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Sample records for analyzing musculoskeletal neck

  1. Analyzing musculoskeletal neck pain, measured as present pain and periods of pain, with three different regression models: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Andersson, Eva M; Hagberg, Mats

    2009-06-19

    In the literature there are discussions on the choice of outcome and the need for more longitudinal studies of musculoskeletal disorders. The general aim of this longitudinal study was to analyze musculoskeletal neck pain, in a group of young adults. Specific aims were to determine whether psychosocial factors, computer use, high work/study demands, and lifestyle are long-term or short-term factors for musculoskeletal neck pain, and whether these factors are important for developing or ongoing musculoskeletal neck pain. Three regression models were used to analyze the different outcomes. Pain at present was analyzed with a marginal logistic model, for number of years with pain a Poisson regression model was used and for developing and ongoing pain a logistic model was used. Presented results are odds ratios and proportion ratios (logistic models) and rate ratios (Poisson model). The material consisted of web-based questionnaires answered by 1204 Swedish university students from a prospective cohort recruited in 2002. Perceived stress was a risk factor for pain at present (PR = 1.6), for developing pain (PR = 1.7) and for number of years with pain (RR = 1.3). High work/study demands was associated with pain at present (PR = 1.6); and with number of years with pain when the demands negatively affect home life (RR = 1.3). Computer use pattern (number of times/week with a computer session > or = 4 h, without break) was a risk factor for developing pain (PR = 1.7), but also associated with pain at present (PR = 1.4) and number of years with pain (RR = 1.2). Among life style factors smoking (PR = 1.8) was found to be associated to pain at present. The difference between men and women in prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was confirmed in this study. It was smallest for the outcome ongoing pain (PR = 1.4) compared to pain at present (PR = 2.4) and developing pain (PR = 2.5). By using different regression models different aspects of neck pain pattern could be addressed and

  2. Musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulder among dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Radanović, B; Vučinić, P; Janković, T; Mahmutović, E; Penjašković, D

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulder represent a condition whose basic characteristic is pain. These conditions are very often present in dental health professionals. The aim of the paper was to determine presence of discomforts in areas of head, neck, shoulders, upper back and upper limbs at health professionals in area of dentistry, as well as discomfort localisation and methods of treatment. The research included 45 health professionals (dentists, dental assistants and dental technicians) employed at Dental Clinic of Vojvodina. The information was collected via questionnaire for analysis musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the dentists (75.9%) and the dental assistants (90.9%) as well as nearly half of the dental technicians (40%) experience discomforts in area of the neck, which are occasional, present in all three working positions and this discomforts are a little more frequent at women. The present musculoskeletal disorders are followed by headache, whose presence is statistically more significant compared to the other symptoms. The headache is usually located in the occipital part, it occurs individually or joined with other symptoms. Due to said discomforts the examinees in 59.4% of the cases don't contact the doctor. Medical therapy prevails in opposition to physical therapy. The discomforts deriving from the cervical part of the spine are present at great percentage of our examinees. Considering the fact that the said discomforts affect performing both professional and everyday activities, its prevention is necessary in order to avoid the consequences they carry.

  3. Analyzing musculoskeletal system discomforts and risk factors in computer-using office workers

    PubMed Central

    Ardahan, Melek; Simsek, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed the prevalence of work-related computer-user musculoskeletal discomforts, personal and computer-related risk factors. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 395 office workers was made between July-September 2015. Musculoskeletal symptoms and risk factors were evaluated for participants’ demographics and job attributes on the 21-item questionnaire and the Turkish-Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. Results: Participants reported musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck (67.85%), back (66.33%), lower back (59.49%), right shoulder (45.32%) and left shoulder (43.54%) during the past week and work interference was 33.6%, 28.5%, 30.6%, 31.3% and 31.9%, respectively. Musculoskeletal discomfort risks were being male, increasing daily computer usage, feeling computer-usage discomfort, hours working at desk and having knowledge about ergonomic exercises. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal symptoms are common in Turkish office workers and indicated the need for more attention to musculoskeletal disorders and designing effective preventive interventions. PMID:28083038

  4. Musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents: Risk factors and complications.

    PubMed

    Fares, Jawad; Fares, Mohamad Y; Fares, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Neck pain is a major public health concern that has been extensively studied in adults but not in children and adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to explore musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents, as well as to discuss its possible risk factors and complications. Participants were patients under 18 years of age, who had presented to the clinic (Beirut, Lebanon) in 2015, with nonspecific neck pain. They were examined and asked to evaluate and localize the pain. Neck positioning during various activities along with other complications were explored. Patients reporting pain associated with congenital or systemic diseases and fractures were excluded. Two-hundred-and-seven children and adolescents presented with nonspecific neck pain. Musculoskeletal neck pain with spasm was diagnosed in 180 patients (N = 180). Participants did not show any findings on physical examination and radiological studies, and had no comorbidities. More females (57%) than males (43%) and more adolescents (60%) than children (40%) were affected. All the 180 participants (100%) reported flawed flexion of their back and neck while studying and/or using smartphones and tablets. Eye symptoms were reported in 21% of the cases, and parents of most participants (82%) reported a change in the psychological and social behavior of their children. Musculoskeletal neck pain is an important disease in children and adolescents with numerous risk factors contributing to its development. Increased stresses regarding the cervical spine may lead to cervical degeneration along with other developmental, medical, psychological, and social complications.

  5. Musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents: Risk factors and complications

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Jawad; Fares, Mohamad Y.; Fares, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neck pain is a major public health concern that has been extensively studied in adults but not in children and adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to explore musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents, as well as to discuss its possible risk factors and complications. Methods: Participants were patients under 18 years of age, who had presented to the clinic (Beirut, Lebanon) in 2015, with nonspecific neck pain. They were examined and asked to evaluate and localize the pain. Neck positioning during various activities along with other complications were explored. Patients reporting pain associated with congenital or systemic diseases and fractures were excluded. Results: Two-hundred-and-seven children and adolescents presented with nonspecific neck pain. Musculoskeletal neck pain with spasm was diagnosed in 180 patients (N = 180). Participants did not show any findings on physical examination and radiological studies, and had no comorbidities. More females (57%) than males (43%) and more adolescents (60%) than children (40%) were affected. All the 180 participants (100%) reported flawed flexion of their back and neck while studying and/or using smartphones and tablets. Eye symptoms were reported in 21% of the cases, and parents of most participants (82%) reported a change in the psychological and social behavior of their children. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal neck pain is an important disease in children and adolescents with numerous risk factors contributing to its development. Increased stresses regarding the cervical spine may lead to cervical degeneration along with other developmental, medical, psychological, and social complications. PMID:28584675

  6. The role of myofascial trigger points in musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Simons, David; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan

    2007-10-01

    Neck and head pain syndromes are common problems seen in clinical practice. Pain features of commonly designated idiopathic neck pain and some primary headaches (ie, tension-type headache or migraine) fit the descriptions of referred pain originating in muscle trigger points (TrPs). This article discusses the scientific evidence supporting the role of muscle TrPs in chronic musculo-skeletal disorders of the neck and head. The relevance of referred pain elicited by muscle TrPs in patients with neck pain has been investigated in few studies. Some authors found that both muscle TrPs in neck-shoulder muscles and cervical joint dysfunctions contribute at the same time to neck pain perception. Furthermore, it seems that referred pain originated in muscle TrPs could also contribute to neck symptoms perceived by subjects after a rear-end crash. In addition, several recent studies reported that both TTH and migraine are associated with referred pain from TrPs in the suboccipital, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, temporalis, or superior oblique muscles. Referred pain elicited by active TrPs mimics the pain areas observed during head pain attacks in these primary headaches. Based on available data, it seems that the pain profile of neck and head syndromes may be provoked referred pain from TrPs in the posterior cervical, head, and shoulder muscles. Additional studies are needed to delineate more information on the relation between muscle TrPs and musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

  7. The nature of work-related neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Buckle, Peter W; Devereux, J Jason

    2002-05-01

    The nature of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper limbs is reviewed using both scientific data and the consensus view of experts, union bodies and government agencies across the European Union. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders describe a wide range of inflammatory and degenerative diseases and disorders. These conditions result in pain and functional impairment and may affect, besides others, the neck, shoulders, elbows, forearms, wrists and hands. They are work-related when the work activities and work conditions significantly contribute to their development or exacerbation but are not necessarily the sole determinant of causation. The classification and the need for standardised diagnostic methods for assessment of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders are reviewed. These disorders are a significant problem within the European Union with respect to ill health, productivity and associated costs. The pathomechanisms of musculoskeletal disorders affecting tendons, ligaments, nerves, muscle, circulation and pain perception are reviewed and conceptual models for the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and upper limbs are presented. The epidemiological evidence on the work-relatedness of these disorders is discussed. A relationship between the performance of work and the occurrence of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders is evident. Intervention strategies in the workplace for the reduction of both exposure and effect should focus upon factors within the work organisation as well as actively involving the individual worker. The current knowledge is sufficient to enable informed decisions to be made on future research needs and prevention strategies at the societal, organisational and individual level.

  8. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Madadizadeh, Farzan; Vali, Leila; Rafiei, Sima; Akbarnejad, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulder are the most common and most influential factors causing disorder in the performance and absenteeism of work in administrative personnel. Aim To identify risk factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders of neck and shoulder areas in headquarters staff of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Methods The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 282 headquarters personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (Kerman, Iran). The desired headquarters staff were selected from seven Deputy Vice-Chancellors of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, including Deputy of Health; Deputy of Treatment; Deputy of Education; Deputy of Students and Cultural Affairs; Deputy of Food and Drugs; Deputy of Management Development and Resource Planning; Deputy of Research and Technology, and data were gathered by using a standard Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire NMQ (Nordic) and were analyzed by using SPSS version 16. The impact of various factors on the most common complications (neck and shoulder pains) was analyzed separately through logistic regression analysis and detailed Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated for each individual. Results The occurrence of neck and shoulder pains in headquarters staff were 42.14% and 40.71%, respectively. In the prevalence of neck pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.01, OR=0.24), work experience (p=0.03, OR=1.07 ), education (bachelor’s degree and lower than master’s degree and higher p=0.003, OR=2.69), right / left-handedness (left than right p=0.03, OR=0.33), weight (p=0.04, OR=1.04), place of work (p<0.05); as well as in the prevalence of shoulder pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.04, OR=0.48), work experience (p=0.01, OR=1.20), education (bachelor and lower than master and higher p=0.04, OR=1.97), right / left handedness (left than right p=0.01, OR=0.42), age (p=0.02, OR=1.05), and gender (male than

  9. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Farzan; Vali, Leila; Rafiei, Sima; Akbarnejad, Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulder are the most common and most influential factors causing disorder in the performance and absenteeism of work in administrative personnel. To identify risk factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders of neck and shoulder areas in headquarters staff of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 282 headquarters personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (Kerman, Iran). The desired headquarters staff were selected from seven Deputy Vice-Chancellors of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, including Deputy of Health; Deputy of Treatment; Deputy of Education; Deputy of Students and Cultural Affairs; Deputy of Food and Drugs; Deputy of Management Development and Resource Planning; Deputy of Research and Technology, and data were gathered by using a standard Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire NMQ (Nordic) and were analyzed by using SPSS version 16. The impact of various factors on the most common complications (neck and shoulder pains) was analyzed separately through logistic regression analysis and detailed Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated for each individual. The occurrence of neck and shoulder pains in headquarters staff were 42.14% and 40.71%, respectively. In the prevalence of neck pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.01, OR=0.24), work experience (p=0.03, OR=1.07 ), education (bachelor's degree and lower than master's degree and higher p=0.003, OR=2.69), right / left-handedness (left than right p=0.03, OR=0.33), weight (p=0.04, OR=1.04), place of work (p<0.05); as well as in the prevalence of shoulder pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.04, OR=0.48), work experience (p=0.01, OR=1.20), education (bachelor and lower than master and higher p=0.04, OR=1.97), right / left handedness (left than right p=0.01, OR=0.42), age (p=0.02, OR=1.05), and gender (male than female p=0.03, OR=0.65) affected

  10. Evaluation of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation as a Treatment of Neck Pain due to Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maayah, Mikhled; Al-Jarrah, Mohammed

    2010-05-19

    This study was designed to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders within the context of a physiotherapy treatment. Thirty subjects with neck pain were randomly allocated to two groups, treated with either TENS (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Each subject received one session for one hour. All subjects were evaluated before, during treatment, after switch off and again a week after by using Myometer machine. All subjects completed the follow-up assessment. Subjects referred for out-subjects' physiotherapy department, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria, took part in the study. The assessments were compared and used to measure outcome treatment. Improvement in their condition was measured in terms of a reduction in the individual's level of pain during the week after the end of the first session. At the end of the first session, the study showed that 11 subjects (73%) in the treatment and 7 subjects (43%) in the control groups had gained marked improvement. These results are statistically highly significant, (P = 0.01) at the end of the follow-up assessment. A conclusion could be drawn that a single intense TENS treatment is an effective treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders. On the other hand, TENS showed an effective pain relief with subjects who have a mild neck pain rather than those with severe symptoms. Musculoskeletal disorders; Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; Neck pain.

  11. Association between back, neck, and upper extremity musculoskeletal pain and the individual body armor.

    PubMed

    Konitzer, Lisa N; Fargo, Matthew V; Brininger, Teresa L; Lim Reed, Mary

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between back, neck, and upper extremity (UE) musculoskeletal pain and the wear of individual body armor, physical training (PT), and work tasks. We conducted a cross-sectional randomized-survey design in which 1,187 surveys were distributed to U.S. Soldiers in Iraq; 863 were completed. The survey was a three-page questionnaire covering demographics, body armor wear, PT, and reports of neck, back, and UE musculoskeletal pain before and during deployment. The results of the survey revealed a substantial increase in the incidence of back, neck, and UE pain during deployment, and approximately twice as many Soldiers attributed their musculoskeletal pain to wearing body armor than to job tasks and PT. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between Soldiers who wore the body armor for four hours or more a day and self-reported musculoskeletal complaints. These results demonstrate a need to consider the potential adverse effects of individual body armor on combat Soldiers.

  12. Associations between neck musculoskeletal complaints and work related factors among public service computer workers in Kaunas.

    PubMed

    Kaliniene, Gintaré; Ustinaviciene, Ruta; Skemiene, Lina; Januskevicius, Vidmantas

    2013-10-01

    Information technologies have been developing very rapidly, also in the case of occupational activities. Epidemiological studies have shown that employees, who work with computers, are more likely to complain of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between neck MSD and individual and work related factors. The investigation which consisted of two parts - a questionnaire study (using Nordic Musculoskeletal questionnaire and Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) and a direct observation (to evaluate ergonomic work environment using RULA method) was carried out in three randomly selected public sector companies of Kaunas. The study population consisted of 513 public service office workers. The survey showed that neck MSDs were very common in the investigated population. The prevalence rate amounted to 65.7%. According to our survey neck MSDs were significantly associated with older age, bigger work experience, high quantitative and cognitive job demands, working for longer than 2 h without taking a break as well as with higher ergonomic risk score. The fully adjusted model working for longer than 2 h without taking a break had the strongest associations with neck complaints. It was confirmed, that neck MSDs were significantly associated with individual factors as well as conditions of work, therefore, preventive actions against neck complaints should be oriented at psychosocial and ergonomic work environment as well as at individual factors.

  13. Protocol for shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S; Zebis, Mette K; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2011-01-14

    Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university including jobs characterized by intensive computer work. The first 100 positive replies entered the study. Among these inclusion criteria were pain intensity in the neck/shoulder of at least 3 on a 0-9 scale. Exclusion criteria were cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease. Before and after the intervention period the participants replied to a questionnaire about musculoskeletal disorders and work disability, and underwent a standardized clinical examination of the neck and shoulder girdle. Further, on a weekly basis the participants log pain intensity of the neck and shoulder during the previous week.The primary outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 10 based on the weekly pain registration and results from the clinical examination. Secondary outcomes are

  14. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Hong; Bian, Rong; Zhang, Songning

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

  15. Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waersted, Morten; Hanvold, Therese N; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2010-04-29

    This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome). A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed. A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work. There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation.

  16. Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome). Methods A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed. Results A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work. Conclusions There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation. PMID:20429925

  17. Typical musculoskeletal patterns in upper string players with neck and arm problems.

    PubMed

    Lahme, Albrecht; Eibl, Iris; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2014-12-01

    Upper string players face a very high risk of playing-related disorders. Based on a questionnaire and a physical examination, this study investigated if a typical musculoskeletal pattern emerges. It was found that the typical upper string musician shows problems with the neck, shoulders (with equal probability for left and right side, X2 = 0.53, p>0.05), right elbow (X2 = 4.80, p<0.05) and hand (X2 = 3.90, p<0.05), and fingers of the left hand (X2 = 9.53, p<0.01). This finding can be used to improve planning of preventive measures and therapeutic treatments.

  18. Inter-individual variation in vertebral kinematics affects predictions of neck musculoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Derek D; Zheng, Liying; Vasavada, Anita N

    2014-10-17

    Experimental studies have found significant variation in cervical intervertebral kinematics (IVK) among healthy subjects, but the effect of this variation on biomechanical properties, such as neck strength, has not been explored. The goal of this study was to quantify variation in model predictions of extension strength, flexion strength and gravitational demand (the ratio of gravitational load from the weight of the head to neck muscle extension strength), due to inter-subject variation in IVK. IVK were measured from sagittal radiographs of 24 subjects (14F, 10M) in five postures: maximal extension, mid-extension, neutral, mid-flexion, and maximal flexion. IVK were defined by the position (anterior-posterior and superior-inferior) of each cervical vertebra with respect to T1 and its angle with respect to horizontal, and fit with a cubic polynomial over the range of motion. The IVK of each subject were scaled and incorporated into musculoskeletal models to create models that were identical in muscle force- and moment-generating properties but had subject-specific kinematics. The effect of inter-subject variation in IVK was quantified using the coefficient of variation (COV), the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. COV of extension strength ranged from 8% to 15% over the range of motion, but COV of flexion strength was 20-80%. Moreover, the COV of gravitational demand was 80-90%, because the gravitational demand is affected by head position as well as neck strength. These results indicate that including inter-individual variation in models is important for evaluating neck musculoskeletal biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. INTER-INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN VERTEBRAL KINEMATICS AFFECTS PREDICTIONS OF NECK MUSCULOSKELETAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Nevins, Derek D.; Zheng, Liying; Vasavada, Anita N.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies have found significant variation in cervical intervertebral kinematics (IVK) among healthy subjects, but the effect of this variation on biomechanical properties, such as neck strength, has not been explored. The goal of this study was to quantify variation in model predictions of extension strength, flexion strength and gravitational demand (the ratio of gravitational load from the weight of the head to neck muscle extension strength), due to inter-subject variation in IVK. IVK were measured from sagittal radiographs of twenty-four subjects (14F, 10M) in five postures: maximal extension, mid-extension, neutral, mid-flexion, and maximal flexion. IVK were defined by the position (anterior-posterior and superior-inferior) of each cervical vertebra with respect to T1 and its angle with respect to horizontal, and fit with a cubic polynomial over the range of motion. The IVK of each subject were scaled and incorporated into musculoskeletal models to create models that were identical in muscle force- and moment-generating properties but had subject-specific kinematics. The effect of inter-subject variation in IVK was quantified using the coefficient of variation (COV), the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. COV of extension strength ranged from 8 – 15% over the range of motion, but COV of flexion strength were 20 – 80%. Moreover, the COV of gravitational demand was 80 – 90%, because the gravitational demand is affected by head position as well as neck strength. These results indicate that including inter-individual variation in models is important for evaluating neck musculoskeletal biomechanical properties. PMID:25234351

  20. Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Hallman, David M; Hellström, Fredrik; Björklund, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Barbe, Mary F; Ali, Sayed

    2017-09-12

    This study systematically summarizes quantitative imaging biomarker research in non-traumatic neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There were two research questions: 1) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the presence of neck and shoulder MSDs?, 2) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the severity of neck and shoulder MSDs? PubMed and SCOPUS were used for the literature search. One hundred and twenty-five studies met primary inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from 49 sufficient quality studies. Most of the 125 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. Only half controlled for potential confounders via exclusion or in the analysis. Approximately one-third reported response rates. In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. The literature synthesis suggested that neck muscle size may be decreased in neck pain, and trapezius myalgia and neck/shoulder pain may be associated with reduced vascularity in the trapezius and reduced trapezius oxygen saturation at rest and in response to upper extremity tasks. Reduced vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon may also be a feature in rotator cuff tears. Five of eight studies showed an association between a quantitative imaging marker and MSD severity. Although research on quantitative imaging biomarkers is still in a nascent stage, some MSD biomarkers were identified. There are limitations in the articles examined, including possible selection bias and inattention to potentially confounding factors. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

  1. Psychosocial indicators among aircraft maintenance workers with and without neck and shoulder musculoskeletal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A; Nogueira, H; Diniz, A; Barbieri, D

    2012-01-01

    In the aircraft maintenance industry, most of workers performs manual handling tasks of different materials, varying from small objects up to large pieces of the aircraft. It can increase the occurrence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), which are strongly associated with high physical demands required by the task. Moreover, psychosocial demands are considered as risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders in both the upper limbs and lumbar spine. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess psychosocial indicators among aircraft maintenance workers according to the presence of neck and shoulder musculoskeletal symptoms. Eighty workers of an aircraft maintenance company were evaluated (32.69 ± 8.25 years, 79.8 ± 13.4 kg, 175 ± 7 cm). According to physical examination, 50 workers were classified as asymptomatic (AS - 4.1 ± 3.17 positive signs) whilst 30 workers were classified as symptomatic (SS - 26.72 ± 11.44 positive signs). AS and SS have shown similar profile of demand (p = 0.62), control (p = 0.66) and social support (p = 0.74) according to the Job Content Questionnaire. However, the groups are different when considering work engagement variables. In general, SS have higher scores than AS (p < 0.05).

  2. Interventions for the prevention and management of neck/upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Boocock, M G; McNair, P J; Larmer, P J; Armstrong, B; Collier, J; Simmonds, M; Garrett, N

    2007-01-01

    Considered from medical, social or economic perspectives, the cost of musculoskeletal injuries experienced in the workplace is substantial, and there is a need to identify the most efficacious interventions for their effective prevention, management and rehabilitation. Previous reviews have highlighted the limited number of studies that focus on upper extremity intervention programmes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the findings of primary, secondary and/or tertiary intervention studies for neck/upper extremity conditions undertaken between 1999 and 2004 and to compare these results with those of previous reviews. Relevant studies were retrieved through the use of a systematic approach to literature searching and evaluated using a standardised tool. Evidence was then classified according to a “pattern of evidence” approach. Studies were categorised into subgroups depending on the type of intervention: mechanical exposure interventions; production systems/organisational culture interventions and modifier interventions. 31 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. The findings provided evidence to support the use of some mechanical and modifier interventions as approaches for preventing and managing neck/upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions and fibromyalgia. Evidence to support the benefits of production systems/organisational culture interventions was found to be lacking. This review identified no single‐dimensional or multi‐dimensional strategy for intervention that was considered effective across occupational settings. There is limited information to support the establishment of evidence‐based guidelines applicable to a number of industrial sectors. PMID:16973739

  3. Interventions for the prevention and management of neck/upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boocock, M G; McNair, P J; Larmer, P J; Armstrong, B; Collier, J; Simmonds, M; Garrett, N

    2007-05-01

    Considered from medical, social or economic perspectives, the cost of musculoskeletal injuries experienced in the workplace is substantial, and there is a need to identify the most efficacious interventions for their effective prevention, management and rehabilitation. Previous reviews have highlighted the limited number of studies that focus on upper extremity intervention programmes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the findings of primary, secondary and/or tertiary intervention studies for neck/upper extremity conditions undertaken between 1999 and 2004 and to compare these results with those of previous reviews. Relevant studies were retrieved through the use of a systematic approach to literature searching and evaluated using a standardised tool. Evidence was then classified according to a "pattern of evidence" approach. Studies were categorised into subgroups depending on the type of intervention: mechanical exposure interventions; production systems/organisational culture interventions and modifier interventions. 31 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. The findings provided evidence to support the use of some mechanical and modifier interventions as approaches for preventing and managing neck/upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions and fibromyalgia. Evidence to support the benefits of production systems/organisational culture interventions was found to be lacking. This review identified no single-dimensional or multi-dimensional strategy for intervention that was considered effective across occupational settings. There is limited information to support the establishment of evidence-based guidelines applicable to a number of industrial sectors.

  4. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulders in female sewing machine operators: prevalence, incidence, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kaergaard, A; Andersen, J H

    2000-08-01

    To assess the occurrence and persistence of two restrictively defined neck-shoulder disorders among sewing machine operators. To assess factors associated with the development of neck-shoulder disorder and prognostic factors for remaining a case, when disorders were already present. In an initial group of 243 sewing machine operators, 178 were followed up for 2 years. At baseline and at 1 and 2 years follow up the participants underwent a clinical examination of the neck and arms and filled in a questionnaire about current musculoskeletal complaints. Clinical criteria for two main neck-shoulder disorders were defined: rotator cuff tendinitis and myofascial pain syndrome. A baseline control group consisted of 357 women with varied non-repetitive work. At baseline the overall prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome and rotator cuff tendinitis was 15.2% and 5.8% among sewing machine operators compared with 9.0% and 2.2%, respectively, among controls. The presence of the disorders was strongly associated with a self perception of poor general health. Although myofascial pain syndrome showed a U shaped association with years as a sewing machine operator, rotator cuff tendinitis was absent among the newest recruits and present among 15% of the women with more than 20 years as a sewing machine operator. Besides years as a sewing machine operator, the risk of having a neck-shoulder disorder at baseline was significantly associated with high stress (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.54; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.28 to 5.05) when adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, living alone with children, job strain, and social support from colleagues and supervisors. Only one of 13 participants with rotator cuff tendinitis at baseline recovered during follow up. Myofascial pain syndrome showed a much more fluctuating tendency. Low social support (RR 3.72; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.30) and smoking (RR 3.93; 95% CI 1.33 to 11.58) were associated with the development of neck

  5. A longitudinal study of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and alternative measures of vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Bovenzi, Massimo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the exposure-response relationships between alternative frequency weightings of hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) and neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in a cohort of HTV workers. In a three-year longitudinal study, the occurrence of neck and upper limb MSDs was investigated in 249 HTV workers and 138 control men. In the HTV workers, MSDs were related to measures of daily vibration exposure expressed in terms of 8-h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration magnitude [A(8)]. To calculate A(8), the acceleration magnitudes of vibration were weighted by means of four alternative frequency weightings of HTV. The associations between MSDs, individual characteristics, physical work load other than vibration, and psychological strain were also investigated. The occurrence of upper limb MSDs was greater in the HTV workers than in the controls. After adjustment for potential confounders, the occurrence of elbow/forearm and wrist/hand MSDs increased with the increase in vibration exposure. A measure of model selection did not reveal any substantial difference in the performance of the alternative frequency weightings of HTV for the prediction of neck and upper limb MSDs. In the study population, age, hard physical work load, and poor psychological well-being were associated with both neck and upper limb MSDs. In this study, there was evidence for significant exposure-response relationships between HTV exposure and MSDs in the distal sites of the upper limbs. There were no differences in the prediction of neck and upper limb MSDs between measures of daily vibration exposure calculated with alternative frequency weightings of acceleration magnitude.

  6. Neck-upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among workers in the telecommunications company at Mansoura City.

    PubMed

    El-Bestar, Sohair Fouad; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf Abdel-Moniem; Khashaba, Eman Omar

    2011-01-01

    This study was to determine the prevalence and work-related risk factors of neck-upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among video display terminal (VDT) users. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted; there were 60 VDT users and 35 controls. The participants filled in a structured questionnaire, had electrophysiological tests and an X-ray of the neck. The prevalence of MSDs was higher (28.3%) among VDTs users compared to controls (14.3%) with no statistically significant difference. The prevalence of cervical disorders with or without radiculopathy (18.3%) was the most common disorder followed by carpal tunnel syndrome (6.6%). The mean (SD) age of MSD cases (51 ± 7.2 years) was statistically significantly higher than of the controls (42.8 ± 9). Physical exposure to prolonged static posture (OR: 6.9; 95% CI: 0.83-57.9), awkward posture (OR: 5.5; 95% CI: 0.6-46.4) and repetitive movements (OR: 5.5; 95% CI: 0.65-46.4) increased risk of MSDs with a statistically significant difference for static posture only (p < .05). VDT users experienced more job dissatisfaction, work-overload and limited social support from supervisors and colleagues. VDT use did not increase the risk of neck-upper extremity MSDs. The risk increased with older age and static posture.

  7. Miniscalpel-Needle Treatment Is Effective for Work-Related Neck and Shoulder Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a group of painful disorders of muscles, tendons, and nerves, such as neck and shoulder MSD. This study was designed to use miniscalpel-needle (MSN) technique as an intervention for work-related MSDs. Methods. Thirty-one patients with work-related MSDs and 28 healthy subjects were enrolled as controls in this study. The MSD symptoms of each patient were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). Blood samples were collected from control subjects and MSD patients before and after treatment. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were measured using ELISA. Results. Prior to MSN treatment, serum levels of CRP and TNF were significantly higher in the MSD patients than the healthy controls. Serum CRP levels correlated with VAS and NDI scores, and serum TNF levels correlated with NDI scores. Compared to pretreatment, VAS and NDI scores were significantly lower in MSD patients after MSN treatment, while serum CRP and TNF levels were significantly lower compared with the healthy control levels. Conclusions. Our results indicate that MSN may be an effective intervention for work-related MSDs and be associated with lower serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers.

  8. Miniscalpel-Needle Treatment Is Effective for Work-Related Neck and Shoulder Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a group of painful disorders of muscles, tendons, and nerves, such as neck and shoulder MSD. This study was designed to use miniscalpel-needle (MSN) technique as an intervention for work-related MSDs. Methods. Thirty-one patients with work-related MSDs and 28 healthy subjects were enrolled as controls in this study. The MSD symptoms of each patient were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). Blood samples were collected from control subjects and MSD patients before and after treatment. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were measured using ELISA. Results. Prior to MSN treatment, serum levels of CRP and TNF were significantly higher in the MSD patients than the healthy controls. Serum CRP levels correlated with VAS and NDI scores, and serum TNF levels correlated with NDI scores. Compared to pretreatment, VAS and NDI scores were significantly lower in MSD patients after MSN treatment, while serum CRP and TNF levels were significantly lower compared with the healthy control levels. Conclusions. Our results indicate that MSN may be an effective intervention for work-related MSDs and be associated with lower serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:27382406

  9. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulders in female sewing machine operators: prevalence, incidence, and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaergaard, A.; Andersen, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the occurrence and persistence of two restrictively defined neck-shoulder disorders among sewing machine operators. To assess factors associated with the development of neck-shoulder disorder and prognostic factors for remaining a case, when disorders were already present.
METHODS—In an initial group of 243 sewing machine operators, 178 were followed up for 2 years. At baseline and at 1 and 2 years follow up the participants underwent a clinical examination of the neck and arms and filled in a questionnaire about current musculoskeletal complaints. Clinical criteria for two main neck-shoulder disorders were defined: rotator cuff tendinitis and myofascial pain syndrome. A baseline control group consisted of 357 women with varied non-repetitive work.
RESULTS—At baseline the overall prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome and rotator cuff tendinitis was 15.2% and 5.8% among sewing machine operators compared with 9.0% and 2.2%, respectively, among controls. The presence of the disorders was strongly associated with a self perception of poor general health. Although myofascial pain syndrome showed a U shaped association with years as a sewing machine operator, rotator cuff tendinitis was absent among the newest recruits and present among 15% of the women with more than 20 years as a sewing machine operator. Besides years as a sewing machine operator, the risk of having a neck-shoulder disorder at baseline was significantly associated with high stress (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.54; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.28 to 5.05) when adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, living alone with children, job strain, and social support from colleagues and supervisors. Only one of 13 participants with rotator cuff tendinitis at baseline recovered during follow up. Myofascial pain syndrome showed a much more fluctuating tendency. Low social support (RR 3.72; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.30) and smoking (RR 3.93; 95% CI 1.33 to 11.58) were

  10. Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Hallman, David M; Hellström, Fredrik; Björklund, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G; Djupsjobacka, Mats; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Piligian, George; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-03-01

    This study systematically summarizes biochemical biomarker research in non-traumatic musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Two research questions guided the review: (i) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper-extremity MSD? and (ii) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper-extremity MSD? A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS, and 87 studies met primary inclusion criteria. Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 articles of sufficient quality. Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies. Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis. Most sufficient-quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group >50 years). In sufficient-quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD and biomarker(s) studied. Evidence suggested that: (i) the collagen-repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibro proliferative disorders, (ii) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and (iii) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSD. Only 5 studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity. While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration), and insufficient attention to comorbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

  11. A Serious Exergame for Patients Suffering from Chronic Musculoskeletal Back and Neck Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Huis in ’t Veld, Rianne M.H.A.; Schönauer, Christian; Kaufmann, Hannes; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Over recent years, the popularity of videogames has gone beyond youth and gamers and is slowly entering the field of professional healthcare. Exergames are an attractive alternative to physical therapy. The primary aim of this pilot study was to explore the user experience (usability, satisfaction, level of motivation, and game experience) of the patient with the “PlayMancer” exergame. The secondary aim was to explore the progression of the performed motor skills (walking velocity, overhead reach ability, and cervical range of motion) and the clinical changes (to physical condition, disability, and pain intensity) in a group of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain using an exergame for 4 weeks. Materials and Methods In the European PlayMancer project, an exergame for physical rehabilitation of chronic pain patients was developed. This exergame is controlled by relevant motions of the patient's body captured by a motion suit and several infrared cameras. In three different integrated minigames, the patient can train the following motor skills: Walking velocity, overhead reaching, and neck mobility. Results Ten patients participated in this study and completed the 4 weeks of gaming. Patients rated the usability of the exergames as good (score of 78.5 [standard deviation 9.7; range, 60.0–97.5]) on the System Usability Scale, and the game motivated all patients to perform their exercises. Patients enjoyed playing and were pleased with both the game environment and the game play. Overall, the patients made a progression in the examined motor skills during the minigames over the 4 weeks of gaming. Conclusions The “PlayMancer” exergame is a potential tool for achieving physical rehabilitation because it motivates patients to perform their exercises and as a result increases their motor skills and physical condition. PMID:24761327

  12. A Serious Exergame for Patients Suffering from Chronic Musculoskeletal Back and Neck Pain: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jansen-Kosterink, Stephanie M; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Schönauer, Christian; Kaufmann, Hannes; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R

    2013-10-01

    Over recent years, the popularity of videogames has gone beyond youth and gamers and is slowly entering the field of professional healthcare. Exergames are an attractive alternative to physical therapy. The primary aim of this pilot study was to explore the user experience (usability, satisfaction, level of motivation, and game experience) of the patient with the "PlayMancer" exergame. The secondary aim was to explore the progression of the performed motor skills (walking velocity, overhead reach ability, and cervical range of motion) and the clinical changes (to physical condition, disability, and pain intensity) in a group of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain using an exergame for 4 weeks. In the European PlayMancer project, an exergame for physical rehabilitation of chronic pain patients was developed. This exergame is controlled by relevant motions of the patient's body captured by a motion suit and several infrared cameras. In three different integrated minigames, the patient can train the following motor skills: Walking velocity, overhead reaching, and neck mobility. Ten patients participated in this study and completed the 4 weeks of gaming. Patients rated the usability of the exergames as good (score of 78.5 [standard deviation 9.7; range, 60.0-97.5]) on the System Usability Scale, and the game motivated all patients to perform their exercises. Patients enjoyed playing and were pleased with both the game environment and the game play. Overall, the patients made a progression in the examined motor skills during the minigames over the 4 weeks of gaming. The "PlayMancer" exergame is a potential tool for achieving physical rehabilitation because it motivates patients to perform their exercises and as a result increases their motor skills and physical condition.

  13. Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Distal Upper Extremities and the Neck in German Veterinarians: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Agnessa; Schedlbauer, Grita; Peters, Claudia; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background Veterinary work is a physically demanding profession and entails the risk of injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system, particularly in the upper body. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), the consequences and work-related accidents in German veterinarians were investigated. Work-related and individual factors associated with MSD of upper extremities and the neck were analyzed. Methods In 2011, a self-reporting Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was mailed to registered veterinarians in seven federal medical associations in Germany. A total of 3174 (38.4%) veterinarians responded. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between risk factors and MSD-related impairment of daily activities. Results MSD in the neck (66.6%) and shoulder (60.5%) were more prevalent than in the hand (34.5%) or elbow (24.5%). Normal activities were affected in 28.7% (neck), 29.5% (shoulder), 19.4% (hand) and 14% (elbow) of the respondents. MSD in the upper body occurred significantly more often in large animal practitioners. Accidents that resulted in MSD were most frequently reported in the hand/wrist (14.3%) or in the shoulder (10.8%). The majority of all accidents in the distal upper extremities were caused by animals than by other factors (19% vs. 9.2%). For each area of the body, a specific set of individual and work-related factors contributed significantly to severe MSD: Older age, gender, previous injuries, BMI, practice type, veterinary procedures such as dentistry, rectal procedures and obstetric procedures as well as high demands and personal burnout. Conclusion From the perspective of occupational health and safety, it seems to be necessary to improve accident prevention and to optimize the ergonomics of specific tasks. Our data suggest the need for target group-specific preventive measures that also focus on the psychological factors at work. PMID:24586718

  14. Self-reported musculoskeletal disorders of the distal upper extremities and the neck in German veterinarians: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Agnessa; Schedlbauer, Grita; Peters, Claudia; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary work is a physically demanding profession and entails the risk of injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system, particularly in the upper body. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), the consequences and work-related accidents in German veterinarians were investigated. Work-related and individual factors associated with MSD of upper extremities and the neck were analyzed. In 2011, a self-reporting Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was mailed to registered veterinarians in seven federal medical associations in Germany. A total of 3174 (38.4%) veterinarians responded. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between risk factors and MSD-related impairment of daily activities. MSD in the neck (66.6%) and shoulder (60.5%) were more prevalent than in the hand (34.5%) or elbow (24.5%). Normal activities were affected in 28.7% (neck), 29.5% (shoulder), 19.4% (hand) and 14% (elbow) of the respondents. MSD in the upper body occurred significantly more often in large animal practitioners. Accidents that resulted in MSD were most frequently reported in the hand/wrist (14.3%) or in the shoulder (10.8%). The majority of all accidents in the distal upper extremities were caused by animals than by other factors (19% vs. 9.2%). For each area of the body, a specific set of individual and work-related factors contributed significantly to severe MSD: Older age, gender, previous injuries, BMI, practice type, veterinary procedures such as dentistry, rectal procedures and obstetric procedures as well as high demands and personal burnout. From the perspective of occupational health and safety, it seems to be necessary to improve accident prevention and to optimize the ergonomics of specific tasks. Our data suggest the need for target group-specific preventive measures that also focus on the psychological factors at work.

  15. A tailored workplace exercise program for women at risk for neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rasotto, Chiara; Bergamin, Marco; Sieverdes, John C; Gobbo, Stefano; Alberton, Cristine L; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Maso, Stefano; Zaccaria, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a tailored physical activity protocol performed in a work environment with a group of female workers employed in manual precision tasks to reduce upper limb pain. Sixty female subjects were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. The IG was administered of a 6-month, twice-a-week, tailored exercise program, whereas the CG received no intervention. The IG showed a reduction on shoulder pain accompanied by increases on the range of motion measures. In addition, reductions in upper limb pain and neck disability were detected with concomitant increases in grip strength. This study indicated positive effects of a tailored workplace exercise protocol in female workers exposed to moderate risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders, showing clinically meaningful reductions of pain symptoms and disability on upper limb and neck regions.

  16. Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and the upper limbs in professional drivers of terrain vehicles--a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Aström, Charlotte; Rehn, Börje; Lundström, Ronnie; Nilsson, Tohr; Burström, Lage; Sundelin, Gunnevi

    2006-11-01

    This study compares the prevalence of symptoms of Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and the upper limbs, between professional drivers of terrain vehicles and a referent group. 769 male professional drivers of forest machines, snowmobiles, snowgroomers and reindeer herders and 296 randomly selected male referents completed a questionnaire about symptoms of HAVS and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and the upper limbs. They also gave information about their lifetime exposure duration driving terrain vehicles and their nicotine use. Prevalence odds ratios (POR) were determined and adjusted for age and nicotine use. Results show that there is a relation between exposure to driving terrain vehicles and some of the symptoms of HAVS (POR: 1.2-6.1). Increased odds of musculoskeletal symptoms in neck, shoulders and wrists were also found (POR 1.2-6.4), and it seemed to be related to the cumulative exposure time.

  17. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and upper extremity among dentists in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Beibei; Liang, Qi; Wang, Yuling; Andersen, Lars L; Szeto, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies from western countries show that dentists are vulnerable to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) of the neck and upper extremities, but little is known about their epidemiology among members of this rapidly growing profession in China. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of WMSDs and identify potential risk factors associated with their occurrence in the dental profession in China. Setting and participants A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 52 different hospitals in a large metropolitan city in China. A total of 304 questionnaires were distributed to respondents identified via stratified random sampling and 272 dentists (121 females and 151 males) completed the survey. The response rate was 89.5%. Outcomes Visual analogue score was used to record neck and upper limb musculoskeletal symptoms on a body chart. Work-related risk factors, including physical and psychosocial factors, were accounted for in the regression analysis. Results 88% of the dentists reported at least one musculoskeletal disorder and 83.8% suffered from neck pain. In the multivariate analyses, working hours per day were associated with neck pain (OR=1.43; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.98). Inability to select the appropriate size of dental instrument was associated with shoulder (OR=2.07; 95% CI 1.00 to 4.32) and wrist/hand (OR=2.47; 95% CI 1.15 to 5.32) pain. As for psychosocial factors, high job demand was associated with symptoms in the shoulder (OR=1.09; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.18), elbow (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.19) and wrist/hand (OR=1.09; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.17). Regular physical exercise was associated with decreased neck pain (OR=0.37; 95% CI 0.14 to 1.00). Conclusions The prevalence of WMSDs among Chinese dentists is high. Specifically, long working hours, inability to select the appropriate size of dental instrument and high job demand are the most significant risk factors. PMID:25526795

  18. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and upper extremity among dentists in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Beibei; Liang, Qi; Wang, Yuling; Andersen, Lars L; Szeto, Grace

    2014-12-19

    Studies from western countries show that dentists are vulnerable to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) of the neck and upper extremities, but little is known about their epidemiology among members of this rapidly growing profession in China. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of WMSDs and identify potential risk factors associated with their occurrence in the dental profession in China. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 52 different hospitals in a large metropolitan city in China. A total of 304 questionnaires were distributed to respondents identified via stratified random sampling and 272 dentists (121 females and 151 males) completed the survey. The response rate was 89.5%. Visual analogue score was used to record neck and upper limb musculoskeletal symptoms on a body chart. Work-related risk factors, including physical and psychosocial factors, were accounted for in the regression analysis. 88% of the dentists reported at least one musculoskeletal disorder and 83.8% suffered from neck pain. In the multivariate analyses, working hours per day were associated with neck pain (OR=1.43; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.98). Inability to select the appropriate size of dental instrument was associated with shoulder (OR=2.07; 95% CI 1.00 to 4.32) and wrist/hand (OR=2.47; 95% CI 1.15 to 5.32) pain. As for psychosocial factors, high job demand was associated with symptoms in the shoulder (OR=1.09; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.18), elbow (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.19) and wrist/hand (OR=1.09; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.17). Regular physical exercise was associated with decreased neck pain (OR=0.37; 95% CI 0.14 to 1.00). The prevalence of WMSDs among Chinese dentists is high. Specifically, long working hours, inability to select the appropriate size of dental instrument and high job demand are the most significant risk factors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Prevalence of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in artisan fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers in Saubara, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Ila Rocha; Couto, Maria Carolina Barreto Moreira; Lima, Verônica Maria Cadena; Pena, Paulo Gilvane Lopes; Andrade, Lílian Lessa; Müller, Juliana dos Santos; Alves, Ivone Batista; Viana, Wendel da Silva; Rêgo, Rita de Cássia Franco

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted in an artisanal fishing community. The main health complaints included musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) attributable to working conditions. The present work found a prevalence of neck and distal upper limb MSD among the artisan fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers in Saubara, Bahia, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort epidemiological study involving 209 artisanal fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers. The Brazilian version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and a survey listing physical demands adapted to shellfish gathering were used for the study. The MSD values obtained in some part of the body, neck or shoulder, and distal upper limb were 94.7%, 71.3% and 70.3%, respectively. The shellfish gatherers were found to work long shifts despite the high prevalence of MSD. The factors that cause these women to keep performing such activities include the need to make a living and provide food for their families through the sale and consumption of seafood.

  20. Agreement between a self-administered questionnaire on musculoskeletal disorders of the neck-shoulder region and a physical examination.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nathalie; Brisson, Chantal; Dionne, Clermont E; Montreuil, Sylvie; Punnett, Laura

    2008-03-17

    In epidemiological studies on neck-shoulder disorders, physical examination by health professionals, although more expensive, is usually considered a better method of data collection than self-administered questionnaires on symptoms. However, little is known on the comparison of these two methods of data collection. The agreement between self-administered questionnaires and the physical examination on the presence of neck-shoulders disorders was assessed in the present study. This study was conducted among clerical workers using video display units. Prevalent cases were workers for whom neck-shoulder symptoms were present for at least 3 days during the previous 7 days and for whom pain intensity was greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. All 85 workers meeting this definition and a random sample of 102 workers who did not meet this definition were selected. Physical examination included measures of active range of motion and musculoskeletal strength. Cohen's kappa and global percent agreement were calculated to compare the two methods of data collection. The effect on the agreement of different question and physical examination definitions and the importance of the time interval elapsed between the administrations of the tests were also evaluated. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.54 depending on the definitions used to ascertain disorders. The agreement was highest when the two instruments were administered 21 days apart or less (Kappa = 0.54, global agreement = 77%). It was not substantially improved by the addition of criteria related to functional limitations or when comparisons were made with alternative physical examination definitions. Pain intensity recorded during physical examination maneuvers was an important element of the agreement between questionnaire and physical examination findings. These results suggest a fair to good agreement between the presence of musculoskeletal disorders ascertained by self-administered questionnaire

  1. Agreement between a self-administered questionnaire on musculoskeletal disorders of the neck-shoulder region and a physical examination

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Nathalie; Brisson, Chantal; Dionne, Clermont E; Montreuil, Sylvie; Punnett, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background In epidemiological studies on neck-shoulder disorders, physical examination by health professionals, although more expensive, is usually considered a better method of data collection than self-administered questionnaires on symptoms. However, little is known on the comparison of these two methods of data collection. The agreement between self-administered questionnaires and the physical examination on the presence of neck-shoulders disorders was assessed in the present study. Methods This study was conducted among clerical workers using video display units. Prevalent cases were workers for whom neck-shoulder symptoms were present for at least 3 days during the previous 7 days and for whom pain intensity was greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. All 85 workers meeting this definition and a random sample of 102 workers who did not meet this definition were selected. Physical examination included measures of active range of motion and musculoskeletal strength. Cohen's kappa and global percent agreement were calculated to compare the two methods of data collection. The effect on the agreement of different question and physical examination definitions and the importance of the time interval elapsed between the administrations of the tests were also evaluated. Results Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.54 depending on the definitions used to ascertain disorders. The agreement was highest when the two instruments were administered 21 days apart or less (Kappa = 0.54, global agreement = 77%). It was not substantially improved by the addition of criteria related to functional limitations or when comparisons were made with alternative physical examination definitions. Pain intensity recorded during physical examination maneuvers was an important element of the agreement between questionnaire and physical examination findings. Conclusion These results suggest a fair to good agreement between the presence of musculoskeletal disorders

  2. Impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of neck and upper extremities on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain

    PubMed Central

    IJzelenberg, W; Burdorf, A

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the presence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities among industrial workers with low back pain, and to examine whether it has an impact on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain. Methods: A self administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 505 industrial workers (response 86%). Results: The 12 month prevalence of low back pain was 50%. Among subjects with low back pain the 12 month prevalence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities was 68%. Among workers with low back pain, subjects with high pain intensity or disabling low back pain were more likely to have musculoskeletal co-morbidity. In comparison to the subjects who report back pain only, subjects with co-morbidity showed worse general health and health related quality of life. No impact of upper extremity co-morbidity was found on healthcare utilisation, and sickness absence due to low back pain. Conclusions: This study provides no evidence that musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities influences the choice to seek care or take sick leave due to low back pain among industrial manual workers. For occupational health practitioners the finding of a high co-morbidity is important to consider when implementing workplace interventions aimed at the reduction of specific musculoskeletal complaints, since the controls for one musculoskeletal complaint may impact adversely on another musculoskeletal complaint. Researchers who perform low back pain intervention studies using generic health measures, should take into account the impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity on these measures. PMID:15377765

  3. Exposure-response relationships for work-related neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders--Analyses of pooled uniform data sets.

    PubMed

    Nordander, Catarina; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Ohlsson, Kerstina; Arvidsson, Inger; Balogh, Istvan; Strömberg, Ulf; Rittner, Ralf; Skerfving, Staffan

    2016-07-01

    There is a lack of quantitative data regarding exposure-response relationships between occupational risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and shoulders. We explored such relationships in pooled data from a series of our cross-sectional studies. We recorded the prevalence of complaints/discomfort (Nordic Questionnaire) and diagnoses (physical examination) in 33 groups (24 female and 9 male) within which the workers had similar work tasks (3141 workers, of which 817 were males). In representative sub-groups, we recorded postures and velocities of the head (N = 299) and right upper arm (inclinometry; N = 306), right wrist postures and velocities (electrogoniometry; N = 499), and muscular activity (electromyography) in the right trapezius muscle (N = 431) and forearm extensors (N = 206). We also assessed the psychosocial work environment (Job Content Questionnaire). Uni- and multivariate linear meta-regression analysis revealed several statistically significant group-wise associations. Neck disorders were associated with head inclination, upper arm elevation, muscle activity of the trapezius and forearm extensors and wrist posture and angular velocity. Right-side shoulder disorders were associated with head and upper arm velocity, activity in the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles and wrist posture and angular velocity. The psychosocial work environment (low job control, job strain and isostrain) was also associated with disorders. Women exhibited a higher prevalence of neck and shoulder complaints and tension neck syndrome than men, when adjusting for postures, velocities, muscular activity or psychosocial exposure. In conclusion, the analyses established quantitative exposure-response relationships between neck and shoulder disorders and objective measures of the physical workload on the arm. Such information can be used for risk assessment in different occupations/work tasks, to establish quantitative exposure limits, and for the

  4. Ergonomic design and training for preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limb and neck in adults.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Kelsall, Helen L; Sim, Malcolm R

    2012-08-15

    Work-related upper limb and neck musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most common occupational disorders around the world. Although ergonomic design and training are likely to reduce the risk of workers developing work-related upper limb and neck MSDs, the evidence is unclear. To assess the effects of workplace ergonomic design or training interventions, or both, for the prevention of work-related upper limb and neck MSDs in adults. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science (Science Citation Index), SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group Database and Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register to July 2010, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health database, and International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre database to November 2010. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of ergonomic workplace interventions for preventing work-related upper limb and neck MSDs. We included only studies with a baseline prevalence of MSDs of the upper limb or neck, or both, of less than 25%. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We included studies with relevant data that we judged to be sufficiently homogeneous regarding the intervention and outcome in the meta-analysis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence for each comparison using the GRADE approach. We included 13 RCTs (2397 workers). Eleven studies were conducted in an office environment and two in a healthcare setting. We judged one study to have a low risk of bias. The 13 studies evaluated effectiveness of ergonomic equipment, supplementary breaks or reduced work hours, ergonomic training, a combination of ergonomic training and equipment, and patient lifting interventions for preventing work-related MSDs of the upper

  5. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the dental professions.

    PubMed

    Morse, Tim; Bruneau, Heather; Dussetschleger, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of and risk factors for neck and shoulder disorders among dental practitioners (dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants) is reviewed. Dentists report 26-73% period prevalence of neck symptoms over the previous year, and 20-65% with shoulder symptoms. Dental hygienists report even higher rates, from 54-83% for neck and 35-76% for shoulder, and dental assistants in between (38-62% and 27-62% respectively). Symptoms begin to appear early in the career, with significant increases upon starting clinical practice. Significant social and economic consequences have been reported, including leaving the profession or reducing hours. While ergonomic improvements appear to have some positive impact, these have not been well studied, and some changes (such as the historic shift from standing to seated posture) may have moved risk from the lower back to the upper extremities. Static awkward posture, particularly those with isometric contractions of the trapezius, has been identified as a risk factor particular to these occupations. Ergonomic improvements, health promotion, and organizational interventions have been suggested as needs for reducing risk.

  6. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper limb among sewing machine operators: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J H; Gaardboe, O

    1993-12-01

    One hundred and seven women participated in a clinical study of an age-stratified random sample of sewing machine operators compared to a group of auxiliary nurses and home helpers. Four groups, according to years of being a sewing machine operator, consisted of: (controls) 25; (0-7 years) 21; (8-15 years) 25; and (more than 15 years) 36. The numbers of the main clinical diagnoses in the four groups were: cervicobrachial fibromyalgia (myofascial pain syndrome) 2, 4, 11, 24; cervical syndrome 0, 1, 3, 10; and rotator cuff syndrome 1, 1, 6, 11. The observed exposure-response relationship between clinical outcomes and years as a sewing machine operator was maintained when adjusting for current exposure to musculoskeletal strain and other potential confounders. Muscle palpation proved to be a reproducible examination with kappa values around 0.70.

