Science.gov

Sample records for anamorphic yeast species

  1. Polyphasic taxonomy of the basidiomycetous yeast genus Rhodosporidium: Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae and related anamorphic species.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, J P; Gadanho, M; Santos, S; Duarte, F L; Pais, C; Fonseca, A; Fell, J W

    2001-03-01

    The phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of the basidiomycetous yeast species Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae was investigated in a group of recent isolates and collection strains. A polyphasic taxonomic approach was followed which included micromorphological studies, nuclear staining, determination of sexual compatibility, physiological characterization, comparison of electrophoretic isoenzyme patterns, PCR fingerprinting, determination of mol% G+C, DNA-DNA reassociation experiments and 26S and ITS rDNA sequence analysis. The results allowed a more natural circumscription of the species, both from the genetic and phenotypic perspectives. The relationships with anamorphic species of the genus Rhodotorula were studied and isolates previously identified as Rhodotorula glutinis were found to belong to Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae. Other isolates included in the study were found to represent members of Rhodotorula glutinis var. dairenensis. Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae was found to include heterothallic strains, besides those already known to be self-sporulating. A total of 17 isolates, which were found to belong to this species, were heterothallic, self-sporulating and anamorphic strains. It is anticipated that integrated polyphasic studies of basidiomycetous yeasts will provide a more coherent classification system and the basis for accurate identification schemes, which in turn are essential for detailed ecological studies.

  2. Pseudozyma vetiver sp. nov., a novel anamorphic ustilaginomycetous yeast species isolated from the phylloplane in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chamnanpa, Thunnicha; Limtong, Pitayakon; Srisuk, Nantana; Limtong, Savitree

    2013-11-01

    Three strains representing one novel yeast species were isolated from the phylloplanes of the vetiver grasses (DMKU-LV90 and DMKU-LV99(T)) and sugarcane (DMKU-SP260) collected in Thailand by leaf washing followed by a plating technique. On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics and the sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS), the three strains were found to represent a single novel anamorphic ustilaginomycetous yeast species in the genus Pseudozyma. The name Pseudozyma vetiver sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species. The type strain is DMKU-LV99(T) (BCC 61021 = CBS 12824). The novel species showed phylogenetic relationships to the other members of the genus Pseudozyma and to teleomorphic fungal genera, namely Ustilago, Sporisorium and Anomalomyces in Ustilaginaceae, Ustilaginales. The three strains showed identical sequences both in the D1/D2 and ITS regions. The Pseudozyma species closest to the novel species in terms of pairwise sequence similarity in the D1/D2 region was Pseudozyma pruni but with 2.3 % nucleotide substitutions (14 nucleotide substitutions and no gaps out of 606 nt). The novel species and P. pruni differed by 10.9 % nucleotide substitutions (75 nucleotide substitutions and 31 gaps out of 691 nt) in the ITS region. The phylogenetic analysis based on the combined sequences of the ITS region and the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene showed that the novel species was found to be most closely related to Pseudozyma fusiformata but with 2.9 % nucleotide substitutions in the D1/D2 region and 7.4 % nucleotide substitutions in the ITS region.

  3. Cryptococcus rajasthanensis sp. nov., an anamorphic yeast species related to Cryptococcus laurentii, isolated from Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Puja; Prasad, G S

    2007-02-01

    Two novel anamorphic yeast strains (S-15LT and 3-C1) were isolated from the inflorescences of plants collected in two different towns in Rajasthan State, India. Sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit (LSU) rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions suggested they are strains of the same species. Phenotypic characteristics such as the absence of fermentation, the absence of sexual structures and ballistoconidia, the assimilation of myo-inositol and d-glucuronate, and positive Diazonium blue B and urease reactions indicated that these strains belong to the genus Cryptococcus. The novel strains differed from Cryptococcus laurentii in six physiological tests and differed from other related species in more than six tests. A phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rDNA and the ITS regions placed these strains in the Bulleromyces clade within the order Tremellales, with C. laurentii as their closest described relative. The novel strains showed 1.6 and 7.5 % divergence in the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA and ITS regions, respectively, with respect to C. laurentii. The divergence from other species was more than 3 % for the D1/D2 domain and more than 9 % for the ITS region. On the basis of the phenotypic and molecular data, strains S-15LT and 3-C1 represent a novel species within the genus Cryptococcus, for which the name Cryptococcus rajasthanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S-15LT (=MTCC 7075T=CBS 10406T).

  4. On the reclassification of species assigned to Candida and other anamorphic ascomycetous yeast genera based on phylogenetic circumscription.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Lachance, Marc-André; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2014-07-01

    Multigene phylogenies have been instrumental in revising the classification of ascosporic (teleomorph) yeasts in a natural system based on lines of descent. Although many taxonomic changes have already been implemented for teleomorph taxa, this is not yet the case for the large genus Candida and smaller anascosporic (anamorph) genera. In view of the recently introduced requirement that a fungal species or higher taxon be assigned only a single valid name under the new International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code), the current species of Candida and other anamorph yeast genera must undergo revision to make genus membership consistent with phylogenetic affinities. A review of existing data and analyses shows that certain Candida species may be assigned to teleomorph genera with high confidence using multigene phylogenies. Candida species that form well-circumscribed phylogenetic clades without any teleomorph member justify the creation of new genera. However, a considerable number of Candida species sit at the end of isolated and often long branches, and hence cannot be assigned to larger species groups. They should be maintained in Candida sensu lato until studied by multigene analyses in datasets with comprehensive taxon sampling. The principle of name stability has to be honoured to the largest extent compatible with a natural classification of Candida species.

  5. Wickerhamomyces mori sp. nov., an anamorphic yeast species found in the guts of wood-boring insect larvae.

    PubMed

    Hui, Feng-Li; Chen, Liang; Chu, Xue-Ying; Niu, Qiu-Hong; Ke, Tao

    2013-03-01

    A novel anamorphic yeast species is described to accommodate three isolates recovered from the guts of three different wood-boring insect larvae collected in Henan, central China. On the basis of sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer regions, the three strains are assigned to a novel species of the genus Wickerhamomyces, although the formation of ascospores was not observed. These strains also exhibited a number of distinct morphological and physiological characteristics that clearly differentiated them from Wickerhamomyces mucosus, Candida odintsovae and Wickerhamomyces rabaulensis, the most closely related species. In view of the phenotypic differences and unique rRNA gene sequences, we consider that these three isolates represent a novel species of the genus Wickerhamomyces, Wickerhamomyces mori sp. nov. The type strain is NYNU 1216(T) ( = CICC 1983(T)  = CBS 12678(T)).

  6. Candida xinjiangensis sp. nov., a new anamorphic yeast species isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Dian-Peng; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2017-03-01

    Three yeast strains designated as S44, XF1 and XF2, respectively, were isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov of apricot tree in Shule County, Xinjiang, China, and were demonstrated to be a new member of the genus Candida by sequence comparisons of 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. BLASTn alignments on NCBI showed that the similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences of S44 (type strain) to all sequences of other Candida yeasts was very low (≦93 %). The phylogenetic tree based on the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and ITS region sequences revealed that the strain S44 is closely related to C. blattae, C. dosseyi, C. pruni, C. asparagi, C. fructus and C. musae. However, the strain S44 is distinguished from these Candida species by the physiological characteristics. Moreover, the strain S44 formed typical pseudohyphae when grown on cornmeal agar at 25 °C for 7 days, but did not form ascospores in sporulation medium for 3-4 weeks. Therefore, the name Candida xinjiangensis is proposed for the novel species, with S44 (=KCTC(T)27747) as the type strain.

  7. Meira siamensis sp. nov., a novel anamorphic ustilaginomycetous yeast species isolated from the vetiver grass phylloplane.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Polburee, Pirapan; Chamnanpa, Thunnicha; Khunnamwong, Pannida; Limtong, Pitayakon

    2017-07-01

    Two strains, DMKU-LV83 and DMKU-LV85, of a novel yeast species were isolated from the phylloplane of vetiver grass collected in Thailand by plating of leaf washings. Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene showed that the two strains represent a single novel species and most closely related to Meira miltonrushii. However, the novel species differed from the type strain of M. miltonrushii (MCA 3882T) by 5.5 % nucleotide substitutions in the D1/D2 region and 8.9 % nucleotide substitutions in the ITS region. The phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene confirmed the placement of the novel species in the Meira clade and its close affinity with M. miltonrushii. Therefore, the species Meira siamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DMKU-LV83T (=CBS 12860T=BCC 61180T).

  8. Hannaella siamensis sp. nov. and Hannaella phetchabunensis sp. nov., two new anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast species isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Am-In, Somjit; Sipiczki, Matthias; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-04-01

    Eight strains, representing two novel anamorphic yeast species, consisted of five strains isolated from the external surfaces of rice leaves (DMKU-RP72(T), DMKU-RP109, DMKU-RP119, YE-124 and YE-156) and one from a corn leaf (DMKU-CP430(T))4 collected in Thailand, and one strain isolated from each of a composite flower (11-1114) and a fallen dead leaf (12-301); the latter two were collected in Belize. On the basis of sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, they were suggested to be two novel species of the genus Hannaella. Seven strains (DMKU-RP72(T), DMKU-RP109, DMKU-RP119, YE-124, YE-156, 11-1114 and 12-301) differed from each other by 0-3 nt substitutions in the D1/D2 region and by 0-1 nt substitutions in the ITS region. In terms of pairwise sequence similarities of the D1/D2 region these seven strains were closest to Hannaella zeae, but with 1.2-1.7% (7-9) nucleotide substitutions. The sequences of the ITS region of these seven strains differed from H. zeae by 3.7-3.9% (16-17) nucleotide substitutions. Therefore, they were assigned to a single novel species and the name Hannaella siamensis sp. nov. has been proposed. The type strain is DMKU-RP72(T) ( = BCC 69493(T) = NBRC 110425(T) = CBS 13533(T)). Strain DMKU-CP430(T) represents the second novel species and was also most closely related to H. zeae, but with 1.0% (6) nucleotide substitutions in the D1/D2 region and 3.2% (14) nucleotide substitutions in the ITS region. It was assigned to the proposed novel species, Hannaella phetchabunensis sp. nov. (type strain DMKU-CP430(T) = BCC 69492(T) = NBRC 110424(T) = CBS 13386(T)).

  9. Two new ascomycetous anamorphic yeast species related to Candida friedrichii--Candida jaroonii sp. nov., and Candida songkhlaensis sp. nov.--isolated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yumi; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Mikata, Kozaburo; Nakagiri, Akira; Limtong, Savitree; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Nakase, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    In a study of yeast diversity in Thailand, eight strains of hitherto undescribed anamorphic yeasts were isolated: four from insect frass, two from Marasmius sp. fruiting bodies, one from a flower, and one from jackfruit exudates. Phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S ribosomal DNA nucleotide sequences indicated that the eight strains represented two new species related to Candida friedrichii. Genetic separation of the two new species was further supported by DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, which resulted in between-species similarity values of less than 48%, and by electrophoretic karyotyping. The two new species are C. jaroonii sp. nov. (type strain, ST-300(T) = NBRC 103209(T) = BCC 11783(T) = CBS 10790(T)) and C. songkhlaensis sp. nov. (type strain, ST-328(T) = NBRC 103214(T) = BCC 11804(T) = CBS 10791(T)).

  10. Candida kuoi sp. nov., a new anamorphic species of the Starmerella yeast clade that synthesizes sophorolipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Candida kuoii sp. nov. (NRRL Y-27208T, CBS 7267T, type strain) is described from a strain isolated from concentrated grape juice in Cape Province, South Africa. Analysis of sequences from the D1/D2 domains of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene separated the proposed new species from Starmerella bom...

  11. Comparison of use of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics for identification of species of the anamorph genus Candida and related teleomorph yeast species.

    PubMed Central

    Latouche, G N; Daniel, H M; Lee, O C; Mitchell, T G; Sorrell, T C; Meyer, W

    1997-01-01

    A total of 49 type and neotype isolates and 32 clinical isolates of the anamorph genus Candida and related teleomorph genera were obtained from different culture collections and clinical laboratories. Isolates were subjected to two phenotypic methods of identification, Vitek yeast biochemical card (YBC) and API ID 32C, both based on carbohydrate assimilation, and one genotypic method, PCR fingerprinting, based on the detection of DNA polymorphisms between minisatellite-specific sequences with the primer M13 (5' GAGGGTGGCGGTTCT 3'). The correct identification of a strain at the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures was used as the gold standard for the identification of an isolate. When the study was restricted to species included in the respective biochemical databases, the Vitek YBC and API ID 32C systems performed adequately with positive identification rates of 87.3 and 76.8%, respectively. When uncommon species were added to the study, several of which are not included in the databases, the identification efficiencies were 76.5 and 77.5%, respectively. By comparison, all isolates were correctly identified by PCR fingerprinting, with 63 reference species profiles in the databank. Sufficient polymorphisms among the total set of banding patterns were observed, with adequate similarity in the major patterns obtained from a given species, to allow each isolate to be assigned unambiguously to a particular species. In addition, variations in minor bands allowed for differentiation to the strain level. PCR fingerprinting was found to be rapid, reproducible, and more cost-effective than either biochemical approach. Our results provide reference laboratories with an improved identification method for yeasts based on genotypic rather than phenotypic markers. PMID:9399515

  12. Comparison of use of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics for identification of species of the anamorph genus Candida and related teleomorph yeast species.

    PubMed

    Latouche, G N; Daniel, H M; Lee, O C; Mitchell, T G; Sorrell, T C; Meyer, W

    1997-12-01

    A total of 49 type and neotype isolates and 32 clinical isolates of the anamorph genus Candida and related teleomorph genera were obtained from different culture collections and clinical laboratories. Isolates were subjected to two phenotypic methods of identification, Vitek yeast biochemical card (YBC) and API ID 32C, both based on carbohydrate assimilation, and one genotypic method, PCR fingerprinting, based on the detection of DNA polymorphisms between minisatellite-specific sequences with the primer M13 (5' GAGGGTGGCGGTTCT 3'). The correct identification of a strain at the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures was used as the gold standard for the identification of an isolate. When the study was restricted to species included in the respective biochemical databases, the Vitek YBC and API ID 32C systems performed adequately with positive identification rates of 87.3 and 76.8%, respectively. When uncommon species were added to the study, several of which are not included in the databases, the identification efficiencies were 76.5 and 77.5%, respectively. By comparison, all isolates were correctly identified by PCR fingerprinting, with 63 reference species profiles in the databank. Sufficient polymorphisms among the total set of banding patterns were observed, with adequate similarity in the major patterns obtained from a given species, to allow each isolate to be assigned unambiguously to a particular species. In addition, variations in minor bands allowed for differentiation to the strain level. PCR fingerprinting was found to be rapid, reproducible, and more cost-effective than either biochemical approach. Our results provide reference laboratories with an improved identification method for yeasts based on genotypic rather than phenotypic markers.

  13. Rhodotorula subericola sp. nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast species isolated from bark of Quercus suber (cork oak).

    PubMed

    Belloch, C; Villa-Carvajal, M; Alvarez-Rodríguez, M L; Coque, J J R

    2007-07-01

    Two yeasts strains, Y-31(T) and Y-20B, pertaining to a previously unknown yeast species were isolated from bark of cork oak in Spain. Physiological characterization revealed a pattern of assimilation of carbon and nitrogen compounds compatible with members of the genus Rhodotorula. From sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene, Rhodotorula cycloclastica and Rhodotorula philyla were related to the unknown species. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene showed that the novel species clustered in a branch together with R. cycloclastica. The name Rhodotorula subericola sp. nov. is proposed, with isolate Y-31(T) (=CECT 11976(T)=CBS 10442(T)) the type strain of this novel taxon in the Microbotryum lineage, subclass Microbotryomycetidae, class Urediniomycetes of basidiomycetous yeasts.

  14. Candida alocasiicola sp. nov., Candida hainanensis sp. nov., Candida heveicola sp. nov. and Candida musiphila sp. nov., novel anamorphic, ascomycetous yeast species isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-An; Jia, Jian-Hua; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2008-08-01

    In a taxonomic study on the ascomycetous yeasts isolated from plant materials collected in tropical forests in Yunnan and Hainan Provinces, southern China, four strains isolated from tree sap (YJ2E(T)) and flowers (YF9E(T), YWZH3C(T) and YYF2A(T)) were revealed to represent four undescribed yeast species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the large subunit (26S) rRNA gene D1/D2 domain sequences showed that strain YJ2E(T) was located in a clade together with Candida haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii. Strain YF9E(T) was most closely related to C. azyma and strain YWZH3C(T) to C. sorbophila and C. spandovensis. Strain YYF2A(T) was clustered in a clade containing small-spored Metschnikowia species and related anamorphic Candida species. The new strains differed from their closely related described species by more than 10% mismatches in the D1/D2 domain. No sexual states were observed for the four strains on various sporulation media. The new species are therefore assigned to the genus Candida and described as Candida alocasiicola sp. nov. (type strain, YF9E(T) = AS 2.3484(T) = CBS 10702(T)), Candida hainanensis sp. nov. (type strain, YYF2A(T) = AS 2.3478(T) = CBS 10696(T)), Candida heveicola sp. nov. (type strain, YJ2E(T) = AS 2.3483(T) = CBS 10701(T)) and Candida musiphila sp. nov. (type strain, YWZH3C(T) = AS 2.3479(T) = CBS 10697(T)).

  15. Description of Taphrina antarctica f.a. sp. nov., a new anamorphic ascomycetous yeast species associated with Antarctic endolithic microbial communities and transfer of four Lalaria species in the genus Taphrina.

    PubMed

    Selbmann, Laura; Turchetti, Benedetta; Yurkov, Andrey; Cecchini, Clarissa; Zucconi, Laura; Isola, Daniela; Buzzini, Pietro; Onofri, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of a large-scale rock sampling in Continental Antarctica, a number of yeasts have been isolated. Two strains that are unable to grow above 20 °C and that have low ITS sequence similarities with available data in the public domain were found. The D1/D2 LSU molecular phylogeny placed them in an isolated position in the genus Taphrina, supporting their affiliation to a not yet described species. Because the new species is able to grow in its anamorphic state only, the species Taphrina antarctica f.a. (forma asexualis) sp. nov. has been proposed to accommodate both strains (type strain DBVPG 5268(T), DSM 27485(T) and CBS 13532(T)). Lalaria and Taphrina species are dimorphic ascomycetes, where the anamorphic yeast represents the saprotrophic state and the teleomorph is the parasitic counterpart on plants. This is the first record for this genus in Antarctica; since plants are absent on the continent, we hypothesize that the fungus may have focused on the saprotrophic part of its life cycle to overcome the absence of its natural host and adapt environmental constrains. Following the new International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants (Melbourne Code 2011) the reorganization of Taphrina-Lalaria species in the teleomorphic genus Taphrina is proposed. We emend the diagnosis of the genus Taphrina to accommodate asexual saprobic states of these fungi. Taphrina antarctica was registered in MycoBank under MB 808028.

  16. On the reclassification of species assigned to Candida and other anamorphic ascomycetous yeast genera based on phylogenetic circumscription

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multigene phylogenies have been instrumental in revising the classification of ascosporic (teleomorph) yeasts in a natural system based on lines of decent. Although many taxonomic changes have already been implemented for teleomorph taxa, this is not yet the case for the large genus Candida and smal...

  17. Cryptococcus tephrensis, sp.nov., and Cryptococcus heimaeyensis, sp.nov.; new anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast species from Iceland.

    PubMed

    Vishniac, Helen S

    2002-05-01

    Two new species from Iceland are described on the basis of physiological profiles and sequence data from the D2 region of LSU rDNA: Cryptococcus tephrensis (type ICE99-IToM Y5, ATCC MYA-1765, CBS 8935, GenBank AF317208) and Cryptococcus heimaeyensis (type ICE99-IToM Y8, ATCC MYA-1759, CBS 8933, GenBank AF370717). The two new species are identifiable from sequence data and can be distinguished from their closest relative, Cryptococcus victoriae, by their higher maximum temperatures for growth, failure to utilize nitrate as sole nitrogen source, and utilization of cadaverine and ethylamine as sole nitrogen sources. Cryptococcus tephrensis is distinguishable from C. heimaeyensis by failure to grow on saccharate as sole source of carbon and energy.

  18. First report of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes in hordeum species

    Treesearch

    A.D. Wilson; S.L. Clement; W.J. Kaiser; D.G. Lester

    1991-01-01

    Clavicipitaceous endophytes systemically infect many grass species and produce alkaloids that confer resistance to insects (2) and toxicity to mammals (1). The mutualistic anamorphic forms (e.g., Acremonium spp.) do not sporulate or cause symptoms, but they produce distinctive mycelium in their hosts. The incidence of anamorphic endophytes in a portion of the U.S....

  19. [Massive isolation of anamorphous ascomycete yeasts Candida oleophila from plant phyllosphere].

    PubMed

    Glushakova, A M; Iurkov, A M; Chernov, I Iu

    2007-01-01

    Many years of research has confirmed a wide distribution of anamorphous ascomycete yeasts in the phyllosphere of diverse plants of the Moscow oblast. Based on the standard morphological and physiological criteria, on the results of restriction analysis of the 5.8S-ITS rDNA region, and on the sequencing of the D1D2 region of 26S rDNA, these yeasts were identified as Candida oleophila Montrocher. Previous isolation of this species has been rare, possibly due to its incorrect identification. This species, together with phytobiotic basidiomycete yeasts, was shown to be dominant in the yeast epiphytic communities on the surface parts of plants. The relative abundance of C. oleophila is highest on plant fruits and increases significantly by the end of the vegetation period. Wide occurrence of this yeast species on fruits and in the phyllosphere may be related to its ability to compete with rapidly growing phytopathogenic fungi.

  20. Cryptococcus allantoinivorans sp.nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast (Tremellales) physiologically resembling other species of the Cryptococcus laurentii complex that degrade polysaccharides and C2 compounds.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, Wouter J

    2005-02-01

    A novel Cryptococcus species is proposed to accommodate a yeast strain (CBS 9604) able to assimilate allantoin as sole carbon source, a characteristic very uncommon among yeasts. By traditional methods, the strain could not be distinguished from Cryptococcus laurentii, but nucleotide sequences of the D1D2 region of the large subunit (26S) and of the ITS region of ribosomal DNA showed relationship to the Bulleromyces clade of the genus Cryptococcus (order Tremellales) with some Tremella spp. as the closest relatives. A traditional morphological and physiological description of the strain is given. Data on the assimilation of some C2 compounds and polysaccharides are provided and compared with those of other type strains of novel species of the C. laurentii complex.

  1. Calonectria species and their Cylindrocladium anamorphs: species with clavate vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Risède, Jean-Michel; Simoneau, Philippe; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2006-01-01

    The present study compares all known species of Cylindrocladium that have clavate vesicles. Several isolates were obtained from baited soils collected in various parts of the world, while others were associated with leaf litter or symptomatic plant hosts. Isolates were compared based on morphology, as well as DNA sequence data from their β-tubulin and histone gene H3 regions. Cylindrocladium australiense and Cy. ecuadoriae, are described as new species, a decision based on morphology and molecular data. A group of isolates associated with toppling disease of banana in the West Indies is identified as Cy. flexuosum. An epitype is designated for Cy. ilicicola, and a new name, Curvicladiella, proposed to replace the anamorphic genus Curvicladium, which is a homonym. PMID:18490981

  2. Trichosporon porosum comb. nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast inhabiting soil, related to the loubieri/laibachii group of species that assimilate hemicelluloses and phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; Scorzetti, G; Fell, J W

    2001-04-01

    Several isolates representing the genus Trichosporon were collected over a 6-year period from soils in The Netherlands. Based on classical growth tests with carbon and nitrogen compounds these were identical. Three of these (CBS 8396, CBS 8397 and CBS 8522) were subjected to molecular analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit of rDNA. This confirmed that the three strains were identical, yet distinct from other members of the genus. Conspecificity was demonstrated with the type strain (CBS 2040) of Apiotrichum porosum Stautz (1931), with the exception that A. porosum, which had been isolated from exudate of a yew tree, differed morphologically from the soil strains. Based on the identity of DNA base sequences, morphology was not considered to be an adequate parameter to separate otherwise identical strains into two genera. Therefore, the new combination Trichosporon porosum is presented. Based on molecular sequence analysis, T. porosum may be related to T. sporotrichoides, within a weakly related clade that includes species such as Trichosporon laibachii and Trichosporon loubieri. The strains of T. porosum degrade phenolic compounds and hemicelluloses, which are characteristics with potential ecological importance in soil habitats. Characters distinguishing the nine species of the laibachii/loubieri group of species were listed. These include traditionally used tests as well as assimilation patterns of some aliphatic and phenolic compounds. Based on these tests, species such as Trichosporon multisporum and T. laibachii could be separated.

  3. Taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of nine species of Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma section Hypocreanum

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Barrie E.; Stewart, Elwin L.; Geiser, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Morphological studies and phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal gene repeat, a partial sequence of RNA polymerase II subunit (rpb2), and a partial sequence of the large exon of tef1 (LEtef1) were used to investigate the taxonomy and systematics of nine Hypocrea species with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum. Hypocrea corticioides and H. sulphurea are reevaluated. Their Trichoderma anamorphs are described and the phylogenetic positions of these species are determined. Hypocrea sulphurea and H. subcitrina are distinct species based on studies of the type specimens. Hypocrea egmontensis is a facultative synonym of the older name H. subcitrina. Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum formed a well-supported clade. Five species with anamorphs morphologically similar to sect. Hypocreanum, H. avellanea, H. parmastoi, H. megalocitrina, H. alcalifuscescens, and H. pezizoides, are not located in this clade. Protocrea farinosa belongs to Hypocrea s.s. PMID:18490989

  4. Botryosphaeria viticola sp. nov. on grapevines: a new species with a Dothiorella anamorph.

    PubMed

    Luque, Jordi; Martos, Soledad; Phillips, Alan J L

    2005-01-01

    Botryosphaeria viticola sp. nov., isolated from pruned canes of Vitis vinifera in NE Spain, is described and illustrated. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS and EF1-alpha sequences and morphological characters of both anamorph and teleomorph confirmed this taxon to be included within the group of Botryosphaeria species with Dothiorella anamorphs. It is related most closely to B. sarmentorum and B. iberica from which it differs in morphological characters of the teleomorph and DNA sequences.

  5. Cryptococcus ibericus sp. nov., Cryptococcus aciditolerans sp. nov. and Cryptococcus metallitolerans sp. nov., a new ecoclade of anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast species from an extreme environment associated with acid rock drainage in São Domingos pyrite mine, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gadanho, Mário; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2009-09-01

    In this report, we describe three novel asexual basidiomycetous yeast species, Cryptococcus aciditolerans sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10872T=SDY 081T), Cryptococcus ibericus sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10871T=SDY 022T) and Cryptococcus metallitolerans sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10873T=SDY 190T), which were isolated from acid rock drainage collected at the São Domingos mine in southern Portugal. Phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data indicated that the novel species belong to the order Filobasidiales of the class Tremellomycetes and form a well-separated clade, next to Cryptococcus gastricus and Cryptococcus gilvescens. Since the novel species also share a peculiar ecology, being able to thrive under extreme environmental conditions characterized by very low pH and high concentrations of heavy metals, we designate this combination of phylogenetic and ecological characteristics as an ecoclade.

  6. Morphological and molecular characterization of the two known North American Chlorociboria species and their anamorphs.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Daniela; Margaritescu, Simona; Sánchez-Ramírez, Santiago; Robinson, Sara C; Cooper, Paul A; Moncalvo, Jean Marc

    2014-08-01

    This study confirms that the two known Chlorociboria species from North America correspond to Chlorociboria aeruginascens and Chlorociboria aeruginosa that were originally described from Europe. The anamorphs of these two species are unambiguously identified for the first time: the genetic connection between C. aeruginascens is Dothiorina tulasnei, is here demonstrated for the first time by molecular data, and the anamorph of C. aeruginosa was previously undescribed. These two species are more closely related to different Southern Hemisphere taxa than they are to each other, indicating complex speciation processes in a global geographic context. Pure cultures isolated from the two species were grown on various media for examination of growth rate, sporulation, and xylindein production. The latter is responsible for green staining of wood and has applications in craftsmanship and perhaps also for drug development. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Two new Ophiostoma species with Sporothrix anamorphs from Austria and Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Aghayeva, Dilzara N; Wingfield, Michael J; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Kirisits, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The genus Ophiostoma includes numerous species of primarily insect-vectored, wood-staining fungi. Several anamorph genera that differ in their micronematous or macronematous conidiogenous cells have been associated with Ophiostoma species. Among the former group, Sporothrix is associated with many species and is characterized by conidiogenous cells that arise laterally or terminally from any place on the hyphae and produce nonseptate conidia on sympodially developing denticles. The purpose of this study was to characterize ophiostomatoid isolates with Sporothrix anamorphs recently collected in Austria and Azerbaijan. The isolates were characterized based on comparisons of rDNA and β-tubulin sequence data. Morphology, growth in culture, and sexual reproductive mode were also considered. Phylogenetic analyses of the combined sequence data showed that the isolates formed two distinct groups, one including isolates from Austria and the other isolates from Austria and Azerbaijan. Growth at 25 C and morphology revealed some differences between the two groups, and supported the view that they represent two new species, which we describe here as Ophiostoma fusiforme sp. nov. and Ophiostoma lunatum sp. nov. Both these groups phylogenetically were related to, but distinct from, Ophiostoma stenoceras.

  8. Yamadazyma barbieri f.a. sp. nov., an ascomycetous anamorphic yeast isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal site (-2300 m) and marine coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Burgaud, Gaëtan; Coton, Monika; Jacques, Noémie; Debaets, Stella; Maciel, Natália O P; Rosa, Carlos A; Gadanho, Mário; Sampaio, José Paulo; Casaregola, Serge

    2016-09-01

    Two yeast strains that are members of the same species were isolated from different marine habitats, i.e. one from Mid-Atlantic Ridge ocean water samples located in the direct vicinity of black smokers near the Rainbow deep-sea hydrothermal vent and one from Brazilian marine water samples off the Ipanema beach. Strains CLIB 1964T and CLIB 1965 are anamorphic ascomycetous yeasts affiliated to the Yamadazyma clade of Saccharomycetales. Interestingly, these strains were phylogenetically and distinctly positioned into a group of species comprising all species of the genus Yamadazyma isolated from marine habitats including deep-sea hydrothermal vents, i.e.Candida atmosphaerica,C. spencermartinsiae,C. atlantica,C. oceani and C. taylorii. These strains differed significantly in their D1/D2 domain sequences of the LSU rRNA gene from the closely related species mentioned above, by 2.6, 3.0, 3.4, 3.8 and 6.0 %, respectively. Internal transcribed spacer region sequence divergence was also significant and corresponded to 4.6, 4.7, 4.7, 12.0 and 24.7 % with C. atlantica,C. atmosphaerica, C. spencermartinsiae,C. oceani and C. taylorii, respectively. Phenotypically, strains CLIB 1964T and CLIB 1965 could be distinguished from closely related species by their inability to assimilate l-sorbose. CLIB 1964T (=CBS 14301T=UBOCC-A-214001T) is the designated type strain for Yamadazyma barbieri sp. nov. The MycoBank number is MB 815884.

  9. Anamorphic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    During the 17th century, Baroque decoration used anamorphism to combine actual architectural elements with illusionistic painting. When viewed from a particular point in space, the architecture blends with painting to form a combined image. In this article, Julian Beever, a leading anamorphic pavement artist, explains to the author the principles…

  10. Anamorphic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    During the 17th century, Baroque decoration used anamorphism to combine actual architectural elements with illusionistic painting. When viewed from a particular point in space, the architecture blends with painting to form a combined image. In this article, Julian Beever, a leading anamorphic pavement artist, explains to the author the principles…

  11. Lewia avenicola sp. nov. and its Alternaria anamorph from oat grain, with a key to the species of Lewia.

    PubMed

    Kwaśna, Hanna; Kosiak, Barbara

    2003-03-01

    Lewia avenicola sp. nov. (anamorph Alternaria sp.) is described. The fungus was isolated from oat grain in Norway. The fungus produced conidia within a month, and ascomata with fully mature ascospores within 8 months following inoculation, when stored on slants of synthetic nutrient agar (SNA) at 4 degrees C in darkness. A comparison with other known Lewia species is made, and a key to the five known Lewia species is included.

  12. A revision of Cyanonectria and Geejayessia gen. nov., and related species with Fusarium-like anamorphs

    PubMed Central

    Schroers, H.-J.; Gräfenhan, T.; Nirenberg, H.I.; Seifert, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    A revision of Fusarium-like species associated with the plant genus Buxus led to a reconsideration of generic concepts in the Fusarium clade of the Nectriaceae. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (rpb2) and the larger subunit of the ATP citrate lyase (acl1) gene exons confirm the existence of a clade, here called the terminal Fusarium clade, that includes genera such as Fusarium sensu stricto (including its Gibberella teleomorphs), Albonectria, Cyanonectria, “Haematonectria”, the newly described genus Geejayessia, and “Nectria” albida. Geejayessia accommodates five species. Four were previously classified in Nectria sensu lato, namely the black perithecial, KOH–species G. atrofusca and the orange or reddish, KOH+ G. cicatricum, G. desmazieri and G. zealandica. Geejayessia celtidicola is newly described. Following our phylogenetic analyses showing its close relationship with Cyanonectria cyanostoma, the former Gibbera buxi is recombined as the second species of Cyanonectria. A three gene phylogenetic analysis of multiple strains of each morphological species using translation elongation factor 1 α (tef-1), rpb2 and acl1 gene exons and introns confirms their status as distinct phylogenetic species. Internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and nuclear large ribosomal subunit sequences were generated as additional DNA barcodes for selected strains. The connection of Fusarium buxicola, often erroneously reported as the anamorph of G. desmazieri, with the bluish black and KOH+ perithecial species C. buxi is reinstated. Most Cyanonectria and Geejayessia species exhibit restricted host ranges on branches or twigs of Buxus species, Celtis occidentalis, or Staphylea trifolia. Their perithecia form caespitose clusters on well-developed, mostly erumpent stromata on the bark or outer cortex of the host and are relatively thin-walled, mostly smooth, and therefore reminiscent of the more or less

  13. Cryptococcus terrestris sp. nov., a tremellaceous, anamorphic yeast phylogenetically related to Cryptococcus flavescens.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Juliana; Fontes Landell, Melissa; Faganello, Josiane; Henning Vainstein, Marilene; Simpson Vishniac, Helen; Valente, Patrícia

    2009-03-01

    Cryptococcus terrestris sp. nov. (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycotina, Tremellomycetes, Tremellales) is typified by CJDX4 Y23(T) (=CBS 10810(T) =NRRL Y-48451(T)), isolated from forest soil in Oklahoma, USA. This species is most readily identified by the sequence of the D1/D2 domain region of the 26S rDNA and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) region. Additional strains from Oklahoma (C107DX4 Y11 =CBS 10813 =NRRL Y-48452) and Brazil (Ep11c =CBS 10812 =NRRL Y-48454; 56e =CBS 10811 =NRRL Y-48453) either had identical sequences or differed minimally. C. terrestris differs physiologically from the most closely related species, Cryptococcus flavescens, by the weak or delayed assimilation of ribose and salicin, and differs from Cryptococcus aureus by the utilization of nitrate and nitrite and growth in vitamin-free medium.

  14. Botryosphaeria corticola, sp. nov. on Quercus species, with notes and description of Botryosphaeria stevensii and its anamorph, Diplodia mutila.

    PubMed

    Alves, Artur; Correia, António; Luque, Jordi; Phillips, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Botr yosphaeria stevensii frequently has been associated with dieback and canker diseases of oak, mainly in the western Mediterranean area but more rarely in other regions. The species concept of B. stevensii has been unclear, and it is possible that some collections were identified incorrectly. A collection of fungal strains isolated from diseased oak trees and initially identified as B. stevensii was characterized on the basis of morphology and ITS nucleotide sequences. Morphology was compared with the type specimens of Physalospora mutila (= B. stevensii) and its anamorph, Diplodia mutila. It was concluded that the isolates from oak differed from B. stevensii in having larger ascospores and conidia as well as different spore shapes and represented an as yet undescribed species, which is described here as B. corticola. Moreover, ITS sequence data separated B. corticola from all other known species of Botryosphaeria. Amended descriptions of B. stevensii and its anamorph are provided to differentiate B. stevensii from B. corticola and to clarify some of the earlier taxonomic uncertainties.

  15. Cryptococcus haglerorum, sp. nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast isolated from nests of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, Wouter J; Fonseca, Alvaro; Carreiro, Solange Cristina; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2003-01-01

    A yeast strain (CBS 8902) was isolated from the nest of a leaf-cutting ant and was shown to be related to Cryptococcus humicola. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S ribosomal DNA and physiological characterization revealed a separate taxonomic position. A novel species named Cryptococcus haglerorum is proposed to accommodate strain CBS 8902 that assimilates n-hexadecane and several benzene compounds. Physiological characteristics distinguishing the novel species from some other members of the C. humicola complex are presented. The phylogenetic relationship of these strains to species of the genus Trichosporon Behrend is discussed.

  16. Yeasts isolated from a fungus-growing ant nest, including the description of Trichosporon chiarellii sp. nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast.

    PubMed

    Pagnocca, Fernando C; Legaspe, Mara F C; Rodrigues, Andre; Ruivo, Carla C C; Nagamoto, Nilson S; Bacci, Maurício; Forti, Luiz C

    2010-06-01

    Thirty-nine yeast strains were recovered from a field nest of a primitive and putative novel attine ant species in the genus Myrmicocrypta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: tribe Attini). Yeasts isolated from the fungus garden and waste deposit included Candida dubliniensis, Candida oleophila, Cryptococcus haglerorum and Hanseniaspora uvarum. In addition, one morphological type was isolated overwhelmingly. Sequencing data of partial large-subunit (LSU) rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region coupled with morphological and physiological characterization accommodated this morphotype in a separate taxonomic position in relation to the known species of Trichosporon (Basidiomycota: Trichosporonales). Here, we propose a novel yeast species named Trichosporon chiarellii sp. nov. based on the description of 34 isolates; the type strain is strain FCP 540806(T) (=CBS 11177(T)).

  17. Candida cabralensis sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from traditional Spanish blue-veined Cabrales cheese.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Belloch, Carmela; Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Querol, Amparo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2010-11-01

    Three yeast strains, 1AD8(T), 3AD15 and 3AD23, belonging to a previously unknown yeast species were isolated from two independent batches of the Spanish blue-veined Cabrales cheese, a traditional cheese manufactured without the addition of starter and mould cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the unknown yeast is not fermentative and does not assimilate lactose; rather it assimilates dl-lactic acid and ethanol, major end products of lactic acid bacteria metabolism in cheese. The novel yeast is anamorphic. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction based on nucleotide sequence comparison of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene showed that Pichia terricola and Pichia fermentans are the closest relatives of the unknown species. The name Candida cabralensis sp. nov. is proposed, and the isolate 1AD8(T) (=CECT 13027(T) =CBS 11679(T)) is the type strain of this novel taxon.

  18. Two new anamorphic yeasts, Candida thailandica sp. nov. and Candida lignicola sp. nov., isolated from insect frass in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Tuntirungkij, Manee; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Nakase, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    Two new yeast strains of the genus Candida were isolated from insect frass collected in Khao-Yai National Park, Nakhonrachasima, Thailand. Based on the morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rRNA gene, these two strains were found to represent two distinct undescribed species and were named Candida thailandica sp. nov. (ST-17 = BCC 7717(T) = NBRC 102562(T)=CBS 10 610) and Candida lignicola sp. nov. (ST-33 = BCC 7733(T) = NBRC 102564(T) = CBS 10612). In the D1/D2 domain of 26S rRNA gene, C. thailandica (GeneBank accession no. AY228491) differs from Candida tsuchiyae, the nearest species, in 66 nucleotide substitutions (10%) and C. lignicola (GeneBank accession no. AY845350) differs from Candida coipomoensis, the nearest species, in nine nucleotides (1.6%). These two new species are clearly distinguished from their closest species by the assimilation of several carbon compounds.

  19. Geotrichum bryndzae sp. nov., a novel asexual arthroconidial yeast species related to the genus Galactomyces.

    PubMed

    Sulo, Pavol; Laurencík, Michal; Poláková, Silvia; Minárik, Gabriel; Sláviková, Elena

    2009-09-01

    Ten strains of an asexual arthroconidial yeast species were isolated from Bryndza, a traditional Slovak artisanal sheep cheese, which was manufactured from raw milk during a 4-month summer production period at two Slovakian sites (the northern RuZomberok and the central-southern Tisovec areas). Sequence comparison of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene revealed that this yeast represents a novel species of the genus Geotrichum, which contains anamorphs of the ascogenous genus Galactomyces, for which the name Geotrichum bryndzae sp. nov. is proposed (type culture CCY 16-2-1T=NRRL Y-48450T=CBS 11176T). The novel species is most closely related to Geotrichum silvicola NRRL Y-27641T, although yeasts with identical or very similar sequences have been found throughout the world.

