e., when two ion-acoustic waves with the same amplitude interact obliquely, a new non-linear wave is formed during their collision, which means that ahead of the colliding ion-acoustic solitary waves, both the amplitude and width are greater that those of the colliding solitary waves. As a result, the nonlinear wave formed after collision is a new one and is delayed. The oblique collision of solitary waves in a two-dimensional geometry is more realistic in high-energy astrophysical pair plasmas such as the magnetosphere of neutron stars and black holes.

  5. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  6. Analyzing Dynamic Pendulum Motion in an Interactive Online Environment Using Flash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezrailson, Cathy Mariotti; Allen, G. Donald; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2004-01-01

    A pendulum "engine" with dynamic parameters can be created and pendulum functions manipulated and analyzed using interactive elements in Flash. The effects of changing the damping (convergence) properties, initial release angle and initial velocity conditions can be explored. The motions then can be digitized using the Flash Digitizer 1.1,…

  7. Reciprocal Teaching: Analyzing Interactive Dynamics in the Co-Construction of a Text's Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarchi, Christian; Pinto, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Reciprocal teaching is one of the most successfully implemented cooperative learning practices, yet many aspects of the process it follows are still unclear. The authors' aim was two-fold: To analyze whether reciprocal teaching activates diversity in discourse moves, communicative functions, and interaction sequences; and to determine whether…

  8. Bayesian Methods for Analyzing Structural Equation Models with Covariates, Interaction, and Quadratic Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of interaction among latent variables has received much attention. This article introduces a Bayesian approach to analyze a general structural equation model that accommodates the general nonlinear terms of latent variables and covariates. This approach produces a Bayesian estimate that has the same statistical optimal properties as a…

  9. Analyzing Dynamic Pendulum Motion in an Interactive Online Environment Using Flash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezrailson, Cathy Mariotti; Allen, G. Donald; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2004-01-01

    A pendulum "engine" with dynamic parameters can be created and pendulum functions manipulated and analyzed using interactive elements in Flash. The effects of changing the damping (convergence) properties, initial release angle and initial velocity conditions can be explored. The motions then can be digitized using the Flash Digitizer 1.1,…

  10. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  11. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  12. A Strategy for Analyzing Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Carolyn; Kaput, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), like all chronic diseases, results from interactions between multiple genes and multiple environmental factors. Nevertheless, many research studies focus on either nutrition or genetic factors independently of each other. The challenges of analyzing gene–nutrient interactions in T2DM are the (i) genetic heterogeneity in humans, (ii) complexity of environmental factors, particularly dietary chemicals, and (iii) diverse physiologies that produce the same apparent disease. Many of these variables are not accounted for in the design or study of T2DM or, indeed, most chronic diseases, although exceptions are noteworthy. Establishing experimental paradigms to analyze the complexity of these interactions and physiologies is challenging, but possible. This article provides a strategy to extend nutrigenomic experimental strategies to include early environmental influences that may promote adult-onset disease. PMID:20144318

  13. Persistent currents in interacting Aharonov-Bohm interferometers and their enhancement by acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Entin-Wohlman, O; Imry, Y; Aharony, A

    2003-07-25

    We consider an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, connected to two electronic reservoirs, with a quantum dot embedded on one of its arms. We find a general expression for the persistent current at steady state, valid for the case where the electronic system is free of interactions except on the dot. The result is used to derive the modification in the persistent current brought about by coupling the quantum dot to a phonon source. The magnitude of the persistent current is found to be enhanced in an appropriate range of the intensity of the acoustic source.

  14. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R. |

    1995-03-27

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions.

  15. Quantum Simulator for the Hubbard Model with Long-Range Coulomb Interactions Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Tim; Recher, Patrik; Kim, Na Young; Utsunomiya, Shoko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-01

    An experimental scheme for a quantum simulator of strongly correlated electrons is proposed. Our scheme employs electrons confined in a two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction. Two surface acoustic waves are then induced in the substrate, creating a two-dimensional “egg-carton” potential. The dynamics of the electrons in this potential are described by a Hubbard model with long-range Coulomb interactions. Estimates of the Hubbard parameters suggest that observations of quantum phase transition phenomena are within experimental reach.

  16. Acoustic measurements from a rotor blade-vortex interaction noise experiment in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ruth M.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from a 40 percent scale model of the 4-bladed BO-105 helicopter main rotor, measured in the large European aeroacoustic wind tunnel, the DNW. Rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data in the low speed flight range were acquired using a traversing in-flow microphone array. The experimental apparatus, testing procedures, calibration results, and experimental objectives are fully described. A large representative set of averaged acoustic signals is presented.

  17. Feasibility of Using Electrocochleography for Objective Estimation of Electro-Acoustic Interactions in Cochlear Implant Recipients with Residual Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Litvak, Leonid M.

    2017-01-01

    Although cochlear implants (CI) traditionally have been used to treat individuals with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss, a recent trend is to implant individuals with residual low-frequency hearing. Patients who retain some residual acoustic hearing after surgery often can benefit from electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) technologies, which combine conventional acoustic amplification with electrical stimulation. However, interactions between acoustic and electrical stimulation may affect outcomes adversely and are time-consuming and difficult to assess behaviorally. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using the Advanced Bionics HiRes90K Advantage implant electronics and HiFocus Mid Scala/1j electrode to measure electrocochleography (ECochG) responses in the presence of electrical stimulation to provide an objective estimate of peripheral physiologic EAS interactions. In general, electrical stimulation reduced ECochG response amplitudes to acoustic stimulation. The degree of peripheral EAS interaction varied as a function of acoustic pure tone frequency and the intra-cochlear location of the electrically stimulated electrode. Further development of this technique may serve to guide and optimize clinical EAS system fittings in the future. PMID:28674482

  18. SeismicCanvas: Interactive software for accessing and analyzing seismic waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    SeismicCavas, a cross-platform, graphically interactive application for accessing and analyzing waveform data is presented. Unlike command-line driven packages like SAC and MatSeis, SeismicCanvas adopts a graphically interactive interface to minimize the learning curve for classroom and laboratory application. The menu structure is patterned after common desktop word processing and spreadsheet applications. Direct graphical interaction with traces adopts a "select, then operate" paradigm used in familiar desktop graphics packages. Viewing options include arbitrary arrangement of traces, seismic sections, spectra and spectrograms. Operations include stacking, filtering, windowing and tapering. Interactive picking and measurement of times and amplitudes and WYSIWYG printing are implemented. SeismicCanvas can import data from local files, or through the new web services interface of the IRIS Data Management System. We invite feedback including suggestions for changes to the user interface or additional capabilities that will allow SeismicCanvas to support classroom and laboratory use of digital seismic data.

  19. Divergence of Acoustic Signals in a Widely Distributed Frog: Relevance of Inter-Male Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Nelson A.; Opazo, Daniel; Díaz, Javier; Penna, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Divergence of acoustic signals in a geographic scale results from diverse evolutionary forces acting in parallel and affecting directly inter-male vocal interactions among disjunct populations. Pleurodema thaul is a frog having an extensive latitudinal distribution in Chile along which males' advertisement calls exhibit an important variation. Using the playback paradigm we studied the evoked vocal responses of males of three populations of P. thaul in Chile, from northern, central and southern distribution. In each population, males were stimulated with standard synthetic calls having the acoustic structure of local and foreign populations. Males of both northern and central populations displayed strong vocal responses when were confronted with the synthetic call of their own populations, giving weaker responses to the call of the southern population. The southern population gave stronger responses to calls of the northern population than to the local call. Furthermore, males in all populations were stimulated with synthetic calls for which the dominant frequency, pulse rate and modulation depth were varied parametrically. Individuals from the northern and central populations gave lower responses to a synthetic call devoid of amplitude modulation relative to stimuli containing modulation depths between 30–100%, whereas the southern population responded similarly to all stimuli in this series. Geographic variation in the evoked vocal responses of males of P. thaul underlines the importance of inter-male interactions in driving the divergence of the acoustic traits and contributes evidence for a role of intra-sexual selection in the evolution of the sound communication system of this anuran. PMID:24489957

  20. Three Dimensional Viscous Finite Element Formulation For Acoustic Fluid Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang’s 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman’s thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable. PMID:20174602

  1. Computational Modeling of Fluid–Structure–Acoustics Interaction during Voice Production

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presented a three-dimensional, first-principle based fluid–structure–acoustics interaction computer model of voice production, which employed a more realistic human laryngeal and vocal tract geometries. Self-sustained vibrations, important convergent–divergent vibration pattern of the vocal folds, and entrainment of the two dominant vibratory modes were captured. Voice quality-associated parameters including the frequency, open quotient, skewness quotient, and flow rate of the glottal flow waveform were found to be well within the normal physiological ranges. The analogy between the vocal tract and a quarter-wave resonator was demonstrated. The acoustic perturbed flux and pressure inside the glottis were found to be at the same order with their incompressible counterparts, suggesting strong source–filter interactions during voice production. Such high fidelity computational model will be useful for investigating a variety of pathological conditions that involve complex vibrations, such as vocal fold paralysis, vocal nodules, and vocal polyps. The model is also an important step toward a patient-specific surgical planning tool that can serve as a no-risk trial and error platform for different procedures, such as injection of biomaterials and thyroplastic medialization. PMID:28243588

  2. Computational Modeling of Fluid-Structure-Acoustics Interaction during Voice Production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presented a three-dimensional, first-principle based fluid-structure-acoustics interaction computer model of voice production, which employed a more realistic human laryngeal and vocal tract geometries. Self-sustained vibrations, important convergent-divergent vibration pattern of the vocal folds, and entrainment of the two dominant vibratory modes were captured. Voice quality-associated parameters including the frequency, open quotient, skewness quotient, and flow rate of the glottal flow waveform were found to be well within the normal physiological ranges. The analogy between the vocal tract and a quarter-wave resonator was demonstrated. The acoustic perturbed flux and pressure inside the glottis were found to be at the same order with their incompressible counterparts, suggesting strong source-filter interactions during voice production. Such high fidelity computational model will be useful for investigating a variety of pathological conditions that involve complex vibrations, such as vocal fold paralysis, vocal nodules, and vocal polyps. The model is also an important step toward a patient-specific surgical planning tool that can serve as a no-risk trial and error platform for different procedures, such as injection of biomaterials and thyroplastic medialization.

  3. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions Throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-04-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15- to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual enactment influences students' learning progressions. This article presents the design principles which elicit the structure and types of modeling and inquiry activities designed to promote students' development of three conceptual models. Some of these activities are enhanced by the use of ICT such as sound level meters connected to data capture systems, which facilitate the measurement of the intensity level of sound emitted by a sound source and transmitted through different materials. Framing this study within the design-based research paradigm, it consists of the experimentation of the designed teaching sequence with two groups of students ( n = 29) in their science classes. The analysis of students' written productions together with classroom observations of the implementation of the teaching sequence allowed characterizing students' development of the conceptual models. Moreover, we could evidence the influence of different modeling and inquiry activities on students' development of the conceptual models, identifying those that have a major impact on students' modeling processes. Having evidenced different levels of development of each conceptual model, our results have been interpreted in terms of the attributes of each conceptual model, the distance between students' preliminary mental models and the intended conceptual models, and the instructional design and enactment.

  4. A comparison of acoustic and articulatory methods for analyzing vowel differences across dialects: Data from American and Australian English.

    PubMed

    Blackwood Ximenes, Arwen; Shaw, Jason A; Carignan, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    In studies of dialect variation, the articulatory nature of vowels is sometimes inferred from formant values using the following heuristic: F1 is inversely correlated with tongue height and F2 is inversely correlated with tongue backness. This study compared vowel formants and corresponding lingual articulation in two dialects of English, standard North American English, and Australian English. Five speakers of North American English and four speakers of Australian English were recorded producing multiple repetitions of ten monophthongs embedded in the /sVd/ context. Simultaneous articulatory data were collected using electromagnetic articulography. Results show that there are significant correlations between tongue position and formants in the direction predicted by the heuristic but also that the relations implied by the heuristic break down under specific conditions. Articulatory vowel spaces, based on tongue dorsum position, and acoustic vowel spaces, based on formants, show systematic misalignment due in part to the influence of other articulatory factors, including lip rounding and tongue curvature on formant values. Incorporating these dimensions into dialect comparison yields a richer description and a more robust understanding of how vowel formant patterns are reproduced within and across dialects.

  5. Acoustic interactions between inversion symmetric and asymmetric two-level systems.

    PubMed

    Churkin, A; Barash, D; Schechter, M

    2014-08-13

    Amorphous solids, as well as many disordered lattices, display remarkable universality in their low temperature acoustic properties. This universality is attributed to the attenuation of phonons by tunneling two-level systems (TLSs), facilitated by the interaction of the TLSs with the phonon field. TLS-phonon interaction also mediates effective TLS-TLS interactions, which dictates the existence of a glassy phase and its low energy properties. Here we consider KBr:CN, the archetypal disordered lattice showing universality. We calculate numerically, using conjugate gradients method, the effective TLS-TLS interactions for inversion symmetric (CN flips) and asymmetric (CN rotations) TLSs, in the absence and presence of disorder, in two and three dimensions. The observed dependence of the magnitude and spatial power law of the interaction on TLS symmetry, and its change with disorder, characterizes TLS-TLS interactions in disordered lattices in both extreme and moderate dilutions. Our results are in good agreement with the two-TLS model, recently introduced to explain long-standing questions regarding the quantitative universality of phonon attenuation and the energy scale of ≈ 1-3 K below which universality is observed.

  6. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  7. Prototype partial one-third octave band spectrum analyzer for acoustic, vibration and other wideband data for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design refinement of a compact frequency analyzer for measurement and analysis on board flight vehicles is discussed. The analyzer has been constructed in a partial one-third octave band configuration with six filters and detectors spaced by the square root of 10 from 316 Hz to 100,000 Hz and a broadband detector channel. The analyzer has been tested over a temperature range of 40 to 120 F at a pressure of one atmosphere, and at a temperature of 75 F at an absolute pressure of 0.000001 torr, and has demonstrated at least 60 db of dynamic range.

  8. Techniques to assess acoustic-structure interaction in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin

    Acoustoelasticity is the study of the dynamic interaction between elastic structures and acoustic enclosures. In this dissertation, acoustoelasticity is considered in the context of liquid rocket engine design. The techniques presented here can be used to determine which forcing frequencies are important in acoustoelastic systems. With a knowledge of these frequencies, an analyst can either find ways to attenuate the excitation at these frequencies or alter the system in such a way that the prescribed excitations do result in a resonant condition. The end result is a structural component that is less susceptible to failure. The research scope is divided into three parts. In the first part, the dynamics of cylindrical shells submerged in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) are considered. The shells are bounded by rigid outer cylinders. This configuration gives rise to two fluid-filled cavities---an inner cylindrical cavity and an outer annular cavity. Such geometries are common in rocket engine design. The natural frequencies and modes of the fluid-structure system are computed by combining the rigid wall acoustic cavity modes and the in vacuo structural modes into a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalue veering is observed near the intersections of the curves representing natural frequencies of the rigid wall acoustic and the in vacuo structural modes. In the case of a shell submerged in LH2, system frequencies near these intersections are as much as 30% lower than the corresponding in vacuo structural frequencies. Due to its high density, the frequency reductions in the presence of LOX are even more dramatic. The forced responses of a shell submerged in LH2 and LOX while subject to a harmonic point excitation are also presented. The responses in the presence of fluid are found to be quite distinct from those of the structure in vacuo. In the second part, coupled mode theory is used to explore the fundamental features of

  9. Effects of the parametric interaction on the toplogical charge of acoustical vortices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiano, Régis; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2008-06-01

    Acoustical vortices are one of the three kinds of phase singularity corresponding to screw dislocations of the wavefront. They are characterized by an helical phase winding up around their axis of propagation along which the phase is singular (undefined). This kind of waves possesses several interesting properties like robustness to wavefront distortion in heterogeneous media or non diffracting propagation due to their relation to Bessel beams. Here we are interested by their potential to transmit information and perform basic arithmetics. We experimentally show that parametric interaction has a double effect on such a beam. First of all, the classical effect of creation of frequencies corresponding to all linear combinations of the primary frequencies is recovered. This classical manifestation of the quadratic nonlinearity in fluids is not new but leads to interesting properties for the spatial information of acoustical vortices as it is possible to do some arithmetics with acoustical vortices. Indeed, it is observed that for a frequency generated by a linear combination of the primary frequencies, the topological charge (number of twists made by the wavefront for one wavelength) is obtained by the same linear combination applied to the topological charges of the primary frequencies. For instance, vortices with negative topological charge appear for a secondary beam at the frequency corresponding to the difference of two primary beams with a positive topological charge when the highest frequency corresponds to the lowest topological charge. This phenomenon is studied for frequencies without and with a common divisor. In the latter case, generated frequencies can be degenerated, i.e two different linear combinations give the same frequency. However there is no reason to have the same common divisor for the topological charge so that two waves at the same frequency but with two different charges are propagating colinearly. In this case, the topological charge can be

  10. Particle-turbulence-acoustic interactions in high-speed free-shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Buchta, David; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the injection of micro-water droplets in turbulent flows can be used to reduce the intensity of near-field pressure fluctuations. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to evaluate the effects of particle-turbulence-acoustic coupling for the first time. Simulations of temporally developing mixing layers are conducted for a range of Mach numbers and mass loadings. Once the turbulence reaches a self-similar state, the air-density shear layer is seeded with a random distribution of mono disperse water-density droplets. For M =0.9 to M =1.75, preliminary results show reductions in the near-field pressure fluctuations for moderate mass loadings, consistent with experimental studies under similar conditions. At high speed, the principle reduction of the normal velocity fluctuations, which increases with particle mass loading, appears to correlate to the reduction of the near-field radiated pressure fluctuations. These findings demonstrate that the DNS reproduces the observed particle-turbulence-acoustic phenomenology, and its complete space-time database can be used to further understand their interactions.

  11. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  12. Different approaches to analyze the dipolar interaction effects on diluted and concentrated granular superparamagnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscoso-Londoño, O.; Tancredi, P.; Muraca, D.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; Coral, D.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Wolff, U.; Neu, V.; Damm, C.; de Oliveira, C. L. P.; Pirota, K. R.; Knobel, M.; Socolovsky, L. M.

    2017-04-01

    Controlled magnetic granular materials with different concentrations of magnetite nanoparticles immersed in a non-conducting polymer matrix were synthesized and, their macroscopic magnetic observables analyzed in order to advance towards a better understanding of the magnetic dipolar interactions and its effects on the obtained magnetic parameters. First, by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption fine structure an accurate study of the structural properties was carried out. Then, the magnetic properties were analyzed by means of different models, including those that consider the magnetic interactions through long-range dipolar forces as: the Interacting Superparamagnetic Model (ISP) and the Vogel-Fulcher law (V-F). In systems with larger nanoparticle concentrations, magnetic results clearly indicate that the role played by the dipolar interactions affects the magnetic properties, giving rise to obtaining magnetic and structural parameters without physical meaning. Magnetic parameters as the effective anisotropic constant, magnetic moment relaxation time and mean blocking temperature, extracted from the application of the ISP model and V-F Law, were used to simulate the zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling curves (FC). A comparative analysis of the simulated, fitted and experimental ZFC/FC curves suggests that the current models depict indeed our dilute granular systems. Notwithstanding, for concentrated samples, the ISP model infers that clustered nanoparticles are being interpreted as single entities of larger magnetic moment and volume, effect that is apparently related to a collective and complex magnetic moment dynamics within the cluster.

  13. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  14. Experiences with nonlinear dynamics of panels and membranes considering fluid-structure interaction and acoustic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Ferman, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A collection of some highlights of the Author`s experiences with nonlinear dynamics in analyses and tests of Panels and Membranes encountered over the past 40 years is given. The primary focus is placed on a major block of his work since the early 70`s, involving work with fluid-structure interaction with Panels and Membranes, and with efforts in Acoustic Fatigue of Panels. While the Author had encountered nonlinear problems throughout Ins career involving flutter, vibration in general, and dynamic thrust instability; it was the more recent work with panels and membranes that greatly expanded his experience. This was triggered by the advent of highly maneuverable aircraft, powered by large powerful, noisy engines, and new materials in the mid 70`s. The significance of nonlinearity for these applications is most obvious from the results shown here-it simply cannot be ignored for optimal, safe design.

  15. On Nonlinear Self-interaction of Geodesic Acoustic Mode Driven By Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that nonlinear self-interaction of energetic particle-driven Geodesic Acoustic Mode does not generate a second harmonic in radial electric field using the fluid model. However, kinetic effects of energetic particles can induce a second harmonic in the radial electric field. A formula for the second order plasma density perturbation is derived. It is shown that a second harmonic of plasma density perturbation is generated by the convective nonlinearity of both thermal plasma and energetic particles. Near the midplane of a tokamak, the second order plasma density perturbation (the sum of second harmonic and zero frequency sideband) is negative on the low field side with its size comparable to the main harmonic at low fluctuation level. These analytic predictions are consistent with the recent experimental observation in DIII-D.

  16. On Nonlinear Self-interaction of Geodesic Acoustic Mode Driven by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Y. Fu

    2010-06-04

    It is shown that nonlinear self-interaction of energetic particle-driven Geodesic Acoustic Mode does not generate a second harmonic in radial electric field using the fluid model. However, kinetic effects of energetic particles can induce a second harmonic in the radial electric field. A formula for the second order plasma density perturbation is derived. It is shown that a second harmonic of plasma density perturbation is generated by the convective nonlinearity of both thermal plasma and energetic particles. Near the midplane of a tokamak, the second order plasma density perturbation (the sum of second harmonic and zero frequency sideband) is negative on the low field side with its size comparable to the main harmonic at low uctuation level. These analytic predictions are consistent with the recent experimental observation in DIII-D.

  17. Parametric amplification of orbital angular momentum beams based on light-acoustic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wei E-mail: zhuzhihandd@sina.com; Mu, Chunyuan; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Hongwei; Zhu, Zhihan E-mail: zhuzhihandd@sina.com

    2015-07-27

    A high fidelity amplification of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is very crucial for OAM multiplexing and other OAM-based applications. Here, we report a demonstration of stimulated Brillouin amplification for OAM beams, and the energy conversion efficiency of photon-phonon coupling and the phase structure of amplified signals are investigated in collinear and noncollinear frame systems, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the OAM signals can be efficiently amplified without obvious noise introduced, and the modes of output signal are independent of the pump modes or the geometrical frames. Meanwhile, an OAM state depending on the optical modes and the geometrical frames is loaded into phonons by coherent light-acoustic interaction, which reveals more fundamental significance and a great application potential in OAM-multiplexing.

  18. Assessment of perceptions of nutrition knowledge and disease using a group interactive system: the Perception Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Emilia; Hargrove, James L; Huang, Chung-Liang; Crawley, Connie C; Canolty, Nancy L

    2002-11-01

    Food labels can be used as a tool for nutrition education, but the information available is of little value to consumers who do not understand how to apply it. In an effort to assess nutrition knowledge and identify misconceptions, a group interactive system--the Perception Analyzer--was used as a lecture aid and data collection tool. The Perception Analyzer is composed of a laptop computer, an antenna, and handheld electronic handsets, or dials, that participants use to answer questions. Participants (N = 621) were surveyed on 14 multiple-choice questions concerning nutrition with 4 nutrition questions repeated at the end of a session as a posttest. A knowledge score was calculated by counting correct answers. Linear regression analyses were used to study the main effects of demographic variables on the knowledge score. Our study reports the following: although participants reported reading food labels, nrisconceptions about label content were identified; analyses of mean scores indicated that age, education, and race influenced the nutrition knowledge score; and participants found the Perception Analyzer to be enjoyable. The findings indicate that because the Perception Analyzer provides immediate and anonymous feedback to a discussion leader about audience's current knowledge, it is a promising tool for nutrition education by dietetic practitioners.

  19. Time-domain simulation of acoustic wave propagation and interaction with flexible structures using Chebyshev collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunqi; Huang, Lixi

    2012-09-01

    A time-domain Chebyshev collocation (ChC) method is used to simulate acoustic wave propagation and its interaction with flexible structures in ducts. The numerical formulation is described using a two-dimensional duct noise control system, which consists of an expansion chamber and a tensioned membrane covering the side-branch cavity. Full coupling between the acoustic wave and the structural vibration of the tensioned membrane is considered in the modelling. A systematic method of solution is developed for the discretized differential equations over multiple physical domains. The time-domain ChC model is tested against analytical solutions under two conditions: one with an initial state of wave motion; the other with a time-dependent acoustic source. Comparisons with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are also made. Results show that the time-domain ChC method is highly accurate and computationally efficient for the time-dependent solution of duct acoustic problems. For illustrative purposes, the time-domain ChC method is applied to investigate the acoustic performance of three typical duct noise control devices: the expansion chamber, the quarter wavelength resonator and the drum silencer. The time-dependent simulation of the sound-structure interaction in the drum silencer reveals the delicate role of the membrane mass and tension in its sound reflection capability.