  7. Mechanisms mediating vibration-induced chronic musculoskeletal pain analyzed in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Joseph, Elizabeth K; Levine, Jon D; Green, Paul G

    2010-04-01

    While occupational exposure to vibration is a common cause of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, eliminating exposure produces limited symptomatic improvement, and reexposure precipitates rapid recurrence or exacerbation. To evaluate mechanisms underlying these pain syndromes, we have developed a model in the rat, in which exposure to vibration (60-80Hz) induces, in skeletal muscle, both acute mechanical hyperalgesia as well as long-term changes characterized by enhanced hyperalgesia to a proinflammatory cytokine or reexposure to vibration. Exposure of a hind limb to vibration-produced mechanical hyperalgesia measured in the gastrocnemius muscle of the exposed hind limb, which persisted for approximately 2 weeks. When nociceptive thresholds had returned to baseline, exposure to a proinflammatory cytokine or reexposure to vibration produced markedly prolonged hyperalgesia. The chronic prolongation of vibration- and cytokine-hyperalgesia was prevented by spinal intrathecal injection of oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) antisense to protein kinase Cepsilon, a second messenger in nociceptors implicated in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain. Vibration-induced hyperalgesia was inhibited by spinal intrathecal administration of ODN antisense to receptors for the type-1 tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) receptor. Finally, in TNFalpha-pretreated muscle, subsequent vibration-induced hyperalgesia was markedly prolonged. These studies establish a model of vibration-induced acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, and identify the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha and the second messenger protein kinase Cepsilon as targets against which therapies might be directed to prevent and/or treat this common and very debilitating chronic pain syndrome. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms Mediating Vibration-induced Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Analyzed in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Olayinka A.; Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Levine, Jon D.; Green, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    While occupational exposure to vibration is a common cause of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, eliminating exposure produces limited symptomatic improvement, and re-exposure precipitates rapid recurrence or exacerbation. To evaluate mechanisms underlying these pain syndromes, we have developed a model in the rat, in which exposure to vibration (60–80 Hz) induces, in skeletal muscle, both acute mechanical hyperalgesia as well as long-term changes characterized by enhanced hyperalgesia to a pro-inflammatory cytokine or re-exposure to vibration. Exposure of a hind limb to vibration produced mechanical hyperalgesia measured in the gastrocnemius muscle of the exposed hind limb, which persisted for ~2 weeks. When nociceptive thresholds had returned to baseline, exposure to a pro-inflammatory cytokine or re-exposure to vibration produced markedly prolonged hyperalgesia. The chronic prolongation of vibration- and cytokine-hyperalgesia induced by vibration was prevented by spinal intrathecal injection of oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) antisense to protein kinase Cε, a second messenger in nociceptors implicated in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain. Vibration-induced hyperalgesia was inhibited by spinal intrathecal administration of ODN antisense to receptors for the type-1 tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) receptor. Finally, in TNFα-pretreated muscle, subsequent vibration-induced hyperalgesia was markedly prolonged. Perspective These studies establish a model of vibration-induced acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, and identify the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα and the second messenger PKCε as targets against which therapies might be directed to prevent and/or treat this common and very debilitating chronic pain syndrome. PMID:19962353

  9. The predictive validity of the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire and the clinicians' prognostic assessment following manual therapy treatment of patients with LBP and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Storheim, K; Magnussen, L H; Ødegaard, T; Hoftaniska, I; Larsen, L G; Ringstad, P O; Hatlebrekke, F; Grotle, M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predictive ability of the standardised screening tool Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (ÖMPQ) and the clinicians' prognostic assessment in identifying patients with low back pain (LBP) and neck pain at risk for persistent pain and disability at eight weeks follow-up. Patients seeking care for LBP or neck pain were recruited by 19 manual therapists in Norway. Patients completed the ÖMPQ and the low back- or neck specific Oswestry Disability Index/Neck Disability Index at baseline and 8 weeks after first consultation. The manual therapists filled in their assessment of patient's prognosis immediately after the first consultation, blinded for patient's answers to the questionnaire. A total of 157 patients (81with neck pain and 76 with LBP) were included. The best odds for predicting the outcome for LBP patients was found for the clinicians' assessment of prognosis (LR+ = 2.1 and LR- = 0.55), whereas the likelihood ratios were similar for the two tools in the neck group. For LBP patients, both the clinicians' assessment and the ÖMPQ contributed significantly in the separate regression models (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, resp), whereas none of the tools where significant contributors for neck patients (p = 0.67 and 0.07). Neither of the two methods showed high precision in their predictions of follow-up at eight weeks. However, for LBP patients, the ÖMPQ and the clinicians' prognostic assessment contributed significantly in the prediction of functional outcome 8 weeks after the initial assessment of manual therapist, whereas the prediction for neck patients was unsure.

  10. [Analyzing the factors of influencing the musculoskeletal disorders of greenhouse vegetable farmers].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-yun; Li, Hong-jun; Yu, Su-fang

    2012-03-01

    To study the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among greenhouse vegetable farmers and to explore the risk factors of MSDs. A household questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate 203 greenhouse vegetable farmers and 127 non-greenhouse vegetable farmers in February, 2011. The one-year prevalence rates of MSDs were 70.0% and 33.9% among greenhouse vegetable farmers and non-greenhouse vegetable farmers, respectively. The three main positions of MSDs in greenhouse farmers were low back, knee (s) and shoulder (s). Age, working years, body weight and usage of rolling machine were statistically associated with MSDs of greenhouse farmers, ORadj values were 1.17, 1.82, 1.08 and 0.07, respectively. The prevalence of MSDs is high in greenhouse workers. Low back pain, knee (s), and shoulder (s) disorders are the main disorders. Age, working years, body weight and usage of rolling machine are main risk factors for the development of MSDs in greenhouse farmers.

  11. The prevalence of work-related neck, shoulder, and upper back musculoskeletal disorders among midwives, nurses, and physicians: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Long, Maryann H; Bogossian, Fiona E; Johnston, Venerina

    2013-05-01

    With the global shortage of health care workers predicted to worsen, attrition from the work force must be minimized. This review examined the incidence or prevalence of neck, shoulder, and upper back musculoskeletal disorders, a possible source of attrition, among midwives, nurses, and physicians. Four electronic databases were systematically searched for publications meeting inclusion criteria. Reference lists of retrieved articles were hand searched for additional articles. After eliminating articles that did not meet inclusion criteria, the remaining articles were assessed for quality and prevalence or incidence data were extracted. Twenty-nine articles published between 1990 and 2012 were included and assessed for quality. Median annual prevalence rates were 45% (neck), 40% (shoulder), and 35% (upper back). Methodological concerns included small sample size, inconsistency of outcome measures, likelihood of non-response bias, and low response rates. Midwives, who have not been well studied, demonstrated prevalence somewhat lower than that of nurses and physicians. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Tool development to assess the work related neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders among female garment workers in Sri-Lanka.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, Nirmalie Champika; De AlwisSenevirathne, Rohini

    2016-10-17

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) have been identified as a predisposing factor for lesser productivity, but no validated tool has been developed to assess them in the Sri- Lankan context. To develop a validated tool to assess the neck and upper limb MSDs. It comprises three components: item selections, item reduction using principal component analysis, and validation. A tentative self-administrated questionnaire was developed, translated, and pre-tested. Four important domains - neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist - were identified through principal component analysis. Prevalence of any MSDs was 38.1% and prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist MSDs are 12.85%, 13.71%, 12%, 13.71% respectively. Content and criterion validity of the tool was assessed. Separate ROC curves were produced and sensitivity and specificity of neck (83.1%, 71.7%), shoulder (97.6%, 91.9%), elbow (98.2%, 87.2%), and wrist (97.6%, 94.9%) was determined. Cronbach's Alpha and correlation coefficient was above 0.7. The tool has high sensitivity, specificity, internal consistency, and test re-test reliability.

  13. Responsiveness of the QuickDASH and SF-12 in workers with neck or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders: one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fan, Z Joyce; Smith, Caroline K; Silverstein, Barbara A

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Questionnaires that measure functional status such as the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) can quantify the impact of health on performance. Little is known about whether these questionnaires can be used as a tool for measuring disabilities among workers. We compare the responsiveness of these two functional status questionnaires to changes in clinical outcomes of neck or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSD) among active workers in a longitudinal study. METHODS We evaluated the effect size (ES) and standardized response means (SRM) of the QuickDASH and the SF-12 for 148 workers who were divided into four subgroups based on the diagnosis status change between baseline and 1-year visit. RESULTS The ES and SRM for QuickDASH scores were 0.6/0.6 for the 50 subjects who became incident symptomatic neck or UEMSD cases, 1.3/1.0 for the 18 subjects who became incident clinical cases of neck or UEMSD, -1.0/-1.1 for the 46 subjects who recovered from having neck or UEMSD symptoms, and -1.1/-1.1 for the 34 subjects who recovered from being neck or UEMSD clinical cases. The correspondent ES/SRM for the QuickDASH work module were 0.4/0.3, 0.7/0.5, -0.6/-0.4, and -1.0/-0.8, respectively. The correspondent ES/SRM for the physical component scores of SF-12 (PCS12) for the four subgroups were 0.2/0.2, -0.9/-0.6, 0.3/0.2, and 0.3/0.3, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The QuickDASH scores were responsive to changes among active workers who were neck or UEMSD symptomatic or clinical case. PCS12 scores were sufficient only for use in clinical case status change.

  14. Occupational Risk Factors for Upper-limb and Neck Musculoskeletal Disorder among Health-care Staff in Nursing Homes for the Elderly in France

    PubMed Central

    PELISSIER, Carole; FONTANA, Luc; FORT, Emmanuel; AGARD, Jean Pierre; COUPRIE, Francoise; DELAYGUE, Beatrice; GLERANT, Valerie; PERRIER, Catherine; SELLIER, Brigitte; VOHITO, Michel; CHARBOTEL, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between working conditions, in terms of physical and psychological demand, and upper-limb and neck musculoskeletal disorders (ULNMD) in female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 105 nursing homes in France. Data on nursing-home working conditions were collected by questionnaire from occupational physicians and by self-administered questionnaire from staff. Psychosocial demand at work was assessed on Siegrist’s questionnaire and ULNMD on the Nordic questionnaire. 2,328 employees were included: 628 housekeepers, 1,372 nursing assistants and 328 nurses. During the previous 12 months, 50% of the subjects (1,160) had presented with a musculoskeletal complaint concerning the neck, 38% (881) the shoulders, 10% (246) the elbows and 22% (520) the wrists. 9% (219) reported effort/reward imbalance on the 2004 Siegrist questionnaire and 42% were in a situation of over-commitment. ULNMD complaints were associated not only with physical occupational factors but also with psychosocial factors (effort/reward imbalance and over-commitment), both before and after adjustment on individual and occupational factors. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the causal role of occupational, including, organizational, psychosocial factors in ULNMD outcomes. Preventive approaches should take account of both physical and psychosocial occupational factors. PMID:24807124

  15. Occupational risk factors for upper-limb and neck musculoskeletal disorder among health-care staff in nursing homes for the elderly in France.

    PubMed

    Pelissier, Carole; Fontana, Luc; Fort, Emmanuel; Agard, Jean Pierre; Couprie, Francoise; Delaygue, Beatrice; Glerant, Valerie; Perrier, Catherine; Sellier, Brigitte; Vohito, Michel; Charbotel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between working conditions, in terms of physical and psychological demand, and upper-limb and neck musculoskeletal disorders (ULNMD) in female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 105 nursing homes in France. Data on nursing-home working conditions were collected by questionnaire from occupational physicians and by self-administered questionnaire from staff. Psychosocial demand at work was assessed on Siegrist's questionnaire and ULNMD on the Nordic questionnaire. 2,328 employees were included: 628 housekeepers, 1,372 nursing assistants and 328 nurses. During the previous 12 months, 50% of the subjects (1,160) had presented with a musculoskeletal complaint concerning the neck, 38% (881) the shoulders, 10% (246) the elbows and 22% (520) the wrists. 9% (219) reported effort/reward imbalance on the 2004 Siegrist questionnaire and 42% were in a situation of over-commitment. ULNMD complaints were associated not only with physical occupational factors but also with psychosocial factors (effort/reward imbalance and over-commitment), both before and after adjustment on individual and occupational factors. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the causal role of occupational, including, organizational, psychosocial factors in ULNMD outcomes. Preventive approaches should take account of both physical and psychosocial occupational factors.

  16. Assessing validity of the QuickDASH and SF-12 as surveillance tools among workers with neck or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Fan, Z Joyce; Smith, Caroline K; Silverstein, Barbara A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess validity of the regional Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) and Short-Form 12 (SF-12) for surveillance purpose. We compared the predictive, discriminate, and concurrent validity of the QuickDASH and SF-12 among 231 workers with specific clinical diagnoses of neck or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs) and 175 workers with symptoms only. Compared to those with symptoms only, the odds of being any neck or UEMSD case were 1.45 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.24-1.70) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.48-0.91) with every 10-point increase in QuickDASH disability and physical component scale (PCS-12) scores, respectively. The clinical cases had significantly higher QuickDASH disability (23.0 vs. 14.3, p<0.0001) and lower PCS-12 scores (44.8 vs. 47.3, p=0.0133) than those with symptom only. The QuickDASH disability scores were moderately correlated with the PCS-12 scores (rho=-0.40) among the clinical cases. Either QuickDASH or PCS-12 can be used as a simple surveillance tool in an active working population.

  17. Prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean string instrument players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yong; Kim, Mi-Sook; Min, Seung-Nam; Cho, Young-Jin; Choi, Junhyeok

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in players of a variety of traditional Korean classical instruments: gayageum, geomungo, ajaeng, and haegeum. A large percentage of these musicians suffer from musculoskeletal pain of various body parts. However, there has been no research regarding the extent of musculoskeletal disorders in players of these instruments. Through a focus group interview, a questionnaire was developed to investigate musculoskeletal disorders. The questionnaire consisted of four parts: demographic factors, performance factors, musculoskeletal disorder symptoms, and musculoskeletal disorder experiences. Eighty-six expert players participated in this survey. The data from the survey were analyzed by correlation analysis and chi-squared analysis. Musculoskeletal disorders symptoms and severe pain were reported in the neck, shoulder, back and knee. These problems were statistically related to height for players of the gayageum and geomungo. In addition, the musculoskeletal disorder experience of geomungo players was correlated with age and career length. The symptoms of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean music players were reported as being mostly observed in the neck, shoulder, back, and knee. In addition, these symptoms were related to various demographic factors such as age, height, career length, and hobby styles. The results of this study can be used as preliminary data for developing guidelines to prevent traditional Korean musical instrument players from developing musculoskeletal injuries.

  18. Effect of physical activity on musculoskeletal discomforts among handicraft workers

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Mahnaz; Rismanchian, Masoud; Khalili, Pejman; Torki, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Handicrafts seems to be one of the high-risk jobs regarding work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) which necessitate the implementation of different corrective intervention like regular physical activities. This study aimed to investigate the impact of physical activity on WMSDs among craftsmen. Methods: This cross-sectional study was an analytical – descriptive study carried out on 100 craftsmen working in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling method was census, and all workshops involved with this job were included. Information on demographic parameters and physical activity was collected by demographic forms. The data related to worker's musculoskeletal discomforts were conducted using Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using statistical tests including independent t-test, Chi-square, and ANOVA. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18. Results: The highest percentages of complaints related to severe musculoskeletal discomfort were reported in right shoulder (%36), right wrist (%26), neck (%25), and upper right arm (%24), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between physical activity and musculoskeletal discomforts of left wrist (P = 0.012), lower back (P = 0.016), and neck (P = 0.006). Discussion and Conclusion: Based on the study results, it can be inferred that regular but not too heavy physical activity can have a positive impact on decreasing the musculoskeletal discomforts. PMID:27512700

  19. On functional motor adaptations: from the quantification of motor strategies to the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck-shoulder region.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, P

    2010-06-01

    Occupations characterized by a static low load and by repetitive actions show a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) in the neck-shoulder region. Moreover, muscle fatigue and discomfort are reported to play a relevant initiating role in WMSD. To investigate relationships between altered sensory information, i.e. localized muscle fatigue, discomfort and pain and their associations to changes in motor control patterns. In total 101 subjects participated. Questionnaires, subjective assessments of perceived exertion and pain intensity as well as surface electromyography (SEMG), mechanomyography (MMG), force and kinematics recordings were performed. Multi-channel SEMG and MMG revealed that the degree of heterogeneity of the trapezius muscle activation increased with fatigue. Further, the spatial organization of trapezius muscle activity changed in a dynamic manner during sustained contraction with acute experimental pain. A graduation of the motor changes in relation to the pain stage (acute, subchronic and chronic) and work experience were also found. The duration of the work task was shorter in presence of acute and chronic pain. Acute pain resulted in decreased activity of the painful muscle while in subchronic and chronic pain, a more static muscle activation was found. Posture and movement changed in the presence of neck-shoulder pain. Larger and smaller sizes of arm and trunk movement variability were respectively found in acute pain and subchronic/chronic pain. The size and structure of kinematics variability decreased also in the region of discomfort. Motor variability was higher in workers with high experience. Moreover, the pattern of activation of the upper trapezius muscle changed when receiving SEMG/MMG biofeedback during computer work. SEMG and MMG changes underlie functional mechanisms for the maintenance of force during fatiguing contraction and acute pain that may lead to the widespread pain seen in WMSD. A lack of harmonious

  20. [Analysis of musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures among manufacturing workers].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan-fa; Gu, Gui-zhen; Sun, Shi-yi; Wang, Hai-sheng; Cui, Shou-ming; Yang, Xiao-fa; Yang, Shu-le; He, Li-hua; Wang, Sheng

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the distribution of the musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures in different factories, gender, education levels, age and working years among manufacturing workers. In a cross-sectional study of 5134 manufacturing workers in 12 factories, the morbidities for musculoskeletal disorders in one year period were measured with questionnaires. The morbidities for musculoskeletal disorders in body sites: waist, neck, shoulder, wrist, ankle/feet, knee, hip/buttocks and elbows were 59.7%, 47.9%, 38.1%, 33.7%, 26.9%, 25.4%, 15.2%, and 14.9%, respectively in one year period. There were significant differences of morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in body sites of workers among different factories (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The morbidities of musculoskeletal symptoms in elbows, waist, wrists and ankle/feet of the workers in refractory material and chemical fiber factories were higher than those in other factories, the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms of workers in garments and diamond factories were lower than those in other factories. The morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in neck, shoulders and wrists of female workers were significantly higher than those of male workers (P < 0.01). There were significant differences of the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in body sites among workers with different educational levels (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). There were significant differences of the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in neck, shoulders, wrists, hip/buttocks and knee among groups with different age or different working years (P < 0.01), and the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms increased with age and working years. The proportions of unhealthy working postures and high working load among workers in refractory material and chemical fiber factories were higher; but those in garments and diamond factories were lower. The morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in waist, neck, shoulder and wrists of workers in

  1. Epidemiological study to investigate potential interaction between physical and psychosocial factors at work that may increase the risk of symptoms of musculoskeletal disorder of the neck and upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Devereux, J; Vlachonikolis, I; Buckle, P

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate potential interactions between physical and psychosocial risk factors in the workplace that may be associated with symptoms of musculoskeletal disorder of the neck and upper limb. Methods: 891 of 1514 manual handlers, delivery drivers, technicians, customer services computer operators, and general office staff reported on physical and psychosocial working conditions and symptoms of neck and upper limb disorders using a self administered questionnaire (59% return rate). Of the 869 valid questionnaire respondents, 564 workers were classified in to one of four exposure groups: high physical and high psychosocial, high physical and low psychosocial, low physical and high psychosocial, and low physical and low psychosocial. Low physical and low psychosocial was used as an internal reference group. The exposure criteria were derived from the existing epidemiological literature and models for physical and psychosocial work factors. The frequency and amplitude of lifting and the duration spent sitting while experiencing vibration were used as physical exposure criteria. Ordinal values of mental demands, job control, and social support with managers and coworkers were used as psychosocial exposure criteria. Results: In the multivariate analyses, the highest and significant increase in risk was found in the high physical and high psychosocial exposure group for symptoms of hand or wrist and upper limb disorders after adjusting for years at the job, age, and sex. A potential interaction effect was found for the symptoms of the hand or wrist and upper limb disorders but not for the neck symptoms. Conclusion: This study showed that workers highly exposed to both physical and psychosocial workplace risk factors were more likely to report symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders than workers highly exposed to one or the other. The results suggest an interaction between physical and psychosocial risk factors in the workplace that increased the risk of

  2. Musculoskeletal Disorders among Cosmetologists

    PubMed Central

    Tsigonia, Alexandra; Tanagra, Dimitra; Linos, Athena; Merekoulias, Georgios; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the relationships between physical, psychosocial, and individual characteristics and different endpoints of low back, neck, shoulder, hand/wrist and knee musculoskeletal complaints among cosmetologists in Athens, Greece. The study population consisted of 95 female and seven male beauty therapists (response rate 90%) with a mean age and duration of employment of 38 and 16 years, respectively. Neck pain was the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 58% of the subjects, while hand/wrist and low back complaints resulted more frequently in self-reported consequences (chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism). Significant relationships were found between self-reported physical risk factors like prolonged sitting, use of vibrating tools, reaching far and awkward body postures and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at various body sites. Among psychosocial variables co-worker support and skill discretion seem to be the most important reflecting organizational problems and cognitive-behavioral aspects. The study results also suggest that effective intervention strategies most likely have to take into account both ergonomic improvements and organizational aspects. PMID:20049238

  3. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  4. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  5. Musculoskeletal Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael K; Blumberg, Henry M

    2017-04-01

    Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB) accounts for approximately 10% of all extrapulmonary TB cases in the United States and is the third most common site of extrapulmonary TB after pleural and lymphatic disease. Vertebral involvement (tuberculous spondylitis, or Pott's disease) is the most common type of skeletal TB, accounting for about half of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. The presentation of musculoskeletal TB may be insidious over a long period and the diagnosis may be elusive and delayed, as TB may not be the initial consideration in the differential diagnosis. Concomitant pulmonary involvement may not be present, thus confusing the diagnosis even further. Early diagnosis of bone and joint disease is important to minimize the risk of deformity and enhance outcome. The introduction of newer imaging modalities, including MRI (imaging procedure of choice) and CT, has enhanced the diagnostic evaluation of patients with musculoskeletal TB and for directed biopsies of affected areas of the musculoskeletal system. Obtaining appropriate specimens for culture and other diagnostic tests is essential to establish a definitive diagnosis and recover M. tuberculosis for susceptibility testing. A total of 6 to 9 months of a rifampin-based regimen, like treatment of pulmonary TB, is recommended for the treatment of drug susceptible musculoskeletal disease. Randomized trials of tuberculous spondylitis have demonstrated that such regimens are efficacious. These data and those from the treatment of pulmonary TB have been extrapolated to form the basis of treatment regimen recommendations for other forms of musculoskeletal TB.

  6. Protocol for work place adjusted intelligent physical exercise reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck (VIMS): a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Zebis, Mette K; Pedersen, Mogens T; Roessler, Kirsten K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Pedersen, Mette M; Feveile, Helene; Mortensen, Ole S; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2010-08-05

    Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Specific strength training is a promising type of physical exercise for relieving neck and shoulder pain in office workers. However, the optimal combination of frequency and exercise duration, as well as the importance of exercise supervision, is unknown. The VIMS study investigates in a cluster randomized controlled design the effectiveness of different time wise combinations of specific strength training with identical accumulated volume, and the relevance of training supervision for safe and effective training. A cluster randomized controlled trial of 20 weeks duration where employed office workers are randomized to 1 x 60 min, 3 x 20 min, 9 x 7 min per week of specific strength training with training supervision, to 3 x 20 min per week of specific strength training with a minimal amount of training supervision, or to a reference group without training. A questionnaire will be sent to 2000 employees in jobs characterized by intensive computer work. Employees with cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease will be excluded. The main outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 20. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027390.

  7. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    PubMed

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  8. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Healthcare consumption due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery sector workers].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Beatriz; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Martínez-Rodríguez, Alicia; Fernández-Cervantes, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    To determine the frequency and factors associated with medicine consumption and consultations with family physicians due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery workers. We performed a cross-sectional study (n = 929). The variables analyzed consisted of sociodemographic factors, the frequency of musculoskeletal pain, healthcare resource consumption, back pain disability (Roland-Morris) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). A total of 98.7% of the sample were women, with a mean age of 50.6 years. Musculoskeletal pain was reported by 66.5%, 43% were taking medication, and 64% had consulted their family physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The factors associated with medication intake in the logistic regression analysis were the number of years worked in the sector, hip-knee pain, bodily pain and physical functioning. The variables associated with physician visits were the presence of hip-knee pain, neck-back-shoulder pain, bodily pain, and social functioning. The variables most closely associated with resource utilization were hip-knee pain and the physical dimension of health-related quality of life, especially bodily pain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders and Risk Factors among Chinese Medical Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Cui, Ya; He, Lihua; Xu, Xiangrong; Yuan, Zhiwei; Jin, Xianning; Li, Zhimin

    2017-05-26

    Medical staff in the department of obstetrics and gynecology are a group of professionals reportedly at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), however, little is known about the current status of this problem in China. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among this population in China. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed to 1017 obstetrics and gynecology practitioners to collect information on musculoskeletal symptoms and relevant factors. Prevalence and severity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in different parts of the body were calculated and the relationship between personal and ergonomic factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders was analyzed using Chi-square test and unconditional logistic regression models. The results indicated a high prevalence of 85.5% among the subjects, with the shoulder (n = 575, 62.0%), neck (n = 560, 60.3%) and lower back (n = 504, 54.3%) being the three most affected regions. Individual, postural, work-environmental as well as psychosocial factors were recognized to be associated with WMSDs in different body parts. Therefore, attention must be given to the problem of musculoskeletal disorders among Chinese obstetrics and gynecology staff. It is recommended to develop good life habits, improve work environment, adjust work organization as well as train on proper postures in their daily operation.

  11. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  12. Musculoskeletal disorders caused by gas cylinder handling tasks: A case study report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Yu, Chiao-Ying; Lin, Da-Yung

    2017-01-01

    This case study used the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) to explore work that involves handling gas cylinders and to determine risk factors that may cause related injuries. The NMQ survey was distributed to 100 gas cylinder handlers in Taiwan, and their handling tasks were analyzed. The results showed that the overall prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 91% within 1 year. More than half of the respondents (62%) experienced shoulder discomfort, followed by lower back/waist (57%) and neck (47%) discomfort. Daily work hours (>10 h) were primary factors influencing the development of discomfort when handling gas cylinders, whereas the daily delivery frequency (>30 deliveries) was relevant to the prevalence of lower limb discomfort. Individual factors also substantially influenced upper body, lower back/waist, and knee discomfort (i.e., age, job tenure, and exercise). The findings of this study can serve as references in the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders caused by performing gas cylinder handling tasks.

  13. Analysis of Risk Factors for Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Radiological Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehyung; Roh, Hyolyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze, through ergonomic analyses, those motions most used by radiological technologists that can cause musculoskeletal disorders. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 7 radiological technologists with work experience in hospitals for more than 5 years. For the analysis of working postures, we simulated the work posture of radiological technologists when moving patients, when pushing or pulling an apparatus, when conducting ultrasonography, and when handling a mouse for MRI were analyzed. [Results] In this study, the burdens on the radiological technologists’ waists were shown to be high when they were moving patients for a CT scan. During mouse handling for an MRI scan, large burdens were imposed on the neck. In the case of ultrasonography working postures, larger burdens on the leg and neck were found when the patient’s examination sites were located further away. The assessment of working postures when pushing a portable radiation apparatus showed that burdens on the musculoskeletal system increased as the weight of the apparatus increased. [Conclusion] The musculoskeletal disorders of radiological technologists occur in various regions of their bodies but occur most frequently in the shoulder and the lumbar region. Therefore, hospitals need to be educated regarding the concept of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:25276028

  14. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain of the neck, upper extremities and lower back among dental practitioners working in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A; AlShaalan, Nouf S; Al-Bani, Waad M; Masuadi, Emad M; Almodaimegh, Hind S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies have shown that dentists have a higher incidence of work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) pain than those in other occupations. The risk factors contributing to MSK pain among Saudi dentists has not been fully studied so this study aims to estimate the prevalence of MSK pain and investigate its associated risk factors among dentists in Saudi Arabia. Setting and participants A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the capital city Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, using random cluster sampling. 224 surveys were distributed among dentists with a 91.1% response rate (101 women and 103 men). Outcomes The prevalence of MSK pain and its associated risk factors were investigated. Results 184 (90.2%) respondents reported having MSK pain. Lower back pain was the most commonly reported MSK pain (68.1%). Gender and age were reported to be predictors for at least one type of MSK pain. Older age was associated with lower back pain (OR 1.23; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.50) and women had double the risk of shoulder pain (OR 2.52; 95% CI 1.12 to 5.68). In addition, lower back pain was related to the time the dentist spent with patients (OR 0.28; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.54), while shoulder pain (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.06) and lower back pain (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.10) were significantly related to years of experience. Conclusions MSK pain is common among older and female Saudi dentists. Research on the impact of exercise and the ergonomics of the workplace on the intensity of MSK pain and the timing of its onset is required. PMID:27324712

  15. Bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in head and neck cancer patients analyzed by classical cytogenetics and FISH.

    PubMed

    Zych, M; Schlade-Bartusiak, K; Chorostkowska, A; Stembalska, A; Krêcicki, T; Sasiadek, M

    2000-05-01

    Individual sensitivity to mutagens has been considered to play an important role in head-and-neck squamous cells carcinoma (HNSCC) development. The bleomycin test was introduced for establishing constitutional susceptibility to mutagens (T.C. Hsu, D.A. Johnston, L.M. Cherry, D. Ramkisson, S.P. Schantz, J.M. Jessup, R.J. Winn, L. Shirley, C. Furlong, Sensitivity to genotoxic effects of bleomycin in humans: possible relationship to environmental carcinogenesis, Int. J. Cancer 43 (1989) 403-409). Its criteria are based on scoring of chromosome aberrations (CAs, mainly breaks) in Giemsa-stained chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers an easy method for analysis of translocations, acentric fragments and dicentrics. In the present study FISH was applied in the analysis of bleomycin-induced CAs of the HNSCC patients and controls. The results proved that FISH is a complementary method to the classical staining in monitoring of bleomycin-induced CAs.

  16. Coping with Musculoskeletal Pain: Implications for Office Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztug, Ozhan; Cowie, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to understand how office workers cope with back, neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders at work (and their implications for work). A small (N = 120) questionnaire survey collected information about potential participants' background and history of musculoskeletal disorders. These data were used to inform…

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Normal Weight, Overweight, and Obese Patients with Arthritis or Other Musculoskeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mbizo, Justice; Okafor, Anthony; Sutton, Melanie A; Burkhart, Erica N; Stone, Leauna M

    2016-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 50 million Americans have been diagnosed with arthritis and other musculoskeletal diseases. The purpose of the current study was to (1) estimate the prevalence of overall complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and (2) examine the role of body mass index (BMI) on CAM use among normal weight, overweight, and obese persons with chronic lower back pain, chronic neck pain, chronic/rheumatoid arthritis, or musculoskeletal diseases, while controlling for other covariates. Cross-sectional design using secondary data for 9724 adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Data were weighted and analyzed by using Stata 12 for Windows (Stata Corp., College Station, TX). Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression statistics were computed. The participants were randomly surveyed from U.S. households. CAM use was measured as reported use of any modality within the five National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health domains. CAM use was statistically significantly associated with female sex; race/ethnicity; having chronic neck pain, lower back pain, or chronic/rheumatoid arthritis; having limitations due to chronic disease; and geographic region (p < 0.05). Factors significantly associated with decreased odds of CAM use included age 50-64 years, income categorized as "other/missing," and having musculoskeletal diseases. Stratification by body mass index suggested increased odds of CAM use among normal/underweight persons with chronic neck pain but decreased odds for those with chronic musculoskeletal diseases. For overweight patients, increased odds of CAM use were significant for chronic lower back pain, musculoskeletal diseases, and chronic/rheumatoid arthritis. Musculoskeletal diseases and arthritis represent important public health problems with economic implications for the well-being of individuals and society. Identifying CAM use trends by patient weight can be

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms and computer use among Finnish adolescents--pain intensity and inconvenience to everyday life: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Paula T; Saarni, Lea A; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Wallenius, Marjut A; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Rimpelä, Arja H

    2012-03-22

    Musculoskeletal symptoms among adolescents are related to the time spent using a computer, but little is known about the seriousness of the symptoms or how much they affect everyday life. The purpose of the present study was to examine the intensity of musculoskeletal pain and level of inconvenience to everyday life, in relation to time spent using a computer. In a survey, 436 school children (12 to 13 and 15 to 16 years of age), answered a questionnaire on musculoskeletal and computer-associated musculoskeletal symptoms in neck-shoulder, low back, head, eyes, hands, and fingers or wrists. Pain intensity (computer-associated symptoms) and inconvenience to everyday life (musculoskeletal symptoms) were measured using a visual analogue scale. Based on the frequency and intensity, three categories were formed to classify pain at each anatomic site: none, mild, and moderate/severe. The association with time spent using the computer was analyzed by multinomial logistic regression. Moderate/severe pain intensity was most often reported in the neck-shoulders (21%); head (20%); and eyes (14%); and moderate/severe inconvenience to everyday life was most often reported due to head (29%), neck-shoulders (21%), and low back (16%) pain. Compared with those using the computer less than 3.6 hours/week, computer use of ≥ 14 hours/week, was associated with moderate/severe increase in computer-associated musculoskeletal pain at all anatomic sites (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9-4.4), and moderate/severe inconvenience to everyday life due to low back (OR = 2.5) and head (OR = 2.0) pain. Musculoskeletal symptoms causing moderate/severe pain and inconvenience to everyday life are common among adolescent computer users. Daily computer use of 2 hours or more increases the risk for pain at most anatomic sites.

  19. Postural Preference and Musculoskeletal Complaints in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Corey A; Strauss, Robert A; Best, Alvin M

    2017-04-26

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons traditionally have musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this study was to determine the postural preferences of oral and maxillofacial surgeons and their effect on musculoskeletal pain. The authors designed and implemented a cross-sectional study. The association of demographic characteristics with postural preferences and use of loupes was explored. Then, the relation of demographic characteristics, postural preferences, and use of loupes to painful musculoskeletal complaints was analyzed. Contingency analysis was used to compare participants' responses and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify relevant predictor variables. The sample was composed of 153 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of which 32% indicated that they had ever had pain attributable to their practice that lasted longer than 2 weeks. Practitioners reported neck and back pain as being most common. Eighty-four percent of practitioners stood for extractions and placement of implants. Those who stood did so for visibility. Practitioners who sat indicated they did so for orthopedic reasons (P < .001). Thirty-one percent of practitioners indicated loupes use. Those who used loupes were more likely to report pain (P = .022). Most respondents stood and did not use loupes. Those who did use loupes were more likely to report pain. Those who stood did so for visibility; those who sat did so for orthopedic reasons. Almost one third of respondents reported pain lasting at least 2 weeks during practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. A 66-year-old man with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Jaynstein, Dayna

    2017-03-01

    Neck pain is a fairly common complaint among patients in the ED. The differential diagnosis is broad, from musculoskeletal causes to potentially life-threatening causes. Providers need to have a good understanding of when the complaint of neck pain requires more diagnostic investigation, even in a patient with chronic neck pain.

  1. Musculoskeletal symptoms among truck assembly workers.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tokeer

    2004-12-01

    Concerns were raised about the possibility of a high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in a truck assembly plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in a group of truck assembly workers. A cross-sectional study of 461 truck assembly workers was carried out using a modified version of the Nordic questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Employees were further subdivided into three distinct occupational subgroups: skilled line workers (252), bench subassembly workers (108) and material handlers (101). Responses were analysed according to occupational subgroup. Seventy per cent of 461 truck assembly workers responded to the questionnaires. Seventy-nine per cent of respondents had been troubled with musculoskeletal symptoms in the last 12 months. The commonest musculoskeletal symptoms were from the lower back (65%), neck (60%) and shoulders (57%). Musculoskeletal symptoms were related to age, length of service, occupational subgroup and GHQ12 score. There was a high reported prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in this group of truck assembly workers, with a differing pattern of symptom reporting depending on occupational subgroup. Risk reduction recommendations were made to the site management. A further study investigating the relationship between symptoms and specific hazards is planned.

  2. Changes of musculoskeletal deformity in severely disabled children using the custom molded fitting chair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Ok; Lee, Jun Ho; Yu, Ju Young; An, Pil Suk; Hur, Do Hang; Park, Eun Seo; Kim, Jae Hong

    2013-02-01

    To know the effectiveness of a custom molded fitting chair between pre- and post-chair status through comparison of musculoskeletal indices in severely disabled children. We researched 34 severely disabled patients who had used a custom molded fitting chair continuously for more than a year. There were 27 cerebral palsy patients and 7 patients with other kinds of diseases that affect the brain such as chromosomal disease or metabolic disease. By radiographic studies, Cobb's angle, the femoral neck-shaft angle of the femur, and Reimers migration percentage were measured. The indices are analyzed before and after application. The average period of application was 24 months. There was a significant reduction in the angles of femur neck-shaft, 163.4 degree before and 158.2 degree after the use of the chair (p<0.05), and 23 of 34 had demonstrated a reduced angle. Cobb's angle and Reimers migration percentage increased but the difference of pre- and post-chair status was not statistically significant. Seventeen of 33 children showed reduced Cobb's angle. Also, 19 of 37 showed a reduced degree of dislocation of the hip joints. In spite of the use of a custom molded fitting chair, a significant improvement did not emerge for musculoskeletal deformity indices in severely disabled children. However, there was no significant aggravation of Cobb's angle or Reimers migration percentage in developing children. Therefore, it is thought be helpful to prevent rapid aggravation of musculoskeletal deformities.

  3. Changes of Musculoskeletal Deformity in Severely Disabled Children Using the Custom Molded Fitting Chair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Ok; Lee, Jun Ho; Yu, Ju Young; An, Pil Suk; Hur, Do Hang; Park, Eun Seo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To know the effectiveness of a custom molded fitting chair between pre- and post-chair status through comparison of musculoskeletal indices in severely disabled children. Methods We researched 34 severely disabled patients who had used a custom molded fitting chair continuously for more than a year. There were 27 cerebral palsy patients and 7 patients with other kinds of diseases that affect the brain such as chromosomal disease or metabolic disease. By radiographic studies, Cobb's angle, the femoral neck-shaft angle of the femur, and Reimers migration percentage were measured. The indices are analyzed before and after application. Results The average period of application was 24 months. There was a significant reduction in the angles of femur neck-shaft, 163.4 degree before and 158.2 degree after the use of the chair (p<0.05), and 23 of 34 had demonstrated a reduced angle. Cobb's angle and Reimers migration percentage increased but the difference of pre- and post-chair status was not statistically significant. Seventeen of 33 children showed reduced Cobb's angle. Also, 19 of 37 showed a reduced degree of dislocation of the hip joints. Conclusion In spite of the use of a custom molded fitting chair, a significant improvement did not emerge for musculoskeletal deformity indices in severely disabled children. However, there was no significant aggravation of Cobb's angle or Reimers migration percentage in developing children. Therefore, it is thought be helpful to prevent rapid aggravation of musculoskeletal deformities. PMID:23524955

  4. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in truck drivers and official workers.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Abolfazl; Vahedian, Mostafa; Mohebi, Siamak; Najafi, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are common among drivers and official workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are frequent causes of absenteeism in many countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and risk factors associated with these symptoms. A total of 346 workers and truck drivers were participated in this case-control study. All the participants were interviewed using a self- administered questionnaire containing demographic data and a Nordic questionnaire about presence site and characteristics of pain. Then the data were gathered, and the prevalence of the mentioned parameters and the relationship between variables in the questionnaire were analyzed statistically. The results of this study revealed that 78.6% out of truck drivers and 55.5% out of official workers had musculoskeletal disorders in on-year and there was a significant difference between two groups in this regard (P<0.001). On the whole, the most common symptoms were neck 47 (27.2%), followed by lumbar pain 42 (24.3%) in truck drivers and knee 63 (36.4%) and lumbar symptom 21 (12.1%) in one-year in official workers. In this study, musculoskeletal disorders showed statistically significant association with work duration, age and BMI (P<0.001). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the musculoskeletal troubles have a high frequency among the drivers and official workers. Both groups usually remain on a prolonged uncomfortable postures and high static muscle load which may imply a risk for development of the troubles.

  5. A Prospective Study of Factors Affecting Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    for musculoskeletal disorders . J Occup Rehabil. 2005;15:377–92. 18. Crook J, Milner R, Schultz IZ, Stringer B. Determinants of occupational disability...Spine. 1996;21:2900–7. 61. Hansson T, Jensen I. Sickness absence due to back and neck disorders . Scan J Public Health. 2004;32:109–51. 62. Lincoln AE...Naval Health Research Center A Prospective Study of Factors Affecting Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injuries Stephanie Booth-Kewley Emily

  6. Complementary and alternative treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Grazio, Simeon; Balen, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high and increasing worldwide. Patients usually use CAM in addition to conventional medicine, mainly to treat pain. In a large number of cases, people use CAM for chronic musculoskeletal pain as in osteoarthritis, back pain, neck pain, or fibromyalgia. Herewith, a review is presented of CAM efficacy in treating musculoskeletal pain for which, however, no scientific research has so far provided evidence solid enough. In some rare cases where adequate pain control cannot be achieved, CAM might be considered in rational and individual approach based on the first general rule in medicine "not to harm" and on the utility theory of each intervention, i.e. according to the presumed mechanism of painful stimulus and with close monitoring of the patient's response. Further high quality studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy and side effects of CAM methods. Therefore, conventional medicine remains the main mode of treatment for patients with musculoskeletal painful conditions.

  7. The relationship between smartphone use and subjective musculoskeletal symptoms and university students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Jin-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of smartphones by university students in selected areas, their musculoskeletal symptoms, and the associated hazard ratio. [Subjects and Methods] This involved the completion of a self-administered questionnaire by dental hygiene students in Seoul, Gyeonggido, and Gyeongsangbukdo. The 292 completed copies of the questionnaire were then analyzed. [Results] The most painful body regions after the use of smartphones were found to be the shoulders and neck. In the musculoskeletal system, back pain was found to have a positive correlation with the size of the smartphone’s liquid crystal display (LCD) screen, and pain in legs and feet were found to have a negative correlation with the length of time that the smartphone was used. As a result, it was revealed that the use of a smartphone was correlated with musculoskeletal symptoms. [Conclusion] Therefore, in today’s environment, where the use of smartphones is on the rise, it is necessary to improve the ways that they are used and to develop a preventive program to alleviate the symptoms of musculoskeletal damage. PMID:25931684

  8. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  9. Musculoskeletal symptoms among handicraft workers engaged in hand sewing tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Iman; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among Iranian handicraft workers engaged in different hand sewing tasks. Methods: Data were collected using questionnaires (including the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) as well as direct observations of posture (using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment [RULA] method) from 632 workers including carpet handicraft workers (n=222), textiles handicraft workers (n=209), and leather handicraft workers (n=201) in Tabriz, Iran. Results: The response rate was 88.8%. The overall prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, particularly in the neck (57.9%), lower back (51.6%), and shoulders (40.5%) was relatively high. The prevalence of neck and shoulder pain was higher among females and with increasing age. Working posture and fast working were associated with neck, shoulder, and lower back pain. Years worked as a sewing worker was associated with neck and lower back pain. Long duration of continuous sitting work (>2 h) without a break was associated with neck pain. Body mass index, marital status, sport/physical activity, smoking, daily working hours, job satisfaction, and perceived pressure due to work had no effect. Conclusions: The findings indicate a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among the studied handicraft workers and emphasize the importance of individual, physical, and psychosocial aspects of hand sewing tasks in this regard. PMID:27725482

  10. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, most commonly with the structures of the cervical spine (neck). Only in rare instances is neck pain ... the neck. Pain can be localized to the cervical spine or may travel down an arm (radiculopathy). All ...

  11. Neck dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are three main types of neck dissection surgery: Radical neck dissection: All the tissue on the side of ... Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap ...

  12. Upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Occhionero, Vincenzo; Korpinen, Leena; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2014-01-01

    The literature on upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (UL-MSD) in different groups of healthcare workers was reviewed: 65 relevant studies were collected. In dentists, the neck was the most frequently affected segment, with prevalences up to 73% and exceeding 50% in 7 out of 12 studies. In dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, the hand/wrist had the highest prevalence in the majority of the studies. In nurses, the most seriously affected anatomic sites were the neck and shoulders. Physiotherapists had the lowest prevalence of UL-MSD. A high prevalence of upper limb disease, mainly carpal tunnel syndrome, was reported in dentists, dental hygienists, anesthesia nurses and endoscopists. The high prevalence of upper limb disorders/diseases reported in health personnel supports the hypothesis of a significant risk in these workers. However, the possible role of biomechanical overload, as much as that of stress or other personal factors, cannot be currently assessed. Practitioner Summary: Published studies support the hypothesis of a significant risk of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare activities. The neck was the most frequently affected segment in dentists, the hand/wrist in dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, and the neck and shoulders in nurses. Lower prevalence was reported in physiotherapists. A high prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome was also observed in various healthcare activities.

  13. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  14. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  15. Neck Pain: Revision 2017.

    PubMed

    Blanpied, Peter R; Gross, Anita R; Elliott, James M; Devaney, Laurie Lee; Clewley, Derek; Walton, David M; Sparks, Cheryl; Robertson, Eric K

    2017-07-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these revised clinical practice guidelines is to review recent peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to neck pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2017;47(7):A1-A83. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0302.

  16. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature

    PubMed Central

    Lavallee, Amy V.; Ching, Randal P.; Nuckley, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6–23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects’ ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30 s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force= −0.0879(age)2+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions. PMID:23127787

  17. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Amy V; Ching, Randal P; Nuckley, David J

    2013-02-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6-23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects' ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force=-0.0879(age)(2)+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions.

  18. Work-related musculoskeletal pain among dentists in Madhya Pradesh, India: prevalence, associated risk factors, and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Deshraj

    2014-05-01

    Dentists are at risk for developing musculoskeletal problems. This provided the impetus for a study of prevalence, distribution, and the associated risk factors of these problems in the dentist population of Madhya Pradesh, India. The data were analyzed from 213 dentists of Madhya Pradesh, India, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria and gave their consent for this cross-sectional study. Subjects were assessed by a special questionnaire using demographic details with working conditions. Chi-square test was used for the statistical analysis of the data. Of total 213 participants, 83.10% had at least one musculoskeletal pain in the past 12 months. Low back pain was most frequent (57.75%) followed by neck pain (31.17%) and wrist pain (17.84%). The pain was significantly prevalent among the group who worked in direct vision, without assistant, in standing position or following none of the fitness regimen.

  19. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, K V; Graham, N; Gross, A R; Goldsmith, C H; Wang, E; Cameron, I D; Kay, T

    2006-07-19

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are the perceptions of benefits. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more traditional treatments for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarizes the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. To determine the effects of acupuncture for individuals with neck pain. We searched CENTRAL (2006, issue 1) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, CINAHL from their beginning to February 2006. We searched reference lists and the acupuncture database TCMLARS in China. Any published trial using randomized (RCT) or quasi-randomized (quasi-RCT) assignment to the intervention groups, either in full text or abstract form, were included. Two reviewers made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of trial methodological quality. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad criteria. Consensus was used to resolve disagreements. When clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies using random-effects meta-analysis models. We did not find any trials that examined the effects of acupuncture for acute or subacute pain, but we found 10 trials that examined acupuncture treatments for chronic neck pain. Overall, methodological quality had a mean of 2.3/5 on the Jadad Scale. For chronic mechanical neck disorders, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective for pain relief than some types of sham controls, measured immediately post-treatment. There was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than inactive, sham treatments measured immediately post-treatment and at short-term follow-up (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.61 to -0.12). There was limited evidence that acupuncture was more effective than massage at short-term follow-up. For chronic

  20. Artifacts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Lorenz, Eileen J; Witte, Russell S

    2014-02-01

    During the past 2 decades, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) has been increasingly utilized in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal trauma and diseases with results comparable with MR imaging. US has an advantage over other cross-sectional modalities in many circumstances due to its superior spatial resolution and ability to allow dynamic assessment. When performing musculoskeletal US, the examiner has to be knowledgeable in the complex anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and US imaging technique. Additionally, he or she must be familiar with several common imaging artifacts in musculoskeletal US that may be mistaken for pathology, as well as several artifacts that frequently accompany pathologic conditions. These artifacts may occur with both B-mode gray-scale and Doppler imaging. In this article, we discuss common artifacts seen in musculoskeletal US and techniques to avoid or minimize these artifacts during clinical US examinations. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Musculoskeletal Discomforts and Occupational Stressors Among Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Kamran; Hosseini, Alireza; Safarian, Mohammad Hasan; Abedi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress in nurses may increase the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts and job stress among nurses and to investigate the association between musculoskeletal discomforts and occupational stressors. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 144 nurses in one of the main referral hospitals of Tehran-Iran were randomly selected and studied. Data were collected by HSE job stress questionnaire and The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire through interviews with nurses in their workplace. Results: Most reported musculoskeletal discomforts localized in the neck, back, knee and shoulder and the minimal discomforts were in wrist and elbow. On the other hand, stressors such as demand, changes in workplace, control and responsibilities had significant effect on increasing musculoskeletal discomforts of organs such as neck, shoulders and back (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was a significant association between stressors such as demand, control, responsibilities and changes in workplace and reported musculoskeletal disorders, especially in neck, shoulders and back. It is suggested to use defined programs for management and control of stressors to control occupational stress in nurses. Moreover, prevention of musculoskeletal discomforts due to their high prevalence in the study population is important. PMID:26258080

  2. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN AND ASSOCIATED DISABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Coggon, David

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been given to the physical determinants of common musculoskeletal complaints such as back and arm pain, research points to a stronger influence of psychological factors. Multiple studies have implicated poor mental health and somatisation (a tendency to worry about common somatic symptoms) in the incidence and chronicity of musculoskeletal pain and associated disability. Also important are adverse beliefs about the prognosis of such disorders, and about the role of physical activity in their development and persistence. Differences in societal beliefs may have contributed to major variation in the prevalence of disabling musculoskeletal pain that has been observed between countries and in the same countries over time. Psychosocial aspects of work have also been linked with musculoskeletal pain, although relative risks have generally been smaller. There is a need to take account of psychological factors in the clinical management of patients with back, neck and arm pain. PMID:26612236

  3. Observational stress factors and musculoskeletal disorders in urban transit operators.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit A; Krause, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    Associations and pathways between observed (rather than self-reported) job stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in 66 transit operators were investigated to determine specific stressors and vulnerable body regions affected, while adjusting for physical workload. Job stressors, defined as barriers to progress with work, comprised 7 categories and the sum of stressors. Outcomes included back and neck pain, low back pain, neck pain, pain of the upper extremities and the lower extremities, and any combination of these. Stressors were significantly associated with the combined musculoskeletal disorders category (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55), back and neck pain (OR = 1.41), low back pain (OR = 1.46), and pain in the lower extremities (OR = 1.44) after controlling for confounders. Five barrier categories had at least 1 significant association with outcomes. Results provide specific intervention targets by avoiding common method variance bias.

  4. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Gross, Anita; Goldsmith, Charlie; Wang, Ellen; Cameron, Ian; Kay, Theresa

    2007-01-15

    Systematic review. To determine the effects of acupuncture for individuals with neck pain. Neck pain is one of the 3 most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are the perceptions of benefits. METHODS.: We searched CENTRAL (2006, issue 1) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature from their beginning to February 2006. We searched reference lists and the acupuncture database TCMLARS in China. Any published trials using randomized (RCT) or quasi-randomized (quasi-RCT) assignment to the intervention groups, either in full text or abstract form, were included. We found 10 trials that examined acupuncture treatments for chronic neck pain. Overall, methodologic quality had a mean of 2.3 of 5 on the Jadad scale. For chronic mechanical neck disorders, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective for pain relief than some types of sham controls, measured immediately posttreatment. There was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than inactive, sham treatments measured immediately posttreatment, and at short-term follow-up (pooled standardized mean difference, -0.37; 95% confidence interval, -0.61 to -0.12). There was limited evidence that acupuncture was more effective than massage at short-term follow-up. For chronic neck disorders with radicular symptoms, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than a wait-list control at short-term follow-up. There is moderate evidence that acupuncture relieves pain better than some sham treatments, measured at the end of the treatment. There is moderate evidence that those who received acupuncture reported less pain at short-term follow-up than those on a waiting list. There is also moderate evidence that acupuncture is more effective than inactive treatments for relieving pain posttreatment, and this is maintained at short-term follow-up.

  5. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Iranian Steel Workers.

    PubMed

    Aghilinejad, M; Choobineh, A R; Sadeghi, Z; Nouri, M K; Bahrami Ahmadi, A

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders in developing countries are considered as main cause of occupational disorders and disability and highly associated with socioeconomic burden to individual, organization and society in general view. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and associated risk factors among Iranian steel workers. In a cross-sectional study, 1439 questionnaires were provided from 1984 randomly selected workers of four Iranian steel industries. Data of musculoskeletal disorders was gathered by means of standardized Nordic self-reporting questionnaire. Demographic and work related data were collected into the check list. Out of 1984 individuals, 1439 questionnaires returned and mean age of study workers was 37.23±8.74 years old. Among workers, 46.3% in the past week and 61% in the last year claimed one of musculoskeletal disorders in their bodies. Lumbar, knee(s) and neck areas had the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders had significant association with the job time of work and BMI. Musculoskeletal disorders in Iranian steel industries happened in high rate. Ergonomic interventions strategies into the workplaces must be focused to eliminate environmental hazards such as apposition on the time of work and manual handling of heavy loads.