  20. Ovularia puerariae Sawada is the hyphomycetous anamorph of a new Marasmius species on living leaves of kudzu (Pueraria montana, Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Roland; Lee, I-Shu; Chen, Chee-Jen

    2013-01-01

    An arthroconidial hyphomycete on living leaves of kudzu (Pueraria montana, Fabaceae), originally described by Sawada in 1959 as Ovularia puerariae, was rediscovered. This anamorph is connected to an unknown Marasmius teleomorph belonging to section Globulares, which develops on the same living leaves. Ultrastructure and LSU rDNA sequence analysis of the anamorph confirm this connection. The fungus does not have only a unique biology among agarics, comparable only to Mycena citricolor, but also has the potential for application as a control agent of kudzu. During comparison with similar anamorph genera, Illosporium graminicola was found to be a synonym for Beniowskia sphaeroidea.

  1. Description of Kuraishia piskuri f.a., sp. nov., a new methanol assimilating yeast and transfer of phylogenetically related Candida species to the genera Kuraishia and Nakazawaea as new combinations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The new anamorphic yeast Kuraishia piskuri, f.a., sp. nov. is described for three strains that were isolated from insect frass from trees growing in Florida, USA (type strain, NRRL YB-2544, CBS 13714). Species placement was based on phylogenetic analysis of nuclear gene sequences for the D1/D2 domai...

  2. Pichia bruneiensis sp. nov., a biofilm-producing dimorphic yeast species isolated from flowers in Borneo.

    PubMed

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Taxonomic analysis of five yeast strains isolated from Hibiscus flowers in Brunei (Borneo) is described. The strains represent a dimorphic, biofilm-producing, anamorphic budding yeast species for which the name Pichia bruneiensis is proposed. P. bruneiensis alternates between yeast and pseudohyphal modes of growth. The pseudohyphae form biofilms on the surface of liquid media and penetrate into solid substrates. The sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 18S rRNA genes were identical in the five strains and indicated a close phylogenetic relationship with teleomorph species of the genus Pichia. In a phylogenetic analysis of these sequences, the closest relative of the new species was Pichia fermentans (6% nucleotide substitutions and indels in the D1/D2 domain). The type strain is 11-485(T) and has been deposited in the Centralbureau voor Schimmelcultures (Utrecht, the Netherlands) as CBS 12611(T), the National Collection of Agricultural and Industrial Micro-organisms (Budapest, Hungary) as NCAIM Y.02019(T) and the Culture Collection of Yeasts (Bratislava, Slovakia) as CCY 29-189-1(T). Mycobank no. MB800537.

  3. Candida middelhoveniana sp. nov., a new yeast species found on the rhizoplane of organically cultivated sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José R de A; Carvalho, Patrícia M B de; Cabral, Anderson de S; Macrae, Andrew; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C S; Berbara, Ricardo L L; Hagler, Allen N

    2011-10-01

    A novel yeast species within the Metschnikowiaceae is described based on a strain from the sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) rhizoplane of an organically managed farm in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The D1/D2 domain of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis showed that the closest related species were Candida tsuchiyae with 86.2% and Candida thailandica with 86.7% of sequence identity. All three are anamorphs in the Clavispora opuntiae clade. The name Candida middelhoveniana sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate this highly divergent organism with the type strain Instituto de Microbiologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMUFRJ) 51965(T) (=Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) 12306(T), Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)-70(T), DBVPG 8031(T)) and the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ accession number for the D1/D2 domain LSU rDNA sequence is FN428871. The Mycobank deposit number is MB 519801.

  4. The anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  5. The anamorphic universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J. E-mail: steinh@princeton.edu

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  6. Cordyceps bassiana and production of stromata in vitro showing Beauveria anamorph in Korea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Cordyceps species was found with Beauveria anamorph state on larval insect cadavers on Obong Mountsin in Gangwon Pronvince, Republic of Korea. Cultures from discharged ascospores formed an anamorph identifiable as Beauveria bassiana. This teleomorph-anamorph connection was also confirmed by the in...

  7. A new species of Heliocephala from Mexico with an assessment of the systematic positions of the anamorph genera Heliocephala and Holubovaniella.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Gabriela Heredia; Ruiz, Rafael F Castañeda; Mota, Rosa María Arias; Hérnandez, Cinthya I Becerra; Gómez, Sergio; Bogale, Mesfin; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2011-01-01

    During a study of the microfungi on decaying leaves collected in México we encountered a fungus sharing features of the anamorph genera Heliocephala and Holubovaniella. This hyphomycete resembled Hol. elegans in possessing obclavate to fusiform, three-septate, rostrate phragmoconidia, but it can be distinguished by its much shorter, branched, determinate conidiophores. Unlike members of genus Heliocephala, which also possess determinant conidiophores, the phragmoconidia of this taxon are short-rostrate and have not been observed to germinate iteratively. Prompted by the discovery of this hyphomycete, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships among species of Heliocephala and Holubovaniella. Analysis of large subunit rDNA gene sequences positioned species of Heliocephala and Holubovaniella in the Dothideomycetes and identified Stomiopeltis betulae (Micropeltididaceae) as their closest relative. These results also indicated that Heliocephala and Holubovaniella are closely related taxa. Based on these findings and the similarity of the developmental and morphological characters of species of Heliocephala and Holubovaniella, we recognize these genera as synonymous and describe a new species, Heliocephala triseptata. A dichotomous key to the species of Heliocephala is provided.

  8. Clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes in Hordeum germplasm

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes, non-choke inducing endosymbiotic fungi of the genus Neotyphodium that systemically infect grasses, in eighteen Hordeum species from the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System was examined using light and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Seventeen plant inventory accessions...

  9. Cordyceps bassiana and Production of Stromata in vitro Showing Beauveria Anamorph in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je-O; Humber, Richard A.; Sung, Gi-Ho; Shrestha, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    A Cordyceps species was found with a Beauveria anamorph state on larval insect cadavers on Obong mountains in Gangwon Provinces, Republic of Korea. Cultures from discharged ascospores formed an anamorph identifiable as Beauveria bassiana. This teleomorph-anamorph connection was also confirmed by the in vitro production of fertile ascomata from conidial cultures with morphology like that of field-collected specimen. This is the first report of in vitro production of a teleomorph for any Beauveria species. The Cordyceps species has been conspecified as Cordyceps bassiana, a species described from China with B. bassiana anamorph. PMID:24039462

  10. Drosophila-associated yeast species in vineyard ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel S T H; Howell, Kate S

    2015-10-01

    Yeast activity during wine fermentation directly contributes to wine quality, but the source and movement of yeasts in vineyards and winery environments have not been resolved. Here, we investigate the yeast species associated with the Drosophila insect vector to help understand yeast dispersal and persistence. Drosophila are commonly found in vineyards and are known to have a mutualistic relationship with yeasts in other ecosystems. Drosophilids were collected from vineyards, grape waste (marc) piles and wineries during grape harvest. Captured flies were identified morphologically, and their associated yeasts were identified. Drosophila melanogaster/D. simulans, D. hydei and Scaptodrosophila lativittata were identified in 296 captured Drosophila flies. These flies were associated with Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii and H. valbyensis yeasts. Yeast and Drosophila species diversity differed between collection locations (vineyard and marc: R = 0.588 for Drosophila and R = 0.644 for yeasts). Surprisingly, the primary wine fermentation yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was not isolated. Drosophila flies are preferentially associated with different yeast species in the vineyard and winery environments, and this association may help the movement and dispersal of yeast species in the vineyard and winery ecosystem. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucosylation and other biotransformations of T-2 toxin by yeasts of the Trichomonascus clade

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty-five yeasts assigned to the Trichomonascus clade (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota), including three Trichomonascus species and 22 anamorphic species presently classified in Blastobotrys, were tested for their ability to convert T-2 toxin, a Fusarium trichothecene mycotoxin, to less toxic product...

  12. Characterisation and classification of phylloplane yeasts from Portugal related to the genus Taphrina and description of five novel Lalaria species.

    PubMed

    Inácio, João; Rodrigues, Manuel G; Sobral, Patrícia; Fonseca, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    Taphrina Fries is a genus of dimorphic ascomycetes comprising more than 90 species distinguished by the specific infections they produce on different vascular plants. Their filamentous states are restricted to parasitised plant tissue whereas the yeast states are saprobic and can be grown on artificial media. The latter coincide with the anamorphic phases and have been given separate nomenclatural status by the erection of the genus Lalaria R.T. Moore. In its original circumscription Lalaria included only 23 yeast states of known species of Taphrina and its creation was then redundant. Here we describe five novel species in the genus Lalaria to accommodate a total of 44 yeast isolates obtained mainly from leaf surfaces (phylloplane) of different plants in Portugal: Lalaria arrabidae sp. nov. (one strain), L. carpini sp. nov. (one strain), L. inositophila sp. nov. (37 strains), L. kurtzmanii sp. nov. (one strain) and L. veronaerambellii sp. nov. (four strains). L. inositophila was notable for its widespread occurrence since it was recovered during two consecutive years from the leaves of miscellaneous plant species. In the absence of sexual states and of unequivocal associations to particular host plants, the taxonomic relationship of the novel species to the yeast states of Taphrina available from culture collections was verified by the comparative analysis of physiological and molecular characteristics. The latter included PCR fingerprinting using single primers for microsatellite regions, sequencing of the 5' end of the 26S rRNA (LSU) gene (D1/D2 domains) and of the ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA spacer regions, and DNA-DNA hybridisation experiments. An emended description of the genus Lalaria is provided.

  13. Anamorphs of the Bolbitiaceae (Basidiomycota, Agaricales).

    PubMed

    Walther, Grit; Weiss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We describe and illustrate thallic conidiogenesis in 14 species of the Bolbitiaceae sensu Singer studied in culture. Conidiogenesis of 12 species is shown for the first time. Bolbitius vitellinus and the investigated species of Conocybe (C. albipes, C. appendiculata, C. magnicapitata, C. semiglobata, C. subovalis, C. subpubescens, C. sulcatipes and C. teneroides) possessed a similar mode of conidiogenesis. Species of both genera formed mostly coiled conidiogenous hyphae arising sympodially from differentiated conidiophores. The anamorphs of the Agrocybe species were not uniform and predominantly differed from those of Conocybe and Bolbitius. The conidia of Agrocybe dura, A. firma and A. praecox developed by the simple fragmentation of normally branched hyphae. Sympodially proliferating conidiophores occurred in Agrocybe arvalis and A. aegerita. Secretory cells of different size and shape were found in Agrocybe and in Conocybe. Our results corroborate a close phylogenetic relationship between Bolbitius and Conocybe as well as the polyphyly of the Bolbitiaceae as currently treated, which is consistent with recent molecular phylogenetic studies. Consequently we emend the family concept based on anamorphic characters.

  14. [Yeasts in domestic animals: species identification and susceptibility to antifungals].

    PubMed

    Hamal, Petr; Koukalová, Dagmar

    2010-02-01

    Yeasts frequently colonize various kinds of domestic animals, but may also cause serious diseases. The aim of this study was to identify yeast isolates collected from dogs, cows and pigs, and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. Fifty-six yeast isolates from dogs (n = 24), cows (n = 20), and pigs (n = 12) were investigated. Appearance of colonies grown on Sabouraud agar, micromorphology on rice agar, as well as assimilation and fermentation of various carbon and nitrogen sources were evaluated. Susceptibility to six antifungals (flucytosine, amphotericin B, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole) was determined semiquantitatively using the commercially available Fungitest kit (Bio-Rad Laboratories). Ten yeast species were identified in dogs with relatively even distribution. On the other hand, cow and pig were clearly dominated by Candida krusei (from 7 species) and Candida rugosa (from 5 species), respectively. Further, most of yeast isolates exhibited good susceptibility to the antifungals tested particularly to amphotericin B, ketoconazole and itraconazole. Based on results, it can be concluded that significant differences in the species spectrum and distribution were documented between groups of yeasts from dogs, cows and pigs. This is probably due to different environmental conditions and the endogenous origin of the yeast isolates. Mostly good susceptibility to systemic antifungals should positively influence the therapy of diseases caused by yeasts in veterinary medicine.

  15. Yeast species associated with wine grapes in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang-Shi; Cheng, Chao; Li, Zheng; Chen, Jing-Yu; Yan, Bin; Han, Bei-Zhong; Reeves, Malcolm

    2010-03-31

    Having more information on the yeast ecology of grapes is important for wine-makers to produce wine with high quality and typical attributes. China is a significant wine-consuming country and is becoming a serious wine-producer, but little has been reported about the yeast ecology of local ecosystems. This study provides the first step towards the exploitation of the yeast wealth in China's vine-growing regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the yeast population density and diversity on three grape varieties cultivated in four representative vine-growing regions of China. Yeast species diversity was evaluated by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequence analysis of the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region of cultivable yeasts. The grapes harbored yeast populations at 10(2)-10(6)CFU/mL, consisting mostly of non-Saccharomyces species. Seventeen different yeast species belonging to eight genera were detected on the grape samples tested, including Hanseniaspora uvarum, Cryptococcus flavescens, Pichia fermentans, Candida zemplinina, Cryptococcus carnescens, Candida inconpicua, Zygosaccharomyces fermentati, Issatchenkia terricola, Candida quercitrusa, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Candida bombi, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Sporidiobolus pararoseus, Cryptococcus magnus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Issatchenkia orientalis and Pichia guilliermondii. H. uvarum and C. flavescens were the dominant species present on the grapes. For the first time Sporidiobolus pararoseus was discovered as an inhabitant of the grape ecosystem. The yeast community on grape berries was influenced by the grape chemical composition, vine-variety and vine-growing region. This study is the first to identify the yeast communities associated with grapes in China using molecular methods. The results enrich our knowledge of wine-related microorganisms, and can be used to promote the development of the local wine

  16. Metschnikowia viticola sp. nov., a new yeast species from grape.

    PubMed

    Péter, Gábor; Tornai-Lehoczki, Judit; Suzuki, Motofumi; Dlauchy, Dénes

    2005-02-01

    Two yeast strains, producing needle-shaped ascospores under suitable conditions, were isolated from grapes grown in Hungary. Based on these two strains, Metschnikowia viticola (type strain NCAIM Y.01705, CBS 9950, JCM 12561) is proposed as a new yeast species. Considering its phenotypic features, the restriction fragment patterns of 18S rDNA and the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA, the proposed new species is closely related to Candida kofuensis.

  17. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    PubMed

    Valles, Belén Suárez; Bedriñana, Rosa Pando; Tascón, Norman Fernández; Simón, Amparo Querol; Madrera, Roberto Rodríguez

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by pneumatic pressing were dominated by non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora genus and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) whereas in the apple juices obtained by traditional pressing Saccharomyces together with non-Saccharomyces, were always present. The species Saccharomyces present were S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Apparently S. bayanus, was the predominant species at the beginning and the middle fermentation steps of the fermentation process, reaching a percentage of isolation between 33% and 41%, whereas S. cerevisiae took over the process in the final stages of fermentation. During the 2001 harvest, with independence of cider-making technology, the species Hanseniaspora valbyensis was always isolated at the end of fermentations.

  18. A yeast pheromone-based inter-species communication system.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefan; Clemens, André; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2015-02-01

    We report on a pheromone-based inter-species communication system, allowing for a controlled cell-cell communication between the two species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a proof of principle. It exploits the mating response pathways of the two yeast species employing the pheromones, α- or P-factor, as signaling molecules. The authentic and chimeric pheromone-encoding genes were engineered to code for the P-factor in S. cerevisiae and the α-factor in S. pombe. Upon transformation of the respective constructs, cells were enabled to express the mating pheromone of the opposite species. The supernatant of cultures of S. pombe cells expressing α-factor were able to induce a G1 arrest in the cell cycle, a change in morphology to the typical shmoo effect and expression driven by the pheromone-responsive FIG1 promoter in S. cerevisiae. The supernatant of cultures of S. cerevisiae cells expressing P-factor similarly induced cell cycle arrest in G1, an alteration in morphology typical for mating as well as the activation of the pheromone-responsive promoters of the rep1 and sxa2 genes in a pheromone-hypersensitive reporter strain of S. pombe. Apparently, both heterologous pheromones were correctly processed and secreted in an active form by the cells of the other species. Our data clearly show that the species-specific pheromone systems of yeast species can be exploited for a controlled inter-species communication.

  19. Species composition of Malassezia yeasts in dogs in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Sihelská, Zuzana; Váczi, Peter; Conková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Malassezia (M.) pachydermatis is the lipophilic yeast, which is normally present on the skin and in the ear canal of dogs but under certain conditions it may cause dermatitis and otitis. There is less known about the occurrence of lipid-dependent Malassezia species in dogs. The aim of this study was to detect whether lipid-dependent yeasts are part of the normal microflora in dogs. Two groups of animals were selected for comparison. The group of healthy dogs contained samples of 118 individuals and the group of dogs with cutaneous lesions or otitis externa comprised 328 dogs. The isolates of Malassezia were identified by using genotypic methods that allow the precise identification. M. pachydermatis was the most frequently isolated species in this study (121 isolates). Only four isolates were identified as M. furfur and one isolate was identified as M. nana.

  20. Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the Planistromellaceae including its coelomycetous anamorphs: contributions towards a monograph of the genus Kellermania

    Treesearch

    A.M. Minnis; A.H. Kennedy; D.B. Grenier; M.E. Palm; A.Y. Rossman

    2012-01-01

    The core species of the family Planistromellaceae are included in the teleomorphic genera Planistroma and Planistromella and the connected anamorphic, coelomycetous genera Alpakesa, Kellermania, and Piptarthron. These genera have been defined primarily on the basis of...

  1. Susceptibility of different yeast species to environmental toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Berdicevsky, I; Duek, L; Merzbach, D; Yannai, S

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate the relative resistance of yeast species to various metallic and metalloid ions, with a view to gaining more knowledge on this subject, as resistant species may become dominant in habitats contaminated with the relevant metals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis were grown in media containing different concentrations of mercury (as HgCl(2)), cadmium (as CdCl(2)), lead (as Pb(CH(3)COO)(2)), arsenic (as Na(2)HAsO(4)) and selenium (as Na(2)SeO(3)) for various intervals. Invariably, the two Candida species turned out to be more resistant to all the metals studied than S. cerevisiae. The metal showing the highest toxicity for these species was mercury, with cadmium being the second, lead, the third and arsenic and selenium being the least toxic elements. Strains showing resistance to mercury were isolated, even in the case of S. cerevisiae.

  2. Cryptococcus friedmannii, a new species of yeast from the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cryptococcus friedmannii Vishniac sp. nov. from an Antarctic cryptoendolithic community is a psychrophilic basidioblastomycete characterized by cream-colored colonies of cells with smooth, layered walls, budding monopolarly, producing amylose and extracellular proteinase, utilizing nitrate and D-alanine (inter alia) as nitrogen sources and L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, salicin, soluble starch, trehalose, and D-xylose as carbon sources. This species differs from all other basidiomycetous yeasts in possessing the following combination of characters: amylose production (positive), assimilation of cellobiose (positive), D-galactose (negative), myo-inositol (negative), D-mannitol (negative), and sucrose (negative).

  3. Cryptococcus friedmannii, a new species of yeast from the Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Vishniac, H S

    1985-01-01

    Cryptococcus friedmannii Vishniac sp. nov. from an Antarctic cryptoendolithic community is a psychrophilic basidioblastomycete characterized by cream-colored colonies of cells with smooth, layered walls, budding monopolarly, producing amylose and extracellular proteinase, utilizing nitrate and D-alanine (inter alia) as nitrogen sources and L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, salicin, soluble starch, trehalose, and D-xylose as carbon sources. This species differs from all other basidiomycetous yeasts in possessing the following combination of characters: amylose production (positive), assimilation of cellobiose (positive), D-galactose (negative), myo-inositol (negative), D-mannitol (negative), and sucrose (negative).

  4. Cryptococcus friedmannii, a new species of yeast from the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cryptococcus friedmannii Vishniac sp. nov. from an Antarctic cryptoendolithic community is a psychrophilic basidioblastomycete characterized by cream-colored colonies of cells with smooth, layered walls, budding monopolarly, producing amylose and extracellular proteinase, utilizing nitrate and D-alanine (inter alia) as nitrogen sources and L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, salicin, soluble starch, trehalose, and D-xylose as carbon sources. This species differs from all other basidiomycetous yeasts in possessing the following combination of characters: amylose production (positive), assimilation of cellobiose (positive), D-galactose (negative), myo-inositol (negative), D-mannitol (negative), and sucrose (negative).

  5. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  6. Vanderwaltozyma verrucispora sp. nov., a new ascomycetous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Fu; Liu, Chun-Hao; Ninomiya, Shinya; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Nakase, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    A new yeast species, Vanderwaltozyma verrucispora, is proposed in this study based on two strains isolated from partially decayed leaves in Japan and one strain from soil in Taiwan. The species is characterized by the fermentation of glucose and galactose, formation of one to four spheroidal to ellipsoidal ascospores with warty surfaces in each ascus, and assimilation of a few carbon and nitrogen compounds. Genus assignment and distinction of the species from the other two recognized species of Vanderwaltozyma is based on the morphological and physiological characteristics, and phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene. From these comparisons, the name V. verrucispora sp. nov. is proposed. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene reveals that the phylogenetically closest relative of V. verrucispora is Vanderwaltozyma yarrowii. The type strain of the new species, which was isolated from a partially decayed leaf in Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan, is NBRC 1884(T) (=CBS 10887(T)=BCRC 23141(T)).

  7. Gibberella xylarioides (anamorph: Fusarium xylarioides), a causative agent of coffee wilt disease in Africa, is a previously unrecognized member of the G. fujikuroi species complex.

    PubMed

    Geiser, David M; Ivey, Melanie L Lewis; Hakiza, Georgina; Juba, Jean H; Miller, Sally A

    2005-01-01

    Tracheomycosis or coffee wilt has emerged as a major disease of robusta coffee in Uganda in the past 10 years. Coffee wilt historically has been associated with Fusarium xylarioides Steyaert (teleomorph Gibberella xylarioides Heim and Sacc.), a species that has been classified as a member of Fusarium section Lateritium. We investigated the molecular phylogenetics of fusarial coffee wilt isolates by generating partial DNA sequences from two protein coding regions, translation elongation factor 1-alpha and beta-tubulin, in 36 isolates previously identified as F. xylarioides and related fusaria from coffee and other woody hosts, as well as from 12 isolates associated with a current coffee wilt outbreak in Uganda. These isolates fell into two morphologically and phylogenetically distinct groups. The first group was found to represent previously unidentified members of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFC), a clade that replaces the artificial Fusarium section Liseola. This group of isolates fit the original description of F. xylarioides, thus connecting it to the GFC. The second group, which was diverse in its morphology and DNA sequences, comprised four distinct lineages related to Fusarium lateritium. Our finding of unrelated species associated with coffee wilt disease has important implications regarding its epidemiology, etiology and control.

  8. Alkali-metal-cation influx and efflux systems in nonconventional yeast species.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Sychrová, Hana

    2011-04-01

    To maintain optimal intracellular concentrations of alkali-metal-cations, yeast cells use a series of influx and efflux systems. Nonconventional yeast species have at least three different types of efficient transporters that ensure potassium uptake and accumulation in cells. Most of them have Trk uniporters and Hak K(+)-H(+) symporters and a few yeast species also have the rare K(+) (Na(+))-uptake ATPase Acu. To eliminate surplus potassium or toxic sodium cations, various yeast species use highly conserved Nha Na(+) (K(+))/H(+) antiporters and Na(+) (K(+))-efflux Ena ATPases. The potassium-specific yeast Tok1 channel is also highly conserved among various yeast species and its activity is important for the regulation of plasma membrane potential. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular phylogenetics of the genus Rhodotorula and related basidiomycetous yeasts inferred from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S K; Yokoyama, K; Nishimura, K; Miyaji, M

    2001-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of basidiomycetous yeasts, especially of the genus Rhodotorula, were studied using partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The results demonstrated that the basidiomycetous yeasts under investigation distributed into two main clusters: one containing Tremellales, Filobasidiales and their anamorphs and the other containing Ustilaginales, Sporidiales and their anamorphs. This clustering in turn correlates with cell wall biochemistry, presence or absence of xylose, and septal ultrastructure, dolipore or simple pore. Bullera, Bulleromyces, Filobasidiella, Cryptococcus and Trichosporon, yeasts of the former cluster, contain xylose in the cell wall and have dolipore septa. In contrast yeasts of the latter cluster, which included Bensingtonia, Erythrobasidium, Leucosporidium, Malassezia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus, Sporobolomyces and Ustilago, have no xylose in the cell wall and have a simple pore septum. Yeasts of the latter group could be further divided into four clades (A-D). Species of Rhodotorula were distributed in all of these clades, indicating the polyphyletic nature of the genus. A limited number of Rhodotorula species demonstrated identical sequences, for example Rhodotorula bacarum and Rhodotorula foliorum, Rhodotorula fujisanensis and Rhodotorula futronensis, Rhodotorula glutinis var. dairenensis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. However, all the other test species of the genus Rhodotorula were well separated based on their 396 bp nucleotide sequences. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the use of cytochrome b sequences for both species identification and the study of phylogenetic relationships among basidiomycetous yeasts.

  10. Trichomonascus apis sp. nov., a heterothallic yeast species from honeycomb.

    PubMed

    Péter, Gábor; Tornai-Lehoczki, Judit; Dlauchy, Dénes

    2009-06-01

    Four strains of a novel heterothallic yeast species were isolated from pollen-storing cells of a honeycomb of honeybee (Apis mellifera) in Hungary. Analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit (26S) rRNA gene sequences placed the strains in the Trichomonascus clade. The four strains share identical D1/D2 sequences and differ by 24 substitutions and nine indels from the genetically most closely related species, Blastobotrys attinorum. The name Trichomonascus apis sp. nov. is proposed for the novel species. The carbon-source assimilation spectrum of T. apis sp. nov. is rather broad. Unlike B. attinorum, it assimilates sucrose, trehalose, d-glucuronate and succinate and does not grow at 37 degrees C, thus enabling the two taxa to be distinguished. The type and isotype strains of Trichomonascus apis are NCAIM Y.01848(T) (=CBS 10922(T) =NRRL Y-48475(T)) and NCAIM Y.01849(IT) (=CBS 10923(IT) =NRRL Y-48476(IT)), respectively.

  11. Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for identification and strain discrimination of the wine spoilage yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Identification and Strain Discrimination of the Wine Spoilage Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Mark A.; Thornton, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  13. Differential paralog divergence modulates genome evolution across yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Bryony; Huang, Mei; Alcantara, Erica; DeSevo, Christopher G.; Pai, Dave A.; Hoang, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary outcomes depend not only on the selective forces acting upon a species, but also on the genetic background. However, large timescales and uncertain historical selection pressures can make it difficult to discern such important background differences between species. Experimental evolution is one tool to compare evolutionary potential of known genotypes in a controlled environment. Here we utilized a highly reproducible evolutionary adaptation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate whether experimental evolution of other yeast species would select for similar adaptive mutations. We evolved populations of S. cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. uvarum, and interspecific hybrids between S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae for ~200–500 generations in sulfate-limited continuous culture. Wild-type S. cerevisiae cultures invariably amplify the high affinity sulfate transporter gene, SUL1. However, while amplification of the SUL1 locus was detected in S. paradoxus and S. mikatae populations, S. uvarum cultures instead selected for amplification of the paralog, SUL2. We measured the relative fitness of strains bearing deletions and amplifications of both SUL genes from different species, confirming that, converse to S. cerevisiae, S. uvarum SUL2 contributes more to fitness in sulfate limitation than S. uvarum SUL1. By measuring the fitness and gene expression of chimeric promoter-ORF constructs, we were able to delineate the cause of this differential fitness effect primarily to the promoter of S. uvarum SUL1. Our data show evidence of differential sub-functionalization among the sulfate transporters across Saccharomyces species through recent changes in noncoding sequence. Furthermore, these results show a clear example of how such background differences due to paralog divergence can drive changes in genome evolution. PMID:28196070

  14. Anamorphic Imaging with Three Mirrors: A Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Stone, Bryan D.

    2010-01-01

    Design methods are described for unobstructed, plane-symmetric, anamorphic systems composed of three mirrors. Low order imaging constraints are used to reduce the dimensionality of the configuration space. Examples are presented from a specific class of systems with fixed packaging constraints.

  15. Cyberlindnera xylolytica sp. nov., a xylitol-producing yeast species isolated from lignocellulosic materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Independent surveys of yeasts associated with lignocellulosic-related materials led to the discovery of a novel yeast species belonging to the Cyberlindnera clade (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota). Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the la...

  16. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  17. Compact Reflective Imaging Spectrometer Design Utilizing An Immersed Grating And Anamorphic Mirror

    DOEpatents

    Lerner, Scott A.

    2006-01-10

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit, an anamorphic mirror, a grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit directs light to the anamorphic mirror. The anamorphic mirror receives the light and directs the light to the grating. The grating receives the light from the anamorphic mirror and defracts the light back onto the anamorphic mirror. The anamorphic mirror focuses the light onto a detector array.

  18. Characterization of culturable yeast species associating with whole crop corn and total mixed ration silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Hao, Wei; Ning, Tingting; Zheng, Mingli; Xu, Chuncheng

    2017-06-26

    This study aims to investigate the association of yeast species with improved aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR) silages with prolonged ensiling, and clarify the characteristics of yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration. Whole crop corn (WCC) silages and TMR silages formulated with WCC were ensiled for 7, 14, 28 and 56 d and used for aerobic stability test. Predominant yeast species were isolated from different periods and identified by sequencing analyses of the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain. Characteristics (assimilation and tolerance) of the yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration were investigated. In addition to species of Candida glabrata and Pichia kudriavzevii previously isolated in WCC and TMR, P. manshurica, C. ethanolica and Zygosaccharomyces bailii that were isolated at great frequency during deteriorating, capable of assimilating lactic or acetic acid and tolerant to acetic acid might function more in deteriorating TMR silages at early fermentation (7 d and 14 d). With ensiling prolonged to 28 d, silages became more (p<0.01) stable, coinciding with the inhibition of yeast to below the detection limit. Species of P. manshurica that was predominant in deteriorating WCC silages was not detectable in TMR silages. In addition, the predominant yeast species of Z. bailii in deteriorating TMR silages at later fermentation (28 d and 56 d) were not observed in both WCC and WCC silages. The inhibition of yeasts particularly for P. kudriavzevii probably account for the improved aerobic stability of TMR silages at later fermentation. Fewer species seemed to involve in aerobic deterioration of silages at later fermentation and Z. bailii was most likely to initiate the aerobic deterioration of TMR silages at later fermentation. The use of WCC in TMR might not influence the predominant yeast species during aerobic deterioration of TMR silages.

  19. Yeast Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Comparison of Two Symbiont Groups in the Same Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jonathan A.; Kopp, Artyom

    2012-01-01

    The combination of ecological diversity with genetic and experimental tractability makes Drosophila a powerful model for the study of animal-associated microbial communities. Despite the known importance of yeasts in Drosophila physiology, behavior, and fitness, most recent work has focused on Drosophila-bacterial interactions. In order to get a more complete understanding of the Drosophila microbiome, we characterized the yeast communities associated with different Drosophila species collected around the world. We focused on the phylum Ascomycota because it constitutes the vast majority of the Drosophila-associated yeasts. Our sampling strategy allowed us to compare the distribution and structure of the yeast and bacterial communities in the same host populations. We show that yeast communities are dominated by a small number of abundant taxa, that the same yeast lineages are associated with different host species and populations, and that host diet has a greater effect than host species on yeast community composition. These patterns closely parallel those observed in Drosophila bacterial communities. However, we do not detect a significant correlation between the yeast and bacterial communities of the same host populations. Comparative analysis of different symbiont groups provides a more comprehensive picture of host-microbe interactions. Future work on the role of symbiont communities in animal physiology, ecological adaptation, and evolution would benefit from a similarly holistic approach. PMID:22885750

  20. Carbon source utilization and inhibitor tolerance of 45 oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli; Selby, Tylan; Lin, Ting; Zhu, Shirley; Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2014-07-01

    Conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to lipids using oleaginous (high lipid) yeasts requires alignment of the hydrolysate composition with the characteristics of the yeast strain, including ability to utilize certain nutrients, ability to grow independently of costly nutrients such as vitamins, and ability to tolerate inhibitors. Some combination of these characteristics may be present in wild strains. In this study, 48 oleaginous yeast strains belonging to 45 species were tested for ability to utilize carbon sources associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates, tolerate inhibitors, and grow in medium without supplemented vitamins. Some well-studied oleaginous yeast species, as well as some that have not been frequently utilized in research or industrial production, emerged as promising candidates for industrial use due to ability to utilize many carbon sources, including Cryptococcus aureus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Hannaella aff. zeae, Tremella encephala, and Trichosporon coremiiforme. Other species excelled in inhibitor tolerance, including Candida aff. tropicalis, Cyberlindnera jadinii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Schwanniomyces occidentalis and Wickerhamomyces ciferrii. No yeast tested could utilize all carbon sources and tolerate all inhibitors tested. These results indicate that yeast strains should be selected based on characteristics compatible with the composition of the targeted hydrolysate. Other factors to consider include the production of valuable co-products such as carotenoids, availability of genetic tools, biosafety level, and flocculation of the yeast strain. The data generated in this study will aid in aligning yeasts with compatible hydrolysates for conversion of carbohydrates to lipids to be used for biofuels and other oleochemicals.

  1. Carbon source utilization and inhibitor tolerance of 45 oleaginous yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli; Selby, Tylan; Lin, Ting; Zhu, Shirley; Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to lipids using oleaginous (high lipid) yeasts requires alignment of the hydrolysate composition with the characteristics of the yeast strain, including ability to utilize certain nutrients, ability to grow independently of costly nutrients such as vitamins, and ability to tolerate inhibitors. Some combination of these characteristics may be present in wild strains. In this study, 48 oleaginous yeast strains belonging to 45 species were tested for ability to utilize carbon sources associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates, tolerate inhibitors, and grow in medium without supplemented vitamins. Some well-studied oleaginous yeast species, as well as some that have not been frequently utilized in research or industrial production, emerged as promising candidates for industrial use due to ability to utilize many carbon sources, including Cryptococcus aureus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Hanaella aff. zeae, Tremella encephala, and Trichosporon coremiiforme. Other species excelled in inhibitor tolerance, including Candida aff. tropicalis, Cyberlindnera jadinii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima Schwanniomyces occidentalis and Wickerhamomyces ciferii. No yeast tested could utilize all carbon sources and tolerate all inhibitors tested. These results indicate that yeast strains should be selected based on characteristics compatible with the composition of the targeted hydrolysate. Other factors to consider include the production of valuable co-products such as carotenoids, availability of genetic tools, biosafety level, and flocculation of the yeast strain. The data generated in this study will aid in aligning yeasts with compatible hydrolysates for conversion of carbohydrates to lipids to be used for biofuels and other oleochemicals. PMID:24818698

  2. Discovery of synthesis and secretion of polyol esters of fatty acids by four basidiomycetous yeast species in the order Sporidiobolales.

    PubMed

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Fiehn, Oliver; Cathcart, Erin; Fry, Russell W; Kanti, Atit; Joko Nugroho, Agustinus; Faulina, Sarah Asih; Stephanandra, Sira; German, J Bruce; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2017-03-13

    Polyol esters of fatty acids (PEFA) are amphiphilic glycolipids produced by yeast that could play a role as natural, environmentally friendly biosurfactants. We recently reported discovery of a new PEFA-secreting yeast species, Rhodotorula babjevae, a basidiomycetous yeast to display this behavior, in addition to a few other Rhodotorula yeasts reported on the 1960s. Additional yeast species within the taxonomic order Sporidiobolales were screened for secreted glycolipid production. PEFA production equal or above 1 g L(-1) were detected in 19 out of 65 strains of yeast screened, belonging to 6 out of 30 yeast species tested. Four of these species were not previously known to secrete glycolipids. These results significantly increase the number of yeast species known to secrete PEFA, holding promise for expanding knowledge of PEFA synthesis and secretion mechanisms, as well as setting the groundwork towards commercialization.

  3. Barcode identifiers as a practical tool for reliable species assignment of medically important black yeast species.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Guido; de Hoog, G Sybren; Haase, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    Herpotrichiellaceous black yeasts and relatives comprise severe pathogens flanked by nonpathogenic environmental siblings. Reliable identification by conventional methods is notoriously difficult. Molecular identification is hampered by the sequence variability in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domain caused by difficult-to-sequence homopolymeric regions and by poor taxonomic attribution of sequences deposited in GenBank. Here, we present a potential solution using short barcode identifiers (27 to 50 bp) based on ITS2 ribosomal DNA (rDNA), which allows unambiguous definition of species-specific fragments. Starting from proven sequences of ex-type and authentic strains, we were able to describe 103 identifiers. Multiple BLAST searches of these proposed barcode identifiers in GenBank revealed uniqueness for 100 taxonomic entities, whereas the three remaining identifiers each matched with two entities, but the species of these identifiers could easily be discriminated by differences in the remaining ITS regions. Using the proposed barcode identifiers, a 4.1-fold increase of 100% matches in GenBank was achieved in comparison to the classical approach using the complete ITS sequences. The proposed barcode identifiers will be made accessible for the diagnostic laboratory in a permanently updated online database, thereby providing a highly practical, reliable, and cost-effective tool for identification of clinically important black yeasts and relatives.

  4. A monograph of the entomopathogenic genera Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia gen. nov. (Ascomycota, Hypocreales, Clavicipitaceae), and their aschersonia-like anamorphs in the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Chaverri, P; Liu, M; Hodge, K T

    2008-01-01

    The present taxonomic revision deals with Neotropical species of three entomopathogenic genera that were once included in Hypocrella s. l.: Hypocrella s. str. (anamorph Aschersonia), Moelleriella (anamorph aschersonia-like), and Samuelsia gen. nov (anamorph aschersonia-like). Species of Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia are pathogens of scale insects (Coccidae and Lecaniidae, Homoptera) and whiteflies (Aleyrodidae, Homoptera) and are common in tropical regions. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from nuclear ribosomal large subunit (28S), translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF 1-alpha), and RNA polymerase II subunit 1 (RPB1) and analyses of multiple morphological characters demonstrate that the three segregated genera can be distinguished by the disarticulation of the ascospores and shape and size of conidia. Moelleriella has filiform multi-septate ascospores that disarticulate at the septa within the ascus and aschersonia-like anamorphs with fusoid conidia. Hypocrella s. str. has filiform to long-fusiform ascospores that do not disarticulate and Aschersonia s. str. anamorphs with fusoid conidia. The new genus proposed here, Samuelsia, has filiform to long-fusiform ascospores that do not disarticulate and aschersonia-like anamorphs with small allantoid conidia. In addition, the present study presents and discusses the evolution of species, morphology, and ecology in Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia based on multigene phylogenetic analyses.

  5. A monograph of the entomopathogenic genera Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia gen. nov. (Ascomycota, Hypocreales, Clavicipitaceae), and their aschersonia-like anamorphs in the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Chaverri, P.; Liu, M.; Hodge, K.T.

    2008-01-01

    The present taxonomic revision deals with Neotropical species of three entomopathogenic genera that were once included in Hypocrella s. l.: Hypocrella s. str. (anamorph Aschersonia), Moelleriella (anamorph aschersonia-like), and Samuelsia gen. nov (anamorph aschersonia-like). Species of Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia are pathogens of scale insects (Coccidae and Lecaniidae, Homoptera) and whiteflies (Aleyrodidae, Homoptera) and are common in tropical regions. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from nuclear ribosomal large subunit (28S), translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF 1-α), and RNA polymerase II subunit 1 (RPB1) and analyses of multiple morphological characters demonstrate that the three segregated genera can be distinguished by the disarticulation of the ascospores and shape and size of conidia. Moelleriella has filiform multi-septate ascospores that disarticulate at the septa within the ascus and aschersonia-like anamorphs with fusoid conidia. Hypocrella s. str. has filiform to long-fusiform ascospores that do not disarticulate and Aschersonia s. str. anamorphs with fusoid conidia. The new genus proposed here, Samuelsia, has filiform to long-fusiform ascospores that do not disarticulate and aschersonia-like anamorphs with small allantoid conidia. In addition, the present study presents and discusses the evolution of species, morphology, and ecology in Hypocrella, Moelleriella, and Samuelsia based on multigene phylogenetic analyses. PMID:18490956

  6. Investigating of yeast species in wine fermentation using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Liu, Yanlin

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) in monitoring yeast communities during wine fermentation and to reveal new information on yeast community of Chinese enology. Firstly, terminal restriction fragment (TRF) lengths database was constructed using 32 pure yeast species. Ten of these species were firstly documented. The species except for Candida vini, Issatchenkia orientalis/Candida krusei, Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces pastorianus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces kudriarzevii and Zygosaccharomyces bisporus could be distinguished by the T-RFLP targeting 5.8S-ITS rDNA. Moreover, the yeast communities in spontaneous fermentation of Chardonnay and Riesling were identified by T-RFLP and traditional methods, including colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis. The result showed that T-RFLP profiles of the yeast community correlated well with that of the results identified by the traditional methods. The TRFs with the highest intensity and present in all the samples corresponded to Saccharomyces sp. Other species detected by both approaches were Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia minuta var. minuta, Saccharomycodes ludwigii/Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida zemplinina. This study revealed that T-RFLP technique is a rapid and useful tool for monitoring the composition of yeast species during wine fermentation.