  20. Measurement of material nonlinearity using surface acoustic wave parametric interaction and laser ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Ellwood, Robert; Sharples, Steve; Clark, Matthew; Somekh, Michael G; Collison, Ian J

    2011-04-01

    A dual frequency mixing technique has been developed for measuring velocity changes caused by material nonlinearity. The technique is based on the parametric interaction between two surface acoustic waves (SAWs): The low frequency pump SAW generated by a transducer and the high frequency probe SAW generated and detected using laser ultrasonics. The pump SAW stresses the material under the probe SAW. The stress (typically <5 MPa) is controlled by varying the timing between the pump and probe waves. The nonlinear interaction is measured as a phase modulation of the probe SAW and equated to a velocity change. The velocity-stress relationship is used as a measure of material nonlinearity. Experiments were conducted to observe the pump-probe interaction by changing the pump frequency and compare the nonlinear response of aluminum and fused silica. Experiments showed these two materials had opposite nonlinear responses, consistent with previously published data. The technique could be applied to life-time predictions of engineered components by measuring changes in nonlinear response caused by fatigue.

  1. Selective toxin-lipid membrane interactions of natural, haemolytic Scyphozoan toxins analyzed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Helmholz, Heike

    2010-10-01

    A comparison of the molecular interaction of natural Scyphozoan lysins with their bioactivity in a haemolytic assay was performed by establishing an efficient, automatable and reproducible procedure for the measurement of protein-membrane interactions. The toxin-membrane interactions were analyzed utilising a chip-based technology with immobilized liposomes as artificial cell membranes. The technique was established with streptolysin O as a cholesterol-selective model toxin and its cholesterol-selectivity has been proven. The haemolytic potency of protein fractions derived from the venom of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita and Cyanea capillata was tested and EC50 values of 35.3mug/mL and 43.1mug/mL against sheep and 13.5mug/mL and 8.8mug/mL against rabbit erythrocytes were measured. Cell membrane binding as a first step in the haemolytic process was analyzed using the Biacore((R)) technology. Major cell membrane lipids (cholesterol, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine) were immobilized as pure liposomes and in binary mixtures. A preference for cholesterol and sphingomyelin of both jellyfish species was demonstrated. The specificity of the method was proven with a non-haemolytic A. aurita protein fraction that did not express a lipid binding. Additionally, an inactivated C. capillata lysine with negligible haemolytic activity showed a remaining but reduced adsorption onto lipid layers. The binding level of the lytic venom fraction of these dominant boreal jellyfish species increased as a function of protein concentration. The binding strength was expressed in RU50 values ranging from 12.4mug/mL to 35.4mug/mL, which were in the same order of magnitude as the EC50 values in the haemolytic assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinguishing interacting dark energy from wCDM with CMB, lensing, and baryon acoustic oscillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Väliviita, Jussi; Palmgren, Elina E-mail: elina.palmgren@helsinki.fi

    2015-07-01

    We employ the Planck 2013 CMB temperature anisotropy and lensing data, and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data to constrain a phenomenological wCDM model, where dark matter and dark energy interact. We assume time-dependent equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treat dark matter and dark energy as fluids whose energy-exchange rate is proportional to the dark-matter density. The CMB data alone leave a strong degeneracy between the interaction rate and the physical CDM density parameter today, ω{sub c}, allowing a large interaction rate |Γ| ∼ H{sub 0}. However, as has been known for a while, the BAO data break this degeneracy. Moreover, we exploit the CMB lensing potential likelihood, which probes the matter perturbations at redshift z ∼ 2 and is very sensitive to the growth of structure, and hence one of the tools for discerning between the ΛCDM model and its alternatives. However, we find that in the non-phantom models (w{sub de}>−1), the constraints remain unchanged by the inclusion of the lensing data and consistent with zero interaction, −0.14 < Γ/H{sub 0} < 0.02 at 95% CL. On the contrary, in the phantom models (w{sub de}<−1), energy transfer from dark energy to dark matter is moderately favoured over the non-interacting model; 0−0.57 < Γ/H{sub 0} < −0.1 at 95% CL with CMB+BAO, while addition of the lensing data shifts this to −0.46 < Γ/H{sub 0} < −0.01.

  3. Reaction norm model with unknown environmental covariate to analyze heterosis by environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Madsen, P; Lund, M S

    2009-05-01

    Crossbreeding is currently increasing in dairy cattle production. Several studies have shown an environment-dependent heterosis [i.e., an interaction between heterosis and environment (H x E)]. An H x E interaction is usually estimated from a few discrete environment levels. The present study proposes a reaction norm model to describe H x E interaction, which can deal with a large number of environment levels using few parameters. In the proposed model, total heterosis consists of an environment-independent part, which is described as a function of heterozygosity, and an environment-dependent part, which is described as a function of heterozygosity and environmental value (e.g., herd-year effect). A Bayesian approach is developed to estimate the environmental covariates, the regression coefficients of the reaction norm, and other parameters of the model simultaneously in both linear and nonlinear reaction norms. In the nonlinear reaction norm model, the H x E is approximated using linear splines. The approach was tested using simulated data, which were generated using an animal model with a reaction norm for heterosis. The simulation study includes 4 scenarios (the combinations of moderate vs. low heritability and moderate vs. low herd-year variation) of H x E interaction in a nonlinear form. In all scenarios, the proposed model predicted total heterosis very well. The correlation between true heterosis and predicted heterosis was 0.98 in the scenarios with low herd-year variation and 0.99 in the scenarios with moderate herd-year variation. This suggests that the proposed model and method could be a good approach to analyze H x E interactions and predict breeding values in situations in which heterosis changes gradually and continuously over an environmental gradient. On the other hand, it was found that a model ignoring H x E interaction did not significantly harm the prediction of breeding value under the simulated scenarios in which the variance for environment

  4. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  5. The solar wind interaction with Mars as seen by the Viking retarding potential analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.

    1982-06-01

    Both energy spectra and continuous monitoring periods of the total flux above 15 eV are available, from Viking retarding potential analyzer measurements of electron fluxes not exceeding 75 eV out to 16,000 km above the Mars surface. Although the mean electron current at energies above 15 eV increases monotonically by almost two orders of magnitude from 9000 to 700 km in Viking 1 data, no clear signature of the bow shock is seen. Total current wave power shows a peak near 1700 km altitude. It is suggested that there may be a highly turbulent shock structure masking a clear signature of the bow shock in the time-averaged data, and it is concluded that the interaction model consistent with the bow shock at 1700 km, together with ionosphere measurements, indicates a permanent magnetic field able to stand off the solar wind during the Viking 1 entry.

  6. Sensors, motors, and tuning in the cochlea: interacting cells could form a surface acoustic wave resonator.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew

    2006-09-01

    The outer hair cells of the cochlea occur in three distinct and geometrically precise rows and, unusually, display both sensing and motor properties. As well as sensing sound, outer hair cells (OHCs) undergo cycle-by-cycle length changes in response to stimulation. OHCs are central to the way in which the cochlea processes and amplifies sounds, but how they do so is presently unknown. In explanation, this paper proposes that outer hair cells act like a single-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator in which the interdigital electrodes--the three distinctive rows--exhibit the required electromechanical and mechanoelectrical properties. Thus, frequency analysis in the cochlea might occur through sympathetic resonance of a bank of interacting cells whose microscopic separation largely determines the resonance frequency. In this way, the cochlea could be tuned from 20 Hz at the apex, where the spacing is largest, to 20 kHz at the base, where it is smallest. A suitable candidate for a wave that could mediate such a short-wavelength interaction--a 'squirting wave' known in ultrasonics--has recently been described. Such a SAW resonator could thereby underlie the 'cochlear amplifier'--the device whose action is evident to auditory science but whose identity has not yet been established.

  7. An Interactive Method of Characteristics Java Applet to Design and Analyze Supersonic Aircraft Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The Method of Characteristics (MOC) is a classic technique for designing supersonic nozzles. An interactive computer program using MOC has been developed to allow engineers to design and analyze supersonic nozzle flow fields. The program calculates the internal flow for many classic designs, such as a supersonic wind tunnel nozzle, an ideal 2D or axisymmetric nozzle, or a variety of plug nozzles. The program also calculates the plume flow produced by the nozzle and the external flow leading to the nozzle exit. The program can be used to assess the interactions between the internal, external and plume flows. By proper design and operation of the nozzle, it may be possible to lessen the strength of the sonic boom produced at the rear of supersonic aircraft. The program can also calculate non-ideal nozzles, such as simple cone flows, to determine flow divergence and nonuniformities at the exit, and its effect on the plume shape. The computer program is written in Java and is provided as free-ware from the NASA Glenn central software server.

  8. StavroX—A Software for Analyzing Crosslinked Products in Protein Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Michael; Pettelkau, Jens; Schaks, Sabine; Bosse, Konstanze; Ihling, Christian H.; Krauth, Fabian; Fritzsche, Romy; Kühn, Uwe; Sinz, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking in combination with mass spectrometry has matured into an alternative approach to derive low-resolution structural information of proteins and protein complexes. Yet, one of the major drawbacks of this strategy remains the lack of software that is able to handle the large MS datasets that are created after chemical crosslinking and enzymatic digestion of the crosslinking reaction mixtures. Here, we describe a software, termed StavroX, which has been specifically designed for analyzing highly complex crosslinking datasets. The StavroX software was evaluated for three diverse biological systems: (1) the complex between calmodulin and a peptide derived from Munc13, (2) an N-terminal ß-laminin fragment, and (3) the complex between guanylyl cyclase activating protein-2 and a peptide derived from retinal guanylyl cyclase. We show that the StavroX software is advantageous for analyzing crosslinked products due to its easy-to-use graphical user interface and the highly automated analysis of mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data resulting in short times for analysis. StavroX is expected to give a further push to the chemical crosslinking approach as a routine technique for protein interaction studies.

  9. NORM2L: An Interactive Computer Program for Acoustic Normal Mode Calculations for the Pekeris Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    although the formulae for the normal mode equations are scattered throughout the book. Chapter 9 of the newer book by Clay and Medwin [6] contains a... Medwin , Acoustical Oceanography, Wiley, 1977 7. F. Ingenito, "Measurements of mode attenuation coefficients in shallow water", J.Acoust.Soc.Am

  10. Global Comparisons of Lectin–Glycan Interactions Using a Database of Analyzed Glycan Array Data*

    PubMed Central

    Kletter, Doron; Singh, Sudhir; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    Lectin–glycan interactions have critical functions in multiple normal and pathological processes, but the binding partners and functions for many glycans and lectins are not known. An important step in better understanding glycan–lectin biology is enabling systematic quantification and analysis of the interactions. Glycan arrays can provide the experimental information for such analyses, and the thousands of glycan array datasets available through the Consortium for Functional Glycomics provide the opportunity to extend the analyses to a broad scale. We developed software, based on our previously described Motif Segregation algorithm, for the automated analysis of glycan array data, and we analyzed the entire storehouse of 2883 datasets from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. We mined the resulting database to make comparisons of specificities across multiple lectins and comparisons between glycans in their lectin receptors. Of the lectins in the database, viral lectins were the most different from other organism types, with specificities nearly always restricted to sialic acids, and mammalian lectins had the most diverse range of specificities. Certain mammalian lectins were unique in their specificities for sulfated glycans. Simple modifications to a lactosamine core structure radically altered the types of lectins that were highly specific for the glycan. Unmodified lactosamine was specifically recognized by plant, fungal, viral, and mammalian lectins; sialylation shifted the binding mainly to viral lectins; and sulfation resulted in mainly mammalian lectins with the highest specificities. We anticipate that this analysis program and database will be valuable in fundamental glycobiology studies, detailed analyses of lectin specificities, and practical applications in translational research. PMID:23399549

  11. Analyzing Systolic-Diastolic Interval Interaction Characteristics in Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohammad Hasan; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN), one of the major complications in diabetes, if detected at the subclinical stage allows for effective treatment and avoiding further complication including cardiovascular pathology. Surface ECG (Electrocardiogram)-based diagnosis of CAN is useful to overcome the limitation of existing cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests traditionally used for CAN identification in clinical settings. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes in the mechanical function of the ventricles in terms of systolic-diastolic interval interaction (SDI) from a surface ECG to assess the severity of CAN progression [no CAN, early CAN (ECAN) or subclinical CAN, and definite CAN (DCAN) or clinical CAN]. ECG signals recorded in supine resting condition from 72 diabetic subjects without CAN (CAN-) and 70 diabetic subjects with CAN were analyzed in this paper. The severity of CAN was determined by Ewing’s Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Fifty-five subjects of the CAN group had ECAN and 15 subjects had DCAN. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the SDI parameter (i.e., TQ/RR interval ratio) measured from the electrical diastolic interval (i.e., TQ interval) and the heart rate interval (i.e., RR interval). The performance of the proposed SDI measure was compared with the performance of the existing SDI measure (i.e., QT/TQ interval ratio). The proposed SDI parameter showed significant differences among three groups (no CAN, ECAN, and DCAN). In addition, the proposed SDI parameter was found to be more sensitive in detecting CAN progression than other ECG interval-based features traditionally used for CAN diagnosis. The modified SDI parameter might be used as an alternative measure for the Ewing autonomic reflex tests to identify CAN progression for those subjects who are unable to perform the traditional tests. These findings could also complement the echocardiographic findings of the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by providing

  12. Analyzing Systolic-Diastolic Interval Interaction Characteristics in Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Progression.

    PubMed

    Imam, Mohammad Hasan; Karmakar, Chandan K; Jelinek, Herbert F; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN), one of the major complications in diabetes, if detected at the subclinical stage allows for effective treatment and avoiding further complication including cardiovascular pathology. Surface ECG (Electrocardiogram)-based diagnosis of CAN is useful to overcome the limitation of existing cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests traditionally used for CAN identification in clinical settings. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes in the mechanical function of the ventricles in terms of systolic-diastolic interval interaction (SDI) from a surface ECG to assess the severity of CAN progression [no CAN, early CAN (ECAN) or subclinical CAN, and definite CAN (DCAN) or clinical CAN]. ECG signals recorded in supine resting condition from 72 diabetic subjects without CAN (CAN-) and 70 diabetic subjects with CAN were analyzed in this paper. The severity of CAN was determined by Ewing's Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Fifty-five subjects of the CAN group had ECAN and 15 subjects had DCAN. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the SDI parameter (i.e., TQ/RR interval ratio) measured from the electrical diastolic interval (i.e., TQ interval) and the heart rate interval (i.e., RR interval). The performance of the proposed SDI measure was compared with the performance of the existing SDI measure (i.e., QT/TQ interval ratio). The proposed SDI parameter showed significant differences among three groups (no CAN, ECAN, and DCAN). In addition, the proposed SDI parameter was found to be more sensitive in detecting CAN progression than other ECG interval-based features traditionally used for CAN diagnosis. The modified SDI parameter might be used as an alternative measure for the Ewing autonomic reflex tests to identify CAN progression for those subjects who are unable to perform the traditional tests. These findings could also complement the echocardiographic findings of the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by providing

  13. Mode coupling and wave particle interactions for unstable ion acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasi-linear and mode coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through second order terms in the wave amplitude, but without usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasi-linear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found, even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  14. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-12-21

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H0 and the matter density perturbation σ8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  15. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    DOE PAGES

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; ...

    2016-12-21

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H0 and the matter density perturbation σ8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid.more » The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.« less

  16. Scattering Matrix for the Interaction between Solar Acoustic Waves and Sunspots. I. Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-Hsu; Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Assessing the interaction between solar acoustic waves and sunspots is a scattering problem. The scattering matrix elements are the most commonly used measured quantities to describe scattering problems. We use the wavefunctions of scattered waves of NOAAs 11084 and 11092 measured in the previous study to compute the scattering matrix elements, with plane waves as the basis. The measured scattered wavefunction is from the incident wave of radial order n to the wave of another radial order n‧, for n=0{--}5. For a time-independent sunspot, there is no mode mixing between different frequencies. An incident mode is scattered into various modes with different wavenumbers but the same frequency. Working in the frequency domain, we have the individual incident plane-wave mode, which is scattered into various plane-wave modes with the same frequency. This allows us to compute the scattering matrix element between two plane-wave modes for each frequency. Each scattering matrix element is a complex number, representing the transition from the incident mode to another mode. The amplitudes of diagonal elements are larger than those of the off-diagonal elements. The amplitude and phase of the off-diagonal elements are detectable only for n-1≤slant n\\prime ≤slant n+1 and -3{{Δ }}k≤slant δ {k}x≤slant 3{{Δ }}k, where δ {k}x is the change in the transverse component of the wavenumber and Δk = 0.035 rad Mm-1.

  17. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-12-01

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H 0 and the matter density perturbation σ 8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ 8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H 0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  18. Mode-coupling and wave-particle interactions for unstable ion-acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasilinear and mode-coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady-state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through terms of second order in the wave amplitude, but without the usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion-acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasilinear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  19. Parallel BDD-based monolithic approach for acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Satsuki; Kawai, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    2012-12-01

    Parallel BDD-based monolithic algorithms for acoustic fluid-structure interaction problems are developed. In a previous study, two schemes, NN-I + CGC-FULL and NN-I + CGC-DIAG, have been proven to be efficient among several BDD-type schemes for one processor. Thus, the parallelization of these schemes is discussed in the present study. These BDD-type schemes consist of the operations of the Schur complement matrix-vector (Sv) product, Neumann-Neumann (NN) preconditioning, and the coarse problem. In the present study, the Sv product and NN preconditioning are parallelized for both schemes, and the parallel implementation of the solid and fluid parts of the coarse problem is considered for NN-I + CGC-DIAG. The results of numerical experiments indicate that both schemes exhibit performances that are almost as good as those of single solid and fluid analyses in the Sv product and NN preconditioning. Moreover, NN-I + CGC-DIAG appears to become more efficient as the problem size becomes large due to the parallel calculation of the coarse problem.

  20. Coherent structure interactions in a two-stream plane turbulent mixing layer with impulsive acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latigo, Ben O.

    1989-10-01

    Periodic plane acoustic waves consisting of four discrete pulses are used to trigger the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability at the origin of an initially laminar plane mixing layer. The resulting coherent large-scale structures (CLSS) which grow and interact with their neighbors are followed downstream with hot-wire probes traversed across the mixing layer to a Reynolds number Re=1.5×106. The Reynolds number here is based on downstream distance x and the velocity difference (U1-U2). The continuous hot-wire time record is conditionally sampled with respect to the tone bursts and the samples are phase averaged to reveal the CLSS footprints. Optimum phase averages are obtained using an iterative correlation technique that corrects for phase jitters due to turbulence. An enhanced study of the CLSS is therefore made possible. The ensembles reveal a vivid picture of vortex pairing between the initial eddies as well as the significant role played by the CLSS in momentum transport; hence turbulence mixing.

  1. Coherent structure interactions in a two-stream plane turbulent mixing layer with impulsive acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latigo, Ben O.

    1989-10-01

    Periodic plane acoustic waves consisting of four discrete pulses are used to trigger the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability at the origin of an initially laminar plane mixing layer. The resulting coherent large-scale structures (CLSS), which grow and interact with their neighbors, are followed downstream with hot-wire probes traversed across the mixing layer to a Reynolds number Re = 1.5 x 10 to the 6th. The Reynolds number here is based on downstream distance x and the velocity difference (U1-U2). The continuous hot-wire time record is conditionally sampled with respect to the tone bursts and the samples are phase averaged to reveal the CLSS footprints. Optimum phase averages are obtained using an iterative correlation technique that corrects for phase jitters due to turbulence. An enhanced study of the CLSS is therefore made possible. The ensembles reveal a vivid picture of vortex pairing between the initial eddies as well as the significant role played by the CLSS in momentum transport; hence turbulence mixing.

  2. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B. |; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the {ital acoustic} {ital Faraday} {ital effect}: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Evaluation of waveform data processing in Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikishima, M.; Katoh, Y.; Kojima, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA) is a software function installed on the Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite. The WPIA directly measures the quantity of energy transfer between whistler-mode chorus waves and resonant energetic electrons by using plasma wave vectors and velocity vectors of plasma particles. The phase differences of the WPIA require accurate phase angles of waves and electrons in order to statistically evaluate the significance of the quantity of energy transfer. We propose a technical method for efficient waveform processing in order to conduct the WPIA measurement precisely. In the WPIA measurement, the various waves detected by the onboard instrument appear as noise in the calculation of the quantity of energy transfer for whistler-mode chorus waves. The characteristic frequency variation of the chorus waves makes waveform processing difficult. A chorus waveform is used for the WPIA processing through passband filtering by selecting appropriate data processing length and frequency resolution. We implement overlapping processing of wave data in order to reduce the induced error of the wave phase. The results of waveform processing indicate that the phase errors are successfully reduced and statistical fluctuations are suppressed. The proposed waveform processing method is a necessary and applicative processing for the calculations of the WPIA in the ERG mission.

  4. On Dowell's simplification for acoustic cavity-structure interaction and consistent alternatives.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Jerry H

    2010-01-01

    A widely employed description of the acoustical response in a cavity whose walls are compliant, which was first proposed by Dowell and Voss [(1962). AIAA J. 1, 476-477], uses the modes of the corresponding cavity with rigid walls as basis functions for a series representation of the pressure. It yields a velocity field that is not compatible with the movement of the boundary, and the system equations do not satisfy the principle of reciprocity. The simplified formulation is compared to consistent solutions of the coupled field equations in the time and frequency domains. In addition, this paper introduces an extension of the Ritz series method to fluid-structure coupled systems that satisfies all continuity conditions by imposing constraint equations to enforce any such conditions that are not identically satisfied by the series. A slender waveguide terminated by an oscillator is analyzed by each method. The simplified formulation is found to be very accurate for light fluid loading, except for the pressure field at frequencies below the fundamental rigid-cavity resonance, whereas the Ritz series solution is found to be extremely accurate in all cases.

  5. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks.

    PubMed

    Kirouac, Daniel C; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Swantek, Jennifer; Burke, John M; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID), PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING). We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a "bow tie" architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit "fuzzy" modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of "cross-talk" interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless), we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream components through myriad alternate paths. Many of these

  6. Heart rate responses induced by acoustic tempo and its interaction with basal heart rate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2017-03-07

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Since previous studies focused on the effects of acoustic tempo on the ANS, and humans have their own physiological oscillations such as the heart rate (HR), the effects of acoustic tempo might depend on the HR. Here we show the relationship between HR elevation induced by acoustic tempo and individual basal HR. Since high tempo-induced HR elevation requires fast respiration, which is based on sympatho-respiratory coupling, we controlled the participants' respiration at a faster rate (20 CPM) than usual (15 CPM). We found that sound stimuli with a faster tempo than the individual basal HR increased the HR. However, the HR increased following a gradual increase in the acoustic tempo only when the extent of the gradual increase in tempo was within a specific range (around + 2%/min). The HR did not follow the increase in acoustic tempo when the rate of the increase in the acoustic tempo exceeded 3% per minute. These results suggest that the effect of the sympatho-respiratory coupling underlying the HR elevation caused by a high acoustic tempo depends on the basal HR, and the strength and the temporal dynamics of the tempo.

  7. Heart rate responses induced by acoustic tempo and its interaction with basal heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Since previous studies focused on the effects of acoustic tempo on the ANS, and humans have their own physiological oscillations such as the heart rate (HR), the effects of acoustic tempo might depend on the HR. Here we show the relationship between HR elevation induced by acoustic tempo and individual basal HR. Since high tempo-induced HR elevation requires fast respiration, which is based on sympatho-respiratory coupling, we controlled the participants’ respiration at a faster rate (20 CPM) than usual (15 CPM). We found that sound stimuli with a faster tempo than the individual basal HR increased the HR. However, the HR increased following a gradual increase in the acoustic tempo only when the extent of the gradual increase in tempo was within a specific range (around + 2%/min). The HR did not follow the increase in acoustic tempo when the rate of the increase in the acoustic tempo exceeded 3% per minute. These results suggest that the effect of the sympatho-respiratory coupling underlying the HR elevation caused by a high acoustic tempo depends on the basal HR, and the strength and the temporal dynamics of the tempo. PMID:28266647

  8. Predicting and Analyzing Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Its Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Rapanoel, Holifidy A.; Mazandu, Gaston K.; Mulder, Nicola J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) depends greatly on how the host responds to the bacteria and how the bacteria manipulates the host, which is facilitated by protein–protein interactions. Thus, to understand this process, there is a need for elucidating protein interactions between human and Mtb, which may enable us to characterize specific molecular mechanisms allowing the bacteria to persist and survive under different environmental conditions. In this work, we used the interologs method based on experimentally verified intra-species and inter-species interactions to predict human-Mtb functional interactions. These interactions were further filtered using known human-Mtb interactions and genes that are differentially expressed during infection, producing 190 interactions. Further analysis of the subcellular location of proteins involved in these human-Mtb interactions confirms feasibility of these interactions. We also conducted functional analysis of human and Mtb proteins involved in these interactions, checking whether these proteins play a role in infection and/or disease, and enriching Mtb proteins in a previously predicted list of drug targets. We found that the biological processes of the human interacting proteins suggested their involvement in apoptosis and production of nitric oxide, whereas those of the Mtb interacting proteins were relevant to the intracellular environment of Mtb in the host. Mapping these proteins onto KEGG pathways highlighted proteins belonging to the tuberculosis pathway and also suggested that Mtb proteins might use the host to acquire nutrients, which is in agreement with the intracellular lifestyle of Mtb. This indicates that these interactions can shed light on the interplay between Mtb and its human host and thus, contribute to the process of designing novel drugs with new biological mechanisms of action. PMID:23844013

  9. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  10. Characterization of nonlinear heat release-acoustic interactions in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellows, Benjamin D.