  6. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cho, KiHun; Cho, Hwi-Young; Han, Gyeong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psychosocial stress, occupational stress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners. [Subjects and Methods] Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to 401 dental practitioners in Korea. To assess the risk factors related to musculoskeletal disorders, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale, and Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form were used. General and work-related characteristics of the subjects consisted of seven items, including age, career, height, weight, working days/week, working hours/day, and physical strain levels. [Results] In this study, 86.8% of the practitioners experienced musculoskeletal symptoms (shoulders, 72.8%; neck, 69.3%; waist, 68.3%; wrist, 58.4%; back, 44.1%; ankle, 38.7%; knee, 36.9%; hip, 20.4%; and elbows, 9.2%). Moreover, psychosocial and occupational stress can affect the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, we found that psychosocial stress has significant influence on the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] To increase the quality of life and provide high-quality medical service for dental practitioners, risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders must be managed. Accordingly, dental practitioners must maintain good posture, get an appropriate amount of rest, and perform regular stretching exercise to reduce psychological stress and improve the work environment.

  7. Quantitative Sensory Testing in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, several published articles have demonstrated that quantitative sensory testing (QST) is useful in the analysis of musculoskeletal pain disorders. Based on the evidence from these studies, it is assumed that QST might be a useful tool in the analysis of the pathogenesis, classification, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The objective of this paper is to discuss measurement properties of QST and potentials research and clinical applications in musculoskeletal pain. This is a review of the current knowledge base on QST as it relates to musculoskeletal pain disorders. We based our summary on articles retrieved from Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to present) including EMBASE, AMED, and PsycINFO databases to search for all published literature focused on QST and musculoskeletal pain. QST has been shown to be related to neural sensitivity in musculoskeletal pain. QST measurement properties have been evaluated for multiple sensory evaluation modalities and protocols with no clear superior instrument or test protocol. The research evidence is incomplete, but suggests potential clinical benefits for predicting outcomes and subtyping pain. Threshold detection testing is commonly used to quantify sensory loss or gain, in current practice and has shown moderate reliability. Intensity/magnitude rating can be assessed on a wide range of rating scales and may be more useful for pain rating in a clinical context. Threshold detection-based testing and intensity/magnitude rating-based testing can be combined to determine pain threshold in clinical evaluation. Musculoskeletal pain management may benefit from treatment algorithms that consider mechanism, pain quality, or neurophysiological correlates. Non-invasive QST may be helpful to find sensory array of altered nociceptive process. Due to the diverse etiopathogenetic basis of musculoskeletal pain disorders, a broad range of reliable and valid QST tests may be needed to analyze the various

  8. Musculoskeletal discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the musculoskeletal discipline must identify possible consequences of weightlessness on this system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers. The musculoskeletal system is highly plastic in that is possesses the inherent capability to adapt its structural and functional properties in accordance with the type and degree of stimuli imposed on it. Prolonged space travel is essentially a period of significant unloading of the musculoskeletal system. This results in adaptive responses in the structure and function of this system, placing it on the low end of a continuum from one of complete disuse to one of maximal use. There is a high probability that the musculoskeletal system is functionally impaired with increasing duration of weightlessness. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences division research and development activities in the area of musculoskeletal function. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines research opportunities, which encompass critical questions in the subdiscipline areas (e.g., muscle, bone, and other musculoskeletal connective tissues). These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  9. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Irnich, Dominik; Cameron, Ian D; Forget, Mario

    2016-05-04

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are perceptions of benefit. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. This update replaces our 2006 Cochrane review update on this topic. To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015. We searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005. We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two review authors made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of quality of trial methods. We assessed study quality by using the Cochrane Back Review Group 'Risk of bias' tool. We used consensus to resolve disagreements, and when clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies by using random-effects meta-analysis models. Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non

  10. Ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal symptoms in surgeons with three types of surgery: Open, laparoscopic, and microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Ehsani, Ali Asghar; Talebi, Atefeh; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Dehghan, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal symptoms are the main cause of loss of working time, and increase in labor costs. Poor posture is the most important risk factor for work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. This study aimed at evaluating the role of ergonomic risk factors in different surgical (open surgery, laparoscopy, and microsurgery) in the frequency or resonance frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted on 81 surgeons in a hospital in Tehran. In this study, the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was evaluated using the Nordic Questionnaire. Moreover, Workplace ergonomic risk assessment method (WERA) was used to evaluate ergonomic risk factors in 3 types of open surgery, laparoscopy, and microsurgery. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck, back, shoulder, and arm is high in surgeons (over 75%). The mean final score of WERA was 40.11, representing the high risk of the 3 types of surgery for the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. Results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck, waist and wrists had a significant relationship with the body posture in the 3 types of open surgery, laparoscopy, and microsurgery (p<0.05). Conclusion: In the present study, the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was high in the neck, waist, and hands surgeries. Depending on the type of surgery, teaching correct working methods, using proper seats and ergonomic equipment are the best strategies to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the surgical profession. PMID:28491842

  11. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    PubMed

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  12. [Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors and Presence of Musculoskeletal disorders in Nursing Staff: A review of Studies and Meta-Analysis].

    PubMed

    Ballester Arias, Antonio Ramón; García, Ana María

    2017-04-07

    There is scientific evidence that psychosocial factors are significantly associated with discomfort and / or pain musculoskeletal complaints in nursing staff. The objective of the research was to analyze the association between occupational exposure to psychosocial factors at work and musculoskeletal damage in nursing staff. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies published up to 2015 in English, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish evaluating the association between musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial factors in the work of nursing staff. A search was made using the same strategies in the bibliographic databases Web of Science, MEDLINE (Pubmed), NIOSHIC and CINAHL. We assessed the quality of eligible studies, heterogeneity, and sensitivity analyzes. 64 studies were reviewed and quality criteria were accepted, accepting those of medium and high quality (n = 47). In a second screening, those that did not meet inclusion criteria were eliminated, with 36 studies being included in the meta-analysis. Statistically significant associations were found between high demands with discomfort and / or pain neck (OR 1.55, IC95%: 1.39-1.72). And between the effort-reward imbalance with discomfort and / or pain in any body region (OR 2.56, IC95%: 1.59-4.11). Heterogeneity was generally average and low for most subsets of the meta-analysis. Occupational exposure to psychosocial factors is associated with discomfort and / or pain in different body areas. Therefore, the improvement of the psychosocial environment has an impact on the reduction and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Buxton, Orfeu M; Dennerlein, Jack T; Boden, Leslie I; Hashimoto, Dean M; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1,119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for covariates including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64-3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64-4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54-3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56-3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82-3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for covariates. Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effect of three ergonomics interventions on body posture and musculoskeletal disorders among stuff of Isfahan Province Gas Company

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Soury, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) is high among computer users. The study investigates the effect of three ergonomic interventions on the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff of Isfahan Province Gas Company, including training, sport, and installation of software. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in the summer of 2013 on 75 (52 men, 23 women) Isfahan Province Gas Company employees in three phases (phase 1: Evaluation of present situation, phase 2: Performing interventions, and phase 3: Re-evaluation). Participants were divided into three groups (training, exercise, and software). The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) were used. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software and McNemar test, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: Based on the evaluations, there was a decrease in musculoskeletal symptoms among the trained group participants after they received the training. McNemar test showed that the lower rate of pain in low back, neck, knee, and wrist was significant (P < 0.05). The results obtained from the RULA method for evaluation of posture showed an average 25 points decrease in the right side of the body and 20 points decrease in the left side of the body in the group subjected to training. Based on t-test, the decrease was significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that majority of the participants accepted interventions, which indicates that most of the people were unsatisfied with the work settings and seeking improvement at the workplace. Overall, the findings show that training, chair adjustment, and arrangement in workplace could decrease musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:26430692

  15. The effect of three ergonomics interventions on body posture and musculoskeletal disorders among stuff of Isfahan Province Gas Company.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Soury, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) is high among computer users. The study investigates the effect of three ergonomic interventions on the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff of Isfahan Province Gas Company, including training, sport, and installation of software. The study was performed in the summer of 2013 on 75 (52 men, 23 women) Isfahan Province Gas Company employees in three phases (phase 1: Evaluation of present situation, phase 2: Performing interventions, and phase 3: Re-evaluation). Participants were divided into three groups (training, exercise, and software). The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) were used. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software and McNemar test, t-test, and Chi-square test. Based on the evaluations, there was a decrease in musculoskeletal symptoms among the trained group participants after they received the training. McNemar test showed that the lower rate of pain in low back, neck, knee, and wrist was significant (P < 0.05). The results obtained from the RULA method for evaluation of posture showed an average 25 points decrease in the right side of the body and 20 points decrease in the left side of the body in the group subjected to training. Based on t-test, the decrease was significant. The study demonstrated that majority of the participants accepted interventions, which indicates that most of the people were unsatisfied with the work settings and seeking improvement at the workplace. Overall, the findings show that training, chair adjustment, and arrangement in workplace could decrease musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Patterns of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among workers in palm plantation occupation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Leonard Joseph; Jafarzadeh Esfehani, Ali; Ramli, Ayiesah; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Justine, Maria; Mohan, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the patterns of ongoing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) and exposure risk to musculoskeletal injuries for various body regions among palm plantation workers. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (SNMQ) was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders symptoms. The Quick Exposure check (QEC) was used to assess the exposure risk of farmers to WRMDs. The common pattern of WRMDs was back pain (40%), followed by shoulder pain (19%). The QEC revealed high exposure risk for neck (56%), followed by back (45.6%). The results from the SNMQ showed that 58% reported pain in 1 region, followed by 2 regions (10.7%) and 3 regions (3.6%). Back pain and shoulder pain were found to be common among workers in palm plantation occupation. Nevertheless, the neck region appeared to have the highest risk of exposure to injuries. © 2013 APJPH.

  17. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Peate, W F

    1994-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders of the workplace include the acute, cumulative and chronic injuries or illnesses of the soft tissues which are caused by mechanical stress, strain, sprain, vibration, inflammation, or irritation. The successful management of occupational musculoskeletal disorders must account for workplace conditions (ergonomics and work practices), psychosocial factors, diagnostic uncertainties, and the need for active modalities (exercises and a progressive increase in activities of daily living), rather than passive (bed rest and traction). Although most occupational musculoskeletal disorders respond to conservative measures such as ice or heat, protective devices such as, neutral splints for carpal tunnel syndrome, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and progressive strengthening, resolution may take months. Prevention is often more important than treatment, and may entail workplace revisions and special worker training. Worker selection programs--strength testing, pre-placement radiographs, and inquiries about prior low back pain--have poor predictive value.

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Schibye, B; Skov, T; Ekner, D; Christiansen, J U; Sjøgaard, G

    1995-12-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to describe the prevalences and development of musculoskeletal symptoms among sewing machine operators in relation to age and exposure and among former sewing machine operators who changed exposure by changing occupation. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed among 327 sewing machine operators in 1985 with the use of the standardized Nordic questionnaire. A follow-up study in 1991 showed that approximately one-third was still working as a sewing machine operator, one-third had changed occupation, and the rest were out of employment. The exposure was assessed by a questionnaire regarding the type of machine being operated, work organization, workplace design, units produced per day, and payment system. High prevalences of musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulders were found, with some associations to exposure variables such as efficiency. Initially symptom-free sewing machine operators were not at a higher risk of developing symptoms when they continued sewing during the six-year follow-up when compared with those who changed to other employment. However, symptomatic sewing machine operators who quit sewing were much more likely to be relieved of their symptoms than were symptomatic operators who continued sewing, odds ratio 3.26 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.38-7.72] for 12-month symptoms and odds ratio 3.90 (95% CI 1.28-11.90) for 7-day symptoms. This trend also applied to long-lasting symptoms. The results demonstrate that, for many sewing machine operators, neck and shoulder symptoms are reversible and may be influenced by reallocation to other worktasks.

  19. Musculoskeletal disorders among Irish farmers.

    PubMed

    Osborne, A; Blake, C; McNamara, J; Meredith, D; Phelan, J; Cunningham, C

    2010-12-01

    Farming is an occupation that predisposes individuals to health problems including musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There is limited research regarding MSDs among farmers especially in Ireland. To establish the prevalence of MSDs, identify the most commonly affected body regions and to explore what factors may influence the development of the most common MSDs among farmers in Ireland. A questionnaire survey of Irish farmers was conducted. The study sample comprised 600 farmers (100 farmers from each of the six main farm enterprise systems in Ireland). Of the 600 farmers, 56% had experienced a MSD in the previous year. The most commonly experienced MSDs were back pain (37%) and neck/shoulder pain (25%). Other MSDs experienced in the previous year included knee pain (9%), hand-wrist-elbow pain (9%), ankle/foot pain (9%) and hip pain (8%). Overall, MSDs were more common in farmers working longer hours (P < 0.05). Back pain was more prevalent in full-time farmers (P < 0.05), while prevalence of hip pain was greater in farmers who were older (P < 0.01), full time (P < 0.05), farming for longer (P < 0.01) and working for longer hours (P < 0.01). Farm enterprise was not a factor in influencing the development of MSDs. These findings suggest that the number of hours worked by farmers, rather than enterprise specific tasks render farmers more susceptible to MSDs. Further investigation is needed to explore risk factors in the development of MSDs.

  20. Flexibility along the Neck of the Neogene Terror Bird Andalgalornis steulleti (Aves Phorusrhacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tambussi, Claudia P.; de Mendoza, Ricardo; Degrange, Federico J.; Picasso, Mariana B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Andalgalornis steulleti from the upper Miocene–lower Pliocene (≈6 million years ago) of Argentina is a medium-sized patagornithine phorusrhacid. It was a member of the predominantly South American radiation of ‘terror birds’ (Phorusrhacidae) that were apex predators throughout much of the Cenozoic. A previous biomechanical study suggests that the skull would be prepared to make sudden movements in the sagittal plane to subdue prey. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze the flexion patterns of the neck of Andalgalornis based on the neck vertebrae morphology and biometrics. The transitional cervical vertebrae 5th and 9th clearly separate regions 1–2 and 2–3 respectively. Bifurcate neural spines are developed in the cervical vertebrae 7th to 12th suggesting the presence of a very intricate ligamentary system and of a very well developed epaxial musculature. The presence of the lig. elasticum interespinale is inferred. High neural spines of R3 suggest that this region concentrates the major stresses during downstrokes. Conclusions/Significance The musculoskeletal system of Andalgalornis seems to be prepared (1) to support a particularly big head during normal stance, and (2) to help the neck (and the head) rising after the maximum ventroflexion during a strike. The study herein is the first interpretation of the potential performance of the neck of Andalgalornis in its entirety and we considered this an important starting point to understand and reconstruct the flexion pattern of other phorusrhacids from which the neck is unknown. PMID:22662194

  1. A Method to Develop Neck Injury Criteria to Aid Design and Test of Escape Systems Incorporating Helmet Mounted Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    outcomes. All subjects had radiological scans taken before admittance to the subject panel and were cleared of any musculoskeletal and other...17 Head and Neck Anatomy ...addressed in this chapter. 18 Head and Neck Anatomy First, it is important to understand human head and neck anatomy . The human head

  2. Work-related Musculoskeletal Pain among Different Dental Specialists in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawi, Natheer H; Khatib, Hiba El; Rajoub, Lin; El-Sayed, Mariem; Naji, Rawand; Youssef, Reem; Kawas, Sausan Al

    2016-08-01

    Dentists are at a very high risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The present study aimed at studying the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among different dental specialists in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and correlating the region of pain with the type of clinical work done by the specialists. A sample of more than 100 dentists was chosen randomly from different emirates in UAE. An interview questionnaire was administered regarding the number of years of experience and the presence, region, duration, and type of musculoskeletal pain they experienced. Musculoskeletal pain is experienced by 83.3% of periodontists, 80% of conservative dentists, 77.8% of endodon-tists, 72.7% of orthodontists, 70% of oral surgeons, 63.6% of prosthodontists, 63% of general dental practitioners, and 50% of pedodontists. The results have also indicated that the region of experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty. From those dentists who experience work-related musculoskeletal pain, 80% of conservative dentists experience pain in neck and shoulders, 66.7% of periodontists, and 54.5% of orthodontists experience pain in the lower back region. More than 50% of endodontists experience pain in the neck and shoulders regions, and 39% of general dental practitioners who experience pain in the neck region. Preventive measures need to be taken to decrease the risk of dentists and dental specialists developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among registered general dental practitioners and dental specialists in UAE was not clearly documented. The study results indicated that the region that experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty.

  3. [The epidemiological study of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and related factors among automobile assembly workers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xu; Qin, Ru-Li; Li, Yu-Zhen; Zhang, Xue-Yan; Jia, Ning; Zhang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Gang; Zhao, Jie; Li, Huan-Huan; Jiang, Hai-Qiang

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among automobile assembly workers, to discusses the related risk factors and their relationship. The selected 1508 automobile assembly workers from a north car manufacturing company were regarded as the study object. The hazard zone jobs checklist, Nordic musculoskeletal symptom questionnaire (NMQ) and pain questionnaire were used to perform the epidemiological cross-sectional and retrospective survey and study for the General status, awkward ergonomics factors and related influencing factors, and musculoskeletal disorders of workers. The predominant body sites of occurring WMSDs among automobile assembly workers were mainly low back, wrist, neck and shoulders, the predominant workshop section of occurring WMSDs were mostly concentrated in engine compartment, interior ornament, door cover, chassis and debugging section. The predominant body site of WMSDs among engine compartment and chassis section workers was low back, interior ornament workers were low back and wrist, door cover workers was wrist, chassis workers was low back, debugging workers were neck and low back. Neck musculoskeletal disorders had the trend with the increase of a body height; Smoking may increase the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. The WMSDs appears to be a serious ergonomic proble assem among automobile assembly workers, predominant occurring site of WMSDs is with different workshop section, its characteristics is quite obvious, probably related to its existing awkward work position or activities. The worker height and smoking habits may be important factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders happen.

  4. Neck lump

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neck lump treated. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have an abnormal neck swelling or ... to Expect at Your Office Visit The health care provider will take your medical history and do a physical exam. You may ...

  5. Musculoskeletal reported symptoms among aircraft assembly workers: a multifactorial approach.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Fabrício Augusto; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with reported work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among aircraft assembly workers. Population consisted of 552 (491 men/61 women) workers who performed tasks related to the work of aircraft assembly. Participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire, including socio-demographic information, habits/lifestyles, working conditions, and work organization. Workers also answered the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to obtain data on musculoskeletal symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to analyze factors associated with musculoskeletal reported symptoms. Results showed that body regions with the highest prevalence of reported musculoskeletal symptoms were similar when referred the past twelve months and the past seven days. Significant factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms included variables related to conflicts at work, sleep problems, mental fatigue, and lack of time for personal care and recovery. Working time in the industry was associated only with reports for the last seven days and regular physical activity off-work seems to be a positive factor in preventing musculoskeletal symptoms for the past twelve months. The results highlight the multi-factorial nature of the problem. Actions to prevent musculoskeletal diseases at the aircraft assembly work should consider multiple interventions that would promote better recovery between work shifts.

  6. Musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate laptop users in a Nigerian University.

    PubMed

    Obembe, Adebimpe Olayinka; Johnson, Olubusola Esther; Tanimowo, Tolulope Odunayo; Onigbinde, Ayodele Teslim; Emechete, Anne Anthonette

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorder is a significant health problem affecting adults and young people alike. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain resulting from musculoskeletal disorders is on the increase especially with increased use of laptops. This study determined the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate students of Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife who use laptops. This was a cross-sectional study and participants were selected using the non-probability sampling technique. The Boston University Computer and Health Survey questionnaire was self-administered to 400 undergraduate laptop users. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of frequency and percentage. Three hundred and seventy six out of 400 copies of administered questionnaires were amenable to data analysis representing a response rate of 94%. Pain in the shoulder was the most reported musculoskeletal complaint from 268 (75.7%) participants. Elbow pain was the least common complaint from 132 (37.3%) participants. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was slightly higher among female students 93 (50.3%) of 185 and highest among students aged between 24 and 26 years: 60 (37.5%). In addition, the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints was highest among those who used single-strap laptop bags 176 (94.1%). There is a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate laptop users in OAU and shoulder pain was the most commonly reported.

  7. Prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for shoulder and neck dysfunction after neck dissection: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gane, E M; Michaleff, Z A; Cottrell, M A; McPhail, S M; Hatton, A L; Panizza, B J; O'Leary, S P

    2017-07-01

    Shoulder pain and dysfunction may occur following neck dissection among people being treated for head and neck cancer. This systematic review aims to examine the prevalence and incidence of shoulder and neck dysfunction after neck dissection and identify risk factors for these post-operative complications. Electronic databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane) were searched for articles including adults undergoing neck dissection for head and neck cancer. Studies that reported prevalence, incidence or risk factors for an outcome of the shoulder or neck were eligible and assessed using the Critical Review Form - Quantitative Studies. Seventy-five articles were included in the final review. Prevalence rates for shoulder pain were slightly higher after RND (range, 10-100%) compared with MRND (range, 0-100%) and SND (range, 9-25%). The incidence of reduced shoulder active range of motion depended on surgery type (range, 5-20%). The prevalence of reduced neck active range of motion after neck dissection was 1-13%. Type of neck dissection was a risk factor for shoulder pain, reduced function and health-related quality of life. The prevalence and incidence of shoulder and neck dysfunction after neck dissection varies by type of surgery performed and measure of dysfunction used. Pre-operative education for patients undergoing neck dissection should acknowledge the potential for post-operative shoulder and neck problems to occur and inform patients that accessory nerve preservation lowers, but does not eliminate, the risk of developing musculoskeletal complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  8. Risks of musculoskeletal disorders among betel quid preparers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Chen, Chih-Yong; Sumd, Shih-Bin; Yin, Hsin-I; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Betel quid chewing is common in Taiwan. The work of betel quid preparers is characterized by long hours of static work, awkward working posture and highly repetitive hand/wrist motion. However, the musculoskeletal health of betel quid preparers receives very little attention. The Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was administered, and electrogoniometers and electromyography were used in this cross-sectional study to characterize the hand/wrist motion of the subjects. Physical examinations on the thumbs and wrists of the subjects were conducted by means of Phalen's test and Finkelstein's test, respectively. Among the 225 participants, more than 95% attributed their musculoskeletal complaints to their work, and shoulder, neck, hand/wrist, and lower back discomfort were most frequently reported. More than 70% of the preparers did not seek medical treatment for their musculoskeletal problems. Based on the physical examination, 24% of the participants had suspected symptom of either carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or DeQuervain's tenosynovitis. The instrumental measurements indicated that betel quid preparation is characterized by extreme angle ranges and moderate repetition of wrist motion as well as low forceful exertion. This study concludes that betel quid preparers are a high risk group of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Future studies by electrogoniometers and detailed physical examination on betel quid preparers are needed to determine the predisposing factors for CTS. Some intervention measures to prevent MSDs and to lessen psychological stress for this group of workers are strongly suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ergonomic intervention, workplace exercises and musculoskeletal complaints: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Heydari, Mohammad; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent occupational disorders in different jobs such as office work. Some interventions such as ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises are introduced as the methods for alleviating these disorders. In this study we compared the effect of ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises on musculoskeletal pain and discomfort in a group of office workers. Methods: In an interventional study on office workers, the effect of two interventions was compared. Ergonomic modification consisted of correcting the arrangement of workstation and changing some equipment; workplace exercises included stretching exercises focusing on neck, shoulders, low back, and hand and wrist. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed and compared before and after 1 month interventions. Results: The frequency of musculoskeletal complaints was high before the study. Both interventions significantly reduced complaints in a similar manner except for low back pain which was reduced in exercise group more than the other group. Conclusion: In this study we found a beneficial short-term effect for both ergonomic modifications and stretching work-place exercises on reducing musculoskeletal pain in office workers. PMID:25405134

  10. Ergonomic intervention, workplace exercises and musculoskeletal complaints: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Heydari, Mohammad; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent occupational disorders in different jobs such as office work. Some interventions such as ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises are introduced as the methods for alleviating these disorders. In this study we compared the effect of ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises on musculoskeletal pain and discomfort in a group of office workers. In an interventional study on office workers, the effect of two interventions was compared. Ergonomic modification consisted of correcting the arrangement of workstation and changing some equipment; workplace exercises included stretching exercises focusing on neck, shoulders, low back, and hand and wrist. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed and compared before and after 1 month interventions. The frequency of musculoskeletal complaints was high before the study. Both interventions significantly reduced complaints in a similar manner except for low back pain which was reduced in exercise group more than the other group. In this study we found a beneficial short-term effect for both ergonomic modifications and stretching work-place exercises on reducing musculoskeletal pain in office workers.

  11. Flexion-relaxation ratio in computer workers with and without chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carina Ferreira; dos Santos, Marina Foresti; Chaves, Thais Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) and flexion-relaxation ratios (FR-ratios) using surface electromyography (sEMG) of the cervical extensor muscles of computer workers with and without chronic neck pain, as well as of healthy subjects who were not computer users. This study comprised 60 subjects 20-45years of age, of which 20 were computer workers with chronic neck pain (CPG), 20 were computer workers without neck pain (NPG), and 20 were control individuals who do not use computers for work and use them less than 4h/day for other purposes (CG). FRP and FR-ratios were analyzed using sEMG of the cervical extensors. Analysis of FR-ratios showed smaller values in the semispinalis capitis muscles of the two groups of workers compared to the control group. The reference FR-ratio (flexion relaxation ratio [FRR], defined as the maximum activity in 1s of the re-extension/full flexion sEMG activity) was significantly higher in the computer workers with neck pain compared to the CG (CPG: 3.10, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 2.50-3.70; NPG: 2.33, CI95% 1.93-2.74; CG: 1.99, CI95% 1.81-2.17; p<0.001). The FR-ratios and FRR of sEMG in this study suggested that computer use could increase recruitment of the semispinalis capitis during neck extension (concentric and eccentric phases), which could explain our results. These results also suggest that the FR-ratios of the semispinalis may be a potential functional predictive neuromuscular marker of asymptomatic neck musculoskeletal disorders since even asymptomatic computer workers showed altered values. On the other hand, the FRR values of the semispinalis capitis demonstrated a good discriminative ability to detect neck pain, and such results suggested that each FR-ratio could have a different application.

  12. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in music students-associated musculoskeletal signs.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, A; Möller, H; Seidel, W; Rigotti, T

    2012-12-01

    Pain and overuse are common problems for musicians. Up to 80% of professional musicians suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). The prevalence rate in music students is very high as well. Sufficient data on the underlying musculoskeletal dysfunctions however is scarce. Additionally, the self-assessment of health in musicians seems to differ compared to non-musicians, which might influence their attitudes concerning preventive strategies. Evaluation of frequency of PRMD in music students, investigation of signs and symptoms in music students compared to non-music controls, comparison of self-reported health and well-being between the two groups. Prospective, cross-sectional, case control, non-randomized. Other (University volunteers). Music students in comparison to a non-music control group. Musculoskeletal examination and questionnaire of 36 volunteers of a music university and 19 volunteer students of an university of education were analyzed. The total number of musculoskeletal dysfunctions and differences between the student groups were examined. The personal pain and health self-rating were compared between music and non-music students. Eighty one percent of musicians experienced PRMD. Musicians experienced 6.19 pain regions on average compared to 4.31 of non-musicians. Musicians experiencing PRMD reported significantly (P<0.05) more pain locations than musicians without. Music students presented with nearly the double amount (8.39 versus 4.37) of musculoskeletal dysfunctions per person compared to the non-music control group. Nevertheless, musicians significantly (P<0.05) rated their health more positively than the controls. Musicians presented with more pain regions and a higher amount of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Further studies evaluating the clinical relevance and their role in the development of PRMD are warranted. Screening of musicians for musculoskeletal dysfunction may identify those musicians at increased risk. Early

  13. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Young Dentists in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Phedy, P; Gatam, L

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Musculoskeletal problems are often work related. Dentists have been reported to have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. Dentists have to perform repetitive tasks, often in awkward and nonergonomic positions in their practice. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Five-hundred copies of Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire were distributed to dentists who participated in a congress of a regional branch of the Indonesian Dentist Association. Data such as sex, length of practice, the presence of assistance, smoking, occupational stress, body mass index, hand dominance, and exercise were collected. Dentist who had practised for more than five years were excluded. Results: Two hundred and forty-one respondents fulfilled the research criteria. Musculoskeletal symptoms occurred in 63.5% respondents. Fatigue and pain were the most common manifestations of musculoskeletal symptoms among dentists (36.5 and 24.9% respectively). Prolonged sitting was the most common aggravating factor (26.6%) while exercise successfully relieved symptoms in 35.3% of respondents. Neck, upper back and lower back were the most common sites involved with prevalence of 25.7, 22.4, and 20.7% respectively. Neck was also the most common site of the symptoms preventing normal work during the preceding 12 months (8.3%). Exercise and stress are associated with the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms (p=0.01 and p<0.01 respectively). Exercise is associated with fatigue (p<0.01) and click (p<0.01), stress is associated with pain (p=0.00), stiffness (p=0.00), fatigue (p<0.01), and discomfort (p<0.01). Conclusions: The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in young dentists is 63.5%. Neck is the most common affected region. Stress and exercise are the main associated factor for musculoskeletal problems in dentists.

  14. Musculoskeletal Aspiration Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2012-01-01

    With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections. PMID:24293800

  15. [Co-occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders and influence factors among Chinese auto workers].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-bing; Ling, Rui-jie; Wang, Zheng-lun; Qi, Cheng; Wu, Kun; Yao, Dao-hua; Liu, Fu-ying; Zhao, Tong-qiang; Zheng, Yu-yu; Wang, Sheng; Yang, Lei

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the prevalence and risk factors of multiple musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in auto workers and the associations between MSDs at different sites. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3998 workers, who were selected from a Chinese auto corporation by cluster random sampling, using the revised Nordic MSDs standard questionnaire; 3800 completed questionnaires were returned. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for multiple MSDs. The logbinomial model was used to calculate the prevalence ratios (PRs) of MSDs at different sites and evaluate the associations between MSDs at different sites. Of the 3800 subjects, 2452 (64.5%) had MSDs at two or more sites, and 469 (12.3%) had MSDs at one site. The PRs varied from 1.5 to 6.7, with significant differences among different sites (P < 0.01). Relatively close associations were found between the MSDs at neck and shoulders, back and shoulders/waist, elbows and wrists/hands, waist and neck, wrists/hands and waist, hip and waist, knees and waist, and ankles/feet and elbows. The multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that the highest risk factor for MSDs was poor posture, including often working in an uncomfortable posture, neck bending forward, and neck twisting (ORs = 3.39, 1.93, and 1.38), followed by labor organization, in which break between tasks could decrease the risk of MSDs at three or more sites to 31%, staff shortage, which could increase the risk of MSDs by 75%, and pushing and pulling heavy objects (> 20 kg) (OR = 1.76). Most auto workers with MSDs have multiple sites affected, and there are high associations between the MSDs at different sites. The major risk factors for multiple MSDs in auto workers include poor posture, labor organization, and heavy physical labor.

  16. Critical review of prolotherapy for osteoarthritis, low back pain, and other musculoskeletal conditions: a physiatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunny R; Stitik, Todd P; Foye, Patrick M; Greenwald, Brian D; Campagnolo, Denise I

    2004-05-01

    The current scientific literature relevant to the use of prolotherapy for osteoarthritis, low back pain, and other musculoskeletal conditions was reviewed and critically analyzed to determine a clinical effect. Three randomized, controlled studies were found studying the use of dextrose/glycerine/phenol prolotherapy for chronic low back pain; however, they were inconclusive due to the lack of adequate controls, heterogeneity in patient diagnoses, and variations in solutions injected. Two randomized, controlled studies were found that provide some evidence supporting the use of 10% dextrose prolotherapy for osteoarthritis. The sample size of the study (n = 13) involving osteoarthritic thumbs and fingers may have been too small to be strongly conclusive; however, it provides preliminary data to support future studies. Two studies involving osteoarthritic knees report an improvement in anterior cruciate ligament laxity; however, they did not have control groups for comparison. Only case reports were found supporting the pursuit of controlled clinical studies of prolotherapy for chronic neck pain. On the basis of the scarce body of literature critically reviewed to date, the clinical efficacy of prolotherapy in treating osteoarthritis, low back pain, and other musculoskeletal conditions remains inconclusive.

  17. Musculoskeletal conditions and complementary/alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2004-08-01

    Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions. It is, therefore, essential to define CAM's value for such indications. This chapter summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for back pain, fibromyalgia, neck pain, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. None of the treatments in question is totally devoid of risks. By and large the data are not compelling, not least due to their paucity and methodological limitations. It is, therefore, concluded that our research efforts must be directed towards defining which form of CAM generates more good than harm for which condition.

  18. Update in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Research

    PubMed Central

    Nwawka, O. Kenechi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) research is expanding due to increased clinical utility of sonography. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Ultrasound is widely applied in musculoskeletal imaging and sports medicine. The real-time capabilities and favorable cost profile of US make it ideal for use in diagnosis of musculoskeletal conditions. The enthusiasm for the use of US in musculoskeletal imaging has led to an increase in US research to broaden its applications. Conclusion: Several recent advances have been made in conventional and novel US imaging techniques, quantitative US imaging, and US-guided interventions. Strength of Recommendations Taxonomy (SORT): C PMID:27528698

  19. The effect of magnification lenses on reducing musculoskeletal discomfort among dentists.

    PubMed

    Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Kabir-Mokamelkhah, Elaheh; Talebi, Atefeh; Soleimani, Roghayeh; Dehghan, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most important problems in the health workforce. These discomforts cause many working days losses, increase absenteeism from work, and impose annual economic costs. Awkward posture is the most important factor among the risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. This study aimed at implementing an interventional ergonomic program to minimize musculoskeletal disorder among dentists. Methods: This semi- experimental study was conducted on 75 dentists of Milad hospital using a census method. The Nordic Questionnaire was used to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. In this study, the intervention was to apply optical magnification lens whose impact on reducing musculoskeletal disorder had been previously investigated. Corlett and Bishop Scale was used to evaluate musculoskeletal disorders before and after the intervention. Paired t-test was conducted to compare the discomfort intensity before and after the intervention. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in neck, back, shoulder, and arm were higher than other areas of the body in dentists. There was a significant difference in discomfort intensity of the neck, shoulder, arm, back, elbow, forearm, and the whole body after the ergonomic intervention (p<0.05). Surveys on improving working conditions using the magnification lens revealed that more than 89% of the individuals expressed that the use of the lens increased the ease while working. Conclusion: The present study revealed that the use of optical magnification loupes, because of providing a suitable posture while working, could reduce musculoskeletal disorders in different areas of the body. Thus, we can predict that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders will be reduced in dentists in a long run if they use optical magnification loupes.

  20. Prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort among the workers engaged in jewelry manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Salve, Urmi Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The workers engaged in jewellery manufacturing exposed to various occupational risk factors that lead to development of musculoskeletal disorders. But there is scarcity of reporting the prevalence of the musculoskeletal disorders among them. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort among the workers engaged in jewellery manufacturing in India. Setting and Design: Case Control Study. Materials and Methods: This study was divided into two phases. First phase: prevalence rate were calculated using Modified Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and compared with the control group. Second phase: strength, flexibility and tightness of the muscle groups (neck, lower back and knee) were evaluated through physical examination for the subjects who reported positive prevalence. Statistical Analysis: A comparative inferential statistics was used. Results: This study was divided into two phases. First phase: prevalence rate were calculated using Modified Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and compared with the control group. Second phase:strength, flexibility and tightness of the muscle groups (neck, lower back and knee) were evaluated through physical examination for the subjects who reported positive prevalence. Conclusions: The musculoskeletal disorders among the workers engaged in jewellery manufacturing were found to be specific to the occupation. PMID:26023271

  1. [Focused musculoskeletal sonography].

    PubMed

    Horn, Rudolf

    2015-09-16

    Even in emergent situations, focused musculoskeletal sonography must not be overlooked. It has a place in traumatology no less valuable than its place in internal medicine. It can be used to identify traumatic joint effusions, occult fractures and fissures, joint inflammation, muscle and tendon rupture; it can differentiate soft tissue swelling, locate a foreign body, or identify the location of fractures. Focused ultrasound should be performed by the attending physician directly at the patient’s bedside, in order to answer these specific questions.

  2. Musculoskeletal pain, depression, and stress among Latino manual laborers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Tribble, Anna Grace; Summers, Phillip; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A

    2016-11-01

    The jobs of Latino manual laborers place their mental and physical health at risk. This study evaluates the associations among musculoskeletal pain, mental health, and work organization in Latino manual laborers. Farmworkers and nonfarmworkers (n = 189) in North Carolina were interviewed for self-reported musculoskeletal pain, depressive symptoms, stress, work safety climate, and precarious job status. More nonfarmworkers than farmworkers had neck and shoulder pain, but they did not differ in other areas of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a significant association with neck and shoulder pain (p < .05). Precariousness had a significant association with back pain (p < .05). Farmworker participants had H-2A visas and were afforded some protection compared to nonfarmworker manual workers. Research is needed to improve policy that relieves pain and improves mental health for all Latino manual workers.

  3. Musculoskeletal Pain, Depression and Stress among Latino Manual Laborers in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Tribble, Anna Grace; Summers, Phillip; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The jobs of Latino manual laborers place their mental and physical health at risk. This study evaluates the associations among musculoskeletal pain, mental health, and work organization in Latino manual laborers. Farmworkers and non-farmworkers (n=189) in North Carolina were interviewed for self-reported musculoskeletal pain, depressive symptoms, stress, work safety climate, and precarious job status. More non-farmworkers than farmworkers had neck and shoulder pain, but they did not differ in other areas of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a significant association with neck and shoulder pain (p<0.05). Precariousness had a significant association with back pain (p<0.05). Farmworker participants had H-2A visas and were afforded some protection compared to non-farmworker manual workers. Research is needed to improve policy that relieves pain and improves mental health for all Latino manual workers. PMID:26422551

  4. Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders among Secondary School Saudi Female Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Zuhair, Shatha Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to estimate prevalence and pattern of musculoskeletal pain disorders among secondary school Saudi female teachers in Al-Khobar area and the psychodemographic and psychosocial factors that may affect them. Material and Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted using sample of secondary schools teachers (governmental and private school) in Al-Khobar area, Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Result. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders was 79.17%. Main sites of pain were lower back (63.8%) followed by shoulder (45.4%), neck (42.1%), leg (40.0%), wrist (16.2%), and elbow joint (10.0%). Factors that showed significant relationship were type of school (p value 0.038), age (p value 0.002), weight (p value 0.007), number of children (p value 0.006), shoe type (p value 0.000), teaching years (p value 0.003), and working daily hours (p value 0.027). Conclusion. Secondary school female teachers showed high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders in most anatomic sites, namely, the back, shoulder, neck, legs, wrist, and elbow joint. Risk factors associated with significant pain were type of school, age, weight, number of children, and number of teaching years. PMID:23970968

  5. Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gheno, Ramon; Cepparo, Juan M.; Rosca, Cristina E.; Cotten, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most common problems affecting the elderly. The resulting loss of mobility and physical independence can be particularly devastating in this population. The aim of this article is to present some of the most frequent musculoskeletal disorders of the elderly, such as fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, microcrystal disorders, infections, and tumors. PMID:22919553

  6. Use of Complementary Health Approaches for Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders Among Adults: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Tainya C; Nahin, Richard L; Barnes, Patricia M; Stussman, Barbara J

    2016-10-01

    This report examines the use of complementary health approaches among U.S. adults aged 18 and over who had a musculoskeletal pain disorder. Prevalence of use among this population subgroup is compared with use by persons without a musculoskeletal disorder. Use for any reason, as well as specifically to treat musculoskeletal pain disorders, is examined. Using the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, estimates of the use of complementary health approaches for any reason, as well as use to treat musculoskeletal pain disorders, are presented. Statistical tests were performed to assess the significance of differences between groups of complementary health approaches used among persons with specific musculoskeletal pain disorders. Musculoskeletal pain disorders included lower back pain, sciatica, neck pain, joint pain or related conditions, arthritic conditions, and other musculoskeletal pain disorders not included in any of the previous categories. Respondents could report having more than one disorder. In 2012, 54.5% of U.S. adults had a musculoskeletal pain disorder. The use of any complementary health approach for any reason among persons with a musculoskeletal pain disorder (41.6%) was significantly higher than use among persons without a musculoskeletal pain disorder (24.1%). Among adults with any musculoskeletal pain disorder, the use of natural products for any reason (24.7%) was significantly higher than the use of mind and body approaches (15.3%), practitioner-based approaches (18.2%), or whole medical system approaches (5.3%). The pattern of use of the above-mentioned groups of complementary health approaches was similar for persons without a musculoskeletal disorder. However, prevalence of use among these persons was significantly lower compared with persons with a musculoskeletal disorder. For treatment, the use of practitioner-based approaches among persons with any musculoskeletal pain disorder (9.7%) was more than three times as high as the use of any

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders: OWAS review

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GALÁN, Marta; PÉREZ-ALONSO, José; CALLEJÓN-FERRE, Ángel-Jesús; LÓPEZ-MARTÍNEZ, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) is very important in the world. Governments and companies are the most interested. The objective of the present work is to review the literature on the applications of the OWAS method in the diverse sectors or fields of knowledge and countries from its publication to March 2017. The use of OWAS method has been classified by categories of knowledge, by country and by year. The search was made by selecting only the main collection of the Web of Science. This was selected by the option “Advanced search” using the term OWAS (ts=OWAS) for the time period of 1900 to 2017. A total of 166 results were found, consisting of conference papers and articles in scientific journals. In conclusion, the OWAS has been applied mainly in two sectors: “Manufacturing industries” and “Healthcare and Social assistance activities”. This method needs to be complemented with other indirect or direct methods. Also, whenever the OWAS has been used, whether individually or together with other methods, musculoskeletal disorders risks have been detected, this perhaps being an indicator to review the evaluation parameters because overestimating the risk. PMID:28484144

  8. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  9. Fiddler's neck.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Gata, I M; García-Bravo, B; Camacho, F M

    1997-03-01

    The dermatologic pathological condition of musicians is a rare medical problem. We would like to draw attention to what is called "Fiddler's neck," a process that is peculiar to violin, viola, or cello players and that may be caused by two different mechanisms: contact allergic reaction or a mechanical action.

  10. Work related risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints in the spinning industry in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Gamperiene, M; Stigum, H

    1999-06-01

    To describe the prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal complaints in the back, arms or neck, and legs among workers in the spinning industry, and to investigate the relations between these complaints and work related variables. An interview based questionnaire survey was carried out in two spinning industry factories in Lithuania. The study group consisted of all workers in production (n = 363). Symptoms of the legs were the musculoskeletal symptom reported most often (61%). Many subjects had arms or neck (55%) or back problems (28%). 20% had experienced pain from all three sites. Almost 25% had had musculoskeletal pain every day and 16% had experienced constant pain during previous year. Packers had the highest risk of arms or neck problems whereas spinners had the highest risk of back or leg problems. Working in a strained posture (bending, work with arms raised up above shoulder level, and repetitive movements of the fingers) was associated with all three complaints. Only arms or neck complaints were associated with age. Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among workers producing gobelin or synthetic thread in Lithuania and working in a strained posture is a risk factor for developing musculoskeletal disorders in three body sites: legs, arms or neck, and back. To better understand the different aspects of physical load as risk factors, a more detailed study of the frequency of postural changes as well as an observation of individually adopted postures would be necessary. This applies to intervention studies in factories of the spinning industry to prevent complaints of the legs and shoulders.

  11. Work related risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints in the spinning industry in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Gamperiene, M.; Stigum, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal complaints in the back, arms or neck, and legs among workers in the spinning industry, and to investigate the relations between these complaints and work related variables. METHODS: An interview based questionnaire survey was carried out in two spinning industry factories in Lithuania. RESULTS: The study group consisted of all workers in production (n = 363). Symptoms of the legs were the musculoskeletal symptom reported most often (61%). Many subjects had arms or neck (55%) or back problems (28%). 20% had experienced pain from all three sites. Almost 25% had had musculoskeletal pain every day and 16% had experienced constant pain during previous year. Packers had the highest risk of arms or neck problems whereas spinners had the highest risk of back or leg problems. Working in a strained posture (bending, work with arms raised up above shoulder level, and repetitive movements of the fingers) was associated with all three complaints. Only arms or neck complaints were associated with age. CONCLUSIONS: Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among workers producing gobelin or synthetic thread in Lithuania and working in a strained posture is a risk factor for developing musculoskeletal disorders in three body sites: legs, arms or neck, and back. To better understand the different aspects of physical load as risk factors, a more detailed study of the frequency of postural changes as well as an observation of individually adopted postures would be necessary. This applies to intervention studies in factories of the spinning industry to prevent complaints of the legs and shoulders.   PMID:10474538

  12. WITHDRAWN: Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Irnich, Dominik; Cameron, Ian D; Forget, Mario

    2016-11-17

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are perceptions of benefit. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. This update replaces our 2006 Cochrane review update on this topic. To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015. We searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005. We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two review authors made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of quality of trial methods. We assessed study quality by using the Cochrane Back Review Group 'Risk of bias' tool. We used consensus to resolve disagreements, and when clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies by using random-effects meta-analysis models. Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non

  13. Musculoskeletal Injuries Resulting from Use of Hoverboards.

    PubMed

    Ho, Michelle; Horn, B David; Lin, Ines C; Chang, Benjamin; Carrigan, Robert B; Shah, Apurva

    2017-01-01

    Hoverboards were recently introduced to the US consumer market and experienced rapid popularity. Given the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury with other wheeled recreation devices, we sought to analyze hoverboard injuries in children. A retrospective review of patients with musculoskeletal injury related to hoverboard use was performed at a tertiary care children's hospital. From November 2015 to January 2016, 2.3% of all fractures were related to hoverboards. Common injury mechanisms were fall (79%) and finger entrapment between wheel and wheel-well (10%). The most frequently fractured sites included the distal radius (43%) and phalanx (17%). Common surgical procedures were nailbed repair and pinning for Seymour fracture and percutaneous pinning for distal radius fracture. There exists high risk for distal radius fractures from falls and phalanx fractures from finger entrapment between the wheel and wheel-well. Hoverboard safety can be improved with regular use of wrist guards and improved wheel-well design.

  14. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  15. The effect of a multifaceted ergonomic intervention program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Naser; Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Nassiri-Kashani, Mohammad Hassan; Amiri, Ziba; Talebi, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are the most common occupational injuries in dentists. These disorders occur due to the specific characteristics of dentistry occupation such as the use of tools and instruments and awkward posture. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of multifaceted ergonomic program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. Methods: One hundred-two male dentists who worked in dentistry clinics of Tehran's hospitals participated in this interventional study. Participants were randomly divided into control (n=50) and intervention (n=52) groups. Dentists in the intervention group (n=52) underwent multifaceted ergonomic intervention program for 8 weeks and dentists in the control group (n=50) only received the measurements. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated in each of the 2 groups at 3 time points before the intervention, 3, and 6 months after the intervention using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Paired t-test was used to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders before and after the ergonomic intervention program at the end of 3 and 6 months. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was reduced after the intervention in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, back, thigh, knees, and feet (p<0.05). On the other hand, the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders increased in the control group in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, thigh, and knee, respectively. The survey results revealed that 98% of the participants agreed with this intervention program. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the multifaceted ergonomic intervention program, which included improving working conditions, identifying ergonomic risk factors, regular exercise, and discussion group meetings, could decrease the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists.

  16. The effect of a multifaceted ergonomic intervention program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Naser; Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Nassiri-Kashani, Mohammad Hassan; Amiri, Ziba; Talebi, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are the most common occupational injuries in dentists. These disorders occur due to the specific characteristics of dentistry occupation such as the use of tools and instruments and awkward posture. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of multifaceted ergonomic program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. Methods: One hundred-two male dentists who worked in dentistry clinics of Tehran's hospitals participated in this interventional study. Participants were randomly divided into control (n=50) and intervention (n=52) groups. Dentists in the intervention group (n=52) underwent multifaceted ergonomic intervention program for 8 weeks and dentists in the control group (n=50) only received the measurements. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated in each of the 2 groups at 3 time points before the intervention, 3, and 6 months after the intervention using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Paired t-test was used to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders before and after the ergonomic intervention program at the end of 3 and 6 months. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was reduced after the intervention in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, back, thigh, knees, and feet (p<0.05). On the other hand, the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders increased in the control group in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, thigh, and knee, respectively. The survey results revealed that 98% of the participants agreed with this intervention program. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the multifaceted ergonomic intervention program, which included improving working conditions, identifying ergonomic risk factors, regular exercise, and discussion group meetings, could decrease the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. PMID:28491847

  17. Prevalence of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists: Symptoms and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Rafie, Forouzan; Zamani Jam, Azadeh; Shahravan, Arash; Raoof, Maryam; Eskandarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine the factors that lead to musculoskeletal disorders in dentists by assessing their posture using RULA method. In this cross-sectional study, 130 dentists (84 male and 46 female) participated. The posture of the subjects during their normal workload was recorded by using the RULA method, and the range of musculoskeletal pains by using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), and individual and professional data was assessed by a demographics questionnaire. All tests were performed at the P < 0.05 level. Assessment of the physical status of the subjects showed that 82.8% of subjects were at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The majority of musculoskeletal pains were in the neck (55.9%) and the shoulder (43.8%). Moreover, 68.9% of the subjects had experienced pain at least once over the last year. Significant relationships were observed between musculoskeletal pain and daily work hours (P = 0.07) and number of patients (P = 0.02), but the pain was not significantly associated with BMI and experience. The present findings showed that unsuitable posture of dentists during work has a considerable effect on musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, further investigation is required to avoid the detrimental effects of wrong posture.

  18. Prevalence of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists: Symptoms and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rafie, Forouzan; Zamani Jam, Azadeh; Shahravan, Arash; Raoof, Maryam; Eskandarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present research was to examine the factors that lead to musculoskeletal disorders in dentists by assessing their posture using RULA method. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 130 dentists (84 male and 46 female) participated. The posture of the subjects during their normal workload was recorded by using the RULA method, and the range of musculoskeletal pains by using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), and individual and professional data was assessed by a demographics questionnaire. All tests were performed at the P < 0.05 level. Results. Assessment of the physical status of the subjects showed that 82.8% of subjects were at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The majority of musculoskeletal pains were in the neck (55.9%) and the shoulder (43.8%). Moreover, 68.9% of the subjects had experienced pain at least once over the last year. Significant relationships were observed between musculoskeletal pain and daily work hours (P = 0.07) and number of patients (P = 0.02), but the pain was not significantly associated with BMI and experience. Conclusion. The present findings showed that unsuitable posture of dentists during work has a considerable effect on musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, further investigation is required to avoid the detrimental effects of wrong posture. PMID:26064141

  19. A system for predicting musculoskeletal disorders among dental students.

    PubMed

    Thanathornwong, Bhornsawan; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Ouivirach, Kan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a system for predicting work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) among dental students. The system comprised 2 accelerometer sensors to register neck and upper back postures and movements, and software developed to collect and process the data. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) were used to predict the likelihood of WMSD in dental students by comparing their neck and upper back movement patterns with WMSD and non-WMSD HMMs learned from previous data. To evaluate the performance of the system, 16 participants were randomly assigned into a 2 × 2 crossover trial scheduled for each sequence of working: receiving feedback or no-feedback from the system. The primary outcome measure was the extension of the neck and upper back, before (pre-test) and after (posttest) receiving feedback or no-feedback from the system. The secondary outcome measure was the log likelihood of classifying the movements as WMSD. The results showed that in the group that received feedback, the extension of the neck in the y axis and of the upper back in the y axis decreased significantly (t test, p < .05) on the post-test. The system for predicting and preventing WMSD aids the correction of the extension of the neck and upper back in the y axis.

  20. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  1. [Musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Christophe; Tourne, Mathias

    2007-06-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a major area of concern in the occupational world. The agricultural industry is particularly affected: 93 percent of occupational diseases in agriculture are MSD. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in one third of the cases. Shoulder is the second most common location. The most affected occupational areas are meat production, viticulture, market gardening, horticulture and small animal farming. This MSD phenomenon, of multifactorial origin, which has been amplifying for two decades, has led to some consensus in terms of definition and prevention strategy. The aim is to identify, limit or even suppress risk factors through worker training as well as through actions related to work organization. Regarding occupational health and safety in agriculture, two fronts of progress have been mentioned: the creation of a statistic observatory of MSD (disease, occupational area and cost) and the assessment of prevention activities. Finally, a new issue is being discussed: sustainable prevention of MSD.

  2. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    PubMed

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Computed tomography of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.W. Magid, D. Fishman, E.K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 10 chapters. The chapter titles are: Soft Tissue Masses; Primary Bone Tumors; The Role of CT in the Therapeutic Management of Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Inflammation; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Trauma; The Foot and Ankle; The Shoulder; Measurement of Bone Mineral for Early Detection of Osteoporosis; MRI of the Musculoskeletal System; and Advances in CT Imaging of Musculoskeletal Pathology.

  4. Arm and neck pain in ultrasonographers.

    PubMed

    Claes, Frank; Berger, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of upper-body-quadrant pain among ultrasonographers and to evaluate the association between individual ergonomics, musculoskeletal disorders, and occurrence of neck pain. A hundred and ten (N = 110) Belgian and Dutch male and female hospital ultrasonographers were consecutively enrolled in the study. Data on work-related ergonomic and musculoskeletal disorders were collected with an electronic inquiry, including questions regarding ergonomics (position of the screen, high-low table, and ergonomic chair), symptoms (neck pain, upper-limb pain), and work-related factors (consecutive working hours a day, average working hours a week). Subjects with the screen on their left had significantly more neck pain (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, p = .0286). Depending on the workspace, high-low tables increased the chance of developing neck pain (OR = 12.9, p = .0246). A screen at eye level caused less neck pain (OR = .22, p = .0610). Employees with a fixed working space were less susceptible to arm pain (OR = 0.13, p = .0058). The prevalence of arm pain was significantly higher for the vascular department compared to radiology, urology, and gynecology departments (OR = 9.2, p = .0278). Regarding prevention of upper-limb pain in ultrasonograph, more attention should be paid to the work environment and more specialty to the ultrasound workstation layout. Primary ergonomic prevention could provide a painless work situation for the ultrasonographer. Further research on the ergonomic conditions of ultrasonography is necessary to develop ergonomic solutions in the work environment that will help to alleviate neck and arm pain. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  5. Association of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache with mental and sleep disorders among adults with disabilities, Spain, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Alejandro; Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007-2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%-67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%-24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments.