  7. Diversity of yeast species during fermentative process contributing to Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor making.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Xu, Y; Chen, L

    2012-10-01

    The famous traditional Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor is produced by a unique spontaneous simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, which contributes to a distinctive yeast community with specific physiological properties and performances. Therefore, it would be useful to investigate this yeast community and reveal the novelty of its characteristics. Nine yeast species were obtained from the fermentation period. A combination of physiological and functional analyses revealed a very high diversity of yeast populations. In particular, the extremely high temperature and low acidity of the fermentation conditions led to an accumulation of species with distinctive heat- and acid-resistant properties. Moreover, these yeast species were also significant flavour contributors, for various alcohols, acids and esters. The Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor-fermentation process is rich in yeast resources with distinctive fermentation properties, which were different from other beverages. This work is the first to study the complex yeast ecology of the Maotai-flavour liquor-making process. It allows a deeper insight into the mechanism of this process. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Occurrence and identification of yeast species in fermented liquid feed for piglets.

    PubMed

    Gori, Klaus; Bjørklund, Marina Kryger; Canibe, Nuria; Pedersen, Anni Øyan; Jespersen, Lene

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and identity of yeast species in fermented liquid feed (FLF) used for feeding piglets. In total, 40 different Danish farms were included in the analysis. The preparation and composition of FLF was found to be very heterogeneous with high variations in both yeast counts and yeast species composition. The yeast population varied between 6.0 × 10(3) and 4.2 × 10(7) cfug(-1) with an average yeast count of 8.7 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(7) cfug(-1). A total of 766 yeasts were isolated and identified by conventional and/or molecular typing techniques. The predominant yeast species in the FLF samples were found to be Candida milleri (58.4%), Kazachstania exigua (17.5%), Candida pararugosa (6.40%) and Kazachstania bulderi (5.09%). No clear separation between isolates of C. milleri and Candida humilis could be obtained based on sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. The combined use of ITS-RFLP analysis and phenotypic criteria did meanwhile suggest a closer relationship with C. milleri than C. humilis.

  9. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    DOEpatents

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2017-09-12

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  10. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    DOEpatents

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  11. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2014-01-07

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  12. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-05-14

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  13. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2016-08-09

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  14. Mold-inhibitory activity of different yeast species during airtight storage of wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Adel Druvefors, Ulrika; Schnürer, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 inhibits spoilage by Penicillium roqueforti in laboratory and pilot studies with high-moisture wheat in malfunctioning airtight storage. We tested the biocontrol ability of an additional 57 yeast species in a grain mini silo system. Most yeast species grew to CFU levels comparable to that of P. anomala J121 after 14 days of incubation (>10(6) CFU g(-1)). Of the 58 species, 38 (63 strains) had no mold-inhibitory effects (Pen. roqueforti levels >10(5) CFU g(-1)). Among these were 11 species (18 strains) that did not grow on the wheat grain. Several of the non-inhibiting yeast species have previously been reported as biocontrol agents in other postharvest environments. Weak inhibitory activity, reducing Pen. roqueforti levels to between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU g(-1), was observed with 11 species (12 strains). Candida silvicola and Pichia guillermondii reduced Pen. roqueforti to <10(4) CFU g(-1). Candida fennica, Candida pelliculosa, Candida silvicultrix, P. anomala (29 strains), Pichia burtonii, Pichia farinosa and Pichia membranifaciens strongly inhibited Pen. roqueforti (<10(3) CFU g(-1)) in the mini silos, but none had higher biocontrol activity than P. anomala strain J121. This report is the first of biocontrol activity of C. fennica and C. silvicultrix. The ability of 27 yeast species to grow to high CFU values without inhibiting mold growth suggests that nutrient competition may not be the main mode of action of P. anomala J121.

  15. Candida sergipensis, a new asexual yeast species isolated from frozen pulps of tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Rita C; Resende, Maria A; Pimenta, Raphael S; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2004-07-01

    Sixteen strains of the new yeast species Candida sergipensis have been isolated from frozen pulps of the tropical fruits umbú ( Spondias tuberosa Avr. Cam.) and mangaba ( Hancornia speciosa Gom.). Candida sergipensis was one of the prevalent species in the yeast community of these substrates. The new asexual ascomycetous yeast is phylogenetically related to Candida spandovensis and Candida sorbophila, species belonging to the Wickerhamiella clade, as evidenced by the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of their large subunit ribosomal DNAs. The species C. sergipensis and C. spandovensis can be separated on the basis of growth on 50% glucose agar, xylose and succinate, negative for the first species and positive for the second. The type culture is strain UFMG-R188 (CBS 9567).

  16. Genetically modified yeast of the species Issatchenkia orientalis and closely relates species, and fermentation processes using same

    DOEpatents

    Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Highland Ranch, CO; Pentilla, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI; Koivuranta, Kari [Vantaa, FI; Roberg-Perez, Kevin [Minneapolis, MN

    2012-01-17

    Cells of the species Issatchenkia orientalis and closely related yeast species are transformed with a vector to introduce an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene. The cells produce lactic acid efficiently and are resistant at low pH, high lactate titer conditions.

  17. Phylogeny and systematics of the anamorphic, entomopathogenic genus Beauveria.

    PubMed

    Rehner, Stephen A; Minnis, Andrew M; Sung, Gi-Ho; Luangsa-ard, J Jennifer; Devotto, Luis; Humber, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria is a cosmopolitan anamorphic genus of arthropod pathogens that includes the agronomically important species, B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, which are used as mycoinsecticides for the biological control of pest insects. Recent phylogenetic evidence demonstrates that Beauveria is monophyletic within the Cordycipitaceae (Hypocreales), and both B. bassiana and B. brongniartii have been linked developmentally and phylogenetically to Cordyceps species. Despite recent interest in the genetic diversity and molecular ecology of Beauveria, particularly as it relates to their role as pathogens of insects in natural and agricultural environments, the genus has not received critical taxonomic review for several decades. A multilocus phylogeny of Beauveria based on partial sequences of RPB1, RPB2, TEF and the nuclear intergenic region, Bloc, is presented and used to assess diversity within the genus and to evaluate species concepts and their taxonomic status. B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, both which represent species complexes and which heretofore have lacked type specimens, are redescribed and types are proposed. In addition six new species are described including B. varroae and B. kipukae, which form a biphyletic, morphologically cryptic sister lineage to B. bassiana, B. pseudobassiana, which also is morphologically similar to but phylogenetically distant from B. bassiana, B. asiatica and B. australis, which are sister lineages to B. brongniartii, and B. sungii, an Asian species that is linked to an undetermined species of Cordyceps. The combination B. amorpha is validly published and an epitype is designated.

  18. Description of Martiniozyma gen. nov. and transfer of seven Candida species to Saturnispora as new combinations.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis has shown Candida abiesophila (NRRL Y-11514(T), CBS 5366(T)) and Candida asiatica (NRRL Y-63747(T), CBS 10863(T)) to be members of a small clade that is phylogenetically separate from other yeasts. In view of their isolation from neighboring genera, such as Pichia and Saturnispora, the two anamorphic species are proposed for transfer to Martiniozyma gen. nov. (MycoBank MB 812061) with Martiniozyma abiesophila designated as type species (MycoBank MB 812062). In keeping with the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, which specifies that related anamorphic and teleomorphic species can be assigned to the same genus, the following Candida species are transferred to Saturnispora to conform with their phylogenetic placement: Candida diversa (NRRL Y-5713(T)), Candida halmiae (CBS 11009(T)), Candida sanitii (CBS 10864(T)), Candida sekii (CBS 10931(T)), Candida siamensis (CBS 11022(T)), Candida silvae (NRRL Y-6725(T)) and Candida suwanaritii (CBS 11021(T)).

  19. Zymography Methods to Simultaneously Analyze Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities: Novel Application for Yeast Species Identification.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    We provide an optimized protocol for a double staining technique to analyze superoxide dismutase enzymatic isoforms Cu-Zn SOD (Sod1) and Mn-SOD (Sod2) and catalase in the same polyacrylamide gel. The use of NaCN, which specifically inhibits yeast Sod1 isoform, allows the analysis of Sod2 isoform while the use of H2O2 allows the analysis of catalase. The identification of a different zymography profiling of SOD and catalase isoforms in different yeast species allowed us to propose this technique as a novel yeast identification and classification strategy.

  20. Evaluation of Different Yeast Species for Improving In vitro Fermentation of Cereal Straws

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuo; He, Zhixiong; Beauchemin, Karen A.; Tang, Shaoxun; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinhe; Odongo, Nicholas E.; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Information on the effects of different yeast species on ruminal fermentation is limited. This experiment was conducted in a 3×4 factorial arrangement to explore and compare the effects of addition of three different live yeast species (Candida utilis 1314, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1355, and Candida tropicalis 1254) at four doses (0, 0.25×107, 0.50×107, and 0.75×107 colony-forming unit [cfu]) on in vitro gas production kinetics, fiber degradation, methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics of maize stover, and rice straw by mixed rumen microorganisms in dairy cows. The maximum gas production (Vf), dry matter disappearance (IVDMD), neutral detergent fiber disappearance (IVNDFD), and methane production in C. utilis group were less (p<0.01) than other two live yeast supplemented groups. The inclusion of S. cerevisiae reduced (p<0.01) the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), isobutyrate, and isovalerate compared to the other two yeast groups. C. tropicalis addition generally enhanced (p<0.05) IVDMD and IVNDFD. The NH3-N concentration and CH4 production were increased (p<0.05) by the addition of S. cerevisiae and C. tropicalis compared with the control. Supplementation of three yeast species decreased (p<0.05) or numerically decreased the ratio of acetate to propionate. The current results indicate that C. tropicalis is more preferred as yeast culture supplements, and its optimal dose should be 0.25×107 cfu/500 mg substrates in vitro. PMID:26732448

  1. Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the Planistromellaceae including its coelomycetous anamorphs: contributions towards a monograph of the genus Kellermania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The core species of the family Planistromellaceae are included in the teleomorphic genera Planistroma and Planistromella and their anamorphic, coelomycetous genera Alpakesa, Kellermania, and Piptarthron. These genera have been defined primarily on the basis of ascospore septation or number of conidi...

  2. Production of sophorolipids biosurfactants by multiple species of the Starmerella (Candida) bombicola yeast clade

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sophorolipid production was tested for 26 strains representing 19 species of the Starmerella yeast clade, including S. bombicola and Candida apicola, which were previously reported to produce sophorolipids. Five of the 19 species tested showed significant production of sophorolipids: S. bombicola, ...

  3. Yeasts and coliform bacteria of water accumulated in bromeliads of mangrove and sand dune ecosystems of southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hagler, A N; Rosa, C A; Morais, P B; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Franco, G M; Araujo, F V; Soares, C A

    1993-10-01

    Yeasts and coliform bacteria were isolated from water that accumulated in the central cups and adjacent leaf axilae of two bromeliads, Neoregelia cruenta of a coastal sand dune and Quesnelia quesneliana of a mangrove ecosystem near the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The mean total coliform counts were above 10,000 per 100 mL for waters of both plants, but the mean fecal coliform counts were only 74 per 100 mL for Q. quesneliana and mostly undetected in water from N. cruenta. Of 90 fecal coliform isolates, 51 were typical of Escherichia coli in colony morphology and indol, methyl red, Volges-Proskauer, and citrate (IMViC) tests. Seven representatives of the typical E. coli cultures were identified as this species, but the identifications of nine other coliform bacteria were mostly dubious. The yeast community of N. cruenta was typical of plant surfaces with basidiomycetous yeasts anamorphs, and the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans was prevalent. Quesnelia quesneliana had a substantial proportion of ascomycetous yeasts and their anamorphs, including a probable new biotype of Saccharomyces unisporus. Our results suggested that the microbial communities in bromeliad waters are typically autochtonous and not contaminants.

  4. Zygosaccharomyces favi sp. nov., an obligate osmophilic yeast species from bee bread and honey.

    PubMed

    Čadež, Neža; Fülöp, László; Dlauchy, Dénes; Péter, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Five yeast strains representing a hitherto undescribed yeast species were isolated from bee bread and honey in Hungary. They are obligate osmophilic, i.e. they are unable to grow in/on high water activity culture media. Following isogamous conjugation, they form 1-4 spheroid or subspheroid ascospores in persistent asci. The analysis of the sequences of their large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domain placed the new species in the Zygosaccharomyces clade. In terms of pairwise sequence similarity, Zygosaccharomyces gambellarensis is the most closely related species. Comparisons of D1/D2, internal transcribed spacer and translation elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) gene sequences of the five strains with that of the type strain of Z. gambellarensis revealed that they represent a new yeast species. The name Zygosaccharomyces favi sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.01994(T) = CBS 13653(T) = NRRL Y-63719(T) = ZIM 2551(T)) is proposed for this new yeast species, which based on phenotype can be distinguished from related Zygosaccharomyces species by its obligate osmophilic nature. Some intragenomic sequence variability, mainly indels, was detected among the ITS copies of the strains of the new species.

  5. Effect of yeast species on the terpenoids profile of Chinese light-style liquor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Zhu, Weian; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Terpenoids are important trace flavour constituents in Chinese light-style liquors, and are formed by the various yeast species present during fermentation of liquor from cereal and legume materials. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia kudriavzevii and Wickerhamomyces anomalus are three such yeast species, and we found S. cerevisiae capable of generating thirteen different terpenoids in cereal and legume extract fermentation, by both de novo and biotransformation pathways. We also found that cereals such as sorghum and barley, and legumes such as peas, contained different terpenoids precursors, which differentially affected the formation and profile of terpenoids mixtures. This work gives new insights into the role of yeast species in generating the various terpenoids mixtures found in Chinese light-style liquors.

  6. Non-conventional Yeast Species for Lowering Ethanol Content of Wines

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Morales, Pilar; Comitini, Francesca; Tronchoni, Jordi; Canonico, Laura; Curiel, José A.; Oro, Lucia; Rodrigues, Alda J.; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Rising sugar content in grape must, and the concomitant increase in alcohol levels in wine, are some of the main challenges affecting the winemaking industry nowadays. Among the several alternative solutions currently under study, the use of non-conventional yeasts during fermentation holds good promise for contributing to relieve this problem. Non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species comprise a high number or species, so encompassing a wider physiological diversity than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Indeed, the current oenological interest of these microorganisms was initially triggered by their potential positive contribution to the sensorial complexity of quality wines, through the production of aroma and other sensory-active compounds. This diversity also involves ethanol yield on sugar, one of the most invariant metabolic traits of S. cerevisiae. This review gathers recent research on non-Saccharomyces yeasts, aiming to produce wines with lower alcohol content than those from pure Saccharomyces starters. Critical aspects discussed include the selection of suitable yeast strains (considering there is a noticeable intra-species diversity for ethanol yield, as shown for other fermentation traits), identification of key environmental parameters influencing ethanol yields (including the use of controlled oxygenation conditions), and managing mixed fermentations, by either the sequential or simultaneous inoculation of S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. The feasibility, at the industrial level, of using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for reducing alcohol levels in wine will require an improved understanding of the metabolism of these alternative yeast species, as well as of the interactions between different yeast starters during the fermentation of grape must. PMID:27199967

  7. Mitochondria, reactive oxygen species, and chronological aging: a message from yeast.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong

    2011-11-01

    As a major intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondria are involved in aging and lifespan regulation. Using the yeast chronological aging model, researchers have identified conserved signaling pathways that affect lifespan by modulating mitochondrial functions. Caloric restriction and a genetic mimetic with reduced target of rapamycin signaling globally upregulate the mitochondrial proteome and respiratory functions. Recent discoveries support the notion that an altered mitochondrial proteome induces mitohormesis. Mitohormesis involves a variety of ROS during several growth stages and extends lifespan in yeast and other organisms. Here we recap recent advances in understanding of ROS as signals that decelerate chronological aging in yeast. We also discuss parallels between yeast and worm hypoxic signaling. In sum, this mini-review covers mitochondrial regulation by nutrient-sensing pathways and the complex underlying interactions of ROS, metabolic pathways, and chronological aging.

  8. Distribution of the trehalase activation response and the regulatory trehalase gene among yeast species.

    PubMed

    Soto, T; Fernández, J; Cansado, J; Vicente, J; Gacto, M

    1997-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts the activity of regulatory trehalases increases in response to the addition of glucose and to thermal changes in the extracellular medium. We have performed an screening on the extent of this response among different representative yeast species and the results show that this ability is displayed only by a few members of the Saccharomycetaceae family. However, all yeasts examined contain a gene related to that coding for regulatory trehalase in S. cerevisiae. This finding reveals that the operational distinction between regulatory and nonregulatory trehalase in yeasts is not a property of the enzyme by itself but relays on the expression of accompanying mechanisms able to modulate trehalase activity.

  9. [Isolated yeast species in urine samples in a Spanish regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, Victor; Ros, Luis; Sorlózano, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Candiduria detection in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients is of great clinical significance. The aim of our study was to describe the isolation frequency of significant species of yeasts in urine samples processed in our hospital during the period 2010- 2013, and to analyze their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents. Species identification was performed by seeding on a chromogenic medium, the filamentation test and automated systems (ASM Vitek and MALDI Biotyper), while susceptibility was determined using the ASM Vitek system. Of the 632 yeast isolates in urine, 371 were Candida albicans species and 261 non-C. albicans Candida spp. The species with the highest number of resistant isolates were Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Based on the results obtained, we believe that species identification and the susceptibility study should be current practice in the laboratories when species other than C. albicans are isolated.

  10. Mixed-species biofilm formation by lactic acid bacteria and rice wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2007-07-01

    We found that species combinations such as Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus IFO3831 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kyokai-10 can form a mixed-species biofilm in coculture. Moreover, the Kyokai-10 yeast strain can form a biofilm in monoculture in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) from L. casei IFO3831. The active substance(s) in bacterial CM is heat sensitive and has a molecular mass of between 3 and 5 kDa. In biofilms from cocultures or CM monocultures, yeast cells had a distinct morphology, with many hill-like protrusions on the cell surface.

  11. Yeast species composition differs between artisan bakery and spontaneous laboratory sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, Gino; De Vuyst, Luc; Van der Meulen, Roel; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; Daniel, Heide-Marie

    2010-06-01

    Sourdough fermentations are characterized by the combined activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. An investigation of the microbial composition of 21 artisan sourdoughs from 11 different Belgian bakeries yielded 127 yeast isolates. Also, 12 spontaneous 10-day laboratory sourdough fermentations with daily backslopping were performed with rye, wheat, and spelt flour, resulting in the isolation of 217 yeast colonies. The isolates were grouped according to PCR-fingerprints obtained with the primer M13. Representative isolates of each M13 fingerprint group were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences, and partial actin gene sequences, leading to the detection of six species. The dominant species in the bakery sourdoughs were Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus (formerly Pichia anomala), while the dominant species in the laboratory sourdough fermentations were W. anomalus and Candida glabrata. The presence of S. cerevisiae in the bakery sourdoughs might be due to contamination of the bakery environment with commercial bakers yeast, while the yeasts in the laboratory sourdoughs, which were carried out under aseptic conditions with flour as the only nonsterile component, could only have come from the flour used.

  12. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  13. Candida carvajalis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species from the Ecuadorian Amazon jungle.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Bond, Christopher J; Cross, Kathryn; Núñez, Norma C; Portero, Patricia B; Roberts, Ian N

    2009-08-01

    In the course of a yeast biodiversity survey of different ecological habitats found in Ecuador, two yeast strains (CLQCA 20-011(T) and CLQCA20-014) were isolated from samples of rotten wood and fallen leaf debris collected at separate sites in the central region of the Ecuadorian Amazonia. These strains were found to represent a novel yeast species based on the sequences of their D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and their physiological characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis based on LSU D1/D2 sequences revealed this novel species to be most closely related to Candida asparagi, Candida fructus, Candida musae and two as yet undescribed Candida species, with the six yeast taxa collectively forming a distinct species group within the Clavispora clade. The species name of Candida carvajalis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with CLQCA 20-011(T) (NCYC 3509(T), CBS 11361(T)) designated as the type strain.

  14. Kockovaella libkindii sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from water tanks of bromeliad.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fatima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2016-12-01

    During a study of yeast community associated with water tanks (phytotelmata) of the bromeliad Vriesea minarum, two strains of a novel stalk-forming yeast species were found. The sequences of the region spanning the ITS and D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene showed that this species belongs to the genus Kockovaella. The novel species differs by 14 or more nucleotide substitutions in the D1/D2 domains and by 26 or more substitutions in the ITS-5.8S region from all other Kockovaella species. We describe this species as Kockovaella libkindii sp. nov. The type strain of Kockovaella libkindii sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y6053T (=UFMG-BRO-488T=CBS 12685T). The MycoBank number is MB 817710.

  15. Delimitation of Neonectria and Cylindrocarpon (Nectriaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota) and related genera with Cylindrocarpon-like anamorphs

    PubMed Central

    Chaverri, P.; Salgado, C.; Hirooka, Y.; Rossman, A.Y.; Samuels, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Neonectria is a cosmopolitan genus and it is, in part, defined by its link to the anamorph genus Cylindrocarpon. Neonectria has been divided into informal groups on the basis of combined morphology of anamorph and teleomorph. Previously, Cylindrocarpon was divided into four groups defined by presence or absence of microconidia and chlamydospores. Molecular phylogenetic analyses have indicated that Neonectria sensu stricto and Cylindrocarpon sensu stricto are phylogenetically congeneric. In addition, morphological and molecular data accumulated over several years have indicated that Neonectria sensu lato and Cylindrocarpon sensu lato do not form a monophyletic group and that the respective informal groups may represent distinct genera. In the present work, a multilocus analysis (act, ITS, LSU, rpb1, tef1, tub) was applied to representatives of the informal groups to determine their level of phylogenetic support as a first step towards taxonomic revision of Neonectria sensu lato. Results show five distinct highly supported clades that correspond to some extent with the informal Neonectria and Cylindrocarpon groups that are here recognised as genera: (1) N. coccinea-group and Cylindrocarpon groups 1 & 4 (Neonectria/Cylindrocarpon sensu stricto); (2) N. rugulosa-group (Rugonectria gen. nov.); (3) N. mammoidea/N. veuillotiana-groups and Cylindrocarpon group 2 (Thelonectria gen. nov.); (4) N. radicicola-group and Cylindrocarpon group 3 (Ilyonectria gen. nov.); and (5) anamorph genus Campylocarpon. Characteristics of the anamorphs and teleomorphs correlate with the five genera, three of which are newly described. New combinations are made for species where their classification is confirmed by phylogenetic data. PMID:21523189

  16. Comparison of the rapid yeast plus panel with the API20C yeast system for identification of clinically significant isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Sotomayor, E; Coon, K; D'Arezzo, J B

    1998-05-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species.

  17. Comparison of the Rapid Yeast Plus Panel with the API20C Yeast System for Identification of Clinically Significant Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Heelan, Judith S.; Sotomayor, Edgar; Coon, Kimberly; D’Arezzo, Julia B.

    1998-01-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species. PMID:9574727

  18. A monograph of Allantonectria, Nectria, and Pleonectria (Nectriaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota) and their pycnidial, sporodochial, and synnematous anamorphs

    PubMed Central

    Hirooka, Y.; Rossman, A.Y.; Samuels, G.J.; Lechat, C.; Chaverri, P.

    2012-01-01

    Although Nectria is the type genus of Nectriaceae (Hypocreales, Sordariomycetes, Pezizomycotina, Ascomycota), the systematics of the teleomorphic and anamorphic state of Nectria sensu Rossman has not been studied in detail. The objectives of this study are to 1) provide a phylogenetic overview to determine if species of Nectria with Gyrostroma, Tubercularia, and Zythiostroma anamorphs form a monophyletic group; 2) define Nectria, segregate genera, and their species using morphologically informative characters of teleomorphic and anamorphic states; and 3) provide descriptions and illustrations of these genera and species. To accomplish these objectives, results of phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from six loci (act, ITS, LSU, rpb1, tef1 and tub), were integrated with morphological characterisations of anamorphs and teleomorphs. Results from the phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that species previously regarded as the genus Nectria having Gyrostroma, Tubercularia, and Zythiostroma anamorphs belong in two major paraphyletic clades. The first major clade regarded as the genus Pleonectria contains 26 species with ascoconidia produced by ascospores in asci, perithecial walls having bright yellow scurf, and immersed or superficial pycnidial anamorphs (Zythiostroma = Gyrostroma). A lineage basal to the Pleonectria clade includes Nectria miltina having very small, aseptate ascospores, and trichoderma-like conidiophores and occurring on monocotyledonous plants. These characteristics are unusual in Pleonectria, thus we recognise the monotypic genus Allantonectria with Allantonectria miltina. The second major clade comprises the genus Nectria sensu stricto including the type species, N. cinnabarina, and 28 additional species. Within the genus Nectria, four subclades exist. One subclade includes species with sporodochial anamorphs and another with synnematous anamorphs. The other two paraphyletic subclades include species that produce abundant stromata in which the

  19. A monograph of Allantonectria, Nectria, and Pleonectria (Nectriaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota) and their pycnidial, sporodochial, and synnematous anamorphs.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Y; Rossman, A Y; Samuels, G J; Lechat, C; Chaverri, P

    2012-03-15

    Although Nectria is the type genus of Nectriaceae (Hypocreales, Sordariomycetes, Pezizomycotina, Ascomycota), the systematics of the teleomorphic and anamorphic state of Nectriasensu Rossman has not been studied in detail. The objectives of this study are to 1) provide a phylogenetic overview to determine if species of Nectria with Gyrostroma, Tubercularia, and Zythiostroma anamorphs form a monophyletic group; 2) define Nectria, segregate genera, and their species using morphologically informative characters of teleomorphic and anamorphic states; and 3) provide descriptions and illustrations of these genera and species. To accomplish these objectives, results of phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from six loci (act, ITS, LSU, rpb1, tef1 and tub), were integrated with morphological characterisations of anamorphs and teleomorphs. Results from the phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that species previously regarded as the genus Nectria having Gyrostroma,Tubercularia, and Zythiostroma anamorphs belong in two major paraphyletic clades. The first major clade regarded as the genus Pleonectria contains 26 species with ascoconidia produced by ascospores in asci, perithecial walls having bright yellow scurf, and immersed or superficial pycnidial anamorphs (Zythiostroma = Gyrostroma). A lineage basal to the Pleonectria clade includes Nectria miltina having very small, aseptate ascospores, and trichoderma-like conidiophores and occurring on monocotyledonous plants. These characteristics are unusual in Pleonectria, thus we recognise the monotypic genus Allantonectria with Allantonectria miltina. The second major clade comprises the genus Nectriasensu stricto including the type species, N. cinnabarina, and 28 additional species. Within the genus Nectria, four subclades exist. One subclade includes species with sporodochial anamorphs and another with synnematous anamorphs. The other two paraphyletic subclades include species that produce abundant stromata in which the large

  20. Evolution of ecological dominance of yeast species in high-sugar environments.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kathryn M; Liu, Ping; Fay, Justin C

    2015-08-01

    In budding yeasts, fermentation in the presence of oxygen evolved around the time of a whole genome duplication (WGD) and is thought to confer dominance in high-sugar environments because ethanol is toxic to many species. Although there are many fermentative yeast species, only Saccharomyces cerevisiae consistently dominates wine fermentations. In this study, we use coculture experiments and intrinsic growth rate assays to examine the relative fitness of non-WGD and WGD yeast species across environments to assess when S. cerevisiae's ability to dominate high-sugar environments arose. We show that S. cerevisiae dominates nearly all other non-WGD and WGD species except for its sibling species S. paradoxus in both grape juice and a high-sugar rich medium. Of the species we tested, S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus have evolved the highest ethanol tolerance and intrinsic growth rate in grape juice. However, the ability of S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus to dominate certain species depends on the temperature and the type of high-sugar environment. Our results indicate that dominance of high-sugar environments evolved much more recently than the WGD, most likely just prior to or during the differentiation of Saccharomyces species, and that evolution of multiple traits contributes to S. cerevisiae's ability to dominate wine fermentations. © 2015 The Author(s) Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Evolution of ecological dominance of yeast species in high‐sugar environments

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn M.; Liu, Ping; Fay, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    In budding yeasts, fermentation in the presence of oxygen evolved around the time of a whole genome duplication (WGD) and is thought to confer dominance in high‐sugar environments because ethanol is toxic to many species. Although there are many fermentative yeast species, only Saccharomyces cerevisiae consistently dominates wine fermentations. In this study, we use coculture experiments and intrinsic growth rate assays to examine the relative fitness of non‐WGD and WGD yeast species across environments to assess when S. cerevisiae’s ability to dominate high‐sugar environments arose. We show that S. cerevisiae dominates nearly all other non‐WGD and WGD species except for its sibling species S. paradoxus in both grape juice and a high‐sugar rich medium. Of the species we tested, S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus have evolved the highest ethanol tolerance and intrinsic growth rate in grape juice. However, the ability of S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus to dominate certain species depends on the temperature and the type of high‐sugar environment. Our results indicate that dominance of high‐sugar environments evolved much more recently than the WGD, most likely just prior to or during the differentiation of Saccharomyces species, and that evolution of multiple traits contributes to S. cerevisiae's ability to dominate wine fermentations. PMID:26087012

  2. "Pecorino di Filiano" cheese as a selective habitat for the yeast species, Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Capece, A; Romano, P

    2009-06-30

    The composition of yeast microflora in artisanal "Pecorino di Filiano" cheese, a typical product of the Basilicata region of Southern Italy, was studied during ripening. The isolates were identified by restriction analysis of the 18S rDNA amplified region with the combined use of Hinf I and Cfo I enzymes. The majority of the isolates were identified as Debaryomyces hansenii, whereas two yeasts were identified as Kluyveromyces lactis and one as Dekkera anomala. To evaluate natural biodiversity, D. hansenii "Pecorino di Filiano" isolates were submitted to genetic and technological characterization. RAPD-PCR analysis with P80 (5CGCGTGCCCA3) primer revealed significant polymorphism among D. hansenii isolates. About 30% of the isolates showed single molecular profiles, whereas the other D. hansenii yeasts were separated into three main patterns, differing for both the ripening time and the isolation source. Furthermore, the yeasts showed significant variability in their, "proteolytic activity". This work demonstrated the high predominance of D. hansenii among the yeast population of "Pecorino di Filiano" cheese, probably in consequence of the traditional salting process, which was selected for this salt tolerant species. This preliminary study allowed us to isolate autochthonous D. hansenii yeasts potentially useful as starters for the production of this artisanal cheese.

  3. Diddensiella caesifluorescens gen. nov., sp. nov., a riboflavin-producing yeast species of the family Trichomonascaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four strains of a novel heterothallic yeast species were isolated from rotten wood collected in or near the Pilis Mountains in Hungary. The strains produced riboflavin in liquid culture. Analysis of gene sequences for the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA), as well as an...

  4. Ogataea saltuana sp. nov., a novel methanol-assimilating yeast species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four ascosporulating strains of an undescribed methanol-assimilating yeast species were isolated from forest habitats in Hungary. Three of them were recovered from rotten wood and one from leaves of a sessile oak. A closely related, but somewhat divergent strain was recovered from insect frass in a ...

  5. Immunochemistry of pathogenic yeast, Candida species, focusing on mannan

    PubMed Central

    SHIBATA, Nobuyuki; KOBAYASHI, Hidemitsu; SUZUKI, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    This review describes recent findings based on structural and immunochemical analyses of the cell wall mannan of Candida albicans, and other medically important Candida species. Mannan has been shown to consist of α-1,2-, α-1,3-, α-1,6-, and β-1,2-linked mannopyranose units with few phosphate groups. Each Candida species has a unique mannan structure biosynthesized by sequential collaboration between species-specific mannosyltransferases. In particular, the β-1,2-linked mannose units have been shown to comprise a characteristic oligomannosyl side chain that is strongly antigenic. For these pathogenic Candida species, cell-surface mannan was also found to participate in the adhesion to the epithelial cells, recognition by innate immune receptors and development of pathogenicity. Therefore, clarification of the precise chemical structure of Candida mannan is indispensable for understanding the mechanism of pathogenicity, and for development of new antifungal drugs and immunotherapeutic procedures. PMID:22728440

  6. Candida ecuadorensis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species found in two separate regions of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Barahona, Patricia Portero; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    In the course of an on-going study aimed at cataloguing the natural yeast biodiversity found in Ecuador, two strains (CLQCA 13-025 and CLQCA 20-004(T)) were isolated from samples of cow manure and rotten wood collected in two separate provinces of the country (Orellana and Bolívar). These strains were found to represent a novel yeast species based on the sequences of their D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and their physiological characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis based on LSU D1/D2 sequences revealed this novel species to belong to the Metschnikowia clade and to be most closely related to Candida suratensis, a species recently discovered in a mangrove forest in Thailand. The species name of Candida ecuadorensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with strain CLQCA 20-004(T) (=CBS 12653(T) = NCYC 3782(T)) designated as the type strain.

  7. Saturnispora quitensis sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from the Maquipucuna cloud forest reserve in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Cadet, Geneviève M; Barriga, Enrique Javier Carvajal; Barahona, Patricia Portero; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2011-12-01

    A single strain, CLQCA-10-114(T), representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Saturnispora was isolated from the fruit of an unidentified species of bramble (Rubus sp.), collected from the Maquipucuna cloud forest reserve, near Quito, in Ecuador. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to the recently described species Saturnispora gosingensis, isolated from the fruiting body of a mushroom collected in Taiwan, and Saturnispora hagleri, a Drosophila-associated yeast found in Brazil. The name Saturnispora quitensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate this strain; the type strain is CLQCA-10-114(T) (=CBS 12184(T)=NCYC 3744(T)).

  8. Spencermartinsiella silvicola sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from rotting wood.

    PubMed

    Morais, Camila G; Lara, Carla A; Oliveira, Evelyn S; Peter, Gábor; Dlauchy, Dénes; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-11-10

    Three strains of a new xylanase-producing yeast species were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in the Atlantic Rain Forest of Brazil. The sequences of the ITS region and D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that this new yeast species belongs to the genus Spencermartinsiella, and its closest relatives among the recognized species are S. europaea and S. ligniputridi. The novel species Spencermartinsiella silvicola sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is UFMG-CM-Y274T (= CBS 13490T). The MycoBank number is MB 813053. In addition, Candida cellulosicola is reassigned to the genus Spencermartinsiella as a new combination.

  9. [Species composition and biochemical properties of yeasts from the water of the Bratsk reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zemskaia, T I; Novozhilova, M I

    1980-01-01

    The specific composition of 370 yeast strains isolated from the water of the Bratsk Reservoir was studied. The strains were assigned to 7 genera and 16 species according to their morphological, cultural, and physiologo-biochemical properties. Asporogenous forms prevailed; 52 strains possessed the amylolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was found in the cultures very seldom. The capability to assimilate organic phosphorus compounds was detected in 8% of the strains, and the ability to use inorganic phosphorus compounds was registered in 38% of the strains. Up to 95% of the strains utilized oil; 88%--engine oil; 43%--phenol. The specific yeast composition varied depending on the biotype.

  10. The Prevalence and Species Composition of Malassezia yeasts in Patients with Clinically Suspected Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Prohic, Asja; Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, Suada; Sadikovic, Tamara Jovovic; Cavaljuga, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are limited numbers of studies which focused on the identification of Malassezia yeasts to a species level in onychomycosis. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of Malassezia yeasts in patients with clinically suspected onychomycosis and to examine if the range of species varies with patient gender, age, site of involvement and clinical pattern of onychomycosis. Methods: Specimens were taken from 785 patients presenting signs of onychomycosis and then incubated on Sabouraud dextrose agar and modified Dixon agar. The yeasts isolated were identified according to their macroscopic and microscopic features and physiological characteristics. Results: Malassezia species were diagnosed both by microscopy and culture in fourteen (1.8%) patients. M. globosa was the predominant, if not only, species identified from nail samples. Mixed cultures were observed in five cases: in 4 cases Malassezia was co-isolated with Candida albicans and in one case with dermatophyte. Fingernails were affected more frequently than toenails (85.7%) and distolateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common clinical type (78.6%). Conclusion: No significant differences were found in the distribution of Malassezia species isolated according to demographic parameters. PMID:26005253

  11. Phenotypic landscape of non-conventional yeast species for different stress tolerance traits desirable in bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Vaskar; Radecka, Dorota; Aerts, Guido; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Lievens, Bart; Thevelein, Johan M

    2017-01-01

    Non-conventional yeasts present a huge, yet barely exploited, resource of yeast biodiversity for industrial applications. This presents a great opportunity to explore alternative ethanol-fermenting yeasts that are more adapted to some of the stress factors present in the harsh environmental conditions in second-generation (2G) bioethanol fermentation. Extremely tolerant yeast species are interesting candidates to investigate the underlying tolerance mechanisms and to identify genes that when transferred to existing industrial strains could help to design more stress-tolerant cell factories. For this purpose, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic evaluation of a large collection of non-conventional yeast species to identify the tolerance limits of the different yeast species for desirable stress tolerance traits in 2G bioethanol production. Next, 12 multi-tolerant strains were selected and used in fermentations under different stressful conditions. Five strains out of which, showing desirable fermentation characteristics, were then evaluated in small-scale, semi-anaerobic fermentations with lignocellulose hydrolysates. Our results revealed the phenotypic landscape of many non-conventional yeast species which have not been previously characterized for tolerance to stress conditions relevant for bioethanol production. This has identified for each stress condition evaluated several extremely tolerant non-Saccharomyces yeasts. It also revealed multi-tolerance in several yeast species, which makes those species good candidates to investigate the molecular basis of a robust general stress tolerance. The results showed that some non-conventional yeast species have similar or even better fermentation efficiency compared to S. cerevisiae in the presence of certain stressful conditions. Prior to this study, our knowledge on extreme stress-tolerant phenotypes in non-conventional yeasts was limited to only few species. Our work has now revealed in a systematic way the

  12. Identification of Malassezia yeast species isolated from patients with pityriasis versicolor.

    PubMed

    Petry, Vanessa; Tanhausen, Fernanda; Weiss, Luciana; Milan, Thais; Mezzari, Adelina; Weber, Magda Blessmann

    2011-01-01

    Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a disease with worldwide distribution. Twelve different species of Malassezia yeast have been described. The objective of this study was to determine which species of Malassezia are more prevalent in patients with pityriasis versicolor. Samples were collected by scraping the lesions of 87 patients with a clinical suspicion of pityriasis versicolor. The samples were then submitted to fungal microscopy and culture to identify the species. The species found were: Malassezia sympodialis (30%), Malassezia furfur (25.7%), Malassezia globosa (22.7%), Malassezia restricta (12.1%), Malassezia obtusa (7.6%) and Malassezia slooffiae (1.5%).

  13. CHROMagar Candida medium as a practical tool for the differentiation and presumptive identification of yeast species isolated from salads.

    PubMed

    Tornai-Lehoczki, Judit; Péter, Gábor; Dlauchy, Dénes

    2003-09-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium was used to study the diversity of yeast biota of salad samples, and to presumptively identify the isolates. This medium was originally developed for the selective isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species such as Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata on the basis of differences in colour and surface of colonies. Ninety three yeast strains representing 33 species from the culture collection and 39 fresh isolates from different mayonnaise-based mixed salads showed a wide range of hue of colony colours ranging from white to yellow, orange, red, pink, purple, blue, green, etc., as well as different morphological appearances on the CHROMagar Candida medium. Therefore, CHROMagar Candida medium facilitates the detection of mixtures of yeast species from different samples on a single isolation plate and this medium can be a practical method for the differentiation and rapid presumptive identification of many yeast species occurring frequently in different kind of foods.

  14. Malassezia cuniculi sp. nov., a novel yeast species isolated from rabbit skin.

    PubMed

    Cabañes, F J; Vega, S; Castellá, G

    2011-01-01

    Members of the genus Malassezia have rarely been associated with lagomorphs. During the course of an investigation of the lipophilic mycobiota of rabbit skin, two lipid-dependent isolates which could not be identified were recovered on Leeming and Notman agar medium from different animals. No growth of Malassezia yeasts was obtained either on Sabouraud's glucose agar or modified Dixon agar media. In this study, we describe a new taxon, Malassezia cuniculi sp. nov., including its morphological and physiological characteristics. The validation of this new species was supported by analysis of the D1/D2 regions of the 26S rRNA gene and the ITS-5.8S rRNA gene sequences. The results of these studies confirm the separation of this new species from the other species of the genus Malassezia, as well as the presence of Malassezia yeasts on lagomorphs.