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of the flame transfer function between flow disturbances and heat release oscillations in lean, premixed combustors. This research effort was motivated by the fact that modern gas turbines, operating fuel lean to minimize exhaust emissions, are susceptible to self-excited combustion oscillations. These instabilities generally occur when the unsteady combustion process couples with the acoustic modes of the combustion chamber. The resultant flow and structural vibrations can substantially reduce hot section part life. As such, avoiding operating regimes where high dynamics occur often requires operating at lower power outputs and/or higher pollutant emissions than the turbine is otherwise capable. This work demonstrated nonlinearities in the chemiluminescence response at large amplitude velocity oscillations in a turbulent, swirling flame. It is observed that the nonlinear flame response can exhibit a variety of behaviors, both in the shape of the response curve and the forcing amplitude at which nonlinearity is first observed depending on the operating conditions of the combustor. The phase between the flow oscillations and heat release is also seen to have substantial amplitude dependence. In addition, the interactions between the fundamental frequency and the higher and subharmonics of the measured signals can significantly influence the flame as well as the frequency response of the system. The nonlinear flame dynamics are governed by different mechanisms in different frequency and flowrate regimes. Three mechanisms, vortex rollup, unsteady flame liftoff, and parametric instability, are identified to influence the nonlinear flame response in these combustors. Analysis of the results shows that the mechanisms responsible for nonlinearity m the flame response are influenced by the Strouhal number, the mean velocity at the combustor dump plane, and the ratio of the oscillating velocity amplitude to the laminar

  11. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  12. Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS): A System for Analyzing Teacher-Pupil Interaction in the Affective Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemis, Katherine A.; Liberty, Paul G.

    The Southwestern Cooperative Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS) is a classroom observation instrument designed to record pupil-teacher interaction. The classification of pupil behavior is based on Krathwohl's (1964) theory of the three lowest levels of the affective domain. The levels are (1) receiving: the learner should be sensitized to…

  13. Acoustical studies of molecular interaction in the solution of propranolol hydrochloride drug at different temperatures and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ritesh R.; Bawankar, S. V.; Kukade, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study ultrasonic velocity (υ), density (ρ) and viscosity (η) have been measured at 1MHz frequency in the binary mixtures of propranolol hydrochloride with water in the concentration range (0.1 to 0.0125%) at 303, 308, 313 K using multifrequency ultrasonic interferometer. The measured value of density, ultrasonic velocity, and viscosity have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (βa), relaxation time (τ), acoustic impedance (z), free length ( L f ), free volume ( V f ) and internal pressure (P i ), Wada's constant ( W), Rao's Constant ( R), and cohesive energy ( CE). These parameters explained formation of hydrogen bond and molecular interaction existing in the solution.

  14. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering.

  15. Electron-acoustic-phonon interaction in core/shell Ge/Si and Si/Ge nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Pérez, Darío G.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Marques, G. E.

    2017-04-01

    General expressions for the electron- and hole-acoustic-phonon deformation potential Hamiltonians (HE-DP) are derived for the case of Ge/Si and Si/Ge core/shell nanowire structures (NWs) with circular cross section. Based on the short-range elastic continuum approach and on derived analytical results, the spatial confinement effects on the phonon displacement vector, the phonon dispersion relation and the electron- and hole-phonon scattering amplitudes are analyzed. It is shown that the acoustic displacement vector, phonon frequencies and HE-DP present mixed torsional, axial, and radial components depending on the angular momentum quantum number and phonon wave vector under consideration. The treatment shows that bulk group velocities of the constituent materials are renormalized due to the spatial confinement and intrinsic strain at the interface. The role of insulating shell on the phonon dispersion and electron-phonon coupling in Ge/Si and Si/Ge NWs are discussed.

  16. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  17. The interaction between two planar and nonplanar quantum electron acoustic solitary waves in dense electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Labany, S. K.; El-Mahgoub, M. G.; EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2012-06-15

    The interaction between two planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) quantum electron acoustic solitary waves (QEASWs) in quantum dense electron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain planar and nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two QEASWs. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for QEASWs due to the effect of the different geometries, the quantum corrections of diffraction, and the cold electron-to-hot electron number density ratio are discussed. It is shown that the interaction of the QEASWs in planar geometry, cylindrical geometry, and spherical geometry are different. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two planar and nonplanar QEASWs that may occur in the quantum plasmas found in laser-produced plasmas as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  18. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and

  19. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezers: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Ha, Kanglyeol; Shung, K. Kirk

    2005-05-01

    The optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point where most of the acoustic energy is concentrated if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on a fluid particle in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in a ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In order to apply the acoustical tweezer to manipulating macromolecules and cells whose size is in the order of a few microns or less, a prerequisite is that the ultrasound wavelength has to be much smaller than a few microns. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. For the realization of acoustic trapping, negative axial radiation force has to be generated to pull a particle towards a focus. The fat particle considered for acoustic trapping in this paper has an acoustic impedance of 1.4 MRayls. The magnitude of the acoustic axial radiation force that has been calculated as the size of the fat particle is varied from 8λ to 14λ. In addition, both Fresnel coefficients at various positions are also calculated to assess the interaction of reflection and refraction and their relative contribution to the effect of the acoustical tweezer. The simulation results show that the feasibility of the acoustical tweezer depends on both the degree of acoustic impedance mismatch and the degree of focusing relative to the particle size. .

  20. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  1. Interfacial Interaction between Transmembrane Ocular Mucins and Adhesive Polymers and Dendrimers Analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, M.; Briand, E.; Woodward, A. M.; Argüeso, P.; Molina Martínez, I. T.; Herrero-Vanrell, R.; Ponchel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Development of the first in vitro method based on biosensor chip technology designed for probing the interfacial interaction phenomena between transmembrane ocular mucins and adhesive polymers and dendrimers intended for ophthalmic administration. Methods The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used. A transmembrane ocular mucin surface was prepared on the chip surface and characterized by QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The mucoadhesive molecules tested were: hyaluronic acid (HA), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), chitosan (Ch) and polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM). Results While Ch originated interfacial interaction with ocular transmembrane mucins, for HA, CMC and HPMC, chain interdiffusion seemed to be mandatory for bioadherence at the concentrations used in ophthalmic clinical practise. Interestingly, PAMAM dendrimers developed permanent interfacial interactions with transmembrane ocular mucins whatever their surface chemical groups, showing a relevant importance of co-operative effect of these multivalent systems. Polymers developed interfacial interactions with ocular membrane-associated mucins in the following order: Ch(1 %) > G4PAMAM-NH2(2 %) = G4PAMAM-OH(2 %) > G3.5PAMAM-COOH(2 %)≫ CMC(0.5 %) = HA(0.2 %) = HPMC(0.3 %). Conclusions The method proposed is useful to discern between the mucin-polymer chemical interactions at molecular scale. Results reinforce the usefulness of chitosan and den-drimers as polymers able to increase the retention time of drugs on the ocular surface and hence their bioavailability. PMID:22565639

  2. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  3. Acoustic plate mode propagation and interaction with ultraviolet light in periodic AIN-on-sapphire structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, Venkata; Shur, Michael; Ciplys, Daumantas; Jain, Rakesh; Yang Jinwei; Gaska, Remis

    2011-02-28

    AlN overlay featuring periodic columnar structure fabricated by epitaxial lateral overgrowth technique leads to excitation of acoustic plate modes (APMs) not observed in overlays without such periodic structure. The measured velocities of acoustic plate modes propagating in AlN-on-sapphire structure were verified by numerical simulation. The APM velocity is strongly modulated by UV illumination at wavelengths from 240 to 365 nm, and the corresponding phase response is sensitive to both the UV power and the wavelength with maximum sensitivity of 3.0 ppm/({mu}W/cm{sup 2}) at 240 nm.

  4. Interactions of hypericin with a model mutagen - Acridine orange analyzed by light absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Monika; Szabelski, Mariusz; Kasparek, Adam; Wieczorek, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the ability of hypericin to interact with a model mutagen - acridine orange. The hetero-association of hypericin and acridine orange was investigated with absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy methods in aqueous solution of DMSO. The data indicate that hypericin forms complexes with acridine orange and that the association constants are relatively high and depend on DMSO concentration. The absorption spectra of the hypericin - acridine orange complexes were examined as well. Owing to its ability to interact with flat aromatic compounds, hypericin may potentially be used as an interceptor molecule.

  5. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  6. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  7. Analyzing User Interaction to Design an Intelligent e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Richa

    2011-01-01

    Building intelligent course designing systems adaptable to the learners' needs is one of the key goals of research in e-learning. This goal is all the more crucial as gaining knowledge in an e-learning environment depends solely on computer mediated interaction within the learner group and among the learners and instructors. The patterns generated…

  8. Analyzing Conflict Dynamics with the Aid of an Interactive Microworld Simulator of a Fishing Dispute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperman, Ranan D.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from a research project that uses an interactive simulator of an imaginary fishing dispute. Subjects operating the simulator play the role of a state leader, while the computer program controls the behavior of a contending state as well as provides all the environmental data associated with the conflict. The…

  9. AOIPS/2 - An interactive system to process, analyze, and display meteorological data sets for nowcasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Desjardins, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    A description of AOIPS/2, an interactive hardware and software system to process, integrate, and display meteorological data is presented. The AOIPS/2 objectives and functional specifications are given. The hardware system architecture and work stations and the software architecture and special features are described. A summary is given of the software system and its main menu.

  10. Analyzing Conceptual Gains in Introductory Calculus with Interactively-Engaged Teaching Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the relationship between an instructional style called Interactive-Engagement (IE) and gains on a measure of conceptual knowledge called the Calculus Concept Inventory (CCI). The data comes from two semesters of introductory calculus courses (Fall 2010 and Spring 2011), consisting of a total of 482 students from the…

  11. Application of Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA) in Analyzing Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Sima; Ketabi, Saeed; Tavakoli, Mansoor; Sadeghi, Moslem

    2012-01-01

    As an area of classroom research, Interaction Analysis developed from the need and desire to investigate the process of classroom teaching and learning in terms of action-reaction between individuals and their socio-cultural context (Biddle, 1967). However, sole reliance on quantitative techniques could be problematic, since they conceal more than…

  12. Analyzing User Interaction to Design an Intelligent e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Richa

    2011-01-01

    Building intelligent course designing systems adaptable to the learners' needs is one of the key goals of research in e-learning. This goal is all the more crucial as gaining knowledge in an e-learning environment depends solely on computer mediated interaction within the learner group and among the learners and instructors. The patterns generated…

  13. Self-sustained Flow-acoustic Interactions in Airfoil Transitional Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    the free-jet anechoic wind tunnel of Ecole Centrale de Lyon. Measurements of wall pressure, far -field acoustic pressure and velocity fluctuations...airfoil and the slightly cambered SD7003 airfoil at moderate incidence were tested in the free-jet anechoic wind tunnel of Ecole Centrale de Lyon. A

  14. Quantum Analogies in the Interaction between Acoustic Waves and Bubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrales, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Analogies between quantum mechanical and acoustical propagation phenomena have a great interest in academic research due to their ability to shed light on some complex quantum effects, which are impossible to visualize directly in the macroscopic world. In this talk, we describe a number of these analogies concerning the acoustic behavior of bubble clouds. Firstly, we show that the structure of the collective oscillation modes of a spherical bubble cloud resembles that of the atomic orbitals of a hydrogen atom. Secondly, we present an analogy between some perturbation methods used in quantum-electrodynamics and the computation of the acoustic response of the randomly distributed bubble cloud by considering the contribution to the total scattered pressure of the multiple scattering paths that take place inside the clouds. As an application of this analogy, we obtain the scattering cross-section of a diluted cloud, which remarkably mimics the quantum scattering of an neutron wave when passing through an atomic nucleus. Finally, we numerically reproduce the behavior of an electron in a covalent bond between two hydrogen atoms by simulating the acoustic wave propagation through two neighboring spherical bubble assemblages. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Grants DPI2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI2011-28356-C03-02.

  15. Acoustic wave excitation during the aerodynamic interaction between a fan blade and a bluff obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukhlantsev, S. G.

    1990-08-01

    The forces generated by flow over the surface of a fan blade and a bluff obstacle are calculated using the discrete vortex method. The results are then used to determine the sound source and the acoustic field formed. Results of an experimental verification of the analytical relations are presented.

  16. Application of an Interactive Computer Model to Analyze the Distribution of U.S. Navy Warfare Specialists Among Generalist Billets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    demands of the operating forces. - Provide reliable planning information to personnel inventory managers... so they may assess the feasibility and...34Forecaster, A Markovian Model to Analyze the Distribution of Naval Officers", Technical Report, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, April 1990. 13...I NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California (0 DTIC O ELECTE 9 11MARO 5 1992 0 THESIS APPLICATION OF AN INTERACTIVE COMPUTER MODEL TO ANALYZE

  17. High Performance Flexible Actuator of Urchin-Like ZnO Nanostructure/Polyvinylenefluoride Hybrid Thin Film with Graphene Electrodes for Acoustic Generator and Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Oug Jae; Lee, James S; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-05-01

    A bass frequency response enhanced flexible polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based thin film acoustic actuator is successfully fabricated. High concentrations of various zinc oxide (ZnO) is embedded in PVDF matrix, enhancing the β phase content and the dielectric property of the composite thin film. ZnO acts as a nucleation agent for the crystallization of PVDF. A chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is used as electrodes, enabling high electron mobility for the distortion free acoustic signals. The frequency response of the fabricated acoustic actuator is studied as a function of the film thickness and filler content. The optimized film has a thickness of 80 μm with 30 wt% filler content and shows 72% and 42% frequency response enhancement in bass and midrange compared to the commercial PVDF, respectively. Also, the total harmonic distortion decreases to 82% and 74% in the bass and midrange regions, respectively. Furthermore, the composite film shows a promising potential for microphone applications. Most of all, it is demonstrated that acoustic actuator performance is strongly influenced by degree of PVDF crystalline. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Using Interactive Visualization to Analyze Solid Earth Data and Geodynamics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Billen, M. I.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Rundle, J. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. Major projects such as EarthScope and GeoEarthScope are producing the data needed to characterize the structure and kinematics of Earth's surface and interior at unprecedented resolution. At the same time, high-performance computing enables high-precision and fine- detail simulation of geodynamics processes, complementing the observational data. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these datasets, to evaluate models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool allowing active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for accelerated scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. Our approach to VR takes advantage of the specialized skills of geoscientists who are trained to interpret geological and geophysical data generated from field observations. Interactive tools allow the scientist to explore and interpret geodynamic models, tomographic models, and topographic observations, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulations or field observations. The use of VR technology enables us to improve our interpretation of crust and mantle structure and of geodynamical processes. Mapping tools based on computer visualization allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions, and an interactive tool allows us to construct digital fault models for use in numerical models. Using the interactive tools on a high-end platform such as an immersive virtual reality

  19. Analyzing Teachers' Professional Interactions in a School as Social Capital: A Social Network Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Riel, Margaret; Krause, Ann E.; Frank, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Researchers have proposed a number of lenses for analyzing teacher professional communities in recent years. These lenses have been useful in describing key dynamics of professional communities; however, none provides a compelling approach to how to integrate data from the school as a whole with case study data on individual…

  20. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  1. Nonlinear Acoustics: Long Range Underwater Propagation, Air-Filled Porous Materials, and Noncollinear Interaction in a Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-28

    degree December 1985. 3. A. TenCate , Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering. " ’-. I. Sw J -- - . II. PROJECTS 1. Nonlinear effects in long range...interaction in a rectangular waveguide. (Hamilton and TenCate ). This work is an outgrowth of Hamilton’s Ph.D. research (84-6,7) and TenCate’s M.S...Ph.D. dissertation research topics. TenCate has begun work on an acoustical chaos experiment, intense standing waves in a closed tube. His initial

  2. Label-free detection of protein-ligand interactions in real time using micromachined bulk acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Marma, Mong S.; Lee, Chuang-Yuan; Kamal-Bahl, Sanat; Kim, Eun Sok; McKenna, Charles E.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present a micromachined film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) to detect protein-ligand interactions in real-time. The surface of the FBAR device has a thin layer of gold deposited on it to immobilize thiol-modified biotin. The resonant frequency of the biotin modified FBAR was measured to decrease by 170 ppm when exposed to streptavidin solution with a concentration of 5×10-7 M, corresponding to an added mass of 120 pg on the FBAR surface due to the biotin-streptavidin interaction. Consequently, the biotin modified FBAR can be used to observe in real time the biotin-streptavidin interaction without the use of labeling or molecular tags. The FBAR can be used in a variety of protein-ligand systems, and be designed for testing in array formats to give high throughput screening for drug discovery.

  3. Non-linear Alfvén wave interaction leading to resonant excitation of an acoustic mode in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, S.; Carter, T. A.

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear three-wave interaction process at the heart of the parametric decay process is studied by launching counter-propagating Alfvén waves from antennas placed at either end of the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. A resonance in the beat wave response produced by the two launched Alfvén waves is observed and is identified as a damped ion acoustic mode based on the measured dispersion relation. Other properties of the interaction including the spatial profile of the beat mode and response amplitude are also consistent with theoretical predictions for a three-wave interaction driven by a nonlinear ponderomotive force. A simple damped, driven oscillator model making use of the MHD equations well-predicts most of the observations, but the width of the resonance curve is still under investigation.

  4. ICAP - An Interactive Cluster Analysis Procedure for analyzing remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.; Turner, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    An Interactive Cluster Analysis Procedure (ICAP) was developed to derive classifier training statistics from remotely sensed data. ICAP differs from conventional clustering algorithms by allowing the analyst to optimize the cluster configuration by inspection, rather than by manipulating process parameters. Control of the clustering process alternates between the algorithm, which creates new centroids and forms clusters, and the analyst, who can evaluate and elect to modify the cluster structure. Clusters can be deleted, or lumped together pairwise, or new centroids can be added. A summary of the cluster statistics can be requested to facilitate cluster manipulation. The principal advantage of this approach is that it allows prior information (when available) to be used directly in the analysis, since the analyst interacts with ICAP in a straightforward manner, using basic terms with which he is more likely to be familiar. Results from testing ICAP showed that an informed use of ICAP can improve classification, as compared to an existing cluster analysis procedure.

  5. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  6. Analyzing driver-pedestrian interaction in a mixed-street environment using a driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Hassan; Abkarian, Hoseb; Abou-Zeid, Maya; Kaysi, Isam

    2017-08-25

    This paper presents the design, analysis and results of a driving simulator experiment conducted to study the interaction between drivers and pedestrians in a mixed-street environment. Ninety-six students of the American University of Beirut (AUB) participated in the experiment that took place in the Transportation and Infrastructure Laboratory of AUB. The study looked at the driver-pedestrian interaction from the driver's perspective, by quantifying the effects of different scenario variables on the driving behavior of the participants. Kruskall-Wallis test shows that drivers' behavior in proximity of pedestrians tends to be statistically significantly less aggressive when their approach velocity is lower, curb-side parking is not allowed, a crosswalk exists, and the number of pedestrians crossing the street is higher. A discrete choice model for the yielding behavior of the drivers was also developed as a function of different predictor variables. Five out of the six predictors considered (except for gender) had a statistically significant effect on the yielding behavior, particularly the effects of curb-side parking, number of pedestrians crossing, and approach velocity. The model was then used to evaluate the effect of policy variables on the yielding probabilities of the drivers. The results of this study enrich current knowledge and understanding of drivers' behavior and their interaction with pedestrians, especially with studying the effects of scenario variables that were not addressed before; this would help planners propose and evaluate safety measures and traffic calming techniques to reduce the risks on pedestrians. The study also confirms the effectiveness of driving simulators in studying driver-pedestrian interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J.; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900’s at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases. PMID:26777674

  8. Molecular interactions and trafficking of influenza A virus polymerase proteins analyzed by specific monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Bussey, Kendra A.; Desmet, Emily A.; Kim, Baek; Takimoto, Toru

    2012-04-25

    The influenza polymerase complex composed of PA, PB1 and PB2, plays a key role in viral replication and pathogenicity. Newly synthesized components must be translocated to the nucleus, where replication and transcription of viral genomes take place. Previous studies suggest that while PB2 is translocated to the nucleus independently, PA and PB1 subunits could not localize to the nucleus unless in a PA-PB1 complex. To further determine the molecular interactions between the components, we created a panel of 16 hybridoma cell lines, which produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each polymerase component. We showed that, although PB1 interacts with both PA and PB2 individually, nuclear localization of PB1 is enhanced only when co-expressed with PA. Interestingly, one of the anti-PA mAbs reacted much more strongly with PA when co-expressed with PB1. These results suggest that PA-PB1 interactions induce a conformational change in PA, which could be required for its nuclear translocation.

  9. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-18

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900's at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases.

  10. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  11. Analyzing Interactions by an IIS-Map-Based Method in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Yang, Kaicheng; Huang, Ronghuai

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a new method named the IIS-map-based method for analyzing interactions in face-to-face collaborative learning settings. This analysis method is conducted in three steps: firstly, drawing an initial IIS-map according to collaborative tasks; secondly, coding and segmenting information flows into information items of IIS; thirdly,…

  12. Analyzing Interactions by an IIS-Map-Based Method in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Yang, Kaicheng; Huang, Ronghuai

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a new method named the IIS-map-based method for analyzing interactions in face-to-face collaborative learning settings. This analysis method is conducted in three steps: firstly, drawing an initial IIS-map according to collaborative tasks; secondly, coding and segmenting information flows into information items of IIS; thirdly,…

  13. A strategy for extracting and analyzing large-scale quantitative epistatic interaction data

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean R; Schuldiner, Maya; Krogan, Nevan J; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2006-01-01

    Recently, approaches have been developed for high-throughput identification of synthetic sick/lethal gene pairs. However, these are only a specific example of the broader phenomenon of epistasis, wherein the presence of one mutation modulates the phenotype of another. We present analysis techniques for generating high-confidence quantitative epistasis scores from measurements made using synthetic genetic array and epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) technology, as well as several tools for higher-level analysis of the resulting data that are greatly enhanced by the quantitative score and detection of alleviating interactions. PMID:16859555

  14. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-11-27

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact.

  15. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  16. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug–drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  17. Analyzing interaction of electricity markets and environmental policies using equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihsu

    Around the world, the electric sector is evolving from a system of regulated vertically-integrated monopolies to a complex system of competing generation companies, unregulated traders, and regulated transmission and distribution. One emerging challenge faced by environmental policymakers and electricity industry is the interaction between electricity markets and environmental policies. The objective of this dissertation is to examine these interactions using large-scale computational models of electricity markets based on noncooperative game theory. In particular, this dissertation is comprised of four essays. The first essay studies the interaction of the United States Environmental Protection Agency NOx Budget Program and the mid-Atlantic electricity market. This research quantifies emissions, economic inefficiencies, price distortions, and overall social welfare under various market assumptions using engineering-economic models. The models calculate equilibria for imperfectly competitive markets---Cournot oligopoly---considering the actual landscape of power plants and transmission lines, and including the possibility of market power in the NOx allowances market. The second essay extends the results from first essay and models imperfectly competitive markets using a Stackelberg or leader-follower formulation. A leader in the power and NO x markets is assumed to have perfect foresight of its rivals' responses. The rivals' best response functions are explicitly embedded in the leader's constraints. The solutions quantify the extent to which a leader in the markets can extract economic rents on the expense of its followers. The third essay investigates the effect of implementing the European Union (EU) CO2 Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) on wholesale power prices in the Western European electricity market. This research uses theoretical and computational modeling approaches to quantify the degree to which CO2 costs were passed on to power prices, and quantifies the

  18. Parametric interactions of acoustic waves in semiconductor quantum plasmas with strain dependent dielectric constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.; Agrawal, A.

    2017-05-01

    Using quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) of semiconductor plasma for a one-component we present an analytical investigation on parametric interaction of a laser radiation in an unmagnetised material with a strain-dependent dielectric constant. The nonlinear current density and third order susceptibility are analyzed in different wave number regions in presence and absence of quantum effect. We present the qualitative behavior of threshold pump intensity with respect to wave number in presence and absence of quantum effect. The numeric estimates are made for n-BaTiO3 crystals at 77k duly irradiated by pulsed 10.6μm CO2 laser. It is found that the quantum correction through Fermi temperature and Bohm potential terms modifies the threshold characteristics.