  6. Association of Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions and Migraine Headache With Mental and Sleep Disorders Among Adults With Disabilities, Spain, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007–2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. Results The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%–67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%–24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. Conclusion The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments. PMID:24576397

  7. Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Drivers of All-Terrain Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REHN, B.; BERGDAHL, I. A.; AHLGREN, C.; FROM, C.; JÄRVHOLM, B.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; NILSSON, T.; SUNDELIN, G.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to characterize the risk of experiencing musculoskeletal symptoms in the region of the neck, shoulders and upper and lower back for professional drivers of various categories of all-terrain vehicles and to assess the association between symptoms and duration of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock from driving all-terrain vehicles. The study group consisted of 215 drivers of forest machines, 137 drivers of snowmobiles and 79 drivers of snowgroomers and a control group of 167 men randomly selected from the general population. The subjects were all from one of the four most northern counties in Sweden and they were all men. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed by use of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, the questionnaire held items about the driving time with all-terrain vehicles and a subjective estimation of exposure to unpleasant movements (shock, jolt, irregular sway). The job strain was measured according to Karasek's demands/control model. The prevalence ratios were adjusted for age, smoking and job strain. Among drivers, significantly increased prevalence ratios within the range of 1∂5-2·9 were revealed for symptoms from the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions during the previous year. None of the driver categories had a statistically significantly increased risk of low back pain. Forest vehicles were those most reported to cause unpleasant movements. In conclusion, drivers of all-terrain vehicles exhibit an increased risk of symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions. The increased risk is suggested to be related to physical factors such as exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock, static overload or extreme body postures. However, since symptoms of low back pain were not significantly increased, it appears that factors other than WBV would explain the occurrence of symptoms in the group of all-terrain drivers.

  8. 'Fiddler's neck'.

    PubMed

    Peachey, R D; Matthews, C N

    1978-06-01

    'Fiddler's neck' is a condition affecting violin and viola players. Although well known to musicians it is not well recognized by dermatologists. Clinically the lesions usually consist of a localized area of lichenification of the left side of the neck--just below the angle of the jaw. Pigmentation, erythema and inflammatory papules or pustules are frequently present, while severe inflammatory induration, cyst formation and scarring occur in more severely affected subjects. The aetiology of the skin changes is probably due to a combination of factors; friction giving rise to lichenification, while local pressure, shearing stress and occlusion may play a part in producing the acne-like changes and cyst formation. In addition, poor hygiene may predispose to local sepsis.

  9. A detailed analysis of musculoskeletal disorder risk factors among Japanese nurses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Mihashi, Mutsuko; Adachi, Yasuko; Koga, Hatsuyo; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2006-01-01

    Although Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) represent a common occupational problem, few epidemiological studies have investigated MSD risk factors among Asian nurses, particularly those in Japan. We administered a modified Japanese-language version of the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire to 1,162 nurses from a large teaching hospital. MSD categories focused on the neck, shoulder, upper back, and lower back regions. A total of 844 completed questionnaires were analyzed (response rate: 72.6%). The 12-month period-prevalence of MSD at any body site was 85.5%. MSD was most commonly reported at the shoulder (71.9%), followed by the lower back (71.3%), neck (54.7%), and upper back (33.9%). Alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, and having children were shown to be significant risk factors, with adjusted Odds Ratios of 1.87 (95%CI: 1.17-2.96), 2.45 (95%CI: 1.43-4.35), and 2.53 (95%CI: 1.32-4.91), respectively. Workplace risk factors included manually handling patients (OR: 2.07 to 11.97) and undertaking physically laborious work (OR: 2.09 to 2.76). Nurses reporting pre-menstrual tension were 1.66 and 1.94 times more likely to suffer from lower back and upper back MSD, respectively. High mental pressure was also identified as a significant risk factor for MSD of the neck (OR: 1.53) and shoulder (OR: 2.07). The complex nature of MSD risk factors identified during this study suggests that remediation strategies which focus only on manual handling tasks would probably be suboptimal in reducing MSD among nurses. Therefore, to help alleviate their considerable MSD burden, a greater emphasis will need to be placed on job satisfaction, work organization, and occupational stress, as well as the more traditional hazard reduction strategies such as manual handling, work tasks, and other occupational factors.

  10. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    PubMed

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  11. Effects of self stretching on pain and musculoskeletal symptom of bus drivers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Gak, Hwang Bo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal symptoms, pain and risk of postures as well as the effects of stretching exercise on the work-related symptoms and pain of bus drivers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-one drivers were randomly recruited from a bus corporation for this study. Information about pain levels, painful regions, and general characteristics of subjects was obtained using the symptom research form (KOSHA Code H-30-2003). The level of pain was assessed on a scale of numeric rating scale (NRS) which is divided by 10. Ergonomic posture assessment was conducted using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA). Self-stretching exercise was performed for 4 weeks by the bus drivers who suffered from neck and shoulder pain. [Results] Musculoskeletal symptoms were present in the order of shoulder, neck, lower back and lower extremities. Compared with other jobs, the final score, and the action level of bus drivers were very high, showing 57.6% of action levels 3 and 4. A statistically significant decrease of pain was shown after the self-stretching intervention. There was also a significant decrease of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders after the self-stretching exercise. [Conclusion] Performing stretching for musculoskeletal symptoms had a positive influence on the symptoms and reduced pain.

  12. Effects of Self Stretching on Pain and Musculoskeletal Symptom of Bus Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Gak, Hwang Bo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal symptoms, pain and risk of postures as well as the effects of stretching exercise on the work-related symptoms and pain of bus drivers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-one drivers were randomly recruited from a bus corporation for this study. Information about pain levels, painful regions, and general characteristics of subjects was obtained using the symptom research form (KOSHA Code H-30-2003). The level of pain was assessed on a scale of numeric rating scale (NRS) which is divided by 10. Ergonomic posture assessment was conducted using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA). Self-stretching exercise was performed for 4 weeks by the bus drivers who suffered from neck and shoulder pain. [Results] Musculoskeletal symptoms were present in the order of shoulder, neck, lower back and lower extremities. Compared with other jobs, the final score, and the action level of bus drivers were very high, showing 57.6% of action levels 3 and 4. A statistically significant decrease of pain was shown after the self-stretching intervention. There was also a significant decrease of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders after the self-stretching exercise. [Conclusion] Performing stretching for musculoskeletal symptoms had a positive influence on the symptoms and reduced pain. PMID:25540496

  13. Musculoskeletal symptoms and type A behaviour in blue collar workers.

    PubMed Central

    Flodmark, B T; Aase, G

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Type A behaviour pattern, characterised by excessive competitiveness, impatience, hostility and time urgency, has been previously investigated as a risk factor for coronary heart disease. There are few studies concerning musculoskeletal symptoms and type A behaviour. Could there be a higher frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms with a more pronounced type A behaviour? DESIGN--A cross sectional retrospective study. Standardised nordic questionnaires were used for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms and the Bortner questionnaire and its subscales (1) speed and (2) hard driving and competitiveness were used to assess type A behaviour. SETTING--Factory based (a manufacturing industry where they make ventilating shafts). SUBJECTS--58 blue collar workers (51 men and seven women). Mean age was 36.9 years. Mean employment time was seven years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Blue collar workers with musculoskeletal symptoms had a more pronounced type A behaviour than those without symptoms. RESULTS--For shoulder symptoms during the past 12 months blue collar workers had a more pronounced type A behaviour (p < 0.001). For symptoms during the past seven days the results were significant for the neck (p < 0.01), the shoulder (p < 0.01), and also for lower back pain (p < 0.05). There were no differences in age, psychosocial factors, or psychosomatic symptoms. According to the Bortner subscales, the speed subscale seems to be more important than the hard driving and competitiveness subscales. CONCLUSIONS--Blue collar workers with a more pronounced type A behaviour seem to have a higher incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms. PMID:1419855

  14. Musculoskeletal injuries in Homer's Iliad: the War of Troy revisited.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Tok, Fatih; Simşek, Ayşe; Ozçakar, Levent

    2014-04-01

    Homer's Iliad--the most famous and influential epic poem--has been previously reviewed with respect to head, craniomaxillofacial, neck, thoracic, and hand injuries in the literature. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no data regarding musculoskeletal injuries. This article describes the musculoskeletal injuries that had ensued during the war of Troy. The Turkish translation of the original epic poem Iliad was reviewed for musculoskeletal injuries, that is, their descriptions, outcome, the weapons used, and the engaged warriors. Extremity injuries were evaluated as regards the affected bones. The pertinent treatment methods were also recorded. In total, 103 musculoskeletal injuries were detected during 81 combats. The most commonly involved areas were the shoulder (15.5%), the head (14.5%), the cervical vertebrae (14.5%), and the thoracic vertebrae (8.7%). The weapons used were spear (n = 52); sword (n = 9); arrow (n = 9); stone (n = 8); and cane, animal, the hand, Chariot race, and broken yoke (n = 1 for each). Fifty-four combats (66.6%) resulted in death. Therapeutic herbs, compound of milk, and essence of fig were used as treatment alternatives. While providing a historic snapshot on the war of Troy, in this article, the authors have reviewed the musculoskeletal injuries and their management in those ancient times. Despite the long period in between, unfortunately, physicians/surgeons are still faced with war injuries in current medical practice. The authors strongly hope that, at least in the near future, physicians will be left with only natural health problems and without those artificially generated by human beings.

  15. Ergonomic Training Reduces Musculoskeletal Disorders among Office Workers: Results from the 6-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Norashikin; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Md Zein, Raemy; Hassan, Siti Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly reported among computer users. This study explored whether these disorders can be reduced by the provision of ergonomics education. Methods: A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in which 3 units were randomised for intervention and received training, and 3 units were given a leaflet. The effect of intervention on workstation habits, musculoskeletal disorders, days and episodes of sick leave, and psychological well-being were assessed. Results: A significant improvement in workstation habits was found, and the differences remained significant at the follow-up time point for keyboard, mouse, chair, and desk use. The largest reduction in the percentage of musculoskeletal disorders was in the neck region (−42.2%, 95% CI −60.0 to −24.4). After adjusting for baseline values, significant differences were found at the follow-up time point in the neck, right shoulder, right and left upper limbs, lower back, and right and left lower limbs. No significant differences were found for the days and episodes of sick leave or the psychological well-being among workers after the intervention. Conclusion: Consistent reductions were observed for all musculoskeletal disorders at the follow-up time point, although the difference was not statistically significant for the upper back. The improvements in the musculoskeletal disorders did not translate into fewer days lost from work or improved psychological well-being. PMID:22135582

  16. Oncologic safety of cervical nerve preservation in neck dissection for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Kada, Shinpei; Tsujimura, Takashi; Kataoka, Michiko

    2017-09-01

    Although the functional merits of preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection for head and neck cancer have been reported, the oncologic safety has not yet been determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of cervical nerve preservation. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with head and neck cancer who had been treated by neck dissection between 2009 and 2014 at Kyoto Medical Center. Management of cervical nerves and clinical results were analyzed. A total of 335 sides of neck dissection had been performed in 222 patients. Cervical nerves were preserved in 175 neck sides and resected in 160 sides. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 71%. The 5-year neck control rate was 95% in cervical nerve preserved sides and 89% in cervical nerve resected sides. Preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection is oncologically safe in selected cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of personal risk factors on the prevalence rate of musculoskeletal disorders among workers of an Iranian rubber factory.

    PubMed

    Samaei, S E; Tirgar, A; Khanjani, N; Mostafaee, M; Bagheri Hosseinabadi, M

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) are among the most common occupational disorders in many countries and have an increasing trend. The present study was conducted in order to determine the prevalence rate of MSDs in different body regions and the effect of personal factors on the prevalence rate of MSDs among rubber industry workers. This analytical and cross-sectional study was performed on 206 workers of an Iranian rubber factory in 2014. The samples were randomly selected. Data were gathered by means of personal information form, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and the Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA). The results were analyzed using SPSS16; by descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean age and work history of subjects were 34.54±6.36 and 12.34±6.28 years, respectively. The highest prevalence rate of MSDs in the last twelve-months was related to the lower back region with a prevalence rate of 62.1%. Based on logistic regression, a significant correlation was found between MSDs and the final REBA score so that for a one-unit increase in score, the risk or complaint of neck and low back pain increased by 48.5% and 37.1%, respectively. Many rubber factory workers experience MSDs especially in the lower back region as a consequence of occupational risk factors. Therefore, detecting the occupational risk factors, work position standards and following ergonomic interventions are highly recommended.

  18. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  19. Rheumatology and musculoskeletal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Graham

    2004-01-01

    MUSCULOSKELETAL disease accounts for a large proportion of a general practitioner's (GP's) workload. Proper management can not only improve quality of care, but also increase job satisfaction and reap rewards under the new contract. Osteoporosis creates a huge socioeconomic burden of disease and disability. Identifying high-risk groups in primary care and using preventative treatment can result in a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality. GPs can help by presenting a unified lifestyle message, advising on fall prevention, and providing effective treatment; in particular, calcium and vitamin D for female nursing home residents. Osteoarthritis is eminently treatable in primary care with a number of management options for GPs, in addition to drug therapy. Glucosamine and chondroitin have few side effects and are worth recommending to patients with mild knee osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause significant disability, which can be limited by early diagnosis, referral, and treatment. Severe refractory rheumatoid arthritis may warrant referral for consideration of biologic therapy. Assessment of the cardiovascular risk and possible use of statins in rheumatoid patients may reduce their cardiovascular mortality. GPs should aim to help patients to achieve optimum quality of life by using a holistic approach and by allowing maximum choice and control over their disease. PMID:15186570

  20. Pulmonary function of patients with chronic neck pain: a spirometry study.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2014-04-01

    Chronic neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pain conditions experienced by many people during their lives. Although patients with neck pain are managed predominantly as musculoskeletal patients, there are indications that they also have poor pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to examine whether patients with chronic neck pain have spirometric abnormalities and whether neck pain problems and psychological states are associated with these abnormalities. Forty-five participants with chronic neck pain and 45 well-matched healthy controls were recruited. Spirometry was used to assess participants' pulmonary function. Neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, cervical range of motion, forward head posture, psychological states, disability, and pain intensity were also evaluated. The results showed that patients with chronic neck pain yielded significantly reduced vital capacity, FVC, expiratory reserve volume, and maximum voluntary ventilation (P < .05), but peak expiratory flow, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC ratio were not affected (P > .05). Strength of neck muscles, pain intensity, and kinesiophobia were found to be significantly correlated (r > 0.3, P < .05) with respiratory function. Patients with chronic neck pain do not have optimal pulmonary function. Cervical spine muscle dysfunction in parallel with pain intensity and kinesiophobia are factors that are associated mainly with this respiratory dysfunction.

  1. [Factors Influencing Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Military Personnel during Basic Combat Training].

    PubMed

    Yi, Jeong Min; Kim, Gwang Suk

    2016-08-01

    This study was done to examine physical, psycho-social, and individual factors influencing musculoskeletal symptoms among Korean military trainees. Using a correlation study design, military trainees who had completed almost of all the basic combat training (BCT) days were recruited from two military training units selected by convenience sampling. Data from 415 participants were analyzed. Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was 29.6% defined as a participant having pain or discomfort in one or more body parts during training hours for more than seven consecutive days. Back/pelvic (10.8%), knees (10.1%), shoulders (7.7%), feet/toes (5.6%), ankles (4.8%) were prone to musculoskeletal symptoms. Musculoskeletal symptoms appeared to be related to physical exertion during BCT, stress during BCT, social support from fellow trainees, or previous musculoskeletal injuries. In the logistic regression model, physical exertion during BCT (OR=2.27, 95% CI: 1.42~3.65), stress during BCT (OR=1.79, 95% CI: 1.15~2.78), and previous musculoskeletal injuries (OR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.01~2.47) were the significant factors affecting prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. Findings indicate that physical exertion and psycho-social stress should be managed to prevent musculoskeletal symptoms in military trainees with more attention being given to trainees having a history of musculoskeletal injuries.

  2. Predictive risk factors for chronic regional and multisite musculoskeletal pain: a 5-year prospective study in a working population.

    PubMed

    Herin, Fabrice; Vézina, Michel; Thaon, Isabelle; Soulat, Jean-Marc; Paris, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The role of psychosocial and physical factors in the development of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) has now been clearly demonstrated. However, it is unclear whether these factors contribute to specific regional MSP or to multisite pain. The main goal of this study was to assess the impact of work-related factors according to gender on the development of regional and multisite MSP. A total of 12,591 subjects (65% men and 35% women) who were born in 1938, 1943, 1948, and 1953 and were participating in a French longitudinal prospective epidemiological survey (ESTEV) in 1990 to 1995 were eligible. Personal factors and work exposure were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Statistical associations between chronic MSP (regional body site or multisite), personal factors, and occupational factors were analyzed using logistic regression modeling. The incidence of regional MSP and multisite pain in 1995 were, respectively, 17% and 25.6%. For women, highly repetitive movements predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and vibrations predicted arm and low back pain; and effort with tools predicted arm pain. For men, forceful effort and vibrations predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and forceful effort predicted lower limb and low back pain; and forceful effort and effort with tools predicted arm pain. Physical constraints (ie, forceful effort or vibrations) were associated with multisite pain in both genders. Only for women, psychological factors were risk factors predictive of upper limb pain and in 3 or 4 painful anatomical sites. These results support the hypothesis that some physical and psychological work-related factors are predictive of regional or multisite MSP but differ according to gender. Gender differences and risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal pain should be also taken into account to more effectively target preventive measures.

  3. A Study of VITOM in Pediatric Surgery and Urology: Evaluation of Technology Acceptance and Usability by Operating Team and Surgeon Musculoskeletal Discomfort.

    PubMed

    Frykman, Philip K; Freedman, Andrew L; Kane, Timothy D; Cheng, Zhi; Petrosyan, Mikael; Catchpole, Kenneth

    2017-02-01

    We studied operating team acceptability of Video Telescopic Monitor (VITOM(®)) exoscope by exploring the ease of use of the device in two centers. We also assessed factors affecting surgeon musculoskeletal discomfort. We focused on how the operating team interacted with the VITOM system with surrogate measures of usefulness, image quality, ease of use, workload, and setup time. Multivariable linear regression was used to model the relationships between team role, experience, and setup time. Relationships between localized musculoskeletal discomfort and use of VITOM alone, and with loupes, were also analyzed. Four surgeons, 7 surgical techs, 7 circulating nurses, and 13 surgical residents performed 70 pediatric surgical and urological operations. We found that subjective views of each team member were consistently positive with 69%-74% agreed or strongly agreed that VITOM enhanced their ability to perform their job and improved the surgical process. Unexpectedly, the scrub techs and nurses perceived more value and utility of VITOM, presumably because it provides them a view of the operative field that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Team members rated perceptions of image quality highly and workload generally satisfactory. Not surprisingly, setup time decreased with team experience and multivariable modeling showed significant correlations with surgeon and surgical tech experience, but not circulating nurse. An important finding was that surgeon neck discomfort was reduced with use of VITOM alone for magnification, compared with use of loupes and VITOM. The most likely explanation for these findings is improved posture with the neck at a neutral position when viewing the VITOM images, compared with neck flexion with loupes, and thus, a less favorable ergonomic position. This study suggests that there may be small drawbacks associated with VITOM use initially, but these reduce with increased experience and benefit both the surgeon and the rest of the team.

  4. Association between plasma testosterone and work-related neck and shoulder disorders among female workers.

    PubMed

    Kaergaard, A; Hansen, A M; Rasmussen, K; Andersen, J H

    2000-08-01

    The aims were to study the association between anabolic hormone testosterone in plasma and the presence of musculoskeletal disorders among female workers and to study the association between changes in testosterone and changes in musculoskeletal complaints. In a cross-sectional design 145 women from 2 different industries filled out questionnaires about current musculoskeletal complaints, participated in a clinical examination of the neck and upper extremities, and gave a blood sample for the analysis of free testosterone in plasma. Individual characteristics, psychosocial job factors, and stress reactions were evaluated by questionnaires. In a follow-up study a subgroup of 73 sewing machine operators from the cross-sectional study was reexamined after 1 year. The group of women with clinically verified neck or shoulder disorders had significantly lower plasma testosterone than the women with no disorders. Furthermore, the testosterone level showed a negative association with age and a positive association with smoking and body mass index. Changes in pain status or clinically diagnosed musculoskeletal disorders were not associated with changes in testosterone levels. However, this finding may well be due to a strong plant influence in that marked changes in testosterone levels were observed for 2 of the 3 participating plants. There is some indication of an association between musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and shoulders and a low level of free plasma testosterone. The study failed to clarify the associations found between changes in testosterone and changes in musculoskeletal complaints over time.

  5. Study of musculoskeletal risks of the office-based surgeries.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, James E; Choi, Sang D

    2012-01-01

    Due to the cost and time benefits associated with patients and physicians, outpatient surgeries continue to become more and more popular over time. With the increase in the number of office-based surgical procedures, the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) associated with office-based surgeries has been reported. The purpose of this pilot study is to ergonomically evaluate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of physicians/surgeons performing office-based surgery (OBS). Ergonomic assessment tools included Questionnaire, the BodyMap and the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment for measuring potential ergonomic concerns. The findings have shown that the ergonomic issues of greatest concerns were the discomforts in the neck, shoulders, arms/wrists, and back. Some additional comments were provided by the participants regarding the duration of discomfort or clarification on the frequency of their body discomfort. This study suggests that there is a considerable risk of musculoskeletal injuries of physicians/surgeons performing the OBS tasks. By properly using the ergonomic assessment techniques, valuable information on ergonomic OBS workplace design and selection could assist in the early interventions of WMSD prevention.

  6. Musculoskeletal symptoms in support staff in a large telecommunication company.

    PubMed

    Fagarasanu, Mircea; Kumar, Shrawan

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent and severity of the musculoskeletal problems in office workers in a telecommunication company. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders' symptoms, their perceived intensity and interaction with ability to work among office workers. The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire and Cornell Hand Discomfort Questionnaire developed by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University were used on a sample of 140 office workers in a telecommunication company. Discomfort/pain/ache at the wrist level was reported by 86.5% for the left side and 95.5% for the right side. Additionally, discomfort/pain/ache was reported by 77.5% of the sample for neck and 31% of the sample for the left and 50% for the right shoulder region. At the hand site, the area in the distal proximity of the wrist was the most affected site being indicated in 90% of cases for left side and 95% of cases for the right side. An overview of problems associated with the body parts in office work may allow targeted prevention and intervention.

  7. Physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain among forest industry workers.

    PubMed

    Miranda, H; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R; Takala, E P; Riihimäki, H

    2001-08-01

    The study investigated the relations between physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain among forest industry workers. We studied a population of 3312 Finnish forest industry workers, who replied to a questionnaire survey in 1994 (response rate 77%). The outcome variables in this cross-sectional study were the number of days with pain in the low back, neck, shoulder and knee during the preceding 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in statistical analyses. Active walkers had more sciatic pain, active volleyball players had more shoulder pain and those who practiced trekking actively had more knee pain than those who practiced these activities less. The risk of shoulder pain was more than three times higher for those who played volleyball actively compared to those who played less. In addition, age, mental stress and work-related physical loading were strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain. When studying the relations between physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain in a working population, it is important to not only detect the general physical activity but also to specify the different modes of exercise. In addition, the other factors which are strongly related to pain (such as mental stress and work-related physical loading) should be taken into account.

  8. Association between shift working and musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing personnel

    PubMed Central

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Raeisi, Saeed; Namvar, Mohamad; Golabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some health problems are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are considered as one of the most common health-related problems that can cause disability among health care workers. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between shift working and the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSs) among nursing personnel. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among 454 health care workers including nurses and nurses’ aides in a general hospital in Iran. A Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to evaluate the prevalence of MSs. Logistic regression analysis with adjusting for confounding factors was performed to evaluate the associations between shift working and the prevalence of MSs. Results: Lower back, knees, and upper back symptoms with the prevalence of 57.4%, 48.4%, and 47%, respectively, were the most common MSs. The prevalence of MSs in eight regions of the body (lower back, neck, knees, upper back, shoulder, wrist, buttock, and ankle) was higher among shift workers than day workers. The differences were statistically significant only in the lower back and ankle regions (P < 0.05). Odds Ratio for lower back symptoms in shift workers was 1.94 compared to day workers (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that shift working could be associated with increased prevalence of lower back disorders among nursing personnel. This study emphasizes on the importance of proper work planning and regulating working hours for nursing personnel. PMID:24949072

  9. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among Indian tabla players.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Wricha; De, Amitabha; Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chandra, Ananga M

    2013-06-01

    Playing a percussion instrument demands great force and effort, which may make percussionists prone to playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). Of all of the percussion instruments in India, tabla is the most popular. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of discomforts among professional tabla players. Eighty-five professional tabla players voluntarily participated in the study. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and visual analog scale were administered to all the participants. Demographic details, music-related activities, and symptoms of discomfort were also recorded. It was found that prone anatomical areas were the low back, right shoulder, neck, left shoulder, upper back, and knees. The frequency of discomfort was found to be mostly weekly for the shoulders and monthly for neck, low back, and knees. There was an association between visual analog scale and prevalence of self-reported discomforts in some body parts. It can be said that the prolonged, unsupported, folded-knee sitting posture may be the cause of discomforts.

  10. Musculoskeletal problems and quality of life of elementary school teachers.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, İlkim Çıtak; Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Tunç, Emsal; Kıhtır, Merve

    2015-01-01

    To investigate prevalence and anatomical distribution of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) and its impact on quality of life (QoL) in elementary school teachers working in Muğla town center. Physical, sociodemographic and occupational characteristics of 104 teachers were recorded. Onset, prevalence and consequences of MSP (Extended Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) and QoL (Short Form-36 Health Survey) of teachers with (n = 37) and without (n = 67) MSP during the last 12 months were compared. The prevalence of MSP was 77% for the lifelong period and 36% for the last 12 months. Physical and sociodemographic characteristics, daily employment period and length of standing and sitting were similar between groups (p > 0.05). The most common painful regions were the neck (39%) and the lower back (38%). MSP of these regions was the common reason for seeking healthcare, prevention from activities and taking sick leave. MSP had negative impact, especially on the physical components of QoL (p < 0.05). The results reveal high prevalence of MSP among teachers, as well as its negative impacts on QoL. Especially neck and lower back seem to be the most frequently affected regions of the body. These findings draw attention toward the need for developing strategies to prevent MSP among teachers.

  11. Musculoskeletal complaints, functional capacity, personality and psychosocial factors.

    PubMed

    Malchaire, J B; Roquelaure, Y; Cock, N; Piette, A; Vergracht, S; Chiron, H

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the research was to study the association between psychosocial and personality factors, and neck and wrist-hand musculoskeletal complaints, taking account of the occupational factors of force, posture and repetitiveness, and non-occupational risk factors such as sport, hobbies, medical history. During personal interviews 133 women from seven different companies, working at constraining workplaces (very repetitive work), answered several questionnaires. These concerned: personal characteristics and history; work characteristics; psychosocial factors (perception and appreciation of the work situation, satisfaction at work, stress symptoms, Karasek questionnaire) and personality factors (neuroticism, conscientiousness, type-A behavior). They also undertook functional and psychomotor tests (wrist angles, grip strength and a dexterity test). Logistic regression models were calculated. Wrist-hand complaints appear to be associated with some personal characteristics (smoking habits, fewer hobbies), work constraints (fewer breaks, heavy lifting efforts) and some personality (introversion) and psychosocial factors (worse appreciation of work). Neck complaints are also associated with some personal characteristics (young people, small, bad health, hormonal problems, fewer hobbies), some personality (urgency of time) and psychosocial factors (constraints as seen by the supervisor). The study confirms the multifactorial character of the musculoskeletal disorders and underlines the need for a global ergonomic approach to work situations, taking into account all their physical, psychological and social components.

  12. Change in Musculoskeletal Pain in Patients With Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder After Tailored Rehabilitation Education: A One-Year Follow-Up Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Kang, Boram; Choi, Seungyoung; Kim, Taikon; Jang, Seong Ho; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-Bog

    2015-01-01

    Objective To apply tailored rehabilitation education to video display terminal (VDT) workers with musculoskeletal pain and to assess changes in musculoskeletal pain after rehabilitation education. Methods A total of 8,828 VDT workers were screened for musculoskeletal disorders using a self-report questionnaire. Six hundred twenty-six VDT workers selected based on their questionnaires were enrolled in musculoskeletal rehabilitation education, which consisted of education on VDT syndrome and confirmed diseases, exercise therapy including self-stretching and strengthening, and posture correction. One year later, a follow-up screening survey was performed on 316 VDT workers, and the results were compared with the previous data. Results Compared with the initial survey, pain intensity was significantly decreased in the neck area; pain duration and frequency were significantly decreased in the low back area; and pain duration, intensity, and frequency were significantly decreased in the shoulder and wrist after tailored rehabilitation education. In addition, pain duration, intensity, and frequency showed a greater significant decrease after tailored rehabilitation education in the mild pain group than in the severe pain group. Conclusions This study found that work-related musculoskeletal pain was reduced after tailored rehabilitation education, especially in the shoulder, wrist, and low back. PMID:26605170

  13. Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in hospital nurse technicians and licensed practical nurses: associations with demographic factors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Roberta F. C.; Sato, Tatiana O.; Foltran, Fabiana A.; Silva, Luciana C. C. B.; Coury, Helenice J. C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This cross-sectional study aimed at analyzing: 1. the main musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) presented by hospital nursing workers and; 2. personal, occupational, and health factors related to MSS among them. Method : Two questionnaires were filled in by 245 nurse technicians (NTs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) (response rate 95%) associated with direct patient care sectors from a hospital. These questionnaires were: the standardized version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and one including questions on 15 demographic independent variables potentially related to outcomes from the NMQ. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify which variables would explain the occurrence of MSS in different body regions. Results: The low back (57%), shoulder (52%), and neck (48%) were identified as the most affected regions. The logistic regression analysis showed that low back symptoms in the last 12 months were significantly associated with LPN activities (OR=2.36; CI=1.24-4.5) and previous sick leave due to MSS (OR=5.97; CI=1.2-29.1). Smoking was significantly associated with symptoms in the low back (OR=2.77; CI=1.13-6.8) and thoracic spine (OR=2.37; CI=1.04-5.40). Physical exercise showed a protective effect on the cervical spine (OR=0.42; CI=0.23-0.77). Previous sick leave was significantly associated with pain in the knees (OR=4.24; CI=1.33-13.5) and in the upper limbs (OR=5.36; CI=1.07-26.7). Conclusions: The nursing workers who were evaluated presented a high prevalence of MSS. Previous history of sick leave was strongly associated with the presence of symptoms in various body regions. These results indicate the need for preventive programs in the hospital environment in order to control more severe MSS in nursing professionals. PMID:25054385

  14. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  15. Musculoskeletal ageing and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Anders; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A; Christiansen, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Loss of musculoskeletal mass and function is a natural ageing trait, reinforced by an unhealthy life style. Loss of bone (osteoporosis) and muscle (sarcopaenia) are conditions whose prevalence are increasing because of the change in population distribution in the western world towards an older mean age. Improvements in lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking and exercise, are the most powerful tools to combat this decline efficiently; however, public health interventions aimed at tackling these problems have shown abysmal success at the population level, mostly due to failure in compliance. With these issues in mind, we believe that the primary prevention modality in coming decades will be pharmacological. We review the basic biology of musculoskeletal ageing and what measures can be taken to prevent ageing-associated loss of musculoskeletal mass and function, with particular emphasis on pharmacological means.

  16. "I know it's changed": a mixed-methods study of the meaning of Global Perceived Effect in chronic neck pain patients.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert; Maiers, Michele; Schulz, Craig; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Global Perceived Effect (GPE) is a commonly used outcome measure for musculoskeletal conditions like neck pain; however, little is known regarding the factors patients take into account when determining their GPE. The overall objective of this work was to describe the thematic variables, which comprise the GPE from the patient's perspective. This was a mixed-methods study in which qualitative data were collected within a randomized clinical trial assessing exercise and manual therapy for chronic neck pain. A consecutive sample of 106 patients who completed the trial intervention took part in semi-structured interviews querying the meaning of GPE. Quantitative measures were collected through self-report questionnaires. Interview transcripts were analyzed using content analysis to identify themes, which were then quantified to assess potential relationships. A model of GPE for chronic neck pain emerged comprised of five main themes: neck symptoms (cited by 85%), biomechanical performance (38%), activities of daily living (31%), self-efficacy (10%), and need for other treatment (6%). Influencing factors included those contributing to GPE: treatment process (64%), biomechanical performance (51%), self-efficacy (16%), and the nature of the condition (8%). Factors, which detracted from GPE or prevented recovery included perceived nature of condition (58%), required daily activities (10%), lack of diagnosis (5%), and history of failed treatment (5%). GPE appears to capture chronic neck pain patient perceptions of change in different domains important to their individual pain experiences that may not be captured by other outcome instruments. Thus, GPE is a suitable patient-oriented outcome that can complement other measures in research and clinical practice. Importantly, many chronic neck pain patients believe it impossible to reach complete recovery because of a perceived intractable aspect of their neck condition; this has important implications regarding long

  17. Neck abscess: 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Demirhan, Erhan; Kozcu, Sureyya Hikmet; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neck abscess is a disease that might cause mortality and severe morbidity, if it is not treated urgently. In our study, patients with diagnosis of neck abscess in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively and presented in the light of the literature. METHODS: In our clinic, age distribution, source of infection, systemic disease, imaging methods that were used in diagnosis, preferred anaesthesia during drainage, abscess sites, culture results of abscess material, complications during treatment procedure, any antibiotherapy before admission and duration of hospitalization of 79 cases with neck abscess who were treated in the hospital between January 2008 and January 2015 were assessed. RESULTS: Cases in our study were aged between 1–79 (mean 28.3) years and 43 of them were female and 36 were male patients. Systemic diseases were determined in 19 of the cases. The most common systemic disease was diabetes mellitus. Abscesses were localized mostly at peritonsillar region and 13 of the cases were operated when abscess were in multipl localizations. In 74 of the cases, drainage was performed under local anaesthesia and in 5 cases under general anaesthesia. Four of these 5 cases, abscesses were localized within retropharyngeal region and 1 of them had multiple abscesses at various regions. Staphylococcus aereus was the most detected microorganism based on culture results. Three adult cases were followed up in the intensive care unit because of development of mediastinitis. One of these 3 cases exited because of sepsis. Hospitalization periods of 79 cases ranged between 2–21 days (mean 7.64 days). Hospitalization period of 19 cases with systemic diseases were 9.47 days (p<0.05) and statistically which were statistically significantly longer when compared with those without any systemic disease. CONCLUSION: Neck abscess must be diagnosed early and treated with surgical drainage and parenteral therapy because it might cause severe complications. PMID:28058371

  18. Ageing in the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sally; Colombier, Pauline; Sowman, Aneka; Mennan, Claire; Rölfing, Jan H D; Guicheux, Jérôme; Edwards, James R

    2016-01-01

    The extent of ageing in the musculoskeletal system during the life course affects the quality and length of life. Loss of bone, degraded articular cartilage, and degenerate, narrowed intervertebral discs are primary features of an ageing skeleton, and together they contribute to pain and loss of mobility. This review covers the cellular constituents that make up some key components of the musculoskeletal system and summarizes discussion from the 2015 Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedic Symposium (AROS) (Regeneration in the Ageing Population) about how each particular cell type alters within the ageing skeletal microenvironment. PMID:27748151

  19. Ageing in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sally; Colombier, Pauline; Sowman, Aneka; Mennan, Claire; Rölfing, Jan H D; Guicheux, Jérôme; Edwards, James R

    2016-12-01

    The extent of ageing in the musculoskeletal system during the life course affects the quality and length of life. Loss of bone, degraded articular cartilage, and degenerate, narrowed intervertebral discs are primary features of an ageing skeleton, and together they contribute to pain and loss of mobility. This review covers the cellular constituents that make up some key components of the musculoskeletal system and summarizes discussion from the 2015 Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedic Symposium (AROS) (Regeneration in the Ageing Population) about how each particular cell type alters within the ageing skeletal microenvironment.

  20. Musculoskeletal ultrasound for sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Tok, F; Özçakar, L; De Muynck, M; Kara, M; Vanderstraeten, G

    2012-12-01

    Each day, the role of musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) in the management of sports injuries is being consolidated. Yet, there is no doubt that the probe of US is (should be) the stethoscope of musculoskeletal physicians dealing with sports medicine. Not only for the diagnosis, but also for the close follow-up of the athletes and during likely onward interventions for their treatment, would US be of paramount importance. Accordingly, in this review paper on common sports injuries, we tried to shed light into the actual role of US in the clinical practice of sports medicine.

  1. Musculoskeletal etiologies of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    Several musculoskeletal diagnoses are frequently concomitant with pelvic floor pathology and pain. The definition of pelvic pain itself often depends on the medical specialist evaluating the patient. Because there is variability among disorders associated with pelvic pain, patients may seek treatment for extended periods as various treatment options are attempted. Further, health care providers should recognize that there may not be a single source of dysfunction. This article discusses the musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic girdle (structures within the bony pelvis) and their association with lumbar spine and hip disorders.

  2. Lower leg musculoskeletal geometry and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Albracht, Kirsten; Braunstein, Bjoern; Moreno Catala, Maria; Goldmann, Jan-Peter; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sprint performance is related to lower leg musculoskeletal geometry within a homogeneous group of highly trained 100-m sprinters. Using a cluster analysis, eighteen male sprinters were divided into two groups based on their personal best (fast: N=11, 10.30±0.07s; slow: N=7, 10.70±0.08s). Calf muscular fascicle arrangement and Achilles tendon moment arms (calculated by the gradient of tendon excursion versus ankle joint angle) were analyzed for each athlete using ultrasonography. Achilles tendon moment arm, foot and ankle skeletal geometry, fascicle arrangement as well as the ratio of fascicle length to Achilles tendon moment arm showed no significant (p>0.05) correlation with sprint performance, nor were there any differences in the analyzed musculoskeletal parameters between the fast and slow sprinter group. Our findings provide evidence that differences in sprint ability in world-class athletes are not a result of differences in the geometrical design of the lower leg even when considering both skeletal and muscular components.

  3. Gravitational demand on the neck musculature during tablet computer use.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, Anita N; Nevins, Derek D; Monda, Steven M; Hughes, Ellis; Lin, David C

    2015-01-01

    Tablet computer use requires substantial head and neck flexion, which is a risk factor for neck pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the biomechanics of the head-neck system during seated tablet computer use under a variety of conditions. A physiologically relevant variable, gravitational demand (the ratio of gravitational moment due to the weight of the head to maximal muscle moment capacity), was estimated using a musculoskeletal model incorporating subject-specific size and intervertebral postures from radiographs. Gravitational demand in postures adopted during tablet computer use was 3-5 times that of the neutral posture, with the lowest demand when the tablet was in a high propped position. Moreover, the estimated gravitational demand could be correlated to head and neck postural measures (0.48 < R(2) < 0.64, p < 0.001). These findings provide quantitative data about mechanical requirements on the neck musculature during tablet computer use and are important for developing ergonomics guidelines. Practitioner Summary: Flexed head and neck postures occur during tablet computer use and are implicated in neck pain. The mechanical demand on the neck muscles was estimated to increase 3-5 times during seated tablet computer use versus seated neutral posture, with the lowest demand in a high propped tablet position but few differences in other conditions.

  4. Risk factors associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Sinem; Demirsoy, Nesrin; Günendi, Zafer

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal system-related complaints; identify regions at risk in dentists by observing and inquiring the dentists at work; and find out the associations with age, sex, working years, academic position and departments, positions during work and daily working hours. Modified Nordic Questionnaire (m-nMQ) was used to evaluate pain, hospital admissions and absenteeism. Quick Exposure Check (QEC) form was utilized to assess risk exposure levels related with low-back, neck, hand-wrist and shoulder-arm. 163 dentists were included the most painful regions were found to be back (66.9%), neck (65%) and low back (64.4%). Musculoskeletal symptoms were more prevalent in women and research assistants. QEC scores were found to be lower in those who performed regular exercises. Dentists should be educated about ergonomics at the beginning of their professional life.

  5. Reduction of work-related musculoskeletal risk factors following ergonomics education of sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Bulduk, Sıdıka; Bulduk, Emre Özgür; Süren, Tufan

    2017-09-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a major hazard for sewing machine operators. Ergonomics education is recommended for reducing musculoskeletal disorders at workstations. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an ergonomics education in reducing the exposure to risk factors for WMSDs among sewing machine operators. In this study of 278 workers, their exposure to the risk of WMSDs was assessed using the quick exposure check scale prior to them attending an ergonomics education programme and then again 3 months after the programme. The scores for risk exposure before the education programme were moderate for back (static) and back (dynamic), high for shoulder/arm and very high for wrist/hand and neck. The results obtained 3 months later were low for back (static) and shoulder/arm, and moderate for back (dynamic), wrist/hand and neck. Based on our results, ergonomics education can reduce the exposure to risk factors for WMSDs in the workplace.

  6. Musculoskeletal Fitness and Risk of Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Craig, Cora L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantified the relationship between musculoskeletal fitness and all-cause mortality in Canada, using measures of musculoskeletal fitness (situps, pushups, grip strength, and sit- and-reach trunk flexibility) from adult male and female participants in the Canadian Fitness Survey. Results indicated that some components of musculoskeletal fitness,…

  7. Repeated survey on changes in musculoskeletal complaints relative to age and work demands.

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart, B C; Broersen, J P; Frings-Dresen, M H; van Dijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in musculoskeletal complaints over four years in groups of employees relative to age and work demands. METHODS: Repeated questionnaire data of male employees in heavy physical work (exposed group, n = 7324) and mental work (control group, n = 4686), stratified for age (20-9, 30-9, 40-9, 50-9), were analysed. For each employee, data on the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints from two surveys with a mean interval of around four years were available. Changes in prevalences over the follow up interval were analysed. Proportions of new, recovered, and chronic cases as well as those free of complaints at both surveys were studied. RESULTS: For most complaints, there were significantly greater increases in prevalences in the exposed group compared with the control group over the follow up interval particularly within the group aged 40-9 for back, neck, and several sites of the upper and lower limbs. The 20-9 year age group also had significantly greater changes for several musculoskeletal complaints. Within the oldest age group (50-9) exposure to heavy physical work demands only affected changes in prevalences of neck and upper arm complaints. After four years in the cohort free of complaints at the start of the follow up the group aged 40-9 had the highest prevalence of complaints of the back, neck, and the upper and lower limbs. CONCLUSIONS: Middle aged and younger employees develop musculoskeletal complaints as a result of exposure to heavy physical work. In the oldest age group health related selection seems to mask the occupational health risks under study. To prevent the expected increase in musculoskeletal disorders and related work disability in our aging workforce, preventive measures should be taken at all stages of a working life. PMID:9538351

  8. Mental Health Levels and Incidence of Musculoskeletal Complaints among Speed Boat Crew Members

    PubMed Central

    Zigheimat, Farzaneh; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahmati Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Malakoti, Mohammad; Kheiri Tootkaleh, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Background The occupational health is an important issue. In some jobs, the working conditions contribute to musculoskeletal complaints and the overall health of the individual is compromised. Musculoskeletal complaints have gained credence in the public as one of the most important problems in the field of occupational diseases. Physical and mental health of crew members with critical jobs and stressful environments must be considered as well. Objectives This study performed an assessment on levels of mental health and the correlation with the frequency of accompanying musculoskeletal complaints (such as neck, back and knee pain) of crew members of speed boats. Material and Methods 149 onboard crew members of speed boats were recruited in a descriptive-correlation study by nonrandom sampling using conducted GHQ12, NMQ and demographic questionnaires. Results Although 63.8% (95 people) had what is conventionally defined as normal mental health, 36.2% (54 cases) had an inherent mental health condition. Overall, 61.1% (91 cases) suffered from back pain, 60.4% (90 cases) complained of knee pain, and 40.3% (60 patients) complained of neck pain. The combination of knee and back pain (48.3%) were the most common complaints whereas the combination of neck and knee pain (31.5%) were the least frequent; 28.2% complained of pain in all three areas. Interestingly, there was correlation between the presence of musculoskeletal complaints and less than optimum mental health. Conclusions Due to the high number of musculoskeletal complaints and the compromised mental health conditions among one-third of the onboard crew members of speed boats, attention for maintaining and improving the health of these members must be considered. PMID:24350130

  9. Musculoskeletal disorders among male sewing machine operators in shoemaking.

    PubMed

    Serratos-Perez, J N; Mendiola-Anda, C

    1993-07-01

    Research on the relationship between the operation of sewing machines and the appearance of musculoskeletal disorders has been conducted mainly among women working in garment or textile production, in developed countries; little is known about male sewing machine operators in other industries, in less developed countries. This study involved 143 Mexican men operating sewing machines in eight shoe factories; 132 of them operated flat-type machines, 11 column-type machines. When studied, the operators had been in this task for at least one year. The study aimed to identify the body regions more liable to develop musculoskeletal disorders and the rates both of appearance of such troubles and of sick leave resulting from them. A questionnaire was given to each worker, asking for their work history, the presence of musculoskeletal disorders at the time of the inquiry, and the frequency of sick leave during the previous 12 months; additionally, a number of workers were filmed on video and this material was then used to identify the body regions undergoing the major work demands. 47.5% of the subjects declared current musculoskeletal disorders; a statistical difference was found when the two groups were considered separately. Low back pain was the most frequent at a rate of 18.2% for both groups; the shoulder was a site of complaint for 14% of the subjects, being three times more frequent among column-machine operators; the back as a whole was mentioned also by 14% of the subjects, all of them flat-machine operators; 4.9% of the subjects complained of neck pain and again none of the column-machine operators was affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Effect of work with visual display units on musculo-skeletal disorders in the office environment.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, J; Huikko, S; Nyberg, M; Kivi, P; Laippala, P; Uitti, J

    2003-10-01

    The increase in computer and mouse use has been associated with an increased prevalence of disorders in the neck and upper extremities. Furthermore, poor workstation design has been associated with an increased risk of developing these symptoms. Aim The aims of this study were (i) to estimate the prevalence of musculo-skeletal disorders among full-time visual display unit (VDU) users; (ii) to examine how the prevalence varies by work environment; and (iii) to explore the association with work factors. A survey was carried out on the effect of work with VDUs on musculo-skeletal disorders in workers in the office environment of 56 workplaces. Office workers (n = 298), customer service workers (n = 238) and designers (n = 247) were studied. For all the occupations combined, the 12 month prevalences of musculo-skeletal symptoms in the neck, shoulders, elbows, lower arms and wrists, and fingers were 63, 24, 18, 35 and 16%, respectively. The study indicated that musculo-skeletal pain is common among computer workers in offices. There was no strong association between the duration of computer work and pain or between the duration of mouse use and pain, but workers' perception of their workstation as being poor ergonomically was strongly associated with an increased prevalence of pain. Musculo-skeletal symptoms are common, but the duration of daily keyboard and mouse use had no connection with musculo-skeletal symptoms. Instead, more consideration should be paid to the ergonomics of workstations, the placing of the mouse, the postures of the upper extremities and the handling of the mouse.

  11. Job strain and risk of musculoskeletal symptoms among a prospective cohort of occupational computer users.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Lindsay M; Monteilh, Carolyn P; Gerr, Fred; Kleinbaum, David G; Marcus, Michele

    2005-10-01

    Most previous studies of the association between psychosocial stress and musculoskeletal illness among computer users have been cross-sectional and have yielded inconsistent results. The association between a measure of psychosocial stress, "job strain", and incident neck-shoulder and arm-hand musculoskeletal symptoms was investigated among recently hired computer users. The participants worked for one of several large employers and were followed prospectively for 6 months. The "job demands" and "decision latitude" subscales of the Job Content Questionnaire were used to estimate the job-strain quadrants and a ratio measure of job strain which was subsequently categorized. Incident musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained with weekly diaries. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate associations between job strain and incident musculoskeletal symptoms. Those in the high-strain quadrant were at increased risk of neck-shoulder symptoms [hazard ratio (HR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.91-2.99] when compared with those in the low-strain quadrant. Those in the highest strain-ratio category were also at increased risk of neck-shoulder symptoms when compared with those in the lowest strain-ratio category (HR 1.52, 95% CI 0.88-2.62). Modification by previous years of computer use was observed, with an elevated risk observed for those in the highest job-strain ratio category who also had low previous computer use (HR 3.16, 95% CI 1.25-8.00). There did not appear to be an association between either measure of job strain and incident arm-hand symptoms. In this cohort, workers who reported high job strain were more likely to develop neck-shoulder symptoms.

  12. The Influence of Smoking on Disability Following Hospitalization for Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    of return to work for relatively minor disabilities. Specific musculoskeletal diagnoses (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, back or neck sprain...off work, and greater levels of pain and disability among patients with low back pain, lower extremity fracture, and upper extremity disorders (Coste...exposure to nicotine; - smoking may reduce calcium absorption; - smoking results in greater risk of falls among the elderly (see Slade, 1995) Frymoyer

  13. Neck proprioception, strength, flexibility, and posture in pilots with and without neck pain history.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Clark, Nicholas C; Smalley, Brian W; Wirt, Michael D; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-05-01

    Neck pain (NP) is common among military helicopter pilots. Older age and more flight-hours have been associated with pilots with a history of NP. However, modifiable neuromuscular and musculoskeletal characteristics such as neck proprioception, strength, flexibility, and posture have rarely been investigated in military helicopter pilots with a history of NP. The purpose of the study was to compare demographics, flight characteristics, physical fitness information, neck proprioception, strength, flexibility, and posture between helicopter pilots with and without a history of NP. A total of 27 Army helicopter pilots with NP in the past 12 mo (pain group) were matched based on age with pilots without a history of NP (nonpain group). All pilots had flown at least 100 h in the past 12 mo and were cleared for flight and physical training. All pilots completed a battery of laboratory testing: neck proprioception, neck and scapular muscular strength, neck active range-of-motion (ROM), forward head and shoulder posture, and pectoralis minor length. Paired t-tests or Wilcoxon tests were used to compare differences between groups. The pain group had significantly less cervical extension (63.7 +/- 8.5 degrees) and rotation ROM (R rotation: 67.7 +/- 8.8 degrees; L rotation: 67.4 +/- 9.0 degrees) when compared to the nonpain group (extension: 68.3 +/- 7.4 degrees; R rotation: 73.4 +/- 7.4 degrees; L rotation: 72.9 +/- 6.8 degrees). No significant differences were found for other variables. The results demonstrate less neck active ROM in pilots with a history of NP. Operating a helicopter with limited neck ROM or NP may negatively impact flight safety and force readiness. Continued research is warranted.

  14. [Musculoskeletal disorders and work-related injuries among hospital day- and shift workers].

    PubMed

    D'Agostin, Flavia; Negro, Corrado

    2014-07-16

    Most research findings show that shift-and night work are associated with cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders as well as work-related injuries among health care workers. This sample based study on 246 hospital workers was performed to determine whether shift work may affect musculoskeletal disorders and injury risk. During the health surveillance program, data were collected by means of the Nordic questionnaire and the risk evaluation document. A sample of 134 shift workers was compared to a sample of 112 day workers. Hospital day workers were found  to be at greater risk of musculoskeletal symptoms in single or multiple body sites than shift workers. The prevalence of symptoms in the low back (63% vs 50%), neck (54% vs 42%) and upper extremities (26% vs 12%) was significantly higher in day workers than shift workers. In particular, among day nurses the prevalence of complaints in the upper extremities was more elevated (p<0,01) than nurses working in shifts; whereas, technicians working during the day reported more frequently symptoms in the neck (p<0,05) than technicians working in shifts. However, the average age and work experience were significantly higher in day workers than shift workers. Furthermore, the study showed that nursing personnel  was at great risk of sustaining an occupational musculoskeletal injury, especially for nurses working in shifts on medical and surgical wards. Data suggest that, concerning shift work planning, it is important to consider the workload according to activity.

  15. Association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

    PubMed

    Moberg, Lene Lehmann; Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Koch, Markus; Tveter, Anne Therese; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2017-03-21

    Construction and health care workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, and they are assumed to have physically demanding jobs. Profession- and gender-specific associations between individual capacity and musculoskeletal pain have not been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between individual capacity (maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) and handgrip strength) and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers. This cross-sectional study examined 137 construction and health care workers (58 women and 79 men) with a mean age of 41.8 years (standard deviation 12). Aerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the Åstrand cycle test, and strength was assessed by a handgrip test. Musculoskeletal pain was described by total pain, divided into neck, shoulder, and low back pain, during the last 12 months, and it was dichotomized in below or above 30 days. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between V̇O2max, strength, and musculoskeletal pain in the total study sample and separately for construction and health care workers. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and selected mechanical and psychosocial factors. Every second participant (51.8%) reported pain in either neck, shoulders or low back for more than 30 days during the last 12 months. Among the health care workers, a small but significant association was found between a high V̇O2max, high handgrip strength, and a low level of musculoskeletal pain. No association was found for the construction workers. An association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain was found for health care workers but not for construction workers. These results indicate that activities promoting individual capacity may reduce musculoskeletal pain for health care workers.

  16. Common injections in musculoskeletal medicine.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Nizran, Parminder Singh

    2013-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injections are a common procedure in primary care and sports medicine but can be intimidating for some clinicians. This article addresses current evidence for corticosteroid injections, and common injection indications and techniques, namely knee, subacromial bursa, glenohumeral joint, lateral epicondyle, de Quervain tenosynovitis, and greater trochanteric bursa injections. Preparation for injections and some evidence for ultrasound guidance are also reviewed.