  15. Bandoniozyma gen. nov., a Genus of Fermentative and Non-Fermentative Tremellaceous Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Crestani, Juliana; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Sette, Lara Durães; Passarini, Michel Rodrigo Zambrano; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Brandão, Luciana R.; Pimenta, Raphael S.; Ribeiro, José Roberto; Garcia, Karina Marques; Lee, Ching-Fu; Suh, Sung-Oui; Péter, Gábor; Dlauchy, Dénes; Fell, Jack W.; Scorzetti, Gloria; Theelen, Bart; Vainstein, Marilene H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Independent surveys across the globe led to the proposal of a new basidiomycetous yeast genus within the Bulleromyces clade of the Tremellales, Bandoniozyma gen. nov., with seven new species. Methodology/Principal Findings The species were characterized by multiple methods, including the analysis of D1/D2 and ITS nucleotide sequences, and morphological and physiological/biochemical traits. Most species can ferment glucose, which is an unusual trait among basidiomycetous yeasts. Conclusions/Significance In this study we propose the new yeast genus Bandoniozyma, with seven species Bandoniozyma noutii sp. nov. (type species of genus; CBS 8364T  =  DBVPG 4489T), Bandoniozyma aquatica sp. nov. (UFMG-DH4.20T  =  CBS 12527T  =  ATCC MYA-4876T), Bandoniozyma complexa sp. nov. (CBS 11570T  =  ATCC MYA-4603T  =  MA28aT), Bandoniozyma fermentans sp. nov. (CBS 12399T  =  NU7M71T  =  BCRC 23267T), Bandoniozyma glucofermentans sp. nov. (CBS 10381T  =  NRRL Y-48076T  =  ATCC MYA-4760T  =  BG 02-7-15-015A-1-1T), Bandoniozyma tunnelae sp. nov. (CBS 8024T  =  DBVPG 7000T), and Bandoniozyma visegradensis sp. nov. (CBS 12505T  =  NRRL Y-48783T  =  NCAIM Y.01952T). PMID:23056233

  16. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  17. Expansion of the Candida tanzawaensis yeast clade: 16 novel Candida species from basidiocarp-feeding beetles.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Oui; McHugh, Joseph V; Blackwell, Meredith

    2004-11-01

    A major clade of new yeast taxa from the digestive tract of basidiocarp-feeding beetles is recognized based on rRNA gene sequence analyses. Almost 30 % of 650 gut isolates formed a statistically well-supported clade that included Candida tanzawaensis. The yeasts in the clade were isolated from 11 families of beetles, of which Tenebrionidae and Erotylidae were most commonly sampled. Repeated isolation of certain yeasts from the same beetle species at different times and places indicated strong host associations. Sexual reproduction was never observed in the yeasts. Based on comparisons of small- and large-subunit rRNA gene sequences and morphological and physiological traits, the yeasts were placed in Candida ambrosiae and in 16 other undescribed taxa. In this report, the novel species in the genus Candida are described and their relationships with other taxa in the Saccharomycetes are discussed. The novel species and their type strains are as follows: Candida guaymorum (NRRL Y-27568(T)=CBS 9823(T)), Candida bokatorum (NRRL Y-27571(T)=CBS 9824(T)), Candida kunorum (NRRL Y-27580(T)=CBS 9825(T)), Candida terraborum (NRRL Y-27573(T)=CBS 9826(T)), Candida emberorum (NRRL Y-27606(T)=CBS 9827(T)), Candida wounanorum (NRRL Y-27574(T)=CBS 9828(T)), Candida yuchorum (NRRL Y-27569(T)=CBS 9829(T)), Candida chickasaworum (NRRL Y-27566(T)=CBS 9830(T)), Candida choctaworum (NRRL Y-27584(T)=CBS 9831(T)), Candida bolitotheri (NRRL Y-27587(T)=CBS 9832(T)), Candida atakaporum (NRRL Y-27570(T)=CBS 9833(T)), Candida panamericana (NRRL Y-27567(T)=CBS 9834(T)), Candida bribrorum (NRRL Y-27572(T)=CBS 9835(T)), Candida maxii (NRRL Y-27588(T)=CBS 9836(T)), Candida anneliseae (NRRL Y-27563(T)=CBS 9837(T)) and Candida taliae (NRRL Y-27589(T)=CBS 9838(T)).

  18. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species.

    PubMed

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-10-29

    The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37 degrees C. The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar.

  19. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  20. XRN1 Is a Species-Specific Virus Restriction Factor in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Paul A.; Ho, Brandon; Bushong, Sarah; Johnson, Arlen; Sawyer, Sara L.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the degradation of cellular mRNAs is accomplished by Xrn1 and the cytoplasmic exosome. Because viral RNAs often lack canonical caps or poly-A tails, they can also be vulnerable to degradation by these host exonucleases. Yeast lack sophisticated mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity, but do use RNA degradation as an antiviral defense mechanism. We find a highly refined, species-specific relationship between Xrn1p and the “L-A” totiviruses of different Saccharomyces yeast species. We show that the gene XRN1 has evolved rapidly under positive natural selection in Saccharomyces yeast, resulting in high levels of Xrn1p protein sequence divergence from one yeast species to the next. We also show that these sequence differences translate to differential interactions with the L-A virus, where Xrn1p from S. cerevisiae is most efficient at controlling the L-A virus that chronically infects S. cerevisiae, and Xrn1p from S. kudriavzevii is most efficient at controlling the L-A-like virus that we have discovered within S. kudriavzevii. All Xrn1p orthologs are equivalent in their interaction with another virus-like parasite, the Ty1 retrotransposon. Thus, Xrn1p appears to co-evolve with totiviruses to maintain its potent antiviral activity and limit viral propagation in Saccharomyces yeasts. We demonstrate that Xrn1p physically interacts with the Gag protein encoded by the L-A virus, suggesting a host-virus interaction that is more complicated than just Xrn1p-mediated nucleolytic digestion of viral RNAs. PMID:27711183

  1. Candida orba sp. nov., a new cactus-specific yeast species from Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Starmer, W T; Phaff, H J; Ganter, P F; Lachance, M A

    2001-03-01

    A new species of yeast from decaying cladodes of Opuntia cactus, Candida orba, is described. This species is a member of a four-species clade of cactophilic yeasts. The new species has only been found in one region of Queensland, Australia, where it was presumably introduced during attempts to eradicate prickly pear cactus. DNA-DNA relatedness, phylogenetic analysis, physiological differences, killer-sensitivity profiles and mating reactions establish the distinctness of the taxon as a new species. C. orba is most closely related to Phaffomyces thermotolerans, a species found associated with columnar cacti in the North American Sonoran Desert. The type strain of C. orba, isolated from rotting cladodes of Opuntia stricta in the State of Queensland, Australia, is strain UCD-FST 84-833.1T (= CBS 8782T = NRRL Y-27336T = ATCC MYA-341). Only the h- mating type of the species has been recovered. The lack of the opposite mating type could be the result of a bottleneck during its introduction to Australia. The original geographic/host distribution of this species in the Americas is unknown.

  2. Kazachstania rupicola sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from water tanks of a bromeliad in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Safar, Silvana Vilas Boas; Gomes, Fátima C O; Marques, Andréa R; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-03-01

    Two isolates of a novel yeast species were obtained from water tanks (phytotelmata) of the bromeliad Vriesea minarum collected in a tableland ('campo rupestre') ecosystem in Brazil. The sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene showed that this species is related to Kazachstania exigua and others, from which it differs by 8-10 nucleotide substitutions. The novel species Kazachstania rupicola sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is UFMG-BRO-80(T) ( = CBS 12684(T)  = CBMAI 1466(T)).

  3. Yeast Species Associated with Orange Juice: Evaluation of Different Identification Methods†

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Covadonga R.; Burns, Jacqueline K.; Friedrich, Lorrie M.; Goodrich, Renee M.; Parish, Mickey E.

    2002-01-01

    Five different methods were used to identify yeast isolates from a variety of citrus juice sources. A total of 99 strains, including reference strains, were identified using a partial sequence of the 26S rRNA gene, restriction pattern analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region (5.8S-ITS), classical methodology, the RapID Yeast Plus system, and API 20C AUX. Twenty-three different species were identified representing 11 different genera. Distribution of the species was considerably different depending on the type of sample. Fourteen different species were identified from pasteurized single-strength orange juice that had been contaminated after pasteurization (PSOJ), while only six species were isolated from fresh-squeezed, unpasteurized orange juice (FSOJ). Among PSOJ isolates, Candida intermedia and Candida parapsilosis were the predominant species. Hanseniaspora occidentalis and Hanseniaspora uvarum represented up to 73% of total FSOJ isolates. Partial sequence of the 26S rRNA gene yielded the best results in terms of correct identification, followed by classical techniques and 5.8S-ITS analysis. The commercial identification kits RapID Yeast Plus system and API 20C AUX were able to correctly identify only 35 and 13% of the isolates, respectively. Six new 5.8S-ITS profiles were described, corresponding to Clavispora lusitaniae, Geotrichum citri-aurantii, H. occidentalis, H. vineae, Pichia fermentans, and Saccharomycopsis crataegensis. With the addition of these new profiles to the existing database, the use of 5.8S-ITS sequence became the best tool for rapid and accurate identification of yeast isolates from orange juice. PMID:11916718

  4. Candida argentea sp. nov., a copper and silver resistant yeast species.

    PubMed

    Holland, Sara L; Dyer, Paul S; Bond, Chris J; James, Steve A; Roberts, Ian N; Avery, Simon V

    2011-09-01

    A new yeast species was isolated from the sediment under metal-contaminated effluent from a disused metal mine in mid-Wales, UK. BLAST searching with DNA sequence amplified from the ribosomal 26S D1/D2 and ITS regions did not reveal a close match with any previously described species (≥6 % and 3 % divergence, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the species was a member of the Saccharomycetales, but did not group closely with other established species, the nearest relative being Wickerhamia fluorescens although bootstrap support was not strong. In addition to its unusual phylogeny, the species also exhibited notable physiological and morphological traits. Isolates exhibited unusually high resistance to both copper and silver in laboratory assays. These phenotypes appeared to be inherent to the species rather than a transient adaptation to the metal-enriched site in Wales, as the same phenotypes were observed in an identical (according to 26S rDNA sequence) isolate from Sao Domingos, Portugal in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. The species exhibited a multipolar budding-type cell division but, unusually, accumulated as rod-shaped cells following division on solid medium, contrasting with the larger ellipsoidal cells observed in broth. This dimorphism could be discerned readily with flow cytometry. The yeast was tolerant of hyper osmotic stress and grew in acidic media (pH 3). This new species is designated Candida argentea and five independent strains are deposited at the National Collection of Yeast Cultures, UK (NCYC 3753(T), 3754, 3755, 3756, 3757). Because of its unusual morphological variation and metal resistance properties, C. argentea may provide opportunities to gain new insights into the physiological and genetic bases of these phenotypes. Results illustrate novel fungal biodiversity that can occur at polluted sites.

  5. Manganese Ion Increases LAB-yeast Mixed-species Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Nozaka, Soma; Furukawa, Soichi; Sasaki, Miwa; Hirayama, Satoru; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm was formed by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 isolated from Fukuyama pot vinegar and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mixed-species biofilm formation increased in proportion to the YPD medium concentration but decreased in proportion to the MRS medium concentration. The effect of MRS components on mixed-species biofilm formation was investigated in a YPD medium environment, and it was clarified that beef extract (one of the MRS medium components) decreased mixed-species biofilm formation. On the other hand, manganese sulfate (another component in MRS) remarkably increased both LAB single- and LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm formation. LAB single- and mixed-species biofilm formation were increased in proportion to the manganese sulfate concentration up to 1 mM and 100 μM, respectively. The growth of L. plantarum ML11-11 was increased significantly by the addition of 10 μM manganese sulfate and was resistant to higher concentration of up to 100 mM, but growth of S. cerevisiae was sensitive to manganese ion above 100 μM. These results suggested that mixed-species biofilm formation could be controlled artificially by controlling the manganese ion level.

  6. Co-Flocculation of Yeast Species, a New Mechanism to Govern Population Dynamics in Microbial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, Debra; Bagheri, Bahareh; Setati, Mathabatha Evodia; Bauer, Florian Franz

    2015-01-01

    Flocculation has primarily been studied as an important technological property of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains in fermentation processes such as brewing and winemaking. These studies have led to the identification of a group of closely related genes, referred to as the FLO gene family, which controls the flocculation phenotype. All naturally occurring S. cerevisiae strains assessed thus far possess at least four independent copies of structurally similar FLO genes, namely FLO1, FLO5, FLO9 and FLO10. The genes appear to differ primarily by the degree of flocculation induced by their expression. However, the reason for the existence of a large family of very similar genes, all involved in the same phenotype, has remained unclear. In natural ecosystems, and in wine production, S. cerevisiae growth together and competes with a large number of other Saccharomyces and many more non-Saccharomyces yeast species. Our data show that many strains of such wine-related non-Saccharomyces species, some of which have recently attracted significant biotechnological interest as they contribute positively to fermentation and wine character, were able to flocculate efficiently. The data also show that both flocculent and non-flocculent S. cerevisiae strains formed mixed species flocs (a process hereafter referred to as co-flocculation) with some of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts. This ability of yeast strains to impact flocculation behaviour of other species in mixed inocula has not been described previously. Further investigation into the genetic regulation of co-flocculation revealed that different FLO genes impact differently on such adhesion phenotypes, favouring adhesion with some species while excluding other species from such mixed flocs. The data therefore strongly suggest that FLO genes govern the selective association of S. cerevisiae with specific species of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, and may therefore be drivers of ecosystem organisational patterns. Our data

  7. Candida bombiphila sp. nov., a new asexual yeast species in the Wickerhamiella clade.

    PubMed

    Brysch-Herzberg, Michael; Lachance, Marc-André

    2004-09-01

    Two yeast strains were isolated from a bumblebee and bumblebee honey. The strains were almost identical in their D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit rDNA and their physiological abilities. In both respects the strains resembled Wickerhamiella domercqiae. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that the strains represent a novel species with the name Candida bombiphila sp. nov. The type strain is CBS 9712T (= NRRL Y-27640T = MH268T).

  8. [Species composition of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, O I; Pokas, O V; V'ialykh, Zh E; Vasylenko, L H; Koltukova, N V

    2007-01-01

    The strains of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected people in 1994-2005 were examined. It was found that a share of non-albicans strains increased up to 46.2%, in monoculture they were present in 40% of examined patients, Candida glabrata (21.3%) being the dominant species. The definition of proteolytic activity as one of the factors of pathogenicity showed that it was typical of 90% of museum strains and 58% of fresh isolates.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Intraspecific Analysis of the Yeast Species Lachancea quebecensis

    PubMed Central

    Freel, Kelle C.; Friedrich, Anne; Sarilar, Véronique; Devillers, Hugo; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The gold standard in yeast population genomics has been the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the exploration of yeast species outside the Saccharomyces genus is essential to broaden the understanding of genome evolution. Here, we report the analyses of whole-genome sequences of nineisolates from the recently described yeast species Lachancea quebecensis. The genome of one isolate was assembled and annotated, and the intraspecific variability within L. quebecensis was surveyed by comparing the sequences from the eight other isolates to this reference sequence. Our study revealed that these strains harbor genomes with an average nucleotide diversity of π = 2 × 10−3 which is slightly lower, although on the same order of magnitude, as that previously determined for S. cerevisiae (π = 4 × 10−3). Our results show that even though these isolates were all obtained from a relatively isolated geographic location, the same ecological source, and represent a smaller sample size than is available for S. cerevisiae, the levels of divergence are similar to those observed in this model species. This divergence is essentially linked to the presence of two distinct clusters delineated according to geographic location. However, even with relatively similar ranges of genome divergence, L. quebecensis has an extremely low global phenotypic variance of 0.062 compared with 0.59 previously determined in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26733577

  10. Yeast species and genetic heterogeneity within Debaryomyces hansenii along the ripening process of traditional ewes' and goats' cheeses.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Manzanares, Paloma; Belloch, Carmela

    2014-04-01

    The yeasts present during the ripening process of ewes' and goats' cheeses produced in a small traditional dairy in Mediterranean Spain were isolated and identified. Five hundred and thirty strains pertaining to eleven yeast species representing eight genera were identified using molecular methods. Debaryomyces hansenii was the yeast species most frequently isolated in all cheeses. Other yeast species commonly found in dairy products were present at the first maturing weeks. Two yeast species Trichosporon coremiiforme and Trichosporon domesticum have been reported in cheeses for the first time, and Meyerozyma guilliermondii has been newly isolated from goats' cheeses. Yeast species composition changed greatly along the process; although, D. hansenii dominated at the end of ripening in all cheeses. Most yeast isolates were able to hydrolyze casein and fatty acid esters. One hundred and eighty seven D. hansenii isolates were genotyped by PCR amplification of M13 satellites and an UPGMA dendrogram was constructed. The majority of isolates were grouped in 5 clusters while 7 profiles were represented by 1-3 isolates. These results demonstrate the genetic heterogeneity present in D. hansenii strains isolated from raw milk cheeses.

  11. Analysis of the community structure of yeasts associated with the decaying stems of cactus. II.Opuntia species.

    PubMed

    Starmer, W T; Phaff, H J

    1983-10-01

    A survey was made of yeast species associated with the decaying pads of 3 prickly pear cacti (Opuntia phaeacantha, O. ficus-indica, andO. lindheimeri) in Arizona and Texas. Yeast communities from 12 localities were compared among localities, amongOpuntia species, and with previous data on yeast communities associated with columnar cacti. The results indicate thatOpuntia necroses contain relatively more yeast species with broader physiological abilities in their communities than columnar necroses. It is argued that differences in chemistry of the opuntias and columnar forms in concert with the insect vectors specific for these cacti account for the differences in yeast community structure. It is further hypothesized that the differences in yeast community structure have been important in the evolution and maintenance of species diversity forDrosophila species which live in the decaying stems or cladodes of various cacti. Most of the yeast community evolution in the cacti is postulated to have proceeded by evolution in situ and not by additions and replacements from outside of the system.

  12. Seed-borne Botryosphaeria spp. from native Prunus and Podocarpus trees in Ethiopia, with a description of the anamorph Diplodia rosulata sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gure, Abdella; Slippers, Bernard; Stenlid, Jan

    2005-09-01

    Botryosphaeria spp. from seeds of the native afromontane forest tree species, Podocarpus falcatus and Prunus africana, in Ethiopia have been identified. This is achieved by combining anamorph morphological characters and ITS sequence data. From a relatively small sample, four Botryosphaeria spp. were encountered. Two of the species from P. falcatus and the one from P. africana have not been previously described. The two species from P. falcatus were represented by only one isolate each and are not named here. The morphology of their Diplodia and Dothiorella anamorphs is, however, characterised. The anamorph of the other Botryosphaeria sp. from P. africana is described here as Diplodia rosulata sp. nov. Furthermore, B. parva is identified from P. falcatus based on ITS phylogeny. This species is also an important pathogen of various commercially important tree species in Ethiopia and elsewhere. This study highlights the ability of Botryosphaeria spp. to infect seeds and the possibility that they might be distributed in this way. The study also contributes to recent attempts to stabilize the taxonomy of Botryosphaeria anamorphs, especially regarding Diplodia, which is currently in taxonomic disarray.

  13. Malassezia nana sp. nov., a novel lipid-dependent yeast species isolated from animals.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Asuka; Kano, Rui; Makimura, Koichi; Duarte, Eduardo Robson; Hamdan, Júnia Soares; Lachance, Marc-André; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2004-03-01

    Five isolates of a novel species of the yeast genus Malassezia were isolated from animals in Japan and Brazil. Phylogenetic trees based on the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit (26S) rDNA sequences and nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region showed that the isolates were conspecific and belonged to the genus Malassezia. They were related closely to Malassezia dermatis and Malassezia sympodialis, but were clearly distinct from these two species and the other six species of Malassezia that have been reported, indicating that they should be classified as a novel species, Malassezia nana sp. nov. Morphologically and physiologically, M. nana resembles M. dermatis and M. sympodialis, but can be distinguished from these species by its inability to use Cremophor EL (Sigma) as the sole lipid source and to hydrolyse aesculin. The type strain of M. nana is NUSV 1003(T) (=CBS 9557(T)=JCM 12085(T)).

  14. Dynamics of cosmological perturbations and reheating in the anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graef, L. L.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Ferreira, Elisa G. M.; Brandenberger, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We discuss scalar-tensor realizations of the Anamorphic cosmological scenario recently proposed by Ijjas and Steinhardt [1]. Through an analysis of the dynamics of cosmological perturbations we obtain constraints on the parameters of the model. We also study gravitational Parker particle production in the contracting Anamorphic phase and we compute the fraction between the energy density of created particles at the end of the phase and the background energy density. We find that, as in the case of inflation, a new mechanism is required to reheat the universe.

  15. [Effect of Invasive Herb Species on the Structure of Soil Yeast Complexes in Mixed Forests Exemplified by Impatiens parviflora DC].

    PubMed

    Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Chernov, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    Yeast abundance and diversity in a mixed forest sod-podzol soil under Impatiens parviflora DC plants was studied in comparison with unimpaired aboriginal herbaceous plants typical of the Mid-Russian secondary, after-forest meadow. The study was carried out throughout the vegetation period. Standard microbiological plating techniques revealed 36 yeast species. Typical pedobiotic (Cryptococcus podzolicus, Wickerhamomyces anomalus) and eurybiotic yeast species (Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) predominated in both biotopes. The relative abundance of the autochthonous soil yeast species Cryptococcus podzolicus was higher in the soil under aboriginal herbs than under Impatiens parviflora. Sites with aboriginal vegetation were also characterized by high abundance of the pedogamous species Schwanniomyces castelli and Torulaspora delbrueckii. The share of yeastlike Trichosporon fungi with high hydrolytic activity was considerably higher under adventitious plants Impatiens parviflora, as well as in the previously studied soil under Heracleum sosnowskyi.

  16. Nanoscale effects of caspofungin against two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Formosa, C; Schiavone, M; Martin-Yken, H; François, J M; Duval, R E; Dague, E

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are model yeasts for biotechnology and human health, respectively. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the effects of caspofungin, an antifungal drug used in hospitals, on these two species. Our nanoscale investigation revealed similar, but also different, behaviors of the two yeasts in response to treatment with the drug. While administration of caspofungin induced deep cell wall remodeling in both yeast species, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in chitin and decrease in β-glucan content, changes in cell wall composition were more pronounced with C. albicans cells. Notably, the increase of chitin was proportional to the increase in the caspofungin dose. In addition, the Young modulus of the cell was three times lower for C. albicans cells than for S. cerevisiae cells and increased proportionally with the increase of chitin, suggesting differences in the molecular organization of the cell wall between the two yeast species. Also, at a low dose of caspofungin (i.e., 0.5× MIC), the cell surface of C. albicans exhibited a morphology that was reminiscent of cells expressing adhesion proteins. Interestingly, this morphology was lost at high doses of the drug (i.e., 4× MIC). However, the treatment of S. cerevisiae cells with high doses of caspofungin resulted in impairment of cytokinesis. Altogether, the use of AFM for investigating the effects of antifungal drugs is relevant in nanomedicine, as it should help in understanding their mechanisms of action on fungal cells, as well as unraveling unexpected effects on cell division and fungal adhesion.

  17. Comparison of nitrogen depletion and repletion on lipid production in yeast and fungal species

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Shihui; Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; ...

    2016-08-29

    Although it is well known that low nitrogen stimulates lipid accumulation, especially for algae and some oleaginous yeast, few studies have been conducted in fungal species, especially on the impact of different nitrogen deficiency strategies. In this study, we use two promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidates to examine the impact of two nitrogen deficiency strategies on lipid production, which are the extensively investigated oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and the commercial cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. We first utilized bioinformatics approaches to reconstruct the fatty acid metabolic pathway and demonstrated the presence of a triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathway in Trichoderma reesei. Wemore » then examined the lipid production of Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces in different media using two nitrogen deficiency strategies of nitrogen natural repletion and nitrogen depletion through centrifugation. Our results demonstrated that nitrogen depletion was better than nitrogen repletion with about 30% lipid increase for Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces, and could be an option to improve lipid production in both oleaginous yeast and filamentous fungal species. The resulting distinctive lipid composition profiles indicated that the impacts of nitrogen depletion on yeast were different from those for fungal species. Under three types of C/N ratio conditions, C16 and C18 fatty acids were the predominant forms of lipids for both Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipolytica. In addition, while the overall fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of Trichoderma reesei were similar, the overall FAME profiles of Y. lipolytica observed a shift. The fatty acid metabolic pathway reconstructed in this work supports previous reports of lipid production in T. reesei, and provides a pathway for future omics studies and metabolic engineering efforts. Further investigation to identify the genetic targets responsible for the effect of nitrogen depletion

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Formaldehyde-Resistant Fungus Byssochlamys spectabilis No. 5 (Anamorph Paecilomyces variotii No. 5) (NBRC109023)

    PubMed Central

    Ekino, Keisuke; Fukuda, Kohsai; Nomura, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Byssochlamys spectabilis no. 5 (anamorph Paecilomyces variotii no. 5) (NBRC109023) was isolated from a soil sample in 2001 in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. This fungus is highly resistant to formaldehyde. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of P. variotii no. 5; this draft was produced with the intent of investigating the mechanism of formaldehyde resistance. This is the first report of the genome sequence of any Paecilomyces species. PMID:24407650

  19. Yeast biogeography and the effects of species recognition approaches: the case study of widespread basidiomycetous species from birch forests in Russia.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, Andrey; Inácio, João; Chernov, Ivan Yu; Fonseca, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Understanding diversity and distribution patterns of fungi, including yeasts, ultimately depends on accuracy of species recognition. However, different approaches to yeast species recognition often result in different entities or operational taxonomic units. We studied the effects of using different yeast species recognition approaches, namely morphological species recognition (MSR) and phylogenetic species recognition (PSR), on the distribution patterns of widespread basidiomycetous yeasts. Hence, we have revised a collection of yeast fungi isolated from spatially remote birch forests in the Moscow Region and Western Siberia with molecular typing and identification tools. PCR fingerprinting and rDNA sequencing analyses of strains of nine species previously identified on the basis of morphological and physiological tests (MSR) yielded 21 phylogenetic species (PSR), including three currently undescribed taxa. The number of distinct phylogenetic species comprised within a single morphospecies ranged from one to seven. A total of ten species were found in both regions, whereas the distribution of 11 yeasts was restricted to a single region only. Both geographical region and type of substrate (plant or soil) influence yeast distribution. Cryptococcus wieringae, C. victoriae, C. magnus, and Leucosporidium scottii were frequently found on plant substrates, whereas C. terricola and C. podzolicus were associated to soil substrates. Occurrence of C. magnus, C. albidus and Sporobolomyces roseus was found to depend on the geographical region. Microsatellite-PCR fingerprinting, MSP-PCR, applied to studying yeast intraspecific variability revealed three different types of distribution: (a) variability that depends on geographical factors (Curvibasidium cygneicollum, C. podzolicus, C. victoriae), (b) genetic identity irrespectively of the region of isolation (Rhodotorula pinicola, C. terricola), and (c) high degree of genetic variability that did not correlate with region of

  20. Bullera vrieseae sp. nov., a tremellaceous yeast species isolated from bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Brandão, Luciana R; Safar, Silvana V B; Gomes, Fatima C O; Félix, Ciro R; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Pagani, Danielle M; Ramos, Jesus P; Broetto, Leonardo; Mott, Tamí; Vainstein, Marilene H; Valente, Patricia; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-08-01

    Two independent surveys of yeasts associated with different bromeliads in different Brazilian regions led to the proposal of a novel yeast species, Bullera vrieseae sp. nov., belonging to the Tremellales clade (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota). Analysis of the sequences in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and D1/D2 domain of the LSU rRNA gene suggested affinity to a phylogenetic lineage that includes Bullera miyagiana and Bullera sakaeratica. Six isolates of the novel species were obtained from different bromeliads and regions in Brazil. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the novel species differs from B. miyagiana and B. sakaeratica by 85 and 64 nt substitutions, respectively and by more than 75 nt substitutions in the ITS region. Phenotypically, Bullera vrieseae sp. nov. can be distinguished from both species based on the assimilation of meso-erythritol, which was negative for B. vrieseae sp. nov. but positive for the others, assimilation of d-glucosamine, which was positive for B. vrieseae sp. nov. but negative for B. miyagiana and of l-sorbose, which was negative for B. vrieseae sp. nov. but positive for B. sakaeratica. The novel species Bullera vrieseae sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain of Bullera vrieseae sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y379T (BRO443T; ex-type CBS 13870T).

  1. Differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts by analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptide profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.D.; Choo, K.B.; Tsai, W.C.; Jen, T.M.; Yeh, J.Y.; Han, S.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a scheme for differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts based on autoradiographic analysis of protein profiles of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cellular proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using ATCC strains as references, protein profile analysis showed that different Candida and other yeast species produced distinctively different patterns. Good agreement in results obtained with this approach and with other conventional systems was observed. Being accurate and reproducible, this approach provides a basis for the development of an alternative method for the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens.

  2. Diversity of yeast and mold species from a variety of cheese types.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2015-06-01

    To generate a comprehensive profile of viable fungi (yeasts and molds) on cheese as it is purchased by consumers, 44 types of cheese were obtained from a local grocery store from 1 to 4 times each (depending on availability) and sampled. Pure cultures were obtained and identified by DNA sequence of the ITS region, as well as growth characteristics and colony morphology. The yeast Debaryomyces hansenii was the most abundant fungus, present in 79 % of all cheeses and 63 % of all samples. Penicillium roqueforti was the most common mold, isolated from a variety of cheeses in addition to the blue cheeses. Eighteen other fungal species were isolated, ten from only one sample each. Most fungi isolated have been documented from dairy products; a few raise potential food safety concerns (i.e. Aspergillus flavus, isolated from a single sample and capable of producing aflatoxins; and Candida parapsilosis, an emerging human pathogen isolated from three cheeses). With the exception of D. hansenii (present in most cheese) and P. roqueforti (a necessary component of blue cheese), no strong correlation was observed between cheese type, manufacturer, or sampling time with the yeast or mold species composition.

  3. Activity of essential oils from Mediterranean Lamiaceae species against food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Araújo, C; Sousa, M J; Ferreira, M F; Leão, C

    2003-04-01

    The essential oils from aerial parts of Melissa officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Salvia officinalis, and Mentha piperita were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Their antimicrobial activities were evaluated against five food spoilage yeasts, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Pichia membranifaciens, Dekkera anomala, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a reference. The oils were preliminarily screened by a disc diffusion technique, with the most active being the oil from M. officinalis. MICs were determined by the broth dilution method, and the main components of the oils were also tested by this method. The essential oil of M. officinalis at 500 microg/ml completely inhibited the growth of all yeast species. The main component of the oil of M. officinalis is citral (neral plus geranial) (58.3%), which showed a marked fungitoxic effect, contributing to its high activity.

  4. Relationships among Cell Size, Membrane Permeability, and Preservative Resistance in Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Warth, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    The rate of uptake of propanoic acid and the cell dimensions were measured for 23 yeasts differing in their resistance to weak-acid-type preservatives. Relationships between reciprocal uptake rate, reciprocal permeability, cell volume, cell area, volume/area, and the MICs of benzoic acid and propanoic acid for the yeasts were tested by correlation analysis on pairs of parameters. The MIC of methylparaben, which is not a weak-acid-type preservative, was included. The most significant relationships found were between both reciprocal uptake rate and reciprocal permeability and the MICs of propanoic and benzoic acids Cell volume, area, and volume/area were each individually correlated with propanoic and benzoic acid MICs, but less strongly. In multiple regression analyses, inclusion of terms for volume, area, or volume/area did not markedly increase the significance. The MIC of methylparaben was unrelated to the uptake and permeability parameters, but did show a correlation with cell volume/area. Schizosaccharomyces pombe was anomalous in having very low permeability. Exclusion of these outlying data revealed particularly strong relationships (P < 0.001) between both reciprocal uptake rate and reciprocal permeability and the benzoic acid MIC. MICs for Zygosaccharomyces bailii isolates were substantially higher than for the other species, and therefore Z. baillii isolates had a large influence on the regressions. However, the relationships observed remained significant even after removal of the Z. bailii data. In showing a correlation between the rate at which propanoic acid enters yeast cells and the ability of the cells to tolerate this and other weak-acid-type preservatives, but not methylparaben, the results suggest that the resistance mechanism, in which preservative is continuously removed from the cell, is a common and major determinant of the preservative tolerance of yeast species. PMID:16348060

  5. Relationships among Cell Size, Membrane Permeability, and Preservative Resistance in Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Warth, A D

    1989-11-01

    The rate of uptake of propanoic acid and the cell dimensions were measured for 23 yeasts differing in their resistance to weak-acid-type preservatives. Relationships between reciprocal uptake rate, reciprocal permeability, cell volume, cell area, volume/area, and the MICs of benzoic acid and propanoic acid for the yeasts were tested by correlation analysis on pairs of parameters. The MIC of methylparaben, which is not a weak-acid-type preservative, was included. The most significant relationships found were between both reciprocal uptake rate and reciprocal permeability and the MICs of propanoic and benzoic acids Cell volume, area, and volume/area were each individually correlated with propanoic and benzoic acid MICs, but less strongly. In multiple regression analyses, inclusion of terms for volume, area, or volume/area did not markedly increase the significance. The MIC of methylparaben was unrelated to the uptake and permeability parameters, but did show a correlation with cell volume/area. Schizosaccharomyces pombe was anomalous in having very low permeability. Exclusion of these outlying data revealed particularly strong relationships (P < 0.001) between both reciprocal uptake rate and reciprocal permeability and the benzoic acid MIC. MICs for Zygosaccharomyces bailii isolates were substantially higher than for the other species, and therefore Z. baillii isolates had a large influence on the regressions. However, the relationships observed remained significant even after removal of the Z. bailii data. In showing a correlation between the rate at which propanoic acid enters yeast cells and the ability of the cells to tolerate this and other weak-acid-type preservatives, but not methylparaben, the results suggest that the resistance mechanism, in which preservative is continuously removed from the cell, is a common and major determinant of the preservative tolerance of yeast species.

  6. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals Highly Conserved Mitochondrial Genomes in the Yeast Species Lachancea thermotolerans

    PubMed Central

    Freel, Kelle C.; Friedrich, Anne; Hou, Jing; Schacherer, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of mitochondrial (mt) sequence data from various yeasts provides a tool to study genomic evolution within and between different species. While the genomes from a range of lineages are available, there is a lack of information concerning intraspecific mtDNA diversity. Here, we analyzed the mt genomes of 50 strains from Lachancea thermotolerans, a protoploid yeast species that has been isolated from several locations (Europe, Asia, Australia, South Africa, and North / South America) and ecological sources (fruit, tree exudate, plant material, and grape and agave fermentations). Protein-coding genes from the mtDNA were used to construct a phylogeny, which reflected a similar, yet less resolved topology than the phylogenetic tree of 50 nuclear genes. In comparison to its sister species Lachancea kluyveri, L. thermotolerans has a smaller mt genome. This is due to shorter intergenic regions and fewer introns, of which the latter are only found in COX1. We revealed that L. kluyveri and L. thermotolerans share similar levels of intraspecific divergence concerning the nuclear genomes. However, L. thermotolerans has a more highly conserved mt genome with the coding regions characterized by low rates of nonsynonymous substitution. Thus, in the mt genomes of L. thermotolerans, stronger purifying selection and lower mutation rates potentially shape genome diversity in contract to what was found for L. kluyveri, demonstrating that the factors driving mt genome evolution are different even between closely related species. PMID:25212859

  7. Cyberlindnera xylosilytica sp. nov., a xylitol-producing yeast species isolated from lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Cadete, Raquel M; Cheab, Monaliza A M; Santos, Renata O; Safar, Silvana V B; Zilli, Jerri E; Vital, Marcos J S; Basso, Luiz C; Lee, Ching-Fu; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-09-01

    Independent surveys of yeasts associated with lignocellulosic-related materials led to the discovery of a novel yeast species belonging to the Cyberlindnera clade (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota). Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene showed that this species is related to C. japonica, C. maesa and C. easanensis. Six isolates were obtained from different sources, including rotting wood, tree bark and sugar cane filter cake in Brazil, frass from white oak in the USA and decayed leaf in Taiwan. A novel species is suggested to accommodate these isolates, for which the name C. xylosilytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of C. xylosilytica sp. nov. is NRRL YB-2097(T) ( = CBS 13984(T) = UFMG-CM-Y347(T)) and the allotype is UFMG-CM-Y409 ( = CBS 14083). The novel species is heterothallic and complementary mating types are represented by the type and allotype strains. The MycoBank number is MB 811428.

  8. Assessment of phylloplane yeasts on selected Mediterranean plants by FISH with group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Inácio, João; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Spencer-Martins, Isabel; Fonseca, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    A previous culture-dependent survey of phylloplane yeasts from selected Mediterranean plants showed that a few species were present in high densities in almost all leaf samples, regardless of the plant type, location or sampling season. However, a few species appeared to be restricted to Cistus albidus leaves, namely Cryptococcus cistialbidi. Here, we describe a culture-independent FISH assay to detect and quantify whole yeast cells in leaf washings. After optimization, the technique was used to check the apparent association between C. albidus leaves and C. cistialbidi and the abundance and ubiquity of other basidiomycetous yeast species such as Erythrobasidium hasegawianum and Sporobolomyces spp. in leaf samples from this and other neighboring plants (Acer monspessulanum and Quercus faginea). No yeast cells were detected in Pistacia lentiscus leaf samples. We were also able to demonstrate that three phylloplane yeasts (C. cistialbidi, E. hasegawianum and Sporobolomyces spp.) appeared to be log-normally distributed among individual C. albidus leaves. The log-normal distribution has important implications for the quantification of phylloplane yeasts based on the washing and plating of bulk leaf samples, which will tend to overestimate the size of the respective populations and become an error source in yeast surveys or related biocontrol studies.

  9. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  10. Torulaspora indica a novel yeast species isolated from coal mine soils.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Puja; Yelchuri, R K; Sohal, Satinder K; Bhagat, Geetika; Paramjit; Prasad, G S

    2012-05-01

    Four yeast strains (APSS 805, APSS 806, APSS 815 and AP-18) belonging to a novel Torulaspora species were isolated from coal mine soils of Singareni in Andhra Pradesh state, India. Another strain (PBA-22) was isolated from agricultural field soil from Gujarat state, India. The vegetative cells of all these strains were round, haploid and produced asci by conjugation between independent cells or mother cell and bud, with rough ascospores, suggesting their possible relation to ascomycetous yeast genus Torulaspora. Phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions revealed that, among the five strains, three viz. APSS 805, APSS 806 and APSS 815 have identical sequences. The other two strains (AP-18 and PBA-22) differed from the other three strains in less than 1% nucleotide substitutions in the combined D1/D2 domain and ITS sequences, indicating that all of them (five strains) may belong to the same species. These five strains were closely related to Torulaspora globosa, but showed more than 3-7% sequence divergence from T. globosa and all other species in the genus Torulaspora in the combined sequence analysis of D1/D2 domain and ITS region of rRNA gene. In addition, these strains also showed distinct microsatellite finger-printing pattern from related species and differed in several physiological responses suggesting that these strains belong to a novel species of Torulaspora. We propose to name these strains as Torulaspora indica sp. nov., and designate APSS 805(T) = MTCC 9772 (T) = CBS 12408 (T) as the type strain of this novel species. The Mycobank number of the novel species is MB 563738.

  11. Phylogenetic reassessment of Mycosphaerella spp. and their anamorphs occurring on Eucalyptus. II.

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Mansilla, J. Pedro; Alfenas, Acelino C.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.