  19. Promoter Recognition by Extracytoplasmic Function σ Factors: Analyzing DNA and Protein Interaction Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Guzina, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors are the largest and the most diverse group of alternative σ factors, but their mechanisms of transcription are poorly studied. This subfamily is considered to exhibit a rigid promoter structure and an absence of mixing and matching; both −35 and −10 elements are considered necessary for initiating transcription. This paradigm, however, is based on very limited data, which bias the analysis of diverse ECF σ subgroups. Here we investigate DNA and protein recognition motifs involved in ECF σ factor transcription by a computational analysis of canonical ECF subfamily members, much less studied ECF σ subgroups, and the group outliers, obtained from recently sequenced bacteriophages. The analysis identifies an extended −10 element in promoters for phage ECF σ factors; a comparison with bacterial σ factors points to a putative 6-amino-acid motif just C-terminal of domain σ2, which is responsible for the interaction with the identified extension of the −10 element. Interestingly, a similar protein motif is found C-terminal of domain σ2 in canonical ECF σ factors, at a position where it is expected to interact with a conserved motif further upstream of the −10 element. Moreover, the phiEco32 ECF σ factor lacks a recognizable −35 element and σ4 domain, which we identify in a homologous phage, 7-11, indicating that the extended −10 element can compensate for the lack of −35 element interactions. Overall, the results reveal greater flexibility in promoter recognition by ECF σ factors than previously recognized and raise the possibility that mixing and matching also apply to this group, a notion that remains to be biochemically tested. IMPORTANCE ECF σ factors are the most numerous group of alternative σ factors but have been little studied. Their promoter recognition mechanisms are obscured by the large diversity within the ECF σ factor group and the limited similarity with the well

  20. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  1. LOCAL HELIOSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ACOUSTIC WAVES AND A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaguru, S. P.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using a high-cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (Fe I 6173 A) and insensitive (Fe I 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination-angle-dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction-dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

  2. Oceanographic and Topographic Interactions in Underwater Acoustic Propagation, with Regional Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    IMACS Symposium on Computational Acoustics (North-Holland, New York, 1990). Lord Rayleigh (J.W. Strutt ), Theory of Sound, (2nd Ed. Dover, New York, 1945...Professor William Siegmann of Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, and Professor George Frisk of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute for their care- ful...machines. Dr. Ding Lee also gave me much support and en- couragement. At the Navy Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., Mr. John Collier provided

  3. The interaction between acoustic waves and inclined magnetic fields near the β~1 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunker, H.; Braun, D. C.; Cally, P. S.; Lindsey, C.

    2006-08-01

    The acoustic showerglass effect may be hindering our helioseismic renditions of the solar subsurface. We present the results of near -surface wave conversion of acoustic waves in a model polytropic atmosphere by a uniform, inclined magnetic field. The upcoming fast, acoustic wave undergoes conversion to a slow, magnetic wave at the β ~ 1 layer where the sound speed and Alfven speed are comparable. The conversion is dependent upon the " attack angle" between the ray path and the magnetic field. The angle of the wave vectors at the polytropic " surface" is compared to observations of surface velocity vectors in sunspot penumbrae. AR9026 and AR9057 both have well- defined, static penumbrae and their Doppler velocities are viewed from different angles by SOHO-MDI as they cross the solar disk. The phase of the correlation between the ingression and surface velocity, determined by helioseismic holography, is used to assess the effect the penumbral magnetic field has on incoming acoustic waves. The phase is found to be dependent upon the line-of-sight of observation indicating that this is a surface phenomenon, which could otherwise be interpreted as subsurface travel-time perturbations of up to one minute. Furthermore, using vector magnetograms from the IVM at the Mees Observatory, the phase of the correlation is found to be dependent on the magnetic field tilt from vertical, and the dependence is consistent across the two sunspots. Comparing the results from the polytropic model with the observations show strong support for the near-surface wave conversion theory, although many questions still remain.

  4. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Fais, A.; Johnson, M.; Wilson, M.; Aguilar Soto, N.; Madsen, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1–2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  5. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  6. Using Electronic Properties of Adamantane Derivatives to Analyze their Ion Channel Interactions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacum, Jason

    2013-03-01

    The derivatives of adamantane, which is a cage-like diamondoid structure, can be used as pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These drugs interact with ion channels, and they act by electronically and physically hindering the ion transport. The electronic properties of each compound influence the location and level of ion channel hindrance, and the specific use of each compound depends on the functional groups that are attached to the adamantane base chain. Computational analysis and molecular simulations of these different derivatives and the ion channels can provide useful insight into the effect that the functional groups have on the properties of the compounds. Using this information, conclusions can be made about the pharmaceutical mechanisms, as well as how to improve them or create new beneficial compounds. Focusing on the electronic properties, such as the dipole moments of the derivatives and amino acids in the ion channels, can provide more efficient predictions of how these drugs work and how they can be enhanced. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER46304

  7. Aviation Safety: Modeling and Analyzing Complex Interactions between Humans and Automated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Brat, Guillaume; Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Raimondi, Franco; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The on-going transformation from the current US Air Traffic System (ATS) to the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NextGen) will force the introduction of new automated systems and most likely will cause automation to migrate from ground to air. This will yield new function allocations between humans and automation and therefore change the roles and responsibilities in the ATS. Yet, safety in NextGen is required to be at least as good as in the current system. We therefore need techniques to evaluate the safety of the interactions between humans and automation. We think that current human factor studies and simulation-based techniques will fall short in front of the ATS complexity, and that we need to add more automated techniques to simulations, such as model checking, which offers exhaustive coverage of the non-deterministic behaviors in nominal and off-nominal scenarios. In this work, we present a verification approach based both on simulations and on model checking for evaluating the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation. Models are created using Brahms (a multi-agent framework) and we show that the traditional Brahms simulations can be integrated with automated exploration techniques based on model checking, thus offering a complete exploration of the behavioral space of the scenario. Our formal analysis supports the notion of beliefs and probabilities to reason about human behavior. We demonstrate the technique with the Ueberligen accident since it exemplifies authority problems when receiving conflicting advices from human and automated systems.

  8. [Interactions between proteins and cation exchange adsorbents analyzed by NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Hao, Dongxia; Qi, Shuting; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    In silico acquirement of the accurate residue details of protein on chromatographic media is a bottleneck in protein chromatography separation and purification. Here we developed a novel approach by coupling with H/D exchange and nuclear magnetic resonance to observe hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) unfolding behavior adsorbed on cation exchange media (SP Sepharose FF). Analysis of 1D 1H-NMR shows that protein unfolding accelerated H/D exchange rate, leading to more loss of signal of amide hydrogen owing to exposure of residues and the more unfolding of protein. Analysis of two-dimensional hydrogen-hydrogen total correlation spectroscopy shows that lysozyme lost more signals and experienced great unfolding during its adsorption on media surface. However, for several distinct fragments, the protection degrees varied, the adsorbed lysozyme lost more signal intensity and was less protected at disorder structures (coil, bend, and turn), but was comparatively more protected against exchange at secondary structure domains (α-helix, β-sheet). Finally, the binding site was determined by electrostatic calculations using computer simulation methods in conjunction with hydrogen deuterium labeled protein and NMR. This study would help deeply understand the microscopic mechanism of protein chromatography and guide the purposely design of chromatographic process and media. Moreover, it also provide an effective tool to study the protein and biomaterials interaction in other applications.

  9. Comparison of three methods for analyzing loureirin B and human serum albumin interaction using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuelin; Sha, Yijie; Qian, Kai; Chen, Xu; Chen, Qin

    2017-04-01

    Loureirin B (LB), a bioactive drug, is widely used in the treatment of biological diseases. However, due to its poor solution in water, it is important to find the approach which helps LB to specific biological targets. As the most abundant protein in plasma, HSA plays the role of a carrier of numerous drug ligand. Thus, the interaction between LB and HSA was explored by ACE, CE frontal analysis, and pressure-mediated ACE under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The binding constants were calculated as 13.14 × 10(4) L/mol, 7.00 × 10(4) L/mol, and 2.78 × 10(4) L/mol for each method, respectively. At the same time, the binding site number (n = 1.429) could be only calculated by the CE frontal analysis method. Furthermore, good experimental repeatability was obtained by pressure-mediated ACE with RSDs for retention times and peak areas within 2.149 and 1.228, respectively.

  10. Interaction of gymnemic acid with cyclodextrins analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Izutani, Yusuke; Kanaori, Kenji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Oda, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    The physiological phenomenon that the antisweet taste effect of gymnemic acid (GA) is diminished by application of gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD) to the mouth was evaluated at the molecular level using isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR and dynamic light scattering. These analyses showed that GA specifically binds to gamma-CD. Thermodynamic analysis using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the association constant of GA and gamma-CD is 10(5)-10(6) m(-1) with favorable enthalpy and entropy changes. The heat capacity change was negative and large, despite the change in accessible surface area upon binding being small. These thermodynamics indicate that the binding is dominated by hydrophobic interactions, which is in agreement with inclusion complex formation of gamma-CD. In addition, NMR measurements showed that in solution the spectra of GA are broad and sharpened by the addition of gamma-CD, indicating that unbound GA is in a water-soluble aggregate that is dispersed when it forms a complex with gamma-CD. Dynamic light scattering showed that the average diameter of unbound GA is > 30 nm and that of GA and gamma-CD complex is 2.2 nm, similar to unbound gamma-CD, supporting the aggregate property of GA and the inclusion complexation of GA by gamma-CD.

  11. A New and Improved Carbon Dioxide Isotope Analyzer for Understanding Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Berman, E. S.; Owano, T. G.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Still, C. J.; Gardner, A.; Baer, D. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotopes provide information on biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. While δ13C measurement can provide information on the sources of the CO2, be it photosynthesis, natural gas combustion, other fossil fuel sources, landfills or other sources, δ18O, and δ17O are thought to be determined by the hydrological cycling of the CO2. Though researchers have called for analytical tools for CO2 isotope measurements that are reliable and field-deployable, developing such instrument remains a challenge. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This new and improved analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (150-2500 ppm). The laboratory precision is ±200 ppb (1σ) in CO2 at 1 s, with a long-term (2 min) precision of ±20 ppb. The 1-second precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.7 ‰, and for δ17O is 1.8 ‰. The long-term (2 min) precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.08 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.18 ‰. The instrument has improved precision, stability and user interface over previous LGR CO2 isotope instruments and can be easily programmed for periodic referencing and sampling from different sources when coupled with LGR's multiport inlet unit (MIU). We have deployed two of these instruments at two different field sites, one at Twitchell Island in Sacramento County, CA to monitor the CO2 isotopic fluxes from an alfalfa field from 6/29/2015-7/13/2015, and the other at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington to monitor primarily the oxygen isotopes of CO2 within the canopy from 8/4/2015 through mid-November 2015. Methodology, laboratory development and testing and field performance are presented.

  12. An Innovative Interactive Modeling Tool to Analyze Scenario-Based Physician Workforce Supply and Demand

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Crawford, James M.; Gross, David; Karcher, Donald S.; Kaufman, Jill; Knapman, Doug; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Bean, Sarah; Kumar, Paramhans; Sharma, Raghav; Chamoli, Vaibhav; Ghai, Vikrant; Gogia, Vineet; Weintraub, Sally; Cohen, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Effective physician workforce management requires that the various organizations comprising the House of Medicine be able to assess their current and future workforce supply. This information has direct relevance to funding of graduate medical education. We describe a dynamic modeling tool that examines how individual factors and practice variables can be used to measure and forecast the supply and demand for existing and new physician services. The system we describe, while built to analyze the pathologist workforce, is sufficiently broad and robust for use in any medical specialty. Our design provides a computer-based software model populated with data from surveys and best estimates by specialty experts about current and new activities in the scope of practice. The model describes the steps needed and data required for analysis of supply and demand. Our modeling tool allows educators and policy makers, in addition to physician specialty organizations, to assess how various factors may affect demand (and supply) of current and emerging services. Examples of factors evaluated include types of professional services (3 categories with 16 subcategories), service locations, elements related to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, new technologies, aging population, and changing roles in capitated, value-based, and team-based systems of care. The model also helps identify where physicians in a given specialty will likely need to assume new roles, develop new expertise, and become more efficient in practice to accommodate new value-based payment models. PMID:28725751

  13. Problems in nonlinear acoustics: Pulsed finite amplitude sound beams, nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer, nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams, effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams, and parametric receiving arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Mark F.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses five projects all of which involve basic theoretical research in nonlinear acoustics: (1) pulsed finite amplitude sound beams are studied with a recently developed time domain computer algorithm that solves the KZK nonlinear parabolic wave equation; (2) nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer is a study of harmonic generation and acoustic soliton information in a liquid between a rigid and a free surface; (3) nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams is a study of source asymmetries and scattering of sound by sound at high intensity; (4) effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams is a completed study of the role of absorption in second harmonic generation and scattering of sound by sound; and (5) parametric receiving arrays is a completed study of parametric reception in a reverberant environment.

  14. Analyzing the interaction between state tax incentives and the federal production tax credit for wind power

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Gagliano, Troy

    2002-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential impact of state tax incentives on the federal production tax credit (PTC) for large-scale wind power projects. While the federal PTC provides critical support to wind plants in the U.S., its so-called ''double-dipping'' provisions may also diminish the value of - or make ineffectual - certain types of state wind power incentives. In particular, if structured the wrong way, state assistance programs will undercut the value of the federal PTC to wind plant owners. It is therefore critical to determine which state incentives reduce the federal PTC, and the magnitude of this reduction. Such knowledge will help states determine which wind power incentives can be the most effective. This research concludes that certain kinds of state tax incentives are at risk of reducing the value of the federal PTC, but that federal tax law and IRS rulings are not sufficiently clear to specify exactly what kinds of incentives trigger this offset. State investment tax credits seem most likely to reduce federal PTC payments; the impact of state production tax credits as well as state property and sales tax incentives is more uncertain. Further IRS rulings will be necessary to gain clarity on these issues. State policymakers can seek such guidance from the IRS. While the IRS may not issue a definitive ''revenue ruling'' on requests from state policymakers, the IRS has in the past been willing to provide general information letters that can provide non-binding clarification on these matters. Private wind power developers, meanwhile, may seek guidance through ''private letter'' rulings.

  15. General in vitro method to analyze the interactions of synthetic polymers with human antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Soshee, Anandakumar; Zürcher, Stefan; Spencer, Nicholas D; Halperin, Avraham; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-13

    Recent reports on the hitherto underestimated antigenicity of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which is widely used for pharmaceutical applications, highlight the need for efficient testing of polymer antigenicity and for a better understanding of its molecular origins. With this goal in mind, we have used the phage-display technique to screen large, recombinant antibody repertoires of human origin in vitro for antibodies that bind poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). PVP is a neutral synthetic polymer of industrial and clinical interest that is also a well-known model antigen in animal studies, thus allowing the comparison of in vitro and in vivo responses. We have identified 44 distinct antibodies that bind specifically to PVP. Competitive binding assays show that the PVP-antibody binding constant is proportional to the polymerization degree of PVP and that specific binding is detected down to the vinylpyrrolidone (VP) monomer level. Statistical analysis of anti-PVP antibody sequences identifies an amino-acid motif that is shared by many phage-display-selected anti-PVP antibodies that are similar to a previously described natural anti-PVP antibody. This suggests a role for this motif in specific antibody/PVP interactions. Interestingly, sequence analysis also suggests that only a single antibody chain containing this shared motif is responsible for antibody binding to PVP, as confirmed upon systematic deletion of either antibody chain for 90% of selected anti-PVP antibodies. Overall, a large number of antibodies in the human repertoires we have screened bind specifically to PVP through a small number of shared amino acid motifs, and preliminary comparison points to significant correlations between the sequences of phage-display-selected anti-PVP antibodies and their natural counterparts isolated from immunized mice in previous studies. This study pioneers the use of antibody phage-display to explore the antigenicity of biotechnologically relevant polymers. It also paves the

  16. AOIPS/2: An interactive system to process, analyze, and display meteorological data sets for nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Desjardins, M. L.

    The Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System 2 (AOIPS/2) is a high performance interactive meteorological processing system where many meteorological data ingest, processing, analysis and display functions may be performed. These functions may be carried out on many types of meteorological data including those from satellites, radars, rawinsondes, surface observations, as well as special aircraft instruments and 3D numerical weather model simulations. Presently the capability to ingest real-time conventional data is being enhanced, and work is in progress to directly receive satellite and radar data. The AOIPS/2 capability to integrate these real-time data makes it an effective tool for nowcasting experiments. The AOIPS/2 hardware system consists of several 32 bit super microcomputers networked to a larger general purpose computer. Two of the ``super micros'' serve as hosts to commercially available image terminals while two others act as hosts to satellite and conventional data ingest systems. When the AOIPS/2 system was designed the following improvements over previous systems were sought: 1) integration of all the major software packages used by the Severe Storms Branch into the METPAK software system, 2) use of microcomputers which could be located near the users, 3) use of a distributed system to eliminate interference of CPU intensive image processing function with other users, and 4) minimization of the work involved in future upgrades to new computers or image terminals. The basic specifications and features of the AOIPS/2 include: 1) a distributed system of MicroVAX IIs, linked by Ethernet to a VAX 780 running VMS based software, 2) two International Imaging System (IIS) 75 image terminals with advanced hardware features like shift, zoom, and histogram etc. on dedicated MicroVAX II host computers eliminating interference between users 3) the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE), user interface and the Display Management System (DMS

  17. Damping of dust-acoustic waves due to dust-dust interactions in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, U.; Shukla, P. K.

    1998-08-01

    The results of a kinetic model are presented which includes dust-dust collisions as a damping mechanism for the low-phase velocity dust-acoustic waves which have been observed [Pieper and Goree, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1976) 3137] in a dusty plasma device. A comparison of our theoretical results with those of observations exhibits a good agreement, and it also leads to quantitative estimates that are close to the predictions of the modified fluid theory, which has introduced a damping rate in an ad hoc manner.

  18. Analytical model of the nonlinear dynamics of cantilever tip-sample surface interactions for various acoustic atomic force microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-04-01

    An analytical model is developed of the interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope with the sample surface that treats the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. To maintain equilibrium, the volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any). The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and amplitude modulation-atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) (intermittent contact mode). The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of A-AFM image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample. Applications of the model to measurements of LaRC™-CP2 polyimide film using RDF-AFUM and AM-AFM images predict maximum variations in the Young modulus of 24% and 18%, respectively, over a common scan area. Both predictions are in good agreement with the value of 21% obtained from independent mechanical stretching measurements of the polyimide sheet material.

  19. Two-dimensional model of the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with nozzle edge and wing trailing edge.

    PubMed

    Faranosov, Georgy A; Bychkov, Oleg P

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of a plane acoustic wave with two-dimensional model of nozzle edge and trailing edge is investigated theoretically by means of the Wiener-Hopf technique. The nozzle edge and the trailing edge are simulated by two half-planes with offset edges. Shear layer behind the nozzle edge is represented by a vortex sheet supporting Kelvin-Helmholtz instability waves. The considered configuration combines two well-known models (nozzle edge and trailing edge), and reveals additional interesting physical aspects. To obtain the solution, the matrix Wiener-Hopf equation is solved in conjunction with a requirement that the full Kutta condition is imposed at the edges. Factorization of the kernel matrix is performed by the combination of Padé approximation and the pole removal technique. This procedure is used to obtain numerical results. The results indicate that the diffracted acoustic field may be significantly intensified due to scattering of hydrodynamic instability waves into sound waves provided that the trailing edge is close enough to the vortex sheet. Similar mechanism may be responsible for the intensification of jet noise near a wing.

  20. Electron Transport Parameters Study for Transition Metal-Doped Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon via Acoustical Phonon Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Ankur; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-04-01

    Electron transport parameters such as electron effective mass, Fermi velocity of an electron and electron mobility are calculated for transition metal [manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co)]-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon (aGNR) via polar acoustical phonon [piezoelectric (PZ)] scattering and acoustical deformation potential (ADP) scattering under a high electric field and different doping concentrations. Moreover, the effect of dopant site on these electron transport parameters is also investigated. It is observed that the electron effective mass is reduced significantly in doped aGNR in comparison to pure GNR. It is observed that the net electron mobility contributed by both ADP and PZ mechanisms for Mn-doped aGNR as well as Co-doped aGNR varies in similar fashion as semiconductors wherein the net electron mobility (ADP + PZ) for Mn-doped aGNR is greater than that for the Co-doped graphene nanoribbon. Moreover, it is found that there is no impact of variation in dopant site on the electron transport parameters considered in this study.

  1. Development of a Nonlinear Acoustic Phased Array and its Interaction with Thin Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzel, Paul; Donahue, Carly; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    Numerous technologies are based on the principle of focusing acoustic energy. We propose a new device to focus sound waves which exploits highly nonlinear dynamics. The advantages of this device are the capability of generating very highly powerful acoustic pulses and potential operation in high-temperature environments where traditional piezoelectrics may fail. This device is composed of rows of ball bearings placed in contact with a medium of interest and with an actuator on the top. Elastic spherical particles have a contact force that grows with their relative displacement to the three-halves power (Hertzian contact). When several spheres are placed in a row, the particles support the propagation of ``solitary waves''--strong, compact stress-wave pulses whose tendency to disperse is counteracted by the nonlinearity of the sphere's contact force. We present results regarding the experimental operation of the device and its comparison to theory and numerical simulations. We will show how well this system is capable of focusing energy at various locations in the medium, and the limits imposed by pre-compression. Finally, the effects of timing error on energy focusing will be demonstrated. This research has been supported by a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  2. Acoustical interaction between vibrating lips, downstream air column, and upstream airways in trombone performance.

    PubMed

    Fréour, Vincent; Scavone, Gary P

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the acoustical influence of the vocal tract in trombone performance. The experimental approach makes use of measurements at the interface between the player and instrument, allowing a relative comparison between upstream airways and the downstream air column impedances, as well as an estimation of the phase of the impedance of the upstream and downstream systems. Measurements were conducted over the full traditional range of playing, during sustained tones with varying dynamic, as well as in special effects such as pitch bending. Subjects able to play over the full range demonstrated significant upstream influence in the higher register of the instrument. These players were categorized in two groups according to their ability to control the phase of the upstream impedance and their ability to generate powerful downstream acoustic energy. Sustained tones played with varying dynamics showed a general tendency of a decrease in vocal-tract support with increase in loudness. Although pitch bends did not involve significant upstream influence at f0, results suggest modification of the lip behavior during bending. Vocal-tract tuning at tone transitions was also investigated and found to potentially contribute to slur articulations.

  3. Analyzing the rules of fracture and damage, and the characteristics of the acoustic emission signal of a gypsum specimen under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, En-yuan; Li, Nan

    2017-08-01

    In order to study the mechanism of rock bursts in a mined-out area of a gypsum mine, in this paper acoustic emission testing of the uniaxial compression of gypsum and sandstone samples is carried out. The case of rupture of the specimen is observed, and the load axial deformation curve and acoustic emission parameters are obtained for the whole process of specimen rupture. The similarities and differences between the gypsum and sandstone samples are determined in terms of their mechanical properties, their damage evolution laws and frequency band energy distributions, and the instantaneous energy characteristics of their acoustic emission. The results show that the main fracture morphology of gypsum is ‘eight’-type, and the macroscopic fracture morphology of sandstone is mainly of partial ‘Y’-type and inverted Y-type. The intensity and uniformity of the gypsum and sandstone of the medium are different; because the gypsum is more uniform, it does not show as much variation as sandstone, instead suddenly increasing and decreasing. The maximum value of the damage variable D of gypsum reached 1, but the maximum value of D of the sandstone only reached 0.9. The frequency band of the maximum energy of gypsum and sandstone gradually decreased across the the four stages of rupture, while the maximum energy percentage increased gradually. From the stage where damage gradually increases to the stage of integral fracture of the specimen, the instantaneous energy showed a certain degree of increase. With an increase in the strength of the sample, the maximum energy percentage of the two materials corresponding to each phase gradually increases, and from the stage where damage gradually increases to the stage of integral fracture of the specimen, the value of instantaneous energy obviously increases. The results indicate that gypsum mines will also experience rock bursts, as coal mines do, but the intensity will be different. Therefore, using the three indicators, the

  4. Interactions of nonlinear electron-acoustic solitary waves with vortex electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Demiray, Hilmi

    2015-02-15

    In the present work, based on a one dimensional model, we consider the head-on-collision of nonlinear electron-acoustic waves in a plasma composed of a cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a trapped/vortex-like distribution, and stationary ions. The analysis is based on the use of extended Poincare, Lighthill-Kuo method [C. H. Su and R. M. Mirie, J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980); R. M. Mirie and C. H. Su, J. Fluid Mech. 115, 475 (1982)]. It is shown that, for the first order approximation, the waves propagating in opposite directions are characterized by modified Korteweg-de Vries equations. In contrary to the results of previous investigations on this subject, we showed that the phase shifts are functions of both amplitudes of the colliding waves. The numerical results indicate that the waves with larger amplitude experience smaller phase shifts. Such a result seems to be plausible from physical considerations.