  17. Epidemiology of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Marco A; Ferrone, Carmela; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) due to musculoskeletal conditions is a major social burden. The case definition of CWP relies on pain, chronicity (more than 3 months' duration) and widespread distribution (both sides of the body including the axial skeleton). Health Interview Survey (HIS) and Health Examination Survey (HES) have been used to assess the frequency of CWP in the general population. Unfortunately, both techniques are poorly standardised, which hampers comparison of data pertaining to different populations and countries. A major effort in the European Union (EU) is the development of common strategies to investigate musculoskeletal pain through HIS. Issues to be addressed include: (1) loss of daily life functions due to pain; (2) pain duration and rhythm; (3) affected sites; and (4) type of pain. We know that musculoskeletal pain affects between 13.5% and 47% of the general population, with CWP prevalence varying between 11.4% and 24%. Risk factors for musculoskeletal pain include age, gender, smoking, low education, low physical activity, poor social interaction, low family income, depression, anxiety and sleep disorders, as well as performing manual work, being a recent immigrant, non-Caucasian and widowed, separated or divorced. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neck/shoulder and back pain in new graduate nurses: A growth mixture modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Malin; Gustavsson, Petter; Melin, Bo; Rudman, Ann

    2014-04-01

    Although it is well known that musculoskeletal disorders are common among registered nurses, little longitudinal research has been conducted to examine this problem from nursing education to working life. The aim was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of neck/shoulder and back pain in nursing students in their final semester, and one and two years after graduation. Furthermore, to identify common trajectories of neck/shoulder and back pain, and explore sociodemographic and lifestyle-related factors, contextual factors and health outcome that might be characteristic of individuals in the various trajectories. Longitudinal study following nursing students from their final year of studies, with follow-ups one and two years after graduation. Nursing students who graduated from the 26 universities providing undergraduate nursing education in Sweden 2002 were invited to participate (N=1700). Of those asked, 1153 gave their informed consent. The participants answered postal surveys at yearly intervals. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze prevalence and incidence of pain, and growth mixture modeling was applied to identify different homogeneous clusters of individuals following similar trajectories in pain development across time. The prevalence of neck/shoulder and back pain remained constant over time (around 50% for neck/shoulder pain and just over 40% for back pain). Six different development trajectories for each symptom were found, reflecting patterns of stable pain levels or variation in levels over time: one symptom-free group, two decreasing pain groups, two increasing pain groups, and one chronic pain group. With few exceptions, the same factors (sex, children, chronic disease, working overtime, work absence, sickness presence, physical load, depression, self-rated health, sleep quality and muscular tension) were associated with neck/shoulder and back pain trajectories. Different types of physical load characterized new nurses with neck

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factor of Neck Pain in Elderly Korean Community Residents

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyeong Min; Cho, Nam H.; Lim, Seung Hun

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in addition to the measurement of the severity of neck pain. The mean age of the study subjects was 61 yr and 57% were females. The lifetime prevalence of neck pain was 20.8% with women having a higher prevalence. The prevalence did not increase with age, and the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain. Subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score in all domains except for mental health. The prevalence of neck pain was significantly associated with female gender, obesity and smoking. This is the first large-scale Korean study estimating the prevalence of neck pain in elderly population. Although the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain, subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score indicating that neck pain has significant health impact. PMID:23678258

  20. Musculoskeletal pain in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jannini, Suely Nóbrega; Dória-Filho, Ulysses; Damiani, Durval; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain, musculoskeletal syndromes, orthopedic disorders and using computers and playing videogames among obese adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study that investigated 100 consecutive obese adolescents and 100 healthy-weight controls using a confidential, self-report questionnaire covering demographic data, sports participation, painful musculoskeletal system symptoms and using computers and playing videogames. The questionnaire's test-retest reliability was tested. Physical examination covered six musculoskeletal syndromes and seven orthopedic disorders. The kappa index for test-retest was 0.724. Pain and musculoskeletal syndromes were equally prevalent in both groups (44 vs. 56%, p = 0.09; 12 vs. 16%, p = 0.541; respectively). Notwithstanding, orthopedic disorders (98 vs. 76%, p = 0.0001), tight quadriceps (89 vs. 44%, p = 0.0001) and genu valgum (87 vs. 24%, p = 0.0001) were significantly more prevalent in obese adolescents than in controls. Median time spent using a computer the day before, on Saturdays and on Sundays were all lower among the obese subjects (30 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.0001; 1 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.001; and 0 vs. 30 minutes, p = 0.02; respectively). Obese adolescents were less likely to play handheld videogames (2 vs. 11%, p = 0.003) and there was no difference in the two groups' use of full-sized videogames (p > 0.05). Comparing obese adolescents with pain to those free from pain revealed that pain was more frequent among females (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.048) and was associated with greater median time spent playing on Sundays [0 (0-720) vs. 0 (0-240) minutes, p = 0.028]. Obesity can cause osteoarticular system damage at the start of adolescence, particularly to the lower limbs. Programs developed specifically for obese female adolescents with musculoskeletal pain are needed.

  1. Musculoskeletal problems of performing artists.

    PubMed

    Greer, J M; Panush, R S

    1994-02-01

    We have reviewed the frequency and variety of rheumatic problems among performing artists. For instrumentalists, injuries are related to the type of instrument played, the technique used and the effort expended in the quest for excellence. For dancers, musculoskeletal problems too reflect technique and effort. We should not be surprised at the frequency of these problems. Rheumatologists, as well as orthopaedic surgeons, physiotherapists, neurologists and other physicians, encounter performing artists as patients. We should be familiar with their problems and be able to knowledgeably diagnose and manage them. This may include observing the artist during actual performances. How is the instrument being held? What is the posture of the artist? What are the comments of the coach or teacher. What type of shoes does the ballerina wear? What movements in particular cause discomfort? These and similar observations will have direct bearing on the musculoskeletal problems of these artists. Published studies have related the variety, frequency and disabling nature of performance-related musculoskeletal problems. Unfortunately few if any of these are controlled, blinded or prospective. We need more and better information. We will want clear information about prevalence of problems, better definition of the musculoskeletal ailments, classification of the relationship of problems with performance and individual biomechanical features, information about response of specific problems to interventions, and data about the long-term consequences, if any, of these rheumatic problems to the musculoskeletal system. Artists as patients are unique. Minor problems can become potentially career-ending disabilities. Making music or performing dance may provide us with delightful entertainment but represents a source of livelihood to artists. Understanding their medical needs and enabling them to continue to perform is the challenge before us.

  2. Dynamic loading on the human musculoskeletal system -- effect of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Arkady S.; Mizrahi, Joseph; Verbitsky, Oleg; Isakov, Eli

    1998-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fatigue on the ability of human musculoskeletal system to deal with the onslaught of the heel strike initiated shock waves. DESIGN: Running on a treadmill at the anaerobic threshold level for 30 min was used to acquire the experimental data on the foot strike initiated shock waves. BACKGROUND: Muscles act to lower the bending stress on bone and to attenuate the dynamic load on human musculoskeletal system. Fatigue may diminish their ability to dissipate and attenuate loading on the system. Knowledge of the effects of fatigue on the ability of the human musculoskeletal system to attenuate the shock waves may help in design of the training procedures and exercises. METHODS: Twenty-two young healthy males participated in this study. Each one was running on the treadmill at the speed corresponding to his anaerobic threshold for 30 min. The heel strike induced shock waves were recorded every 5 min on the tibial tuberosity and sacrum. The data obtained were analyzed in both temporal and frequency domains. RESULTS: The results reveal significant increase in the dynamic loading experienced by the human musculoskeletal system with fatigue. This may be attributed to the inability of the fatigued system to provide an efficient way to attenuate shock waves. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of the recorded signals suggests that fatigue contributes to the reduction of the human musculoskeletal system's capacity to attenuate and dissipate those shock waves. This capacity appears to be a function not only of the fatigue level, but also of the vertical location along the skeleton. RELEVANCE: Fatigue during running may affect the ability of the human musculoskeletal system to attenuate and dissipate the heel strike induced shock waves. The study of the fatigue effect on shock wave attenuation provides information that may benefit the runner.

  3. Validated assessment scale for neck volume.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Gerhard; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Flynn, Timothy C; Geister, Thorin L; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Hardas, Bhushan; Himmrich, Silvia; Jones, Derek; Kerscher, Martina; Mohrmann, Cornelia; Narins, Rhoda S; Pooth, Rainer; Rzany, Berthold; Buchner, Larry; Benter, Ursula; Breitscheidel, Lusine; de Maio, Maurício

    2012-02-01

    Sagging of the neck aesthetic area is an important indicator of age. The development of complex and globally accepted tools for proper assessment of the change in neck volume is an essential contribution to aesthetic research and the routine clinical setting. To develop a grading scale for the objective assessment of the neck volume and to establish the reliability of this scale for clinical research and practice. A 5-point rating scale was developed to assess neck volume objectively. Twelve experts rated frontal and lateral neck photographs of 50 subjects in two separate rating cycles using the neck volume scale. Responses of raters were analyzed to assess inter- and intrarater reliability. Interrater reliability for the neck volume scale was almost perfect, with intraclass correlation coefficients for the first and second rating cycles of 0.85 and 0.84, respectively. Intrarater reliability for the neck volume scale was high (0.90) and Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.88 and 0.95 and were statistically significant. The neck volume scale demonstrates optimal reliability for clinical research and practice. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Association Between Neck Pain and Pulmonary Function: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kahlaee, Amir Hossein; Ghamkhar, Leila; Arab, Amir Massoud

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence on respiratory function changes in patients with chronic neck pain. MEDLINE, Elsevier, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, Springer, and Google scholar electronic databases were explored thorough December 2015. English-language studies investigating cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters in patients with chronic neck pain were included. Characteristics of the patients, sampling method and size, musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters studied, and appropriateness of the statistical tests were considered. Studies were rated based on study design and performance. Of the 68 studies reviewed, 9 observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Significant difference in maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures were reported in patients with chronic neck pain compared to asymptomatic subjects. Some of the respiratory volumes were found to be lower in patients with chronic neck pain. Muscle strength and endurance, cervical range of motion, and psychological states were found to be significantly correlated with respiratory parameters. Lower Pco2 in patients and significant relationship between chest expansion and neck pain were also shown. Respiratory retraining was found to be effective in improving some cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory impairment. Functional pulmonary impairments accompany chronic neck pain. Based on the observed association, investigation of the effectiveness of management of CNP on respiratory function is strongly suggested.

  5. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Agricultural Risk Factors Among Korean Farmers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Lee, Myeong-Jun; Chung, HweeMin; Shin, Dong-Hee; Youn, Kan-Woo; Im, Sang-Hyuk; Chae, Hye Seon; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Farming is a strenuous occupation with various health risks, with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) being some of the most common. The risk factors for MSDs among Korean farmers are not well understood. Data were obtained from the Korean Farmers' Occupational Disease and Injury Survey (2012), which interviewed 16,113 participants regarding their demographic profiles, self-reported MSDs, and agricultural characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for MSDs. Subjects reported MSDs in the neck or upper extremities (5.89%), lower extremities (19.62%), and back (26.9%). Working in animal husbandry significantly increased the risk of MSDs in the neck/upper extremities, compared with irrigation farming (odds ratio: 1.837, 95% confidence interval: 1.130-2.987). The risk of MSDs increased significantly with number of years of farming, after adjusting for age and sex (neck/upper extremities, P for trend = .0002; lower extremities, <.001; back, <.001). Agriculture type, years of farming, and ergonomic factors increased the risk of MSDs among Korean farmers.

  6. A Survey of Severity and Distribution of Musculoskeletal Pain in Multiple Sclerosis Patients; a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    ShayestehAzar, Masoud; Kariminasab, Mohammad H; Saravi, Majid Sajjadi; Abedini, Mahmoud; Fazli, Mehran; Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas; Abdizadeh, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain, a common phenomenon in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, is associated with many symptoms and problems. Aim: To investigation severity and distribution of musculoskeletal pain in MS patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 115 members of the Mazandaran MS Association with confirmed MS were randomly selected to participate in the study. The patients were asked to fill out Numerical Rating Score and Nodric questionnaires, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS ver. 16 software. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.43±5.86 years and 88 cases (76.5%) were female. The mean disease duration was 26.34±24.32 months and 87.8% of the cases were experiencing pain at the time of study. The mean pain severity was 3.75±2.25 and worst pain experienced was 5.73±2.12. The most common pain sites were: the knees (55.7%), wrist (43.5%), and neck (41.7%). Women experience higher prevalence of shoulder, upper back, and ankle pain (P<0.05). In 62 cases (53.91%) MS interfered with daily functioning at least for a time. The prevalence of upper back and neck pain was higher in cases with a shorter disease duration (P<0.05). Conclusions: Pain was very common in patients with MS and not relevant to sex or age. In the majority of the cases more than 1 limb was involved and the prevalence of pain in the lower limbs was higher, especially in the knees. In females, the prevalence of pain in the shoulders, upper back, and ankle was higher compared to males. Also, neck and upper-back pain were found in the early stages of the disease. PMID:26110178

  7. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Aweto, Happiness Anulika; Tella, Bosede Abidemi; Johnson, Omobolanle Yewande

    2015-01-01

    This study has investigated the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the most commonly affected body parts, the risk factors of WMSDs and the coping strategies adopted by hairdressers. The study design was a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. Two hundred and ninety-nine hairdressers (242 females and 57 males) from salons in Surulere and Mushin Local Government Areas of Lagos State completed a 27-item questionnaire. They were selected using a non-probability consecutive sampling technique. The inferential analysis was conducted using the Chi2 test. The level of significance stood at p < 0.05. The 12-month prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders stood at 75.6%. Two hundred and twenty-one (91.3%) participants reported gradual onset of musculoskeletal disorders. One hundred and sixteen (47.9%) participants had the onset of the WMSDs at the age range of 26-35 years. The most commonly affected body parts included the low back (76.3%), shoulder (62.5%) and neck (46.3%). Some of the major job risk factors of the WMSDs that were identified included: working in the same position for long periods and attending to a large number of customers in 1 day. Taking sufficient rest breaks by participants was one of the coping strategies adopted by the participants. The mean number of years of working experience was 7.85±0.4 years. One hundred and twenty-four (41.5%) participants had worked for 1-5 years. The Chi2 analysis showed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders were significantly associated with the age of a participant (Chi2 = 78.78, p = 0.001), years of working experience (Chi2 = 78.03, p = 0.001) and hours spent working in a standing position (Chi2 = 8.77, p = 0.01), respectively. The age of hairdressers, their years of working and the long hours they spent working in a standing position may be significant factors that contribute to the high prevalence of the WMSDs among them. The most commonly affected body parts included the low

  8. [How do physical fitness and heavy physical work interact in the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders?].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Adauto Luis Moreira; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira

    2014-10-01

    A cross-sectional study investigated the association between self-reported physical fitness and musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder, or upper back among workers in 14 plastics factories in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Physical fitness was assessed on a scale from 0 to 5. Cases were defined as self-reported pain in the previous 12 months, lasting more than a week or having monthly minimum frequency, with restrictions at work or seeking medical care, or where respondents' severity was greater than 2 (on a scale from 0 to 5). Logistic regression was performed to investigate statistical interaction between physical fitness and physical demands from work in the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. Precarious physical fitness resulted in 3.19 times greater odds of musculoskeletal disorders among workers exposed to light physical demands on the job. Among workers exposed to heavy physical demands, physical fitness failed to protect against musculoskeletal disorders. Heavy physical work was always associated with high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Despite the importance of physical fitness, physical exercise programs should not be used to replace improvements in working conditions.

  9. Computer products usage and prevalence of computer related musculoskeletal discomfort among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Siu, Damian Chi Hong; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak Sun; Griffiths, Sian Meryl

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern of computer related activities among Hong Kong adolescents and the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort by anatomic sites. This study used a questionnaire-based cross-sectional design. Students from Year 1 to 7 of six local high schools were invited to complete a Student Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire and Computer Usage Questionnaire. Complete data for 3,191 questionnaires was obtained, giving an overall response rate of 95.5%. High prevalence (68.3%) of musculoskeletal discomfort related to using computer was reported among Hong Kong children and adolescents in the past 12 months. Shoulder (37.7%) and neck (35.0%) were the most frequently involved body parts for both genders, while female students reported higher rates of musculoskeletal discomfort in each of the specified anatomic site than male students. Students who reported musculoskeletal discomfort were significantly older and spent a longer time on computer related activities. The associations found in this cross-sectional study should be confirmed by subsequent longitudinal studies. An urgent need in healthy computing environment is demanded among Hong Kong adolescents.

  10. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Building Construction Workers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsaaran, Zaid Fahad; Alshehri, Moayad Khalid; Azam Khashougji, Mohammed; Almeterk, Abdul Aziz Zayed; Almutairi, Saif Fraj; Alsaeed, Saad Fahad

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among building construction workers. Total 389 apparently healthy, male volunteers were selected with mean age 34.56±8.33 years and a mean working duration in building construction as 5.76±2.68 years. Musculoskeletal complaints were recorded through a detailed clinical interview and comprehensive questionnaire. Substantial number of building construction workers developed musculoskeletal symptoms including neck pain 29 (7.5%), shoulder pain 41(10.5%), upper back pain 24(6.2%), lower back pain 64 (16.5%), legs pain 93 (23.9%), feet pain 52 (13.4%), head heaviness 44 (11.3%) and whole body fatigue 78 (20.1%). These complaints were significantly associated with long-term duration-response in building construction industry. Furthermore, cigarette smokers had little higher percentage of musculoskeletal complaints compared to non-smoker companions. Building construction occupation is a prolific source of musculoskeletal ailments and complaints were significantly increased with long-term working duration in building construction industry.

  11. Examination of postures and frequency of musculoskeletal disorders among manual workers in Calcutta, India

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Background Manual material handling (MMH) activities require workers to adopt various awkward postures leading to the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Objectives To investigate the postures adopted during heavy load handling and the frequency of MSDs among MMH workers in Calcutta, India. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with 100 MMH workers. MSD frequency was assessed via the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. The Ovako Working Posture Assessment System (OWAS) was used to analyze working posture. We used logistic regression to predict MSD risk factors. Results Ninety five percent of workers reported a MSD in at least one body part in the past 12 months. According to OWAS results, 83% of the analysed work postures require immediate corrective measures for worker safety. The most harmful posture was carrying a heavy load overhead. Carrying more than 120 kg increased the odds of low back and neck pain by 4.527 and 4.555, respectively. Conclusions This sample had a high frequency of reported MSDs, likely attributed to physiologically strenuous occupational activities repeated on average of 30–40 times daily. Ergonomic interventions, such as the use of handcarts, and occupational training are urgently needed. PMID:27362732

  12. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among workers in an MDF furniture factory in eastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Meepradit, Parvena

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among 439 workers in an MDF furniture factory using questionnaires and the risk assessment form of the Ergonomic Assessment Tool for Arthritis technique to assess aspects of the workstations and working postures of jobs. With regard to factors that affected MSDs, it was found that workers older than 50 years were having knee symptoms: their adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 18.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.51, 226.40]. Those who had been working for 1-2 years were having neck pain symptoms: aOR 12.01, 95% CI [1.82, 79.43]. The recommendation of this study is that health monitoring should be provided for workers who have pain in various parts of their bodies, especially those who have been working for 6-10 years, and those who are over 50 years old with knee pain.

  13. Work-organisational and personal factors associated with upper body musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P-C; Rempel, D M; Harrison, R J; Chan, J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the contribution of work-organisational and personal factors to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among garment workers in Los Angeles. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 520 sewing machine operators from 13 garment industry sewing shops. Detailed information on work-organisational factors, personal factors, and musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. The outcome of interest, upper body WMSD, was defined as a worker experiencing moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain. Unconditional logistic regression models were adopted to assess the association between both work-organisational factors and personal factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. Results The prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in the neck/shoulder region was 24% and for distal upper extremity it was 16%. Elevated prevalence of upper body pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis of a MSD or a systemic illness, working more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work–rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction. Conclusion Work-organisational and personal factors were associated with increased prevalence of moderate or severe upper body musculoskeletal pain among garment workers. Owners of sewing companies may be able to reduce or prevent WMSDs among employees by adopting rotations between different types of workstations thus increasing task variety; by either shortening work periods or increasing rest periods to reduce the work–rest ratio; and by improving the work-organisation to control psychosocial stressors. The findings may guide prevention efforts in the garment sector and have important public health implications for this workforce of

  14. Work-organisational and personal factors associated with upper body musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-C; Rempel, D M; Harrison, R J; Chan, J; Ritz, B R

    2007-12-01

    To assess the contribution of work-organisational and personal factors to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among garment workers in Los Angeles. This is a cross-sectional study of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 520 sewing machine operators from 13 garment industry sewing shops. Detailed information on work-organisational factors, personal factors, and musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. The outcome of interest, upper body WMSD, was defined as a worker experiencing moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain. Unconditional logistic regression models were adopted to assess the association between both work-organisational factors and personal factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in the neck/shoulder region was 24% and for distal upper extremity it was 16%. Elevated prevalence of upper body pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis of a MSD or a systemic illness, working more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work-rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction. Work-organisational and personal factors were associated with increased prevalence of moderate or severe upper body musculoskeletal pain among garment workers. Owners of sewing companies may be able to reduce or prevent WMSDs among employees by adopting rotations between different types of workstations thus increasing task variety; by either shortening work periods or increasing rest periods to reduce the work-rest ratio; and by improving the work-organisation to control psychosocial stressors. The findings may guide prevention efforts in the garment sector and have important public health implications for this workforce of largely immigrant labourers.

  15. Musculoskeletal symptoms and psychosocial work environment, among Swedish commercial pilots.

    PubMed

    Runeson-Broberg, Roma; Lindgren, Torsten; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The associations between psychosocial work conditions and health in pilots are understudied, and therefore, the associations between the psychosocial work conditions and musculoskeletal problems among Swedish commercial pilots were investigated. In 2010, a self-administered questionnaire study was performed among pilots in one Swedish commercial airline: 354 pilots participated (61 %). Musculoskeletal symptoms and the psychosocial work conditions measured by the demand control social support model were investigated. Odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) were expressed per change of one unit on the interquartile score scale. Pilots on long-haul flights had less elbow symptoms (OR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.14-0.85), and women had more hand symptoms (OR 2.90, 95 % CI 1.11-7.52). There were associations between high work demands and symptoms from the neck (OR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.45-2.88), shoulders (OR 1.46, 95 % 1.05-2.03), elbows (OR 1.79, 95 % CI 1.10-2.90) and low back (OR 1.42, 95 % CI 1.02-1.96) in pilots. Low social support was associated with symptoms from the neck (OR 1.87, 95 % 1.35-2.58), shoulders (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.14-2.14) and low back (OR 1.63, 95 % CI 1.18-2.24). Low supervisor support was associated with neck (OR 1.67, 95 % CI 1.22-2.27), shoulders (OR 1.38, 95 % CI 1.02-1.87) and low back symptoms (OR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.09-2.01). The associations were mainly found among first officers. Musculoskeletal symptoms in pilots can be affected by poor psychosocial work conditions such as high demands and low social support, especially for first officers. The psychosocial aspects of organisational changes in commercial airlines should be taken into consideration.

  16. Health-related quality of life and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: after compared to before short-term group-based aqua-exercises

    PubMed Central

    Enblom, Anna; Wicher, Martin; Nordell, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders after participation in group-based aqua-exercising, compared to before participation. Physiotherapists instructed group-based aqua-exercising for 30 min twice a week for 8 weeks in 39 patients (81% women, mean age 55 ± 12 years), with musculoskeletal disorders located in the back (28%), neck (17%), general myalgia (21%), lower extremities (9%), shoulder (7%) and multiple/other regions (18%). Before and after the aqua-exercising, physiotherapists assessed patients’ musculoskeletal function categorized using Goal Attainment Scaling, and HRQoL was measured using EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). The median EQ-5D score was 0.36 (25th–75th percentiles 0.09–0.69) at the start, and after the intervention improved to 0.62 (0.09–0.73) (p = 0.038). The EQ-5D score and musculoskeletal function improved in 49% (EQ-5D) and 34% (physiotherapist assessment), were stable in 33% and 63%, and worsened in 18% and 7% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, comparable with improvements previously seen after more time-consuming exercise periods, patients with musculoskeletal disorders had improved HRQoL after 8 weeks of aqua-exercising compared to before exercising. This uncontrolled feasibility study does not reveal whether this was the result of aqua-exercising. The effects and costs need to be evaluated in randomized controlled studies. PMID:28251037

  17. Health-related quality of life and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: after compared to before short-term group-based aqua-exercises.

    PubMed

    Enblom, Anna; Wicher, Martin; Nordell, Therese

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders after participation in group-based aqua-exercising, compared to before participation. Physiotherapists instructed group-based aqua-exercising for 30 min twice a week for 8 weeks in 39 patients (81% women, mean age 55 ± 12 years), with musculoskeletal disorders located in the back (28%), neck (17%), general myalgia (21%), lower extremities (9%), shoulder (7%) and multiple/other regions (18%). Before and after the aqua-exercising, physiotherapists assessed patients' musculoskeletal function categorized using Goal Attainment Scaling, and HRQoL was measured using EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). The median EQ-5D score was 0.36 (25th-75th percentiles 0.09-0.69) at the start, and after the intervention improved to 0.62 (0.09-0.73) (p = 0.038). The EQ-5D score and musculoskeletal function improved in 49% (EQ-5D) and 34% (physiotherapist assessment), were stable in 33% and 63%, and worsened in 18% and 7% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, comparable with improvements previously seen after more time-consuming exercise periods, patients with musculoskeletal disorders had improved HRQoL after 8 weeks of aqua-exercising compared to before exercising. This uncontrolled feasibility study does not reveal whether this was the result of aqua-exercising. The effects and costs need to be evaluated in randomized controlled studies.

  18. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain.

    PubMed

    Linari-Melfi, Marcela; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Guisado-Barrilao, Rafael; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2011-11-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists.

  19. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  20. Head and neck pain review: traditional and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Nelson, A J

    1996-10-01

    A variety of conditions are frequently associated with the occurrence of head and neck pain. The purposes of this review are: to describe the characteristics of several musculoskeletal, neurological, and systemic conditions frequently cited as possible causes of head and neck pain and to suggest a new technique for treating head and neck pain. The characteristics of musculoskeletal conditions, such as muscle spasm, tendinitis, trigger points, and joint inflammation, and their relationship to head and neck pain are considered. The features and clinical implications of neurologic conditions, such as atypical facial pain, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and neurogenic inflammation, are also described. The distinguishing characteristics of headaches, including cluster, tension, chronic daily, rebound, posttraumatic, and postlumbar puncture, are detailed. This review also addresses the contributions of systemic disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the variants, and rheumatoid-related conditions, like dermatomyositis, temporal arteritis, Lyme's disease, and fibromyalgia, to head and neck pain. The results of a recent pilot study of the effectiveness of intraoral circulating ice water for resolving symptoms related to head and neck pain secondary to neurogenic inflammation are presented in this work. Ice water circulating through hollow metal tubes was placed intraorally for 15 minutes in the posterior maxillary area on 12 individuals with cervical pain and muscle spasm. In nine of these individuals, reduced cervical pain perception, upper trapezius electromyography signal reduction, and increased cervical range of motion was produced. Six out of 12 individuals had accompanying headache, which was reduced or eliminated in four cases. These findings suggest a strong trigemino-cervical relationship to neck pain and headache.

  1. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP.

  2. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  3. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith; Goodson, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses, and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered. PMID:26612237

  4. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity) and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined. PMID:21910870

  5. Musculoskeletal colloquialisms based on weapons.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    Eponyms and colloquialisms are commonly used in orthopaedic literature and convey a great deal of information in a concise fashion. Several orthopaedic conditions have characteristic clinical or radiologic appearances, mimicking the appearance of certain arms or weapons. Most of these are easy to memorise and recognise, provided the orthopaedic surgeon is aware of the colloquialism and familiar with the appearance of the weapon on which it is based. Unfortunately, many such colloquialisms are based on traditional weapons no longer in current use, and their appearances are not familiar to most orthopaedists, creating confusion and difficulty in understanding them. In this paper, we have reviewed the musculoskeletal colloquialisms based on weapons, including a brief description of the weapon with illustrations, highlighting the importance of the colloquialism in diagnosis or treatment of musculoskeletal conditions.

  6. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Goodson, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter, we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered.

  7. Radiologic management of musculoskeletal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Springfield, D.S.; Enneking, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The present book is written by a radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons with long experience in musculoskeletal tumors. It is based on modern pathologic and surgical principles, and from those principles the radiologic approach is discussed. The main questions ask what information can be gained by the different modalities, and which combination of modalities is the most profitable to determine the local behaviour of the tumor, diagnosis and local extent.

  8. MRI of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Seeger, L L

    1992-04-01

    MRI is rapidly altering the presurgical evaluation for many forms of musculoskeletal pathology, and the indications for MRI will undoubtedly continue to grow. Because of the complexity of this modality and the ability to totally "miss" pathology by the inappropriate choice of imaging plane or pulse sequence, cooperation between the orthopedic surgeon and the radiologist is essential. A close working relationship is required for maximum diagnostic information to be obtained with each examination and for optimal patient care.

  9. Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    and vegetables: 4 - 5 of each/day; • Eat cold water fish ( salmon , halibut, scallops,tuna, mackerel,cod, shrimp, snapper, and sardines) ≥ 2x...Oats • Soy • Brown rice • Wheat • Cold-water fish Dietary Supplements • Glucosamine/Chondroitin sulfate • Vitamins C and E • Selenium...Omega-3 Fatty Acids • Calcium and Vitamin D • Coenzyme Q10 • Capsaicin Cream (chili peppers) Summary Musculoskeletal health requires: • A

  10. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  11. Content and psychometric evaluations of questionnaires for assessing physical function in people with neck disorders: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wiitavaara, Birgitta; Heiden, Marina

    2017-06-02

    The purpose was to investigate how physical function is assessed in people with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the neck. Specifically, we aimed to determine: (1) Which questionnaires are used to assess physical function in people with MSD in the neck? (2) What do those questionnaires measure? (3) What are the measurement properties of the questionnaires? A systematic review was performed to identify questionnaires and psychometric evaluations. The content of the questionnaires was categorized according to the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health, and the psychometric properties were quality-rated using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments checklist. Ten questionnaires and 32 articles evaluating measurement properties were analyzed. Most questionnaires covered only the components body functions and activity and participation, more often activity participation than body function. Internal consistency was adequate in most questionnaires, whereas responsiveness was generally low. Neck Disability Index was most evaluated, but the evaluations of all questionnaires tended to cover most properties in the checklist. The questionnaires differed substantially in items and extent to which their psychometric properties had been evaluated. Focus of measurement was on activities in daily life rather than physical function as such. Implications for Rehabilitation To provide early diagnostics and effective treatment for patients with neck disorders, valid and reliable instruments that measure relevant aspects of the disorders are needed. This paper presents an overview of content and quality of questionnaires used to assess physical function in neck disorders, which may facilitate informed decisions about which measurement instruments to use when evaluating the course of neck disorders. Most of the questionnaires need more testing to judge the quality, however the NDI was the most frequently tested

  12. Texting on mobile phones and musculoskeletal disorders in young adults: A five-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ewa; Thomée, Sara; Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Hagberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to examine whether texting on a mobile phone is a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities in a population of young adults. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study with Swedish young adults (aged 20-24 years) data were collected via a web-based questionnaire at baseline (n = 7092) and after one and five years. Cross-sectional associations were found between text messaging and reported ongoing symptoms in neck and upper extremities (odds ratios, ORs 1.3-2.0). Among symptom-free at baseline prospective associations were only found between text messaging and new cases of reported symptoms in the hand/fingers (OR 2.0) at one year follow up. Among those with symptoms at baseline prospective associations were found between text messaging and maintained pain in neck/upper back (OR 1.6). The results imply mostly short-term effects, and to a lesser extent, long-term effects on musculoskeletal disorders in neck and upper extremities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  14. The effect of Kinesiotape application on functional performance in surgeons who have musculo-skeletal pain after performing surgery.

    PubMed

    Karatas, Nihan; Bicici, Seda; Baltaci, Gul; Caner, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons make up a unique group that is at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Kinesiotape technique on pain and functional performance in surgeons who have musculoskeletal system pain after performing surgery. 32 surgeons between the ages of 27 and 44 yrs working in a university hospital were included. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the surgeons' neck and low back pain and the Oswestry Low Back and Neck Disability Indexes were used to determine the impact of pain on daily living activities. First, surgeons were evaluated without Kinesiotape application, then evaluated again on the first day and fourth day of Kinesiotape application. The results showed that surgeons had a significant reduction in neck and low back pain (p < 0.05). There were improvements in both Oswestry Low Back Disability Index and Neck Disability Index scores when compared with their initial status (p < 0.05). After Kinesiotape application, neck and low back range of motions' scores showed an increase (p < 0.05). Findings demonstrated that Kinesio taping would be an effective method for reducing neck and low back pain and improving functional performance.

  15. Variation of neck position with image-guided radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ove, Roger; Cavalieri, Ronaldo; Noble, Darin; Russo, Suzanne M

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the setup variation of the low neck in relation to the upper neck is necessary to define appropriate planning margins, while treating the full neck with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. The setup of 20 sequential head and neck cancer patients was studied. Daily position verification was performed with a computed tomography (CT) on rails. An upper neck point was defined as the anterior-most portion of the cervical spine on the lowest CT cut on which both styloid processes are visible. A low neck point was defined as the anterior-most portion of the cervical spine on the lowest CT cut on which the thyroid gland was visible bilaterally. This procedure was carried out on the planning CT and on each daily treatment CT. The variation of the low neck was analyzed, assuming perfect alignment of the upper neck anatomy. Daily treatment CT of upper neck anterior cervical spine points were normalized to the planning CT. Relative to this coordinate system, the low neck cervical spine point was displaced an average of 3.08 mm anteriorly, ±0.17 mm. There was no systematic lateral or craniocaudal displacement. Random setup errors resulted in low neck standard deviations of 3.9 mm (anteroposterior), 3.3 mm (lateral), and 2.6 mm (craniocaudal). Position variation in the low neck varied in excess of the planning margins. There was a systematic anterior displacement. Random setup error was greater than expected. The results suggest that the neck volumes located distant from the region of fusion should be drawn with larger planning margins.

  16. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  17. Correlations of Neck/Shoulder Perfusion Characteristics and Pain Symptoms of the Female Office Workers with Sedentary Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shan-Hua; Li, Yung-Hui; Kuo, Fun-Chie

    2017-01-01

    Aim Modern office workers are often impacted by chronic neck/shoulder pain. Most of the previous studies which investigated the relationship of the occupational factors and musculoskeletal symptoms had adopted questionnaire survey. In this study the microcirculatory characteristics and perceived symptoms in neck/shoulder region were compared among office workers with sedentary lifestyle. Methods Thirty-seven female office workers were recruited in this study. Microcirculatory flow in neck/shoulder region characterized by the mean blood flow (MMBF value), pulsatile blood flow (PMBF value), and the PMBF/MMBF ratio (perfusion pulsatility, PP) were investigated using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF). A Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) were also administered to collect the information of perceived neck/shoulder symptoms. Correlations between the perfusion characteristics and the individual/occupational factors were analyzed using the Spearman test. The difference of the MMBF values between the low-pain group (pain level≤2) and the high-pain group (pain level>2) were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results There were 81% participants reported neck or shoulder pain symptoms. The duration of shoulder pain was significantly correlated with the workers’ age and the duration of employment (p<0.01) (n = 37). While both the MMBF and PMBF values in shoulder region were significantly reduced with the workers’ age and the duration of employment (p<0.05) (n = 27). And there was a 54% reduction in the MMBF value of the workers from age of 23 to 47. And the MMBF value of the high-pain group (n = 15) was significantly lower than the value of the low-pain group (n = 15) (p<0.05). The duration of shoulder pain showed a moderately negative correlation with PMBF values (n = 19). Besides, the PP value was moderately correlated with shoulder pain level attributed by the rapid reduction of MMBF values (p = 0.07). Conclusion In this

  18. Differences in musculoskeletal health due to gender in a rural multiethnic cohort: a Project FRONTIER study.

    PubMed

    Brismée, J M; Yang, S; Lambert, M E; Chyu, M C; Tsai, P; Zhang, Y; Han, J; Hudson, C; Chung, Eunhee; Shen, C L

    2016-04-26

    Very few studies have investigated differences in musculoskeletal health due to gender in a large rural population. The aim of this study is to investigate factors affecting musculoskeletal health in terms of hand grip strength, musculoskeletal discomfort, and gait disturbance in a rural-dwelling, multi-ethnic cohort. Data for 1117 participants (40 years and older, 70% female) of an ongoing rural healthcare study, Project FRONTIER, were analyzed. Subjects with a history of neurological disease, stroke and movement disorder were excluded. Dominant hand grip strength was assessed by dynamometry. Gait disturbance including stiff, spastic, narrow-based, wide-based, unstable or shuffling gait was rated. Musculoskeletal discomfort was assessed by self-reported survey. Data were analyzed by linear, logistic regression and negative binomial regressions as appropriate. Demographic and socioeconomic factors were adjusted in the multiple variable analyses. In both genders, advanced age was a risk factor for weaker hand grip strength; arthritis was positively associated with musculoskeletal discomfort, and fair or poor health was significantly associated with increased risk of gait disturbance. Greater waist circumference was associated with greater musculoskeletal discomfort in males only. In females, advanced age is the risk factor for musculoskeletal discomfort as well as gait disturbance. Females with fair or poor health had weaker hand grip strength. Higher C-reactive protein and HbA1c levels were also positively associated with gait disturbance in females, but not in males. This cross-sectional study demonstrates how gender affects hand grip strength, musculoskeletal discomfort, and gait in a rural-dwelling multi-ethnic cohort. Our results suggest that musculoskeletal health may need to be assessed differently between males and females.

  19. Musculoskeletal disorders of the upper cervical spine in women with episodic or chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Ferracini, Gabriela N; Florencio, Lidiane L; Dach, Fabíola; Bevilaqua Grossi, Débora; Palacios-Ceña, María; Ordás-Bandera, Carlos; Chaves, Thais C; Speciali, José G; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-06-01

    The role of musculoskeletal disorders of the cervical spine in migraine is under debate. To investigate differences in musculoskeletal impairments of the neck including active global and upper cervical spine mobility, the presence of symptomatic upper cervical spine joints, cervicocephalic kinesthesia and head/neck posture between women with episodic migraine, chronic migraine, and controls. A cross-sectional study. Tertiary university-based hospital. Fifty-five women with episodic migraine, 16 with chronic migraine, and 22 matched healthy women. Active cervical range of motion, upper cervical spine mobility (i.e., flexion-rotation test), referred pain from upper cervical joints, cervicocephalic kinesthesia (joint position sense error test, JPSE), and head/neck posture (i.e. the cranio-vertebral and cervical lordosis angles) were assessed by an assessor blinded to the subject's condition. Women with migraine showed reduced cervical rotation than healthy women (P=0.012). No differences between episodic and chronic migraine were found in cervical mobility. Significant differences for flexion-rotation test were also reported, suggesting that upper cervical spine mobility was restricted in both migraine groups (P<0.001). Referred pain elicited on manual examination of the upper cervical spine mimicking pain symptoms was present in 50% of migraineurs. No differences were observed on the frequency of symptomatic upper cervical joints between episodic and chronic migraine. No differences on JPSE or posture were found among groups (P>0.121). Women with migraine exhibit musculoskeletal impairments of the upper cervical spine expressed as restricted cervical rotation, decreased upper cervical rotation, and the presence of symptomatic upper cervical joints. No differences were found between episodic or chronic migraine. Identification treatment of the musculoskeletal impairments of the cervical spine may help to clinician for better management of patients with migraine.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for musculoskeletal problems associated with microlaryngeal surgery: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adrienne; Baker, Nancy; Smith, Libby; Rosen, Clark A

    2014-08-01

    Microlaryngeal surgery (MLS) presents ergonomic challenges to surgeons and potential risks for developing musculoskeletal symptoms (MSSx). This study describes prevalence and risk factors of MLS-associated MSSx. Cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire was administered to members of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Outcome measures related to surgeon demographics, training, MLS experience, operating room setup, experience of MSSx in relation to MLS, treatment sought, and practice changes due to MSSx. Response rate was 9.2% (n = 476); 83% reported musculoskeletal symptoms during MLS, and 21% reported rest breaks during MLS. Taking breaks was independently associated with back support lack (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08) and surgery lasting >30 minutes (OR = 1.68). Areas most commonly affected were neck, upper back, shoulder, and lower back. Ten percent reported treatment for MLS-related MSSx. Some respondents reported major practice changes due to MSSx, including fewer cases, ceasing to perform MLS, applying for disability, and early retirement. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common (83%) among surgeons performing microlaryngeal surgery. Findings suggest multiple factors may contribute to development of MSSx in otolaryngologists. Risk factors for MSSx and taking breaks during surgery include average case operating time >30 minutes and absence of back support. Previous studies have identified neck flexion and lack of arm support as associated with risk of musculoskeletal injury. This study demonstrates that MSSx related to surgery do occur in otolaryngologists, and that poor surgical ergonomics may play a role. Surgeons should consider proper support and positioning during MLS to protect their health. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Industrial medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation. 4. Interventional procedures for work-related cervical spine conditions.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Robert W; Zuhosky, Joseph P; Sullivan, William J; Panagos, Andre; Foye, Patrick M; Sable, Aaron W

    2007-03-01

    This self-directed learning module outlines the use of interventional techniques in the treatment of neck pain with and without referred pain into the arm. It is part of the supplement on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article specifically focuses on interventions used to diagnose or treat the conditions commonly seen in patients with neck pain or referred pain into the upper limb. Techniques reviewed include the use of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of myofascial pain, cervical zygapophyseal joint injections and radiofrequency neuroablation in the treatment of posterior column disorders, and epidural steroid injections in the treatment of cervical radicular and referred upper-limb pain. To give an overview of the current state of the art regarding diagnostic and nonsurgical invasive treatment procedures for neck pain with and without referred upper-limb pain.

  2. Associations of self estimated workloads with musculoskeletal symptoms among hospital nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ando, S.; Ono, Y.; Shimaoka, M.; Hiruta, S.; Hattori, Y.; Hori, F.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the prevalence of neck, shoulder, and arm pain (NSAP) as well as low back pain (LBP) among hospital nurses, and to examine the association of work tasks and self estimated risk factors with NSAP and LBP.
METHODS—A cross sectional study was carried out in a national university hospital in Japan. Full time registered nurses in the wards (n=314) were selected for analysis. The questionnaire was composed of items on demographic conditions, severity of workloads in actual tasks, self estimated risk factors for fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain in the previous month. Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by the Cox's proportional hazards model to study the association of pain with variables related to work and demographic conditions.
RESULTS—The prevalences of low back, shoulder, neck, and arm pain in the previous month were 54.7%, 42.8%, 31.3%, and 18.6%, respectively. The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among hospital nurses was higher than in previous studies. In the Cox's models for LBP and NSAP, there were no significant associations between musculoskeletal pain and the items related to work and demographic conditions. The RRs for LBP tended to be relatively higher for "accepting emergency patients" and some actual tasks. Some items of self estimated risk factors for fatigue tended to have relatively higher RRs for LBP and NSAP.
CONCLUSIONS—It was suggested that musculoskeletal pain among hospital nurses may have associations with some actual tasks and items related to work postures, work control, and work organisation. Further studies, however, are necessary, as clear evidence of this potential association was not shown in the study.


Keywords: workloads; musculoskeletal pain; nurses PMID:10810105

  3. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior.

  4. The Effectiveness of Neck Stretching Exercises Following Total Thyroidectomy on Reducing Neck Pain and Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Hatice; Tastan, Sevinc; Iyigün, Emine; Oztürk, Erkan; Yildiz, Ramazan; Görgülü, Semih

    2016-06-01

    Although there are a limited number of studies showing effects of neck stretching exercises following a thyroidectomy in reducing neck discomfort symptoms, no study has specifically dealt with and examined the effect of neck stretching exercises on neck pain and disability. To analyze the effect of neck stretching exercises, following a total thyroidectomy, on reducing neck pain and disability. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. The participants were randomly assigned either to the stretching exercise group (n = 40) or to the control group (n = 40). The stretching exercise group learned the neck stretching exercises immediately after total thyroidectomy. The effects of the stretching exercises on the participants' neck pain and disability, neck sensitivity, pain with neck movements as well as on wound healing, were evaluated at the end of the first week and at 1 month following surgery. When comparing neck pain and disability scale (NPDS) scores, neck sensitivity and pain with neck movement before thyroidectomy, after 1 week and after 1-month time-points, it was found that patients experienced significantly less pain and disability in the stretching exercise group than the control group (p < .001). At the end of the first week, the NPDS scores (mean [SD] = 8.82 [12.23] vs. 30.28 [12.09]), neck sensitivity scores (median [IR] = 0 [.75] vs. 2.00 [4.0]) and pain levels with neck movements (median [IR] = 0 [2.0] vs. 3.5 [5.75]) of the stretching exercise group were significantly lower than those of the control group. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with regard to the scores at the 1-month evaluation (p > .05). Neck stretching exercises done immediately after a total thyroidectomy reduce short-term neck pain and disability symptoms. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Cook, Cristi R

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a rapidly growing field within veterinary medicine. Ultrasound for musculoskeletal disorders has been commonly used in equine and human medicine and is becoming more commonly performed in small animal patients due to the increase in the recognition of soft tissue injuries. Ultrasound is widely available, cost-effective, but technically difficult to learn. Advantages of musculoskeletal ultrasound are the opposite limb is commonly used for comparison to evaluate symmetry of the tendinous structures and the ease of repeat examinations to assess healing. The article discusses the major areas of shoulder, stifle, iliopsoas, gastrocnemius, and musculoskeletal basics.

  6. A Survey of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Dabholkar, Twinkle; Yardi, Sujata; Dabholkar, Yogesh G; Velankar, Haritosh K; Ghuge, Gaurav

    2017-06-01

    There are increased reports of prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) in surgeons performing minimal access surgeries. Due to the nature of the speciality, otolaryngologists spend their work days in performing markedly precise procedures in small workspaces i.e. the patients' ear, nose and throat. Due to this, they frequently adopt awkward neck, back and shoulder postures while using devices like otoscope, endoscope and microscope. The field of otolaryngology has barely received any attention with respect to ergonomic assessment. Thus, the aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of WRMSDs in otolaryngologists in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai. A pre-validated, structured questionnaire was distributed to 150 otolaryngologists. Seventy-three otolaryngologists responded to the questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised of demographic and workload data, report of musculoskeletal symptoms and otolaryngologists' interpretation of casual and preventive factors of symptoms at workplace. Response rate of the survey was 48.6%. The total prevalence of WRMSDs in the otolaryngologists was 87.67%. Majority of those surveyed reported that they suffered from musculoskeletal problems which they attributed to the ergonomic flaws encountered during surgery (60.27%) and OPD (69.86%) respectively. Pain and discomfort during surgery experienced by the surgeons were most frequently attributed to the awkward and sustained postures adopted during surgery. Effective time management, ergonomically apt postures, intermittent change of posture, using back rest and availing skilled assistance during OPD and surgery, were the self-assessed corrective measures suggested by the respondents. The otolaryngologists' job profile puts them at high risk for WRMSDs.

  7. Validation of an EMG-driven, graphically based isometric musculoskeletal model of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Netto, Kevin J; Burnett, Angus F; Green, Jonathon P; Rodrigues, Julian P

    2008-06-01

    EMG-driven musculoskeletal modeling is a method in which loading on the active and passive structures of the cervical spine may be investigated. A model of the cervical spine exists; however, it has yet to be criterion validated. Furthermore, neck muscle morphometry in this model was derived from elderly cadavers, threatening model validity. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was to modify and criterion validate this preexisting graphically based musculoskeletal model of the cervical spine. Five male subjects with no neck pain participated in this study. The study consisted of three parts. First, subject-specific neck muscle morphometry data were derived by using magnetic resonance imaging. Second, EMG drive for the model was generated from both surface (Drive 1: N=5) and surface and deep muscles (Drive 2: N=3). Finally, to criterion validate the modified model, net moments predicted by the model were compared against net moments measured by an isokinetic dynamometer in both maximal and submaximal isometric contractions with the head in the neutral posture, 20 deg of flexion, and 35 deg of extension. Neck muscle physiological cross sectional area values were greater in this study when compared to previously reported data. Predictions of neck torque by the model were better in flexion (18.2% coefficient of variation (CV)) when compared to extension (28.5% CV) and using indwelling EMG did not enhance model predictions. There were, however, large variations in predictions when all the contractions were compared. It is our belief that further work needs to be done to improve the validity of the modified EMG-driven neck model examined in this study. A number of factors could potentially improve the model with the most promising probably being optimizing various modeling parameters by using methods established by previous researchers investigating other joints of the body.

  8. Job experience, work load, and risk of musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hakkanen, M; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the effects of physical work load and job experience on morbidity from musculoskeletal disorders among trailer assembly workers.
METHODS—A longitudinal study was carried out in a trailer assembly factory with many new workers employed during the follow up. The sickness absence of 532 workers (160 experienced and 372 new (separately for the first year of employment and from the second year on)) was followed up. Exposure was assessed by job titles, visits, task descriptions, and some direct measurements. The associations between the explanatory variables and sick leave were assessed by log linear models.
RESULTS—A higher rate of sick leave due to disorders of the upper limbs was found for new workers compared with experienced ones, especially in the high work load group. Women had a higher rate than men. New male workers in physically strenuous tasks had a high rate of sick leave due to neck and shoulder disorders.
CONCLUSIONS—As being unaccustomed to work seems to increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders, special attention should be paid to newly employed workers.


Keywords: new workers; physical work load; assembly work PMID:11160992

  9. Impact of rest breaks on musculoskeletal discomfort of Chikan embroiderers of West Bengal, India: a follow up field study

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Mitra, Kalpita; Sahu, Subhashis; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine risk factors that predict musculoskeletal discomfort in Chikan embroiderers of West Bengal, India, and to compare the effect of two rest break schedules to reduce these symptoms. Methods: The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was performed on 400 Chikan embroiderers at baseline containing questions on job autonomy, working behavior, and work stress factors. Relative risk was calculated to identify prognostic factors for musculoskeletal discomfort in different body regions. Two groups of workers received two rest break schedules for 4 months and compared in a between-subject design. Outcome variables were scores of Body Part Discomfort (BPD) scale. Results: Chikan embroiderers are afflicted with musculoskeletal discomfort mainly in the lower back, neck/shoulder and wrist/forearm region, which is attributed to their prolonged working timeinvolving hands and wrists, being in a static seating posture. Rigidity in working methods, prolonged working time, inadequate rest break during the working day, dissatisfaction regarding earning, monotonous work, static sitting posture, and repetitive movement of wrist and forearm were the significant predictors of these symptom developments. Rest break schedule 1 with more frequent and shorter breaks had more significant improvement on the severity of these musculoskeletal discomforts. Conclusions: Chikan embroiderers perform a highly dreary occupation and various ergonomics conditions work as predictors for developing musculoskeletal discomforts among them. Design of proper rest break schedule involving shorter and frequent breaks was competent for reducing these discomforts to a certain extent. PMID:27265529

  10. Work-Related Psychosocial Factors and Mental Health Problems Associated with Musculoskeletal Pain in Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common cause of incapacity among nurses. This study aimed to report the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among hospital nurses and to explore the associations of work-related psychosocial factors and mental health problems with musculoskeletal pain. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital during April and May 2011. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations between dependent and independent variables. Results. Analysis was based on 404 nurses (45% of the hospital's nursing population). The overall prevalence of MSP was 70% in the past year and 64% in the past month. Lower back (57%) and neck (56%) were the body areas most commonly painful in the past year. Higher quantitative and emotional demands, work pace, low justice and respect in the workplace, influence on work organisation, and role conflicts were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain among nurses (p < 0.05). All mental health problems and most strongly somatic stress symptoms were associated with musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions. Work-related psychosocial risk factors and mental health problems, especially somatic stress symptoms, have an important impact on the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among university hospital nurses. PMID:27885319

  11. Impact of rest breaks on musculoskeletal discomfort of Chikan embroiderers of West Bengal, India: a follow up field study.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Mitra, Kalpita; Sahu, Subhashis; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-07-22

    This study aimed to determine risk factors that predict musculoskeletal discomfort in Chikan embroiderers of West Bengal, India, and to compare the effect of two rest break schedules to reduce these symptoms. The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was performed on 400 Chikan embroiderers at baseline containing questions on job autonomy, working behavior, and work stress factors. Relative risk was calculated to identify prognostic factors for musculoskeletal discomfort in different body regions. Two groups of workers received two rest break schedules for 4 months and compared in a between-subject design. Outcome variables were scores of Body Part Discomfort (BPD) scale. Chikan embroiderers are afflicted with musculoskeletal discomfort mainly in the lower back, neck/shoulder and wrist/forearm region, which is attributed to their prolonged working timeinvolving hands and wrists, being in a static seating posture. Rigidity in working methods, prolonged working time, inadequate rest break during the working day, dissatisfaction regarding earning, monotonous work, static sitting posture, and repetitive movement of wrist and forearm were the significant predictors of these symptom developments. Rest break schedule 1 with more frequent and shorter breaks had more significant improvement on the severity of these musculoskeletal discomforts. Chikan embroiderers perform a highly dreary occupation and various ergonomics conditions work as predictors for developing musculoskeletal discomforts among them. Design of proper rest break schedule involving shorter and frequent breaks was competent for reducing these discomforts to a certain extent.

  12. Work-Related Psychosocial Factors and Mental Health Problems Associated with Musculoskeletal Pain in Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Tiina; Pääsuke, Mati; Merisalu, Eda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common cause of incapacity among nurses. This study aimed to report the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among hospital nurses and to explore the associations of work-related psychosocial factors and mental health problems with musculoskeletal pain. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital during April and May 2011. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations between dependent and independent variables. Results. Analysis was based on 404 nurses (45% of the hospital's nursing population). The overall prevalence of MSP was 70% in the past year and 64% in the past month. Lower back (57%) and neck (56%) were the body areas most commonly painful in the past year. Higher quantitative and emotional demands, work pace, low justice and respect in the workplace, influence on work organisation, and role conflicts were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain among nurses (p < 0.05). All mental health problems and most strongly somatic stress symptoms were associated with musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions. Work-related psychosocial risk factors and mental health problems, especially somatic stress symptoms, have an important impact on the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among university hospital nurses.