    2006-01-01

    Species of Eucalyptus are widely planted as exotics in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere and to some extent in southern Europe, for timber and fibre production. Species of Mycosphaerella are commonly associated with leaves and twigs of Eucalyptus and can result in defoliation, dieback, and even tree death. In the present study, numerous isolates of Mycosphaerella species were collected from leaf litter, living leaves exhibiting leaf spot symptoms or severe Mycosphaerella leaf blotch symptoms. Isolates were compared based on DNA sequence data for the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1 & ITS2) and the 5.8S gene. These data, together with characteristics of the fungal growth on three different media, morphology of the anamorph and teleomorph structures as well as ascospore germination patterns were used to describe 21 new species. PMID:18490974

  12. Species Accumulation Curves and Incidence-Based Species Richness Estimators to Appraise the Diversity of Cultivable Yeasts from Beech Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Andrey M.; Kemler, Martin; Begerow, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Background Yeast-like fungi inhabit soils throughout all climatic zones in a great abundance. While recent estimations predicted a plethora of prokaryotic taxa in one gram of soil, similar data are lacking for fungi, especially yeasts. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the diversity of soil yeasts in different forests of central Germany using cultivation-based techniques with subsequent identification based on rDNA sequence data. Based on experiments using various pre-cultivation sample treatment and different cultivation media we obtained the highest number of yeasts by analysing mixed soil samples with a single nutrient-rich medium. Additionally, several species richness estimators were applied to incidence-based data of 165 samples. All of them predicted a similar range of yeast diversity, namely 14 to 16 species. Randomized species richness curves reached saturation in all applied estimators, thus indicating that the majority of species is detected after approximately 30 to 50 samples analysed. Conclusions/Significance In this study we demonstrate that robust species identification as well as mathematical approaches are essential to reliably estimate the sampling effort needed to describe soil yeast communities. This approach has great potential for optimisation of cultivation techniques and allows high throughput analysis in the future. PMID:21858201

  13. Cryptococcus foliicola sp. nov. and Cryptococcus taibaiensis sp. nov., novel basidiomycetous yeast species from plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Ming; Boekhout, Teun; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2011-01-01

    A molecular taxonomic investigation performed on basidiomycetous yeast strains isolated from plant leaves collected in two areas of China revealed two novel species, Cryptococcus foliicola sp. nov. (type strain HS 23.3(T) = AS 2.2471(T) = CBS 9920(T)) and Cryptococcus taibaiensis sp. nov. (type strain ST 7.9(T) = AS 2.2444(T) = CBS 9919(T)), among the non ballistoconidium-forming strains producing cream-colored colonies. These new species differed markedly from closely related species in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 26S rRNA D1/D2 region sequences. They clustered in a strongly supported clade represented by Cryptococcus victoriae in the Tremellales group in the phylogenetic trees drawn from ITS and D1/D2 sequences.

  14. Ogataea ganodermae sp. nov., a methanol-assimilating yeast species isolated from basidiocarps of Ganoderma sp.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhao-Hui; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2008-06-01

    Three methanol-utilizing yeast strains were isolated from basidiocarps of Ganoderma sp. collected from a tree trunk in Mangshan Mountain, Hunan Province, southern China. These strains formed hat-shaped ascospores in unconjugated and deliquescent asci. Sequence analysis of the large-subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, electrophoretic karyotype comparison and phenotypic characterization demonstrated that the three strains represent a novel species of the genus Ogataea, which is described as Ogataea ganodermae sp. nov. (type strain SHS 2.1(T) =CGMCC AS 2.3435(T) =CBS 10646(T)). Phylogenetically, the novel species was closely related to Ogataea pini and Ogataea henricii. The latter two taxa with similar D1/D2 sequences were confirmed to represent separate species by ITS sequence and electrophoretic karyotype comparisons.

  15. Starmerella syriaca f.a., sp. nov., an osmotolerant yeast species isolated from flowers in Syria.

    PubMed

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Four strains of a novel asexual ascomycetous yeast species were isolated from Malva sp. flowers in Syria. Sequencing of the regions spanning the small subunit, 5.8S, and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit ribosomal RNA genes showed that the isolates were conspecific. Comparative analysis of these sequences and the corresponding sequences of the type strains of ascomycetous yeasts revealed that the novel species is phylogenetically related to members of the Starmerella clade. Its closest relative is Candida vaccinii. For the new species the name Starmerella syriaca is proposed. Its strains are osmotolerant and produce pseudohypha-like structures capable of penetrating agar media. The type strain is 2-1362(T) (=CBS 13909(T) = NCAIM Y.02138(T) = CCY 090-003-001(T)). The GenBank accession numbers for its nucleotide sequences are: JX515986 (D1/D2 LSU), JX515987 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and JX515988 (SSU). Mycobank: MB 810090.

  16. Unified physical model for statistical nucleosome positioning in different yeast species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, Wolfram; Osberg, Brendan; Tsankov, Alexander M.; Rando, Oliver J.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    Recent genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions in different eukaryotes have revealed a common pattern around transcription start sites, involving a nucleosome-free region flanked by a pronounced periodic pattern in the average nucleosome density. For the yeast S. cerevisiae, a gas of hard rods, known as Tonks gas and equivalent to the statistical positioning mechanism of Kornberg and Stryer, can be used to describe the experimentally observed pattern. Here, we consider 12 Hemiascomycota yeast species, each of which displays a distinct nucleosome pattern. Since the mechanisms underlying the formation of the patterns are expected to be related, we undertake a data-driven search for a unified quantitative description. We find that the simple one-dimensional gas model needs to be extended to take into account transient unwrapping of short segments of nucleosomal DNA, such that the particles no longer have a fixed size. Chromatin behavior in all but one species is well described by this generalized gas model, with a single unified set of model parameters where only the average nucleosome density is a species-dependent variable.

  17. Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov., a tremellaceous yeast species isolated from plants and soil.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Brandão, Luciana R; Barbosa, Anne C; Ramos, Jesus P; Safar, Silvana V B; Gomes, Fatima C O; Sousa, Francisca M P; Morais, Paula B; Broetto, Leonardo; Leoncini, Orílio; Ribeiro, José Roberto; Fungsin, Bundit; Takashima, Masako; Nakase, Takashi; Lee, Ching-Fu; Vainstein, Marilene H; Fell, Jack W; Scorzetti, Gloria; Vishniac, Helen S; Rosa, Carlos A; Valente, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Several independent surveys of yeasts associated with different plant materials and soil led to the proposal of a novel yeast species belonging to the Tremellales clade (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota). Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and internal transcribed spacer region of the large subunit of the rRNA gene suggested affinity to a phylogenetic lineage that includes Hannaella coprosmaensis, Hannaella oryzae and Hannaella sinensis. Thirty-two isolates were obtained from different sources, including bromeliads, nectar of Heliconia psittacorum (Heliconiaceae), flowers of Pimenta dioica (Myrtaceae), roots and leaves of sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) in Brazil, leaves of Cratoxylum maingayi, Arundinaria pusilla and Vitis vinifera in Thailand, soil samples in Taiwan, and prairie soil in the USA. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the novel species differs from Hannaella coprosmaensis and Hannaella oryzae by 36 and 46 nt substitutions, respectively. A novel species is suggested to accommodate these isolates, for which the name Hannaella pagnoccae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BI118(T) ( = CBS 11142(T) = ATCC MYA-4530(T)).

  18. Ascomycetous yeasts associated with naturally occurring fruits in a tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Prada, G M; Pagnocca, F C

    1997-01-01

    Fruits from twenty different species of angiosperms were collected during the period from November, 1991 to January, 1992. Two hundred and two strains of yeasts and yeast-like fungi were isolated, of which 74% showed ascomycetic affinity. Candida was the predominant genus, followed by (in descending order of occurrence): Cryptococcus, Kloeckera, Sporobolomyces, Pichia, Hanseniaspora and Bullera. Black yeasts and other strains showing basidiomycetic affinity were also isolated. The genus Candida represented the highest number of identified species and the greatest variety of associated substrates. Among the ascomycetes and their anamorphs, 38 species were identified, with Kloeckera apiculata being the most frequent among the isolates and the one which occurred in the largest variety of substrates. Some of the biotypes designated as Candida sp. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, and Pichia sp. did not correspond to the standard species description found in the literature, and may represent new species. The strains of yeasts isolated in this study were characterized and incorporated into the Tropical Culture Collection of the Fundaao Tropical de Pesquisas e Tecnologia Andŕe Tosello, Campinas, São Paulo.

  19. Starmerella neotropicalis f. a., sp. nov., a yeast species found in bees and pollen.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Rosa, Carlos A; São Thiago-Calaça, Paula S; Antonini, Yasmine; Bastos, Esther M A F; Evrard, Pierre; Huret, Stéphanie; Fidalgo-Jiménez, Abel; Lachance, Marc-André

    2013-10-01

    A novel yeast species was found repeatedly and in high cell densities in underground-nesting stingless bees of the species Melipona quinquefasciata and their provisions in northern Minas Gerais (Brazil). One additional strain was isolated from bee-collected pollen in Cuba. Phylogenetic analyses based on rRNA gene sequences (D1/D2 large subunit gene and internal transcribed spacer) indicated that the novel species belongs to the Starmerella clade and is most closely related to Candida (iter. nom. Starmerella) apicola. Growth reactions on carbon and nitrogen sources were typical of those observed in related species of the Starmerella clade. PCR-fingerprinting with mini- and microsatellite specific primers allowed the distinction of the novel species from Candida apicola, Candida bombi and a yet undescribed species represented by strain CBS 4353. On the basis of phylogenetic relationships, the novel species is assigned to the genus Starmerella despite the failure to observe sexual reproduction after extensive mating tests. We propose the name Starmerella neotropicalis f. a., sp. nov. (Mycobank MB 804285) and designate UFMG PST 09(T) ( = MUCL 53320(T) = CBS 12811(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Issatchenkia hanoiensis, a new yeast species isolated from frass of the litchi fruit borer Conopomorpha cramerella Snellen.

    PubMed

    Vu, Nguyen Vu; Dao, Anh Hai; Lachance, Marc-André

    2003-10-01

    The new ascogenous yeast species Issatchenkia hanoiensis was discovered in the frass of the litchi fruit borer Conopomorpha cramerella Snellen. The yeast forms unconjugated persistent asci containing one to two roughened ascospores. The yeast has a CoQ-7 system, which is typical for the genus Issatchenkia. The closest species to I. hanoiensis as indicated by analysis of the partial ribosomal DNA large-subunit (D1/D2) sequence is the asexual species Candida pseudolambica. The two share 94.2% similarity in the sequenced region. Other species of Issatchenkia were also among the closest relatives of I. hanoiensis, the level of similarity ranging from 89.8% to 94.1%. The type culture is strain HB1.3.13=CBS 9198=NRRL Y-27509.

  1. Determination of methionine and selenomethionine in yeast by species-specific isotope dilution GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Mester, Zoltán; Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2004-09-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of methionine (Met) and selenomethionine (SeMet) in yeast using species-specific isotope dilution (ID) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described. Samples were digested by refluxing for 16 h with 4 M methanesulfonic acid. Analytes were derivatized with methyl chloroformate and extracted into chloroform for GC/MS analysis. In addition to use of commercially available 13C-enriched Met and SeMet spikes for species specific ID analysis, a 74Se-enriched SeMet spike was also available for comparison of results. In selective ion monitoring mode, the intensities of ions at m/z 221, 222, 269, 270, and 263 were used to calculate the 221/222, 269/270, and 269/263 ion ratios for quantification of Met and SeMet. Concentrations of 5959 +/- 33 and 3404 +/- 12 microg g(-1) (one standard deviation, n = 6) with relative standard deviations of 0.55 and 0.36% for Met and SeMet, respectively, were obtained using 13C-enriched spikes. A concentration of 3417 +/- 8 microg g(-1) (one standard deviation, n = 6) was obtained using the 74Se-enriched SeMet spike. The concentration of SeMet measured in the yeast is equivalent to 66.43 +/- 0.24% of total Se and 30.31 +/- 0.11% of total Met is in the form of SeMet. Method detection limits (three times the standard deviation) of 3.4 and 1.0 microg g(-1) were estimated for Met and SeMet, respectively, based on a 0.25-g subsample of yeast with 1 mL of extract used for derivatization. A similar concentration of 5930 +/- 29 microg g(-1) (one standard deviation, n = 4) for Met and a lower concentration of 2787 +/- 49 microg g(-1) (one standard deviation, n = 4) for SeMet were obtained for this yeast sample using species-specific ID analysis based on GC/MS with 13C-enriched Met and SeMet spikes when a 2-h open microwave digestion approach using 8 M methanesulfonic acid was used.

  2. Comparison of nitrogen depletion and repletion on lipid production in yeast and fungal species

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-08-29

    Although it is well known that low nitrogen stimulates lipid accumulation, especially for algae and some oleaginous yeast, few studies have been conducted in fungal species, especially on the impact of different nitrogen deficiency strategies. In this study, we use two promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidates to examine the impact of two nitrogen deficiency strategies on lipid production, which are the extensively investigated oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and the commercial cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. We first utilized bioinformatics approaches to reconstruct the fatty acid metabolic pathway and demonstrated the presence of a triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathway in Trichoderma reesei. We then examined the lipid production of Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces in different media using two nitrogen deficiency strategies of nitrogen natural repletion and nitrogen depletion through centrifugation. Our results demonstrated that nitrogen depletion was better than nitrogen repletion with about 30% lipid increase for Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces, and could be an option to improve lipid production in both oleaginous yeast and filamentous fungal species. The resulting distinctive lipid composition profiles indicated that the impacts of nitrogen depletion on yeast were different from those for fungal species. Under three types of C/N ratio conditions, C16 and C18 fatty acids were the predominant forms of lipids for both Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipolytica. In addition, while the overall fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of Trichoderma reesei were similar, the overall FAME profiles of Y. lipolytica observed a shift. The fatty acid metabolic pathway reconstructed in this work supports previous reports of lipid production in T. reesei, and provides a pathway for future omics studies and metabolic engineering efforts. Further investigation to

  3. Redisposition of phoma-like anamorphs in Pleosporales

    PubMed Central

    de Gruyter, J.; Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Aveskamp, M.M.; Verkley, G.J.M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    The anamorphic genus Phoma was subdivided into nine sections based on morphological characters, and included teleomorphs in Didymella, Leptosphaeria, Pleospora and Mycosphaerella, suggesting the polyphyly of the genus. Recent molecular, phylogenetic studies led to the conclusion that Phoma should be restricted to Didymellaceae. The present study focuses on the taxonomy of excluded Phoma species, currently classified in Phoma sections Plenodomus, Heterospora and Pilosa. Species of Leptosphaeria and Phoma section Plenodomus are reclassified in Plenodomus, Subplenodomus gen. nov., Leptosphaeria and Paraleptosphaeria gen. nov., based on the phylogeny determined by analysis of sequence data of the large subunit 28S nrDNA (LSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer regions 1 & 2 and 5.8S nrDNA (ITS). Phoma heteromorphospora, type species of Phoma section Heterospora, and its allied species Phoma dimorphospora, are transferred to the genus Heterospora stat. nov. The Phoma acuta complex (teleomorph Leptosphaeria doliolum), is revised based on a multilocus sequence analysis of the LSU, ITS, small subunit 18S nrDNA (SSU), β-tubulin (TUB), and chitin synthase 1 (CHS-1) regions. Species of Phoma section Pilosa and allied Ascochyta species were determined to belong to Pleosporaceae based on analysis of actin (ACT) sequence data. Anamorphs that are similar morphologically to Phoma and described in Ascochyta, Asteromella, Coniothyrium, Plectophomella, Pleurophoma and Pyrenochaeta are included in this study. Phoma-like species, which grouped outside the Pleosporineae based on a LSU sequence analysis, are transferred to the genera Aposphaeria, Paraconiothyrium and Westerdykella. The genera Medicopsis gen. nov. and Nigrograna gen. nov. are introduced to accommodate the medically important species formerly known as Pyrenochaeta romeroi and Pyrenochaeta mackinnonii, respectively. Taxonomic novelties: New genera: Medicopsis Gruyter, Verkley & Crous, Nigrograna Gruyter, Verkley & Crous

  4. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Results Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Conclusion Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system. PMID:23856115

  5. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species.

    PubMed

    Zubko, Elena I; Zubko, Mikhajlo K

    2013-07-15

    Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system.

  6. Yamadazyma riverae sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from plant materials.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mariana R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Carvalho, Tatiana F C; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Chagas, Rafaella A; Morais, Paula B; Rosa, Luiz H; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    Nine strains of a novel yeast species were isolated from rotting wood, tree bark, ant nests or living as endophytes in leaves of Vellozia gigantea. Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene showed that this species was related to Candida insectorum in the Yamadazyma clade. The novel species differed from closely related species by 10 and 11 substitutions in the ITS region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene, respectively. The species is heterothallic and forms asci with one to two hat-shaped ascospores. The name Yamadazyma riverae sp. nov. is proposed for the novel species. The type strain is UFMG-CM-Y444T ( = CBS 14121T) and the allotype strain is TT12 ( = CBS 14098 = UFMG-CM-Y577). The Mycobank number is MB 813221.

  7. Five new species of yeasts from fresh water and marine habitats in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Fell, Jack W; Statzell-Tallman, Adele; Scorzetti, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Marcelo H

    2011-03-01

    Yeast populations in the Shark River Slough of the Florida Everglades, USA, were examined during a 3-year period (2002-2005) at six locations ranging from fresh water marshes to marine mangroves. Seventy-four described species (33 ascomycetes and 41 basidiomycetes) and an approximately equal number of undescribed species were isolated during the course of the investigation. Serious human pathogens, such as Candida tropicalis, were not observed, which indicates that their presence in coastal waters is due to sources of pollution. Some of the observed species were widespread throughout the fresh water and marine habitats, whereas others appeared to be habitat restricted. Species occurrence ranged from prevalent to rare. Five representative unknown species were selected for formal description. The five species comprise two ascomycetes: Candida sharkiensis sp. nov. (CBS 11368(T)) and Candida rhizophoriensis sp. nov. (CBS 11402(T)) (Saccharomycetales, Metschnikowiaceae), and three basidiomycetes: Rhodotorula cladiensis sp. nov. (CBS 10878(T)) in the Sakaguchia clade (Cystobasidiomycetes), Rhodotorula evergladiensis sp. nov. (CBS 10880(T)) in the Rhodosporidium toruloides clade (Microbotryomycetes, Sporidiobolales) and Cryptococcus mangaliensis sp. nov. (CBS 10870(T)) in the Bulleromyces clade (Agaricomycotina, Tremellales).

  8. Honey Bees Avoid Nectar Colonized by Three Bacterial Species, But Not by a Yeast Species, Isolated from the Bee Gut

    PubMed Central

    Good, Ashley P.; Gauthier, Marie-Pierre L.; Vannette, Rachel L.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees’ health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees’ health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees’ efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees’ health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior. PMID:24466119

  9. Honey bees avoid nectar colonized by three bacterial species, but not by a yeast species, isolated from the bee gut.

    PubMed

    Good, Ashley P; Gauthier, Marie-Pierre L; Vannette, Rachel L; Fukami, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees' health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees' health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees' efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees' health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior.

  10. Characterization of the yeast flora present in some Turkish high-sugar products.

    PubMed

    Senses-Ergul, Sule; Ozbas, Zekiye Yesim

    2006-04-01

    In this study, 129 Turkish high-sugar products were examined in terms of their yeast flora and 73 representative strains were isolated. Yeast isolates were identified at species level by using Apilab Plus (bioMérieux, France), a specific computer program developed for ID 32C strips (bioMérieux, France). While one of the isolates could be identified at genus level as Aureobasidium, 66 of them were identified as 21 species belonging to 8 different genera. The distribution of these isolates were as follows: Candida (38), Rhodotorula (8), Zygosaccharomyces (7), Cryptococcus (6), Saccharomyces (3), Debaryomyces (2), Pichia (1) and Torulaspora (1). Approximately 70% of the isolates were found to have the ability to grow on media with 50% (w/w) glucose. Hence, they were characterized as xerotolerant strains. Although Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is known as the most xerotolerant yeast species, only two strains of Z. rouxii could be isolated from Turkish high-sugar foods. During identification studies, it was observed that ID 32C test strips should certainly be supported by morphological and physiological tests for obtaining more reliable identification results. If not, closely related yeast species such as anamorph and telemorph forms can not be distinguished.

  11. Routine use of CHROMagar Candida medium for presumptive identification of Candida yeast species and detection of mixed fungal populations.

    PubMed

    Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Declerck, Philippe; Cimon, Bernard; Planchenault, Claire; de Gentile, Ludovic; Chabasse, Dominique

    1996-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of the new differential culture medium CHROMagar Candida for routine investigation of clinical specimens. METHODS: During a whole year, 6150 clinical samples were plated on CHROMagar Candida medium. After incubation, the green colonies were considered to be Candida albicans. The colonies of other colors were identified using Bichrolatex-krusei, or by their assimilation pattern on ID 32C test strips and their morphology on rice cream-agar-Tween. RESULTS: Among the 6150 clinical samples, 1643 were positive for fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus and Geotrichum sp. were the predominant filamentous fungi isolated. Candida albicans was the most common species isolated (1274 of the positive samples; 77.5%), and Candida glabrata was the second most common yeast isolated (174 positive samples; 10.6%). Other yeast species were detected at lower frequencies, mainly Candida tropicalis (3.8%), Candida krusei (2.7%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2.7%) and Candida kefyr (2.3%), and 16 samples revealed a lipophilic species, Malassezia furfur. Mixed fungal populations accounted for 14.7% of the positive samples. Two or more yeast species were detected in 206 of the 242 specimens containing mixed fungal populations, and five yeast species were detected in one sample. Additionally, we did not observe significant differences in the isolation of yeasts or filamentous fungi from the 366 samples simultaneously plated on CHROMagar Candida and Sabouraud dextrose agar. Close agreement between the two culture media was observed for 89.9% of these samples. CONCLUSIONS: CHROMagar Candida medium was shown to be extremely helpful in a routine clinical mycology service, facilitating the detection of mixed cultures of yeasts and allowing direct identification of C. albicans, as well as rapid presumptive identification of the other yeasts: C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei and S. cerevisiae. This chromogenic medium thus appears to be suitable as a primary culture medium

  12. Candida ruelliae sp. nov., a novel yeast species isolated from flowers of Ruellia sp. (Acanthaceae).

    PubMed

    Saluja, Puja; Prasad, Gandham S

    2008-06-01

    Two novel yeast strains designated as 16Q1 and 16Q3 were isolated from flowers of the Ruellia species of the Acanthaceae family. The D1/D2 domain and ITS sequences of these two strains were identical. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of large-subunit rRNA gene indicated their relationship to species of the Candida haemulonii cluster. However, they differ from C. haemulonii by 14% nucleotide sequence divergence, from Candida pseudohaemulonii by 16.1% and from C. haemulonii type II by 16.5%. These strains also differ in 18 physiological tests from the type strain of C. haemulonii, and 12 and 16 tests, respectively, from C. pseudohaemulonii and C. haemulonii type II. They also differ from C. haemulonii and other related species by more than 13% sequence divergence in the internal transcribed spacer region. In the SSU rRNA gene sequences, strain 16Q1 differs by 1.7% nucleotide divergence from C. haemulonii. Sporulation was not observed in pure or mixed cultures on several media examined. All these data support the assignment of these strains to a novel species; we have named them as Candida ruelliae sp. nov., and designate strain 16Q1(T)=MTCC 7739(T)=CBS10815(T) as type strain of the novel species.

  13. Basidioascus persicus sp. nov., a yeast-like species of the order Geminibasidiales isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Shaghayegh; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Nasrabadi, Seyyedeh Maryam Zamanzadeh; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Nguyen, Hai D T

    2014-09-01

    A novel species of basidiomycetes was isolated from kitchen garden soil in Shahryar city, Tehran province, Iran. Molecular and conventional methods were employed to identify and classify this single isolate. Morphologically, the isolate was considered yeast-like with hyaline and oval cells reproducing by monopolar budding, forming ballistoconidia, hyphae, arthroconidia and didymospores. Basidia and basidiospores resembling those produced by Basidioascus species were observed. Sequencing and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of rRNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer region revealed its sister relationship to described species of the genus Basidioascus. Assimilation and fermentation tests, cell-wall carbohydrate analysis and enzyme activity tests were performed to provide insight into the metabolism of the isolate. Based on morphology, physiology and phylogeny of rRNA gene sequences, the isolate was shown to represent a novel species of the genus Basidioascus, described as Basidioascus persicus sp. nov. (holotype IBRC P1010180(T) = ex-type IBRC M30078(T) = isotype CBS 12808(T)). The MycoBank number of the novel species is MB 804703. An emended description of the genus Basidioascus is also provided.

  14. Multiple Origins of the Pathogenic Yeast Candida orthopsilosis by Separate Hybridizations between Two Parental Species

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Stephen; Higgins, Desmond G.; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Mating between different species produces hybrids that are usually asexual and stuck as diploids, but can also lead to the formation of new species. Here, we report the genome sequences of 27 isolates of the pathogenic yeast Candida orthopsilosis. We find that most isolates are diploid hybrids, products of mating between two unknown parental species (A and B) that are 5% divergent in sequence. Isolates vary greatly in the extent of homogenization between A and B, making their genomes a mosaic of highly heterozygous regions interspersed with homozygous regions. Separate phylogenetic analyses of SNPs in the A- and B-derived portions of the genome produces almost identical trees of the isolates with four major clades. However, the presence of two mutually exclusive genotype combinations at the mating type locus, and recombinant mitochondrial genomes diagnostic of inter-clade mating, shows that the species C. orthopsilosis does not have a single evolutionary origin but was created at least four times by separate interspecies hybridizations between parents A and B. Older hybrids have lost more heterozygosity. We also identify two isolates with homozygous genomes derived exclusively from parent A, which are pure non-hybrid strains. The parallel emergence of the same hybrid species from multiple independent hybridization events is common in plant evolution, but is much less documented in pathogenic fungi. PMID:27806045

  15. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  16. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified.

  17. Imaging performance of the EUV high NA anamorphic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ingen Schenau, Koen; Bottiglieri, Gerardo; van Schoot, Jan; Neumann, Jens-Timo; Roesch, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the predicted imaging performance for an anamorphic EUV high NA (>0.5) exposure system with a 4x magnification in X orientation and a 8x magnification in Y orientation. It has a half field size with which the productivity requirements can be maintained. The main findings of the study are that horizontal and vertical features have very similar process window sizes despite magnification difference. A new definition of the Mask Error Factor (MEF) is introduced that is more relevant for anamorphic imaging; it shows that reticle CD errors have 2x larger impact for vertical compared to horizontal features. For dark field horizontal two-bar trenches relatively small mask induced focus shift was observed compared to the 0.33NA case, probably due to the relatively small Mask Angle of Incidence in the Y orientation with the 8x magnification. Finally a Ni type absorber has potential to further improve imaging performance.

  18. Anamorphic integral field spectrometer for diffuse ultraviolet astronomy.

    PubMed

    Cook, Timothy

    2013-12-20

    We present the design of a novel anamorphic integral field spectrometer for diffuse ultraviolet astronomy. The system is designed to be able to measure emissions from faint diffuse astrophysical sources across a large field with good spectral resolving power. The design uses a standard focal plane image slicer and an anamorphic relay mirror and spectrometer to achieve an exceptional area, field of view, resolving power (AΩR) product, the key figure of merit for a spectroscopic system intended to study line emission from extended or diffuse sources. We present a typical design with R∼1000 and an effective etendue (AΩ) of 1.5×10(-4)cm2 sr.

  19. Candida species and other yeasts in the oral cavities of type 2 diabetic patients in Cali, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, María Inés; de Bernal, Matilde; Collazos, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Candida species and to study factors associated to oral cavity colonization in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A total of 107 diabetics were classified into controlled and uncontrolled according to glycosylated hemoglobin values. Each patient was assessed for stimulated salivary flow rates, pH, and an oral rinse to search for yeast. The study also determined the state of oral health via Klein and Palmer CPO indexes for permanent dentition, dental plaque by O'Leary, and a periodontal chart. Results: We found yeasts in 74.8% of the patients. A total of 36 of the 52 subjects with controlled diabetes presented yeasts and 44 in the uncontrolled; no significant differences (p = 0.2) were noted among the presence of yeasts and the control of blood glucose. The largest number of isolates corresponded to C. albicans, followed by C. parapsilosis. Uncontrolled individuals presented a significantly higher percentage of yeast different from C. albicans (p = 0.049). Conclusions: We found a high percentage of Candida colonization and uncontrolled individuals had greater diversity of species. The wide range of CFU/mL found both in patients with oral candidiasis, as well as in those without it did not permit distinguishing between colonization and disease. We only found association between isolation of yeasts and the low rate of salivary flow. PMID:24892318

  20. Orbilia querci sp. nov. and its knob-forming nematophagous anamorph.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Xing-Zhong; Zhuang, Wen-Ying

    2005-04-01

    Orbilia querci, a new nematode-trapping fungus, was found on rotten wood of Quercus sp. in Huai-rou County, Beijing, China. It is characterized by having a tear-shaped spore body in the cylindrical ascospore. Pure culture was obtained from the ascospores. Conidiophores were simple or occasionally branched, bearing a single conidium on the tip. Conidia were spindle-shaped, mostly with 3-septa. Nematodes were captured by means of adhesive stalked knobs. The adhesive knobs were produced frequently on nutritional agar plates even in the absence of challenging nematodes. Its anamorph is placed in Dactylellina and named as D. querci. The sequence divergence of the ITS1 region between the fungus and the other knob-forming species tested was 23.8-33.4%, supporting O. querci as a distinct species. This is the first report of the connection between a knob-forming nematophagous hyphomycete and an Orbilia teleomorph.

  1. Utilization of size polymorphism in ITS1 and ITS2 regions for identification of pathogenic yeast species.

    PubMed

    Khodadadi, Hossein; Karimi, Ladan; Jalali-Zand, Niloufar; Adin, Hassan; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2017-01-09

    Despite the existence of a variety of available yeast identification strategies, easier and more cost-effective methods are required for routine use in clinical laboratories. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA genes exhibit variable sizes depending on the yeast species. In the present study, fragment size polymorphism (FSP) analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions for identification of the clinically most important yeast species was assessed. The ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 190 strains, including isolates of 31 standard strains and 159 clinical isolates, were separately PCR-amplified with two primer sets: ITS1-ITS2 and ITS3-ITS4. PCR products were mixed and the two-band electrophoretic pattern of each sample was analysed according to the size of the ITS regions as predicted from the GenBank database. Using this method and avoiding expensive tools such as sequencing or capillary electrophoresis, we were able to differentiate nearly all pathogenic yeast species, including Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida guilliermondii, Candida kefyr, Candida lusitaniae, Candida rugosa, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method showed limited discriminatory power to differentiate species of the Candida parapsilosis complex. Differentiation of C. albicans and C. tropicalis needs already identified controls. Nevertheless, the method benefits from advantages such as lower cost, higher speed and wider range of species than some commercial yeast-identification methods. We consider this method one of the easiest molecular approaches for identifying a wide range of human pathogenic yeast species, applicable to both diagnostic and epidemiological purposes.

  2. Taxonomy and physiological characterisation of Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species from China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Cao, Wan-Nan; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Xu, Long-Long; Yi, Ze-Hao; Liu, Zheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-08-25

    Three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the host beetle Dorcus titanus collected from two different localities in Henan Province, Central China. These strains formed two hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rDNAs, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that these strains represent a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Scheffersomyces. The phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the xylose reductase (XYL1) gene supported the view that the new strains could be grouped as a unique species. Although this new species is highly similar to Scheffersomyces stipitis-like yeasts in terms of nrDNA sequences and morphological and physiological characteristics, the species can be clearly differentiated from its close relatives on the basis of the sequences of XYL1 and RPB1. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is NYNU 14712(T) (CICC 33061(T) = CBS 13926(T)).

  3. Taxonomy and physiological characterisation of Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species from China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Cao, Wan-Nan; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Xu, Long-Long; Yi, Ze-Hao; Liu, Zheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the host beetle Dorcus titanus collected from two different localities in Henan Province, Central China. These strains formed two hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rDNAs, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that these strains represent a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Scheffersomyces. The phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the xylose reductase (XYL1) gene supported the view that the new strains could be grouped as a unique species. Although this new species is highly similar to Scheffersomyces stipitis-like yeasts in terms of nrDNA sequences and morphological and physiological characteristics, the species can be clearly differentiated from its close relatives on the basis of the sequences of XYL1 and RPB1. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces titanus sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is NYNU 14712T (CICC 33061T = CBS 13926T). PMID:27558134

  4. Structural characterization of novel sophorolipid biosurfactants from a newly identified species of Candida yeast.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil P J; Ray, Karen J; Vermillion, Karl E; Dunlap, Christopher A; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2012-02-01

    Sophorolipids are a group of O-acylsophorose-based biosurfactants produced by several yeasts of the Starmerella clade. The known sophorolipids are typically partially acetylated 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose (sophorose) O-β-glycosidically linked to 17-L-hydroxy-Δ9-octadecenoic acid, where the acyl carboxyl group often forms a 4″-lactone to the terminal glucosyl residue. In a recent MALDI-TOFMS-based screen for sophorolipid-producing yeasts we identified a new species, Candida sp. NRRL Y-27208, that produces significant amounts of novel sophorolipids. This paper describes the structural characterization of these new compounds, using carbohydrate and lipid analysis, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy. Unlike those reported previously, the NRRL Y-27208 sophorolipids contain an ω-hydroxy-linked acyl group (typically 18-hydroxy-Δ9-octadecenoate), and occur predominantly in a non-lactone, anionic form. In addition, 17 dimeric and trimeric sophoroses were identified by MALDI-TOFMS from this strain. The surfactant-like properties of these sophorolipids have value as potential replacements for petroleum-based detergents and emulsifiers.

  5. Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. and Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov., two tremellaceous yeast species from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado Pagani, Danielle; Brandão, Luciana R; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Felix, Ciro R; Pais Ramos, Jesus; Broetto, Leonardo; Scorzetti, Gloria; Fell, Jack W; Augusto Rosa, Carlos; Valente, Patricia; Fontes Landell, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    Two yeast species, Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. and Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov., in the family Rhynchogastremataceae of the Tremellales are proposed. The two species are related to six species of the genus Papiliotrema: Papiliotrema aureus, P. flavescens, P. terrestris, P. baii, P. ruineniae and P. wisconsinensis. The novel species are proposed on the basis of the sequence-based phylogenetic species concept with analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. A total of 16 strains of Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. were obtained from freshwater and bromeliad leaves collected in Brazil. Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. differs by 11, 12, 16, 14, 11 and 13 substitutions in the D1/D2 domain from the related species P. aureus, P. flavescens, P. terrestris, P. baii, P. ruineniae and P. wisconsinensis, respectively. Differences of 11 substitutions and 21 or more substitutions in ITS regions were found when the sequences of Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. were compared with P. wisconsinensis and its closest relatives. The type strain of Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y374T (=CBS 13918T). Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov. is represented by two strains isolated from a flower of Miconia sp. and a water sample in Brazil. Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov. differs from the related species P. aureus and P. ruineniae by eight substitutions, from P. flavescens and P. terrestris by 11 substitutions, from P. baii by 10 substitutions and from P. wisconsinensis by 6 substitutions in the D1/D2 domain, and by 7 substitutions from P. wisconsinensis and more than 19 substitutions in the ITS region from its closest relatives. The type strain of Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov. is CBS 8358T (ML 3666T=DBVPG-4492T). The MycoBank numbers for Papiliotrema leoncinii sp. nov. and Papiliotrema miconiae sp. nov. are MB 813594 and MB 814882, respectively.

  6. Unraveling the Enzymatic Basis of Wine "Flavorome": A Phylo-Functional Study of Wine Related Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are a heterogeneous microbial group involved in the early stages of wine fermentation. The high enzymatic potential of these yeasts makes them a useful tool for increasing the final organoleptic characteristics of wines in spite of their low fermentative power. Their physiology and contribution to wine quality are still poorly understood, with most current knowledge being acquired empirically and in most cases based in single species and strains. This work analyzed the metabolic potential of 770 yeast isolates from different enological origins and representing 15 different species, by studying their production of enzymes of enological interest and linking phylogenetic and enzymatic data. The isolates were screened for glycosidase enzymes related to terpene aroma release, the β-lyase activity responsible for the release of volatile thiols, and sulfite reductase. Apart from these aroma-related activities, protease, polygalacturonase and cellulase activities were also studied in the entire yeast collection, being related to the improvement of different technological and sensorial features of wines. In this context, and in terms of abundance, two different groups were established, with α-L-arabinofuranosidase, polygalacturonase and cellulase being the less abundant activities. By contrast, β-glucosidase and protease activities were widespread in the yeast collection studied. A classical phylogenetic study involving the partial sequencing of 26S rDNA was conducted in conjunction with the enzymatic profiles of the 770 yeast isolates for further typing, complementing the phylogenetic relationships established by using 26S rDNA. This has rendered it possible to foresee the contribution different yeast species make to wine quality and their potential applicability as pure inocula, establishing species-specific behavior. These consistent results allowed us to design future targeted studies on the impact different non-Saccharomyces yeast species

  7. Unraveling the Enzymatic Basis of Wine “Flavorome”: A Phylo-Functional Study of Wine Related Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are a heterogeneous microbial group involved in the early stages of wine fermentation. The high enzymatic potential of these yeasts makes them a useful tool for increasing the final organoleptic characteristics of wines in spite of their low fermentative power. Their physiology and contribution to wine quality are still poorly understood, with most current knowledge being acquired empirically and in most cases based in single species and strains. This work analyzed the metabolic potential of 770 yeast isolates from different enological origins and representing 15 different species, by studying their production of enzymes of enological interest and linking phylogenetic and enzymatic data. The isolates were screened for glycosidase enzymes related to terpene aroma release, the β-lyase activity responsible for the release of volatile thiols, and sulfite reductase. Apart from these aroma-related activities, protease, polygalacturonase and cellulase activities were also studied in the entire yeast collection, being related to the improvement of different technological and sensorial features of wines. In this context, and in terms of abundance, two different groups were established, with α-L-arabinofuranosidase, polygalacturonase and cellulase being the less abundant activities. By contrast, β-glucosidase and protease activities were widespread in the yeast collection studied. A classical phylogenetic study involving the partial sequencing of 26S rDNA was conducted in conjunction with the enzymatic profiles of the 770 yeast isolates for further typing, complementing the phylogenetic relationships established by using 26S rDNA. This has rendered it possible to foresee the contribution different yeast species make to wine quality and their potential applicability as pure inocula, establishing species-specific behavior. These consistent results allowed us to design future targeted studies on the impact different non-Saccharomyces yeast species

  8. Candida flosculorum sp. nov. and Candida floris sp. nov., two yeast species associated with tropical flowers.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carlos A; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Lachance, Marc-André; Ruivo, Carla C C; Medeiros, Adriana O; Pimentel, Mariana R C; Fontenelle, Julio C R; Martins, Rogério P

    2007-12-01

    Two ascomycetous yeast species, Candida flosculorum sp. nov. and Candida floris sp. nov., were isolated from tropical flowers and their associated insects. C. flosculorum was isolated from flower bracts of Heliconia velloziana and Heliconia episcopalis (Heliconiaceae) collected from two Atlantic rain forest sites in Brazil. C. floris was isolated from flowers of Ipomoea sp. (Convolvulaceae) growing on the banks of the river Paraguai in the pantanal ecosystem in Brazil and from an adult of the stingless bee Trigona sp. and a flower of Merremia quinquefolia (Convolvulaceae) in Costa Rica. C. flosculorum belongs to the Metschnikowiaceae clade and C. floris belongs to the Starmerella clade. The type strain of C. flosculorum is UFMG-JL13(T) (=CBS 10566(T)=NRRL Y-48258(T)) and the type strain of C. floris is UWO(PS) 00-226.2(T) (=CBS 10593(T)=NRRL Y-48255(T)).

  9. Hanseniaspora nectarophila sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from ephemeral flowers.

    PubMed

    Cadež, Neža; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Raspor, Peter; Rosa, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Seven apiculate yeast strains that were isolated from the flowers of Syphocampylus corymbiferus Pohl in Brazil are genetically, morphologically and phenotypically distinct from recognized species of the genera Hanseniaspora and Kloeckera. Genetic discontinuities between the novel strains and their closest relatives were found using a networking approach based on the concatenated sequences of the rRNA gene (internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 of the LSU), and the protein-coding genes for actin and translation elongation factor-1α. Phylogenetic analysis based on the rRNA and the actin gene placed the novel species represented by the strains in close relationship to Hanseniaspora meyeri and Hanseniaspora clermontiae. PCR fingerprinting with microsatellite primers confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of the novel species. The name Hanseniaspora nectarophila sp. nov. is proposed, with UFMG POG a.1(T) ( = ZIM 2311(T)  = CBS 13383(T)) as the type strain; MycoBank no. MB807210. As the current description of the genus does not allow the presence of multilateral budding, an emended diagnosis of the genus Hanseniaspora Zikes is proposed.

  10. Hyperphoretic Dispersal of a Pyxidiophora Anamorph

    Treesearch

    Meredith Blackwell; J. Robert Bridges; John C. Moser; Thelma J. Perry

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that Thaxteriola species and other minute, nonmycelial fungi associated with arthropods have phylogenetic relationships with the Laboulbeniales. However, direct development of the thallus of Thaxteriola from an ascospore of Pyxidiophora has now been discovered. Thaxteriola...