  5. Interactions of nonlinear electron-acoustic solitary waves with vortex electron distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Hilmi

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, based on a one dimensional model, we consider the head-on-collision of nonlinear electron-acoustic waves in a plasma composed of a cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a trapped/vortex-like distribution, and stationary ions. The analysis is based on the use of extended Poincare, Lighthill-Kuo method [C. H. Su and R. M. Mirie, J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980); R. M. Mirie and C. H. Su, J. Fluid Mech. 115, 475 (1982)]. It is shown that, for the first order approximation, the waves propagating in opposite directions are characterized by modified Korteweg-de Vries equations. In contrary to the results of previous investigations on this subject, we showed that the phase shifts are functions of both amplitudes of the colliding waves. The numerical results indicate that the waves with larger amplitude experience smaller phase shifts. Such a result seems to be plausible from physical considerations.

  6. Models and finite element approximations for interacting nanosized piezoelectric bodies and acoustic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasedkin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This research presents the new size-dependent models of piezoelectric materials oriented to finite element applications. The proposed models include the facilities of taking into account different mechanisms of damping for mechanical and electric fields. The coupled models also incorporate the equations of the theory of acoustics for viscous fluids. In particular cases, these models permit to use the mode superposition method with full separation of the finite element systems into independent equations for the independent modes for transient and harmonic problems. The main boundary conditions were supplemented with the facilities of taking into account the coupled surface effects, allowing to explore the nanoscale piezoelectric materials in the framework of theories of continuous media with surface stresses and their generalizations. For the considered problems we have implemented the finite element technologies and various numerical algorithms to maintain a symmetrical structure of the finite element quasi-definite matrices (matrix structure for the problems with a saddle point).

  7. A multichannel acoustically driven microfluidic chip to study particle-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Yan; Fillafer, Christian; Pichl, Clara; Deinhammer, Stephanie; Hofer-Warbinek, Renate; Wirth, Michael; Gabor, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have emerged as important tools for experimental physiology. They allow to study the effects of hydrodynamic flow on physiological and pathophysiological processes, e.g., in the circulatory system of the body. Such dynamic in vitro test systems are essential in order to address fundamental problems in drug delivery and targeted imaging, such as the binding of particles to cells under flow. In the present work an acoustically driven microfluidic platform is presented in which four miniature flow channels can be operated in parallel at distinct flow velocities with only slight inter-experimental variations. The device can accommodate various channel architectures and is fully compatible with cell culture as well as microscopy. Moreover, the flow channels can be readily separated from the surface acoustic wave pumps and subsequently channel-associated luminescence, absorbance, and/or fluorescence can be determined with a standard microplate reader. In order to create artificial blood vessels, different coatings were evaluated for the cultivation of endothelial cells in the microchannels. It was found that 0.01% fibronectin is the most suitable coating for growth of endothelial monolayers. Finally, the microfluidic system was used to study the binding of 1 μm polystyrene microspheres to three different types of endothelial cell monolayers (HUVEC, HUVECtert, HMEC-1) at different average shear rates. It demonstrated that average shear rates between 0.5 s−1 and 2.25 s−1 exert no significant effect on cytoadhesion of particles to all three types of endothelial monolayers. In conclusion, the multichannel microfluidic platform is a promising device to study the impact of hydrodynamic forces on cell physiology and binding of drug carriers to endothelium. PMID:24404060

  8. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  9. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  10. Development of a kinematic 3D carpal model to analyze in vivo soft-tissue interaction across multiple static postures.

    PubMed

    Marai, G; Crisco, Joseph J; Laidlaw, David H

    2009-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific kinematic model to analyze in vivo soft-tissue interaction in the carpus in static, unloaded postures. The bone geometry was extracted from a reference computed tomography volume image. The soft-tissue geometry, including cartilage and ligament tissues, was computationally modeled based on kinematic constraints; the constraints were extracted from multiple computed tomography scans corresponding to different carpal postures. The data collected in vivo was next coupled with numerical simulation in order to analyze the role of soft-tissues in different postures. The resulting model extends the state of biomechanical modeling by incorporating soft-tissue constraints across the carpus range of motion, while successfully using only physiological constraints. The model results suggest that soft-tissue wrapping constraints have substantial impact on carpus stability.

  11. Study of Ocean Bottom Interactions with Acoustic Waves by a New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm and an Energy Flow Analysis Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Study Of Ocean Bottom Interactions With Acoustic Waves By A New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique Ru-Shan Wu...imaging to study the wave/sea-bottom interaction, energy partitioning, scattering mechanism and other problems that are crucial for many ocean bottom...Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  12. Interaction of attention and acoustic factors in dichotic listening for fused words.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Katie; Lachner Bass, Natascha; Dial, Heather; Hiscock, Merrill; Jansen, Ben

    2017-07-01

    Two dichotic listening experiments examined the degree to which the right-ear advantage (REA) for linguistic stimuli is altered by a "top-down" variable (i.e., directed attention) in conjunction with selected "bottom-up" (acoustic) variables. Halwes fused dichotic words were administered to 99 right-handed adults with instructions to attend to the left or right ear, or to divide attention equally. Stimuli in Experiment 1 were presented without noise or mixed with noise that was high-pass or low-pass filtered, or unfiltered. The stimuli themselves in Experiment 2 were high-pass or low-pass filtered, or unfiltered. The initial consonants of each dichotic pair were categorized according to voice onset time (VOT) and place of articulation (PoA). White noise extinguished both the REA and selective attention, and filtered noise nullified selective attention without extinguishing the REA. Frequency filtering of the words themselves did not alter performance. VOT effects were inconsistent across experiments but PoA analyses indicated that paired velar consonants (/k/ and /g/) yield a left-ear advantage and paradoxical selective-attention results. The findings show that ear asymmetry and the effectiveness of directed attention can be altered by bottom-up variables.

  13. Aggregation property of glycyrrhizic acid and its interaction with cyclodextrins analyzed by dynamic light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Izutani, Yusuke; Kanaori, Kenji; Oda, Masayuki

    2014-06-17

    The structural properties of glycyrrhizic acid, a sweet-tasting constituent of Glycyrrhiza glabra, and its interaction with cyclodextrins were analyzed using dynamic light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR. The dynamic light scattering and NMR studies showed that glycyrrhizic acid forms a water-soluble aggregate that disperses upon the addition of γ-cyclodextrin. The high sweetness of glycyrrhizic acid can be closely correlated with this aggregation, because the multimers of glycyrrhizic acid can simultaneously bind to the sweet taste receptors on the human tongue. The isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that γ-cyclodextrin binds to glycyrrhizic acid more strongly than β-cyclodextrin, however, both reactions are accompanied by a favorable change in binding entropy. Considering the large negative change in heat capacity that is observed during the binding of γ-cyclodextrin, the main driving force for the binding is hydrophobic interactions with dehydration, which is typical for inclusion complex. NMR experiments showed that γ-cyclodextrin interacts with the central part of the aglycone moiety, not the glucuronic acid moieties, resulting in high binding affinity. It should also be noted that the two distinct complexes of glycyrrhizic acid with γ-cyclodextrin would exist in aqueous solution.

  14. Coupled-mode theory for the interaction between acoustic waves and spin waves in magnonic-phononic crystals: Propagating magnetoelastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graczyk, Piotr; Krawczyk, Maciej

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated codirectional and contradirectional couplings between spin wave and acoustic wave in a one-dimensional periodic structure (the so-called magphonic crystal). The system consists of two ferromagnetic layers alternating in space. We have taken into consideration materials commonly used in magnonics: yttrium iron garnet, CoFeB, permalloy, and cobalt. The coupled mode theory (CMT) formalism has been successfully implemented to describe the magnetoelastic interaction as a periodic perturbation in the magphonic crystal. The results of CMT calculations have been verified by more rigorous simulations with the frequency-domain plane-wave method and the time-domain finite-element method. The presented resonant coupling in the magphonic crystal is an active in-space mechanism which spatially transfers energy between propagating spin and acoustic modes, thus creating a propagating magnetoelastic wave. We have shown that CMT analysis of the magnetoelastic coupling is an useful tool to optimize and design a spin wave-acoustic wave transducer based on magphonic crystals. The effect of spin-wave damping has been included to the model to discuss the efficiency of such a device. Our model shows that it is possible to obtain forward conversion of the acoustic wave to the spin wave in case of codirectional coupling and backward conversion in case of contradirectional coupling. That energy transfer may be realized for broadband coupling and for generation of spin waves which are of different wavelength (in particular, shorter) than exciting acoustic waves.

  15. Rail-wheel interaction monitoring using Acoustic Emission: A laboratory study of normal rolling signals with natural rail defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, N. A.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a laboratory study on the Acoustic Emission (AE) generated during railway wheel-rail track interaction, with a view to developing methods of in situ rail-wheel interaction monitoring using rail-mounted sensors. It is known that the physical processes of impact and wear generate AE and it was therefore expected that axle loads, speed and traction would influence the AE generated by an interaction and that the characteristics of "normal" interaction would be affected by wheel and/or track defects and/or any misalignment between rail and track. A set of laboratory experiments were carried out on a scaled test rig to characterise the continuous AE generated by a wheel rolling on a rail and, secondarily, to assess the effect on the AE characteristic of the natural defects present on the contact profile of the rail. The natural defects were of a relatively minor nature and their assessment serves as part of the calibration of background AE for experiments with more significant simulated defects. A simplified analytical model, devised for AE waves propagating from a moving source, based on "vehicle" speed and wave damping coefficients, has been developed for the test track and fitted to the measured results. As a wheel rolls towards a sensor and then away from the sensor the measured AE generally rises and falls in a predictable way. The effects of wheel and rail surface features were found to introduce deviations from this "background", and a method to identify the location of surface defects, based on identifying peaks above the background is also demonstrated.

  16. Biotin-Streptavidin Binding Interactions of Dielectric Filled Silicon Bulk Acoustic Resonators for Smart Label-Free Biochemical Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Amir; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Park, Woo-Tae; Su, Pei-Chen; Miao, Jianmin; Lin, Julius Tsai Ming; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Sensor performance of a dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonator type label-free biosensor is verified with biotin-streptavidin binding interactions as a model system. The mass sensor is a micromachined silicon square plate with a dielectric filled capacitive excitation mechanism. The resonance frequency of the biotin modified resonator decreased 315 ppm when exposed to streptavidin solution for 15 min with a concentration of 10−7 M, corresponding to an added mass of 3.43 ng on the resonator surface. An additional control is added by exposing a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-covered device to streptavidin in the absence of the attached biotin. No resonance frequency shift was observed in the control experiment, which confirms the specificity of the detection. The sensor-to-sensor variability is also measured to be 4.3%. Consequently, the developed sensor can be used to observe in biotin-streptavidin interaction without the use of labelling or molecular tags. In addition, biosensor can be used in a variety of different immunoassay tests. PMID:24608003

  17. Biotin-streptavidin binding interactions of dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonators for smart label-free biochemical sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Amir; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Park, Woo-Tae; Su, Pei-Chen; Miao, Jianmin; Lin, Julius Tsai Ming; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2014-03-07

    Sensor performance of a dielectric filled silicon bulk acoustic resonator type label-free biosensor is verified with biotin-streptavidin binding interactions as a model system. The mass sensor is a micromachined silicon square plate with a dielectric filled capacitive excitation mechanism. The resonance frequency of the biotin modified resonator decreased 315 ppm when exposed to streptavidin solution for 15 min with a concentration of 10(-7) M, corresponding to an added mass of 3.43 ng on the resonator surface. An additional control is added by exposing a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-covered device to streptavidin in the absence of the attached biotin. No resonance frequency shift was observed in the control experiment, which confirms the specificity of the detection. The sensor-to-sensor variability is also measured to be 4.3%. Consequently, the developed sensor can be used to observe in biotin-streptavidin interaction without the use of labelling or molecular tags. In addition, biosensor can be used in a variety of different immunoassay tests.

  18. A Photoactivatable Nanopatterned Substrate for Analyzing Collective Cell Migration with Precisely Tuned Cell-Extracellular Matrix Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Boehm, Heike; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Spatz, Joachim P.; Nakanishi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML), and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K) and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions. PMID:24632806

  19. Interaction between acoustic startle and habituated neck postural responses in seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Siegmund, Gunter P; Timothy Inglis, J

    2007-04-01

    Postural and startle responses rapidly habituate with repeated exposures to the same stimulus, and the first exposure to a seated forward acceleration elicits a startle response in the neck muscles. Our goal was to examine how the acoustic startle response is integrated with the habituated neck postural response elicited by forward accelerations of seated subjects. In experiment 1, 14 subjects underwent 11 sequential forward accelerations followed by 5 additional sled accelerations combined with a startling tone (124-dB sound pressure level) initiated 18 ms after sled acceleration onset. During the acceleration-only trials, changes consistent with habituation occurred in the root-mean-square amplitude of the neck muscles and in the peak amplitude of five head and torso kinematic variables. The subsequent addition of the startling tone restored the amplitude of the neck muscles and four of the five kinematic variables but shortened onset of muscle activity by 9-12 ms. These shortened onset times were further explored in experiment 2, wherein 16 subjects underwent 11 acceleration-only trials followed by 15 combined acceleration-tone trials with interstimulus delays of 0, 13, 18, 23, and 28 ms. Onset times shortened further for the 0- and 13-ms delays but did not lengthen for the 23- and 28-ms delays. These temporal and spatial changes in EMG can be explained by a summation of the excitatory drive converging at or before the neck muscle motoneurons. The present observations suggest that habituation to repeated sled accelerations involves extinguishing the startle response and tuning the postural response to the whole body disturbance.

  20. Temperature effects on acoustic interactions between altitude test facilities and jet engine plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Massey, K. C.; Tan, C. K.; Jones, R. R.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of the present investigation was to determine the mechanisms responsible for engine/test cell resonance observed at the AEDC facility. The specific objective was to determine the effect of heating the jet on its coupling with the diffuser used in a typical engine/test cell facility. This objective was to be accomplished through systematic measurements of cold and heated free and ducted jets using a subscale facility. An additional objective was to analytically examine the behavior of jet instability waves as a function of temperature, and to identify any potential of strong coupling between the jet instabilities and diffuser duct resonance modes directly attributable to heating of the jet. Model cold and heated jet experiments are performed with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle in a test setup that simulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of a free and ducted plume for a range of jet exit Mach numbers and four reservoir temperatures: ambient, 400 F, 750 F, and 1,000 F. Analytical results on the growth of instability waves and the duct resonance have been introduced. It is shown that the screech frequency increases with increasing operating temperature ratio. The measured in-duct microphone signatures contain a number of discrete tones, and almost all of them can be associated with duct resonances. The amplitudes increase with increasing Mach number and operating temperature ratios. At certain operating conditions, the acoustic fluctuations associated with these ejector duct modes excite the most amplified wave of the jet.

  1. Investigations on dynamics of interacting cavitation bubbles in strong acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Ge, Han; Liu, Fengbin; Chen, Darong

    2017-01-01

    Given its importance to the dynamics of cavitation bubbles, the mutual interaction between bubbles was carefully investigated in this work. The cavitation noises emitted in different sonication conditions were recorded to study the dynamical behavior of the bubbles. The frequency spectra of the noises suggest that the dispersing state of the bubbles severely influence the oscillations of bubbles, and that the nonlinear feature of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles, imposed by the mutual bubble-bubble interaction, gradually develops with the decrease of the dispersing height. Theoretical analysis shows that the size difference between the interacting bubbles should be responsible for the increase of nonlinearity of the oscillation, and that the decrease of the distance between them could effectively enhance the nonlinear feature of the oscillation of the bubble, both of which agree well with the experimental observation.

  2. Assemble: an interactive graphical tool to analyze and build RNA architectures at the 2D and 3D levels.

    PubMed

    Jossinet, Fabrice; Ludwig, Thomas E; Westhof, Eric

    2010-08-15

    Assemble is an intuitive graphical interface to analyze, manipulate and build complex 3D RNA architectures. It provides several advanced and unique features within the framework of a semi-automated modeling process that can be performed by homology and ab initio with or without electron density maps. Those include the interactive editing of a secondary structure and a searchable, embedded library of annotated tertiary structures. Assemble helps users with performing recurrent and otherwise tedious tasks in structural RNA research. Assemble is released under an open-source license (MIT license) and is freely available at http://bioinformatics.org/assemble. It is implemented in the Java language and runs on MacOSX, Linux and Windows operating systems.

  3. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  4. Pitch Contour Matching and Interactional Alignment across Turns: An Acoustic Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorisch, Jan; Wells, Bill; Brown, Guy J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the influence of context on the phonetic design of talk-in-interaction, we investigated the pitch characteristics of short turns (insertions) that are produced by one speaker between turns from another speaker. We investigated the hypothesis that the speaker of the insertion designs her turn as a pitch match to the prior turn…

  5. Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans’ communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans’ behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  6. Experimental investigation of geodesic acoustic mode spatial structure, intermittency, and interaction with turbulence in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.

    2012-02-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flows are nonlinearly driven, axisymmetric (m=0andn=0) E ×B flows, which are thought to play an important role in establishing the saturated level of turbulence in tokamaks. Results are presented showing the GAM's observed spatial scales, temporal scales, and nonlinear interaction characteristics, which may have implications for the assumptions underpinning turbulence models towards the tokamak edge (r /a>rsim0.75). Measurements in the DIII-D tokamak [Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have been made with multichannel Doppler backscattering systems at toroidal locations separated by 180∘; analysis reveals that the GAM is highly coherent between the toroidally separated systems (γ>0.8) and that measurements are consistent with the expected m =0andn=0 structure. Observations show that the GAM in L-mode plasmas with ~2.5-4.5 MW auxiliary heating occurs as a radially coherent eigenmode, rather than as a continuum of frequencies as occurs in lower temperature discharges; this is consistent with theoretical expectations when finite ion Larmor radius effects are included. The intermittency of the GAM has been quantified, revealing that its autocorrelation time is fairly short, ranging from about 4 to about 15 GAM periods in cases examined, a difference that is accompanied by a modification to the probability distribution function of the E ×B velocity at the GAM frequency. Conditionally-averaged bispectral analysis shows the strength of the nonlinear interaction of the GAM with broadband turbulence can vary with the magnitude of the GAM. Data also indicate a wavenumber dependence to the GAM's interaction with turbulence.

  7. Use of the roter interaction analysis system to analyze veterinarian-client-patient communication in companion animal practice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jane R; Adams, Cindy L; Bonnett, Brenda N; Larson, Susan; Roter, Debra L

    2004-07-15

    To identify specific components of veterinarian-client-patient communication during clinical appointments in companion animal practice. Cross-sectional descriptive study. A random sample of 50 companion animal practitioners in southern Ontario and a convenience sample of 300 clients and their pets. For each practitioner, 6 clinical appointments (3 wellness appointments and 3 appointments related to a health problem) were videotaped, and the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS) was used to analyze the resulting 300 videotapes. Statements made during each appointment were classified by means of a communication framework reflecting the 4 essential tasks of the appointment (ie, data gathering, education and counseling, relationship building, and activation and partnership). 57% of the veterinarians contacted (50/87) and 99% of the clients contacted agreed to participate in the study. Mean duration of the appointments was 13 minutes. Typically, veterinarians contributed 62% of the total conversation and clients contributed 38%. Fifty-four percent of the veterinarian interaction was with the client, and 8% was with the pet. Data gathering constituted 9% of the veterinarian-to-client communication and was primarily accomplished through closed-ended questioning; 48% of veterinarian-to-client communication involved client education and counseling, 30% involved relationship building, and 7% involved activation and partnership (the remaining 6% constituted orientation). Results suggest that the RIAS was a reliable method of assessing the structure, process, and content of veterinarian-client-patient communication and that some veterinarians do not use all the tools needed for effective communication.

  8. Parametric Acoustic Array Formation Via Weak Collinear and Noncollinear INteraction in Diepersive Fluids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    L. Kuntz, and Messrs. J. A. TenCate , Y. II. Berthelot, and D. A. Nelson. Typing was performed primarily by Miss Rebecca G. Messer, with final...becomes extremely *0 123 S OS 59 inefficient. Recently, TenCate reported results for wave interaction L in a rectangular waveguide which indisputably...is uncertain. Experimental results which support the angular dependence of the second term in Equation (5.16) have been reported 59 recently by TenCate

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  10. Sound reduction by metamaterial-based acoustic enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shanshan; Li, Pei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-12-15

    In many practical systems, acoustic radiation control on noise sources contained within a finite volume by an acoustic enclosure is of great importance, but difficult to be accomplished at low frequencies due to the enhanced acoustic-structure interaction. In this work, we propose to use acoustic metamaterials as the enclosure to efficiently reduce sound radiation at their negative-mass frequencies. Based on a circularly-shaped metamaterial model, sound radiation properties by either central or eccentric sources are analyzed by numerical simulations for structured metamaterials. The parametric analyses demonstrate that the barrier thickness, the cavity size, the source type, and the eccentricity of the source have a profound effect on the sound reduction. It is found that increasing the thickness of the metamaterial barrier is an efficient approach to achieve large sound reduction over the negative-mass frequencies. These results are helpful in designing highly efficient acoustic enclosures for blockage of sound in low frequencies.

  11. Interactions Among Behavioral Responses of Baleen Whales to Acoustic Stimuli, Oceanographic Features, and Prey Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    deployed from the back of the SOCAL-BRS research vessel. Fine-scale prey density and distribution and individual predator behavior was measured in two...phases (late-July to mid-August and September 2011) using the existing research platform (R/V Truth). By analyzing prey and predator at fine...scales (100s of meters), we can begin to test for the relationships between prey distribution and predator behavior and understand the ecological

  12. A hierarchy of two-fluid models with specific numerical methods for the simulation of bubbly flows/acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drui, Florence; Larat, Adam; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Kokh, Samuel; Massot, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Simulating the injection, evaporation, and combustion of fuel in energy conversion applications represents a major challenge. The formulation of closed sets of equations able to accurately predict these complex systems by relying solely on averaged information has been a longstanding problem. As a consequence, no simple model is currently available that describes the complete injection process, known to range from the separated phase regime in the early stages of atomization to the dispersed regime that occurs further downstream. The benefits of such a unified formulation would be significant, both in terms of computational cost and algorithmic complexity. In order to identify the challenges in formulating one such approach, a one-pressure, one-velocity isothermal two-fluid model for bubble-acoustic wave interaction is studied and incrementally improved by introducing additional variables that characterize the micro-structure of bubbles. The elastic and dissipative structures of the models are investigated in depth, and their performances compared to reference solutions (Drew & Passman, 1999). Numerical strategies are devised which can accurately handle the whole hierarchy and related stiffness, and rely on Suliciu's relaxation method as well as an asymptotic-preserving treatmen

  13. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  14. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  15. Real-time electro-mechano-acoustic imaging for monitoring interactions between trypsin and different inhibitors in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Qing; Butt, Yoki Kwok Chu

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the real-time interactions between trypsin and various inhibitors in articular cartilage in vitro using a novel electro-mechano-acoustic imaging method. Monitored in real-time, articular cartilage specimens from bovine patellae were first treated with trypsin to reach half proteoglycan depletion (Phase I), then the trypsin solution was replaced with (i) physiological saline buffer (PS), (ii) fetal bovine serum (FBS), (iii) protease inhibitor cocktail (PI) and (iv) 10% formalin (F), respectively, to observe their effects on residual digestion (Phase II). Ultrasound radio frequency signals from the articular cartilage were used to form a M-mode image, where the interface between trypsin digested and intact cartilage tissues could be observed with an additional echo generated. The inhibition time, the digestion depth and digestion fraction were measured for each specimen. The results showed that the dilution of trypsin using saline solution was not sufficient to stop the enzyme action instantly. Although groups FBS and PI had a similar inhibition time of approximately 1.5 h, their digestion depth was obviously different (0.25±0.03 and 0.06±0.06 mm, respectively). In contrast, formalin only took <30 min to stop the trypsin digestion with almost no further digestion. The results demonstrated that the current system was capable of monitoring the trypsin digestion and inhibition process in real time. Also, different chemicals affected the residual trypsin digestion to different degrees.

  16. Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  17. Acoustic, Thermal and Molecular Interactions of Polyethylene Glycol (2000, 3000, 6000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatramanan, K.; Padmanaban, R.; Arumugam, V.

    Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a condensation polymer of ethylene oxide and water. PEG find its application as emulsifying agents, detergents, soaps, plasticizers, ointments, etc. Though the chemical and physical properties of PEG are known, still because of their uses in day to day life, it becomes necessary to study few physical properties like ultrasonic velocity, viscosity and hence adiabatic compressibility, free length, etc. In the present study, an attempt has been made to compute the activation energy and hence to analyse the molecular interactions of aqueous solutions of Polyethylene Glycol of molar mass 2000, 3000 and 6000 at different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10%) at different temperatures (303K, 308K, 313K, 318K) by determining relative viscosity, ultrasonic velocity and density. Various parameters like adiabatic compressibility, viscous relaxation time, inter molecular free length, free volume, internal pressure, etc are calculated at 303K and the results are discussed in the light of polymer-solvent interaction. This study helps to understand the behavior of macro-molecules with respect to changing concentration and temperature. Furthermore, viscosity and activation energy results are correlated to understand the increased entanglement of the polymer chains due to the increase in the concentration of a polymer solution that leads to an increase in viscosity and an increase in the activation energy of viscous flow.