  13. USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    TITLE: USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Abt, PhD, ATC...8 Musculoskeletal , Physiological, and Biomechanical Profiles...47 Introduction Unintentional musculoskeletal injuries limit tactical readiness, shorten the

  14. Kettlebell training for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jay, Kenneth; Frisch, Dennis; Hansen, Klaus; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Mortensen, Ole S; Andersen, Lars L

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. This single-blind randomized controlled trial involved 40 adults from occupations with a high prevalence of reported musculoskeletal pain symptoms (mean age 44 years, body mass index 23 kg/m², 85% women, with pain intensity of the neck/shoulders 3.5 and of the low back 2.8 on a scale of 0-10). A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to training--consisting of ballistic full-body kettlebell exercise 3 times per week for 8 weeks--or a control group. The main outcome measures were pain intensity of the neck/shoulders and low back, isometric muscle strength, and aerobic fitness. Compared with the control group, pain intensity of the neck/shoulders decreased 2.1 points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -3.7- -0.4] and pain intensity of the low back decreased 1.4 points (95% CI -2.7- -0.02) in the training group. Compared with the control group, the training group increased muscle strength of the trunk extensors (P<0.001), but not of the trunk flexors and shoulders. Aerobic fitness remained unchanged. Worksite intervention using kettlebell training reduces pain in the neck/shoulders and low back and improves muscle strength of the low back among adults from occupations with a high prevalence of reported musculoskeletal pain symptoms. This type of training does not appear to improve aerobic fitness.

  15. Effect of working characteristics and taught ergonomics on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders amongst dental students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are one of the main occupational health hazards affecting dental practitioners. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD) amongst dental students. Possible correlations with the working environment and ergonomics taught in Malaysian dental schools were also sought. Methods Five dental schools in Malaysia participated in this cross-sectional study. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to establish the point prevalence of WMSD in the dental students based on various body regions. The questionnaire also collected data regarding the working environment, clinical practice and the taught ergonomics of the students during their training years. Results Out of five hundred and sixty eight dental students who participated in the study, 410 were in their clinical years whilst 158 were students in their non- clinical years. Ninety three percent of the clinical year students reported symptoms of WMSD in one or more body regions. Female students reported a significantly higher numbers of symptoms compared to male students. The neck (82%) and lower back (64%) were reported to have the highest prevalence of WMSD. Discomfort in the neck region was found to be associated with self-reported frequency of bending of the neck. A majority of students (92%) reported minimum participation in workshops related to ergonomics in dentistry and 77% were unfamiliar with treatment and remedies available in the case of WMSD. Conclusions There was more WMSD seen in dental students who had started their clinical years. Neck and lower back are more injury prone areas and are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Theory and practice of ergonomics should be incorporated into the dental undergraduate curriculum. PMID:23547959

  16. Parameters influencing AIS 1 neck injury outcome in frontal impacts.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Lotta; Norin, Hans; Svensson, Mats Y

    2004-06-01

    In order to gain more knowledge of the neck injury scenario in frontal impacts, a statistical study of parameters influencing incidences of AIS 1 neck injuries was performed. The data set consisted of 616 occupants in Volvo cars. Information regarding the crash, the safety systems, occupant characteristics (including prior neck problems), behavior and sitting posture at the time of impact, and neck symptoms (including duration) was collected and analyzed. Occupant characteristics (mainly gender, weight, and age), kinematics (head impacts) and behavior at the time of impact were identified as the most prominent parameter areas with regard to AIS 1 neck injury outcome. Specifically, women had a significantly higher AIS 1 neck injury rate as compared to men, occupants under the age of 50 had a significantly higher AIS 1 neck injury rate as compared to those above 50 and occupants weighing less than 65 kg have a significantly higher AIS 1 neck injury rate than heavier occupants. Drivers stating that they impacted their head against a frontal interior structure had a significantly higher AIS 1 neck injury rate than those without head impact. Also, occupants who stated they had tensed their neck muscles at the time of impact, had a significantly higher AIS 1 neck injury rate as compared to occupants who did not. Occupant activities, such as tightly gripping the steering wheel or straightening their arms showed a significantly increased AIS 1 neck injury rate, indicating that occupant behavior at time of impact could be influential with respect to AIS 1 neck injury outcome. Also, occupants reporting prior neck problems had a higher rate of persistent symptoms (>1 year) but no difference with respect to passing symptoms (<3 months) as compared to those without prior neck problems. Additionally, there was no distinct pattern for the duration of neck symptoms.

  17. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Anthony D.; Pfleger, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are a major burden on individuals, health systems, and social care systems, with indirect costs being predominant. This burden has been recognized by the United Nations and WHO, by endorsing the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010. This paper describes the burden of four major musculoskeletal conditions: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and low back pain. Osteoarthritis, which is characterized by loss of joint cartilage that leads to pain and loss of function primarily in the knees and hips, affects 9.6% of men and 18% of women aged > 60 years. Increases in life expectancy and ageing populations are expected to make osteoarthritis the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. Joint replacement surgery, where available, provides effective relief. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that usually affects multiple joints. It affects 0.3-1.0% of the general population and is more prevalent among women and in developed countries. Persistent inflammation leads to joint destruction, but the disease can be controlled with drugs. The incidence may be on the decline, but the increase in the number of older people in some regions makes it difficult to estimate future prevalence. Osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration, is a major risk factor for fractures of the hip, vertebrae, and distal forearm. Hip fracture is the most detrimental fracture, being associated with 20% mortality and 50% permanent loss in function. Low back pain is the most prevalent of musculoskeletal conditions; it affects nearly everyone at some point in time and about 4-33% of the population at any given point. Cultural factors greatly influence the prevalence and prognosis of low back pain. PMID:14710506

  18. Surgical Management of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Edwards, Dafydd

    2017-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries cause a significant burden to society and can have a considerable impact on patient morbidity and mortality. It was initially thought that these patients were too sick to undergo surgery and later believed that they were too sick not to undergo surgery. The pendulum has subsequently swung back and forth between damage control orthopedics and early total care for polytrauma patients with extremity injuries and has settled on providing early appropriate care (EAC). The decision-making process in providing EAC is reviewed in an effort to optimize patient outcomes following severe extremity trauma. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coculture in musculoskeletal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2014-10-01

    Most tissues in the body are made up of more than one cell type. For successful tissue regeneration, it is essential to simulate the natural conditions of the cellular environment as much as possible. In a coculture system, two or more cell types are brought together, interact, and communicate in the same culture environment. The coculture system provides a powerful in vitro tool in research on cell-to-cell communications, repair, and regeneration. This review provides an overview on recent studies on general platforms and applications of coculture systems to enhance musculoskeletal regeneration, with a particular focus on osteogenesis, chondrogensis, and angiogenesis.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms with computer based work across occupations.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Karin Lindgren; Mackey, Martin G; Adamson, Barbara J; Pepper, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the 12-month prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and risk factors associated with computer based work between occupations in a sample of Australian public sector employees. A cross-sectional study was completed with employees of 6 government departments. An online survey was electronically distributed to over 8,000 employees characterised by a range of occupational groups and levels of employment. Data collected included individual and employment characteristics, estimation of hours worked with a computer per day and self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms in the upper extremity and spinal areas using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. Responses from 934 completed surveys could be used. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of reported musculoskeletal symptoms between occupational groups except for the wrist/hand and elbow areas. Estimated duration of computer work per day was significantly associated with increased musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck (OR 1.41, 95%CI: 1.09 to 1.83), wrist/hand/s (OR 1.46, 95%CI: 1.17 to 1.83) and elbow/s (OR 1.41, 95%CI: 1.07 to 1.85) areas, with the finding of a linear relationship between hours worked and prevalence of symptoms. A greater proportion of employees in higher level management and professional occupational groups were found to be working with a computer in excess of 6 to 8 hours per day compared with those in non-professional (administration and secretarial) groups. Hours worked with a computer per day was a significant risk factor for reported musculoskeletal symptoms amongst all occupational groups working in Australian public sector offices. No significant difference in the level of risk was found between occupations.

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste collectors in Mansoura, Egypt: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Bestar, Sohair Fouad; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Awad, Ehab El-Sayed

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the percentage of musculoskeletal complaints and their possible risk factors among municipal solid waste (MSW) collectors. Design A descriptive cross-sectional study with a comparison group. Setting Primary level of care, at the Western Municipality of Mansoura City, Egypt. Participants A total of 160 male MSW collectors fulfilled the eligibility criteria and 120 of them participated in the study (response rate of 75%). The inclusion criteria were permanent or temporary solid waste collectors employed for 1 year or more. A comparison group of 110 male service workers at the Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, comparable to MSW collectors in most of the variables. Outcome The percentage of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among collectors, their risk factors (socio-demographic, psychosocial, physical), and the independent risk factors for having the disorders. Results The percentage of musculoskeletal complaints during the past 12 months was higher among MSW collectors (60.8%) than the comparison group (43.6%). Low back was the most frequently affected body region among MSW collectors. The differences in the distribution of musculoskeletal complaints between the two groups were statistically significant for the neck and hip/thigh regions. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among MSW collectors were the longer duration of employment (OR=0.4, 95% CI=0.1 to 0.9); low decision latitude (OR=0.3, 95% CI=0.1 to 0.7); lifting, pulling; pushing/carrying loads >20 kg (OR=5.5, 95% CI=1.8 to 17.0) and walking for long periods of time (OR=2.6, 95% CI=1.1 to 6.6). Conclusions Musculoskeletal complaints are highly prevalent among MSW collectors which require engineering, medical and legislative measures. We suggest further research in the interventions that could reduce the high percentage among collectors. PMID:22977187

  2. Physical and psychosocial indicators among office workers from public sector with and without musculoskeletal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Dechristian França; Nogueira, Helen Cristina; Bergamin, Letícia Januário; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMD) are the result of the combination of different risk factors. They are very common among computer workers, mainly when neck and upper limbs are considered. Forty-two office workers from a public university participated in this study. They were divided into two groups: Symptomatic Subjects (SS, n=20) and Asymptomatic Subjects (AS, n=22), according to the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Psychosocial indicators were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). Workplaces were evaluated according to the Ergonomic Workplace Analysis (EWA), proposed by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. The NMQ showed higher weekly prevalence of complaints on neck, shoulders and wrist/hands (p=0.00) among SS. The annual prevalence of symptoms on wrist/hands was also higher among SS (p=0.02). The JCQ did not show any difference between groups (p>0.05). Higher proportion of servers with 'high level' of engagement, dedication and absorption, according to UWES, was identified among SS (p<0.01). EWA showed worse scores for 'Work Site', 'Job Content' and 'Repetitiveness of the Work' among SS (p<0.05). Servers are exposed to physical and psychosocial risk factors that can contribute to the development of WRMD. Work conditions need to be change in order to improve musculoskeletal health.

  3. Musculoskeletal disorders among clerical workers in Los Angeles: a labor management approach.

    PubMed

    Delp, Linda; Wang, Pin-Chieh

    2013-09-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) persist among clerical workers despite ergonomic advances. A cross-sectional survey among 2,310 clerical workers investigated MSD cases, defined as musculoskeletal discomfort and seeking treatment for that discomfort in the past 12 months. A modified Poisson regression model was adopted to assess the association between work and individual factors and the risk of MSDs. Over half of respondents reported musculoskeletal discomfort. The prevalence of MSD cases was: 37.2% neck/shoulders, 21.7% upper extremities, 18% lower extremities, and 34.3% back region. Elevated risk of MSDs was associated with less workstation adjustability; work schedule, gender, age, and BMI were also significant. Positive trends were observed between computer use and MSDs for the neck/shoulder region and the effect was amplified among those reporting insufficient workstation adjustability and lacking computer ergonomics training. Results demonstrate the need to limit continuous computer use and to improve the human-machine interface through adjustable workstations and worker training to enhance use of adjustable features. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. VDT-related musculoskeletal symptoms: interactions between work posture and psychosocial work factors.

    PubMed

    Faucett, J; Rempel, D

    1994-11-01

    Video display terminal (VDT) operators (n = 150) in the editorial department of a large metropolitan newspaper participated in a study of day-to-day musculoskeletal symptoms. Work posture related to the VDT workstation and psychosocial work factors were also investigated for their contributions to the severity of upper body pain, numbness, and stiffness using a representative subsample (n = 70). Self-report measures included Karasek's Job Content Instrument and the author-designed Work Interpersonal Relationships Inventory. Independent observations of work posture were performed using techniques similar to those reported by Sauter et al. [1991]. Pain during the last week was reported by 59% (n = 88) of the respondents, and 28% (n = 42) were categorized by symptom criteria potentially to have musculoskeletal disorders. More hours per day of VDT use and less decision latitude on the job were significant risk factors for potential musculoskeletal CTDs. Head rotation and relative keyboard height were significantly related to more severe pain and stiffness in the shoulders, neck, and upper back. Lower levels of co-worker support were associated with more severe hand and arm numbness. For both the region of the shoulders, neck, and upper back and the hand and arm region, however, the contributions of relative keyboard and seat back heights to symptom severity were modified by psychological workload, decision latitude, and employee relationship with the supervisor. Alternative explanations for these findings are discussed.

  5. Associations among temporomandibular disorders, chronic neck pain and neck pain disability in computer office workers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bragatto, M M; Bevilaqua-Grossi, D; Regalo, S C H; Sousa, J D; Chaves, T C

    2016-05-01

    Neck pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint among computer office workers. There are several reports about the coexistence of neck pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, there are no studies investigating this association in the context of work involving computers. The purpose of this study was to verify the association between TMD and neck pain in computer office workers. Fifty-two female computer workers who were divided into two groups: (i) those with self-reported chronic neck pain and disability (WNP) (n = 26) and (ii) those without self-reported neck pain (WONP) (n = 26), and a control group (CG) consisting of 26 women who did not work with computers participated in this study. Clinical assessments were performed to establish a diagnosis of TMD, and craniocervical mechanical pain was assessed using manual palpation and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The results of this study showed that the WNP group had a higher percentage of participants with TMD than the WONP group (42·30% vs. 23·07%, χ(2) = 5·70, P = 0·02). PPTs in all cervical sites were significantly lower in the groups WNP and WONP compared to the CG. Regression analysis revealed TMD, neck pain and work-related factors to be good predictors of disability (R(2) = 0·93, P < 0·001). These results highlighted the importance of considering the work conditions of patients with TMD, as neck disability in computer workers is explained by the association among neck pain, TMD and unfavourable workplace conditions. Consequently, this study attempted to emphasise the importance of considering work activity for minimising neck pain-related disability. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. Methods In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2–6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6–11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Conclusion Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered. PMID:26106512

  7. Musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among office workers with high workload computer use.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chiung-Yu; Hwang, Yea-Shwu; Cherng, Rong-Ju

    2012-09-01

    Although the prevalence of reported discomfort by computer workers is high, the impact of high computer workload on musculoskeletal symptoms remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms for office workers with high computer workload. The association between risk factors and musculoskeletal symptoms was also assessed. Two questionnaires were posted on the Web sites of 3 companies and 1 university to recruit computer users in Tainan, Taiwan, during May to July 2009. The 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire and Musculoskeletal Symptom Questionnaire were chosen as the evaluation tools for musculoskeletal symptoms and its associated risk factors. Chinese Health Questionnaire greater than 5 and computer usage greater than 7 h/d were used to as the cutoff line to divide groups. Descriptive statistics were computed for mean values and frequencies. χ(2) Analysis was used to determine significant differences between groups. A 0.05 level of significance of was used for statistical comparisons. A total of 254 subjects returned the questionnaire, of which 203 met the inclusion criteria. The 3 leading regions of musculoskeletal symptoms among the computer users were the shoulder (73%), neck (71%), and upper back (60%) areas. Similarly, the 3 leading regions of musculoskeletal symptoms among the computer users with high workload were shoulder (77.3%), neck (75.6%), and upper back (63.9%) regions. High psychologic distress was significantly associated with shoulder and upper back complaints (odds ratio [OR], 3.46; OR, 2.24), whereas a high workload was significantly associated with lower back complaints (OR, 1.89). Females were more likely to report shoulder complaints (OR, 2.25). This study found that high psychologic distress was significantly associated with shoulder and upper back pain, whereas high workload was associated with lower back pain. Women tended to have a greater risk of shoulder complaints than men

  8. Upper limb strength estimation of physically impaired persons using a musculoskeletal model: A sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Marc G; Liu, Dikai

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of upper limb strength calculated from a musculoskeletal model was analyzed, with focus on how the sensitivity is affected when the model is adapted to represent a person with physical impairment. Sensitivity was calculated with respect to four muscle-tendon parameters: muscle peak isometric force, muscle optimal length, muscle pennation, and tendon slack length. Results obtained from a musculoskeletal model of average strength showed highest sensitivity to tendon slack length, followed by muscle optimal length and peak isometric force, which is consistent with existing studies. Muscle pennation angle was relatively insensitive. The analysis was repeated after adapting the musculoskeletal model to represent persons with varying severities of physical impairment. Results showed that utilizing the weakened model significantly increased the sensitivity of the calculated strength at the hand, with parameters previously insensitive becoming highly sensitive. This increased sensitivity presents a significant challenge in applications utilizing musculoskeletal models to represent impaired individuals.

  9. Musculoskeletal trauma services in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Naddumba, E K

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 2000 lives are lost in Uganda annually through road traffic accidents. In Kampala, they account for 39% of all injuries, primarily in males aged 16-44 years. They are a result of rapid motorization and urbanization in a country with a poor economy. Uganda's population is an estimated 28 million with a growth rate of 3.4% per year. Motorcycles and omnibuses, the main taxi vehicles, are the primary contributors to the accidents. Poor roads and drivers compound the situation. Twenty-three orthopaedic surgeons (one for every 1,300,000 people) provide specialist services that are available only at three regional hospitals and the National Referral Hospital in Kampala. The majority of musculoskeletal injuries are managed nonoperatively by 200 orthopaedic officers distributed at the district, regional and national referral hospitals. Because of the poor economy, 9% of the national budget is allocated to the health sector. Patients with musculoskeletal injuries in Uganda frequently fail to receive immediate care due to inadequate resources and most are treated by traditional bonesetters. Neglected injuries typically result in poor outcomes. Possible solutions include a public health approach for prevention of road traffic injuries, training of adequate human resources, and infrastructure development.

  10. Advancing musculoskeletal research with nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cameron P

    2013-10-01

    Nanoscience has arrived. Biological applications of nanoscience are particularly prominent and can be useful in a range of disciplines. Advances in nanoscience are underpinning breakthroughs in biomedical research and are beginning to be adopted by the rheumatology and musculoskeletal science communities. Within these fields, nanoscience can be applied to imaging, drug delivery, implant development, regenerative medicine, and the characterization of nanoscale features of cells, matrices and biomaterials. Nanoscience and nanotechnology also provide means by which the interaction of cells with their environment can be studied, thereby increasing the understanding of disease and regenerative processes. Although its potential is clear, nanoscience research tends to be highly technical, generally targeting an audience of physicists, chemists, materials scientists and engineers, and is difficult for a general audience to follow. This Review aims to step back from the most technical aspects of nanoscience and provide a widely accessible view of how it can be applied to advance the field of rheumatology, with an emphasis on technologies that can have an immediate impact on rheumatology and musculoskeletal research.

  11. Do ergonomically designed school workstations decrease musculoskeletal symptoms in children? A 26-month prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Saarni, Lea A; Rimpelä, Arja H; Nummi, Tapio H; Kaukiainen, Anneli; Salminen, Jouko J; Nygård, Clas-Håkan

    2009-05-01

    Workstations at school are among several factors that contribute to musculoskeletal symptoms among school-aged children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ergonomically designed workstations on schoolchildren's musculoskeletal symptoms as compared to conventional workstations. In the first 14-month phase of the study (2002-2003, two schools), 42 from the intervention and 46 from the control school participated. In the total follow-up of 26 months (2002-2004), 23 in the intervention group and 20 in the control group participated. Anthropometrics and musculoskeletal symptoms were measured. In general, the ergonomically designed school workstations did not decrease present neck-shoulder, upper back, low back and lower limbs strain and pain, compared to conventional ones during follow-ups.

  12. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  13. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  14. Statistical analysis of 4 types of neck whiplash injuries based on classical meridian theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yemeng; Zhao, Yan; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Hui; Wu, Xiuyan; Zhang, Qunce; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Tianfang

    2015-01-01

    As one component of the Chinese medicine meridian system, the meridian sinew (Jingjin, (see text), tendino-musculo) is specially described as being for acupuncture treatment of the musculoskeletal system because of its dynamic attributes and tender point correlations. In recent decades, the therapeutic importance of the sinew meridian has become revalued in clinical application. Based on this theory, the authors have established therapeutic strategies of acupuncture treatment in Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) by categorizing four types of neck symptom presentations. The advantage of this new system is to make it much easier for the clinician to find effective acupuncture points. This study attempts to prove the significance of the proposed therapeutic strategies by analyzing data collected from a clinical survey of various WAD using non-supervised statistical methods, such as correlation analysis, factor analysis, and cluster analysis. The clinical survey data have successfully verified discrete characteristics of four neck syndromes, based upon the range of motion (ROM) and tender point location findings. A summary of the relationships among the symptoms of the four neck syndromes has shown the correlation coefficient as having a statistical significance (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), especially with regard to ROM. Furthermore, factor and cluster analyses resulted in a total of 11 categories of general symptoms, which implies syndrome factors are more related to the Liver, as originally described in classical theory. The hypothesis of meridian sinew syndromes in WAD is clearly supported by the statistical analysis of the clinical trials. This new discovery should be beneficial in improving therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Forgotten triangles of neck.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons.

  16. Forgotten triangles of neck

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons PMID:27563614

  17. Musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic hazards among material handlers in grocery retail industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Grocery retail work can be physically demanding as material handler’s tasks involve manual lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing and pulling loads. The nature of this work puts them at a risk for serious low back pain, shoulder pain and other musculoskeletal injuries. This study was conducted by using two different types of tools which were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) as a survey and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) Checklist as a direct observation method. Among 46 males and 14 females material handlers were involved throughout this study. For NMQ, the highest body part trouble in the last 12 months was low back pain (88.3%), followed by upper back (68.3%), neck (55.3%) and shoulder (36.7%). While for WISHA Checklist, most of them experienced hazard level involving awkward posture and high hand force. From the research conducted, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) do related as it showed that musculoskeletal disorders may arise if the workers ignored the safety in ergonomic hazards.

  18. Vitamin D insufficiency and musculoskeletal symptoms in breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Waltman, Nancy L; Ott, Carol D; Twiss, Janice J; Gross, Gloria J; Lindsey, Ada M

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) on aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy often experience musculoskeletal symptoms (joint pain and stiffness, bone and muscle pain, and muscle weakness), and these musculoskeletal symptoms may be related to low serum levels of vitamin D. The primary purpose of this pilot exploratory study was to determine whether serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration were below normal (<30 ng/mL) in 29 BCSs on AI therapy and if musculoskeletal symptoms were related to these low vitamin D levels. The mean (SD) serum 25(OH)D level was 25.62 (4.93) ng/mL; 86% (n = 25) had levels below 30 ng/mL. Patients reported muscle pain in the neck and back, and there was a significant inverse correlation between pain intensity and serum 25(OH)D levels (r = -0.422; P < .05 [2 tailed]). This sample of BCSs taking AIs had below normal levels of serum 25(OH)D despite vitamin D supplements. This is one of the few studies to document a significant relationship between vitamin D levels and muscle pain in BCSs on AI therapy. Findings from this pilot study can be used to inform future studies examining musculoskeletal symptoms in BCSs on AI therapy and relationships with low serum levels of vitamin D.

  19. Ergonomic practices within patient care units are associated with musculoskeletal pain and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Dennerlein, Jack T.; Hopcia, Karen; Sembajwe, Grace; Kenwood, Christopher; Stoddard, Anne M.; Tveito, T. Helene; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-01-01

    Background With the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) for patient care unit workers, prevention efforts through ergonomic practices within units may be related to symptoms associated with typical work-related MSDs. Methods We completed a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers (n=1572) in two large academic hospitals in order to evaluate relationships between self-reported musculoskeletal pain, work interference due to this pain, and limitations during activities of daily living (functional limitations) and with ergonomic practices and other organizational policy and practices metrics within the unit. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses tested the significance of these associations. Results Prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 3-months was 74% with 53% reporting pain in the low back. 32.8% reported that this pain interfered with their work duties and 17.7% reported functional limitations in the prior week. Decreased ergonomic practices were significantly associated with reporting pain in four body areas (low back, neck/shoulder, arms, and lower extremity) in the previous 3-months, interference with work caused by this pain, symptom severity and limitations in completing activities of daily living in the past week. Except for low back pain and work interference, these associations remained significant when psychosocial covariates such as psychological demands were included in multiple logistic regressions, Conclusions Ergonomic practices appear to be associated with many of the musculoskeletal symptoms denoting their importance for prevention efforts in acute health care settings. PMID:22113975

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial risk factors among workers of the aircraft maintenance industry.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Helen Cristina; Diniz, Ana Carolina Parise; Barbieri, Dechristian França; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    During the recent decades Brazil has experienced an exponential growth in the aviation sector resulting in an increasing workforce. The aircraft maintenance industry stands out, where the workers have to handle different kind of objects. The aim of this study was to evaluate psychosocial indicators as well as musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders among aircraft maintenance workers. One hundred and one employees were evaluated (32.69 ± 8.25 yr, 79.8 ± 13.4 kg, and 1.75 ± 0.07 m). Musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders were assessed through the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and a standardized physical examination. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) were applied to evaluate psychosocial indicators. Results of the NMQ indicate the lower back as the most affected body region. On the other hand, the physical examination has shown clinical diagnosis of shoulder disorders. Neck, upper back and ankle/foot were also reported as painful sites. Most of workers have active work-demand profile and high work engagement levels. We suggest that musculoskeletal symptoms may be related to high biomechanical demand of the tasks performed by workers, what must be further investigated.

  1. Comparison of the BackJoy SitSmart Relief and Spine Buddy LT1 H/C Ergonomic Chair Supports on Short-Term Neck and Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Ward, John; Coats, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a needs assessment to determine whether short-term use of BackJoy SitSmart Relief and Spine Buddy LT1 H/C chair supports influences neck, upper back, and lower back pain. Forty-eight college students (age, 27.5 ± 6.3 years; height, 1.72 ± 0.08 m; body mass, 78.7 ± 19.8 kg; time seated that day, 4.3 ± 2.8 hours; means ± SD) were recruited for this study. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to measure pain for the neck, upper back, and lower back regions. Subjects were randomized to sit in a stationary office chair for a single 12-minute period under 1 of 4 conditions: office chair only (control group), BackJoy SitSmart Relief and chair, freezer-cooled Spine Buddy LT1 H/C and chair, or microwave-heated Spine Buddy LT1 H/C and chair. Participants then completed a posttest Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. A between-within repeated-measures analysis of variance using the between-subject factor intervention (group) and within-subject factor time (baseline and posttest) was used to analyze study data. The main effect of time across the whole sample was statistically significant for neck (P = .000), upper back (P = .032), and lower back (P = .000) pain; however, there was no statistically significant interaction effect between intervention and time. Thus, as long as participants sat down and rested, symptoms improved similarly across the different groups. In this preliminary study, short-term and single use of a support product for an office chair had no additive effect on reducing neck and back pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Musculoskeletal pain in Arctic indigenous and non-indigenous adolescents, prevalence and associations with psychosocial factors: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in otherwise healthy adolescents. In recent years widespread musculoskeletal pain, in contrast to single site pain, and associating factors has been emphasized. Musculoskeletal pain has not been examined in Arctic indigenous adolescents. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of widespread musculoskeletal pain and its association with psychosocial factors, with emphasis on gender- and ethnic differences (Sami vs. non-Sami), and the influence of pain related functional impairment. Methods This is a cross-sectional study based on The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study; a school-based survey responded by 4,881 10th grade students (RR: 83%) in North Norway, in 2003–2005. 10% were indigenous Sami. Musculoskeletal pain was based on reported pain in the head, shoulder/neck, back and/or arm/knee/leg, measured by the number of pain sites. Linear multiple regression was used for the multivariable analyses. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was high, and significantly higher in females. In total, 22.4% reported 3–4 pain sites. We found a strong association between musculoskeletal pain sites and psychosocial problems, with a higher explained variance in those reporting pain related functional impairment and in females. There were no major differences in the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in Sami and non-Sami, however the associating factors differed somewhat between the indigenous and non-indigenous group. The final multivariable model, for the total sample, explained 21.2% of the variance of musculoskeletal pain. Anxiety/depression symptoms was the dominant factor associated with musculoskeletal pain followed by negative life events and school-related stress. Conclusions Anxiety/depression, negative life events, and school-related stress were the most important factors associated with musculoskeletal pain, especially in those reporting pain related functional impairment. The most important sociocultural aspect

  3. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists in the Hail Region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aljanakh, Mohammad; Shaikh, Sameer; Siddiqui, Ammar Ahmed; Al-Mansour, Moazzy; Hassan, Syed Sirajul

    2015-01-01

    Dentists suffer a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) but studies are quite limited. The present study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of MSDs among dentists in the Ha'il Region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional, questionnaire study was conducted among 80 licensed dentists af.filiated with the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ha'il Region, Saudi Arabia from January 2014-January 2015. A self-administered questionnaire, based on the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was sent to participants after translation to Arabic. The questionnaire was delivered by mail with a prepaid return envelope. Sixty-eight questionnaires (85%) were returned. The prevalence of MSDs among respondents was 77.9% (n=53) with the most commonly affected areas the lower back (73.5%) (39/53) followed by the neck (66%) (35/53) and the shoulders (43.3%) (23/53). Twenty-four (45.2%) of 53 respondents had experienced MSDs in the neck and lower back at the same time throughout the past twelve months. Nearly 85% (45/53) of respondents were found to have MSDs affecting two or more sites. Prevalence of MSDs was high among dentists in the Ha'il region. Lower back, neck and shoul.ders were the most commonly affected body sites.

  4. Physical Activity Level and Sport Participation in Relation to Musculoskeletal Pain in a Population-Based Study of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Guddal, Maren Hjelle; Stensland, Synne Øien; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Johnsen, Marianne Bakke; Zwart, John-Anker; Storheim, Kjersti

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among adolescents is high, and pain in adolescence increases the risk of chronic pain in adulthood. Studies have shown conflicting evidence regarding associations between physical activity and musculoskeletal pain, and few have evaluated the potential impact of sport participation on musculoskeletal pain in adolescent population samples. Purpose: To examine the associations between physical activity level, sport participation, and musculoskeletal pain in the neck and shoulders, low back, and lower extremities in a population-based sample of adolescents. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence 4. Methods: Data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (Young-HUNT3) were used. All 10,464 adolescents in the Nord-Trøndelag county of Norway were invited, of whom 74% participated. Participants were asked how often they had experienced pain, unrelated to any known disease or acute injury, in the neck and shoulders, low back, and lower extremities in the past 3 months. The associations between (1) physical activity level (low [reference], medium or high) or (2) sport participation (weekly compared with no/infrequent participation) and pain were evaluated using logistic regression analyses, stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, socioeconomic status, and psychological distress. Results: The analyses included 7596 adolescents (mean age, 15.8 years; SD, 1.7). Neck and shoulder pain was most prevalent (17%). A moderate level of physical activity was associated with reduced odds of neck and shoulder pain (OR = 0.79 [95% CI, 0.66-0.94]) and low back pain (OR = 0.75 [95% CI, 0.62-0.91]), whereas a high level of activity increased the odds of lower extremity pain (OR = 1.60 [95% CI, 1.29-1.99]). Participation in endurance sports was associated with lower odds of neck and shoulder pain (OR = 0.79 [95% CI, 0.68-0.92]) and low back pain (OR = 0.77 [95% CI, 0.65-0.92]), especially among girls. Participation in technical

  5. Physically demanding workloads and the risks of musculoskeletal disorders in homecare workers in the USA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Ho; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Trinkoff, Alison; Muntaner, Carles

    2010-09-01

    Although musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are prevalent among homecare workers, little is known about the MSD risk factors. This study investigated whether physically demanding workloads among homecare workers are related to MSDs, especially in neck, shoulder and back pain. Data were taken from two waves of a random sample (June to December 2003 and December 2003 to February 2004). The sample included 1643 homecare workers at Wave 1 and 1198 homecare workers at Wave 2, respectively. A basic telephone interview and 30 minutes computer-assisted interview were performed for homecare workers in Wave 1 and Wave 2. The prevalence of neck, shoulder and back MSDs was assessed at Wave 1 and Wave 2 using the Nordic questionnaire of musculoskeletal symptoms. The incidence of MSDs at 6 months was estimated at Wave 2 using only those who were in the asymptomatic reference group at Wave 1 as the denominator. At Wave 1, back MSDs were the most prevalent (10.2%), followed by neck (9.6%) and shoulder (7.1%) MSDs. After 6 months, the incidence of neck MSDs was the highest (7.0%), followed by back (6.4%) and shoulder (4.8%) MSDs. Physical demands of work were assessed using items developed from focus groups of workers. When compared with asymptomatic workers, those with MSDs showed a dose-response effect for physical job demands. After controlling for age, psychosocial demands and social support on-the-job, physical demands among homecare workers were significantly associated with an excessive odds of neck, shoulder and back MSDs incident at 6 months (odds ratios of 1.14-1.17 for each unit increase on a physical demand scale). Our study shows that the physical demands of work are a significant risk factor for MSDs among homecare workers. Considering the high physical demands among homecare workers, the finding in this study clearly indicates that practical intervention strategies should be implemented to protect homecare workers from exposure to MSD risk factors.

  6. Neck and upper back pain among eye care professionals.

    PubMed

    Al-Marwani Al-Juhani, M; Khandekar, R; Al-Harby, M; Al-Hassan, A; Edward, D P

    2015-12-01

    Ophthalmologists and optometrists have reported a higher prevalence of neck, hand/wrist and lower back pain than family medicine physicians. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders have not previously been studied in Saudi eye care professionals. To determine the magnitude and determinants of neck and upper back pain among eye care professionals at a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia in 2013. A cross-sectional study using a close-ended questionnaire to determine the frequency of neck and back pain and its association with age, sex, weight, comorbidities, duration of professional work, history of injury and physician sub-speciality. The response rate was 82% and 165 eye care professionals participated, 70% (113) of whom reported neck and back pain. The rate was similar in ophthalmologists and allied eye care professionals and among surgical and medical ophthalmologists. The prevalence rate of neck and upper back pain was not associated with number of years in the profession, comorbidities, self-reported weight or injury. Pain appeared to be associated with reported physical discomfort during professional activities (P < 0.01) but not with mental stress. Pain was thought to be work related by 50% of participants. A lower rate of neck and upper back pain was associated with regular exercise [odds ratio = 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9)]. Neck and back pain was reported by 70% of eye care professionals. The pain was graded as mild to moderate and improved when on holidays. Regular physical exercise appeared to prevent or reduce neck and upper back pain. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients.

    PubMed

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-05-30

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis (p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis

  8. Prevalence and Characteristics of Musculoskeletal Pain in Korean Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Min, David; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal pain (MSK) pain in Korean farmers using initial survey data of Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related MSK pain (FARM) study. Methods Farmers (534 females and 479 males; mean age 57.2±7.5 years) who owned or rented a farm and belonged to an agricultural cooperative unit were recruited. Presence of pain for each body part (neck, shoulder, arm/elbow, wrist/hand/finger, low back, leg/foot), and characteristics of MSK pain (prevalence, location, duration, severity, and frequency) during the last year was assessed. Additionally, demographic data such as farming duration, history of prior injury, and workload (low, moderate, somewhat hard, or hard) were collected using structured questionnaires. Results Almost all subjects (n=925; 91.3%) complained of pain in more than one body part. The frequency order was low back (63.8%), leg/foot (43.3%), shoulder (42.9%), wrist/hand/finger (26.6%), arm/elbow (25.3%), and neck (21.8%). Low back pain was more frequent in those with over 30 years of farming experience (odds ratio [OR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.81). MSK pain was related to history of prior injury (OR, 2.18–5.24; p<0.05) in all body parts except for leg/foot, and very hard workload was associated with low back, leg/foot, neck, shoulder, and wrist/hand/finger pain (OR, 2.88–10.83; p<0.05). Conclusion Most Korean farmers experience MSK pain; furthermore, there is a significant association between pain, history of prior injury, and workload, suggestive of the necessity of coping and preventive strategies to reduce injury or workload. PMID:26949663

  9. Musculoskeletal pain and injury in professional orchestral musicians in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Bronwen; Driscoll, Tim; Kenny, Dianna T

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on the major findings from the questionnaire component of a cross-sectional survey of the musicians in Australia's eight fulltime professional symphonic and pit orchestras, focusing on performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). All musician members of the orchestras participating in this project were invited to complete a self-report survey. The overall response rate was about 70% (n = 377). In addition to general health and experience questions, respondents who reported a current or previous PRMD were asked to report on a range of associated factors. Of the participants, 84% had experienced pain or injuries that had interfered either with playing their instrument or participating in normal orchestral rehearsals and performances. Fifty percent reported having such pain or injury at the time of the survey, mostly with disorders perceived by the musicians to be work-related. Twenty-eight percent had taken at least 1 day off from work for such pain in the previous 18 months. The most common broad sites affected were the trunk (primarily the back), the right upper limb and neck, the left upper limb and neck, and the neck alone, but the relative proportions varied by instrument. Of those musicians who reported at least one episode of pain or injury in the past, less than 50% reported that they had completely recovered. The most commonly cited performance-related factors that had contributed to injury or pain all related to training and playing load (including practice and performance). This study provides strong evidence that PRMDs are a common complaint in professional orchestral musicians and identifies a range of factors suggested as contributing to the occurrence or persistence of these disorders.

  10. Cluster Analysis of Symptoms Among Patients with Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piligian, George; Glutting, Joseph J.; Hanlon, Alexandra; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Some musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity are not readily classified. The study objective was to determine if there were symptom patterns in self-identified repetitive strain injury (RSI) patients. Methods Members (n = 700) of the Dutch RSI Patients Association filled out a detailed symptom questionnaire. Factor analysis followed by cluster analysis grouped correlated symptoms. Results Eight clusters, based largely on symptom severity and quality were formulated. All but one cluster showed diffuse symptoms; the exception was characterized by bilateral symptoms of stiffness and aching pain in the shoulder/neck. Conclusions Case definitions which localize upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders to a specific anatomical area may be incomplete. Future clustering studies should rely on both signs and symptoms. Data could be collected from health care providers prospectively to determine the possible prognostic value of the identified clusters with respect to natural history, chronicity, and return to work. PMID:20414797

  11. Poor safety climate, long work hours, and musculoskeletal discomfort among Latino horse farm workers.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Clouser, Jessica Miller; Gan, Wenqi; Flunker, John C; Westneat, Susan; Browning, Steven R

    2017-09-03

    This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) and work-related factors associated with elevated MSD among Latino thoroughbred farm workers. Participants (N = 225) were recruited using a community-based purposive sampling approach to participate in in-person interviews. Of these workers, 85% experienced MSD. MSD was divided into tertiles; the upper tertile was defined as elevated. Multivariable Poisson regression revealed associations between any elevated MSD and longer tenure on horse farms, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated neck/back MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated upper extremity MSD was associated with age and poor safety climate. Elevated lower extremity MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and being female. Musculoskeletal discomfort is common among these workers. Improving safety climate and minimizing long work hours is recommended.

  12. Association between psychosocial, organizational and personal factors and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

    PubMed

    Piranveyseh, Peyman; Motamedzade, Majid; Osatuke, Katerine; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational and personal (individual) factors with the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in office workers of the Iranian Gas Transmission Company. The participants rated two questionnaires - the standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to measure the prevalence of MSDs, and the Veterans Healthcare Administration All Employee Survey questionnaire (2004 version) - to measure psychosocial, organizational and individual aspects of job satisfaction and workplace climate. The highest prevalence of MSDs was found in the lower back (49.7%) and neck (49.0%) regions. Results of the logistic regression models showed that some psychosocial and organizational factors and also some individual factors were associated with prevalence of MSDs (p < 0.05).These findings illustrate the need to consider all elements of the work system as a whole in future studies and in organizational planning.

  13. Risk Factors of Work-related Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Male Shipyard Workers: Structural Equation Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung-Chan; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Soo Geun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to develop a model describing the interaction between lifestyle, job, and postural factors and parts of the upper extremities in shipyard workers. Methods A questionnaire survey was given to 2,140 workers at a shipyard in Ulsan City. The questionnaire consisted of questions regarding the subjects' general characteristics, lifestyle, tenure, physical burden, job control, posture and musculoskeletal symptoms. The overall relationship between variables was analyzed by a structural equation model (SEM). Results The positive rate of upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms increased in employees who worked longer hours, had severe physical burden, and did not have any control over their job. Work with a more frequent unstable posture and for longer hours was also associated with an increased positive rate of musculoskeletal symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that unstable posture and physical burden were closely related to the positive rate of musculoskeletal symptoms after controlling for age, smoking, drinking, exercise, tenure, and job control. In SEM analysis, work-related musculoskeletal disease was influenced directly and indirectly by physical and job stress factors, lifestyle, age, and tenure (p < 0.05). The strongest correlations were found between physical factors and work-related musculoskeletal disease. Conclusion The model in this study provides a better approximation of the complexity of the actual relationship between risk factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Among the variables evaluated in this study, physical factors (work posture) had the strongest association with musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22953172

  14. Penetrating Neck Trauma: Review of 192 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodie, Mohsen; Sanei, Behnam; Moazeni-Bistgani, Mohammad; Namgar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Background The neck region contains a high density of vital organ structures within a relatively small and unprotected anatomic region, making it one of the most vulnerable areas of the body for all types of injuries. Objectives In this article, we studied penetrating neck trauma cases in Alzahra Hospital over a 10-year period. Patients and Methods In this retrospective, descriptive, analytical study, penetrating neck trauma cases admitted to Alzahra Hospital between April 2000 and April 2010 were analyzed for epidemiology, mechanism of trauma, zone of trauma, therapeutic method, injuries to other organs, complications, and mortality. Results Among 192 penetrating neck injuries, the mean age at the time of injury was 25.08 ± 15.02 years. Of these cases, 96.4% occurred in men. The most common mechanisms of trauma was stab wounds (85.93%). In 56.3% of penetrating neck injuries, zone 2 was involved. Neck exploration was positive in 84.4% of cases, and 52.1% of patients underwent surgery. Vascular exploration was the most common cause of surgery (67.2% of patients). The most common surgical intervention was vein ligation (50.8% of cases). In 11.98% of cases, another organ injury occurred simultaneously, and chest injury was the most common coexisting problem (65.2%). Complications were reported in 9.3% of patients, and the need for intubation was the most common complication (5.2% of patients). Mortality rate was 1.5%. Conclusions According to the findings of this study, the most common cause of penetrating neck injuries was stab wounds, and the majority of patients were young men, therefore, preventive measures should be implemented. Because of fatal complications associated with neck injuries, we recommend early neck exploration in unstable cases or when injuries are deeper than the platysma. PMID:24719835

  15. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  16. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  17. Musculoskeletal trauma: the baseball bat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, D. D.; Greenfield, R.; Martin, E.

    1992-01-01

    Between July 1987 and December 1990 in Washington, DC, 116 patients sustained 146 fractures and seven dislocations due to an assault with a baseball bat. The ulna was the most common site of trauma (61 fractures), followed by the hand (27 injuries) and the radius (14 injuries). Forty-two of the 146 fractures were significantly displaced and required open reduction and internal fixation to restore satisfactory alignment. Twenty-nine of the 146 fractures were open fractures. Treatment protocol for open fractures consisted of irrigation and debridement, antibiotic therapy, and bone stabilization with either internal or external fixation, or casting. Recognition of the severity of the soft tissue and bone damage is important in the management of musculoskeletal trauma secondary to the baseball bat. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1460683

  18. Musculoskeletal manifestations of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Imad; Lally, Edward V

    2008-07-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms in Lyme disease are very common at all stages of the disease. Lyme arthritis, whether intermittent or chronic, is a hallmark of late Lyme disease. This may cause severe joint pain and swelling especially confined to one or a few joints, most notably the knee. Antibiotic therapy is very effective in treating Lyme arthritis in the majority of cases. However, a small proportion of individuals will develop persistent chronic arthritis which is likely mediated through immunologic mechanisms. In these patients treatment strategies should include anti-inflammatory medications and possibly immunosuppressive treatments. Arthroscopic synovectomy ma ybe very helpful in some of these patients. Post Lyme disease syndrome and Lyme myositis are two other sequelae that are associated with Lyme disease.

  19. Musculoskeletal imaging in preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    Kainberger, Franz; Falkowski, Anna L; Hirtler, Lena; Riegler, Georg; Schlegl, Thomas; Thaker, Siddharth; Patsch, Janina; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The aim is to review the modalities in musculoskeletal imaging with view on the prognostic impact for the patient's and for social outcome and with view on three major fields of preventive medicine: nutrition and metabolism, sports, and patient education. The added value provided by preventive imaging is (1) to monitor bone health and body composition with a broad spectrum of biomarkers, (2) to detect and quantify variants or abnormalities of nerves, muscles, tendons, bones, and joints with a risk of overuse, rupture, or fracture, and (3) to develop radiology reports from the widely used narrative format to structured text and multimedia datasets. The awareness problem is a term for describing the underreporting and the underdiagnosis of fragility fractures in osteoporosis.

  20. Musculoskeletal problems in Parkinson's disease: neglected issues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Lee, Woong-Woo; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui June; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S

    2013-07-01

    To identify the prevalence and clinical features of musculoskeletal problems in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared to controls. 400 PD patients and 138 age- and sex-matched controls were interviewed by physicians about their musculoskeletal problems. The prevalence of musculoskeletal problems was significantly higher in the PD group than in the control group (66.3% vs. 45.7%, P < 0.001). Commonly involved body sites were the low back, knee, and shoulder in that order. The low back was more frequently involved in the PD group than in the control group (44.3% vs. 24.6%, P < 0.001), and the shoulder tended to be more involved in the PD group than in the control group (15.0% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.061). However, the knee was similarly involved in both group (12.3% vs. 18.0%, P = 0.121). Among the past diagnoses associated with musculoskeletal problems, frozen shoulder, low back pain, osteoporosis and fracture were more common in the PD group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Older age, female, and a higher score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale I & II were associated with musculoskeletal problems in the PD group. Only 26.8% of the PD patients and 52.5% of the controls with musculoskeletal problems answered that their musculoskeletal problems were recovering. Furthermore, musculoskeletal problems in the PD group tended to receive less treatment than that of the control group (P = 0.052). Musculoskeletal problems were more common in the PD group than in the controls. Furthermore, despite PD patients having a higher prevalence, they did not receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders in Norway: prevalence of chronicity and use of primary and specialist health care services.

    PubMed

    Kinge, Jonas Minet; Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Skirbekk, Vegard; Vollset, Stein Emil

    2015-04-02

    Uncertainty exists with regards to the extent of prevalence and health care use for musculoskeletal disorders in Norway. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders and to estimate the prevalence of persons receiving primary and specialist health services for these disorders. We used three data-sources. First, four discrete years of the nationally representative cross-sectional Survey of Health and Living Conditions (SHLC) conducted in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2012 by Statistics Norway. Second, we used the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR) to estimate the proportion of the population who used specialist health services in 2012. Third, we used the national register dataset for reimbursement of primary care physicians, chiropractors and physiotherapists (KUHR) to estimate the proportion of the population attending primary care physicians, chiropractors or physiotherapists in 2012. Age- and sex-specific prevalence/utilization estimates for musculoskeletal disorders were calculated. In 2012, 18% of men and 27% of women reported musculoskeletal disorders lasting for six months or more in the SHLC. Primary health care services reimbursed for musculoskeletal disorders were used by 37% of women and 30% of men. Of these 32% (women) and 26% (men) were physician contacts and between 5 and 9% physiotherapist or chiropractor or combined contact types. Corresponding numbers for specialist services were 5% in men and 7% in women, where the majority was out-patient consultations. Low back and neck pain were the most common diagnoses both in the general population and as reason for health care utilization. We found that musculoskeletal disorders increased with age, however our results showed no variation in prevalence of chronic disorders between 2002 and 2012. Chronic musculoskeletal disorders were common in the general population, with higher prevalence among women compared to men, and increasing prevalence with age. Musculoskeletal

  2. Epidemiology of musculoskeletal injury in the California film and motion picture industry

    PubMed Central

    Kusnezov, Nicholas A.; Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Garcia, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal injury exerts a significant burden on US industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of musculoskeletal injuries in the California (CA) film and motion picture (FMP) industry which may result in unforeseen morbidity and mortality. Methods We reviewed the workers’ compensation (WC) claims database of the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of California (WCIRB) and employment statistics through the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). We analyzed the frequency, type, body part affected, and cause of musculoskeletal injuries. Results From 2003 to 2009, there were 3505 WC claims of which 94.4% were musculoskeletal. In the CA FMP industry, the most common injuries were strains (38.4%), sprains (12.2%), and fractures (11.7%). The most common sites of isolated injury were the knee (18.9%), lower back (15.0%), and ankle (8.6%). Isolated musculoskeletal spine injuries represented 19.3% of all injuries. The most common causes of injury were work-directed activity (36.0%) and falls (25.5%). Conclusion We present the first report on the unique profile of musculoskeletal injury claims in the FMP industry. This data provides direction for improvement of workplace safety. PMID:26812757

  3. Epidemiology of musculoskeletal injury in the California film and motion picture industry.

    PubMed

    Kusnezov, Nicholas A; Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Garcia, Eddie; Shamie, Arya N

    2016-06-01

    Musculoskeletal injury exerts a significant burden on US industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of musculoskeletal injuries in the California (CA) film and motion picture (FMP) industry which may result in unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We reviewed the workers' compensation (WC) claims database of the Workers' Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of California (WCIRB) and employment statistics through the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). We analyzed the frequency, type, body part affected, and cause of musculoskeletal injuries. From 2003 to 2009, there were 3505 WC claims of which 94.4% were musculoskeletal. In the CA FMP industry, the most common injuries were strains (38.4%), sprains (12.2%), and fractures (11.7%). The most common sites of isolated injury were the knee (18.9%), lower back (15.0%), and ankle (8.6%). Isolated musculoskeletal spine injuries represented 19.3% of all injuries. The most common causes of injury were work-directed activity (36.0%) and falls (25.5%). We present the first report on the unique profile of musculoskeletal injury claims in the FMP industry. This data provides direction for improvement of workplace safety.

  4. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Aditya Ravindra; Karnik, Alpana Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26288519

  5. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  6. Head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-29

    Essential facts Head and neck cancers include those of the mouth and throat, and rarer forms affecting the sinuses, salivary glands, nose or middle ear. The Oracle Cancer Trust says head and neck cancer is the UKs sixth most common type, with 31 people diagnosed each day.

  7. Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems Among Professional Orchestra Musicians in Scotland: A Prevalence Study Using a Validated Instrument, the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM).

    PubMed

    Berque, Patrice; Gray, Heather; McFadyen, Angus

    2016-06-01

    Many epidemiological surveys on playing-related musculoskeletal problems (PRMPs) have been carried out on professional musicians, but none have evaluated or confirmed the psychometric properties of the instruments that were used. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of PRMPs among professional orchestra musicians and to gather information on pain intensity and pain interference on function and psychosocial variables, using a self-report instrument developed and validated specifically for a population of professional orchestra musicians. Out of 183 professional orchestra players, 101 took part in the study (55% response rate) and completed the Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity and Interference Questionnaire for Musicians (MPIIQM). Lifetime prevalence of PRMPs was 77.2%, 1-year prevalence was 45.5%, and point prevalence was 36.6%. Of the PRMP group, 43% reported having pain in three or more locations, most commonly the right upper limb, neck, and left forearm and elbow. However, predominant sites of PRMPs varied between instrument groups. The mean pain intensity score for the PRMP group was 12.4±7.63 (out of 40). The mean pain interference score was 15.2±12.39 (out of 50), increasing significantly with the number of reported pain locations (F=3.009, p=0.044). This study confirms that musculoskeletal complaints are common in elite professional musicians and that the use of an operational definition and a validated self-report instrument allows for more accurate and meaningful estimates of pain prevalence.

  8. [Sensitivity and antibiotic resistance in infections of the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Mata-Hernández, Argenis; Rivera-Villa, Adrián Huematzin; Miguel-Pérez, Adrián; Pérez-Atanasio, José Manuel; Torres-González, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the musculoskeletal system are a devastating complication for patients, due to it's long rehabilitation process and even sometimes the removal of the implant, the chronicity of infection, is often due to lack of coverage in empirical antibiotics. A retrospective, observational, descriptive cohort study was performed. All cultures form musculoskeletal system infected patients reported of sensitivity and resistance of germs isolated were analyzed. A total of 143 positive results were included. Reported more frequent germ Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 75 positive cases, followed by Escherichia coli with 31 positive results. Antibiotics with better sensitivity according to the type of microorganisms were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin, levofloxacin and linezolid, gentamicin, erythromycin and amikacin. Regarding antibiotic resistance, those reported with the highest percentage were penicillin G, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and ampicillin. We recommend using empirical treatments in musculoskeletal system infections, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are the best choice because they have the same sensitivity compare with vancomycin and a resistance rate of 7.6%. Betalactamics have a high percentage of resistance and low sensitivity so we must consider alternatives.