  11. A new species of pyxidiophora and its Thaxteriola anamorph

    Treesearch

    Meredith Blackwell; Thelma J. Perry; Robert J. Bridges; John C. Moser

    1986-01-01

    Nine genera of minute nonmycelial fungi characterized by a thallus of one to 15 cells in linear arrangement, a usually darkened holdfast, and often endospores cut off in succession are known from arthropod hosts. The taxonomic relationship of these minute fungi, including Thaxteriola, has been the subject of speculation, and morphological comparisons...

  12. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics.

  13. Site-specific structural analysis of a yeast prion strain with species-specific seeding activity

    PubMed Central

    Marcelino-Cruz, Anna Marie; Bhattacharya, Moumita; Anselmo, Aaron C

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins misfold and aggregate into multiple infectious strain variants that possess unique abilities to overcome prion species barriers, yet the structural basis for the species-specific infectivities of prion strains is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the site-specific structural properties of a promiscuous chimeric form of the yeast prion Sup35 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. The Sup35 chimera forms two strain variants, each of which selectively infect one species but not the other. Importantly, the N-terminal and middle domains of the Sup35 chimera (collectively referred to as Sup35NM) contain two prion recognition elements (one from each species) that regulate the nucleation of each strain. Mutations in either prion recognition element significantly bias nucleation of one strain conformation relative to the other. Here we have investigated the folding of each prion recognition element for the serine-to-arginine mutant at residue 17 of the Sup35NM chimera known to promote nucleation of C. albicans strain conformation. Using cysteine-specific labeling analysis, we find that residues in the C. albicans prion recognition element are solvent-shielded, while those outside the recognition sequence (including most of those in the S. cerevisiae recognition element) are solvent-exposed. Moreover, we find that proline mutations in the C. albicans recognition sequence disrupt the prion templating activity of this strain conformation. Our structural findings reveal that differential folding of complementary and non-complementary prion recognition elements within the prion amyloid core of the Sup35NM chimera is the structural basis for its species-specific templating activity. PMID:22048721

  14. Metschnikowia persici sp. nov., A Novel Protease-Producing Yeast Species from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Tao-Tao; Lu, Cai-Ge; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Dian-Peng; Liu, Wei-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Three yeast strains, named as FHL-A, FHL-B, and FHL-C, were isolated from peach fruit surfaces collected from different regions in the North of China highly produced protease and were presented as single separate group in the genus Metschnikowia by sequence comparisons of 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. BLASTn alignments on NCBI showed that the similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences of the three strains to all sequences of other yeasts accessed into the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ and other database was very low (≦93%). The phylogenetic tree based on the D1/D2 region of 26S rRNA gene sequences revealed that three strains are most closely related to Metschnikowia koreensis KCTC 7828T (AF257272.1) (sequence similarity: 93.0%) and Metschnikowia reukaufii CBS9709(T) (AJ716113.1) (sequence similarity: 93.0%). However, the strains are distinguished from M. koreensis by its non-assimilation of galactose, ribitol, and D-xylose, and by its growth at 37 °C or in vitamin-free medium, and are notably different from M. reukaufii by its non-assimilation of galactose, D-xylose, D-arabinose, and D-ribose, and by its growth at 35 °C or in vitamin-free medium. The strain FHL-B formed asci in V8 juice sporulation medium for 3 weeks. Therefore, the name Metschnikowia persici is proposed for the novel species, with FHL-B (= CBS12815(T) = CFCC 3578T) as the type strain.

  15. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L.; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 → T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites. PMID:15280510

  16. Multigene phylogeny and taxonomic revision of yeasts and related fungi in the Ustilaginomycotina

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.-M.; Begerow, D.; Groenewald, M.; Liu, X.-Z.; Theelen, B.; Bai, F.-Y.; Boekhout, T.

    2015-01-01

    The subphylum Ustilaginomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) comprises mainly plant pathogenic fungi (smuts). Some of the lineages possess cultivable unicellular stages that are usually classified as yeast or yeast-like species in a largely artificial taxonomic system which is independent from and largely incompatible with that of the smut fungi. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses based on seven genes including three nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and four protein coding genes to address the molecular phylogeny of the ustilaginomycetous yeast species and their filamentous counterparts. Taxonomic revisions were proposed to reflect this phylogeny and to implement the ‘One Fungus = One Name’ principle. The results confirmed that the yeast-containing classes Malasseziomycetes, Moniliellomycetes and Ustilaginomycetes are monophyletic, whereas Exobasidiomycetes in the current sense remains paraphyletic. Four new genera, namely Dirkmeia gen. nov., Kalmanozyma gen. nov., Golubevia gen. nov. and Robbauera gen. nov. are proposed to accommodate Pseudozyma and Tilletiopsis species that are distinct from the other smut taxa and belong to clades that are separate from those containing type species of the hitherto described genera. Accordingly, new orders Golubeviales ord. nov. with Golubeviaceae fam. nov. and Robbauerales ord. nov. with Robbaueraceae fam. nov. are proposed to accommodate the sisterhood of Golubevia gen. nov. and Robbauera gen. nov. with other orders of Exobasidiomycetes. The majority of the remaining anamorphic yeast species are transferred to corresponding teleomorphic genera based on strongly supported phylogenetic affinities, resulting in the proposal of 28 new combinations. The taxonomic status of a few Pseudozyma species remains to be determined because of their uncertain phylogenetic positions. We propose to use the term pro tempore or pro tem. in abbreviation to indicate the single-species lineages that are temporarily maintained. PMID:26955198

  17. Nematodospora anomalae sp. nov., a novel and D-xylose-fermenting yeast species in the Lodderomyces clade.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Yi, Ze-Hao; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-10-01

    Three strains of a novel species of ascomycetous yeast were isolated from the beetle species Anomala corpulenta (Scarabaeoidea) collected from the Baotianman and Funiu Mountains of China. These strains produced conjugated asci with a single coiled ascospore. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer regions demonstrated that the three strains were closely related to Nematodospora valgi and an undescribed yeast strain, 13Y231. The novel strains could be differentiated from N. valgi CBS 12562T by a 1.6 % sequence divergence (9 substitutions) and from the undescribed yeast strain, 13Y231, by a 1.1 % sequence divergence (6 substitutions) in the D1/D2 sequences. The ITS sequences of these strains displayed more than 4.1 % sequence divergence (12-22 substitutions and 7-8 gaps) from their two closest relatives. Interestingly, all the three strains could ferment d-xylose to ethanol effectively, a rare property among members of the Lodderomyces clade. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Nematodosporaanomalae sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain of N.anomalae sp. nov. is NYNU 14914T (=CICC 33059T=CBS 13927T). The MycoBank number is MB 816795.

  18. The combined rapid detection and species-level identification of yeasts in simulated blood culture using a colorimetric sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung H.; Wilson, Deborah A.; SalasVargas, Ana Victoria; Churi, Yair S.; Rhodes, Paul A.; Mazzone, Peter J.; Procop, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Background A colorimetric sensor array (CSA) has been demonstrated to rapidly detect and identify bacteria growing in blood cultures by obtaining a species-specific “fingerprint” of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during growth. This capability has been demonstrated in prokaryotes, but has not been reported for eukaryotic cells growing in culture. The purpose of this study was to explore if a disposable CSA could differentially identify 7 species of pathogenic yeasts growing in blood culture. Methods Culture trials of whole blood inoculated with a panel of clinically important pathogenic yeasts at four different microorganism loads were performed. Cultures were done in both standard BacT/Alert and CSA-embedded bottles, after adding 10 mL of spiked blood to each bottle. Color changes in the CSA were captured as images by an optical scanner at defined time intervals. The captured images were analyzed to identify the yeast species. Time to detection by the CSA was compared to that in the BacT/Alert system. Results One hundred sixty-two yeast culture trials were performed, including strains of several species of Candida (Ca. albicans, Ca. glabrata, Ca. parapsilosis, and Ca. tropicalis), Clavispora (synonym Candida) lusitaniae, Pichia kudriavzevii (synonym Candida krusei) and Cryptococcus neoformans, at loads of 8.2 × 105, 8.3 × 103, 8.5 × 101, and 1.7 CFU/mL. In addition, 8 negative trials (no yeast) were conducted. All negative trials were correctly identified as negative, and all positive trials were detected. Colorimetric responses were species-specific and did not vary by inoculum load over the 500000-fold range of loads tested, allowing for accurate species-level identification. The mean sensitivity for species-level identification by CSA was 74% at detection, and increased with time, reaching almost 95% at 4 hours after detection. At an inoculum load of 1.7 CFU/mL, mean time to detection with the CSA was 6.8 hours (17%) less than with the

  19. The combined rapid detection and species-level identification of yeasts in simulated blood culture using a colorimetric sensor array.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Nabin K; Lim, Sung H; Wilson, Deborah A; SalasVargas, Ana Victoria; Churi, Yair S; Rhodes, Paul A; Mazzone, Peter J; Procop, Gary W

    2017-01-01

    A colorimetric sensor array (CSA) has been demonstrated to rapidly detect and identify bacteria growing in blood cultures by obtaining a species-specific "fingerprint" of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during growth. This capability has been demonstrated in prokaryotes, but has not been reported for eukaryotic cells growing in culture. The purpose of this study was to explore if a disposable CSA could differentially identify 7 species of pathogenic yeasts growing in blood culture. Culture trials of whole blood inoculated with a panel of clinically important pathogenic yeasts at four different microorganism loads were performed. Cultures were done in both standard BacT/Alert and CSA-embedded bottles, after adding 10 mL of spiked blood to each bottle. Color changes in the CSA were captured as images by an optical scanner at defined time intervals. The captured images were analyzed to identify the yeast species. Time to detection by the CSA was compared to that in the BacT/Alert system. One hundred sixty-two yeast culture trials were performed, including strains of several species of Candida (Ca. albicans, Ca. glabrata, Ca. parapsilosis, and Ca. tropicalis), Clavispora (synonym Candida) lusitaniae, Pichia kudriavzevii (synonym Candida krusei) and Cryptococcus neoformans, at loads of 8.2 × 105, 8.3 × 103, 8.5 × 101, and 1.7 CFU/mL. In addition, 8 negative trials (no yeast) were conducted. All negative trials were correctly identified as negative, and all positive trials were detected. Colorimetric responses were species-specific and did not vary by inoculum load over the 500000-fold range of loads tested, allowing for accurate species-level identification. The mean sensitivity for species-level identification by CSA was 74% at detection, and increased with time, reaching almost 95% at 4 hours after detection. At an inoculum load of 1.7 CFU/mL, mean time to detection with the CSA was 6.8 hours (17%) less than with the BacT/Alert platform. The CSA

  20. Sexual reproduction as the cause of heat resistance in the food spoilage fungus Byssochlamys spectabilis (anamorph Paecilomyces variotii).

    PubMed

    Houbraken, Jos; Varga, János; Rico-Munoz, Emilia; Johnson, Shawn; Samson, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    Paecilomyces variotii is a common cosmopolitan species that is able to spoil various food- and feedstuffs and is frequently encountered in heat-treated products. However, isolates from heat-treated products rarely form ascospores. In this study we examined by using molecular techniques and mating tests whether this species can undergo a sexual cycle and form ascospores. The population structure of this species was examined by analyzing the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene, as well as partial beta-tubulin, actin, and calmodulin gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that P. variotii is a highly variable species. Partition homogeneity tests revealed that P. variotii has a recombining population structure. In addition to sequence analyses, mating experiments indicated that P. variotii is able to form ascomata and ascospores in culture in a heterothallic manner. The distribution of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes showed a 1:1 ratio in the progeny of the mating experiments. From the sequence analyses and mating data we conclude that P. variotii is the anamorph of Talaromyces spectabilis and that it has a biallelic heterothallic mating system. Since Paecilomyces sensu stricto anamorphs group within Byssochlamys, a new combination Byssochlamys spectabilis is proposed.

  1. Sexual Reproduction as the Cause of Heat Resistance in the Food Spoilage Fungus Byssochlamys spectabilis (Anamorph Paecilomyces variotii)▿

    PubMed Central

    Houbraken, Jos; Varga, János; Rico-Munoz, Emilia; Johnson, Shawn; Samson, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Paecilomyces variotii is a common cosmopolitan species that is able to spoil various food- and feedstuffs and is frequently encountered in heat-treated products. However, isolates from heat-treated products rarely form ascospores. In this study we examined by using molecular techniques and mating tests whether this species can undergo a sexual cycle and form ascospores. The population structure of this species was examined by analyzing the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene, as well as partial β-tubulin, actin, and calmodulin gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that P. variotii is a highly variable species. Partition homogeneity tests revealed that P. variotii has a recombining population structure. In addition to sequence analyses, mating experiments indicated that P. variotii is able to form ascomata and ascospores in culture in a heterothallic manner. The distribution of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes showed a 1:1 ratio in the progeny of the mating experiments. From the sequence analyses and mating data we conclude that P. variotii is the anamorph of Talaromyces spectabilis and that it has a biallelic heterothallic mating system. Since Paecilomyces sensu stricto anamorphs group within Byssochlamys, a new combination Byssochlamys spectabilis is proposed. PMID:18192427

  2. Candida caseinolytica sp. nov., a new species of yeast occurring in necrotic tissue of Opuntia and Stenocereus species in the southwestern United States and Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Phaff, H J; Starmer, W T; Lachance, M A; Ganter, P F

    1994-10-01

    We describe Candida caseinolytica, a new yeast species which occurs in rotting tissues of opuntias and other cacti in the North American Sonoran Desert and a few other localities. This small-celled, slowly growing yeast does not ferment any sugar and assimilates a limited number of carbon compounds, including 2- and 5-ketogluconic acids. It exhibits strong extracellular proteolytic activity on casein at pH 6.5, but gelatin is not hydrolyzed or is only weakly hydrolyzed by a few strains. The type strain of C. caseinolytica is strain UCD-FST 83-438.3 (= ATCC 90546 = CBS 7781).

  3. Instability of Succinate Dehydrogenase in SDHD Polymorphism Connects Reactive Oxygen Species Production to Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomic Mutations in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Lan; Hsieh, Meng-Hsun; Chang, Wei-Wen; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Lin, Mei-Chun; Wang, Cheng-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an essential complex of the electron transport chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle. Mutations in the human SDH subunit D frequently lead to paraganglioma (PGL), but the mechanistic consequences of the majority of SDHD polymorphisms have yet to be unraveled. In addition to the originally discovered yeast SDHD subunit Sdh4, a conserved homolog, Shh4, has recently been identified in budding yeast. To assess the pathogenic significance of SDHD mutations in PGL patients, we performed functional studies in yeast. Results: SDHD protein expression was reduced in SDHD-related carotid body tumor tissues. A BLAST search of SDHD to the yeast protein database revealed a novel protein, Shh4, that may have a function similar to human SDHD and yeast Sdh4. The missense SDHD mutations identified in PGL patients were created in Sdh4 and Shh4, and, surprisingly, a severe respiratory incompetence and reduced expression of the mutant protein was observed in the sdh4Δ strain expressing shh4. Although shh4Δ cells showed no respiratory-deficient phenotypes, deletion of SHH4 in sdh4Δ cells further abolished mitochondrial function. Remarkably, sdh4Δ shh4Δ strains exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nuclear DNA instability, mtDNA mutability, and decreased chronological lifespan. Innovation and Conclusion: SDHD mutations are associated with protein and nuclear and mitochondrial genomic instability and increase ROS production in our yeast model. These findings reinforce our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGL tumorigenesis and point to the yeast Shh4 as a good model to investigate the possible pathogenic relevance of SDHD in PGL polymorphisms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 587–602. PMID:25328978

  4. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the influence of twenty different single (i.e. 19 amino acids and ammonium sulphate) and two multiple nitrogen sources (N-sources) on growth and fermentation (i.e. glucose consumption and ethanol production) performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of four wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, isoleucine, ammonium sulphate, serine, valine and mixtures of 19 amino acids and of 19 amino acids plus ammonium sulphate (for S. cerevisiae), serine (for L. thermotolerans), alanine (for H. uvarum), alanine and asparagine (for M. pulcherrima), arginine, asparagine, glutamine, isoleucine and mixture of 19 amino acids (for T. delbrueckii). Furthermore, our results showed a clear positive effect of complex mixtures of N-sources on S. cerevisiae and on T. delbrueckii (although to a lesser extent) as to all performance parameters studied, whereas for L. thermotolerans, H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima, single amino acids affected growth and fermentation performance to the same extent as the mixtures. Moreover, we found groups of N-sources with similar effects on the growth and/or fermentation performance of two or more yeast species. Finally, the influences of N-sources observed for T. delbrueckii and H. uvarum resembled those of S. cerevisiae the most and the least, respectively. Overall, this work contributes to an improved understanding of how different N-sources affect growth, glucose consumption and ethanol production of wine-related yeast species under oxygen-limited conditions, which, in turn, may be used to, e.g. optimize growth and fermentation performance of the given yeast upon N-source supplementation during

  5. Species-specific activation of Cu/Zn SOD by its CCS copper chaperone in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Julie E.; Li, Cissy X; Odeh, Hana M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast of important public health relevance. Virulence of C. albicans requires a copper and zinc containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), but the biology of C. albicans SOD1 is poorly understood. To this end, C. albicans SOD1 activation was examined in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a eukaryotic expression system proven fruitful for the study of Cu/Zn SODs from invertebrates, plants and mammals. In spite of the 80% similarity between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans SOD1 molecules, C. albicans SOD1 is not active in S. cerevisiae. The SOD1 appears incapable of productive interactions with the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS1) of baker’s yeast. C. albicans SOD1 contains a proline at position 144 predicted to dictate dependence on CCS1. By mutating this proline, C. albicans SOD1 gained activity in baker’s yeast and this activity was independent of CCS1. We identified a putative CCS1 gene in C. albicans and created heterozygous and homozygous gene deletions at this locus. Loss of CCS1 resulted in loss of SOD1 activity, consistent with its role as a copper chaperone. C. albicans CCS1 also restored activity to C. albicans SOD1 expressed in baker’s yeast. C. albicans CCS1 is well adapted for activating its partner SOD1 from C. albicans, but not SOD1 from S. cerevisiae. In spite of the high degree of homology between the SOD1 and CCS1 molecules in these two fungal species, there exists a specie-specific barrier in CCS-SOD interactions which may reflect the vastly different lifestyles of the pathogenic versus non-infectious yeast. PMID:24043471

  6. An improved high-throughput Nile red fluorescence assay for estimating intracellular lipids in a variety of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, I.R.; Ignatia, L.; Franz, A. K.; Wong, D. M.; Faulina, S.A.; Tsui, M.; Kanti, A.; Boundy-Mills, K.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method for estimating lipid content of yeasts is needed for screening large numbers of yeasts samples. Nile red is a fluorescent lipophilic dye used for detection and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets in various biological system including algae, yeasts and filamentous fungi. However, a published assay for yeast is affected by variable diffusion across the cell membrane, and variation in the time required to reach maximal fluorescence emission. In this study, parameters that may influence the emission were varied to determine optimal assay conditions. An improved assay with a high-throughput capability was developed that includes the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to improve cell permeability, elimination of the washing step, the reduction of Nile red concentration, kinetic readings rather than single time-point reading, and utilization of a black 96-well microplate. The improved method was validated by comparison to gravimetric determination of lipid content of a broad variety of ascomycete and basidiomycete yeast species. PMID:22985718

  7. The evolutionary history of Saccharomyces species inferred from completed mitochondrial genomes and revision in the 'yeast mitochondrial genetic code'.

    PubMed

    Sulo, Pavol; Szabóová, Dana; Bielik, Peter; Poláková, Silvia; Šoltys, Katarína; Jatzová, Katarína; Szemes, Tomáš

    2017-06-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces are widely used to test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses. A large number of nuclear genomic DNA sequences are available, but mitochondrial genomic data are insufficient. We completed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing from Illumina MiSeq reads for all Saccharomyces species. All are circularly mapped molecules decreasing in size with phylogenetic distance from Saccharomyces cerevisiae but with similar gene content including regulatory and selfish elements like origins of replication, introns, free-standing open reading frames or GC clusters. Their most profound feature is species-specific alteration in gene order. The genetic code slightly differs from well-established yeast mitochondrial code as GUG is used rarely as the translation start and CGA and CGC code for arginine. The multilocus phylogeny, inferred from mtDNA, does not correlate with the trees derived from nuclear genes. mtDNA data demonstrate that Saccharomyces cariocanus should be assigned as a separate species and Saccharomyces bayanus CBS 380T should not be considered as a distinct species due to mtDNA nearly identical to Saccharomyces uvarum mtDNA. Apparently, comparison of mtDNAs should not be neglected in genomic studies as it is an important tool to understand the origin and evolutionary history of some yeast species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  8. Cryptococcus bestiolae and Cryptococcus dejecticola, two new yeast species isolated from frass of the litchi fruit borer Conopomorpha sinensis Bradley.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Vu Nguyen; Hai, Dao Anh; Lachance, Marc-André

    2006-03-01

    Two new yeast species, Cryptococcus bestiolae and Cryptococcus dejecticola, were discovered in the frass of the litchi fruit borer Conopomorpha sinensis Bradley. The yeasts utilize inositol, hydrolyze urea, produce starch-like substance, and contain CoQ10. Phylogenetic analyses of D1/D2 26S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicate that the yeasts are closely related to Bullera dendrophila and an undescribed species of Cryptococcus (strain CBS 8507). The two new species differed from each other by 17 nucleotides in the D1/D2 region and by 68 nucleotides in the ITS region. Cryptococcus bestiolae is a sister species to Cryptococcus sp. CBS 8507, from which it differs by eight nucleotides in the D1/D2 region and 59 nucleotides in the ITS region. Cryptococcus dejecticola and B. dendrophila differed by 13 nucleotides in the D1/D2 and 57 nucleotides in the ITS region. Cryptococcus bestiolae and Cr. dejecticola formed with B. dendrophila a well defined clade consisting of insect associated species. The type strain of Cr. bestiolae is TH3.2.59 (=CBS 10118=NRRL Y-27894), and the type strain of Cr. dejecticola is Litch 17 (=CBS 10117=NRRL Y-27898).

  9. Description of Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., a New D-Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Species Isolated from Rotten Wood

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Niu, Qiuhong; Hui, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of a D-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from rotten wood samples collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve in Henan Province, central China. These strains formed hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that the two strains represent a novel yeast species closely related to Scheffersomyces segobiensis. A sequence comparison of xylose reductase (XYL1) gene, which was recently recommended for rapid identification of cryptic species in the Scheffersomyces clade, revealed a significant sequence divergence of 25 nucleotides between the novel strains and their closest relative S. segobiensis, supporting their classification as a distinct species. Furthermore, these new strains can be clearly distinguished from S. segobiensis by a number of morphological and physiological characteristics. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is BY-41T ( =  CICC 1974T  =  CBS 12475T). PMID:24647466

  10. Description of Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., a new D-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotten wood.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Niu, Qiuhong; Hui, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of a D-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from rotten wood samples collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve in Henan Province, central China. These strains formed hat-shaped ascospores in conjugated and deliquescent asci. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes, as well as RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1) gene demonstrated that the two strains represent a novel yeast species closely related to Scheffersomyces segobiensis. A sequence comparison of xylose reductase (XYL1) gene, which was recently recommended for rapid identification of cryptic species in the Scheffersomyces clade, revealed a significant sequence divergence of 25 nucleotides between the novel strains and their closest relative S. segobiensis, supporting their classification as a distinct species. Furthermore, these new strains can be clearly distinguished from S. segobiensis by a number of morphological and physiological characteristics. Therefore, a novel yeast species, Scheffersomyces henanensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is BY-41T ( =  CICC 1974T  =  CBS 12475T).

  11. Three common bryophilous fungi with meristematic anamorphs and phylogenetic alliance to Teratosphaeriaceae, Capnodiales.

    PubMed

    Wäli, Pauliina P; Huhtinen, Seppo; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Stenroos, Soili

    2014-12-01

    Bryophilous ascomycetes are an overlooked and poorly known fungal group. In this study, the extreme and small-sized niche of Polytrichum piliferum hyaline leaf tips was screened for the presence of these fungi in Finland. Three closely related species were found. Bryochiton perpusillus and Bryochiton monascus were identified from several samples, and DNA isolations revealed a third closely related species, Bryochiton sp. In addition, melanised hyphae, typical to the Bryochiton species, were present in all the samples. According to phylogenetic analyses consisting of combined small subunit (SSU), large subunit (LSU), and 5.8S rDNA sequences, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequences, the species showed affinity with Teratosphaeriaceae within Capnodiales, and especially with black, meristematic species often inhabiting rock substrate in extreme environments. The connection was supported by meristematic growth of the Bryochiton species in culture. Bryochiton is the second sexual genus associated within the family Teratosphaeriaceae, and B. perpusillus, and B. monascus constitute examples of teleomorphs within a group of meristematic anamorphs. These findings emphasize the multiform diversity underlying poorly researched fungal groups, such as the bryophilous fungi.

  12. Use of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of yeast species isolated from bovine intramammary infection.

    PubMed

    Fadda, M E; Pisano, M B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Mossa, V; Deplano, M; Moroni, P; Liciardi, M; Cosentino, S

    2013-01-01

    This study reports a rapid PCR-based technique using a one-enzyme RFLP for discrimination of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical and subclinical mastitis milk samples. We analyzed a total of 1,486 milk samples collected over 1 yr in south Sardinia and northern Italy, and 142 yeast strains were preliminarily grouped based on their cultural morphology and physiological characteristics. Assimilation tests were conducted using the identification kit API ID 32C and APILAB Plus software (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). For PCR-RFLP analysis, the 18S-ITS1-5.8S ribosomal(r)DNA region was amplified and then digested with HaeIII, and dendrogram analysis of RFLP fragments was carried out. Furthermore, within each of the groups identified by the API or PCR-RFLP methods, the identification of isolates was confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 region using an ABI Prism 310 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The combined phenotypic and molecular approach enabled the identification of 17 yeast species belonging to the genera Candida (47.9%), Cryptococcus (21.1%), Trichosporon (19.7%), Geotrichum (7.1%), and Rhodotorula (4.2%). All Candida species were correctly identified by the API test and their identification confirmed by sequencing. All strains identified with the API system as Geotrichum candidum, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus, and Rhodotorula glutinis also produced characteristic restriction patterns and were confirmed as Galactomyces geotrichum (a teleomorph of G. candidum), Filobasidium uniguttulatum (teleomorph of Crypt. uniguttulatus), and R. glutinis, respectively, by D1/D2 rDNA sequencing. With regard to the genus Trichosporon, preliminary identification by API was problematic, whereas the RFLP technique used in this study gave characteristic restriction profiles for each species. Moreover, sequencing of the D1/D2 region allowed not only successful identification of Trichosporon gracile where API could not, but also correct identification of

  13. Ring closure activates yeast γTuRC for species-specific microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Justin M.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Li, Sam; Moritz, Michelle; Zelter, Alex; Fong, Kimberly K.; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Sali, Andrej; Kilmartin, John; Davis, Trisha N.; Agard, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) is the primary microtubule nucleator in cells. γTuRC is assembled from repeating γ-tubulin small complex (γTuSC) subunits and is thought to function as a template by presenting a γ-tubulin ring that mimics microtubule geometry. However, a previous yeast γTuRC structure showed γTuSC in an open conformation that prevents matching to microtubule symmetry. By contrast, we show here that γ-tubulin complexes are in a closed conformation when attached to microtubules. To confirm its functional importance we trapped the closed state and determined its structure, showing that the γ-tubulin ring precisely matches microtubule symmetry and providing detailed insight into γTuRC architecture. Importantly, the closed state is a stronger nucleator, suggesting this conformational switch may allosterically control γTuRC activity. Finally, we demonstrate that γTuRCs have a profound preference for tubulin from the same species. PMID:25599398

  14. Genomic insights into the evolution of industrial yeast species Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Christopher D; Pretorius, Isak S

    2014-11-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis, like its wine yeast counterpart Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is intrinsically linked with industrial fermentations. In wine, B. bruxellensis is generally considered to contribute negative influences on wine quality, whereas for some styles of beer, it is an essential contributor. More recently, it has shown some potential for bioethanol production. Our relatively poor understanding of B. bruxellensis biology, at least when compared with S. cerevisiae, is partly due to a lack of laboratory tools. As it is a nonmodel organism, efforts to develop methods for sporulation and transformation have been sporadic and largely unsuccessful. Recent genome sequencing efforts are now providing B. bruxellensis researchers unprecedented access to gene catalogues, the possibility of performing transcriptomic studies and new insights into evolutionary drivers. This review summarises these findings, emphasises the rich data sets already available yet largely unexplored and looks over the horizon at what might be learnt soon through comprehensive population genomics of B. bruxellensis and related species. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Research of 3D display using anamorphic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Honda, Toshio

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the auto-stereoscopic display which can reconstruct more reality and viewer friendly 3-D image by increasing the number of parallaxes and giving motion parallax horizontally. It is difficult to increase number of parallaxes to give motion parallax to the 3-D image without reducing the resolution, because the resolution of display device is insufficient. The magnification and the image formation position can be selected independently in horizontal direction and the vertical direction by projecting between the display device and the 3-D image with the anamorphic optics. The anamorphic optics is an optics system with different magnification in horizontal direction and the vertical direction. It consists of the combination of cylindrical lenses with different focal length. By using this optics, even if we use a dynamic display such as liquid crystal display (LCD), it is possible to display the realistic 3-D image having motion parallax. Motion parallax is obtained by assuming width of the single parallax at the viewing position to be about the same size as the pupil diameter of viewer. In addition, because the focus depth of the 3-D image is deep in this method, conflict of accommodation and convergence is small, and natural 3-D image can be displayed.

  16. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  17. Molecular identification of yeast species associated with 'Hamei'--a traditional starter used for rice wine production in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Jeyaram, K; Singh, W Mohendro; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2008-05-31

    In Manipur state of North-Eastern India, wine from glutinous rice using traditional solid state starter called 'Hamei' is particularly interesting because of its unique flavour. A total of 163 yeast isolates were obtained from fifty four 'Hamei' samples collected from household rice wine preparations in tribal villages of Manipur. Molecular identification of yeast species was carried out by analysis of the restriction digestion pattern generated from PCR amplified internal transcribed spacer region along with 5.8S rRNA gene (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). Seventeen different restriction profiles were obtained from the size of PCR products and the restriction analysis with three endonucleases (Hae III, Cfo I and Hinf I). Nine groups were identified as S. cerevisiae, Pichia anomala, Trichosporon sp., Candida tropicalis, Pichia guilliermondi, Candida parapsilosis, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Pichia fabianii and Candida montana by comparing this ITS-RFLP profile with type strains of common wine yeasts, published data and insilico analysis of ITS sequence data available in CBS yeast database. ITS-RFLP profile of eight groups was not matching with available database of 288 common wine yeast species. The most frequent yeast species associated with 'Hamei' were S. cerevisiae (32.5%), P. anomala (41.7%) and Trichosporon sp. (8%). The identity of major groups was confirmed by additional restriction digestion of ITS region with Hind III, EcoRI, Dde I and Msp I. The genetic diversity of industrially important S. cerevisiae group was investigated using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Although most of the 53 strains of S. cerevisiae examined were exhibited a common species specific pattern, a distinct degree of chromosomal length polymorphism and variable number of chromosomal DNA fragments were observed with in the species. Cluster analysis showed seven major karyotypes (K1-K7) with more than 83% similarity. The karyotype pattern K1 was the most frequent (67.9%) among the strains from

  18. Polyphasic taxonomy of the heat resistant ascomycete genus Byssochlamys and its Paecilomyces anamorphs.

    PubMed

    Samson, R A; Houbraken, J; Varga, J; Frisvad, J C

    2009-06-01

    Byssochlamys and related Paecilomyces strains are often heat resistant and may produce mycotoxins in contaminated pasteurised foodstuffs. A comparative study of all Byssochlamys species was carried out using a polyphasic approach to find characters that differentiate species and to establish accurate data on potential mycotoxin production by each species. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS region, parts of the beta-tubulin and calmodulin genes, macro- and micromorphological examinations and analysis of extrolite profiles were applied. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the genus Byssochlamys includes nine species, five of which form a teleomorph, i.e. B. fulva, B. lagunculariae, B. nivea, B. spectabilis and B. zollerniae, while four are asexual, namely P. brunneolus, P. divaricatus, P. formosus and P. saturatus. Among these, B. nivea produces the mycotoxins patulin and byssochlamic acid and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid. Byssochlamys lagunculariae produces byssochlamic acid and mycophenolic acid and thus chemically resembles B. nivea. Some strains of P. saturatus produce patulin and brefeldin A, while B. spectabilis (anamorph P. variotii s.s.) produces viriditoxin. Some micro- and macromorphological characters are valuable for identification purposes, including the shape and size of conidia and ascospores, presence and ornamentation of chlamydospores, growth rates on MEA and CYA and acid production on CREA. A dichotomous key is provided for species identification based on phenotypical characters.

  19. Emulation of anamorphic imaging on the SHARP extreme ultraviolet mask microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Chao, Weilun; Salmassi, Farhad H.; Oh, Sharon R.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Miyakawa, Ryan H.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-07-12

    The SHARP high-numerical aperture actinic reticle review project is a synchrotron-based, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope dedicated to photomask research. SHARP emulates the illumination and imaging conditions of current EUV lithography scanners and those several generations into the future. An anamorphic imaging optic with increased mask-side numerical aperture (NA) in the horizontal and increased demagnification in the vertical direction has been proposed in this paper to overcome limitations of current multilayer coatings and extend EUV lithography beyond 0.33 NA. Zoneplate lenses with an anamorphic 4×/8× NA of 0.55 are fabricated and installed in the SHARP microscope to emulate anamorphic imaging. SHARP’s Fourier synthesis illuminator with a range of angles exceeding the collected solid angle of the newly designed elliptical zoneplates can produce arbitrary angular source spectra matched to anamorphic imaging. A target with anamorphic dense features down to 50-nm critical dimension is fabricated using 40 nm of nickel as the absorber. In a demonstration experiment, anamorphic imaging at 0.55 4×/8× NA and 6 deg central ray angle (CRA) is compared with conventional imaging at 0.5 4× NA and 8 deg CRA. A significant contrast loss in horizontal features is observed in the conventional images. Finally, the anamorphic images show the same image quality in the horizontal and vertical directions.

  20. Emulation of anamorphic imaging on the SHARP extreme ultraviolet mask microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Chao, Weilun; Salmassi, Farhad; Oh, Sharon; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Miyakawa, Ryan H.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-07-01

    The SHARP high-numerical aperture actinic reticle review project is a synchrotron-based, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope dedicated to photomask research. SHARP emulates the illumination and imaging conditions of current EUV lithography scanners and those several generations into the future. An anamorphic imaging optic with increased mask-side numerical aperture (NA) in the horizontal and increased demagnification in the vertical direction has been proposed to overcome limitations of current multilayer coatings and extend EUV lithography beyond 0.33 NA. Zoneplate lenses with an anamorphic 4×/8× NA of 0.55 are fabricated and installed in the SHARP microscope to emulate anamorphic imaging. SHARP's Fourier synthesis illuminator with a range of angles exceeding the collected solid angle of the newly designed elliptical zoneplates can produce arbitrary angular source spectra matched to anamorphic imaging. A target with anamorphic dense features down to 50-nm critical dimension is fabricated using 40 nm of nickel as the absorber. In a demonstration experiment, anamorphic imaging at 0.55 4×/8× NA and 6 deg central ray angle (CRA) is compared with conventional imaging at 0.5 4× NA and 8 deg CRA. A significant contrast loss in horizontal features is observed in the conventional images. The anamorphic images show the same image quality in the horizontal and vertical directions.

  1. Emulation of anamorphic imaging on the SHARP extreme ultraviolet mask microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Chao, Weilun; ...

    2016-07-12

    The SHARP high-numerical aperture actinic reticle review project is a synchrotron-based, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope dedicated to photomask research. SHARP emulates the illumination and imaging conditions of current EUV lithography scanners and those several generations into the future. An anamorphic imaging optic with increased mask-side numerical aperture (NA) in the horizontal and increased demagnification in the vertical direction has been proposed in this paper to overcome limitations of current multilayer coatings and extend EUV lithography beyond 0.33 NA. Zoneplate lenses with an anamorphic 4×/8× NA of 0.55 are fabricated and installed in the SHARP microscope to emulate anamorphic imaging. SHARP’smore » Fourier synthesis illuminator with a range of angles exceeding the collected solid angle of the newly designed elliptical zoneplates can produce arbitrary angular source spectra matched to anamorphic imaging. A target with anamorphic dense features down to 50-nm critical dimension is fabricated using 40 nm of nickel as the absorber. In a demonstration experiment, anamorphic imaging at 0.55 4×/8× NA and 6 deg central ray angle (CRA) is compared with conventional imaging at 0.5 4× NA and 8 deg CRA. A significant contrast loss in horizontal features is observed in the conventional images. Finally, the anamorphic images show the same image quality in the horizontal and vertical directions.« less

  2. Evaluation of the BD Phoenix system for identification of a wide spectrum of clinically important yeast species: a comparison with Vitek 2-YST.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Choi, Min Ji; Joo, Min Young; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2014-08-01

    The Phoenix Yeast ID and Vitek 2-YST panels were compared using 351 molecularly identified yeast isolates. The Phoenix showed a comparable rate of correct identification for 4 common (Phoenix, 98%; Vitek, 94%) and 45 uncommon species (Phoenix, 70%; Vitek, 64%) and had a shorter mean identification time (6-7 h).

  3. Moniliella carnis sp. nov. and Moniliella dehoogii sp. nov., two novel species of black yeasts isolated from meat processing environments.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Vu Nguyen; Hai, Dao Anh; Hien, Dinh Duc; Takashima, Masako; Lachance, Marc-André

    2012-12-01

    Thirteen strains of yeasts typical of the genus Moniliella were isolated from fermenting meat and meat processing tools in Vietnam. PCR fingerprints generated by primer (GAC)(5) subdivided the strains into two distinctive genetic groups. In a phylogenetic tree based on D1/D2 large subunit rRNA gene sequences, the strains formed a well-supported clade with Moniliella spathulata and Moniliella suaveolens but represented two new lineages. The names Moniliella carnis sp. nov. and Moniliella dehoogii sp. nov. are proposed. The two novel species can be distinguished from each other and from known species of Moniliella based on phenotypic characteristics. It is assumed that the yeasts were associated with fatty substances that contaminated the meat processing tools. The type strain of Moniliella carnis is KFP 246(T) ( = CBS 126447(T) = NRRL Y-48681(T)) and the type strain of Moniliella dehoogii is KFP 211(T) ( = CBS 126564(T) = NRRL Y-48682(T)).

  4. Taxonomy, nomenclature and phylogeny of three cladosporium-like hyphomycetes, Sorocybe resinae, Seifertia azaleae and the Hormoconis anamorph of Amorphotheca resinae

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, K.A.; Hughes, S.J.; Boulay, H.; Louis-Seize, G.

    2007-01-01

    Using morphological characters, cultural characters, large subunit and internal transcribed spacer rDNA (ITS) sequences, and provisions of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, this paper attempts to resolve the taxonomic and nomenclatural confusion surrounding three species of cladosporium-like hyphomycetes. The type specimen of Hormodendrum resinae, the basis for the use of the epithet resinae for the creosote fungus {either as Hormoconis resinae or Cladosporium resinae) represents the mononematous synanamorph of the synnematous, resinicolous fungus Sorocybe resinae. The phylogenetic relationships of the creosote fungus, which is the anamorph of Amorphotheca resinae, are with the family Myxotrichaceae, whereas S. resinae is related to Capronia (Chaetothyriales, Herpotrichiellaceae). Our data support the segregation of Pycnostysanus azaleae, the cause of bud blast of rhododendrons, in the recently described anamorph genus Seifertia, distinct from Sorocybe; this species is related to the Dothideomycetes but its exact phylogenetic placement is uncertain. To formally stabilize the name of the anamorph of the creosote fungus, conservation of Hormodendrum resinae with a new holotype should be considered. The paraphyly of the family Myxotrichaceae with the Amorphothecaceae suggested by ITS sequences should be confirmed with additional genes. PMID:18491002

  5. Marine culturable yeasts in deep-sea hydrothermal vents: species richness and association with fauna.

    PubMed

    Burgaud, Gaëtan; Arzur, Danielle; Durand, Lucile; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Barbier, Georges

    2010-07-01

    Investigations of the diversity of culturable yeasts at deep-sea hydrothermal sites have suggested possible interactions with endemic fauna. Samples were collected during various oceanographic cruises at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, South Pacific Basins and East Pacific Rise. Cultures of 32 isolates, mostly associated with animals, were collected. Phylogenetic analyses of 26S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the yeasts belonged to Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla, with the identification of several genera: Rhodotorula, Rhodosporidium, Candida, Debaryomyces and Cryptococcus. Those genera are usually isolated from deep-sea environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of yeasts associated with deep-sea hydrothermal animals.