  18. Acoustic and volumetric studies of intermolecular interactions in dilute solutions of methanol in aromatic amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, W.; Chowanska, A.; Piwowarska, B.

    2005-10-01

    Limiting partial compressibilities and volumes of methanol in pyridine, 2-methylpyridine, 3-methylpyridine, 4-methylpyridine and 2,6-dimethylpyridine were calculated from the experimental speeds of sounds and densities of dilute solutions at 298.15 K. The limiting functions were found to be linearly correlated with the association energies of isolated 1:1 complexes of the pyridine derivatives with water. Those association energies are close to the energies for similar complexes with methanol. The results evidence that ortho effect enhances the ability of pyridines to hydrogen bonding with methanol in the same way as with water. The effect consist in changes of hydrogen bond energy, unspecific interactions with a steric hindrance, e.g. between hydrocarbon tail of the alcohol molecule and the methyl group in the ring, and changes in resonance interactions. Stronger hydrogen bonds cause smaller partial molar compressibilities and volumes of the solute, as well as greater negative enthalpies of solution. Importantly, single molecule of water or methanol forms one hydrogen bond with the proton-accepting solvent.

  19. Subwavelength diffractive acoustics and wavefront manipulation with a reflective acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqi; Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces provide useful wavefront shaping capabilities, such as beam steering, acoustic focusing, and asymmetric transmission, in a compact structure. Most acoustic metasurfaces described in the literature are transmissive devices and focus their performance on steering sound beam of the fundamental diffractive order. In addition, the range of incident angles studied is usually below the critical incidence predicted by generalized Snell's law of reflection. In this work, we comprehensively analyze the wave interaction with a generic periodic phase-modulating structure in order to predict the behavior of all diffractive orders, especially for cases beyond critical incidence. Under the guidance of the presented analysis, a broadband reflective metasurface is designed based on an expanded library of labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials. Various local and nonlocal wavefront shaping properties are experimentally demonstrated, and enhanced absorption of higher order diffractive waves is experimentally shown for the first time. The proposed methodology provides an accurate approach for predicting practical diffracted wave behaviors and opens a new perspective for the study of acoustic periodic structures. The designed metasurface extends the functionalities of acoustic metasurfaces and paves the way for the design of thin planar reflective structures for broadband acoustic wave manipulation and extraordinary absorption.

  20. Investigation of salt properties with electro-acoustic measurements and their effect on dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Faude, Alexander

    2008-01-11

    The pH dependence in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is usually discussed exclusively in terms of protein dependence and there are no clear defined trends. Many of the deviations from an ideal solution are caused solely by the high salt concentration, as protein concentration is usually negligible. So pH dependency in hydrophobic interaction chromatography could also be the result of pH dependent changes of ion properties from the salt solution. The possibility that pH dependent ion hydration or ion association in highly concentrated salt solutions may influence the dynamic protein binding capacity onto HIC resins was investigated. In buffer solutions commonly used in HIC e.g. sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate and sodium citrate pH dependent maxima in the electro-acoustic signals were found. These maxima are related to an increase of the ion sizes by hydration or ion association. At low ionic strength the maxima are in the range between 4.5 and 6 and they increased in concentrated electrolyte solutions to values between 6 and 8. The range of these maxima is in the same region as dynamic protein binding capacity maxima often observed in HIC. For a qualitative interpretation of this phenomenon of increased protein stabilization by volume exclusion effect extended scaling theory can be used. This theory predicts a maximum of protein stabilization if the ratio of salt ion diameter to water is 1.8. According to the hypothesis raised here, if the pH dependent ratio of salt ion diameter to water approaches this value the transport of the protein in the pore system is less restricted and an increase in binding capacity can be produced.

  1. Study of the Dependence of Photoenhanced Nonlinear Acoustic Surface Wave Interactions on the Wavelength of Light.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-10

    CenterRockwell International SC5027.4FR 5.0 APPEND IX a) Participating Sci enti fic Personnel: Dr. Edgar A. Kraut Dr. T. C. Lim Mr. Fran k J. Morin Mr. John...Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 JUN 23 19fl _ / L~. Co-Inve stigators F— 0 . Edgar A. Kraut Dr. Te g C. Lim ___________ 4nr...INTERACTIONS ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ON THE WAVELENGTH OF LIGHT~ I sc~o~i.~ p. /7 QR(a,) ~~~~~O~~TRA~~’T O R GRA NT NUMBER(S) Dr. Edgar A

  2. Computational Analysis of the Flow and Acoustic Effects of Jet-Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.; Pao, S. Paul; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Massey, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Computational simulation and prediction tools were used to understand the jet-pylon interaction effect in a set of bypass-ratio five core/fan nozzles. Results suggest that the pylon acts as a large scale mixing vane that perturbs the jet flow and jump starts the jet mixing process. The enhanced mixing and associated secondary flows from the pylon result in a net increase of noise in the first 10 diameters of the jet s development, but there is a sustained reduction in noise from that point downstream. This is likely the reason the pylon nozzle is quieter overall than the baseline round nozzle in this case. The present work suggests that focused pylon design could lead to advanced pylon shapes and nozzle configurations that take advantage of propulsion-airframe integration to provide additional noise reduction capabilities.

  3. Development of BWR plant analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Mallen, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The BWR Plant Analyzer has been developed for realistic and accurate simulations of normal and severe abnormal transients in BWR power plants at high simulation speeds, low capital and operating costs and with outstanding user conveniences. The simulation encompasses neutron kinetics, heat conduction in fuel structures, nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous coolant dynamics, steam line acoustics, and the dynamics of turbines, condensers, feedwater pumps and heaters, of the suppression pool, the control systems and the plant protection systems. These objectives have been achieved. Advanced modeling, using extensively analytical integration and dynamic evaluation of analytical solutions, has been combined with modern minicomputer technology for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The High-Speed Interactive Plant Analyzer code HIPA-BWR has been implemented on the AD10 peripheral parallel processor.

  4. Signal Analysis of Helicopter Blade-Vortex-Interaction Acoustic Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Dai, Renshou

    1998-01-01

    Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) produces annoying high-intensity impulsive noise. NASA Ames collected several sets of BVI noise data during in-flight and wind tunnel tests. The goal of this work is to extract the essential features of the BVI signals from the in-flight data and examine the feasibility of extracting those features from BVI noise recorded inside a large wind tunnel. BVI noise generating mechanisms and BVI radiation patterns an are considered and a simple mathematical-physical model is presented. It allows the construction of simple synthetic BVI events that are comparable to free flight data. The boundary effects of the wind tunnel floor and ceiling are identified and more complex synthetic BVI events are constructed to account for features observed in the wind tunnel data. It is demonstrated that improved recording of BVI events can be attained by changing the geometry of the rotor hub, floor, ceiling and microphone. The Euclidean distance measure is used to align BVI events from each blade and improved BVI signals are obtained by time-domain averaging the aligned data. The differences between BVI events for individual blades are then apparent. Removal of wind tunnel background noise by optimal Wiener-filtering is shown to be effective provided representative noise-only data have been recorded. Elimination of wind tunnel reflections by cepstral and optimal filtering deconvolution is examined. It is seen that the cepstral method is not applicable but that a pragmatic optimal filtering approach gives encouraging results. Recommendations for further work include: altering measurement geometry, real-time data observation and evaluation, examining reflection signals (particularly those from the ceiling) and performing further analysis of expected BVI signals for flight conditions of interest so that microphone placement can be optimized for each condition.

  5. Virtual Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  6. Binaural electric-acoustic interactions recorded from the inferior colliculus of Guinea pigs: the effect of masking observed in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Noh, Heil; Lee, Dong-Hee

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the electric-acoustic interactions within the inferior colliculus of guinea pigs and to observe how central masking appears in invasive neural recordings of the inferior colliculus (IC). A platinum-iridium wire was inserted to scala tympani through cochleostomy with a depth no greater than 1 mm for intracochlear stimulation of electric pulse train. A 5 mm 100 µm, single-shank, thin-film, penetrating recording probe was inserted perpendicularly to the surface of the IC in the coronal plane at an angle of 30-40° off the parasagittal plane with a depth of 2.0-2.5 mm. The peripheral and central masking effects were compared using electric pulse trains to the left ear and acoustic noise to the left ear (ipsilateral) and to the right ear (contralateral). Binaural acoustic stimuli were presented with different time delays and compared with combined electric and acoustic stimuli. The averaged evoked potentials and total spike numbers were measured using thin-film electrodes inserted into the central nucleus of the IC. Ipsilateral noise had more obvious effects on the electric response than did contralateral noise. Contralateral noise decreased slightly the response amplitude to the electric pulse train stimuli. Immediately after the onset of acoustic noise, the response pattern changed transiently with shorter response intervals. The effects of contralateral noise were evident at the beginning of the continuous noise. The total spike number decreased when the binaural stimuli reached the IC most simultaneously. These results suggest that central masking is quite different from peripheral masking and occurs within the binaural auditory system, and this study showed that the effect of masking could be observed in the IC recording. These effects are more evident and consistent with the psychophysical data from spike number analyses than with the previously reported gross potential data.

  7. Biomechanical interactions of endodontically treated tooth implant-supported prosthesis under fatigue test with acoustic emission monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Fu; Chen, Wan-Rung; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-02-24

    This study investigated the biomechanical interactions in endodontically treated tooth implant-supported prosthesis (TISP) with implant system variations under dynamic cyclic loads monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. Macrostructure implants using a taper integrated screw-in (TIS; 2-piece implant) and a retaining-screw (RS; 3-piece implant) connected to an abutment were used for this investigation and their corresponding mechanical resistances in conformity with the ISO 14801 standard were evaluated. The endodontically treated TISP samples were constructed containing TIS and RS implants splinted to the second premolar with fatigue tests performed by applying occlusal force onto the premolar simulating the bending moment effect. The numbers of accumulated AE signals in the fatigue tests and failure modes for the sample were recorded to evaluate the mechanical resistance. The maximum load in the static test for RS (3-piece) implant (797N) was significantly higher than that for the TIS (2-piece) implant (559N). Large deformations were found at abutment screws in both RS and TIS implants. Although the numbers of accumulated AE signals for the TIS implant (72511) were higher than those for the RS implant (437), statistical non-significant differences were found between TIS and RS implants. No obvious damage was noted in endodontically treated TISP samples using RS implants but two of the corresponding TIS implants fractured in the abutment screws. Splints with RS (3-piece) implant prosthesis produce better mechanical responses than the TIS (2-piece) implant when connected to an endodontically treated tooth restored with a post core and crown.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  9. The pyPHaz software, an interactive tool to analyze and visualize results from probabilistic hazard assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Selva, Jacopo; Costa, Antonio; Sandri, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic Hazard Assessment (PHA) is becoming an essential tool for risk mitigation policies, since it allows to quantify the hazard due to hazardous phenomena and, differently from the deterministic approach, it accounts for both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. On the other hand, one of the main disadvantages of PHA methods is that their results are not easy to understand and interpret by people who are not specialist in probabilistic tools. For scientists, this leads to the issue of providing tools that can be easily used and understood by decision makers (i.e., risk managers or local authorities). The work here presented fits into the problem of simplifying the transfer between scientific knowledge and land protection policies, by providing an interface between scientists, who produce PHA's results, and decision makers, who use PHA's results for risk analyses. In this framework we present pyPHaz, an open tool developed and designed to visualize and analyze PHA results due to one or more phenomena affecting a specific area of interest. The software implementation has been fully developed with the free and open-source Python programming language and some featured Python-based libraries and modules. The pyPHaz tool allows to visualize the Hazard Curves (HC) calculated in a selected target area together with different levels of uncertainty (mean and percentiles) on maps that can be interactively created and modified by the user, thanks to a dedicated Graphical User Interface (GUI). Moreover, the tool can be used to compare the results of different PHA models and to merge them, by creating ensemble models. The pyPHaz software has been designed with the features of storing and accessing all the data through a MySQL database and of being able to read as input the XML-based standard file formats defined in the frame of GEM (Global Earthquake Model). This format model is easy to extend also to any other kind of hazard, as it will be shown in the applications

  10. Acoustics-turbulence interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.; Zaman, K. B. M. O.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the instability frequency was undertaken. Measurements revealed that the hot wire probe induces and sustains stable upstream oscillation of the free shear layer. The characteristics of the free shear layer tone are found to be different from the slit jet wedge edgetone phenomenon. The shear tone induced by a plane wedge in a plane free shear layer was then examined in order to further document the phenomenon. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the tone fundamental show agreement with the spatial stability theory. A comprehensive summary of the results is also included.

  11. Kundt's Tube: An Acoustic Gas Analyzer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristov, Natasha; Habekost, Gehsa; Habekost, Achim

    2011-01-01

    A Kundt tube is normally used to measure the speed of sound in gases. Therefore, from known speeds of sound, a Kundt tube can be used to identify gases and their fractions in mixtures. In these experiments, the speed of sound is determined by measuring the frequency of a standing sound wave at a fixed tube length, temperature, and pressure. This…

  12. Analyzing acoustic phenomena with a smartphone microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes how different sound types can be explored using the microphone of a smartphone and a suitable app. Vibrating bodies, such as strings, membranes, or bars, generate air pressure fluctuations in their immediate vicinity, which propagate through the room in the form of sound waves. Depending on the triggering mechanism, it is possible to differentiate between four types of sound waves: tone, sound, noise, and bang. In everyday language, non-experts use the terms "tone" and "sound" synonymously; however, from a physics perspective there are very clear differences between the two terms. This paper presents experiments that enable learners to explore and understand these differences. Tuning forks and musical instruments (e.g., recorders and guitars) can be used as equipment for the experiments. The data are captured using a smartphone equipped with the appropriate app (in this paper we describe the app Audio Kit for iOS systems ). The values captured by the smartphone are displayed in a screen shot and then viewed directly on the smartphone or exported to a computer graphics program for printing.

  13. Kundt's Tube: An Acoustic Gas Analyzer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristov, Natasha; Habekost, Gehsa; Habekost, Achim

    2011-01-01

    A Kundt tube is normally used to measure the speed of sound in gases. Therefore, from known speeds of sound, a Kundt tube can be used to identify gases and their fractions in mixtures. In these experiments, the speed of sound is determined by measuring the frequency of a standing sound wave at a fixed tube length, temperature, and pressure. This…

  14. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Scattering of Sound by Sound, Parametric Arrays, Focused Sound Beams, and Noncollinear Tone-Noise Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    in Non- linear Acoustics," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 83, 74-77 (1988). 3 M. F. Hamilton and J. A. TenCate , "Finite Amplitude Sound near Cutoff in Higher...Tjottas and Darvennes have motivated experi- mental work by J. A. TenCate at ARL:UT. The experimental work receives partial support 3 from ONR Contract...88 (Purdue University, Indiana, 1988), pp. 193-198. [17] M. F. Hamilton and J. A. TenCate , "Sum and Difference Frequency Generation due to

  15. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  16. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  18. The existence of electron-acoustic shock waves and their interactions in a non-Maxwellian plasma with q-nonextensive distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiu-Ning; He, Yong-Lin; Han, Zhen-Hai; Dong, Guang-Xing; Nan, Ya-Gong; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2013-07-15

    We present a theoretical investigation for the nonlinear interaction between electron-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive two-electron plasma. The interaction is governed by a pair of Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equations. We focus on studying the colliding effects on the propagation of shock waves, more specifically, we have studied the effects of plasma parameters, i.e., the nonextensive parameter q, the “hot” to “cold” electron number density ratio α, and the normalized electron kinematic viscosity η{sub 0} on the trajectory changes (phase shifts) of shock waves. It is found that there are trajectory changes (phase shifts) for both colliding shock waves in the present plasma system. We also noted that the nonlinearity has no decisive effect on the trajectory changes, the occurrence of trajectory changes may be due to the combined role played by the dispersion and dissipation of the nonlinear structure. Our theoretical study may be beneficial to understand the propagation and interaction of nonlinear electrostatic waves and may brings a possibility to develop the nonlinear theory of electron-acoustic waves in astrophysical plasma systems.

  19. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  20. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  1. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  2. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  3. Read-Alouds in Kindergarten Classrooms: A Moment-by-Moment Approach to Analyzing Teacher-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascareño, Mayra; Deunk, Marjolein I.; Snow, Catherine E.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore teacher-child interaction in 24 whole-class read-aloud sessions in Chilean kindergarten classrooms serving children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Fifteen sessions focused on story meaning, and nine focused on language coding/decoding. We coded teacher and child turns for their function (i.e., teacher…

  4. Video Interactions for Teaching and Learning (VITAL): Analyzing Videos Online to Learn to Teach Early Childhood Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joon Sun; Ginsburg, Herbert P.; Preston, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The most pressing need in early childhood mathematics education in the United States is to improve early childhood teacher preparation. A Web-based video system, "Video Interactions for Teaching and Learning (VITAL)", is a novel and effective approach for teacher preparation integrated into early childhood mathematics education courses. With…

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Analyzing Genome Reductive Evolution Using Protein–Protein Interaction Networks: A Case Study of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Akinola, Richard O.; Mazandu, Gaston K.; Mulder, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    The advance in high-throughput sequencing technologies has yielded complete genome sequences of several organisms, including complete bacterial genomes. The growing number of these available sequenced genomes has enabled analyses of their dynamics, as well as the molecular and evolutionary processes which these organisms are under. Comparative genomics of different bacterial genomes have highlighted their genome size and gene content in association with lifestyles and adaptation to various environments and have contributed to enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms of their evolution. Protein–protein functional interactions mediate many essential processes for maintaining the stability of the biological systems under changing environmental conditions. Thus, these interactions play crucial roles in the evolutionary processes of different organisms, especially for obligate intracellular bacteria, proven to generally have reduced genome sizes compared to their nearest free-living relatives. In this study, we used the approach based on the Renormalization Group (RG) analysis technique and the Maximum-Excluded-Mass-Burning (MEMB) model to investigate the evolutionary process of genome reduction in relation to the organization of functional networks of two organisms. Using a Mycobacterium leprae (MLP) network in comparison with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) network as a case study, we show that reductive evolution in MLP was as a result of removal of important proteins from neighbors of corresponding orthologous MTB proteins. While each orthologous MTB protein had an increase in number of interacting partners in most instances, the corresponding MLP protein had lost some of them. This work provides a quantitative model for mapping reductive evolution and protein–protein functional interaction network organization in terms of roles played by different proteins in the network structure. PMID:27066064

  6. Analyzing Katana referral hospital as a complex adaptive system: agents, interactions and adaptation to a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Karemere, Hermès; Ribesse, Nathalie; Marchal, Bruno; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the adaptation of Katana referral hospital in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in a changing environment that is affected for more than a decade by intermittent armed conflicts. His objective is to generate theoretical proposals for addressing differently the analysis of hospitals governance in the aims to assess their performance and how to improve that performance. The methodology applied approach uses a case study using mixed methods ( qualitative and quantitative) for data collection. It uses (1) hospital data to measure the output of hospitals, (2) literature review to identify among others, events and interventions recorded in the history of hospital during the study period and (3) information from individual interviews to validate the interpretation of the results of the previous two sources of data and understand the responsiveness of management team referral hospital during times of change. The study brings four theoretical propositions: (1) Interaction between key agents is a positive force driving adaptation if the actors share a same vision, (2) The strength of the interaction between agents is largely based on the nature of institutional arrangements, which in turn are shaped by the actors themselves, (3) The owner and the management team play a decisive role in the implementation of effective institutional arrangements and establishment of positive interactions between agents, (4) The analysis of recipient population's perception of health services provided allow to better tailor and adapt the health services offer to the population's needs and expectations. Research shows that it isn't enough just to provide support (financial and technical), to manage a hospital for operate and adapt to a changing environment but must still animate, considering that it is a complex adaptive system and that this animation is nothing other than the induction of a positive interaction between agents.

  7. Analyzing the Multi-scale Interactions of Tropical Waves and Tropical Cyclone Formation with the NASA CMAVis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.; Nelson, B.; Tao, W.

    2011-12-01

    Among the scenarios in the Decadal Survey (DS) Missions, the advanced data processing group at the ESTO AIST PI workshop identified "Extreme Event Warning" and "Climate Projections" as two of the top priority scenarios. Recently, we (e.g., Shen et al., 2010a,b; 2011a,b) have made attempt of addressing the first by successfully developing the NASA Coupled Advanced global multiscale Modeling and concurrent Visualization systems (CAMVis) on NASA supercomputers, and demonstrating a great potential for extending the lead time (from 5~7 days up to 20 days) of tropical cyclone (TC) prediction with improved multi-scale interactions between a TC with large-scale environmental conditions such as African Easterly Waves (AEWs), and Madden Julian Oscillation (MJOs). In order to increase our confidence in long-term TC prediction and thus TC climate projection, the predictive relationships between large-scale tropical waves and TC formation need to be further examined and verified with massive model and satellite data sets. To achieve this goal, we have conducted multiscale analysis to study the TC genesis processes, accompanied downscaling (from large-scale events) and upscaling (from small-scale events) processes, and their subsequent non-linear interactions. In this study, we first illustrate the complicated multi-scale interactions during TC genesis with our newly-developed 3D streamline packages in the NASA CAMVis system. With selected cases that include twin TCs in 2002, TC Nargis (2008) and hurricane Helene (2006), we will show that the CAMVis can provide a detailed (zoomed-in) view on hurricane physical processes and an integrative (zoomed-out) view on its interactions with environmental conditions. In the end of talk, we will discuss our future work in multiscale analysis with the Hilbert Huang Transform and improved ensemble empiric mode decomposition.

  8. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  9. Global electro-structural-acoustic filtering in the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Grosh, Karl

    2003-10-01

    The active filtering in the cochlea is now believed to be due to the piezo-motility of the Outer Hair Cell (OHC), and the modulation of stereocilia resistance. Physiologically, the OHC resting potential is known to be modulated by the K+ ions in the cochlear fluid entering or leaving the OHC via gated channels, in response to structural motion, which in turn couples the electrical potential in the cochlear fluids to OHCs piezo-motility. However, the electrotonic space-constant of the ionic fluid in the cochlea is not negligible compared to the structural-acoustic wavelength for all frequencies, thus limiting the currently existing models that adopt local structural-electrical interaction. The electrical wave interacts globally with the structural-acoustic wave. This paper proposes a three-dimensional global electro-structural-acoustic linear finite element model to analyze the coupled behavior in the active cochlea. The OHC is modeled as a piezoelectric bar. A cable model is used for the electrical voltages, and a micromechanical model based on Dallos (2002) is proposed. Modeling is maintained as physiological as possible. The active response of the cochlea to acoustic input, Electrically Evoked Oto-Acoustic Emissions, efferent feedback, and the potential of IHC in response to acoustic or electrical input are studied.

  10. A versatile platform to analyze low affinity and transient protein-protein interactions in living cells in real time

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao-Cheng; Rodewald, Luo Wei; Hoppmann, Christian; Wong, Ee Tsin; Lebreton, Sylvain; Safar, Pavel; Patek, Marcel; Wang, Lei; Wertman, Kenneth F.; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play central roles in orchestrating biological processes. While some PPIs are stable, many important ones are transient and hard to detect with conventional approaches. We developed ReBiL, a recombinase enhanced bimolecular luciferase complementation platform, to enable weak PPI detection in living cells. ReBiL readily identified challenging transient interactions between an E3 ubiquitin ligase and an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. ReBiL’s ability to rapidly interrogate PPIs in diverse conditions revealed that some stapled α-helical peptides, a new class of PPI antagonists, induce target-independent cytosolic leakage and cytotoxicity that is antagonized by serum. These results explain the requirement for serum-free conditions to detect stapled peptide activity, and define a required parameter to evaluate for peptide antagonist approaches. ReBiL’s ability to expedite PPI analysis, assess target specificity and cell permeability, and to reveal off-target effects of PPI modifiers should facilitate development of effective, cell permeable PPI therapeutics and elaboration of diverse biological mechanisms. PMID:25464845

  11. Interactions among the A and T Units of an ECF-Type Biotin Transporter Analyzed by Site-Specific Crosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Olivia; Reiffler, Christin; Behrendt, Laura; Eitinger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters are a huge group of micronutrient importers in prokaryotes. They are composed of a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a module consisting of a moderately conserved transmembrane protein (T component) and two ABC ATPase domains (A components). Modules of A and T units may be dedicated to a specific S component or shared by many different S units in an organism. The mode of subunit interactions in ECF transporters is largely unknown. BioMNY, the focus of the present study, is a biotin transporter with a dedicated AT module. It consists of the S unit BioY, the A unit BioM and the T unit BioN. Like all T units, BioN contains two three-amino-acid signatures with a central Arg residue in a cytoplasmic helical region. Our previous work had demonstrated a central role of the two motifs in T units for stability and function of BioMNY and other ECF transporters. Here we show by site-specific crosslinking of pairs of mono-cysteine variants that the Ala-Arg-Ser and Ala-Arg-Gly signatures in BioN are coupling sites to the BioM ATPases. Analysis of 64 BioN-BioM pairs uncovered interactions of both signatures predominantly with a segment of ∼13 amino acid residues C-terminal of the Q loop of BioM. Our results further demonstrate that portions of all BioN variants with single Cys residues in the two signatures are crosslinked to homodimers. This finding may point to a dimeric architecture of the T unit in BioMNY complexes. PMID:22216173

  12. Interactions among the A and T units of an ECF-type biotin transporter analyzed by site-specific crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Olivia; Reiffler, Christin; Behrendt, Laura; Eitinger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters are a huge group of micronutrient importers in prokaryotes. They are composed of a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a module consisting of a moderately conserved transmembrane protein (T component) and two ABC ATPase domains (A components). Modules of A and T units may be dedicated to a specific S component or shared by many different S units in an organism. The mode of subunit interactions in ECF transporters is largely unknown. BioMNY, the focus of the present study, is a biotin transporter with a dedicated AT module. It consists of the S unit BioY, the A unit BioM and the T unit BioN. Like all T units, BioN contains two three-amino-acid signatures with a central Arg residue in a cytoplasmic helical region. Our previous work had demonstrated a central role of the two motifs in T units for stability and function of BioMNY and other ECF transporters. Here we show by site-specific crosslinking of pairs of mono-cysteine variants that the Ala-Arg-Ser and Ala-Arg-Gly signatures in BioN are coupling sites to the BioM ATPases. Analysis of 64 BioN-BioM pairs uncovered interactions of both signatures predominantly with a segment of ~13 amino acid residues C-terminal of the Q loop of BioM. Our results further demonstrate that portions of all BioN variants with single Cys residues in the two signatures are crosslinked to homodimers. This finding may point to a dimeric architecture of the T unit in BioMNY complexes. © 2011 Neubauer et al.