  9. A study on the relationship between stress and fatigue and the musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by Korean radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between factors such as stress and fatigue on musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by radiologists who were working in clinics and hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] A survey was conducted for radiologists in clinics, general hospitals, and university hospitals across the nation in a 20-day period from July 10-31, 2011. [Results] According to the comprehensive results of this study, job stress, psychosocial stress, and fatigue felt by radiologists had impacts on musculoskeletal disease in multiple body regions. First, according to the analysis results, job stress was scored at 2.48 on average on a 4-point Likert scale, while psychosocial stress was scored at 2.27 on average on the same scale, which demonstrated that job stress had a slightly higher score than psychosocial stress. Second, job stress, psychosocial stress, and fatigue had impacts on musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by radiologists; the possibility of musculoskeletal symptoms on the neck area increased as the physical environment got worse, interpersonal conflicts got serious, stress from organizational system increased, and psychosocial stress went up. [Conclusion] We expect that the results of this study would be useful as basic data for systematic and efficient management of resources when taking preventative measures against musculoskeletal disease experienced by radiologists in the future.

  10. Workplace Bullying as a Risk Factor for Musculoskeletal Disorders: The Mediating Role of Job-Related Psychological Strain.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Michela; Guglielmi, Dina; Balducci, Cristian; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is considered by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work one of the emerging psychosocial risk factors that could negatively affect workers' health. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the process that leads from bullying to negative health (such as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)), testing the mediating role of job-related strain. Data were collected on 512 workers (62.9% female; mean age = 43.6 years) of a retail chain who filled in a self-report questionnaire after a one-hour training session on work-related stress. Data analyses were performed controlling for potentially confounding variables (i.e., gender, age, organizational role, type of contract, and perceived physical job demands). Preacher and Hayes analytical approach was used to test the indirect relationship between bullying and MSDs. Results showed that work-related strain mediates the relationship between bullying and MSDs considered (low back, upper back, and neck) except for MSDs of the shoulders. Our study confirms the role played by bullying and job-related strain in determining workers' MSDs.

  11. Workplace Bullying as a Risk Factor for Musculoskeletal Disorders: The Mediating Role of Job-Related Psychological Strain

    PubMed Central

    Vignoli, Michela; Guglielmi, Dina; Balducci, Cristian; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is considered by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work one of the emerging psychosocial risk factors that could negatively affect workers' health. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the process that leads from bullying to negative health (such as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)), testing the mediating role of job-related strain. Data were collected on 512 workers (62.9% female; mean age = 43.6 years) of a retail chain who filled in a self-report questionnaire after a one-hour training session on work-related stress. Data analyses were performed controlling for potentially confounding variables (i.e., gender, age, organizational role, type of contract, and perceived physical job demands). Preacher and Hayes analytical approach was used to test the indirect relationship between bullying and MSDs. Results showed that work-related strain mediates the relationship between bullying and MSDs considered (low back, upper back, and neck) except for MSDs of the shoulders. Our study confirms the role played by bullying and job-related strain in determining workers' MSDs. PMID:26557693

  12. Risk of musculoskeletal disorders among females and males in repetitive/constrained work.

    PubMed

    Nordander, Catarina; Ohlsson, Kerstina; Akesson, Ingrid; Arvidsson, Inger; Balogh, Istvan; Hansson, Gert-Ake; Strömberg, Ulf; Rittner, Ralf; Skerfving, Staffan

    2009-10-01

    This paper combines epidemiological data on musculoskeletal morbidity in 40 female and 15 male occupational groups (questionnaire data 3720 females, 1241 males, physical examination data 1762 females, 915 males) in order to calculate risk for neck and upper limb disorders in repetitive/constrained vs. varied/mobile work and further to compare prevalence among office, industrial and non-office/non-industrial settings, as well as among jobs within these. Further, the paper aims to compare the risk of musculoskeletal disorders from repetitive/constrained work between females and males. Prevalence ratios (PR) for repetitive/constrained vs. varied/mobile work were in neck/shoulders: 12-month complaints females 1.2, males 1.1, diagnoses at the physical examination 2.3 and 2.3. In elbows/hands PRs for complaints were 1.7 and 1.6, for diagnoses 3.0 and 3.4. Tension neck syndrome, cervicalgia, shoulder tendonitis, acromioclavicular syndrome, medial epicondylitis and carpal tunnel syndrome showed PRs > 2. In neck/shoulders PRs were similar across office, industrial and non-office/non-industrial settings, in elbows/hands, especially among males, somewhat higher in industrial work. There was a heterogeneity within the different settings (estimated by bootstrapping), indicating higher PRs for some groups. As in most studies, musculoskeletal disorders were more prevalent among females than among males. Interestingly, though, the PRs for repetitive/constrained work vs. varied/mobile were for most measures approximately the same for both genders. In conclusion, repetitive/constrained work showed elevated risks when compared to varied/mobile work in all settings. Females and males showed similar risk elevations. This article enables comparison of risk of musculoskeletal disorders among many different occupations in industrial, office and other settings, when using standardised case definitions. It confirms that repetitive/constrained work is harmful not only in industrial but also

  13. Cross-sectional associations between occupational factors and musculoskeletal pain in women teachers, nurses and sonographers.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Inger; Gremark Simonsen, Jenny; Dahlqvist, Camilla; Axmon, Anna; Karlson, Björn; Björk, Jonas; Nordander, Catarina

    2016-01-18

    It is usually assumed that musculoskeletal pain is associated with both the physical workload and the psychosocial work environment, as well as with personal and lifestyle factors. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in women with varying or different occupational exposures, and to explore the associations between musculoskeletal pain and the occupational and personal factors. A questionnaire on physical, psychosocial and individual factors was answered by 1591 women in five occupational groups with contrasting occupational exposures (teachers, anaesthetic, theatre, and assistant nurses, and sonographers). The outcome measure was musculoskeletal pain (in a new model based on frequency and intensity of complaints the preceding year) from the neck, shoulders, hands, lower back and feet. Neck pain was equally frequent among teachers, assistant nurses and sonographers, and less frequent in anaesthetic and theatre nurses. The sonographers experienced the highest prevalence of shoulder pain, while the assistant nurses were the most affected in the wrists and hands, lower back, and feet. The teachers reported the highest scores in most of the psychosocial dimensions. The theatre nurses scored highest in strenuous work postures and movements (mechanical exposure index, MEI), and the assistant nurses in physical activity and lifting (physical exposure index, PHYI). Multivariable models in the total population showed that both the physical workload and the psychosocial work environment were associated with pain in all body regions, though different factors affected different regions. Pain in the neck, shoulders, hands and lower back was strongly associated with a high MEI and high job demands, while pain in the feet was associated with a high PHYI and a high BMI. A young age was associated with pain in the neck, and an older age was associated with pain in the hands and feet. Lack of time for personal recovery was associated with pain in the

  14. Welder analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. L.

    1968-01-01

    Welder analyzer circuit evaluates and certifies resistance welding machines. The analyzer measures peak current, peak voltage, peak power, total energy, and first-pulse energy. It is used as an energy monitor while welding is being performed, or a precision shunt load for a pure electrical evaluation of the weld machine.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Seeger, L L; Hall, T R

    1990-12-01

    MRI is an important tool for evaluating acute and chronic injuries to the musculoskeletal system. It is effective in demonstrating abnormalities in the knee and hips and in detecting bone and ligamentous trauma that is not evident radiographically.

  16. Computed Tomography of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has specific uses in veterinary species' appendicular musculoskeletal system. Parameters for acquisition of images, interpretation limitations, as well as published information regarding its use in small animals is reviewed.

  17. Prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal symptoms in symphony orchestra musicians vary by gender: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal symptoms are common in the neck, back, and upper limbs amongst musicians. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders have been found to range from 32% to 87% with a tendency for female musicians to have more problems than males. Studies of musculoskeletal problems in instrumentalists have generally involved pre-professional musicians or populations comprising musicians of different levels. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate the prevalence, duration and consequences of musculoskeletal symptoms in professional symphony orchestra musicians. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study. The study population comprised of 441 musicians from six Danish symphony orchestras; 342 (78%) completed the questionnaire. Results During the last year 97% of the women and 83% of the men experienced symptoms in at least one of nine anatomic regions (neck, upper and lower back, shoulders, elbows, and hands and wrists). 86% of the women and 67% of the men experienced symptoms for more than seven days, while 63% of the women and 49% of the men had symptoms for more than 30 days. Woodwind players had a lower risk for musculoskeletal symptoms and a lower risk for the consequences. Among consequences were changed way of playing, reported by 73% of the musicians, difficulty in daily activities at home, reported by 55%, and difficulty in sleeping, reported by 49%. Their health behaviour included taking paracetamol as the most used analgesic, while physiotherapists and general practitioners were reported as the most consulted health care professionals concerning musculoskeletal problems. Results regarding symptoms in six anatomic regions were compared to results for a sample of the general Danish workforce. Symptoms were more frequent in musicians and lasted longer than in the general workforce. This applied to both genders. Conclusions Within the last year most symphony orchestra musicians experienced musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck, back

  18. Frequency, severity and predictors of playing-related musculoskeletal pain in professional orchestral musicians in Germany.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, A; Scheffer, I; Esmer, E; Delank, K S; Peroz, I

    2015-05-01

    Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD) in professional musicians are common. Existing literature demonstrates that up to 86 % of musicians are affected. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of musculoskeletal pain in professional orchestral musicians with regard to their instrument affiliation. Of special interest were pain intensity and its association with predictors such as gender, instrument group, age or stage fright. Professional orchestra players completed a self-report questionnaire to assess playing-related musculoskeletal pain and its frequency and intensity in various body regions on a numeric rating scale (NRS). Relative frequencies and prevalence ratios for different instrument groups were estimated. Out of 720 approached musicians, 408 were included in the sample (response rate 57 %); overall, 89.5 % had been affected by current or past playing-related musculoskeletal pain, 62.7 % reported pain in the previous 3 months, and 8.6 % reported current pain. Pain distribution and frequency varied between instrument groups. For all instrument groups, the neck was the most common pain region. About 43 % of musicians presented more than five pain regions, in particular violin players. Approximately 40 % of musicians indicated frequent or permanent pain. Average pain intensities increased from NRS 3.8 up to a range of 5.9 and 7.4 for frequent and permanent pain, respectively. Female gender and stage fright were proven to be predictors for musculoskeletal pain. Professional orchestral musicians are greatly affected by PRMD, often experiencing frequent or permanent pain, high pain levels and pain in various body regions. As PRMD might contribute considerably to performance disability, sick leave and the possibility of premature termination of a musicians' career, this study highlights the necessity for tailored therapeutic and preventive strategies in performing arts medicine.

  19. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  20. Neurologic and musculoskeletal complications of burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffery C; Qu, Huaguang David

    2011-05-01

    As more people survive burn injuries, there is an increasing focus on managing the complications of burn injuries with the ultimate goal of improving survivors' quality of life. Musculoskeletal and neurologic sequelae are significant complications of burn injury. Electrical injury is a subcategory of burns with multiple musculoskeletal and neurologic complications. Knowledge of these complications helps clinicians provide optimal long-term care for burn survivors and enables survivors to attain maximal recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hox genes and limb musculoskeletal development.

    PubMed

    Pineault, Kyriel M; Wellik, Deneen M

    2014-12-01

    In the musculoskeletal system, muscle, tendon, and bone tissues develop in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner, and integrate into a cohesive functional unit by forming specific connections unique to each region of the musculoskeletal system. The mechanisms of these patterning and integration events are an area of great interest in musculoskeletal biology. Hox genes are a family of important developmental regulators and play critical roles in skeletal patterning throughout the axial and appendicular skeleton. Unexpectedly, Hox genes are not expressed in the differentiated cartilage or other skeletal cells, but rather are highly expressed in the tightly associated stromal connective tissues as well as regionally expressed in tendons and muscle connective tissue. Recent work has revealed a previously unappreciated role for Hox in patterning all the musculoskeletal tissues of the limb. These observations suggest that integration of the musculoskeletal system is regulated, at least in part, by Hox function in the stromal connective tissue. This review will outline our current understanding of Hox function in patterning and integrating the musculoskeletal tissues.

  2. Fiddler's neck: A review.

    PubMed

    Myint, Calvin W; Rutt, Amy L; Sataloff, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Fiddler's neck is a common dermatologic condition associated with instrument use in violin and viola players. It typically manifests as a submandibular and/or supraclavicular lesion. It is a benign condition, but it may be mistaken for lymphedema or a salivary gland malignancy. Otolaryngologists who treat patients with fiddler's neck should be aware of appropriate management protocols and the need to avoid surgical excision. We obtained informed consent from 3 violinists to present their cases as specific examples of fiddler's neck. In addition, we present a literature review based on our PubMed search for articles about this instrument-induced dermatitis. The literature suggests that submandibular fiddler's neck is caused by mechanical pressure and shear stress on the skin and that it can present as erythema, scarring, edema, and lichenification. Supraclavicular fiddler's neck, on the other hand, is caused by allergic contact dermatitis, and it can present as an eczematous, scaly, and/or vesicular lesion. In most cases, a good history (especially of string instrument use), physical examination, and a patch test are sufficient to diagnose this condition. Management of fiddler's neck includes a topical steroid, proper instrument handling, neck padding, changing the instrument's materials, and/or reducing the amount of playing time. Surgical excision is usually not advisable.

  3. Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.

    PubMed

    Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol

  4. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  5. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls and young women employees of textile industries in Tamil Nadu, India - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Angeline, Gnanaselvam Nancy; Bobby, Joseph

    2017-05-24

    Musculoskeletal disorders are common in those employed in the textile industry. The aim of the study is to assess musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls who are current employees of textile industries in comparison with the adolescent girls and young women who are past employees of textile industries and adolescent girls who have never been employed in the textile industry. Methodology This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 321 subjects, 107 in each study group were sampled. Standardized nordic questionnaires (SNQ) was used to assess musculoskeletal symptoms. Results More than half of the current employees (67.28%) and past employees (67.28%) reported musculoskeletal pain. Among the never been employed, 18.69% reported musculoskeletal pain. Neck and shoulder were the most common sites of musculoskeletal pain among the current employees (49.5% and 50.5%, respectively) and the past employees (45.8% and 49.5%, respectively). In the regression model, having ever been diagnosed for anemia (AOR 6.57, 95% CI 1.4 to 30.76), working for more than 48 h in a week (AOR 3.37, 95% CI 1.53 to 7.41) and the presence of depression (AOR 6.6, 95% CI 1.48 to 29.36) were significantly associated with the presence of musculoskeletal pain in the study participants. Conclusion Musculoskeletal disorders are a major occupational health problem among the adolescent and young women employees of textile industries. Working hours should be fixed at 48 h per week and anemia and depression should be treated to avert the work related musculoskeletal disorders in the study population.

  6. Workstation design in carpet hand-weaving operation: guidelines for prevention of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Choobineh, Alireza; Lahmi, Mohammadali; Hosseini, Mostafa; Shahnavaz, Houshang; Jazani, Reza Khani

    2004-01-01

    Carpet weavers suffer from musculoskeletal problems mainly attributed to poor working postures. Their posture is mostly constrained by the design of workstations. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of 2 design parameters (weaving height and seat type) on postural variables and subjective experience, and to develop guidelines for workstation adjustments. At an experimental workstation, 30 professional weavers worked in 9 different conditions. Working posture and weavers' perceptions were measured. It was shown that head, neck and shoulder postures were influenced by weaving height. Both design parameters influenced trunk and elbows postures. The determinant factor for weavers' perception on the neck, shoulders and elbows was found to be weaving height, and on the back and knees it was seat type. Based on the results, the following guidelines were developed: (a) weaving height should be adjusted to 20 cm above elbow height; (b) a 10 degrees forward-sloping high seat is to be used at weaving workstations.

  7. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Brazilian hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Mussi, Gisele; Gouveia, Nelson

    2008-08-01

    There are occupational risks inherent to the activities of professional hairdressers, which are not frequently studied, and therefore not considered in the formulation of health policies for this group. To verify the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) in hairdressers through symptom reports, to characterize the most frequently affected anatomical parts and to identify and analyse risk factors of WRMDs in hairdressing. A cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 hairdressers from beauty parlours in São Paulo (Brazil) was carried out. Each hairdresser completed a self-administered questionnaire which included information on socio-demographic characteristics, working conditions and health-related musculoskeletal system complaints. Ergonomic analyses were also performed in six parlours. The prevalence of WRMDs was 71%. Risk factors were associated with psychosocial factors and factors related to discomfort and work fatigue such as lack of acknowledgement of work and uncomfortable posture at work [odds ratio (OR) = 3.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51-8.30], not feeling comfortable with body/neck/shoulders while working (OR = 2.78; 95% CI 1.40-5.54) and having >15 years of professional activity (OR = 3.04; 95% CI 1.17-7.91). Occupational risk factors associated with the development of WRMDs in hairdressers are related to biomechanical, organizational and psychosocial work factors. The high prevalence of WRMDs found highlights the importance of disseminating recommendations for prevention of symptoms with regards to the provision of suitable furniture, equipment and work tools, environmental conditions, size of workplace, work organization and psychosocial work factors.

  8. Musculoskeletal disorders among a group of Iranian general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Tirgar, Aram; Javanshir, Khodabakhsh; Talebian, Arash; Amini, Fatemeh; Parhiz, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Dentists have to remain in a fixed position during dental practices for the accuracy required, therefore they are susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Considering the infrequency of ergonomics studies in general dental practitioners (GDPs), especially in cervical region, this study aimed to reviews MSDs in the neck region among GDPs. An analytic cross-sectional study was carried out among the GDPs in 2011. A total of 60 dentists (40 males and 20 females) were examined through a combination of questionnaires (concerning their demographic information) such as the Nordic standardized musculoskeletal disorder questionnaire (NMQ) and Body Discomfort Assessment questionnaire (BDA). Each dentist's working posture was assessed using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) and deep cervical flexor muscle endurance through a Craniocervical Flexion test (CCFT). Descriptive statistical indexes and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis, while considering p< 0.05. The mean dental practice experience was 16.9 ± 5.6 years with average 41.2 ± 13.4 working hours per week. About 45% of dentists took regular exercises weekly. Some 83.3% of these dentists expressed to be suffering from the cervical pain, whereas, 56.7% complained about back pains and 41% shoulder problems. Female dentists were found more at risk of neckache, discomfort and pain in shoulder and hand than males. Greater pain frequency in knee was found in more experienced and older age dentists (P= 0.07). Results from the CCF test showed that the deep cervical flexor muscles endurance increased with regular exercise and decreased with aging. Many dentists experience the MSDs, especially in cervical region, as a consequence of occupational stresses. Therefore, detecting occupational risk factors, standards of work position, regular exercise and following ergonomic policy are intensely recommended.

  9. The effect of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, I Hsien; Chang, Kwang H; Liou, Tsan H; Tsou, Chih M; Huang, Yi C

    2017-07-17

    BACKGROUNDː Although neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, there is no consensus on suitable exercise methods for middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise intervention program on cervical muscle function improvement in ≥45-year old patients with chronic neck pain. To evaluated the effects of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. A randomized controlled Single-blind trial. Rehabilitation department of a hospital. POPULATIONː A total of 72 subjects aged ≥45 years with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated to either a experimental group (n = 36; age 57.3±8.74 years) or a control group (n = 36; age 58.15±8.17 years). The control group received only traditional physiotherapy, whereas the experimental group participated in a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise program consisting of cranio-cervical flexion and progressive resistance exercises in addition to receiving traditional physiotherapy. The muscle functions of subjects in both groups were tested before the experiment and also after the intervention program. The pretest and posttest measured the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) and the superficial cervical muscle strength. RESULTSː After the intervention, the experimental group had a 56.48point improvement in the performance index of the CCFT (P<0.001), a 1.71-kg improvement in superficial neck flexor strength (P<0.001), and a 2.52-kg improvement in superficial neck extensor strength (P<0.001), indicating that in 6-week intervention significantly influenced the improvement of cervical muscle functions. CONCLUSIONSː This study confirmed that the 6-week progressive shoulder-neck exercise program can effectively improve cervical muscle function in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise might provide positive

  10. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a “hot spot”. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  11. Effect of static neck flexion in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon in healthy males and females.

    PubMed

    Mousavi-Khatir, Roghayeh; Talebian, Saeed; Maroufi, Nader; Olyaei, Gholam Reza

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, especially among skilled workers who must keep their necks in a flexed position frequently during the day. The present study investigated changes in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon parameters after sustained neck flexion. The participants were 40 healthy subjects grouped by gender (20 females, 20 males). They were exposed to static neck flexion at the full angle of cervical flexion for 10 min. Each subject underwent three trials of cervical flexion and re-extension before and after this period. Differences in onset and cessation angle of flexion-relaxation phenomenon, maximum neck flexion angle, amplitude of neck muscle activation and flexion-relaxation ratio were evaluated. The maximum neck flexion angle significantly increased after sustained flexion. The onset of flexion-relaxation was significantly delayed during flexion, but cessation angle remained unchanged. Myoelectric activity of the cervical erector spinae muscles increased significantly after maintaining flexion, especially in female subjects. The flexion-relaxation ratio also decreased significantly. It was concluded that 10 min of static flexion results in a delay in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and a shortened silence period. Also the cervical erector spinae muscles are required to be active longer and generate more activity. These neuromuscular changes may be a risk factor for neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  13. Approach to managing musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Richard H.; Choquette, Denis; Craig, Brian N.; De Angelis, Carlo; Habal, Flavio; Fulthorpe, Gordon; Stewart, John I.; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Davis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians and pharmacists with practical, evidence- and expertise-based guidance on choosing the safest approach to using analgesics to manage patients with musculoskeletal pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Health care providers from family practice, rheumatology, gastroenterology, hepatology, internal medicine, and pharmacy participated in an educational needs assessment regarding the management of pain and the safety of commonly used analgesics. Feedback from one-on-one interviews was compiled and distributed to participants who selected key topics. Topics chosen formed the basis for the discussions of this multidisciplinary panel that reviewed data on the safety of analgesics, particularly in regard to comorbidity and concurrent use with other therapies. MAIN MESSAGE Treatment should begin with an effective analgesic with the best safety profile at the lowest dose and escalate to higher doses and different analgesics as required. Acetaminophen is a safe medication that should be considered first-line therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with potential adverse gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, and cardiovascular effects. Physicians should not prescribe NSAIDs before taking a careful history and doing a physical examination so they have the information they need to weigh the risks (adverse effects and potential drug interactions) and benefits for individual patients. CONCLUSION Taking a complete and accurate history and doing a physical examination are essential for choosing the safest analgesic for a particular patient. PMID:17872814

  14. Mini Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Because NASA's approach to space exploration calls for long-term extended missions, there is a pressing need to equip astronauts with effective exercise regimens that will maintain musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. ZIN Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative miniature treadmill for use in both zero-gravity and terrestrial environments. The treadmill offers excellent periodic impact exercise to stimulate cardiovascular activity and bone remodeling as well as resistive capability to encourage full-body muscle maintenance. A novel speed-control algorithm allows users to modulate treadmill speed by adjusting stride, and a new subject load device provides a more Earth-like gravity replacement load. This new and compact treadmill offers a unique approach to managing astronaut health while addressing the inherent and stringent challenges of space flight. The innovation also has the potential to offer numerous terrestrial applications, as a real-time daily load stimulus (DLS) measurement feature provides an effective mechanism to combat or manage osteoporosis, a major public health threat for 55 percent of Americans over the age of 50.

  15. Environmental discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Elovainio, M; De Nardis, I; Heponiemi, T; Bergamaschi, A

    2011-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the most common occupational disease in Europe, with high prevalence among hospital workers. Both environmental and psychosocial work factors may impact significantly on the development and exacerbation of MSDs. To evaluate whether environmental factors at work are associated with MSDs in hospital workers and to investigate potential interactions between environmental and psychosocial risk factors in the workplace that are associated with MSDs. A cross-sectional investigation was performed using the Nordic questionnaire to assess MSDs, the IAQ/MM-040 indoor air questionnaire for environmental factors, the demand-control model for job strain and the Goldberg questionnaire for anxiety and depression. The association between environmental factors and MSDs was studied using logistic regression analysis. In addition, the interactions of environmental factors with strain, anxiety and depression for MSDs were examined. Environmental complaints were associated with MSDs. The strongest associations were found between temperature complaints (OR 2.73), noise and light complaints (OR 2.22), other environmental complaints (OR 3.12) and upper limb disorders. A significant interaction between temperature complaints and strain for upper limb disorders (F = 9.52, P < 0.05) was found. To prevent MSDs, a multi-level approach is needed, including environmental measures and interventions directed to both psychosocial and organizational factors.

  16. Work Related Psychosocial and Organizational Factors for Neck Pain in Workers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Hitchcock, Edward; Haldeman, Scott; Swanson, Naomi; Lu, Ming-Lun; Choi, BongKyoo; Nakata, Akinori; Baker, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a prevalent musculoskeletal condition among workers in the United States. This study explores a set of workplace psychosocial and organization-related factors for neck pain. Methods Data used for this study comes from the 2010 National Health interview Survey which provides a representative sample of the US population. To account for the complex sampling design, the Taylor linearized variance estimation method was used. Logistic regression models were constructed to measure the associations. Results This study demonstrated significant associations between neck pain and a set of workplace risk factors including work-family imbalance, exposure to a hostile work environment and job insecurity, non-standard work arrangements, multiple jobs and long work hours. Conclusion Workers with neck pain may benefit from intervention programs that address issues related to these workplace risk factors. Future studies exploring both psychosocial risk factors and physical risk factors with a longitudinal design will be important. PMID:27184340

  17. Prevalence of persistent neck and upper limb pain in a historical cohort of sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J H; Gaardboe, O

    1993-12-01

    Four hundred and twenty-four sewing machine operators from a historical cohort of garment industry workers answered questionnaires concerning musculoskeletal symptoms and job exposure. They were compared with 781 women from the general population of the region and an internal control group of 89 women from the garment industry. The risk for persistent neck and shoulder complaints increased with years of being a sewing machine operator: (up to seven years, eight to fifteen years, and more than fifteen years: prevalence proportion ratio 1.8, 3.5 and 4.4 [neck] and 1.5, 4 and 6.8 [shoulder] compared with the controls [n = 781]). The exposure-response relationships remained when adjusted for potential confounders, of which age, current shoulder-neck exposure, and child bearing were the most contributing. The study revealed that work for more than eight years as a sewing machine operator probably has a cumulative deleterious effect on the neck and shoulders.

  18. When should a cervical collar be used to treat neck pain?

    PubMed

    Muzin, Stefan; Isaac, Zacharia; Walker, Joseph; Abd, Omar El; Baima, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    Neck pain is one of the most prevalent and costly health problems in the United States. It remains a complex, subjective experience with a variety of musculoskeletal causes. Although, cervical collars are a seemingly benign intervention, they can have adverse effects, especially when used for longer periods of time. It is feared that a long period of immobilization, can result in atrophy-related secondary damage. Many physicians cite anecdotal evidence of their clinical utility and soft cervical collars are often prescribed by convention for patients complaining of neck pain. The use of cervical collars to treat neck pain is an area of controversy. This review article examines the current evidence and studies related to recommending cervical collars for neck pain of a variety of etiologies.

  19. Comparison of musculoskeletal disorder health claims between construction floor layers and a general working population.

    PubMed

    Dale, Ann Marie; Ryan, Daniel; Welch, Laura; Olsen, Margaret A; Buchholz, Bryan; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Compare rates of medical insurance claims for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) between workers in a construction trade and a general worker population to determine if higher physical exposures in construction lead to higher rates of claims on personal medical insurance. Health insurance claims between 2006 and 2010 from floor layers were frequency matched by age, gender, eligibility time and geographic location to claims from insured workers in general industry obtained from MarketScan. We extracted MSD claims and dates of service from six regions of the body: neck, low back, knee, lower extremity, shoulder and distal arm, and evaluated differences in claim rates. Fifty-one per cent of floor layers (n=1475) experienced musculoskeletal claims compared with 39% of MarketScan members (p<0.001). Claim rates were higher for floor layers across all body regions with nearly double the rate ratios for the knee and neck regions (RR 2.10 and 2.07). The excess risk was greatest for the neck and low back regions; younger workers had disproportionately higher rates in the knee, neck, low back and distal arm. A larger proportion of floor layers (22%) filed MSD claims in more than one body region compared with general workers (10%; p<0.001). Floor layers have markedly higher rates of MSD claims compared with a general worker population, suggesting a shifting of medical costs for work-related MSD to personal health insurance. The occurrence of disorders in multiple body regions and among the youngest workers highlights the need for improved work methods and tools for construction workers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Comparison of Musculoskeletal Disorder Health Claims Between Construction Floor Layers and a General Working Population

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ann Marie; Ryan, Daniel; Welch, Laura; Olsen, Margaret A.; Buchholz, Bryan; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compare rates of medical insurance claims for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) between workers in a construction trade and a general worker population to determine if higher physical exposures in construction lead to higher rates of claims on personal medical insurance. Methods Health insurance claims between 2006 and 2010 from floor layers were frequency matched by age, gender, eligibility time, and geographic location to claims from insured workers in general industry obtained from MarketScan. We extracted MSD claims and dates of service from six regions of the body: neck, low back, knee, lower extremity, shoulder, and distal arm, and evaluated differences in claim rates. Results Fifty-one percent of floor layers (n=1,475) experienced musculoskeletal claims compared to 39% of MarketScan members (p<0.001). Claim rates were higher for floor layers across all body regions with nearly double the rate ratios for the knee and neck regions (RR: 2.10 and 2.07). The excess risk was greatest for the neck and low back regions; younger workers had disproportionately higher rates in the knee, neck, low back, and distal arm. A larger proportion of floor layers (22%) filed MSD claims in more than one body region compared to general workers (10%; p<0.001). Conclusions Floor layers have markedly higher rates of MSD claims compared to a general worker population, suggesting shifting of medical costs for work-related MSD to personal health insurance. The occurrence of disorders in multiple body regions and among the youngest workers highlights the need for improved work methods and tools for construction workers. PMID:25224720

  1. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture.

  2. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  3. The Relationship between Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Work-related Risk Factors in Hotel Workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju Jong; Mun, Hyeon Je; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Kim, Joo Ja

    2013-10-11

    To identify work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and any associated work-related risk factors, focusing on structural labor factors among hotel workers. A total of 1,016 hotel workers (620 men and 396 women) were analyzed. The questionnaire surveyed participants' socio-demographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed using the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. All analyses were stratified by gender, and multiple logistic regression modeling was used to determine associations between work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and work-related risk factors. The risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 1.9 times higher among male workers in the kitchen department than males in the room department (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.03-3.79), and 2.5 times higher among male workers with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.57-4.04). All of the aforementioned cases demonstrated a statistically significant association with work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Moreover, the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 3.3 times higher among female workers aged between 30 and 34 than those aged 24 or younger (OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.56-7.04); 0.3 times higher among females in the back office department than those in the room department (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.12-0.91); 1.6 times higher among females on shift schedules than those who were not (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.02-2.59); 1.8 times higher among females who performed more intensive work than those who performed less intensive work (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.17-3.02), and; 2.1 times higher among females with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.34-3.50). All of the aforementioned cases also displayed a statistically significant association with work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. This study

  4. The Relationship between Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Work-related Risk Factors in Hotel Workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and any associated work-related risk factors, focusing on structural labor factors among hotel workers. Methods A total of 1,016 hotel workers (620 men and 396 women) were analyzed. The questionnaire surveyed participants’ socio-demographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed using the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. All analyses were stratified by gender, and multiple logistic regression modeling was used to determine associations between work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and work-related risk factors. Results The risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 1.9 times higher among male workers in the kitchen department than males in the room department (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.03-3.79), and 2.5 times higher among male workers with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.57-4.04). All of the aforementioned cases demonstrated a statistically significant association with work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Moreover, the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 3.3 times higher among female workers aged between 30 and 34 than those aged 24 or younger (OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.56-7.04); 0.3 times higher among females in the back office department than those in the room department (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.12-0.91); 1.6 times higher among females on shift schedules than those who were not (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.02-2.59); 1.8 times higher among females who performed more intensive work than those who performed less intensive work (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.17-3.02), and; 2.1 times higher among females with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.34-3.50). All of the aforementioned cases also displayed a statistically significant association with work

  5. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ChemScan UV-6100 is a spectrometry system originally developed by Biotronics Technologies, Inc. under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. It is marketed to the water and wastewater treatment industries, replacing "grab sampling" with on-line data collection. It analyzes the light absorbance characteristics of a water sample, simultaneously detects hundreds of individual wavelengths absorbed by chemical substances in a process solution, and quantifies the information. Spectral data is then processed by ChemScan analyzer and compared with calibration files in the system's memory in order to calculate concentrations of chemical substances that cause UV light absorbance in specific patterns. Monitored substances can be analyzed for quality and quantity. Applications include detection of a variety of substances, and the information provided enables an operator to control a process more efficiently.

  6. Musculoskeletal clinic in general practice: study of one year's referrals.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D; Davies, P; Pietroni, P

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. A musculoskeletal clinic, staffed by a general practitioner trained in osteopathy, medical acupuncture and intralesional injections, was set up in an inner London general practice in 1987. AIM. A retrospective study was undertaken of one year's referrals to the clinic in 1989-90 to determine how general practitioners were using the clinic in terms of problems referred; consultation patterns of patients attending the clinic and 12 months after initially being seen; and how access to the clinic influenced referrals to relevant hospital departments. METHOD. Day sheets were studied which recorded information on demographic characteristics of patients referred to the clinic and their problems, diagnoses made, duration of symptoms, number and range of treatments given, and recurrence of problems. Use of secondary referral sources was also examined. RESULTS. During the study year 154 of 3264 practice patients were referred to the musculoskeletal clinic, and attended a mean of 3.5 times each. Of all the attenders 64% were women and 52% were 30-54 years old. Eighty one patients (53%) presented with neck, back or sciatic pain. A specific traumatic, inflammatory or other pathological process could be ascribed to only 19% of patients. Regarding treatment, 88% of patients received osteopathic manual treatment or acupuncture, or a combination of these treatments and 4% received intralesional injections. Nine patients from the clinic (6%) were referred to an orthopaedic specialist during the year, two with acute back pain. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists by the practice as a whole were not significantly lower than the national average, although the practice made fewer referrals to physiotherapy and rheumatology departments than national figures would have predicted. Seventeen patients (11%) returned to the clinic with a recurrence of their main complaint within a year of their initial appointment; second courses of treatment were usually brief. CONCLUSION. The

  7. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  8. Recognising neuroplasticity in musculoskeletal rehabilitation: a basis for greater collaboration between musculoskeletal and neurological physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Heneghan, Nicola R; Tsao, Henry; Stanwell, Peter T; Rivett, Darren A; Van Vliet, Paulette M

    2014-12-01

    Evidence is emerging for central nervous system (CNS) changes in the presence of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain. Motor control exercises, and potentially manual therapy, can induce changes in the CNS, yet the focus in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice is conventionally on movement impairments with less consideration of intervention-induced neuroplastic changes. Studies in healthy individuals and those with neurological dysfunction provide examples of strategies that may also be used to enhance neuroplasticity during the rehabilitation of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction, improving the effectiveness of interventions. In this paper, the evidence for neuroplastic changes in patients with musculoskeletal conditions is discussed. The authors compare and contrast neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapy clinical paradigms in the context of the motor learning principles of experience-dependent plasticity: part and whole practice, repetition, task-specificity and feedback that induces an external focus of attention in the learner. It is proposed that increased collaboration between neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapists and researchers will facilitate new discoveries on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning sensorimotor changes in patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. This may lead to greater integration of strategies to enhance neuroplasticity in patients treated in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy).

  10. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  11. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... vary widely and often include medication, nutritional changes, relaxation techniques, emotional support, and other therapies. You may ... help treat head and neck cancer. Immunotherapy. An active area of immunotherapy research centers around drugs that ...

  12. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  13. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  14. Connecting Curiosity Neck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-23

    In the clean room at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, engineers gather around the base of Curiosity neck the Mast as they slowly lower it into place for attachment to the rover body the Wet Electronics Box, or WEB.

  15. Defibrillator analyzers.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Defibrillator analyzers automate the inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) testing of defibrillators. They need to be able to test at least four basic defibrillator performance characteristics: discharge energy, synchronized-mode operation, automated external defibrillation, and ECG monitoring. We prefer that they also be able to test a defibrillator's external noninvasive pacing function--but this is not essential if a facility already has a pacemaker analyzer that can perform this testing. In this Evaluation, we tested seven defibrillator analyzers from six suppliers. All seven units accurately measure the energies of a variety of discharge wave-forms over a wide range of energy levels--from 1 J for use in a neonatal intensive care unit to 360 J for use on adult patients requiring maximum discharge energy. Most of the analyzers are easy to use. However, only three of the evaluated units could perform the full range of defibrillator tests that we prefer. We rated these units Acceptable--Preferred. Three more units could perform four of the five tests, they could not test the pacing feature of a defibrillator. These units were rated Acceptable. The seventh unit could perform only discharge energy testing and synchronized-mode testing and was difficult to use. We rate that unit Acceptable--Not Recommended.

  16. A COMPARISON BETWEEN CIVILIAN AND MILITARY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS' KNOWLEDGE IN MANAGING MUSCULOSKELETAL CONDITIONS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Ryan; Roberts, Jared; Whitney, Gabe; Mankins, Steve; Dille, Caleb; Donaldson, Megan; Hassen, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Military physical therapists have been shown to have the necessary knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine in order to practice as a direct access provider. However, research about musculoskeletal knowledge in the civilian physical therapist (non-military) population is lacking. The purpose of the current study was to compare the knowledge in managing musculoskeletal conditions between civilian and military physical therapists using a validated and standardized musculoskeletal competency examination. Furthermore, this study aims to investigate the potential factors that may lead to increased musculoskeletal competency. Cross-sectional, electronic survey. This study involved a cross-sectional, electronic survey completed in August and September of 2014 in order to assess licensed physical therapists' knowledge in identifying and managing musculoskeletal conditions. Only physical therapists practicing in orthopedics were permitted to be involved in the study. Descriptive statistics of the participants, and logistic regressions analyzing variables correlated with passing the musculoskeletal exam were calculated using SPSS 22.0. Frequencies were produced for multiple variables. Binary logistic regressions were used to correlate the frequency variables with performing at competency level on the musculoskeletal exam. A total of 22,750 surveys were sent to physical therapists in Arizona, Ohio, Texas, Maine and Wyoming. Two thousand sixty-five surveys were returned for a response rate of 10.6%. Of the 2,065 surveys completed, 408 responses were included for analysis. The average score for the respondents on the exam was 65.08% and only 28.2% of all respondents met the competency cutoff score (previously established to be 73.1%). Respondents who were orthopedic certified specialists (OCS) or sports certified specialists (SCS) were 3.091 times more likely to perform at the competency level on the examination with a p-value of < 0.001 and a confidence interval >95%. The

  17. The genetic pleiotropy of musculoskeletal aging

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, David; Cohen-Zinder, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal aging is detrimental to multiple bodily functions and starts early, probably in the fourth decade of an individual's life. Sarcopenia is a health problem that is expected to only increase as a greater portion of the population lives longer; prevalence of the related musculoskeletal diseases is similarly expected to increase. Unraveling the biological and biomechanical associations and molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases represents a formidable challenge. There are two major problems making disentangling the biological complexity of musculoskeletal aging difficult: (a) it is a systemic, rather than “compartmental,” problem, which should be approached accordingly, and (b) the aging per se is neither well defined nor reliably measurable. A unique challenge of studying any age-related condition is a need of distinguishing between the “norm” and “pathology,” which are interwoven throughout the aging organism. We argue that detecting genes with pleiotropic functions in musculoskeletal aging is needed to provide insights into the potential biological mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences insusceptibility to the musculoskeletal diseases. However, exploring pleiotropic relationships among the system's components is challenging both methodologically and conceptually. We aimed to focus on genetic aspects of the cross-talk between muscle and its “neighboring” tissues and organs (tendon, bone, and cartilage), and to explore the role of genetics to find the new molecular links between skeletal muscle and other parts of the “musculoskeleton.” Identification of significant genetic variants underlying the musculoskeletal system's aging is now possible more than ever due to the currently available advanced genomic technologies. In summary, a “holistic” genetic approach is needed to study the systems's normal functioning and the disease predisposition in order to improve musculoskeletal health. PMID:22934054

  18. The genetic pleiotropy of musculoskeletal aging.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Cohen-Zinder, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal aging is detrimental to multiple bodily functions and starts early, probably in the fourth decade of an individual's life. Sarcopenia is a health problem that is expected to only increase as a greater portion of the population lives longer; prevalence of the related musculoskeletal diseases is similarly expected to increase. Unraveling the biological and biomechanical associations and molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases represents a formidable challenge. There are two major problems making disentangling the biological complexity of musculoskeletal aging difficult: (a) it is a systemic, rather than "compartmental," problem, which should be approached accordingly, and (b) the aging per se is neither well defined nor reliably measurable. A unique challenge of studying any age-related condition is a need of distinguishing between the "norm" and "pathology," which are interwoven throughout the aging organism. We argue that detecting genes with pleiotropic functions in musculoskeletal aging is needed to provide insights into the potential biological mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences insusceptibility to the musculoskeletal diseases. However, exploring pleiotropic relationships among the system's components is challenging both methodologically and conceptually. We aimed to focus on genetic aspects of the cross-talk between muscle and its "neighboring" tissues and organs (tendon, bone, and cartilage), and to explore the role of genetics to find the new molecular links between skeletal muscle and other parts of the "musculoskeleton." Identification of significant genetic variants underlying the musculoskeletal system's aging is now possible more than ever due to the currently available advanced genomic technologies. In summary, a "holistic" genetic approach is needed to study the systems's normal functioning and the disease predisposition in order to improve musculoskeletal health.

  19. Musculoskeletal manifestations in diabetic versus prediabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Alimohammad; Iraj, Bijan; Barzanian, Jafar; Maracy, Mohammadreza; Smiley, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in a sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and those with prediabetes and compare the findings between the two groups. One hundred and eighty-eight patients with DM and 125 prediabetic subjects were randomly enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Demographic data and past history were recorded. Musculoskeletal physical examinations were done by a single rheumatologist. Regression analyses were employed to assess the crude and adjusted effects of determinants on DM musculoskeletal manifestations (DMMMs). Female/male ratio was not significantly different between diabetic and prediabetic patients (4.4 vs. 4.7, respectively, P = 0.9). However, diabetic patients were significantly older than the prediabetic ones (56.6 vs. 52 years, respectively, P = 0.0001); 83.5% of diabetic patients and 52.8% of prediabetic ones had at least one musculoskeletal manifestation (P = 0.0001). The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and shoulder involvement were almost two times more common (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.015) in diabetic patients than in prediabetic ones (73.4% vs. 38% and 21.2% vs. 9.5%, respectively). Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) was 48% and 36.5% in patients with diabetes and prediabetes, respectively (P = 0.053). Multivariate backward regression analysis showed age, sex, BMI (body mass index) and DM as the significant determinants in development of musculoskeletal manifestations in all subjects. Age and BMI were the only significant factors associated with musculoskeletal manifestations in both diabetic and prediabetic patients. Diabetic and prediabetic patients may show high prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations. In non-diabetic patients diagnosed with CTS, prediabetes might be ruled out. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Axiomatics Corporation developed a shunting Dielectric Sensor to determine the nutrient level and analyze plant nutrient solutions in the CELSS, NASA's space life support program. (CELSS is an experimental facility investigating closed-cycle plant growth and food processing for long duration manned missions.) The DiComp system incorporates a shunt electrode and is especially sensitive to changes in dielectric property changes in materials at measurements much lower than conventional sensors. The analyzer has exceptional capabilities for predicting composition of liquid streams or reactions. It measures concentrations and solids content up to 100 percent in applications like agricultural products, petrochemicals, food and beverages. The sensor is easily installed; maintenance is low, and it can be calibrated on line. The software automates data collection and analysis.

  1. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  2. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  3. Atmosphere Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    California Measurements, Inc.'s model PC-2 Aerosol Particle Analyzer is produced in both airborne and ground-use versions. Originating from NASA technology, it is a quick and accurate method of detecting minute amounts of mass loadings on a quartz crystal -- offers utility as highly sensitive detector of fine particles suspended in air. When combined with suitable air delivery system, it provides immediate information on the size distribution and mass concentrations of aerosols. William Chiang, obtained a NASA license for multiple crystal oscillator technology, and initially developed a particle analyzer for NASA use with Langley Research Center assistance. Later his company produced the modified PC-2 for commercial applications Brunswick Corporation uses the device for atmospheric research and in studies of smoke particles in Fires. PC-2 is used by pharmaceutical and chemical companies in research on inhalation toxicology and environmental health. Also useful in testing various filters for safety masks and nuclear installations.

  4. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  5. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among Iranian dentists.

    PubMed

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Badakhsh, Samaneh; Khosroshahi, Shadab Safarzadeh; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), associated factors and treatment among dentists over a one year period. A total of 272 questionnaires were returned complete providing demographic information, details of the physical workload, location of pain in the body, and the treatment and prevention of MSDs. All data was coded for each of the parameters. The association between pain and each of the parameters was determined by parametric and non-parametric statistical tests (P < 0.05). General and specialist dentists participated in the study. The sample set of dentists consisted of 205 (75.4%) generalists and 67 (24.6%) specialists. Seventy-five percent of the total cohort experienced MSDs. Female dentists complained of pain significantly more frequently than their male counterparts (p=0.018). Significantly higher rates of pain and MSDs are related to increased years of work (r=0.168, p =0.017) and less regular ergonomic exercise (p=0.002). Reported pain was most common in the shoulder (44.2%), neck (31.8%) and lower back (29.9%). Dentists who worked inclined had significantly more pain disorder than those who did not (p=0.013). In total 23.5% of dentists reduced working hours and 16.5% sought medical help. Pain was most commonly reported in the shoulder, neck and back. Physical workload is an important factor in MSDs. The impact of MSDs on the work and life of dentists demonstrates the need for increased knowledge of MSDs and the instigation of preventive strategies.

  6. Abdominal and pelvic tumors with musculoskeletal histology.

    PubMed

    Dyrstad, Sara W; Fowler, Amy M; Jokerst, Clint E; Baker, Jonathan C; Hillen, Travis J; Menias, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case-based review of the broad spectrum of tumors with musculoskeletal histology that can arise in the abdomen or pelvis and involve the soft tissues, muscle, and bone. In this article, pathology-proven cases are presented with a focus on radiographic, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography findings. The imaging features that differentiate tumors with musculoskeletal histology from more common abdominal tumors are discussed. Representative cases include malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, desmoplastic fibroma, neurofibrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, intimal sarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, teratoma, and chordoma. A variety of tumors with musculoskeletal histology can arise in the abdomen and pelvis. In some cases, unique imaging characteristics allow a confident diagnosis, whereas other cases have a more nonspecific appearance. Recognition of imaging features that suggest a musculoskeletal tumor including direct extension from a bone or neural foramen, the presence of cartilaginous or osseous matrix, or macroscopic fat would allow the radiologist to suggest the proper diagnosis. Recognizing imaging characteristics of tumors with musculoskeletal histology is important clinically as management and prognosis differ from that of more common abdominal tumors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Imaging features of extraaxial musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Sanghvi, Darshana A; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. TB can involve pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary sites. The musculoskeletal system is involved in 1–3% of patients with tuberculosis. Although musculoskeletal TB has become uncommon in the Western world, it remains a huge problem in Asia, Africa, and many developing countries. Tuberculous spondylitis is the most common form of musculoskeletal TB and accounts for approximately 50% of cases. Extraspinal musculoskeletal TB shows a predilection for large joints (hip and knee) and para-articular areas; isolated soft tissue TB is extremely rare. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are mandatory to prevent serious destruction of joints and skeletal deformity. However, due to the nonspecific and often indolent clinical presentation, the diagnosis may be delayed. Radiological assessment is often the first step in the diagnostic workup of patients with musculoskeletal TB and further investigations are decided by the findings on radiography. Both the radiologist and the clinician should be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis. In this manuscript we review the imaging features of extraspinal bone, joint, and soft tissue TB. PMID:19881081

  8. Rehabilitation versus Nursing Home Nurses' Low Back and Neck-Shoulder Complaints.

    PubMed

    Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Sheffer, Dvora; Treger, Iuly; Finkels, Tova; Kalichman, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of those complaints in nurses working in rehabilitation departments and nursing homes, and to evaluate factors associated with them. A cross-sectional study in rehabilitation and in nursing home departments. Data were obtained from questionnaires relating to basic demographics, prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, potentially harmful positions and actions and job satisfaction. Multivariate analyses demonstrated higher work-related musculoskeletal complaints for nurses in rehabilitation than nursing home nurses (p=.012 for low back pain; p<.001 for neck-shoulder pain). Trunk bending, static posture, repetitive tasks, and recognition of superiors were associated with low back pain. Freedom to choose work techniques and degree of diversity at work were associated with neck-shoulder pain. Differences between the nurse groups as to work tasks might be a reason for differences in musculoskeletal complaints. Further comparisons between nurses working in different fields might reveal more accurate potential risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Instruction for static/awkward posture avoidance, by using mechanical aids and designing a friendlier environment, should be part of a nursing staff injury prevention strategy. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  9. [Musculoskeletal pain and its association with ergonomic risk factors in administrative workers].

    PubMed

    Vernaza-Pinzón, Paola; Sierra-Torres, Carlos H

    2005-01-01

    Establishing the frequency of musculoskeletal lesions in administrative workers and its possible association with ergonomic risk factors. A descriptive study of 145 workers from the Universidad del Cauca in Popayán was carried out between July 2002 and June 2003. Two instruments were used for collecting the information: a format for analysing working posture and a questionnaire for analysing musculoskeletal symptoms. Fifty-seven percent of the administrative workers presented symptoms of pain. The most frequent lesions were found in the lower back (56.6%), upper back (53.1%) and the neck (49%). Workers who sat for most of their working day presented an OR of 3.0 for lower back lesions and workers who had to walk more during their daily activity presented an OR of 2.8. The results of this study reveal an association between exposure to biomechanical risk factors and the presence of musculoskeletal lesion, indicating that forced work postures signify greater risk. This type of lesion could therefore incapacitate workers carrying out their daily activities.

  10. Psychological factors at work and musculoskeletal disorders: a one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Zołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; Jędryka-Góral, Anna; Gasik, Robert; Hildt-Ciupińska, Katarzyna; Malińska, Marzena; Bedyńska, Sylwia

    2013-12-01

    The etiology of musculoskeletal disorders is complex, with physical and psychosocial working conditions playing an important role. This study aimed to determine the relationship between psychosocial work conditions, such as psychological job demands, decision latitude, social support and job insecurity and musculoskeletal complains (MSCs) and (repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) in a 1-year prospective study. The job content questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and provocation tests were used to study 725 employees aged 20-70 years. Pain in the lower back (58 % of subjects), neck (57 %), wrists/hands (47 %) and upper back (44 %) was most frequent. The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (33.6 %), rotator cuff tendinitis (15.4 %), Guyon's canal syndrome (13.4 %), lateral epicondylitis (7.6 %), medial epicondylitis (5.3 %), tendinitis of forearm-wrist extensors (7.8 %) and tendinitis of forearm-wrist flexors (7.3 %) were the most frequent RSIs. Logistic analysis showed that increased psychological job demands statistically significantly increased the probability of lateral and medial epicondylitis, and increased control (decision latitude) statistically significantly decreased the risk of CTS. There was no relationship between job insecurity, social support and the studied RSIs. Psychosocial factors at work predict prevalence of MSCs and RSIs, irrespectively of demographic factors, e.g., age or gender, and organizational and physical factors.

  11. Musculoskeletal complaints among physiotherapy and occupational therapy rehabilitation professionals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shofiqul; Habib, Md Monjurul; Hafez, Md Abdul; Nahar, Nazmun; Lindstrom-Hazel, Debra; Rahman, Mohammad Khalilur

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals are at high risk of developing occupational musculoskeletal injuries globally. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common problem. To determine the extent of discomfort that physiotherapy and occupational therapy health professionals report while working at a physical rehabilitation centre. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals which include both graduate and diploma physiotherapists and occupational therapists as well as physiotherapy and occupational therapy assistants. A self administered questionnaire (survey) was conducted on a convenient sample of 101 physiotherapy and occupational therapy personnel. The mean age of the 101 participants was 27.8 (± 4.5) years and most of the participants (62%) had less than 5 years of work experience. Ninety-five percent of the participants complained of work related pain. Most of the participants reported pain in the lower back (n=84) followed by upper back (n=71) and neck (n=66). Significant associations were found for pain in ankles/feet with age (p=0.05) and pain in neck with gender (p=0.01). Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals suffer from pain in relation to the work they do as therapists which may be due to non-practice of appropriate body mechanics. Mechanism to assess level of practice during dealing with patients may be introduced to enable corrective measures. Incentives should be considered for appropriate practice.

  12. [Socioeconomic position and duration of disability benefit due to work-related musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2012-02-01

    This study estimated the effect of socioeconomic position on the duration of disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs. A cohort study including 563 insured workers from the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, registered in the General Social Security System and who received temporary disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs, was performed in 2008 using data from the National Social Security Institute. The results show that among union member workers with high psychosocial demands at work, those with low socioeconomic status are almost twice as likely to receive benefit for a shorter period of time compared to those with a higher socioeconomic position (RR = 1.89; 95%CI: 1.25-2.87). These results reveal an inequitable situation or unnecessary use of insurance for workers with a higher socioeconomic position. Future research aimed at elucidating the differences in the use of benefits are needed so that social insurance system managers may take the appropriate steps to resolve this issue.

  13. Musculoskeletal discomfort of music teachers: an eight-year perspective and psychosocial work factors.

    PubMed

    Fjellman-Wiklund, A; Sundelin, G

    1998-01-01

    Musicians at all levels of performance, especially string players, are known to have a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The disorders seem to be most common in the neck, shoulders and low back. In 1988, a survey of the work-related musculoskeletal disorders of 36 music teachers was carried out at a music school in northern Sweden. In 1996, the teachers were reinvestigated. The study also included an investigation of the psychosocial work environment according to the Karasek demand-control theory, as well as measurements of upper-arm elevation during a working day in five violin teachers. The results showed that music teachers, like other professional musicians, often experience discomfort in the neck, shoulders, and low back. The discomfort tended to be of long duration, increasing over the years. The psychosocial work environment was characterized by high psychological demands and low authority over decisions. This was compensated for through good social support. The work required skill and creativity but was monotonous. The measurements of upper-arm elevation indicated considerable variations in shoulder positions between teachers. There were also differences in the work done with the right and left arms, with repetitive motions more commonly involving the right arm. Approximately a fourth of the working day was spent with the arm elevated 30-90 degrees. The relationships between upper-arm movements and ratings of discomfort were moderate.