  6. Looking beyond Saccharomyces: the potential of non-conventional yeast species for desirable traits in bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Radecka, Dorota; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Mateo, Raquel Quintilla; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in the production of food and beverages and is by far the most studied yeast species. Currently, it is also the most used microorganism in the production of first-generation bioethanol from sugar or starch crops. Second-generation bioethanol, on the other hand, is produced from lignocellulosic feedstocks that are pretreated and hydrolyzed to obtain monomeric sugars, mainly D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose. Recently, S. cerevisiae recombinant strains capable of fermenting pentose sugars have been generated. However, the pretreatment of the biomass results in hydrolysates with high osmolarity and high concentrations of inhibitors. These compounds negatively influence the fermentation process. Therefore, robust strains with high stress tolerance are required. Up to now, more than 2000 yeast species have been described and some of these could provide a solution to these limitations because of their high tolerance to the most predominant stress conditions present in a second-generation bioethanol reactor. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the non-conventional yeast species showing unusual tolerance to these stresses, namely Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (osmotolerance), Kluyveromyces marxianus and Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha (thermotolerance), Dekkera bruxellensis (ethanol tolerance), Pichia kudriavzevii (furan derivatives tolerance) and Z. bailii (acetic acid tolerance).

  7. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P.; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species’ contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  8. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species.

  9. Development of Two Molecular Approaches for Differentiation of Clinically Relevant Yeast Species Closely Related to Candida guilliermondii and Candida famata

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaobo; Wu, Jingsong; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    The emerging pathogens Candida palmioleophila, Candida fermentati, and Debaryomyces nepalensis are often misidentified as Candida guilliermondii or Candida famata in the clinical laboratory. Due to the significant differences in antifungal susceptibilities and epidemiologies among these closely related species, a lot of studies have focused on the identification of these emerging yeast species in clinical specimens. Nevertheless, limited tools are currently available for their discrimination. Here, two new molecular approaches were established to distinguish these closely related species. The first approach differentiates these species by use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and large subunit ribosomal DNA with the enzymes BsaHI and XbaI in a double digestion. The second method involves a multiplex PCR based on the intron size differences of RPL18, a gene coding for a protein component of the large (60S) ribosomal subunit, and species-specific amplification. These two methods worked well in differentiation of these closely related yeast species and have the potential to serve as effective molecular tools suitable for laboratory diagnoses and epidemiological studies. PMID:24951804

  10. Development of two molecular approaches for differentiation of clinically relevant yeast species closely related to Candida guilliermondii and Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Wu, Jingsong; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2014-09-01

    The emerging pathogens Candida palmioleophila, Candida fermentati, and Debaryomyces nepalensis are often misidentified as Candida guilliermondii or Candida famata in the clinical laboratory. Due to the significant differences in antifungal susceptibilities and epidemiologies among these closely related species, a lot of studies have focused on the identification of these emerging yeast species in clinical specimens. Nevertheless, limited tools are currently available for their discrimination. Here, two new molecular approaches were established to distinguish these closely related species. The first approach differentiates these species by use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and large subunit ribosomal DNA with the enzymes BsaHI and XbaI in a double digestion. The second method involves a multiplex PCR based on the intron size differences of RPL18, a gene coding for a protein component of the large (60S) ribosomal subunit, and species-specific amplification. These two methods worked well in differentiation of these closely related yeast species and have the potential to serve as effective molecular tools suitable for laboratory diagnoses and epidemiological studies.

  11. Spathaspora allomyrinae sp. nov., a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from a scarabeid beetle Allomyrina dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Zhang, Zheng-Tian; Ke, Tao; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-05-01

    During an investigation of yeasts associated with insects, three strains of a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from the gut of the host beetles Allomyrina dichotoma (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae) collected on the Baotianman National Nature Reserve, Nanyan, Henan Province, China. These strains formed two elongated ascospores, which were tapered and curved at the ends in persistent asci. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes showed that these new strains represent a phylogenetically distinct species in the Spathaspora clade. This novel species differed from the closest species, Candida lyxosophila NRRL Y-17539T, by a 6.7 % sequence divergence (31 substitutions and 7 gaps) in the D1/D2 LSU rRNA gene and a 1.2 % divergence (17 substitutions, 4 gaps) in the SSU rRNA gene. The novel species can also be distinguished from C. lyxosophila NRRL Y-17539T in terms of the ability to assimilate myo-inositol and to grow in the presence of 0.1 % cycloheximide, as well as the inability to assimilate citrate. The name Spathaspora allomyrinae sp. nov. is proposed for this species. The type strain is NYNU 1495T ( = CICC 33057T = CBS 13924T). The MycoBank number is MB 815071.

  12. Cryptococcus bromeliarum sp. nov., an orange-coloured basidiomycetous yeast isolated from bromeliads in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Inácio, João; Fonseca, Alvaro; Vainstein, Marilene H; Valente, Patricia

    2009-04-01

    During a survey of yeasts associated with the phylloplane of several bromeliad species in Itapuã Park in southern Brazil, we isolated four orange-coloured strains which were found to represent a novel anamorphic tremellaceous (Tremellales, Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota) yeast species, Cryptococcus bromeliarum sp. nov. (type strain BI20(T) =CBS 10424(T) =NRRL Y-48112(T)). PCR-fingerprinting profiles of the four strains with primers M13 and (GTG)(5) were almost identical, which suggested conspecificity among the isolates. On the basis of D1/D2 26S rDNA sequence analysis, C. bromeliarum is phylogenetically closely related to other orange-coloured Cryptococcus species, namely Cryptococcus armeniacus, C. amylolyticus, C. tibetensis and C. cistialbidi, but differed from these species by at least six nucleotide substitutions and was thus considered a separate species. Physiological differences from C. armeniacus, C. amylolyticus and C. cistialbidi included the inability of C. bromeliarum to assimilate citrate and to form starch-like compounds. Differentiation from C. tibetensis can be achieved by the ability of the latter to assimilate ethylamine.

  13. Cryptococcus mujuensis sp. nov. and Cryptococcus cuniculi sp. nov., basidiomycetous yeasts isolated from wild rabbit faeces.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kee-Sun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Park, Yong-Ha; Lee, Kang Hyun; Poo, Haryoung; Kwon, Gi-Seok; Kwon, O-Yu

    2006-09-01

    Two previously undescribed anamorphic yeasts, strains T-11(T) and T-26(T), recovered from wild rabbit faecal pellets collected in Muju, Korea, were identified using phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. The isolates were characterized by the proliferation of budding cells, positive diazonium blue B and urease reactions, the presence of Q-10 as the major ubiquinone, the presence of xylose in whole-cell hydrolysates and the inability to ferment sugars. Phylogenetic analyses based on 26S rRNA gene partial sequences revealed that strain T-11(T) was located in the Bulleromyces clade and was related to Sirobasidium intermedium, Tremella exigua, Cryptococcus cellulolyticus and Bullera pseudoalba. Strain T-26(T) was located in the Mesenterica clade and was closely related to Cryptococcus sp. F6 and Cryptococcus heveanensis CBS 8976. Sequence divergence values of more than 4 % from other described Cryptococcus species, together with the phenotypic differences, showed that the isolated yeasts represent previously unrecognized members of this genus. Therefore, two novel yeast species are proposed: Cryptococcus mujuensis sp. nov., with strain T-11(T) (=KCTC 17231(T)=CBS 10308(T)) as the type strain, and Cryptococcus cuniculi sp. nov., with strain T-26(T) (=KCTC 17232(T)=CBS 10309(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Evaluation of Pyrosequencing® Technology for the Identification of Clinically Relevant Non-Dematiaceous Yeasts and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Montero, C.I.; Shea, Y.R.; Jones, P.A.; Harrington, S.M.; Tooke, N.E; Witebsky, F.G; Murray, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing was used to identify 133 isolates of clinically relevant non-dematiaceous yeasts. These included 97 ATCC strains (42 type strains), 7 UAMH strains, and 29 clinical isolates. Isolates belonged to the following genera: Candida (18 species), Trichosporon (10), Cryptococcus (7), Malassezia (3), Rhodotorula (2), Geotrichum (1), Blastoschizomyces (1) and Kodamaea (1). Amplicons were obtained of a hypervariable ITS region and analyzed using Pyrosequencing technology. The data were evaluated by a BLAST search against the GenBank database and correlated with data obtained by conventional cycle sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region. Cycle sequencing identified (78.9%) if the isolates to the species level. Pyrosequencing technology identified 69.1%. In 90.1% of all the strains tested, identification results of both sequencing methods were identical. Most Candida isolates can be identified to the species level by pyrosequencing. Trichosporon species and some Cryptococcus cannot be differentiated at the species level. Pyrosequencing can be used for the reliable identification of most commonly isolated non-dematiaceous yeasts, with a reduction of cost per identification compared to conventional sequencing. PMID:18421488

  15. Phylogenetic classification of yeasts and related taxa within Pucciniomycotina

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.-M.; Yurkov, A.M.; Göker, M.; Lumbsch, H.T.; Leavitt, S.D.; Groenewald, M.; Theelen, B.; Liu, X.-Z.; Boekhout, T.; Bai, F.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Most small genera containing yeast species in the Pucciniomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) are monophyletic, whereas larger genera including Bensingtonia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus and Sporobolomyces are polyphyletic. With the implementation of the “One Fungus = One Name” nomenclatural principle these polyphyletic genera were revised. Nine genera, namely Bannoa, Cystobasidiopsis, Colacogloea, Kondoa, Erythrobasidium, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, Sakaguchia and Sterigmatomyces, were emended to include anamorphic and teleomorphic species based on the results obtained by a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis, phylogenetic network analyses, branch length-based methods, as well as morphological, physiological and biochemical comparisons. A new class Spiculogloeomycetes is proposed to accommodate the order Spiculogloeales. The new families Buckleyzymaceae with Buckleyzyma gen. nov., Chrysozymaceae with Chrysozyma gen. nov., Microsporomycetaceae with Microsporomyces gen. nov., Ruineniaceae with Ruinenia gen. nov., Symmetrosporaceae with Symmetrospora gen. nov., Colacogloeaceae and Sakaguchiaceae are proposed. The new genera Bannozyma, Buckleyzyma, Fellozyma, Hamamotoa, Hasegawazyma, Jianyunia, Rhodosporidiobolus, Oberwinklerozyma, Phenoliferia, Pseudobensingtonia, Pseudohyphozyma, Sampaiozyma, Slooffia, Spencerozyma, Trigonosporomyces, Udeniozyma, Vonarxula, Yamadamyces and Yunzhangia are proposed to accommodate species segregated from the genera Bensingtonia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporidiobolus and Sporobolomyces. Ballistosporomyces is emended and reintroduced to include three Sporobolomyces species of the sasicola clade. A total of 111 new combinations are proposed in this study. PMID:26951631

  16. Culture-dependent and independent techniques to monitor yeast species during cold soak carried out at different temperatures in winemaking.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Y Paola; Mestre, M Victoria; Combina, Mariana; Toro, María Eugenia; Vazquez, Fabio; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-11-21

    Transformation of grape must into wine is a process that may vary according to the consumers' requirements. Application of cold soak prior to alcoholic fermentation is a common practice in cellars in order to enhance flavor complexity and extraction of phenolic compounds. However, the effect of this step on wine yeast microbiota is not well-known. The current study simultaneously analyzed the effect of different cold soak temperatures on the microbiological population throughout the process and the use of culture-dependent and independent techniques to study this yeast ecology. The temperatures assayed were those normally applied in wineries: 2.5, 8 and 12°C. PCR-DGGE allowed detection of the most representative species such as Hanseniaspora uvarum, Starmerella bacillaris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As could be expected, highest diversity indices were obtained at the beginning of each process, and survival of H. uvarum or S. bacillaris depended on the temperature. Our results are in agreement with those obtained with culture independent methods, but qPCR showed higher precision and a different behavior was observed for each yeast species and at each temperature assayed. Comparison of both culture-independent techniques can provide a general overview of the whole process, although DGGE does not reveal the diversity expected due to the reported problems with the sensitivity of this technique.

  17. Yamadazyma insecticola f.a., sp. nov. and Yamadazyma epiphylla f.a., sp. nov., two novel yeast species.

    PubMed

    Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Am-In, Somjit; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-04-01

    Two yeast strains representing two novel yeast species were isolated from frass of an unidentified insect (ST-78(T)) and the external surfaces of rice leaves (YE170(T)) collected in Thailand. The two strains were genetically, morphologically and phenotypically distinct from recognized species and were found to represent two novel species of the genus Yamadazyma although formation of ascospores was not observed. In terms of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, the closest relative of strain ST-78(T) was Candida lessepsii CBS 9941(T) but with 3.8% nucleotide substitutions, while the closest relative of strain YE170(T) was strain ST-78(T) but with 4.3% nucleotide substitutions. Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS1-2) regions revealed that strain ST-78 differed from C. lessepsii CBS 9941(T) by 8.8% nucleotide substitutions and from strain YE170(T) by 9.4% nucleotide substitutions. The result of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 and ITS1-2 regions together with phylogenetic analysis indicated that strains ST-78(T) and YE170(T) represented two novel species within the Yamadazyma clade. The names Yamadazyma insecticola f.a., sp. nov. (type strain ST-78(T) = BCC 8314(T) = NBRC 110421(T) = CBS 13382(T); MycoBank no. MB810546) and Yamadazyma epiphylla f.a., sp. nov. (type strain YE170(T) = BCC 63466(T) = NBRC 110423(T) = CBS 13384(T); MycoBank no. MB810547) are proposed for the two novel yeast species.

  18. Candida aquaetextoris sp. nov., a new species of yeast occurring in sludge from a textile industry wastewater treatment plant in Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Vallini, G; Frassinetti, S; Scorzetti, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe Candida aquaetextoris, a new yeast species isolated from sludge that accumulates at the main wastewater treatment facility which processes discharges from textile factories located in the Prato metropolitan district, northern Tuscany, Italy. This yeast degrades 4-(1-nonyl)phenol, a toxic intermediate originating from the microbial attack of nonylphenol polyethoxylates, which are nonionic surfactants largely used in leather and textile industries. In the investigation we employed conventional and molecular taxonomy techniques to compare the new isolate to strains of physiologically similar species, such as Candida maltosa and Candida tropicalis, as well as strains of quite phenotypically different species, such as Candida haemulonii. The results demonstrate that the yeast which we identified represents a separate taxon. The type strain of C. aquaetextoris is strain Lmar1, which has been deposited in the Industrial Yeast Collection of the Division of Applied Microbiology, Department of Plant Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, as strain DBVPG 6732.

  19. Yarrowia porcina sp. nov. and Yarrowia bubula f.a. sp. nov., two yeast species from meat and river sediment.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edina; Dlauchy, Dénes; Medeiros, Adriana O; Péter, Gábor; Rosa, Carlos A

    2014-04-01

    Eleven yeast strains representing two hitherto undescribed species were isolated from different kinds of meat samples in Hungary and one from the sediment of a tropical freshwater river in Southeastern Brazil. The analysis of the sequences of their large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions placed the two new species in the Yarrowia clade. Some of the seven strains representing the first new species can mate and give rise to asci and form ascospores embedded in capsular material, which qualifies it as the third teleomorph species of the Yarrowia clade. The name Yarrowia porcina sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.02100(T) = CBS 12935(T) = NRRL Y-63669(T), allotype strain UFMG-RD131(A) = CBS 12932(A)) is proposed for this new yeast species, which, based on physiological characters, is indistinguishable from Yarrowia lipolytica and some other species of the genus. Considerable intraspecific variability was detected among the sequences of the large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domains of the seven strains. The variability among the D1/D2 sequences exceeded the divergence observed among the ITS sequences and in some cases more than 1 % substitution among the D1/D2 sequences was detected. The conspecificity of these strains was supported by the low (0-3 substitutions) sequence divergence among their ITS sequences, the result of a parsimony network analysis utilizing the concatenated ITS and D1/D2 sequences and also by the fingerprint patterns generated by microsatellite primed PCR. No ascospore formation was observed in the group of the other five strains representing the second new species. These strains shared identical D1/D2 and ITS sequences. Yarrowia bubula f.a., sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.01998(T) = CBS 12934(T) = NRRL Y-63668(T)) is proposed to accommodate these strains.

  20. Kwoniella mangroviensis gen. nov., sp.nov. (Tremellales, Basidiomycota), a teleomorphic yeast from mangrove habitats in the Florida Everglades and Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Statzell-Tallman, Adele; Belloch, Carmela; Fell, Jack W

    2008-02-01

    Mangrove forests inhabit the shoreline regions of tropical and subtropical marine habitats, where they are the basis of a multi-trophic level food web that drives the shellfish and fisheries industries. Yeasts, and other fungi, have significant roles in these ecosystems as they decompose plant organic material and serve as a food source for small invertebrates. Studies designed to examine yeast communities of mangrove regions of the Florida Everglades and the Bahamas demonstrated the repeated presence of an undescribed teleomorphic basidiomycetous yeast. The yeast is heterothallic, with a sexual cycle that can be observed on artificial media. Mating between compatible pairs produces polymorphic basidia. Some basidia are globose, ovoid or lageniform, with longitudinal to oblique and transverse septa, whereas other basidia are navicular with one to three transverse septa. Basidiocarps and ballistoconidia are absent. Molecular sequence analysis of a partial region (D1/D2 domains) of the large subunit rRNA demonstrated that the yeast is phylogenetically distinct from other teleomorphic Tremellales with close relationships to the anamorphic species Cryptococcus dejecticola, Cryptococcus bestiolae and Bullera dendrophila. The molecular and phenotypic data indicate that this teleomorph should be classified in a novel genus. Therefore, Kwoniella mangroviensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (Type strain CBS 8507), is proposed.

  1. Two new species of the genus Candida in the Zygoascus clade, Candida lundiana sp. nov. and Candida suthepensis sp. nov., isolated from raw honey in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saksinchai, Sujinan; Suzuki, Motofumi; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Ohkuma, Moriya; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2012-03-01

    During a survey of yeasts associated with raw honey collected in Thailand, two strains of the Zygoascus clade were isolated from the Asian cavity-nesting honeybee Apis cerana and the stingless bee Homotrigona fimbriata. Phylogeny based on 26S rDNA D1/D2 sequences placed these yeasts as members of a clade including Candida bituminiphila, Candida patagonica and Candida polysorbophila. The strains of the two novel species, CBS 12271(T) and CBS 12270(T), respectively, could be unquestionably distinguished from their relatives by rDNA sequences and other taxonomic characteristics. Therefore, the novel anamorphic species, Candida lundiana sp. nov. (type strain CBS 12271(T) = JCM 16823(T)) and Candida suthepensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 12270(T) = JCM 16822(T)) are described.

  2. Structural characterization of novel sophorolipid biosurfactants from a newly-identified species of Candida yeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sophorolipids are a group of O-acylsophorose-based biosurfactants produced by several yeasts of the Starmerella clade. The known sophorolipids are typically partially acetylated 2-O-ß-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose (sophorose) ß-O-glycosidically-linked to 17-L-hydroxy-delta-9-octadecenoic aci...

  3. Evaluation of PNA FISH® Yeast Traffic Light in identification of Candida species from blood and non-blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marina; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Tonkic, Marija

    2016-08-01

    PNA FISH(®) (peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization) Yeast Traffic Light (PNA FISH(®) YTL) assay is a commercially avaliable method for rapid identification of Candida spp. directly from positive blood cultures. This report provides a one-year experience in identification of yeasts from 25 specimens (15 positive blood cultures and 10 other clinically significant specimens) using PNA FISH(®) YTL and comparing it to VITEK 2 System. Overall, assay identification compatibility with VITEK 2 System was found among 21/25 (84%) isolates tested. Only 3/25 (12%) of the isolates were not identified, and one isolate was misidentified by the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay. Our results show that the assay is a reliable method in identification of Candida spp. not only from blood cultures, but even from other clinically significant specimens (urine cultures, catheter tip cultures, peritoneal fluid cultures) when compared to automated method like VITEK 2 System. This novel application of the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay could therefore contribute to cost savings and significant benefit to patients, as rapid information about isolated yeast species is provided. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Identification of Candida species and susceptibility testing with Sensititre YeastOne microdilution panel to 9 antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Kucukates, Emine; Gultekin, Nuh N; Alisan, Zeynep; Hondur, Nur; Ozturk, Recep

    2016-07-01

    To determine the species incidence and susceptibility pattern to 9 antifungal agents of yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens of colonized or infected patients treated in the coronary and surgical intensive care units (ICU).  A total of 421 ICU patients were treated at the Cardiology Institute, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey between June 2013 and May 2014, and 44 Candida species were isolated from blood, urine, endotracheal aspiration fluid, sputum, and wounds of 16 ICU patients. Identification of Candida was performed using CHROMagar. Antifungal susceptibility was determined by a Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric microdilution panel.  Candida albicans (C. albicans) was the most commonly observed microorganism 23 (54%); the other microorganisms isolated were Candida tropicalis 12 (27%), Candida glabrata 5 (11%), Candida parapsilosis 1 (2%), Candida lusitaniae 1 (2%), Candida sake 1 (2%), and Geotrichum capitatum 1 (2%). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Geotrichum capitatum excepted, the other isolates were also susceptible to anidulafungin, micafungin, and caspofungin. Candida parapsilosis was found to be susceptible to all the studied antifungals. High MIC rates for azole group of antifungal drugs were found for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The rate of colonisation was 3.8% (16/421). Only 0.7% (3/421) patients out of a total of 421 developed candidemia.  We found that the yeast colonization and infection rates of patients in our ICUs are very low. Candida albicans is still the most common species. We detected a decreasing susceptibility to azole compounds.

  5. Fast method for identifying inter- and intra-species Saccharomyces hybrids in extensive genetic improvement programs based on yeast breeding.

    PubMed

    Solieri, L; Verspohl, A; Bonciani, T; Caggia, C; Giudici, P

    2015-07-01

    The present work proposes a two-step molecular strategy to select inter- and intra-species Saccharomyces hybrids obtained by spore-to-spore mating, one of the most used methods for generating improved hybrids from homothallic wine yeasts. As low spore viability and haplo-selfing are the main causes of failed mating, at first, we used colony screening PCR (csPCR) of discriminative gene markers to select hybrids directly on dissection plate and discard homozygous diploid colonies arisen from one auto-diploidized progenitor. Then, pre-selected candidates were submitted to recursive streaking and conventional PCR in order to discriminate between the hybrids with stable genomic background and the false-positive admixtures of progenitor cells both undergone haplo-selfing. csPCRs of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 or 2, and the subsequent digestion with diagnostic endonucleases HaeIII and RsaI, respectively, were efficient to select six new Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces uvarum hybrids from 64 crosses. Intragenic minisatellite regions in PIR3, HSP150, and DAN4 genes showed high inter-strain size variation detectable by cost-effective agarose gel electrophoresis and were successful to validate six new intra-species S. cerevisiae hybrids from 34 crosses. Both protocols reduce significantly the number of massive DNA extractions, prevent misinterpretations caused by one or both progenitors undergone haplo-selfing, and can be easily implemented in yeast labs without any specific instrumentation. The study provides a method for the marker-assisted selection of several inter- and intra-species yeast hybrids in a cost-effective, rapid and reproducible manner. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Bensingtonia rectispora sp. nov. and Bensingtonia bomiensis sp. nov., ballistoconidium-forming yeast species from Tibetan plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Ming; Boekhout, Teun; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2012-08-01

    Five yeast strains isolated from plant leaves collected in south-east Tibet formed cream to brownish colonies and produced asymmetrical ballistoconidia and CoQ-9 as the major ubiquinone. Sequence analysis of the 26S rRNA D1/D2 domain and the internal transcribed spacer region indicated that these strains represented two novel species of the genus Bensingtonia. The names Bensingtonia rectispora sp. nov. (type strain XZ 4C5(T) = CGMCC 2.02635(T) = CBS 10710(T)) and Bensingtonia bomiensis sp. nov. (type strain XZ 33D1(T) = CGMCC 2.02670(T) = CBS 10713(T)) are proposed for the two novel species, which are phylogenetically closely related to Bensingtonia naganoensis, Bensingtonia pseudonaganoensis and the type species of the genus, Bensingtonia ciliata.

  7. Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis: the physiology of a new species related to the spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces lentus and Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Steels, Hazel; James, Steve A; Bond, Chris J; Roberts, Ian N; Stratford, Malcolm

    2002-05-01

    Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis was recently discovered in the 'tea fungus' used to make fermented tea. Z. kombuchaensis was shown by ribosomal DNA sequencing to be a novel species, and a close relative of Zygosaccharomyces lentus, from which it could not be distinguished by conventional physiological tests. Z. lentus was originally established as a new taxon by growth at 4 degrees C, sensitivity for heat and oxidative stress, and lack of growth in aerobic shaken culture at temperatures above 25 degrees C. Subsequent analysis of Z. kombuchaensis reveals that this species shares these unusual characteristics, confirming its close genealogical relationship to Z. lentus. Detailed physiological data from a number of Z. kombuchaensis and Z. lentus strains clearly demonstrate that these two species can in fact be distinguished from one another based on their differing resistance/sensitivity to the food preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid. The spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Z. lentus are resistant to both acetic acid and sorbic acid, whereas Z. kombuchaensis is resistant to acetic acid but sensitive to sorbic acid. This would indicate that Z. kombuchaensis strains lack the mechanism for resistance to sorbic acid, but possess the means of resistance to acetic acid. This observation would therefore suggest that these two resistance mechanisms are different, and that in all probability acetic and sorbic acids inhibit yeast growth by different modes of action. Z. kombuchaensis strains were also sensitive to benzoic acid, again suggesting inhibition dissimilar from that to acetic acid.

  8. Rhodotorula svalbardensis sp. nov., a novel yeast species isolated from cryoconite holes of Ny-Ålesund, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Singh, Shiv M; Tsuji, Masaharu; Prasad, Gandham S; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2014-02-01

    A psychrophilic yeast species was isolated from glacier cryoconite holes of Svalbard. Nucleotide sequences of the strains were studied using D1/D2 domain, ITS region and partial sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The strains belonged to a clade of psychrophilic yeasts, but showed marked differences from related species in the D1/D2 domain and biochemical characters. Effects of temperature, salt and media on growth of the cultures were also studied. Screening of the cultures for amylase, cellulase, protease, lipase, urease and catalase activities was carried out. The strains expressed high amylase and lipase activities. Freeze tolerance ability of the isolates indicated the formation of unique hexagonal ice crystal structures due to presence of 'antifreeze proteins' (AFPs). FAME analysis of cultures showed a unique trend of increase in unsaturated fatty acids with decrease in temperature. The major fatty acids recorded were oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, myristic acid and pentadecanoic acid. Based on sequence data and, physiological and morphological properties of the strains, we propose a novel species, Rhodotorula svalbardensis and designate strains MLB-I (CCP-II) and CRY-YB-1 (CBS 12863, JCM 19699, JCM 19700, MTCC 10952) as its type strains (Etymology: sval.bar.den'sis. N.L. fem. adj. svalbardensis pertaining to Svalbard).

  9. Evolution and Ecophysiology of the Industrial Producer Hypocrea jecorina (Anamorph Trichoderma reesei) and a New Sympatric Agamospecies Related to It

    PubMed Central

    Druzhinina, Irina S.; Komoń-Zelazowska, Monika; Atanasova, Lea; Seidl, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Trichoderma reesei, a mitosporic green mould, was recognized during the WW II based on a single isolate from the Solomon Islands and since then used in industry for production of cellulases. It is believed to be an anamorph (asexual stage) of the common pantropical ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina. Methodology/Principal Findings We combined molecular evolutionary analysis and multiple methods of phenotype profiling in order to reveal the genetic relationship of T. reesei to H. jecorina. The resulting data show that the isolates which were previously identified as H. jecorina by means of morphophysiology and ITS1 and 2 (rRNA gene cluster) barcode in fact comprise several species: i) H. jecorina/T. reesei sensu stricto which contains most of the teleomorphs (sexual stages) found on dead wood and the wild-type strain of T. reesei QM 6a; ii) T. parareesei nom. prov., which contains all strains isolated as anamorphs from soil; iii) and two other hypothetical new species for which only one or two isolates are available. In silico tests for recombination and in vitro mating experiments revealed a history of sexual reproduction for H. jecorina and confirmed clonality for T. parareesei nom. prov. Isolates of both species were consistently found worldwide in pantropical climatic zone. Ecophysiological comparison of H. jecorina and T. parareesei nom. prov. revealed striking differences in carbon source utilization, conidiation intensity, photosensitivity and mycoparasitism, thus suggesting adaptation to different ecological niches with the high opportunistic potential for T. parareesei nom. prov. Conclusions Our data prove that T. reesei belongs to a holomorph H. jecorina and displays a history of worldwide gene flow. We also show that its nearest genetic neighbour - T. parareesei nom. prov., is a cryptic phylogenetic agamospecies which inhabits the same biogeographic zone. These two species thus provide a so far rare example of sympatric speciation within saprotrophic

  10. Metschnikowia santaceciliae, Candida hawaiiana, and Candida kipukae, three new yeast species associated with insects of tropical morning glory.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc André; Bowles, Jane M; Starmer, William T

    2003-03-01

    A new haplontic heterothallic species of Metschnikowia and two related asexual yeast species were discovered in morning glory flowers and associated insects. Metschnikowia santaceciliae came from Conotelus (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and other insect species associated with flowers of Ipomoea indica (purple morph) in Costa Rica. Candida hawaiiana and Candida kipukae were found in I. indica (syn. I. acuminata) and its insects in Hawai'i, and the former was also isolated in a specimen of Conotelus collected on Merremia tuberosa (Convolvulaceae) in Costa Rica. The three species have nearly identical physiological profiles, typical of the genus Metschnikowia. The sequences of the D1/D2 domains of their large subunit ribosomal DNA confirm that the species belong to the Metschnikowia clade, even though they share a very low degree of inter-relatedness. M. santaceciliae is a sister species to Metschnikowia continentalis. C. kipukae is a basal member of the large-spored Metschnikowia subclade, and C. hawaiiana has a weak affinity to Metschnikowia agaves. Two of the three species appear to be endemic. The type cultures are: Metschnikowia santaceciliae, strains UWO(PS)01-517a1=CBS 9148=NRRL Y-27475 (h(+, holotype) and UWO(PS)01-520a1=CBS 9149=NRRL Y-27476 (h-, isotype); Candida hawaiiana, strain UWO(PS)91-698.3=CBS 9146=NRRL Y-27473; Candida kipukae, strain UWO(PS)00-669.2=CBS 9147=NRRL Y-27474.

  11. Malassezia arunalokei sp. nov., a Novel Yeast Species Isolated from Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients and Healthy Individuals from India.

    PubMed

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Prasad, Gandham S; Ghosh, Anup; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M

    2016-07-01

    The majority of species within the genus Malassezia are lipophilic yeasts that colonize the skin of warm-blooded animals. Two species, Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta, are implicated in the causation of seborrheic dermatitis/dandruff (SD/D). During our survey of SD/D cases, we isolated several species of Malassezia and noticed vast variations within a few lipid-dependent species. Variations observed in the phenotypic characteristics (colony morphology, absence of catalase activity, growth at 37°C, and precipitation surrounding wells containing Tween 20 or Cremophor EL) suggested the possible presence of a novel species. Sequence divergence observed in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the D1/D2 domain, and the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA and the TEF1 gene, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ITS2 region, and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis support the existence of a novel species. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization of these strains, we propose a new species, namely, M. arunalokei sp. nov., and we designate NCCPF 127130 (= MTCC 12054 = CBS 13387) as the type strain. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Malassezia arunalokei sp. nov., a Novel Yeast Species Isolated from Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients and Healthy Individuals from India

    PubMed Central

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Prasad, Gandham S.; Ghosh, Anup; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    The majority of species within the genus Malassezia are lipophilic yeasts that colonize the skin of warm-blooded animals. Two species, Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta, are implicated in the causation of seborrheic dermatitis/dandruff (SD/D). During our survey of SD/D cases, we isolated several species of Malassezia and noticed vast variations within a few lipid-dependent species. Variations observed in the phenotypic characteristics (colony morphology, absence of catalase activity, growth at 37°C, and precipitation surrounding wells containing Tween 20 or Cremophor EL) suggested the possible presence of a novel species. Sequence divergence observed in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the D1/D2 domain, and the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA and the TEF1 gene, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ITS2 region, and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis support the existence of a novel species. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization of these strains, we propose a new species, namely, M. arunalokei sp. nov., and we designate NCCPF 127130 (= MTCC 12054 = CBS 13387) as the type strain. PMID:27147721

  13. Molecular taxonomy of bambusicolous fungi: Tetraplosphaeriaceae, a new pleosporalean family with Tetraploa-like anamorphs

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K.; Hirayama, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Hatakeyama, S.; Harada, Y.; Sano, T.; Shirouzu, T.; Hosoya, T.

    2009-01-01

    A new pleosporalean family Tetraplosphaeriaceae is established to accommodate five new genera; 1) Tetraplosphaeria with small ascomata and anamorphs belonging to Tetraploa s. str., 2) Triplosphaeria characterised by hemispherical ascomata with rim-like side walls and anamorphs similar to Tetraploa but with three conidial setose appendages, 3) Polyplosphaeria with large ascomata surrounded by brown hyphae and anamorphs producing globose conidia with several setose appendages, 4) Pseudotetraploa, an anamorphic genus, having obpyriform conidia with pseudosepta and four to eight setose appendages, and 5) Quadricrura, an anamorphic genus, having globose conidia with one or two long setose appendages at the apex and four to five short setose appendages at the base. Fifteen new taxa in these genera mostly collected from bamboo are described and illustrated. They are linked by their Tetraploa s. l. anamorphs. To infer phylogenetic placement in the Pleosporales, analyses based on a combined dataset of small- and large-subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU+LSU nrDNA) was carried out. Tetraplosphaeriaceae, however, is basal to the main pleosporalean clade and therefore its relationship with other existing families was not completely resolved. To evaluate the validity of each taxon and to clarify the phylogenetic relationships within this family, further analyses using sequences from ITS-5.8S nrDNA (ITS), transcription elongation factor 1-α (TEF), and β-tubulin (BT), were also conducted. Monophyly of the family and that of each genus were strongly supported by analyses based on a combined dataset of the three regions (ITS+TEF+BT). Our results also suggest that Tetraplosphaeria (anamorph: Tetraploa s. str.) is an ancestral lineage within this family. Taxonomic placement of the bambusicolous fungi in Astrosphaeriella, Kalmusia, Katumotoa, Massarina, Ophiosphaerella, Phaeosphaeria, Roussoella, Roussoellopsis, and Versicolorisporium, are also discussed based on the SSU

  14. Species-specific activation of Cu/Zn SOD by its CCS copper chaperone in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Julie E; Li, Cissy X; Odeh, Hana M; Culotta, Valeria C

    2014-06-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast of important public health relevance. Virulence of C. albicans requires a copper and zinc containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), but the biology of C. albicans SOD1 is poorly understood. To this end, C. albicans SOD1 activation was examined in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a eukaryotic expression system that has proven fruitful for the study of SOD1 enzymes from invertebrates, plants, and mammals. In spite of the 80% similarity between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans SOD1 molecules, C. albicans SOD1 is not active in S. cerevisiae. The SOD1 appears incapable of productive interactions with the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS1) of S. cerevisiae. C. albicans SOD1 contains a proline at position 144 predicted to dictate dependence on CCS1. By mutation of this proline, C. albicans SOD1 gained activity in S. cerevisiae, and this activity was independent of CCS1. We identified a putative CCS1 gene in C. albicans and created heterozygous and homozygous gene deletions at this locus. Loss of CCS1 resulted in loss of SOD1 activity, consistent with its role as a copper chaperone. C. albicans CCS1 also restored activity to C. albicans SOD1 expressed in S. cerevisiae. C. albicans CCS1 is well adapted for activating its partner SOD1 from C. albicans, but not SOD1 from S. cerevisiae. In spite of the high degree of homology between the SOD1 and CCS1 molecules in these two fungal species, there exists a species-specific barrier in CCS-SOD interactions which may reflect the vastly different lifestyles of the pathogenic versus the noninfectious yeast.

  15. New Hybrids between Saccharomyces Sensu Stricto Yeast Species Found among Wine and Cider Production Strains

    PubMed Central

    Masneuf, Isabelle; Hansen, Jørgen; Groth, Casper; Piskur, Jure; Dubourdieu, Denis

    1998-01-01

    Two yeast isolates, a wine-making yeast first identified as a Mel+ strain (ex. S. uvarum) and a cider-making yeast, were characterized for their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Electrophoretic karyotyping analyses, restriction fragment length polymorphism maps of PCR-amplified MET2 gene fragments, and the sequence analysis of a part of the two MET2 gene alleles found support the notion that these two strains constitute hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus. The two hybrid strains had completely different restriction patterns of mitochondrial DNA as well as different sequences of the OLI1 gene. The sequence of the OLI1 gene from the wine hybrid strain appeared to be the same as that of the S. cerevisiae gene, whereas the OLI1 gene of the cider hybrid strain is equally divergent from both putative parents, S. bayanus and S. cerevisiae. Some fermentative properties were also examined, and one phenotype was found to reflect the hybrid nature of these two strains. The origin and nature of such hybridization events are discussed. PMID:9758815

  16. New hybrids between Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast species found among wine and cider production strains.

    PubMed

    Masneuf, I; Hansen, J; Groth, C; Piskur, J; Dubourdieu, D

    1998-10-01

    Two yeast isolates, a wine-making yeast first identified as a Mel+ strain (ex. S. uvarum) and a cider-making yeast, were characterized for their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Electrophoretic karyotyping analyses, restriction fragment length polymorphism maps of PCR-amplified MET2 gene fragments, and the sequence analysis of a part of the two MET2 gene alleles found support the notion that these two strains constitute hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus. The two hybrid strains had completely different restriction patterns of mitochondrial DNA as well as different sequences of the OLI1 gene. The sequence of the OLI1 gene from the wine hybrid strain appeared to be the same as that of the S. cerevisiae gene, whereas the OLI1 gene of the cider hybrid strain is equally divergent from both putative parents, S. bayanus and S. cerevisiae. Some fermentative properties were also examined, and one phenotype was found to reflect the hybrid nature of these two strains. The origin and nature of such hybridization events are discussed.

  17. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  18. AFLP fingerprinting for identification of infra-species groups of Rhizoctonia solani and Waitea circinata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Patch diseases caused by Thanatephorus cucumeris and Waitea circinata varieties (anamorphs: Rhizoctonia species) pose a serious threat to successful maintenance of several important turfgrass species. Reliance on field symptoms to identify Rhizoctonia causal agents can be difficult and misleading. D...