  13. Development of an inexact-variance hydrological modeling system for analyzing interactive effects of multiple uncertain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Li, Y. P.; Zhang, J. L.; Huang, G. H.

    2015-09-01

    Uncertainty assessment of hydrological model parameters has become one of the main topics due to their significant effects on prediction in arid and semi-arid river basins. Incorporation of uncertainty assessment within hydrological models can facilitate the calibration process and improve the degree of credibility to the subsequent prediction. In this study, an inexact-variance hydrological modeling system (IVHMS) is developed for assessing parameter uncertainty on modeling outputs in the Kaidu River Basin, China. Through incorporating the techniques of type-2 fuzzy analysis (T2FA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) within the semi-distributed land use based runoff processes (SLURP) model, IVHMS can quantitatively evaluate the individual and interactive effects of multiple uncertain parameters expressed as type-2 fuzzy sets in the hydrological modeling system. The modeling outputs indicate a good performance of SLURP model in describing the daily streamflow at the Dashankou hydrological station. Uncertainty analysis is conducted through sampling from fuzzy membership functions under different α-cut levels. The results show that, under a lower degree of plausibility (i.e. a lower α-cut level), intervals for peak and average flows are both wider; while intervals of peak and average flows become narrower under a higher degree of plausibility. Results based on ANOVA reveal that (i) precipitation factor (PF), one of main factors dominating the runoff processes, should be paid more attention in order to enhance the model performance; (ii) retention constant for fast store (RS) controls the amount and timing of the outflow from saturated zone and has a highly nonlinear effect on the average flow; (iii) the interaction between retention constant for fast store (RF) and maximum capacity for fast store (MF) has statistically significant (p < 0.05) effect on modeling outputs through affecting the maximum water holding capacity and the soil infiltration rate. The findings can

  14. Problems In Nonlinear Acoustics: pulsed finite amplitude sound beams, nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer, nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams, effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams and parametric receiving arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-07

    Proceedings of the 13th Interna- tional Congress on Acoustics, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, August 1989, edited by P. Pravica and G. Drakulic (Sava Centar...Congress on Acoustics (Sava Centar, Belgrade, 1989), edited by P. Pravica and G. Drakulic , Vol. 1, pp. 145-148. [11] K.-E. Froysa, "Weakly nonlinear...Congress on Acoustics (Sava Centar, Belgrade, 1989), edited by P. Pravica and G. Drakulic , Vol. 1, pp. 283-286. [41] C. M. Darvennes, M. F. Hamilton, J

  15. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed.

  16. Development of an approach to analyze the interaction between Nosema bombycis (microsporidia) deproteinated chitin spore coats and spore wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Donglin; Dang, Xiaoqun; Tian, Rui; Long, Mengxian; Li, Chunfeng; Li, Tian; Chen, Jie; Li, Zhi; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2014-01-01

    Nosema bombycis is an obligate intracellular parasite of the Bombyx mori insect. The spore wall of N. bombycis is composed of an electron-dense proteinaceous outer layer and an electron-transparent chitinous inner layer, and the spore wall is connected to the plasma membrane. In this study, the deproteinated chitin spore coats (DCSCs) were acquired by boiling N. bombycis in 1M NaOH. Under a transmission electron microscope, the chitin spore coat resembles a loosely curled ring with strong refractivity; organelles and nuclei were not observed inside the spore. The anti-SWP25, 26, 30 and 32 antibodies were used to detect whether spore wall proteins within the total soluble and mature spore proteins could bind to the DCSCs. Furthermore, a chitin binding assay showed that within the total soluble and mature spore proteins, the SWP26, SWP30 and SWP32 spore wall proteins, bound to the deproteinated chitin spore coats, although SWP25 was incapable of this interaction. Moreover, after the DCSCs were incubated with the alkali-soluble proteins, the latter were obtained by treating N. bombycis with 0.1M NaOH. Following this treatment, SWP32 was still capable of binding the DCSCs, while SWP26 and SWP30 were unable to bind. Collectively, the DCSCs are useful for investigating the arrangement of spore wall proteins, and they shed light on how the microsporidia spore wall is self-assembled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  18. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  19. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  20. Development of Proteogenomic Approaches to Analyze the Role of Virus-Microbe Interactions in Shaping Natural Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jillian; Breitbart, Mya; VerBerkmoes, Nathan

    2014-04-25

    CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) are adaptive immune systems in Bacteria and Archaea. Transcripts of the spacers that separate the repeats confer immunity through sequence identity with a targeted region (proto-spacer) in phage/viral, plasmid, or other foreign DNA. Short sequences immediately flanking the proto-spacer (proto-spacer adjacent motifs—PAMs) are important in both procuring spacers from and providing immunity to targeted sequences. New spacers are incorporated unidirectionally at the leader end of the CRISPR loci, thus recording a timeline of recent viral exposure. In the early phase of our research, we documented extremely rapid diversification of the CRISPR loci in natural populations [Tyson and Banfield, 2008] matched by high levels of sequence variation in natural viral populations [Andersson and Banfield, 2008]. Since then, in a genetically tractable model laboratory system, we have 1) tracked phage mutation and CRISPR diversification, and in a natural model system, we have 2) examined population history via over time, 3) investigated the timescale over which spacers become ineffective and the process by which ineffective spacers are removed, and 4) analyzed viral diversity. In addition to research activities, our group has organized five international CRISPR meetings, the fifth to be held at University of California, Berkeley in June 2012. Most importantly, the project provided the majority of funding support for Christine Sun (Ph.D. 2012).

  1. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    J., “ Comparison of measured acoustic reflection fluctuations and estimates based on roughness,” J. Acous. Soc. Am., 137, 2391-2391 (2015), DOI:http...of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries Marcia... acoustic interaction with the ocean floor, including penetration through and reflection from smooth and rough water/sediment interfaces, scattering

  2. Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satelliteretrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirecteffect

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.; Del Genio, A.D.; Kaufman, Y.; Bennartz, R.; Koch, D.; Loeb, N.; Orlikowski, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evidence of aerosol-cloud interactions are evaluated using satellite data from MODIS, CERES, AMSR-E, reanalysis data from NCEP and data from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model. We evaluate a series of model simulations: (1) Exp N- aerosol direct radiative effects; (2) Exp C- Like Exp N but with aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus and stratus clouds; (3) Exp CN- Like Exp C but with model wind fields nudged to reanalysis data. Comparison between satellite-retrieved data and model simulations for June to August 2002, over the Atlantic Ocean indicate the following: a negative correlation between aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and cloud droplet effective radius (R{sub eff}) for all cases and satellite data, except for Exp N; a weak but negative correlation between liquid water path (LWP) and AOT for MODIS and CERES; and a robust increase in cloud cover with AOT for both MODIS and CERES. In all simulations, there is a positive correlation between AOT and both cloud cover and LWP (except in the case of LWP-AOT for Exp CN). The largest slopes are obtained for Exp N, implying that meteorological variability may be an important factor. The main fields associated with AOT variability in NCEP/MODIS data are warmer temperatures and increased subsidence for less clean cases, not well captured by the model. Simulated cloud fields compared with an enhanced data product from MODIS and AMSR-E indicate that model cloud thickness is over-predicted and cloud droplet number is within retrieval uncertainties. Since LWP fields are comparable this implies an under-prediction of R{sub eff} and thus an over-prediction of the indirect effect.

  3. Land use and disturbance interactions in dynamic arid systems: Multiscale remote sensing approaches for monitoring and analyzing riparian vegetation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Miguel L.

    Riparian systems are comprised of interacting aquatic and terrestrial elements that contribute distinctively to the natural capital of arid landscapes. Riparian vegetation is a major component of riparian systems, providing the ecosystem services required to support watershed health. The spatial and temporal distributions of riparian vegetation are influenced by hydrologic and disturbance processes operating at scales from local to regional. I believe both these processes are well suited to monitoring using synoptic and multitemporal approaches. The research in this dissertation is presented as 3 related studies. The first study focused on historical riparian dynamics related to natural disturbance and land use. Using current and historical riparian vegetation maps, we examined vegetation change within catchments of varying land use intensity. Results suggest that land use activities and wastewater subsidy affect the rate of development and diversity of riparian community types. The second study used moderate resolution satellite imagery to monitor changes in riparian structure and pattern within a land cover change framework. We classified Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery of the Upper Santa Cruz River watershed using Classification and Regression Tree (CART) models. We tested the ability of our models to capture change at landscape, floodplain, and catchment scales, centering our change detection efforts on a riparian tree die-off episode and found they can be used to describe both general landscape dynamics and disturbance-related riparian change. The third study examined historical and environmental factors contributing to spatial patterns of vegetation following two riparian tree die-offs. We used high resolution aerial imagery to map locations of individual live and dead trees and collected a suite of environmental variables and historical variables related directly and indirectly to land use and disturbance history. We tested for differences between

  4. A model using marginal efficiency of investment to analyze carbon and nitrogen interactions in terrestrial ecosystems (ACONITE Version 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are coupled in terrestrial ecosystems through multiple processes including photosynthesis, tissue allocation, respiration, N fixation, N uptake, and decomposition of litter and soil organic matter. Capturing the constraint of N on terrestrial C uptake and storage has been a focus of the Earth System Modeling community. However, there is little understanding of the trade-offs and sensitivities of allocating C and N to different tissues in order to optimize the productivity of plants. Here we describe a new, simple model of ecosystem C-N cycling and interactions (ACONITE), that builds on theory related to plant economics in order to predict key ecosystem properties (leaf area index, leaf C : N, N fixation, and plant C use efficiency) based on the outcome of assessments of the marginal change in net C or N uptake associated with a change in allocation of C or N to plant tissues. We simulated and evaluated steady-state ecosystem stocks and fluxes in three different forest ecosystems types (tropical evergreen, temperate deciduous, and temperate evergreen). Leaf C : N differed among the three ecosystem types (temperate deciduous < tropical evergreen < temperature evergreen), a result that compared well to observations from a global database describing plant traits. Gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) estimates compared well to observed fluxes at the simulation sites. Simulated N fixation at steady-state, calculated based on relative demand for N and the marginal return on C investment to acquire N, was an order of magnitude higher in the tropical forest than in the temperate forest, consistent with observations. A sensitivity analysis revealed that parameterization of the relationship between leaf N and leaf respiration had the largest influence on leaf area index and leaf C : N. A parameter governing how photosynthesis scales with day length had the largest influence on total vegetation C, GPP, and NPP

  5. AS-ALPS: a database for analyzing the effects of alternative splicing on protein structure, interaction and network in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Shionyu, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shinoda, Kazuki; Takahashi, Ken-ichi; Go, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    We have constructed a database, AS-ALPS (alternative splicing-induced alteration of protein structure), which provides information that would be useful for analyzing the effects of alternative splicing (AS) on protein structure, interactions with other bio-molecules and protein interaction networks in human and mouse. Several AS events have been revealed to contribute to the diversification of protein structure, which results in diversification of interaction partners or affinities, which in turn contributes to regulation of bio-molecular networks. Most AS variants, however, are only known at the sequence level. It is important to determine the effects of AS on protein structure and interaction, and to provide candidates for experimental targets that are relevant to network regulation by AS. For this purpose, the three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins are valuable sources of information; however, these have not been fully exploited in any other AS-related databases. AS-ALPS is the only AS-related database that describes the spatial relationships between protein regions altered by AS (‘AS regions’) and both the proteins’ hydrophobic cores and sites of inter-molecular interactions. This information makes it possible to infer whether protein structural stability and/or protein interaction are affected by each AS event. AS-ALPS can be freely accessed at http://as-alps.nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp and http://genomenetwork.nig.ac.jp/as-alps/. PMID:19015123

  6. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  7. The influence of acoustic-dislocation interaction on intensity of the bound exciton recombination in initial and irradiated GaAsP LEDs structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoreva, O. V.; Olikh, Ya. M.; Pinkovska, M. B.; Radkevych, O. I.; Tartachnyk, V. P.; Shlapatska, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic-excitant interaction of GaAsP light emitting diodes (initial and irradiated by 2 MeV electrons) was studied. Structure based on GaAs1-xPx solid solutions, grown by epitaxy from the vapor phase, were the object of the research. It was observed that ultrasonic treatment (UST) results in the drop of the emitting intensity of structures, which relaxes to the previous values after ultrasound termination. The possible reason of observed changes concerning nonequilibrium dislocation clusters were discussed. Electron irradiation leads to the exponential drop of emitting intensity, which restores after UST much slower than initial one. Radiation degradation parameters τ0/Kτ of yellow and orange LEDs were found.

  8. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  9. Acoustical oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Acoustical Society of America has formed a Technical Specialty Group on Acoustical Oceanography. At ASA meetings the new group will have special sessions where they will give invited and contributed papers and have panel discussions about ocean parameters that are measured effectively by acoustical techniques.The first special sessions will be May 22-23, 1990, at the ASA meeting at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The focus on May 22 will be acoustical techniques for detection and measurement of internal waves and turbulence; conveners are Robert Pinkel of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., and Herman Medwin of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Acoustical studies of the physical and biological characteristics of ocean mass boundaries are the discussion topic on May 23. The convener is C. S. Clay, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  10. Interaction of electronic excitations of Tm3+ ions with acoustic vibrations in KTm(MoO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskyi, D.; Poperezhai, S.; Gogoi, P.; Engelkamp, H.; Maan, J. C.; Wosnitza, J.; Kut'ko, V.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of KTm(MoO4)2 were measured as a function of magnetic field between 3 and 11.5 cm-1 at T =2 K. We found that in addition to the absorption line caused by the electronic excitation of Tm3+ ions, the spectra contain sidebands. Far-infrared transmission measured with polarized light from 10 to 75 cm-1 revealed vibration modes at 16.7 and 25.7 cm-1 for polarizations Eω∥a and Eω∥c, respectively. We show that sidebands in the spectra of paramagnetic resonance result from a parametric resonance between the electronic excitations of the Tm3+ ions and the acoustic vibrations of the crystal lattice.

  11. Visco-acoustic modelling of a vibrating plate interacting with water confined in a domain of micrometric size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebental, B.; Bourquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that concrete durability strongly depends on the capillary porosity of the material. Hence, structural health monitoring of concrete structure could take advantage of concrete microporosity monitoring. To this end, a new method for the in situ non-destructive testing of capillary porosity in cementitious materials has been proposed. A sensing device that seems well suited to this application is a capacitive ultrasonic transducer with a characteristic size of 1 μm. It is to be embedded in the material. Its vibrating membrane is made of aligned carbon nanotubes forming a thin layer with a typical thickness of 1 nm. It generates acoustic waves of micrometric wavelength into water-filled micropores, aiming at measuring their properties. The present paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the embedded sensor. In order to properly account for viscous effects in fluids at the micrometric scale, we have developed a specific computational method for the visco-acoustic modelling of a microplate vibrating between 10 MHz and 2 GHz in a water-filled domain of micrometric size. Our approach is based on the condensation of the fluid part of the fluid-structure problem on the structure by a finite element method, and on a spectral approximation of the structural equations. The numerical results indicate that the fluid domain is resonant despite the viscous terms, which causes a frequency downshift of the resonances and a decrease of the quality factor. In the coupled system, the plate does not perturb the fluid resonances, whereas the plate resonances are strongly upshifted by the water load. The resonance frequencies of the system are shown to display a clear dependence on the pore width, which makes the device a good candidate as a porosity sensor.

  12. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  13. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  14. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  15. 50 years of nonlinear acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naugolnykh, K.

    2008-06-01

    Episodes of nonlinear acoustics history related to several topics are discussed. Nonlinear evolution of finite amplitude wave, its distortion and weak shock wave formation, nonlinear absorption of the high intensity wave. Nonlinear wave propagation in a randomly inhomogeneous media, interaction of noises and regular signals. Nonlinear sound wave interactions. Parametric transmitting and receiving array theoretical models, experimental test and applications in ocean and atmospheric sounding. Parametric acoustic array in oceanic waveguids. High-intensity focused ultrasound propagation in a inhomogeneous fluid and tissue, nonlinear mechanism of heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound, which is important for ultrasound thermal therapy. Intense acoustic pulses generation, cavitation, laser generated nonlinear pulses.

  16. Welder analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. L.

    1968-01-01

    Welder analyzer circuit evaluates and certifies resistance welding machines. The analyzer measures peak current, peak voltage, peak power, total energy, and first-pulse energy. It is used as an energy monitor while welding is being performed, or a precision shunt load for a pure electrical evaluation of the weld machine.

  17. Use model-based Analysis of ChIP-Seq (MACS) to analyze short reads generated by sequencing protein-DNA interactions in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Model-based Analysis of ChIP-Seq (MACS) is a computational algorithm for identifying genome-wide protein-DNA interaction from ChIP-Seq data. MACS combines multiple modules to process aligned ChIP-Seq reads for either transcription factor or histone modification by removing redundant reads, estimating fragment length, building signal profile, calculating peak enrichment, and refining and reporting peak calls. In this protocol, we provide a detailed demonstration of how to apply MACS to analyze ChIP-Seq datasets related to protein-DNA interactions in embryonic stem cells (ES cells). Instruction on how to interpret and visualize the results is also provided. MACS is an open-source and is available from http://github.com/taoliu/MACS.

  18. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  19. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  1. Interactions Between Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and the Serotonin 1A Receptor System on Acoustic Startle Amplitude and Prepulse Inhibition of the Startle Response in Two Rat Strains

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Lisa H.

    2011-01-01

    Both the neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor systems have been implicated in anxiety disorders and there is evidence that the two systems interact with each other to affect behavior. Both systems have individually been shown to affect prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. PPI is a form of sensorimotor gating that is reduced in patients with anxiety disorders including post-traumatic stress and panic disorder. Here, we examined whether the two systems interact or counteract each other to affect acoustic startle amplitude, PPI and habituation of the startle response. In experiment 1, Brown Norway (BN) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were administered ether an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of saline or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT 10 min prior to receiving an intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of either saline or CRF (0.3 µg). In a second experiment, rats were administered either an IP injection of saline or the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY 100,635 10 min prior to receiving an ICV infusion of saline or CRF. Thirty min after the ICV infusion, the startle response and PPI were assessed. As we have previously shown, the dose of CRF used in these experiments reduced PPI in BN rats and had no effect on PPI in WKY rats. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT alone had no effect on PPI in either rat strain when the data from the two strains were examined separately. Administration of 8-OHDPAT added to the effect of CRF in BN rats, and the combination of 8-OH-DPAT and CRF significantly reduced PPI in WKY rats. CRF alone had no effect on baseline startle amplitude in either rat strain, but CRF enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced increase in startle in both strains. Administration of WAY 100,635 did not affect the CRF-induced change in PPI and there were no interactions between CRF and WAY 100,635 on baseline startle. The results suggest that activation of the 5-HT1A receptor can potentiate the effect of

  2. Interactions between corticotropin-releasing factor and the serotonin 1A receptor system on acoustic startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition of the startle response in two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Conti, Lisa H

    2012-01-01

    Both the neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor systems have been implicated in anxiety disorders and there is evidence that the two systems interact with each other to affect behavior. Both systems have individually been shown to affect prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. PPI is a form of sensorimotor gating that is reduced in patients with anxiety disorders including post-traumatic stress and panic disorder. Here, we examined whether the two systems interact or counteract each other to affect acoustic startle amplitude, PPI and habituation of the startle response. In experiment 1, Brown Norway (BN) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were administered ether an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of saline or the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT 10 min prior to receiving an intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of either saline or CRF (0.3 μg). In a second experiment, rats were administered either an IP injection of saline or the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY 100,635 10 min prior to receiving an ICV infusion of saline or CRF. Thirty min after the ICV infusion, the startle response and PPI were assessed. As we have previously shown, the dose of CRF used in these experiments reduced PPI in BN rats and had no effect on PPI in WKY rats. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT alone had no effect on PPI in either rat strain when the data from the two strains were examined separately. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT added to the effect of CRF in BN rats, and the combination of 8-OH-DPAT and CRF significantly reduced PPI in WKY rats. CRF alone had no effect on baseline startle amplitude in either rat strain, but CRF enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced increase in startle in both strains. Administration of WAY 100,635 did not affect the CRF-induced change in PPI and there were no interactions between CRF and WAY 100,635 on baseline startle. The results suggest that activation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor can potentiate the

  3. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  4. Strategies for Analyzing Tone Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupe, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of auditory and acoustic analysis for determining the tonemes of a language starting from scratch, drawing on the author's experience of recording and analyzing tone languages of north-east India. The methodology is applied to a preliminary analysis of tone in the Thang dialect of Khiamniungan, a virtually undocumented…

  5. Strategies for Analyzing Tone Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupe, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of auditory and acoustic analysis for determining the tonemes of a language starting from scratch, drawing on the author's experience of recording and analyzing tone languages of north-east India. The methodology is applied to a preliminary analysis of tone in the Thang dialect of Khiamniungan, a virtually undocumented…

  6. Heating of carriers as controlled by the combined interactions with acoustic and piezoelectric phonons in degenerate III-V semiconductors at low lattice temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. P.; Das, J.; Basu, A.; Das, B.

    2017-09-01

    In compound semiconductors which lack inversion symmetry, the combined interaction of the electrons with both acoustic and piezoelectric phonons is dominant at low lattice temperatures ( 20 K). The field dependence of the effective electron temperature under these conditions, has been calculated by solving the modified energy balance equation that takes due account of the degeneracy. The traditionally used heated Fermi-Dirac (F.D.) function for the non-equilibrium distribution function is approximated by some well tested model distribution. This makes it possible to carry out the integrations quite easily and, thus to obtain some more realistic results in a closed form, without taking recourse to any oversimplified approximations. The numerical results that follow for InSb, InAs and GaN, from the present analysis, are then compared with the available theoretical and experimental data. The degeneracy and the piezoelectric interaction, both are seen to bring about significant changes in the electron temperature characteristics. The scope for further refinement is discussed.

  7. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ChemScan UV-6100 is a spectrometry system originally developed by Biotronics Technologies, Inc. under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. It is marketed to the water and wastewater treatment industries, replacing "grab sampling" with on-line data collection. It analyzes the light absorbance characteristics of a water sample, simultaneously detects hundreds of individual wavelengths absorbed by chemical substances in a process solution, and quantifies the information. Spectral data is then processed by ChemScan analyzer and compared with calibration files in the system's memory in order to calculate concentrations of chemical substances that cause UV light absorbance in specific patterns. Monitored substances can be analyzed for quality and quantity. Applications include detection of a variety of substances, and the information provided enables an operator to control a process more efficiently.

  8. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  9. Gallium nitride electro-acoustic devices and acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2016-05-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) being one of a few piezoelectric semiconductors with low acoustic loss is a perfect material for electro-acoustic applications. Interactions of electrons and phonons are facilitated by the piezoelectric effect in addition to the deformation coupling in GaN, a property that can be used to implement a variety of very interesting devices and metamaterials, such as resonant transistors, acoustic amplifiers, circulators, and couplers. This talk covers theoretical basis of such devices and overviews recent advances in this technology.