  14. Musculoskeletal injuries in auto racing: a retrospective study of 137 drivers.

    PubMed

    Koutras, Christos; Buecking, Benjamin; Jaeger, Marcus; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Heep, Hansjoerg

    2014-11-01

    The effect of continuous exposure of a driver's bones and muscles to vibration and G forces to years of automobile racing and the effect on overall health have not yet been examined in detail. The goal of this study was to investigate via questionnaire the musculoskeletal injuries and influencing parameters in 130 amateur and 7 professional race car drivers. A questionnaire, translated in English and German, was used to investigate the parameters that influence the racing performance and the character of resulting injuries. This investigation involved 137 drivers (133 men and 4 women) with a mean age of 42 years (standard deviation = 15). Approximately half of the drivers had < 10 years of experience in auto racing (49%). The drivers mainly complained about pains in the lumbar (n = 36; 26%), shoulder (n = 27; 20%), and neck regions (n = 25; 18%). The driver's posture and the comfort of the seat were statistically significant for causing lower back and upper legs pains. The race duration was relevant to neck and shoulder discomfort. The high incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in race car driving indicates the need for further improvements. Elimination of driver complaints about pain in the spine and upper extremities can be achieved through technical development, as already accomplished in Formula One racing.

  15. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  16. CCFP Analyzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-06

    ISS047e106715 (05/06/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake unpacks a cerebral and cochlear fluid pressure (CCFP) analyzer. The device is being tested to measure the pressure of the fluid in the skull, also known as intracranial pressure, which may increase due to fluid shifts in the body while in microgravity. It is hypothesized that the headward fluid shift that occurs during space flight leads to increased pressure in the brain, which may push on the back of the eye, causing it to change shape.

  17. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  18. [Frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms in diagnostic medical sonographers. Results of a pilot survey].

    PubMed

    Mirk, P; Magnavita, N; Masini, L; Bazzocchi, M; Fileni, A

    1999-10-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey in diagnostic medical sonographers. Aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of musculoskeletal disorders in sonologists and the relationship of these symptoms to ergonomic factors. 340 sonographers (258 male, 82 female doctors; mean age 41.5 +/- 7.2 years) were given a questionnaire to fill out. The questionnaire asked questions about the sonologist's age, gender, technique of ultrasound procedure, physical activity, and work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Two symptom lists regarded carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms (8 items) and other work-related musculoskeletal symptoms (13 items). The categorized response variables "have now" or "in the past" were provided. The symptoms experienced were categorized into three levels as no symptoms, few symptoms (1-4 symptoms), and many symptoms (> 5 symptoms). One third of the respondents reported having at least one or more work-related symptoms in the upper extremities. The most frequent symptoms were tingling (17.6%), numbness or finger pain (13.5%). Carpal tunnel syndrome had been diagnosed in 5 cases (1.5%). More than 60% of all respondents have experienced one or more musculoskeletal symptoms in the cervical or lumbar spine. The commonest symptom was neck and low back pain (67%). The pain was generally intermittent and occurred at the end of the workday. Motion impairment in the neck and/or back was present in 23.5% of cases. Twenty-five percent of respondents had received treatments for their symptoms and 10% reported having stopped work because of their symptoms. Data analysis showed that muscular efforts such as gripping the transducer, applying sustained pressure, and scanning with a correlated flexed or hyperextended wrist were significantly correlated with increasing severity of symptoms in the hand, wrist, and forearm area. On the other hand, low back pain appeared to be negatively correlated with correct position of the body. Several physical risk factors (e

  19. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Associated With Job Contentment in Dental Professionals: Indian Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD Method Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. Result A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Conclusion Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:24795512

  20. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  1. Analyzing Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  2. Job factors related to musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing personnel--a review.

    PubMed

    Coluci, Marina Zambon Orpinelli; Alexandrea, Neusa Maria Costa

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to conduct a literature review as a step of the development of a new questionnaire about the nursing workers' perception of job factors that may lead to musculoskeletal symptoms. An information synthesis was achieved by collecting data from studies that fitted the search criteria. The results showed that despite the existence of several job factors related to musculoskeletal symptoms, no specific questionnaire that evaluates this relationship was found. Therefore, this literature review presents important topics for developing the first questionnaire to analyze work activities that may contribute to pain and discomfort among nursing personnel.

  3. Design and Evaluation of Ergonomic Interventions for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders in India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improper workstation, work procedures and tools are found to be the risk factors for the development of musculoskeletal disorders among the informal sector workers of the developing countries. Low cost ergonomic interventions can effectively improve such adverse conditions. Case presentation In the present article some studies related to design interventions in different informal and agricultural sectors were discussed and their efficacies were analyzed. It was observed that with the help of appropriate interventions musculoskeletal disorders were reduced, adverse physiological conditions were improved when awkward postures were corrected and ultimately the organisational productivity was increased. Conclusion Proper implementation of ergonomic interventions can ultimately improve the economy of the nation. PMID:25009740

  4. Design and evaluation of ergonomic interventions for the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in India.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Dev, Samrat

    2014-01-01

    Improper workstation, work procedures and tools are found to be the risk factors for the development of musculoskeletal disorders among the informal sector workers of the developing countries. Low cost ergonomic interventions can effectively improve such adverse conditions. In the present article some studies related to design interventions in different informal and agricultural sectors were discussed and their efficacies were analyzed. It was observed that with the help of appropriate interventions musculoskeletal disorders were reduced, adverse physiological conditions were improved when awkward postures were corrected and ultimately the organisational productivity was increased. Proper implementation of ergonomic interventions can ultimately improve the economy of the nation.

  5. Baggage handler seniority and musculoskeletal symptoms: is heavy lifting in awkward positions associated with the risk of pain?

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Stine Hvid; Brauer, Charlotte; Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Koblauch, Henrik; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Alkjær, Tine; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Heavy lifting is associated with musculoskeletal disorders but it is unclear whether it is related to acute reversible effects or to chronic effects from cumulated exposure. The aim of this study was to examine whether musculoskeletal symptoms in Danish airport baggage handlers were associated with their seniority as baggage handler, indicating chronic effects from cumulated workload. Methods We established a group of baggage handlers employed at Copenhagen Airport during the period 1983–2012 (n=3092) and a reference group of men in other unskilled occupations with less heavy work (n=2478). Data regarding work history, lifestyle and musculoskeletal symptoms were collected using a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 70.1% among baggage handlers and 68.8% among the reference group). Results The ORs of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms during the last 12 months in the neck/upper back, lower back, shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips and knees were significantly higher in baggage handlers than in the reference group. These differences were explained by significant linear effects of baggage handler seniority for six anatomical regions. Adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking and leisure-time physical activity did not change these results. The findings were stable over age strata and among present and former baggage handlers. Conclusions The risk of musculoskeletal symptoms in six anatomical regions increased with increasing seniority as a baggage handler. This is consistent with the assumption that cumulated heavy lifting may cause chronic or long-lasting musculoskeletal symptoms. However, we cannot exclude that other factors related to baggage handler seniority may explain some of the associations. PMID:24293209

  6. Baggage handler seniority and musculoskeletal symptoms: is heavy lifting in awkward positions associated with the risk of pain?

    PubMed

    Bern, Stine Hvid; Brauer, Charlotte; Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Koblauch, Henrik; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Alkjær, Tine; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2013-11-29

    Heavy lifting is associated with musculoskeletal disorders but it is unclear whether it is related to acute reversible effects or to chronic effects from cumulated exposure. The aim of this study was to examine whether musculoskeletal symptoms in Danish airport baggage handlers were associated with their seniority as baggage handler, indicating chronic effects from cumulated workload. We established a group of baggage handlers employed at Copenhagen Airport during the period 1983-2012 (n=3092) and a reference group of men in other unskilled occupations with less heavy work (n=2478). Data regarding work history, lifestyle and musculoskeletal symptoms were collected using a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 70.1% among baggage handlers and 68.8% among the reference group). The ORs of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms during the last 12 months in the neck/upper back, lower back, shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips and knees were significantly higher in baggage handlers than in the reference group. These differences were explained by significant linear effects of baggage handler seniority for six anatomical regions. Adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking and leisure-time physical activity did not change these results. The findings were stable over age strata and among present and former baggage handlers. The risk of musculoskeletal symptoms in six anatomical regions increased with increasing seniority as a baggage handler. This is consistent with the assumption that cumulated heavy lifting may cause chronic or long-lasting musculoskeletal symptoms. However, we cannot exclude that other factors related to baggage handler seniority may explain some of the associations.

  7. The Effects of Workplace Physical Activity Programs on Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Silva, Isabel; Teixeira, Pedro M; Santos, Rute; Abreu, Sandra; Moreira, Carla; Mota, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of physical activity (PA) interventions at the workplace to reduce musculoskeletal pain among employees and assesses the effect size of these programs using meta-analysis. Four databases (i.e., PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane) were searched for research trials, which included comparison groups of employees that assessed PA programs, musculoskeletal pain, and health-related behaviors, published between January 1990 and March 2013. The meta-analysis estimates of standardized mean differences (Hedges' g) present significant evidence of less general pain (g = -.40 with a 95% confidence interval [CI] = [-0.78, -0.02]) and neck and shoulder pain (g = -.37 with a 95% CI = [-0.63, -0.12]) in intervention groups. The few studies of low back pain and arm, elbow, wrist, hand, or finger pain did not present sufficient statistically significant evidence. Consistent evidence demonstrates that workplace PA interventions significantly reduce general musculoskeletal pain and neck and shoulder pain. More studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of work-related PA interventions for arm, elbow, wrist, hand or finger, and low back pain. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Prevalence and risk factors associated with musculoskeletal complaints among users of mobile handheld devices: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanfei; Szeto, Grace; Dai, Jie

    2017-03-01

    This systematic review aimed at evaluating the prevalence and risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints associated with mobile handheld device use. Pubmed, Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL and Embase were searched. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed. Strength of evidence for risk factors was determined based on study designs, methodological quality and consistency of results. Five high-quality, eight acceptable-quality and two low-quality peer-reviewed articles were included. This review demonstrates that the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among mobile device users ranges from 1.0% to 67.8% and neck complaints have the highest prevalence rates ranging from 17.3% to 67.8%. This study also finds some evidence for neck flexion, frequency of phone calls, texting and gaming in relation to musculoskeletal complaints among mobile device users. Inconclusive evidence is shown for other risk factors such as duration of use and human-device interaction techniques due to inconsistent results or a limited number of studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

  10. Pitfalls in MR imaging of musculoskeletal tumors.

    PubMed

    Arkun, Remide; Argin, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    A wide range of musculoskeletal tumors and tumor-like conditions may be encountered when patients undergo radiologic examinations. Although MR imaging is a powerful medical imaging method that has been used extensively in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors, nontumoral or tumorlike lesions may have similar imaging findings. The imaging features of certain normal, reactive, benign neoplastic, inflammatory, traumatic, or degenerative processes in the musculoskeletal system may mimic malignant tumors. Misinterpretation of the imaging findings can lead to inappropriate clinical management of the patient. We review and describe the MR imaging characteristics of nontumoral bone lesions that are located in the marrow cavity, cortical bone, or in both, and soft tissue lesions that may be misinterpreted as sarcoma. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Musculoskeletal infections associated with Citrobacter koseri

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Z; Weerasinghe, C; Dunkow, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Citrobacter koseri is a well known cause of central nervous system infections in the paediatric setting. Musculoskeletal infections caused by C koseri are rare, with only 14 previously reported cases. We present the first recorded case of C koseri induced septic arthritis of the knee along with a review of the literature. Methods A search of the PubMed, Embase® and Google Scholar™ databases was undertaken. Only complete or near complete cases were reviewed. Findings Fourteen musculoskeletal infections were identified. Of these, five were associated with an operative procedure and five involved a septic joint. Surgical treatment was required in the majority of cases and cure was achieved in all cases following prolonged antibiotic use. Conclusions C koseri associated musculoskeletal infections may complicate primary orthopaedic procedures. The organism can present aggressively and can be difficult to identify microbiologically. It is sensitive to newer generation beta-lactams, cephalosporin-based antibiotics and timely surgery. PMID:27412805

  12. Musculoskeletal infections associated with Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Kwaees, T A; Hakim, Z; Weerasinghe, C; Dunkow, P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Citrobacter koseri is a well known cause of central nervous system infections in the paediatric setting. Musculoskeletal infections caused by C koseri are rare, with only 14 previously reported cases. We present the first recorded case of C koseri induced septic arthritis of the knee along with a review of the literature. Methods A search of the PubMed, Embase(®) and Google Scholar™ databases was undertaken. Only complete or near complete cases were reviewed. Findings Fourteen musculoskeletal infections were identified. Of these, five were associated with an operative procedure and five involved a septic joint. Surgical treatment was required in the majority of cases and cure was achieved in all cases following prolonged antibiotic use. Conclusions C koseri associated musculoskeletal infections may complicate primary orthopaedic procedures. The organism can present aggressively and can be difficult to identify microbiologically. It is sensitive to newer generation beta-lactams, cephalosporin-based antibiotics and timely surgery.

  13. Aquatic exercise & balneotherapy in musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2012-06-01

    This is a best-evidence synthesis providing an evidence-based summary on the effectiveness of aquatic exercises and balneotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. The most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions addressed in this review include: low back pain, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. Over 30 years of research demonstrates that exercises in general, and specifically aquatic exercises, are beneficial for reducing pain and disability in many musculoskeletal conditions demonstrating small to moderate effect sizes ranging between 0.19 and 0.32. Balneotherapy might be beneficial, but the evidence is yet insufficient to make a definitive statement about its use. High-quality trials are needed on balneotherapy and aquatic exercises research especially in specific patient categories that might benefit most.

  14. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Danyu

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  15. Association of Parental Awareness of Using Schoolbags with Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Carrying Habits of Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dianat, Iman; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    The association between parental awareness of using schoolbags and the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms and carrying habits of children was investigated in a cross-sectional study in Tabriz, Iran. Data on 454 students aged 11-14 years and their parents (n = 358) were analyzed. The awareness of the recommended weight limit, appropriate method…

  16. Association of Parental Awareness of Using Schoolbags with Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Carrying Habits of Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dianat, Iman; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    The association between parental awareness of using schoolbags and the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms and carrying habits of children was investigated in a cross-sectional study in Tabriz, Iran. Data on 454 students aged 11-14 years and their parents (n = 358) were analyzed. The awareness of the recommended weight limit, appropriate method…

  17. Myofascial trigger points, neck mobility, and forward head posture in episodic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cuadrado, Maria L; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-05-01

    To assess the differences in the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in head and neck muscles, forward head posture (FHP) and neck mobility between episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) subjects and healthy controls. In addition, we assess the relationship between these muscle TrPs, FHP, neck mobility, and several clinical variables concerning the intensity and the temporal profile of headache. TTH is a headache in which musculoskeletal disorders of the craniocervical region might play an important role in its pathogenesis. Design.-A blinded, controlled pilot study. Fifteen ETTH subjects and 15 matched controls without headache were studied. TrPs in both upper trapezius, both sternocleidomastoids, and both temporalis muscles were identified according to Simons and Gerwin diagnostic criteria (tenderness in a hypersensible spot within a palpable taut band, local twitch response elicited by snapping palpation, and elicited referred pain with palpation). Side-view pictures of each subject were taken in both sitting and standing positions, in order to assess FHP by measuring the craniovertebral angle. A cervical goniometer was employed to measure neck mobility. All measures were taken by a blinded assessor. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks in order to assess headache intensity, frequency, and duration. The mean number of TrPs for each ETTH subject was 3.7 (SD: 1.3), of which 1.9 (SD: 0.9) were active, and 1.8 (SD: 0.9) were latent. Control subjects only had latent TrPs (mean: 1.5; SD: 1). TrP occurrence between the 2 groups was significantly different for active TrPs (P < .001), but not for latent TrPs (P > .05). Differences in the distribution of TrPs were significant for the right upper trapezius muscles (P= .04), the left sternocleidomastoid (P= .03), and both temporalis muscles (P < .001). Within the ETTH group, headache intensity, frequency, and duration outcomes did not differ depending on TrP activity, whether the TrP was active or latent. The craniovertebral

  18. Speech analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A speech signal is analyzed by applying the signal to formant filters which derive first, second and third signals respectively representing the frequency of the speech waveform in the first, second and third formants. A first pulse train having approximately a pulse rate representing the average frequency of the first formant is derived; second and third pulse trains having pulse rates respectively representing zero crossings of the second and third formants are derived. The first formant pulse train is derived by establishing N signal level bands, where N is an integer at least equal to two. Adjacent ones of the signal bands have common boundaries, each of which is a predetermined percentage of the peak level of a complete cycle of the speech waveform.

  19. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  20. Risk factors for musculoskeletal pain amongst nurses in Estonia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Tiina; Coggon, David; Merisalu, Eda; Animägi, Liina; Pääsuke, Mati

    2013-12-01

    Routine statistics indicate a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Estonia. We aimed to describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) amongst Estonian nurses, and to explore associations with personal characteristics and occupational risk factors. As a part of an international investigation (the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID) study), a cross-sectional survey was carried out amongst registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital, focusing on pain at six anatomical sites (low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand and knee) lasting for more than a day during the past year and past month. Associations with regional and multi-site (≥2 anatomical sites) pain were analysed by logistic regression. Analysis was based on 221 female nurses (response rate 57%). The overall prevalence of MSP was 84% in the past year and 69% in the past month. The prevalence of multi-site pain was 60% in the past year and 40% in the past month. Low back, neck and knee were the sites most commonly painful. Pain in the past year tended to be more frequent at older ages, and with higher emotional exhaustion, and at most sites, with poor self-rated health, and reported distress from somatic symptoms. Multi-site pain was also significantly associated with older age and tendency to somatise. The prevalence of MSP among Estonian nurses is high. Psychological risk factors such as somatising tendency have an important impact. However, none of the risk factors examined seems likely to explain the high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Estonia.

  1. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in urban bus drivers of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Grace P Y; Lam, Peggo

    2007-06-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) affect workers in many occupations including drivers of large vehicles. Urban bus drivers have been found to have high prevalence rates of back problems in overseas studies. Hong Kong is a densely populated city and has a large number of double-deck buses that constitute a major means of public transportation. The present study aimed at investigating the prevalence and characteristics of WMSD in male and female bus drivers who operate double-deck buses in Hong Kong. Altogether 481 bus drivers (404 males, 77 females) participated in the study that consisted of a questionnaire survey as well as physical assessment. The questionnaire included questions on work, musculoskeletal complaints and perceived occupational risk factors associated with each discomfort. Physical assessment consisted of measurement of lumbar spine mobility, hand grip strength, sit-and-reach test, and observation of standing and sitting postures. The results showed generally the male drivers had longer years of work experience but their daily workloads were similar to the females. On the average drivers worked 9-10 h per day, with 5 days on and 1 day off. Neck, back, shoulder and knee/thigh areas had the highest 12-month prevalence rates ranging from 35% to 60%, and about 90% of the discomfort was related to bus-driving. Occupational factors of prolonged sitting and anthropometric mismatch were perceived to be most related to musculoskeletal discomfort. On physical examination, grip strength was significantly related to neck and shoulder discomfort. The present results showed high prevalence rates of WMSD among bus drivers in Hong Kong which warrants further investigation.

  2. USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    6 Nutrition ...identifying suboptimal biomechanical, musculoskeletal, physiological, and nutritional characteristics that are task and demand-specific to the...To prospectively identify biomechanical, musculoskeletal, physiological, and nutritional risk factors for injury in USASOC Operators Methods: A

  3. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R

    2014-11-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomic and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter. In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal metrics of white matter integrity compared with healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD in the anterior limbs of the internal capsule and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a P < .01 level: fractional anisotropy in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with total pain experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of the internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus was correlated with total pain experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both total pain experience and pain catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that white matter abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain as a cause, a predisposing factor, a consequence, or a compensatory adaptation. Patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit altered metrics of diffusion in the brain's white matter compared with healthy volunteers, and some of these differences are

  4. Musicians' illness perceptions of musculoskeletal complaints.

    PubMed

    Kok, Laura M; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; Fiocco, Marta; Kaptein, Ad A; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to know the views of people about their illness, i.e., illness perceptions, determine coping strategies, and outcome. Previous research suggests a higher prevalence and a different perception of musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. The aim of this study is to compare illness perceptions related to musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. In this cross-sectional study, students from three music academies (n = 345) and one university medical center (n = 2,870) in the Netherlands received an electronic questionnaire concerning questions on sociodemographic characteristics, use of musical instruments, occurrence and characteristics of musculoskeletal complaints in the past year, and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Baseline and B-IPQ scores were compared between the samples by means of t tests, chi-square tests, and regression models to adjust for differences in sociodemographic characteristics. Eighty-three music academy students and 494 medical students completed the questionnaire (response rates, 25.5 and 17.6 %, respectively). Seventy-four (89 %) persons in the musician group and 382 (78 %) persons in the nonmusician group reported occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints during the last 12 months. Adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, the B-IPQ scores of the domains consequences (my illness is a serious condition), concern (I am extremely concerned about my illness), and emotions (my illness makes me scared) were significantly higher among musicians, whereas personal control (there is little I can do to improve my illness), identity (number of symptoms patient sees as part of illness) were not significantly different. Music academy students had a significant more positive score on treatment control. Music academy students report more negative perceptions of their musculoskeletal complaints compared to medical students. Although some selection bias is

  5. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; Richardson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of the Musculoskeletal System features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors; infections; musculoskeletal trauma; spinal disorders; and miscellaneous conditions. The authors comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans. An outstanding selection of more than 250 detail-revealing illustrations depicts representatives MRI findings.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  7. Shape and size of the body vs. musculoskeletal stress markers.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Anna; Piontek, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the relationship between the degree of development of muscle attachment sites (musculoskeletal stress markers - MSM1) and the length and circumference measurements of long bones and the body build expressed with the reconstructed values of body height (BH) and body mass (BM). The bone material (102 male and 99 female skeletons) used in the study was collected in the medieval burial ground in Cedynia, Poland. The authors analyzed 10 musculoskeletal stress markers located on the scapula (2), humerus (2), radius (2), femur (2) and tibia (2). The frequency and the degree of expression of muscle attachment size was carried out using the scale prepared by Myszka (2007). The scale encompassed three degrees of expression of muscle attachment size. Only changes of robusticity type (nonpathological changes) were taken into account. The assessment of body build of individuals was carried out according to the method proposed by Vancata & Charvátová (2001). Body height was reconstructed from the length of the humerus and femur using eight equations. Body mass was reconstructed from the measurements of the breadth of the proximal and distal sections of the femur and tibia (mechanical method) using twenty one equations. The equations were developed for different reference populations. The same equations were used for men and women. The correlation between the MSM and the length and circumference measurements of the bones was analyzed using the principal components analysis and the Gamma correlation coefficient. The strength of the correlation between the reconstructed body build traits (BH, BM) and the moderate degree of musculoskeletal stress markers expression was studied based on the principal components method and the Pearson correlation coefficient. A linear correlation was found between musculoskeletal stress markers and the circumference measurements and the reconstructed body mass, but no relationship with body height and the

  8. Incidence and prevalence of complaints of the neck and upper extremity in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, S; van der Waal, J M; Terwee, C; van der Windt, D A W M; Schellevis, F; Bouter, L; Dekker, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence and prevalence of neck and upper extremity musculoskeletal complaints in Dutch general practice. Methods: Data were obtained from the second Dutch national survey of general practice. In all, 195 general practitioners (GPs) from 104 practices across the Netherlands recorded all contacts with patients during 12 consecutive months. Incidence densities and consultation rates were calculated. Results: The total number of contacts during the registration period of one year was 1 524 470. The most commonly reported complaint was neck symptoms (incidence 23.1 per 1000 person-years), followed by shoulder symptoms (incidence 19.0 per 1000 person-years). Sixty six GP consultations per 1000 person-years were attributable to a new complaint or new episode of complaint of the neck or upper extremity (incidence density). In all, the GPs were consulted 147 times per 1000 registered persons for complaints of the neck or upper extremity. For most complaints the incidence densities and consultation rates were higher for women than for men. Conclusions: Neck and upper extremity symptoms are common in Dutch general practice. The GP is consulted approximately seven times each week for a complaint relating to the neck or upper extremity; of these, three are new complaints or new episodes. Attention should be paid to training GPs to deal with neck and upper limb complaints, and to research on the prognosis and treatment of these common complaints in primary care. PMID:15608309

  9. [Musculoskeletal system load in operating room nurses and its determinants].

    PubMed

    Kułagowska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the survey was to analyze the musculoskeletal system load during work performed by operating room nurses, and to identify the most loading activities along with their causes. The observation of work process and the Ovako Working posture Analysing System (OWAS) method for analyzing and evaluating work postures were used as major tools of this survey. Altogether 170 observations of work process were made and also seven basic work activities and 101,320 work postures were selected. The results of the survey show: a) average proportion of time spent by nurses on individual tasks during the shift were: preparation for operative procedure--16%, instrumentation nurse tasks--16%, circulating nurse tasks--13%, cleaning after operative procedure--4%, cleaning and preparation of surgical instruments--4%, breaks at work--43% and other tasks--4%; b) average proportion of time spent by nurses in OWAS posture categories were: category 1--89%, category 2--10%, category 3 and 4--1%. The collected data revealed that the main causes of the musculoskeletal system load in all tasks were: time spent by nurses on awkward postures during the shift (inability to change postures), awkward postures with a hard load (manual lifting or transporting the equipment, more than 10 kg and also above 20 kg). It should be emphasized that the identified causes of loading activities resulted from poor work organization and technical working conditions.

  10. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  11. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  12. The effects of office ergonomic training on musculoskeletal complaints, sickness absence, and psychological well-being: a cluster randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Norashikin; Kenny, Dianna T; Md Zein, Raemy; Hassan, Siti Nurani

    2015-03-01

    This study explored whether musculoskeletal complaints can be reduced by the provision of ergonomics education. A cluster randomized controlled trial study was conducted in which 3 units were randomized to intervention and received training and 3 units were given a leaflet. The effect of intervention on knowledge, workstation practices, musculoskeletal complaints, sickness absence, and psychological well-being were assessed at 6 and 12 months. Although there was no increment of knowledge among workers, significant improvements in workstation practices in the use of monitor, keyboard, and chair were observed. There were significant reductions in neck and upper and lower back complaints among workers but these did not translate into fewer days lost from work. Workers' stress was found to be significantly reduced across the studies. In conclusion, office ergonomics training can be beneficial in reducing musculoskeletal risks and stress among workers.

  13. Effect of Deep Cervical Flexor Training vs. Conventional Isometric Training on Forward Head Posture, Pain, Neck Disability Index In Dentists Suffering from Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhuvan Deep; Aggarwal, Shagun; Gupta, Bharat; Gupta, Madhuri; Gupta, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain accounts for 15% of all soft tissue problems seen in general practice and are a common reason for referral to physiotherapy treatment. The prevalence of neck pain in dentists is 74.3%. Musculoskeletal symptoms in dentists are caused due to many reasons for e.g., prolonged static posture, repetitive movements, suboptimal lighting, and genetic predisposition. Since deep cervical muscle activity is required in synergy with superficial muscle activity to stabilize the cervical segments, a study is needed, to compare the effectiveness of deep cervical flexor (DCF) training and posture correction training on neck pain and neck disability index and forward head posture. Aim: To determine and compare the effect of DCF training on forward head posture, neck pain and neck disability index in dentists suffering from chronic non severe neck pain. Material and Methods: Total of 30 subjects were selected, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, who were further divided into Experimental and Control groups. Baseline information of dependent variables was taken at the beginning of study on day one, for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Neck disability Index (NDI). Forward head posture was measured on day one using digital photograph technique. Then, Experimental group was given DCF training and Control group was given conventional isometrics training (CIT) for 4 weeks under supervision of examiner. All measurements were repeated at end of 4th week, on completion of study. Results: It was observed that pain and disability had reduced in both groups on group analysis. But the forward head posture had improved significantly in experimental group only. Conclusion: DCF training is more effective than CIT in improving forward head posture, decreasing pain and disability in dentists suffering from chronic neck pain. PMID:24298492

  14. Effect of Deep Cervical Flexor Training vs. Conventional Isometric Training on Forward Head Posture, Pain, Neck Disability Index In Dentists Suffering from Chronic Neck Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhuvan Deep; Aggarwal, Shagun; Gupta, Bharat; Gupta, Madhuri; Gupta, Neha

    2013-10-01

    Neck pain accounts for 15% of all soft tissue problems seen in general practice and are a common reason for referral to physiotherapy treatment. The prevalence of neck pain in dentists is 74.3%. Musculoskeletal symptoms in dentists are caused due to many reasons for e.g., prolonged static posture, repetitive movements, suboptimal lighting, and genetic predisposition. Since deep cervical muscle activity is required in synergy with superficial muscle activity to stabilize the cervical segments, a study is needed, to compare the effectiveness of deep cervical flexor (DCF) training and posture correction training on neck pain and neck disability index and forward head posture. To determine and compare the effect of DCF training on forward head posture, neck pain and neck disability index in dentists suffering from chronic non severe neck pain. Total of 30 subjects were selected, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, who were further divided into Experimental and Control groups. Baseline information of dependent variables was taken at the beginning of study on day one, for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Neck disability Index (NDI). Forward head posture was measured on day one using digital photograph technique. Then, Experimental group was given DCF training and Control group was given conventional isometrics training (CIT) for 4 weeks under supervision of examiner. All measurements were repeated at end of 4(th) week, on completion of study. It was observed that pain and disability had reduced in both groups on group analysis. But the forward head posture had improved significantly in experimental group only. DCF training is more effective than CIT in improving forward head posture, decreasing pain and disability in dentists suffering from chronic neck pain.

  15. Effects of participatory ergonomic intervention on the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and disability in office employees using a computer

    PubMed Central

    Baydur, Hakan; Ergör, Alp; Demiral, Yücel; Akalın, Elif

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the participatory ergonomic method on the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and disability in office employees. Methods: This study is a randomized controlled intervention study. It comprised 116 office workers using computers. Those in the intervention group were taught office ergonomics and the risk assessment method. Cox proportional hazards model and generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used. Results: In the 10-month postintervention follow-up, the possibility of developing symptoms was 50.9%. According to multivariate analysis results, the possibility of developing symptoms on the right side of the neck and in the right wrist and hand was significantly less in the intervention group than in the control group (p<0.05). Neck disability/symptom scores over time were significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: The participatory ergonomic intervention decreases the possibility of musculoskeletal complaints and disability/symptom level in office workers. PMID:27108647

  16. Effects of participatory ergonomic intervention on the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and disability in office employees using a computer.

    PubMed

    Baydur, Hakan; Ergör, Alp; Demiral, Yücel; Akalın, Elif

    2016-06-16

    To evaluate the participatory ergonomic method on the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and disability in office employees. This study is a randomized controlled intervention study. It comprised 116 office workers using computers. Those in the intervention group were taught office ergonomics and the risk assessment method. Cox proportional hazards model and generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used. In the 10-month postintervention follow-up, the possibility of developing symptoms was 50.9%. According to multivariate analysis results, the possibility of developing symptoms on the right side of the neck and in the right wrist and hand was significantly less in the intervention group than in the control group (p<0.05). Neck disability/symptom scores over time were significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group (p<0.05). The participatory ergonomic intervention decreases the possibility of musculoskeletal complaints and disability/symptom level in office workers.

  17. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Studies of the Musculoskeletal System PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Subburaman Mohan, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Loma Linda Veterans...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03...proposed research projects focuses on bone health, including relevance to the musculoskeletal system in battlefield performance and in battlefield

  18. Malakoplakia of the neck.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, Sebastien; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Reyt, Emile

    2003-11-01

    Malakoplakia that presents in the head and neck is very rare. We describe a 76-year-old man who presented with an inflammatory mass in the lateral aspect of the neck that clinically mimicked a tumoral expansion and was consistent with a cervical malakoplakia. To our knowledge, this is the second case reported with manifestations of this chronic inflammatory disease localized in the neck. Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease that most frequently involves the genitourinary tract and occurs in an immunodeficient host. The symptoms are nonspecific and the diagnosis is based on the histologic findings. In the present case, the biopsy specimen of the cervical mass revealed a collection of numerous von Hansemann cells containing Michaelis-Gutmann bodies, which are pathognomonic of malakoplakia. Bacteriologic analysis identified Escherichia coli. The evolution was favorable after surgical excision and prolonged antibiotic therapy with fluoroquinolones.

  19. A randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of two workstation interventions on upper body pain and incident musculoskeletal disorders among computer operators

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, D M; Krause, N; Goldberg, R; Benner, D; Hudes, M; Goldner, G U

    2006-01-01

    Background Call centre work with computers is associated with increased rates of upper body pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Methods This one year, randomised controlled intervention trial evaluated the effects of a wide forearm support surface and a trackball on upper body pain severity and incident musculoskeletal disorders among 182 call centre operators at a large healthcare company. Participants were randomised to receive (1) ergonomics training only, (2) training plus a trackball, (3) training plus a forearm support, or (4) training plus a trackball and forearm support. Outcome measures were weekly pain severity scores and diagnosis of incident musculoskeletal disorder in the upper extremities or the neck/shoulder region based on physical examination performed by a physician blinded to intervention. Analyses using Cox proportional hazard models and linear regression models adjusted for demographic factors, baseline pain levels, and psychosocial job factors. Results Post‐intervention, 63 participants were diagnosed with one or more incident musculoskeletal disorders. Hazard rate ratios showed a protective effect of the armboard for neck/shoulder disorders (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.97) after adjusting for baseline pain levels and demographic and psychosocial factors. The armboard also significantly reduced neck/shoulder pain (p = 0.01) and right upper extremity pain (p = 0.002) in comparison to the control group. A return‐on‐investment model predicted a full return of armboard and installation costs within 10.6 months. Conclusion Providing a large forearm support combined with ergonomic training is an effective intervention to prevent upper body musculoskeletal disorders and reduce upper body pain associated with computer work among call centre employees. PMID:16621849

  20. The impact of tissue glue in wound healing of head and neck patients undergoing neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Wei; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Huang, Yu-Chia; Ho, Hui-Ching; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of fibrin glue on postoperative drainage amount and duration in head and neck cancer patients who underwent neck dissection. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients who were scheduled to undergo neck dissection due to head and neck cancer were eligible for this study. After receiving a detailed explanation, all patients signed an informed consent form before enrollment. Patients were then randomly assigned to the study group (fibrin glue) or control group. In the study group, 2 ml of fibrin glue (Tissucol(®); Duploject, Baxter AG) was applied on the surface of the surgical wound before closure. Basic demographic data along with tumor-related features, operation-related variables, postoperative drainage amount/duration, postoperative pain, and analgesic usage were collected and analyzed. A total of 15 patients were included in the final analyses, with eight patients in the study group and seven patients in the control group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in age, gender, primary site, clinical N stage, neck dissection levels, perioperative bleeding, postoperative drainage amount/duration, hospitalization duration, and postoperative pain status. The application of 2 ml fibrin glue by the method described herein did not reduce the postoperative drainage amount/duration nor the postoperative pain status in patients who underwent neck dissection.

  1. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently.

  2. Comparative reliability of different instruments used to measure the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Ardalan; Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri Mohd; Arumugam, Manohar; Danaee, Mahmoud; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-06-08

    The accuracy of instruments such as questionnaires and the goniometer are critical for measuring the severity of musculoskeletal disorders among office workers. To determine the reliability of the Cornell questionnaire, goniometer and Borg questionnaire, which are commonly used instruments to assess the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers. One hundred twenty healthy office workers, body mass: 87.1 ± 10.3 (kg), age: 27 ± 5.1 (years), height: 1.78 ± 0.16 (m), (mean ± SD), who had at least 1 year of experience in office working, were chosen randomly. A plastic goniometer (30" height) was used three times to measure the range of motion in the neck, hip, knee and shoulder area, with a period of one hour between measurements to evaluate the test-retest accuracy. The Cornell questionnaire was used to measure the severity of musculoskeletal disorders and the Borg scale was used to measure perceived exertion. The questionnaires were filled out twice with a gap of 2 weeks between measurements. The Inter-class Correlation Co-efficient (ICC) indicated that all instrument sub-scales showed high levels of repeatability. The ICC coefficient was (0.805-0.954, p <0.001) for the Borg scale, (0.785-0.978, p <0.001) for the goniometer and (0.883-0.975, p <0.001) for the Cornell questionnaire. The Cornell questionnaire, goniometer and Borg questionnaire all exhibit high reliability when used for the evaluation of the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

  3. Subjective Mental Workload and Its Correlation With Musculoskeletal Disorders in Bank Staff.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Ebrahim; Maleki, Afshin; Giahi, Omid; Akbarzadeh, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of subjective mental workload (SMWL) and its correlation with musculoskeletal disorders among bank staff members in Kurdistan Province located in western Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 bank staff members in Kurdistan Province, Iran. The mental workload was assessed using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) computerized version. NASA-TLX is a multidimensional rating procedure that derives an overall workload score based on a weighted average of ratings on 6 subscales. These subscales include Mental Demands, Physical Demands, Temporal Demands, Performance, Effort, Effectiveness, and Frustration. The musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) were documented with the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and generic body diagram. Of the staff members, 78.5% experienced pain at least once during the past year in 1 of their 9 musculoskeletal body regions. The highest frequencies of pain were in the neck and lower back. The NASA-TLX estimated the Effort and Performance scales with mean ± SD of 72.8 ± 25.2 and 36 ± 22.6, respectively, as the maximal and minimal scores among the 6 subscales of SMWL. The statistical analysis of the data revealed that there was a significant correlation between the overall mental workload score and also among the 6 subscales of SMWL separately with MSDs (P < .05). SMWL appears to be a risk factor in the incidence of MSDs, so that the odds of MSDs increased by 11% with each additional 1-point increase in SMWL score. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Musculoskeletal pain and school bag use: a cross-sectional study among Ugandan pupils

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Though seen as a convenient method of carrying books and other scholastic materials including food items, schoolbags are believed to contribute to back and other musculoskeletal problems in school going children. This study set out to determine the prevalence of low back and other musculoskeletal pains and describe their relationship with schoolbag use in pupils. Results This was a cross-sectional descriptive study involving 532 pupils from six primary schools with a mean age of 13.6 years. Analyses included the chi- square test, independent t tests, regression analysis and test for trend across ordered groups. Backpacks were the most common type of schoolbag and younger children carried disproportionately heavier bags. Urban pupils were younger, carried significantly heavier bags, and less likely to complain about schoolbag weight than the rural pupils, About 30.8% of the pupils carried schoolbags which were more than 10% of their body weight. About 88.2% of pupils reported having body pain especially in the neck, shoulders and upper back. About 35.4% of the children reported that carrying the schoolbag was the cause of their musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence of lower back pain was 37.8%. There was significant association between low back pain and; method of bag carriage (p < 0.0001), long duration of walking (odds ratio 2.67, 95% CI 1.38- 5.16) and the time spent sitting after school (p = 0.02). Only 19% had lockers at school. Conclusion Urban pupils were younger, carried significantly heavier bags, and less likely to complain about schoolbag weight than the rural pupils. The majority of pupils complained of musculoskeletal pain of which 35.4% was attributed to the schoolbags. The prevalence of lower back pain was 37.8%. Schools need to provide lockers and functional libraries in order to avoid excessive loading and repetitive strain injuries. PMID:24713177

  5. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently. PMID:25995567

  6. Work related musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic stressors in the South African workforce.

    PubMed Central

    Schierhout, G H; Meyers, J E; Bridger, R S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The main objective of this study was to investigate exposure-response relations between adverse musculoskeletal outcomes and ergonomic exposure variables. METHODS--A cross sectional analytical study was conducted in 11 factories from seven sectors of manufacturing industry in South Africa. Exposure to workplace ergonomic stressors was assessed in factory floor jobs (n = 46) with a simple low technology observational model. Repetition, force, static posture, dynamic movement, and other job exposures were measured. Data of adverse musculoskeletal outcome and data on potential confounders and effect modifiers were obtained from subjects (n = 401) randomly sampled from each job category with a questionnaire given by interviewers. RESULTS--High prevalences of regional musculoskeletal pain were found with substantial variability between industries. Sex was the only individual risk factor (after adjustment for potential confounders and effect modifiers) that was significantly associated with regional pain. Ergonomic exposures in the workplace were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain of the neck and shoulders odds ratio (OR) 5.38 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.16 to 25.0) for repetition, and OR 3.91 (95% CI 1.11 to 13.7) for seated compared with standing work; pain of the wrists and hands OR 10.2 (95% CI 1.39 to 75.6) for high summed score of dynamic postures of the wrist). CONCLUSIONS--This study indicates good predictive ability to reduce ergonomic stress with the exposure model, simple surveillance methods, and educational programmes in the workplace. Further study on sampling strategies and refinement of dimensions of ergonomic stressors are needed. PMID:7697140

  7. Association of individual and work-related risk factors with musculoskeletal symptoms among Iranian sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Kord, Madeh; Yahyazade, Parvin; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Stedmon, Alex W

    2015-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated working conditions and the occurrence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 251 Iranian sewing machine operators. A questionnaire and direct observations of working postures using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method were used. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, particularly in the neck/shoulders, back and hands/wrists were found. The mean RULA grand score of 5.7 highlighted a poor sewing workstation design and indicated that most operators (with posture assessed at action level 3) needed an investigation and changes in their working habits soon. Work-related factors (including number of years worked as an operator, prolonged working hours per shift, long duration of sitting work without a break, feeling pressure due to work and working postures) and individual factors (including age, gender, BMI and regular sport/physical activities) were associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in multiple logistic regression models. The findings add to the understanding of working conditions of those jobs involving sewing activities and emphasise the need for ergonomic interventions to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the future.

  8. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bervoets, Diederik C; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Alessie, Jeroen J N; Buijs, Martijn J; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-07-01

    Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. People with musculoskeletal disorders. Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues) as a stand-alone intervention. The primary outcomes were pain and function. The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579) per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of occupational and non-occupational factors on the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in users of portable computers.

    PubMed

    Malińska, Marzena; Bugajska, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Portable computers are becoming an increasingly common main work tool; however, they are not properly adapted to the workstation. Musculoskeletal complaints are a very frequent complaint reported by workers who use computers in their work. AIM. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and intensity of pain in the musculoskeletal system in workers who regularly use a portable computer in their work and to determine the influence of working conditions and duration of work with a portable computer. The study covered 300 workers. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed with the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire complemented with a visual analogue scale. Working conditions was assessed with a questionnaire developed as part of the study. The most prevalent faults in the organization of workstations were lack of a computer desk with an adjustable keyboard tray/drawer, no adjustment of chair armrests and no possibility to use an additional keyboard. The most frequent complaints among computer operators were headaches, low-back pain and neck pain. The use of an additional keyboard reduced the intensity of shoulder pain.

  10. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and use of painkillers among adolescent male ice hockey players in Finland.

    PubMed

    Selanne, Harri; Ryba, Tatiana V; Siekkinen, Kirsti; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Hakonen, Harto; Mikkelsson, Marja; Kujala, Urho M

    2014-01-01

    Participating in competitive sport increases the risk for injuries and musculoskeletal pain among adolescent athletes. There is also evidence that the use of prescription drugs has increased among sport club athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of painkillers among young male ice hockey players (IHP) in comparison to schoolboys (controls) and its relation to the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and problems during activities and sleeping. Information was gathered through a questionnaire, completed by 121 IHP and compared to the responses of 618 age-matched controls. Results showed that monthly existing pain was at 82% for IHP, and 72% for controls, though IHP had statistically more musculoskeletal pain in their lower limbs (56% vs. 44%), lower back (54% vs. 35%), and buttocks (26% vs. 11%). There were no group differences in the neck, upper back, upper limb, or chest areas. The disability index was statistically similar for both groups, as musculoskeletal pain causing difficulties in daily activities and sleeping was reported by a minority of subjects. Despite this similarity, IHP used more painkillers than controls (18% vs. 10%). Further nuanced research is encouraged to compare athletes and non-athletes in relation to painkillers.

  11. Neck/shoulder discomfort due to visually demanding experimental near work is influenced by previous neck pain, task duration, astigmatism, internal eye discomfort and accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O.

    2017-01-01

    Visually demanding near work can cause eye discomfort, and eye and neck/shoulder discomfort during, e.g., computer work are associated. To investigate direct effects of experimental near work on eye and neck/shoulder discomfort, 33 individuals with chronic neck pain and 33 healthy control subjects performed a visual task four times using four different trial lenses (referred to as four different viewing conditions), and they rated eye and neck/shoulder discomfort at baseline and after each task. Since symptoms of eye discomfort may differ depending on the underlying cause, two categories were used; internal eye discomfort, such as ache and strain, that may be caused by accommodative or vergence stress; and external eye discomfort, such as burning and smarting, that may be caused by dry-eye disorders. The cumulative performance time (reflected in the temporal order of the tasks), astigmatism, accommodation response and concurrent symptoms of internal eye discomfort all aggravated neck/shoulder discomfort, but there was no significant effect of external eye discomfort. There was also an interaction effect between the temporal order and internal eye discomfort: participants with a greater mean increase in internal eye discomfort also developed more neck/shoulder discomfort with time. Since moderate musculoskeletal symptoms are a risk factor for more severe symptoms, it is important to ensure a good visual environment in occupations involving visually demanding near work. PMID:28832612

  12. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  13. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  14. Management of musculoskeletal tumors during pregnancy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Postl, Lukas K; Gradl, Guntmar; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Toepfer, Andreas; Pohlig, Florian; Burgkart, Rainer; Rechl, Hans; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, scientific research has increasingly focused on malignancies during pregnancy. However, the development of musculoskeletal tumors during pregnancy has only been the subject of a few studies so far. The primary aim of this study was to identify the incidence of sarcomas during pregnancy at our musculoskeletal tumor center (MSTC). Secondarily we intended to analyze these cases and discuss possible recommendations regarding diagnostic work-up as well as therapy on the basis of the literature. All female patients who had been treated for soft tissue or bone sarcoma at our academic MSTC in the period between the years 2002 and 2010 were screened retrospectively for anamnestic annotations of pregnancy or records of pregnancy in the obstetrical database of our university hospital. The patients who met the criteria for inclusion (diagnosed sarcoma and pregnancy) were enrolled. For every pregnant patient two age-matched female control patients that suffered from tumors with the same histologic type were included. In the period between 2002 and 2010, 240 female patients between the age of 16 and 45 were treated for sarcoma. In eight out of the 240 cases the tumor disease developed or progressed during pregnancy. The delay in diagnosis was approximately eight months and turned out to be significantly higher for pregnant patients compared to non- pregnant controls. Each woman's tumor was misdiagnosed at least once. Diagnostic follow-up of pregnant women presenting with a growing or painful mass, which is suspected to be a musculoskeletal tumor, should be performed at a specialized tumor center. We recommend a multidisciplinary approach and discussing all possible consequences for mother and child intensively in accordance with the available literature.

  15. Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shannon; Melin, Alyson; Reilly, Debra

    2017-10-01

    Management of head and neck burns involves acute and intermediate phases. Acutely, the goals are establish a secure airway and treat life-threatening injuries. Then, optimize nutrition, assess extent of the burn, perform local wound care, and provide eye protection. Management depends on the degree of the head and neck burn. Postinjury splinting and rehabilitation are vital to healing. After the acute inflammation has resolved and the scars have matured, reconstruction begins with the goals of restoring both function and aesthetics. Reconstruction ranges from simple scar release, to skin grafting, and possibly free flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shashanka, R; Smitha, B R

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma appears to be increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world over the past 30-40 years and continues to increase in the United States, Canada, Australia, Asia, and Europe. The behavior of head and neck melanoma is aggressive, and it has an overall poorer prognosis than that of other skin sites. The authors review the published literature and text books, intending to give an overall picture of malignant melanomas of the head and neck and a special emphasis on treatment considerations with controversies in treatment including biopsy, radiation therapy, sentinel node biopsy, and nodal dissection.

  17. High intensity physical exercise and pain in the neck and upper limb among slaughterhouse workers: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49-0.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers.

  18. High Intensity Physical Exercise and Pain in the Neck and Upper Limb among Slaughterhouse Workers: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49–0.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers. PMID:24527440

  19. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  20. Basilar impression presenting as intermittent mechanical neck pain: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Firas; Giovannico, Giuseppe; Maselli, Filippo; Bonetti, Francesca; Fernández de las Peñas, César; Dunning, James

    2016-01-11

    Neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. However neck pain may mask more serious pathology. Although uncommon in most musculoskeletal physiotherapy practices, it is possible to encounter rare and extremely life-threatening conditions, such as craniovertebral congenital anomalies. Basilar invagination is an abnormality where the odontoid peg projects above the foramen magnum and is the commonest malformation of the craniocervical junction. Its prevalence in the general population is estimated to be 1%. Furthermore, it is a well-recognised cause of neck pain insomuch as it can be easily overlooked and mistaken for a musculoskeletal disorder. Diagnosis is based on the patient's symptoms in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). If life-threatening symptoms, or pressure on the spinal cord are present, the recommended treatment is typically surgical correction. This case report describes the history, relevant examination findings, and clinical reasoning used for a 37 year old male who had the chief complaint of neck pain and occipital headache. After the history and the physical examination, there were several key indicators in the patient's presentation that appeared to warrant further investigation with diagnostic imaging: (1) the drop attack after a triggering event (i.e., heading a football), (2) several episodes of facial numbness immediately and shortly after the trauma, (3) the poorly defined muscle upper extremity muscle weakness, and (4) the modification of symptoms during the modified Sharp-Purser test. Therefore, the decision was made to contact the referring neurosurgeon to discuss the patient's history and his physical examination. The physician requested immediate cervical spine MRI, which revealed a "basilar impression". This case report highlights the need for more research into a number of issues surrounding the prevalence, diagnosis, and the central role of primary care clinicians such as

  1. Heterogeneity in health status and the influence of patient characteristics across patients seeking musculoskeletal orthopaedic care - a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Perruccio, Anthony V; Gandhi, Rajiv; Rampersaud, Y Raja

    2013-03-07

    Health status is an important predictor of patient outcomes. Consequently, identifying patient predictors of health status is essential. In musculoskeletal orthopaedic care, the majority of work examining the association between patient characteristics and health status has been undertaken among hip/knee cohorts. We investigate these associations comparing findings across four musculoskeletal cohorts (hip/knee; foot/ankle; neck/back; elbow/shoulder). Patients seeking elective musculoskeletal orthopaedic care were recruited prior to consultation. Questionnaires captured health domain status (bodily pain, physical functioning, and mental and general health) and covariates: demographics; socioeconomic characteristics; and comorbidity. Scores were compared across cohorts. Two path regression analyses were undertaken. First, domain scores were simultaneously examined as dependent variables in the overall sample. Subsequently, the model was assessed stratified by cohort. 1,948 patients: 454 neck/back, 767 hip/knee, 378 shoulder/elbow, 349 foot/ankle. From stratified analyses, significant variability in covariate effects was observed. Worse bodily pain scores were associated with increasing age and female sex among hip/knee, low income among foot/ankle, and overweight/obese for foot/ankle and hip/knee. Worse mental health scores were associated with low income across cohorts except elbow/shoulder, low education within neck/back, and compared to Whites, Blacks had significantly worse scores among foot/ankle, better scores among hip/knee. Worse general health scores were observed for Asians among hip/knee, Blacks among foot/ankle, and South-Asians among elbow/shoulder and neck/back. The substantial heterogeneity across musculoskeletal cohorts suggests that patient- and cohort-specific approaches to patient counsel and care may be more effective for achieving optimal health and outcomes.

  2. Individual and work related factors associated with symptoms of musculoskeletal complaints. II. Different risk factors among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed Central

    Westgaard, R H; Jansen, T

    1992-01-01

    Individual and work related risk factors in the development of occupational musculoskeletal complaints were studied in a group of 210 female production workers, mainly sewing machine operators. Another group of 35 female employees performing secretarial or laboratory duties were also included. The production workers had significantly higher symptom scores with respect to self reported musculoskeletal complaints than the group with more varied work tasks for the head, neck, shoulders, and arms, but not for the low back, hips, and the lower extremities. No significant differences were found in symptom level between geographically separate groups of production workers with similar work tasks. The main individual risk factor identified in this study was the experience of previous, similar symptoms in the same body region, but this factor only accounted for 2-3% of total variance in symptom score for the neck and shoulders. Other individual factors of importance for symptoms in the neck and shoulders were "signs of psychological problems" and "tendency of muscle tension," but these only account for about 1% of total variance in symptom score. Symptoms in the head and low back showed complex relations with individual parameters. PMID:1554612

  3. Individual and work related factors associated with symptoms of musculoskeletal complaints. II. Different risk factors among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Westgaard, R H; Jansen, T

    1992-03-01

    Individual and work related risk factors in the development of occupational musculoskeletal complaints were studied in a group of 210 female production workers, mainly sewing machine operators. Another group of 35 female employees performing secretarial or laboratory duties were also included. The production workers had significantly higher symptom scores with respect to self reported musculoskeletal complaints than the group with more varied work tasks for the head, neck, shoulders, and arms, but not for the low back, hips, and the lower extremities. No significant differences were found in symptom level between geographically separate groups of production workers with similar work tasks. The main individual risk factor identified in this study was the experience of previous, similar symptoms in the same body region, but this factor only accounted for 2-3% of total variance in symptom score for the neck and shoulders. Other individual factors of importance for symptoms in the neck and shoulders were "signs of psychological problems" and "tendency of muscle tension," but these only account for about 1% of total variance in symptom score. Symptoms in the head and low back showed complex relations with individual parameters.