  10. Acoustic spectrum analysis for gyro bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzman, C. E.

    1981-08-01

    An acoustic system analyzer has been developed that will be an aid in bearing analysis for displacement gyros. The phenomenon of the Fourier Transform has made possible the development of an optical processor that operates by the interaction of light from a light emitting diode array sweeping across a binary frequency mask and through lenses onto a vidicon tube. This arrangement performs the Fourier Transform of large time samples of sound in a parallel process, preserving amplitude, frequency and phase information. The resultant information can then be entered into a computer for programmed analysis or displayed for visual analysis of the condition of gyro-bearings.

  11. Defibrillator analyzers.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Defibrillator analyzers automate the inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) testing of defibrillators. They need to be able to test at least four basic defibrillator performance characteristics: discharge energy, synchronized-mode operation, automated external defibrillation, and ECG monitoring. We prefer that they also be able to test a defibrillator's external noninvasive pacing function--but this is not essential if a facility already has a pacemaker analyzer that can perform this testing. In this Evaluation, we tested seven defibrillator analyzers from six suppliers. All seven units accurately measure the energies of a variety of discharge wave-forms over a wide range of energy levels--from 1 J for use in a neonatal intensive care unit to 360 J for use on adult patients requiring maximum discharge energy. Most of the analyzers are easy to use. However, only three of the evaluated units could perform the full range of defibrillator tests that we prefer. We rated these units Acceptable--Preferred. Three more units could perform four of the five tests, they could not test the pacing feature of a defibrillator. These units were rated Acceptable. The seventh unit could perform only discharge energy testing and synchronized-mode testing and was difficult to use. We rate that unit Acceptable--Not Recommended.

  12. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  13. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  14. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  15. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Axiomatics Corporation developed a shunting Dielectric Sensor to determine the nutrient level and analyze plant nutrient solutions in the CELSS, NASA's space life support program. (CELSS is an experimental facility investigating closed-cycle plant growth and food processing for long duration manned missions.) The DiComp system incorporates a shunt electrode and is especially sensitive to changes in dielectric property changes in materials at measurements much lower than conventional sensors. The analyzer has exceptional capabilities for predicting composition of liquid streams or reactions. It measures concentrations and solids content up to 100 percent in applications like agricultural products, petrochemicals, food and beverages. The sensor is easily installed; maintenance is low, and it can be calibrated on line. The software automates data collection and analysis.

  16. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  17. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  18. Atmosphere Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    California Measurements, Inc.'s model PC-2 Aerosol Particle Analyzer is produced in both airborne and ground-use versions. Originating from NASA technology, it is a quick and accurate method of detecting minute amounts of mass loadings on a quartz crystal -- offers utility as highly sensitive detector of fine particles suspended in air. When combined with suitable air delivery system, it provides immediate information on the size distribution and mass concentrations of aerosols. William Chiang, obtained a NASA license for multiple crystal oscillator technology, and initially developed a particle analyzer for NASA use with Langley Research Center assistance. Later his company produced the modified PC-2 for commercial applications Brunswick Corporation uses the device for atmospheric research and in studies of smoke particles in Fires. PC-2 is used by pharmaceutical and chemical companies in research on inhalation toxicology and environmental health. Also useful in testing various filters for safety masks and nuclear installations.

  19. A model for the pressure excitation spectrum and acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow is essential information when analyzing sound propagation within ducts. A unification of the theory of the nonlinear acoustic resistance of Helmholtz resonators including grazing flow is presented. The nonlinear resistance due to grazing flow is considered to be caused by an exciting pressure spectrum produced by the interaction of the grazing flow and the jets flowing from the resonator orifices. With this exciting pressure spectrum the resonator can be treated in the same manner as a resonator without grazing flow but with an exciting acoustic spectrum.

  20. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  1. Inhibition of TRAF6-Ubc13 interaction in NFkB inflammatory pathway by analyzing the hotspot amino acid residues and protein-protein interactions using molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ria; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are important in most of the biochemical processes. Hotspot amino acid residues in proteins are the most important contributors for proper protein-protein interactions. Hotspot amino acid residues have been looked down upon as important therapeutic targets in inhibiting PPIs. Interaction between TRAF6 and Ubc13 is a crucial point in the NFkB inflammatory pathway. Dysfunction of the NFkB pathway is associated with numerous human diseases including cancer and neurodenegeration disorders. Ubc13 also interacts specifically to TRAF6 and not with other proteins of the TRAF family and this makes the TRAF6-Ubc13 complex an important target for specific inhibition. Hence, interfering with the TRAF6-Ubc13 association may prove effective in suppressing the NFkB disease pathway. In the present study, we searched the TRAF6-Ubc13 interaction interface to analyze their binding hotspot amino acid residues using various computational techniques. Heterocyclic compounds are known for their medicinal properties. We screened for heterocyclic analogues to the known TRAF6 inhibitor PDTC, to predict a better inhibitor using in silico protein-ligand and protein-protein interaction studies. Our in silico prediction results suggest that tetrahydro-2-thiophenecarbothioamide (Chemspider ID 36027528) binds one of the major hot-spot residues of TRAF6-Ubc13 interface and can be a better alternative in suppressing TRA6-Ubc13 complex formation in chronic inflammation than PDTC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Depression Diagnoses and Fundamental Frequency-Based Acoustic Cues in Maternal Infant-Directed Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, Laura L.; Zinser, Michael C.; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Kaplan, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    F[subscript 0]-based acoustic measures were extracted from a brief, sentence-final target word spoken during structured play interactions between mothers and their 3- to 14-month-old infants and were analyzed based on demographic variables and DSM-IV Axis-I clinical diagnoses and their common modifiers. F[subscript 0] range (?F[subscript 0]) was…

  3. Depression Diagnoses and Fundamental Frequency-Based Acoustic Cues in Maternal Infant-Directed Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, Laura L.; Zinser, Michael C.; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Kaplan, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    F[subscript 0]-based acoustic measures were extracted from a brief, sentence-final target word spoken during structured play interactions between mothers and their 3- to 14-month-old infants and were analyzed based on demographic variables and DSM-IV Axis-I clinical diagnoses and their common modifiers. F[subscript 0] range (?F[subscript 0]) was…

  4. Acoustic analysis of the propfan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Succi, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    A review of propeller noise prediction technology is presented. Two methods for the prediction of the noise from conventional and advanced propellers in forward flight are described. These methods are based on different time domain formulations. Brief descriptions of the computer algorithms based on these formulations are given. The output of the programs (the acoustic pressure signature) was Fourier analyzed to get the acoustic pressure spectrum. The main difference between the two programs is that one can handle propellers with supersonic tip speed while the other is for subsonic tip speed propellers. Comparisons of the calculated and measured acoustic data for a conventional and an advanced propeller show good agreement in general.

  5. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  6. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  7. CCFP Analyzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-06

    ISS047e106715 (05/06/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake unpacks a cerebral and cochlear fluid pressure (CCFP) analyzer. The device is being tested to measure the pressure of the fluid in the skull, also known as intracranial pressure, which may increase due to fluid shifts in the body while in microgravity. It is hypothesized that the headward fluid shift that occurs during space flight leads to increased pressure in the brain, which may push on the back of the eye, causing it to change shape.

  8. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  9. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  10. Interactions between self-assembled monolayers and an organophosphonate: A detailed study using surface acoustic wave-based mass analysis, polarization modulation-FTIR spectroscopy, and ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, R.M.; Yang, H.C.; McEllistrem, L.J.

    1997-06-24

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having surfaces terminated in the following functional groups: -CH{sub 3}, -OH, -COOH, and (COO{sup -}){sub 2}Cu{sup 2+} (MUA-Cu{sup 2+}) have been prepared and examined as potential chemically sensitive interfaces. Mass measurements made using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices indicate that these surfaces display different degrees of selectivity and sensitivity to a range of analytes. The response of the MUA-Cu{sup 2+} SAM to the nerve-agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) is particularly intriguing. Exposure of this surface to 50%-of-saturation DIMP yields a surface concentration equivalent to about 20 DIMP monolayers. Such a high surface concentration in equilibrium with a much lower-than-saturation vapor pressure has not previously been observed. Newly developed analytical tools have made it possible to measure the infrared spectrum of the chemically receptive surface during analyte dosing. Coupled with in-situ SAW/ellipsometry measurements, which permit simultaneous measurement of mass and thickness with nanogram and Angstrom resolution, respectively, it has been possibly to develop a model for the surface chemistry leading to the unusual behavior of this system. The results indicate that DIMP interacts strongly with surface-confined Cu{sup 2+} adduct that nucleates growth of semi-ordered crystallites having substantially lower vapor pressure than the liquid.

  11. Analyzing Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  12. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Rajkumar S. Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  13. Novel synthetic ester of Brassicasterol, DFT investigation including NBO, NLO response, reactivity descriptor and its intramolecular interactions analyzed by AIM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Prakash, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, Brassicasterol (compound 1) isolated from Allamanda Violacea reacted with the well known NSAID ibuprofen by Steglich esterification yielding a novel steroidal ester, 3β-(2-(4-isobutyl phenyl) propionoxy) 24 methyl cholest-5, 22-dien (compound 2). Identity of synthetic derivative (compound 2) was done with the help of modern spectroscopic techniques like, 1H NMR, IR and UV as well as mass spectrometry. Molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of compound 2 were calculated using density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) and 6-31(d,p) basis set. NMR chemical shifts of the compound were calculated with GIAO method. Electronic properties such as HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with the help of time dependent DFT method. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to study hyperconjugative interactions. Non linear optical (NLO) response of compound 2 was also evaluated. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface has been used to indicate nucleophilic and electrophilic sites. Global reactivity descriptors of compound 1 and 2 were also calculated. Intramolecular interactions were analyzed using Atoms in molecule (AIM) theory.

  14. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing & transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  15. The acoustic correlates of valence depend on emotion family.

    PubMed

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The voice expresses a wide range of emotions through modulations of acoustic parameters such as frequency and amplitude. Although the acoustics of individual emotions are well understood, attempts to describe the acoustic correlates of broad emotional categories such as valence have yielded mixed results. In the present study, we analyzed the acoustics of emotional valence for different families of emotion. We divided emotional vocalizations into "motivational," "moral," and "aesthetic" families as defined by the OCC (Ortony, Clore, and Collins) model of emotion. Subjects viewed emotional scenarios and were cued to vocalize congruent exclamations in response to them, for example, "Yay!" and "Damn!". Positive valence was weakly associated with high-pitched and loud vocalizations. However, valence interacted with emotion family for both pitch and amplitude. A general acoustic code for valence does not hold across families of emotion, whereas family-specific codes provide a more accurate description of vocal emotions. These findings are consolidated into a set of "rules of expression" relating vocal dimensions to emotion dimensions.

  16. Seismic resonances of acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F. M.; Esterhazy, S.; Perugia, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to clarify at a possible testsite whether a member state of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)has violated its rules by conducting a underground nuclear test. Compared toatmospheric and underwater tests underground nuclear explosions are the mostdifficult to detect.One primary structural target for the field team during an OSI is the detectionof an underground cavity, created by underground nuclear explosions. Theapplication of seismic-resonances of the cavity for its detection has beenproposed in the CTBT by mentioning "resonance seismometry" as possibletechnique during OSIs. We modeled the interaction of a seismic wave-field withan underground cavity by a sphere filled with an acoustic medium surrounded byan elastic full space. For this setting the solution of the seismic wave-fieldcan be computed analytically. Using this approach the appearance of acousticresonances can be predicted in the theoretical calculations. Resonance peaksappear in the spectrum derived for the elastic domain surrounding the acousticcavity, which scale in width with the density of the acoustic medium. For lowdensities in the acoustic medium as for an gas-filled cavity, the spectralpeaks become very narrow and therefore hard to resolve. The resonancefrequencies, however can be correlated to the discrete set of eigenmodes of theacoustic cavity and can thus be predicted if the dimension of the cavity isknown. Origin of the resonance peaks are internal reverberations of wavescoupling in the acoustic domain and causing an echoing signal that couples outto the elastic domain again. In the gas-filled case the amplitudes in timedomain are very low.Beside theoretical considerations we seek to find real data examples fromsimilar settings. As example we analyze a 3D active seismic data set fromFelsőpetény, Hungary that has been conducted between 2012 and 2014 on behalf ofthe CTBTO. In the subsurface of this area a former clay mine is

  17. Speech analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A speech signal is analyzed by applying the signal to formant filters which derive first, second and third signals respectively representing the frequency of the speech waveform in the first, second and third formants. A first pulse train having approximately a pulse rate representing the average frequency of the first formant is derived; second and third pulse trains having pulse rates respectively representing zero crossings of the second and third formants are derived. The first formant pulse train is derived by establishing N signal level bands, where N is an integer at least equal to two. Adjacent ones of the signal bands have common boundaries, each of which is a predetermined percentage of the peak level of a complete cycle of the speech waveform.

  18. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  19. Probability of detecting marine predator-prey and species interactions using novel hybrid acoustic transmitter-receiver tags.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurie L; Jonsen, Ian D; Mills Flemming, Joanna E; Lidgard, Damian C; Bowen, William D; Iverson, Sara J; Webber, Dale M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of inter-specific and conspecific interactions in the ocean is challenging because direct observation is usually impossible. The development of dual transmitter/receivers, Vemco Mobile Transceivers (VMT), and satellite-linked (e.g. GPS) tags provides a unique opportunity to better understand between and within species interactions in space and time. Quantifying the uncertainty associated with detecting a tagged animal, particularly under varying field conditions, is vital for making accurate biological inferences when using VMTs. We evaluated the detection efficiency of VMTs deployed on grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, off Sable Island (NS, Canada) in relation to environmental characteristics and seal behaviour using generalized linear models (GLM) to explore both post-processed detection data and summarized raw VMT data. When considering only post-processed detection data, only about half of expected detections were recorded at best even when two VMT-tagged seals were estimated to be within 50-200 m of one another. At a separation of 400 m, only about 15% of expected detections were recorded. In contrast, when incomplete transmissions from the summarized raw data were also considered, the ratio of complete transmission to complete and incomplete transmissions was about 70% for distances ranging from 50-1000 m, with a minimum of around 40% at 600 m and a maximum of about 85% at 50 m. Distance between seals, wind stress, and depth were the most important predictors of detection efficiency. Access to the raw VMT data allowed us to focus on the physical and environmental factors that limit a transceiver's ability to resolve a transmitter's identity.

  20. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  1. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  2. Spatial Structure of Deep Water Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-29

    1000m. The acoustic interaction of sound with seamounts is an open research question involving the development of an acoustic shadow , it’s...ranges of 520 km and 600 km were received at various positions behind and over the seamount . The predicted acoustic shadow was observed. The study...The extent to which scattering from seamounts , downslope conversion and internal waves affects the spatial structure (mode composition) of this

  3. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  4. Structure, dynamics, and seasonal variability of the Mars-solar wind interaction: MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer in-flight performance and science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Harada, Y.; Collinson, G.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Eparvier, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the in-flight performance of the Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) and observations of the Mars-solar wind interaction made during the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) prime mission and a portion of its extended mission, covering 0.85 Martian years. We describe the data products returned by SWIA and discuss the proper handling of measurements made with different mechanical attenuator states and telemetry modes, and the effects of penetrating and scattered backgrounds, limited phase space coverage, and multi-ion populations on SWIA observations. SWIA directly measures solar wind protons and alpha particles upstream from Mars. SWIA also provides proxy measurements of solar wind and neutral densities based on products of charge exchange between the solar wind and the hydrogen corona. Together, upstream and proxy observations provide a complete record of the solar wind experienced by Mars, enabling organization of the structure, dynamics, and ion escape from the magnetosphere. We observe an interaction that varies with season and solar wind conditions. Solar wind dynamic pressure, Mach number, and extreme ultraviolet flux all affect the bow shock location. We confirm the occurrence of order-of-magnitude seasonal variations of the hydrogen corona. We find that solar wind Alfvén waves, which provide an additional energy input to Mars, vary over the mission. At most times, only weak mass loading occurs upstream from the bow shock. However, during periods with near-radial interplanetary magnetic fields, structures consistent with Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures and their wakes form upstream, dramatically reconfiguring the Martian bow shock and magnetosphere.

  5. Specificity of mammalian Y-box binding protein p50 in interaction with ss and ds DNA analyzed with generic oligonucleotide microchip.

    PubMed

    Zasedateleva, O A; Krylov, A S; Prokopenko, D V; Skabkin, M A; Ovchinnikov, L P; Kolchinsky, A; Mirzabekov, A D

    2002-11-15

    p50 protein is a member of the Y-box binding transcription factor family and is a counterpart of YB-1 protein. The generic microchip was used to analyze the sequence specificity of p50 binding to single (ss) and double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxyribonucleotides. The generic microchip contained 4,096 single-stranded octadeoxyribonucleotides in which all possible core 6-mers (4(6)=4,096) were flanked at their 3' and 5'-ends with degenerated nucleotides. The oligonucleotides were chemically immobilized within polyacrylamide gel pads fixed on a glass slide. The binding of p50 to the generic microchip was shown to be the most specific to ss GGGG motif and then to ss CACC and CATC motifs. GC-rich ds oligonucleotides of the generic microchip, and particularly those containing GGTG/CACC, GATG/CATC, and GTGG/CCAC heterogeneous motifs, were most efficiently destabilized due to interaction with p50. Gel-shift electrophoresis has shown that the protein exhibits much higher binding specificity to 24-mer oligoA-TGGGGG-oligoA containing G-rich 6-mer, in comparison with 24-mer oligoA-AAATAT-oligoA carrying A,T-rich 6-mer in full correspondence with the data obtained with the microchip. Studies of DNA-binding proteins using gel-immobilized ss and ds DNA fragments provide a unique possibility to detect low-affinity complexes of these proteins with short sequence motifs and assess the role of these motifs in sequence-specific interactions with long recognition sites.

  6. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  7. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  8. On the acoustic radiation of a pitching airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the acoustic far field of a thin elastic airfoil, immersed in low-Mach non-uniform stream flow, and actuated by small-amplitude sinusoidal pitching motion. The near-field fluid-structure interaction problem is analyzed using potential thin-airfoil theory, combined with a discrete vortex model to describe the evolution of airfoil trailing edge wake. The leading order dipole-sound signature of the system is investigated using Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. Compared with a pitching rigid airfoil, the results demonstrate a two-fold effect of structure elasticity on airfoil acoustic field: at actuation frequencies close to the system least stable eigenfrequency, elasticity amplifies airfoil motion amplitude and associated sound levels; however, at frequencies distant from this eigenfrequency, structure elasticity acts to absorb system kinetic energy and reduce acoustic radiation. In the latter case, and with increasing pitching frequency ωp, a rigid-airfoil setup becomes significantly noisier than an elastic airfoil, owing to an ω _p^{5/2} increase of its direct motion noise component. Unlike rigid airfoil signature, it is shown that wake sound contribution to elastic airfoil radiation is significant for all ωp. Remarkably, this contribution contains, in addition to the fundamental pitching frequency, its odd multiple harmonics, which result from nonlinear interactions between the airfoil and the wake. The results suggest that structure elasticity may serve as a viable means for design of flapping flight noise control methodologies.

  9. Extreme driven ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The excitation of large amplitude, strongly nonlinear ion acoustic waves from trivial equilibrium by a chirped frequency drive is discussed. Under certain conditions, after passage through the linear resonance in this system, the nonlinearity and the variation of parameters work in tandem to preserve the phase-locking with the driving wave via excursion of the excited ion acoustic wave in its parameter space, yielding controlled growth of the wave amplitude. We study these autoresonant waves via a fully nonlinear warm fluid model and predict the formation of sharply peaked (extreme) ion acoustic excitations with local ion density significantly exceeding the unperturbed plasma density. The driven wave amplitude is bound by the kinetic wave-breaking, as the local maximum fluid velocity of the wave approaches the phase velocity of the drive. The Vlasov-Poisson simulations are used to confirm the results of the fluid model, and Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied for analyzing the evolution of autoresonant ion acoustic waves.

  10. Proanthocyanidins in wild sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries analyzed by reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with UV and MS detection.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Wei; Liu, Pengzhan; Yang, Baoru

    2014-08-06

    A rapid and sensitive method for profiling of proanthocyanidins (PAs) of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries was established based on aqueous, acidified acetone extraction. The extract was purified by Sephadex column chromatography and analyzed using reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in single ion recording (SIR) and full scan modes combined with UV detection were used to define the combinations and ratios of PA oligomer classes. PAs with degree of polymerization from 2 to 11 were detected by HILIC-ESI-MS. Quantification of dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric PAs was carried out with ESI-MS-SIR, and their molar proportions were 40, 40, and 20%, respectively. Only B-type PAs were found, and (epi)gallocatechins were the main monomeric units. More than 60 combinations of (epi)catechins and (epi)gallocatechins of proanthocyanidin dimers and trimers were found. A majority of the PAs were shown to be higher polymers based on the HILIC-UV analysis.

  11. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  12. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  14. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  15. An improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L. ); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration); Hoffmann, T.L. )

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  16. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  17. Spectrum analysis for introductory musical acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, John E.

    1998-02-01

    A "real time" fast Fourier transform spectrum analyzer facilitates several experiments for an introductory course in musical acoustics. With its rapidly updated display, the time-dependent vibrations of an aluminum bar are easily studied. Using longer time acquisitions and correspondingly higher resolution facilitates the study of string inharmonicities, resonant energy transfer, and sound radiation patterns in guitar acoustics.

  18. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  19. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive "tinnitus-causing" network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  20. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F.; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive “tinnitus-causing” network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  1. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Laser excitation of surface acoustic waves: a new direction in opto-acoustic spectroscopy of a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, Aleksander A.

    1985-11-01

    Studies in thermo-optic excitation of surface acoustic waves are reviewed. The excitation of periodic and pulse signals is discussed, using nonmoving and moving beams. Most attention is paid to application of this effect for purposes of opto-acoustic spectroscopy of a solid. The possibilities and promises of using opto-acoustic spectroscopy (OAS) employing surface acoustic waves (SAW) are analyzed

  2. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  3. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  4. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  5. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed.

  6. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropy of acoustooptic interaction in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoi, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Physical processes responsible for the anisotropy of acoustooptic interaction (AOI) in crystals are studied. A set of equations is derived that allows one the analyze the AOI anisotropy under arbitrary action of external acoustic and light wave fields on crystals with an arbitrary symmetry. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  9. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  10. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  11. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  12. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  13. Interactions between Neurophysiology and Psychoacoustics: Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (117th) Held in Syracuse, New York on 22 May 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    the intensity for which performance equals the chosen value. We use the PEST (parameter estimation by sequential testing; Taylor and Creelman , 1967...forward masking in the auditory nerve." J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 584-591. Taylor, M.M. and Creelman , C.D. (1967). "PEST: Efficient estimates on

  14. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  15. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  16. [The acoustic indicator of saliva under stress].

    PubMed

    Shalenkova, M A; Mikhaĭlova, Z D; Klemin, V A; Korkotashvili, L V; Abanin, A M; Klemina, A V; Dolgov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The situation of stress affects various organs and systems that results in development of functional disorders and/or somatic diseases. As a result, different noninvasive, including salivary, techniques of diagnostic of stress conditions are in the process of development. The dynamics of acoustic indicator of saliva is studied during the period of passing the exams. The relationship of indicator with levels of potassium, sodium, glucose and protein of saliva was analyzed. The sampling consisted of 102 students of 5 and 6 academic years of medical university. To detect the acoustic indicator of saliva acoustic analyzer AKBa-01- "BIOM" was applied. The level of potassium and sodium in saliva was detected using method of flame photometry. The level of glucose in saliva was detected by glucose oxydase technique using analyzer "EXAN-G". The protein in saliva was detected by biuretic technique. The correlation between acoustic indicator of saliva and analyzed indicators of saliva was established.

  17. Correlations between the in situ acoustic properties and geotechnical parameters of sediments in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baohua; Han, Tongcheng; Kan, Guangming; Li, Guanbao

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about the marine sediment acoustic properties is a key to understanding wave propagation in sediments and is very important for military oceanography and ocean engineering. We developed a hydraulic-drived self-contained in situ sediment acoustic measurement system, and measured for the first time the in situ acoustic properties of sediments on 78 stations in the Yellow Sea, China, by employing this system. The relationships between the in situ measured acoustic properties and the onboard or laboratory determined geotechnical parameters were analyzed. Porosity was found to be the dominant factor in reducing velocity in a quadratic fashion; velocity showed an increment with bulk density and a decrement with mean grain size and clay content both with a nonlinear dependence; acoustic attenuation showed a bell-shaped correlation with porosity and mean grain size but reduced with clay content of the sediments. The attenuation results indicate that intergrain friction rather than viscous interactions between pore fluid and solid grains is the dominant loss mechanism in our marine sediments. The relationships established would be used to predict the geotechnical parameters from in situ measured acoustic properties and vice versa, as well as being an indicator of the seafloor processes, potential gas bubbles hazard and gas hydrates resources or other suitable targets of acoustic surveys.

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1989-09-26

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K. 3 figs.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.