  19. Glucosylation and Other Biotransformations of T-2 Toxin by Yeasts of the Trichomonascus Clade

    PubMed Central

    Price, Neil P. J.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2012-01-01

    Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid toxins produced by Fusarium species. Since these mycotoxins are very stable, there is interest in microbial transformations that can remove toxins from contaminated grain or cereal products. Twenty-three yeast species assigned to the Trichomonascus clade (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota), including four Trichomonascus species and 19 anamorphic species presently classified in Blastobotrys, were tested for their ability to convert the trichothecene T-2 toxin to less-toxic products. These species gave three types of biotransformations: acetylation to 3-acetyl T-2 toxin, glycosylation to T-2 toxin 3-glucoside, and removal of the isovaleryl group to form neosolaniol. Some species gave more than one type of biotransformation. Three Blastobotrys species converted T-2 toxin into T-2 toxin 3-glucoside, a compound that has been identified as a masked mycotoxin in Fusarium-infected grain. This is the first report of a microbial whole-cell method for producing trichothecene glycosides, and the potential large-scale availability of T-2 toxin 3-glucoside will facilitate toxicity testing and development of methods for detection of this compound in agricultural and other products. PMID:23042183

  20. Determination and differentiation of triacylglycerol molecular species in Antarctic and non-Antarctic yeasts by atmospheric pressure-chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Tucker, David; Watson, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    Yeast, particularly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has long served as a model eukaryotic system for studies on the regulation of lipid metabolism. We developed a high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for the detailed analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in 14 species of yeast consisting of seven Antarctic yeasts (grown at 15°C and 5°C) and seven non-Antarctic yeasts (grown at 25°C and 15°C), the latter including 3 strains of S. cerevisiae. Analysis of TAG molecular species established that the sn-2 position was invariably occupied by an unsaturated fatty acyl moiety. In S. cerevisiae the preference was for oleic acid 18:1>palmitoleic acid 16:1, in Candida albicans, Cryptococcus humicolus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa 18:1>linoleic acid 18:2 and in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii 18:2>18:1. In the Antarctic yeasts (Cryptococcus watticus, Cryptococcus victoriae, Cryptococcus nyarrowii, Leucosporidium antarcticum, Leucosporidium fellii, Candida psychrophila and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) the general pattern was for the sn-2 position to be occupied by 18:1, 18:2 or linolenic acid 18:3. A trend towards synthesis of increased unsaturated fatty acid in TAGs was observed as the growth temperature was lowered. The application of principal component analysis demonstrated that the yeasts were differentiated into three distinct groups. One group consisted of the three S. cerevisiae strains, a second the other four non-Antarctic yeasts and the third the seven Antarctic yeasts. The data for the Antarctic yeasts, to the best of our knowledge, have not been previously reported. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid Differentiation of Aspergillus Species from Other Medically Important Opportunistic Molds and Yeasts by PCR-Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    de Aguirre, Liliana; Hurst, Steven F.; Choi, Jong Soo; Shin, Jong Hee; Hinrikson, Hans Peter; Morrison, Christine J.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a PCR-based assay to differentiate medically important species of Aspergillus from one another and from other opportunistic molds and yeasts by employing universal, fungus-specific primers and DNA probes in an enzyme immunoassay format (PCR-EIA). Oligonucleotide probes, directed to the internal transcribed spacer 2 region of ribosomal DNA from Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus ustus, and Aspergillus versicolor, differentiated 41 isolates (3 to 9 each of the respective species; P < 0.001) in a PCR-EIA detection matrix and gave no false-positive reactions with 33 species of Acremonium, Exophiala, Candida, Fusarium, Mucor, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Rhizopus, Scedosporium, Sporothrix, or other aspergilli tested. A single DNA probe to detect all seven of the most medically important Aspergillus species (A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans, A. niger, A. terreus, A. ustus, and A. versicolor) was also designed. Identification of Aspergillus species was accomplished within a single day by the PCR-EIA, and as little as 0.5 pg of fungal DNA could be detected by this system. In addition, fungal DNA extracted from tissues of experimentally infected rabbits was successfully amplified and identified using the PCR-EIA system. This method is simple, rapid, and sensitive for the identification of medically important Aspergillus species and for their differentiation from other opportunistic fungi. PMID:15297489

  2. Novel low abundance and transient RNAs in yeast revealed by tiling microarrays and ultra high-throughput sequencing are not conserved across closely related yeast species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Albert; Hansen, Kasper Daniel; Bullard, James; Dudoit, Sandrine; Sherlock, Gavin

    2008-12-01

    A complete description of the transcriptome of an organism is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of how it functions and how its transcriptional networks are controlled, and may provide insights into the organism's evolution. Despite the status of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as arguably the most well-studied model eukaryote, we still do not have a full catalog or understanding of all its genes. In order to interrogate the transcriptome of S. cerevisiae for low abundance or rapidly turned over transcripts, we deleted elements of the RNA degradation machinery with the goal of preferentially increasing the relative abundance of such transcripts. We then used high-resolution tiling microarrays and ultra high-throughput sequencing (UHTS) to identify, map, and validate unannotated transcripts that are more abundant in the RNA degradation mutants relative to wild-type cells. We identified 365 currently unannotated transcripts, the majority presumably representing low abundance or short-lived RNAs, of which 185 are previously unknown and unique to this study. It is likely that many of these are cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs), which are rapidly degraded and whose function(s) within the cell are still unclear, while others may be novel functional transcripts. Of the 185 transcripts we identified as novel to our study, greater than 80 percent come from regions of the genome that have lower conservation scores amongst closely related yeast species than 85 percent of the verified ORFs in S. cerevisiae. Such regions of the genome have typically been less well-studied, and by definition transcripts from these regions will distinguish S. cerevisiae from these closely related species.

  3. Morphological and physiological features of Arthroderma benhamiae anamorphs isolated in northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Jochen; Wodarg, Svea

    2015-02-01

    The anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae is an upcoming zoophilic dermatophyte that only in recent years has gained importance as a cause of tinea in humans. Its identification by conventional methods can cause problems. In this study we have subjected seven genetically confirmed strains of A. benhamiae anamorphs from northern Germany recently identified in our laboratory to a comprehensive assessment. Their macroscopic and microscopic morphology was checked on various agars and enzyme release stimulated by substrates with keratin, hair perforation and other physiological characteristics were tested. All strains were related to the previously described yellow phenotype of the A. benhamiae anamorph and showed a high resemblance among themselves. Coherent features were their uniform thallus morphology on Sabouraud glucose agar with yellow pigmentation, the formation of circuit-like hyphal structures and hyphal connections that had not been described previously, a lack of conidia, thiamine dependence, the spectrum of released enzymes and a good growth on human stratum corneum. With exception of the latter two these criteria are suggested for the identification of this anamorph phenotype that should be evaluated by future observations. Different phenotypes of the A. benhamiae anamorph may prevail in other geographic regions. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Use of the VITEK 2 system to identify and test the antifungal susceptibility of clinically relevant yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, MSC; Bertoletti, A; Lucca, HRL; Silva, RBO; Meneghin, FA; Szeszs, MW

    2013-01-01

    Eleven quality control isolates (Candida albicans ATCC 64548, C. tropicalis ATCC 200956, C. glabrata ATCC 90030, C. lusitaniae ATCC 200951, C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, C. krusei ATCC 6258, C. dubliniensis ATCC 6330, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 9763, Cryptococcus neoformans ATCC 90012, C. gattii FIOCRUZ-CPF 60, and Trichosporon mucoides ATCC 204094) and 32 bloodstream isolates, including C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. guilliermondii, C. pelliculosa (Pichia anomala), C. haemulonii, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr were identified at the species level by the VITEK 2 system. A set of clinical isolates (32 total) were used as challenge strains to evaluate the ability of the VITEK 2 system to determine the antifungal susceptibility of yeasts compared with the CLSI and EUCAST BMD reference standards. The VITEK 2 system correctly identified 100% of the challenge strains. The identification of yeast species and the evaluation of their susceptibility profiles were performed in an automated manner by the VITEK 2 system after approximately 15 h of growth for most species of Candida. The VITEK 2 system ensures that each test is performed in a standardized manner and provides quantitative MIC results that are reproducible and accurate when compared with the BMD reference methods. This system was able to determine the MICs of amphotericin B, flucytosine, voriconazole, and fluconazole in 15 h or less for the most common clinically relevant Candida species. In addition, the VITEK 2 system could reliably identify resistance to flucytosine, voriconazole, and fluconazole and exhibits excellent quantitative and qualitative agreement with the CLSI or EUCAST broth microdilution reference methods. PMID:24688520

  5. Tetrapisispora namnaonensis sp. nov., a novel ascomycetous yeast species isolated from forest soil of Nam Nao National Park, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sumpradit, Tawatchai; Limtong, Savitree; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Seki, Tatsuji

    2005-07-01

    Twenty-one strains of a novel ascomycetous yeast species were isolated from soil collected in three kinds of natural forest, namely a dry dipterocarp forest, a mixed deciduous forest and a pine forest, in Nam Nao National Park, Phetchabun province, Thailand. The strains formed asci containing one to four ovoid to reniform ascospores, assimilated glucose, galactose and glycerol, fermented glucose and galactose vigorously and contained ubiquinone Q-6, indicating that they belonged to the genus Tetrapisispora. A comparative analysis of the small subunit rDNA (SSU rDNA) and the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rDNA (LSU rDNA) of all available sequences for ascomycetous yeasts confirmed that the strains were phylogenetically related to the genus Tetrapisispora. All strains had identical nucleotide sequences in the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA and differed from the nearest species, Tetrapisispora arboricola IFO 10925(T), by 6.4% nucleotide substitutions. The strains differed from Tetrapisispora arboricola by the ability to assimilate D-gluconic acid, the inability to grow on 50% glucose medium, the nuclear DNA base composition and deliquescent asci. The strains were differentiated from the other four species of Tetrapisispora on the basis of trehalose assimilation, the ability to grow on 50% glucose or 10% NaCl plus 5% glucose, vitamin requirement, the nuclear DNA base composition and the type of ascus. Based on the characteristics mentioned above, the strains are recognized as a single novel species of the genus Tetrapisispora and the name Tetrapisispora namnaonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TN1-01(T) (=TISTR 5828(T)=JCM 12664(T)=CBS 10093(T)).

  6. Deep fungal dermatitis caused by the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii in captive coastal bearded dragons (Pogona barbata).

    PubMed

    Johnson, R S P; Sangster, C R; Sigler, L; Hambleton, S; Paré, J A

    2011-12-01

    Deep fungal dermatitis caused by the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii (CANV) was diagnosed in a group of coastal bearded dragons (Pogona barbata). The outbreak extended over a 6-month period, with four of six lizards from the same zoological outdoor enclosure succumbing to infection. A fifth case of dermatomycosis was identified in a pet lizard originally sourced from the wild. Diagnosis of infection with the CANV was based on similar clinical signs and histopathology in all animals and confirmed by culture and sequencing of the fungus from one animal. This is the first report of the CANV causing disease in a terrestrial reptile species in Australia and the first in the coastal bearded dragon.

  7. Characterisation of Yeasts Isolated from 'Nduja of Spilinga.

    PubMed

    Giarratana, Filippo; Muscolino, Daniele; Beninati, Chiara; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Ziino, Graziella; Panebianco, Antonio

    2014-04-17

    The 'Nduja of Spilinga protected geographical indication (PGI) is a spreadable italian salami, obtained by using fat (50%), lean of pork (25%), chili pepper (25%) and NaCl, stuffed into natural pork casing. Its predominant flora is represented by yeasts, reaching at the end of seasoning values of 6 log CFU/g. Considering the need to enhance and protect traditional local products, it seemed interesting to carry out a characterisation of yeasts of the 'Nduja of Spilinga PGI. A total of 127 strains of yeast isolated from samples of 'Nduja of Spilinga PGI (79 strains from samples at different days of curing and 48 from samples of commerce) was subjected to morphological identification, hydrolysis of urea, lipolytic activity and identification with API 20C AUX, ID 32C and simplified identification systems. One hundred twenty three (96.8%) strains were attributable to the phylum Ascomycetes (urease-negative), the remaining 4 strains (3.2%) were Basidiomycetes (urease-positive). Debaryomyces hansenii and its anamorph shape, Candida famata, represented the most prevalent species (61.42 and 17.32% respectively), followed by Candida glabrata (8.66%), Pichia (Candida) guilliermondii (5.17%), Candida parapsilosis and Rhodotorula glutinis (1.57%). Candida catenulata, Criptococcus uniguttulatus, Rhodotorula minuta, Candida zeylanoides and Candida utilis were observed with 0.79%. The lipolytic activity was observed only in 10 strains of D. hansenii and in one of C. zeylanoides. Further investigation will contribute to the selection of indigenous strains that could be used for the creation of specific starter, useful to improve the process of characterisation of the 'Nduja of Spilinga and also to guarantee its safety.

  8. Characterisation of Yeasts Isolated from ‘Nduja of Spilinga

    PubMed Central

    Muscolino, Daniele; Beninati, Chiara; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Ziino, Graziella; Panebianco, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The ‘Nduja of Spilinga protected geographical indication (PGI) is a spreadable italian salami, obtained by using fat (50%), lean of pork (25%), chili pepper (25%) and NaCl, stuffed into natural pork casing. Its predominant flora is represented by yeasts, reaching at the end of seasoning values of 6 log CFU/g. Considering the need to enhance and protect traditional local products, it seemed interesting to carry out a characterisation of yeasts of the ‘Nduja of Spilinga PGI. A total of 127 strains of yeast isolated from samples of ‘Nduja of Spilinga PGI (79 strains from samples at different days of curing and 48 from samples of commerce) was subjected to morphological identification, hydrolysis of urea, lipolytic activity and identification with API 20C AUX, ID 32C and simplified identification systems. One hundred twenty three (96.8%) strains were attributable to the phylum Ascomycetes (urease-negative), the remaining 4 strains (3.2%) were Basidiomycetes (urease-positive). Debaryomyces hansenii and its anamorph shape, Candida famata, represented the most prevalent species (61.42 and 17.32% respectively), followed by Candida glabrata (8.66%), Pichia (Candida) guilliermondii (5.17%), Candida parapsilosis and Rhodotorula glutinis (1.57%). Candida catenulata, Criptococcus uniguttulatus, Rhodotorula minuta, Candida zeylanoides and Candida utilis were observed with 0.79%. The lipolytic activity was observed only in 10 strains of D. hansenii and in one of C. zeylanoides. Further investigation will contribute to the selection of indigenous strains that could be used for the creation of specific starter, useful to improve the process of characterisation of the ‘Nduja of Spilinga and also to guarantee its safety. PMID:27800341

  9. [Selenium tolerance of yeasts].

    PubMed

    Golubev, V I; Golubev, N V

    2002-01-01

    Selenium tolerance of yeasts widely varies: the growth of some yeasts can be inhibited by a selenium concentration as low as 10(-4) M, whereas others can grow in the presence of 10(-1) M selenium. Homogeneous yeast taxa are characterized by a certain level of selenium tolerance, and heterogeneous taxa show a variable level of tolerance to selenium. In general, ascomycetous yeasts are more tolerant to selenium than basidiomycetous yeasts. Among the ascomycetous yeasts, the genera Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces exhibited the lowest and the species Candida maltosa, Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica the highest tolerance to selenium. Among the basidiomycetous yeasts, the genera Bullera, Cryptococcus, and Holtermannia showed the lowest and the species Cryptococcus curvatus, Cr. humicola, and Trichosporon spp. the highest tolerance to selenium. The selenium tolerance of yeasts depends on the composition of the growth medium, in particular, on the presence of sulfate, sulfur-containing amino acids, and glutamine in the medium.

  10. Reactive oxygen species may influence the heat shock response and stress tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, Christos; Curran, Brendan P G

    2004-03-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as second messengers in a number of biochemical pathways, and in animal cells have been associated with the activation of the heat shock response (HSR). Here, using an intracellular probe, we demonstrate that differential accumulation of ROS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly associated with differential induction of an HS reporter gene over a range of heat shock temperatures. There was a good correlation between cellular ROS levels and the levels of HS-induced reporter gene expression between 37 degrees C and 44 degrees C, both reaching maximal values at 41 degrees C. Furthermore, the addition of 150 microM H2O2 to the yeast cells during heat treatment resulted in a 3 degrees C decrease in the temperature required for maximal induction of the HS expression vector--an increased HS sensitivity that corresponded to a concomitant increase in ROS levels at these lower HS temperatures. Conversely, cells treated with 10 mM of the antioxidant ascorbic acid required a temperature that was 2 degrees C above that required in untreated controls for maximal induction of the HS expression vector. This decreased HS sensitivity corresponded to a decrease in ROS levels at these higher HS temperatures. Finally, cell viability assays reveal that intrinsic thermotolerance remains high in control cells despite concomitant decreases in HS-reporter gene expression and ROS accumulation between 41 degrees C and 44 degrees C. We conclude that the sensitivity of the yeast HSR is strongly associated with ROS accumulation, and suggest that ROS-mediated signalling ensures cooperation between the HS and the antioxidant responses.

  11. Cytosine DNA methylation is found in Drosophila melanogaster but absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and other yeast species.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Floriana; Mülleder, Michael; Kok, Robert; Blom, Henk J; Ralser, Markus

    2014-04-15

    The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic DNA modification in many bacteria, plants, and mammals, but its relevance for important model organisms, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, is still equivocal. By reporting the presence of 5-meC in a broad variety of wild, laboratory, and industrial yeasts, a recent study also challenged the dogma about the absence of DNA methylation in yeast species. We would like to bring to attention that the protocol used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry involved hydrolysis of the DNA preparations. As this process separates cytosine and 5-meC from the sugar phosphate backbone, this method is unable to distinguish DNA- from RNA-derived 5-meC. We employed an alternative LC-MS/MS protocol where by targeting 5-methyldeoxycytidine moieties after enzymatic digestion, only 5-meC specifically derived from DNA is quantified. This technique unambiguously identified cytosine DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana (14.0% of cytosines methylated), Mus musculus (7.6%), and Escherichia coli (2.3%). Despite achieving a detection limit at 250 attomoles (corresponding to <0.00002 methylated cytosines per nonmethylated cytosine), we could not confirm any cytosine DNA methylation in laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces paradoxus, or Pichia pastoris. The protocol however unequivocally confirmed DNA methylation in adult Drosophila melanogaster at a value (0.034%) that is up to 2 orders of magnitude below the detection limit of bisulphite sequencing. Thus, 5-meC is a rare DNA modification in drosophila but absent in yeast.

  12. Comparison and optimization of two MALDI-TOF MS platforms for the identification of medically relevant yeast species.

    PubMed

    Pence, M A; McElvania TeKippe, E; Wallace, M A; Burnham, C-A D

    2014-10-01

    The rapid identification of yeast is essential for the optimization of antifungal therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate two matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platforms, the bioMérieux VITEK MS (IVD Knowledgebase v.2.0) and Bruker Biotyper (software version 3.1), for the rapid identification of medically relevant yeast. One hundred and seventeen isolates, representing six genera and 18 species, were analyzed using multiple direct smear methods to optimize identification. Sequence analysis was the gold standard for comparison. Isolates were analyzed with VITEK MS using the direct smear method +/- a 25 % formic acid on-plate extraction. For Biotyper, isolates were analyzed using direct smear without formic acid, and with 25 % and 100 % formic acid on-plate extractions. When all methods were included, VITEK MS correctly identified 113 (96.6 %) isolates after 24 h with one misidentification, and Biotyper correctly identified 77 (65.8 %) isolates using a threshold of ≥2.0 with no misidentifications. Using a revised threshold of ≥1.7, Biotyper correctly identified 103 (88.0 %) isolates, with 3 (2.6 %) misidentifications. For both platforms, the number of identifications was significantly increased using a formic acid overlay (VITEK MS, p < 0.01; Biotyper, p < 0.001), and reducing the Biotyper threshold from ≥2.0 to ≥1.7 significantly increased the rate of identification (p < 0.001). The data in this study demonstrate that the direct smear method with on-plate formic acid extraction can be used for yeast identification on both MS platforms, and more isolates are identified using the VITEK MS system (p < 0.01).

  13. Enhanced longevity by ibuprofen, conserved in multiple species, occurs in yeast through inhibition of tryptophan import.

    PubMed

    He, Chong; Tsuchiyama, Scott K; Nguyen, Quynh T; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N; Terrill, Samuel R; Sahibzada, Sarah; Patel, Bhumil; Faulkner, Alena R; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V; Tian, Ruilin; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Kaeberlein, Matt; Moskalev, Alexey A; Kennedy, Brian K; Polymenis, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen has been associated with a reduced risk of some age-related pathologies. However, a general pro-longevity role for ibuprofen and its mechanistic basis remains unclear. Here we show that ibuprofen increased the lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, indicative of conserved eukaryotic longevity effects. Studies in yeast indicate that ibuprofen destabilizes the Tat2p permease and inhibits tryptophan uptake. Loss of Tat2p increased replicative lifespan (RLS), but ibuprofen did not increase RLS when Tat2p was stabilized or in an already long-lived strain background impaired for aromatic amino acid uptake. Concomitant with lifespan extension, ibuprofen moderately reduced cell size at birth, leading to a delay in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Similar changes in cell cycle progression were evident in a large dataset of replicatively long-lived yeast deletion strains. These results point to fundamental cell cycle signatures linked with longevity, implicate aromatic amino acid import in aging and identify a largely safe drug that extends lifespan across different kingdoms of life.

  14. Enhanced Longevity by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import

    PubMed Central

    He, Chong; Tsuchiyama, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Terrill, Samuel R.; Sahibzada, Sarah; Patel, Bhumil; Faulkner, Alena R.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Tian, Ruilin; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Kaeberlein, Matt; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Polymenis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen has been associated with a reduced risk of some age-related pathologies. However, a general pro-longevity role for ibuprofen and its mechanistic basis remains unclear. Here we show that ibuprofen increased the lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, indicative of conserved eukaryotic longevity effects. Studies in yeast indicate that ibuprofen destabilizes the Tat2p permease and inhibits tryptophan uptake. Loss of Tat2p increased replicative lifespan (RLS), but ibuprofen did not increase RLS when Tat2p was stabilized or in an already long-lived strain background impaired for aromatic amino acid uptake. Concomitant with lifespan extension, ibuprofen moderately reduced cell size at birth, leading to a delay in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Similar changes in cell cycle progression were evident in a large dataset of replicatively long-lived yeast deletion strains. These results point to fundamental cell cycle signatures linked with longevity, implicate aromatic amino acid import in aging and identify a largely safe drug that extends lifespan across different kingdoms of life. PMID:25521617

  15. Yeasts from Scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber): A focus on monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of Candida famata and closely related species.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Silva, Aline Lobão da; Monteiro, Frederico Ozanan Barros; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Sales, Jamille Alencar; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Maia Junior, José Erisvaldo; Miranda, Stefânia Araújo; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Castelo-Branco, Débora Souza Collares Maia; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pereira Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to identify yeasts from the gastrointestinal tract of scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber) and from plant material collected from the environment where they live. Then, the isolates phenotypically identified as Candida famata were submitted to molecular identification of their closely related species and evaluated for their antifungal susceptibility and possible resistance mechanisms to antifungal drugs. Cloacal swabs from 20 scarlet ibises kept in captivity at Mangal das Garças Park (Brazil), pooled stool samples (n = 20) and samples of trunks and hollow of trees (n = 20) obtained from their enclosures were collected. The samples were seeded on Sabouraud agar supplemented with chloramphenicol. The 48 recovered isolates were phenotypically identified as 15 Candida famata, 13 Candida catenulata, 2 Candida intermedia, 1 Candida lusitaniae, 2 Candida guilliermondii, 1 Candida kefyr, 1 Candida amapae, 1 Candida krusei, 8 Trichosporon spp., and 4 Rhodotorula spp. The C. famata isolates were further identified as 3 C. famata, 8 Debaryomyces nepalensis, and 4 C. palmioleophila. All C. famata and C. palmioleophila were susceptible to caspofungin and itraconazole, while one D. nepalensis was resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. This same isolate and another D. nepalensis had lower amphotericin B susceptibility. The azole resistant strain had an increased efflux of rhodamine 6G and an alteration in the membrane sterol content, demonstrating multifactorial resistance mechanism. Finally, this research shows that scarlet ibises and their environment harbor C. famata and closely related species, including antifungal resistant isolates, emphasizing the need of monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of these yeast species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The value of the D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers (ITS) domains for the identification of yeast species belonging to the genus Yamadazyma.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, M; Robert, V; Smith, M Th

    2011-06-01

    In a taxonomic study of yeasts that have been isolated in French Guiana and Thailand, five yeast strains isolated from plants were found to belong to the Yamadazyma clade of Saccharomycotina. On the basis of morphology, physiology and the nucleotide divergence in the D1/D2 domain of the 26S nuclear ribosomal RNA (nrRNA) gene, as well as the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) domain of the nrRNA gene operon, these strains were identified to represent three novel species in this teleomorphic clade. An additional isolate, that is publicly available from the CBS yeast collection and isolated from Taiwan, was found to be similar to one of the novel species described from Thailand. Yeast species belonging to the Yamadazyma clade have previously been described as members of the Candida membranifaciens clade. These species are widely distributed and were isolated from diverse habitats, including water, plants, animals and guts of insects and termites. In the present study the ITS region is shown to be a valuable region for species identification within this clade, and the novel species proposed are Candida vaughaniae (ex-type strain CBS 8583), Candida khao-thaluensis (ex-type strain CBS 8535) and Candida tallmaniae (ex-type strain CBS 8575).

  17. Communities of anamorphic fungi on green leaves and leaf litter of native forests of Scutia buxifolia and Celtis tala: Composition, diversity, seasonality and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, Natalia; Bucsinszky, Ana María; Arturi, Marcelo; Cabello, Marta Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Xeric forests dominated by two tree species, Scutia buxifolia (Rhamnaceae) and Celtis tala (Ulmacea), are temperate, semi-deciduous wooded communities that represent the most abundant woodlands on the eastern plains of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. The district of Magdalena has one of the most well-preserved native-forest areas, with an environmental heterogeneity that gives rise to the wide variability in the vegetation present. The aim of this study was to analyze the species composition, diversity, seasonal variations, and substrate specificity of anamorphic fungi (Ascomycota) on the green leaves and in the leaf litter of native forests dominated by Scutia buxifolia and Celtis tala from Magdalena, Buenos Aires, Argentina. In order to obtain the mycobiota of decomposition, seasonal samples of green leaves and leaf litter from both types of trees were collected over a two-year period. In the laboratory, the leaves were placed in a moist chamber and incubated at room temperature. A total of 100 species of anamorphic Ascomycota were identified in both forests. No significant variations were observed in the richness, diversity, or evenness of the fungal communities of the green leaves and leaf litter of both forests between seasons. The species that characterized the fungal communities in the leaves of each of the trees were found to be different. The type of substrate had a stronger influence in determining the composition of the fungal community in both types of forests. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges of anamorphic high-NA lithography and mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D.; Liu, Jingjing

    2017-06-01

    .1117/12.2086074). To ensure no assist feature printing, the assist feature sizes need to be scaled with λ/NA. The extremely small SRAF width (below 25 nm on the reticle) is difficult to fabricate across the full reticle. In this paper, we introduce an innovative `attenuated SRAF' to improve SRAF manufacturability and still maintain the process window benefit. A new mask fabrication process is proposed to use existing mask-making capability to manufacture the attenuated SRAFs. The high-NA EUV system utilizes anamorphic reduction; 4× in the horizontal (slit) direction and 8× in the vertical (scanning) direction (J. van Schoot, K. van Ingen Schenau, G. Bottiglieri, K. Troost, J. Zimmerman, et al., `Proc. SPIE. 9776, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VII', vol. 97761I (2016) doi: 10.1117/12.2220150; B. Kneer, S. Migura, W. Kaiser, J. T. Neumann, J. van Schoot, in `Proc. SPIE9422, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VI', vol. 94221G (2015) doi: 10.1117/12.2175488). For an anamorphic system, the magnification has an angular dependency, and thus, familiar mask specifications such as mask error factor (MEF) need to be redefined. Similarly, mask-manufacturing rule check (MRC) needs to consider feature orientation.

  19. Yeast diversity in a traditional French cheese "Tomme d'orchies" reveals infrequent and frequent species with associated benefits.

    PubMed

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Drider, Djamel; Jacques, Philippe; Coucheney, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    This study is aimed at unrevealing the yeast diversity of handmade cheese, Tomme d'orchies, produced and marketed in the north of France. A total of 185 yeast colonies were isolated from the surface and core of this cheese. From these, 80 morphologically different colonies were selected and subjected to rep-PCR analysis. The isolates were clustered into six distinct groups based on their DNA fingerprints. From each group, at least 30% of isolates were selected and identified to species level by biochemical characteristics (ID32C Api system) and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 26S rDNA regions. The isolates belonged to Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus, frequently isolated, and less frequently isolated Saturnispora mendoncae and Clavispora lusitaniae. Two isolates designated as Kluyveromyces lactis (isolate S-3-05) and Kluyveromyces marxianus (isolate S-2-05) were non-hemolytic, sensitive to antifungal compounds and able to inhibit the growth of pathogens including Candida albicans, Listeria monocytogenes and some bacilli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing a set of strong intronic promoters for robust metabolic engineering in oleaginous Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium) yeast species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Yap, Sihui Amy; Koh, Chong Mei John; Ji, Lianghui

    2016-11-25

    Red yeast species in the Rhodotorula/Rhodosporidium genus are outstanding producers of triacylglyceride and cell biomass. Metabolic engineering is expected to further enhance the productivity and versatility of these hosts for the production of biobased chemicals and fuels. Promoters with strong activity during oil-accumulation stage are critical tools for metabolic engineering of these oleaginous yeasts. The upstream DNA sequences of 6 genes involved in lipid biosynthesis or accumulation in Rhodotorula toruloides were studied by luciferase reporter assay. The promoter of perilipin/lipid droplet protein 1 gene (LDP1) displayed much stronger activity (4-11 folds) than that of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), one of the strongest promoters known in yeasts. Depending on the stage of cultivation, promoter of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (ACC1) and fatty acid synthase β subunit gene (FAS1) exhibited intermediate strength, displaying 50-160 and 20-90% levels of GPD1 promoter, respectively. Interestingly, introns significantly modulated promoter strength at high frequency. The incorporation of intron 1 and 2 of LDP1 (LDP1in promoter) enhanced its promoter activity by 1.6-3.0 folds. Similarly, the strength of ACC1 promoter was enhanced by 1.5-3.2 folds if containing intron 1. The intron 1 sequences of ACL1 and FAS1 also played significant regulatory roles. When driven by the intronic promoters of ACC1 and LDP1 (ACC1in and LDP1in promoter, respectively), the reporter gene expression were up-regulated by nitrogen starvation, independent of de novo oil biosynthesis and accumulation. As a proof of principle, overexpression of the endogenous acyl-CoA-dependent diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 gene (DGA1) by LDP1in promoter was significantly more efficient than GPD1 promoter in enhancing lipid accumulation. Intronic sequences play an important role in regulating gene expression in R. toruloides. Three intronic promoters, LDP1in, ACC1in and FAS1in, are

  1. Kurtzmaniella gen. nov. and description of the heterothallic, haplontic yeast species Kurtzmaniella cleridarum sp. nov., the teleomorph of Candida cleridarum.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc-André; Starmer, William T

    2008-02-01

    The teleomorph of Candida cleridarum was discovered through the detection of conjugation between isolates of a large collection from the nitidulid beetles of the genus Carpophilus found in the flowers of various cacti in Arizona, USA. The previous oversight of the sexual cycle of this yeast is attributed to the inequality (ca. 5 : 1) of the two mating types. Extensive conjugation between compatible mating types is observed after overnight incubation on 5 % malt agar, followed after 3-5 days by the formation of mature asci. The hat-shaped ascospores are reminiscent of those seen in Kodamaea species, which are members of the same guild. However, published analyses of D1/D2 large subunit rDNA sequences indicate an affinity with the genus Debaryomyces. As the latter is polyphyletic and morphologically heterogeneous, and in view of the distinct life cycle of the new teleomorph, the new genus Kurtzmaniella is described with a novel species, Kurtzmaniella cleridarum sp. nov. Given the close relatedness of Kurtzmaniella cleridarum sp. nov. to Candida quercitrusa, Candida oleophila and Candida railenensis, for which several natural isolates were available, strains of these species were mixed in pairs under the conditions found favourable for the former. Conjugation was not detected in those species. The type strain of Kurtzmaniella cleridarum sp. nov. is UWOPS 99-101.1(T) (=CBS 8793(T)=NRRL Y-48386(T), h(+)), type of Candida cleridarum. The allotype is UWOPS 07-123.1 (=CBS 10688=NRRL Y-48387, h(-)).

  2. Metschnikowia sinensis sp. nov., Metschnikowia zizyphicola sp. nov. and Metschnikowia shanxiensis sp. nov., novel yeast species from jujube fruit.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meng-Lin; Zhang, Li-Qun; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Ji-Shu; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2006-09-01

    Eight yeast strains were isolated from jujube fruit surfaces collected in Shanxi and Shandong Provinces, China. All eight strains produced needle-shaped ascospores under suitable conditions. Three separate groups, representing three novel species in the genus Metschnikowia, were recognized by sequence comparisons of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. The names Metschnikowia sinensis sp. nov. (type strain XY103(T)=AS 2.3110(T)=CBS 10357(T)), Metschnikowia zizyphicola sp. nov. (type strain XY201(T)=AS 2.3111(T)=CBS 10358(T)) and Metschnikowia shanxiensis sp. nov. (type strain XY801(T)=AS 2.3112(T)=CBS 10359(T)) are proposed for the three novel species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequence showed that these three novel species are clustered in a clade together with the previously described species Metschnikowia fructicola, Metschnikowia andauensis, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Metschnikowia chrysoperlae.

  3. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Yeast Species to Fluconazole and Voriconazole as Determined by the 2010 National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net (CHIF-NET) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Kong, Fanrong; Sun, Zi-Yong; Liao, Kang; Lu, Juan; Shao, Hai-Feng; Yan, Yan; Fan, Hong; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling

    2012-01-01

    We conducted active, laboratory-based surveillance for isolates from patients with invasive infections across China from August 2009 to July 2010. DNA sequencing methods were used to define species, and susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A2 disk diffusion method but using up-to-date clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values. Candida spp. made up 90.5% of the 814 yeast strains isolated, followed by Cryptococcus neoformans (7.7%) and other non-Candida yeast strains (1.7%). Bloodstream isolates made up 42.9% of the strains, isolates from ascitic fluid made up 22.1%, but pus/tissue specimens yielded yeast strains in <5% of the cases. Among the Candida isolates, Candida albicans was the most common species from specimens other than blood (50.1%) but made up only 23% of the bloodstream isolates (P < 0.001). C. parapsilosis complex species were the most common Candida isolates from blood (33.2%). Uncommon bloodstream yeast strains included Trichosporon spp., C. pelliculosa, and the novel species C. quercitrusa, reported for the first time as a cause of candidemia. Most (>94%) of the isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis complex were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, as were all of the Trichosporon strains; however, 12.2% of the C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates were fluconazole resistant and 17.8% had non-wild-type susceptibility to voriconazole. Seven C. tropicalis strains were cross-resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole; six were from patients in the same institution. Resistance to fluconazole and voriconazole was seen in 31.9% and 13.3% of the uncommon Candida and non-Candida yeast strains, respectively. Causative species and azole susceptibility varied with the geographic region. This study provided clinically useful data on yeast strains and their antifungal susceptibilities in China. PMID:23035204

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the angiosperm-floricolous insect-yeast association: have yeast and angiosperm lineages co-diversified?

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Beatriz; Lachance, Marc-André; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-08-01

    Metschnikowia (Saccharomycetales, Metschnikowiaceae/Metschnikowia clade) is an ascomycetous yeast genus whose species are associated mostly with angiosperms and their insect pollinators over all continents. The wide distribution of the genus, its association with angiosperm flowers, and the fact that it includes some of the best-studied yeasts in terms of biogeography and ecology make Metschnikowia an excellent group to investigate a possible co-radiation with angiosperm lineages. We performed phylogenetic analyses implementing Bayesian inference and likelihood methods, using a concatenated matrix (≈2.6 Kbp) of nuclear DNA (ACT1, 1st and 2nd codon positions of EF2, Mcm7, and RPB2) sequences. We included 77 species representing approximately 90% of the species in the family. Bayesian and parsimony methods were used to perform ancestral character reconstructions within Metschnikowia in three key morphological characters. Patterns of evolution of yeast habitats and divergence times were explored in the Metschnikowia clade lineages with the purpose of inferring the time of origin of angiosperm-associated habitats within Metschnikowiaceae. This paper presents the first phylogenetic hypothesis to include nearly all known species in the family. The polyphyletic nature of Clavispora was confirmed and Metschnikowia species (and their anamorphs) were shown to form two groups: one that includes mostly floricolous, insect-associated species distributed in mostly tropical areas (the large-spored Metschnikowia clade and relatives) and another that comprises more heterogeneous species in terms of habitat and geographical distribution. Reconstruction of character evolution suggests that sexual characters (ascospore length, number of ascospores, and ascus formation) evolved multiple times within Metschnikowia. Complex and dynamic habitat transitions seem to have punctuated the course of evolution of the Metschnikowiaceae with repeated and independent origins of angiosperm

  5. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  6. Phylogeny of tremellomycetous yeasts and related dimorphic and filamentous basidiomycetes reconstructed from multiple gene sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.-Z.; Wang, Q.-M.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Bai, F.-Y.; Boekhout, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Tremellomycetes (Basidiomycota) contains a large number of unicellular and dimorphic fungi with stable free-living unicellular states in their life cycles. These fungi have been conventionally classified as basidiomycetous yeasts based on physiological and biochemical characteristics. Many currently recognised genera of these yeasts are mainly defined based on phenotypical characters and are highly polyphyletic. Here we reconstructed the phylogeny of the majority of described anamorphic and teleomorphic tremellomycetous yeasts using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and neighbour-joining analyses based on the sequences of seven genes, including three rRNA genes, namely the small subunit of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rDNA, and the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 2) of rDNA including 5.8S rDNA; and four protein-coding genes, namely the two subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (CYTB). With the consideration of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characters and the congruence of phylogenies inferred from analyses using different algorithms based on different data sets consisting of the combined seven genes, the three rRNA genes, and the individual protein-coding genes, five major lineages corresponding to the orders Cystofilobasidiales, Filobasidiales, Holtermanniales, Tremellales, and Trichosporonales were resolved. A total of 45 strongly supported monophyletic clades with multiple species and 23 single species clades were recognised. This phylogenetic framework will be the basis for the proposal of an updated taxonomic system of tremellomycetous yeasts that will be compatible with the current taxonomic system of filamentous basidiomycetes accommodating the ‘one fungus, one name’ principle. PMID:26955196

  7. [Prevention and control of nosocomial and health-care facilities associated infections caused by species of Candida and other yeasts].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Zaragoza, Rafael; Salavert, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts (Candida spp., especially) in health care settings allows the establishment of the levels necessary for its prevention. A first step is to identify groups of patients at high risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infections, establish accurate risk factors, observing the periods of greatest risk, and analyze the epidemiological profile in genera and species as well as the patterns of antifungal resistance. Secondly, mechanisms to avoid persistent exposure to potential fungal pathogens must be programed, protecting areas and recommending measures such as the control of the quality of the air and water, inside and outside the hospital, and other products or substances able to cause outbreaks. Finally, apart from the correct implementation of these measures, in selected patients at very high risk, the use of antifungal prophylaxis should be considered following the guidelines published.

  8. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  9. Wickerhamomyces queroliae sp. nov. and Candida jalapaonensis sp. nov., two yeast species isolated from Cerrado ecosystem in North Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carlos A; Morais, Paula B; Lachance, Marc-André; Santos, Renata O; Melo, Weilan G P; Viana, Rodney H O; Bragança, Marcos A L; Pimenta, Raphael S

    2009-05-01

    Two novel yeast species, Wickerhamomyces queroliae sp. nov. and Candida jalapaonensis sp. nov., were isolated, respectively, from larvae of Anastrepha mucronata (Diptera: Tephritidae) collected from ripe fruit of Peritassa campestris ('Bacupari', Hippocrateaceae) and from flowers of Centropogon cornutus (Campanulaceae) in the Cerrado ecosystem of the state of Tocantins, Brazil. Analysis of the D1/D2 large-subunit rRNA gene sequences placed W. queroliae in the Wickerhamomyces clade near Wickerhamomyces ciferri and Candida silvicultrix. Candida jalapaonensis belongs to the Wickerhamiella clade and is related to Candida drosophilae. The type strain of Wickerhamomyces queroliae is UFMG-05-T200.1(T) (=CBS 10936(T)=NRRL Y-48478(T)) and the type strain of Candida jalapaonensis is UFMG-03-T210(T) (=CBS 10935(T)=NRRL Y-48477(T)).

  10. Candida vulturna pro tempore sp. nov., a dimorphic yeast species related to the Candida haemulonis species complex isolated from flowers and clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Sipiczki, Matthias; Tap, Ratna Mohd

    2016-10-01

    In a taxonomic study of yeasts isolated from flowers in Cagayan de Oro, Mindenao Island, The Philippines, strains were identified as representing Kabatiella microsticta, Metschnikowia koreensis and a hitherto undescribed dimorphic species. Sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU 26S rRNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the SSU 18S rRNA genes were identical in the strains of the last-named group and differed from the corresponding sequences of the type strain of the closest related species, Candida duobushaemulonii, by 4 % (D1/D2), 7 % (ITS) and 1 % (SSU). In an independent study, a strain with D1/D2 and ITS sequences very similar to those of the Philippine strains was isolated in Malaysia from the blood of a patient dying of aspiration pneumonia. Both groups of isolates were moderately sensitive to anidulafungin, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole but resistant to amphotericin B. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the sequences placed the Philippine and Malaysian isolates close to the Candida haemulonis complex of Candida species. To reflect the geographical location of the sites of sample collection, the novel species name Candida vulturna pro tempore sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is 11-1170T (=CBS 14366T=CCY 094-001-001T=NCAIM-Y02177T) isolated in Cagayan de Oro, The Philippines. Mycobank: MB 817222.

  11. Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the Planistromellaceae including its coelomycetous anamorphs: contributions towards a monograph of the genus Kellermania.

    PubMed

    Minnis, A M; Kennedy, A H; Grenier, D B; Palm, M E; Rossman, A Y

    2012-12-01

    The core species of the family Planistromellaceae are included in the teleomorphic genera Planistroma and Planistromella and the connected anamorphic, coelomycetous genera Alpakesa, Kellermania, and Piptarthron. These genera have been defined primarily on the basis of ascospore septation or number of conidial appendages. Due to a lack of DNA sequence data, phylogenetic placement of these genera within the Dothideomycetes, evaluation of monophyly, and questions about generic boundaries could not be adequately addressed in the past. Isolates of nearly all of the known species in these genera were studied genetically and morphologically. DNA sequence data were generated for the nSSU, ITS, nLSU, and RPB1 markers and analysed phylogenetically. These results placed the Planistromellaceae, herein recognised as a distinct family, in an unresolved position relative to other genera within the order Botryosphaeriales. Species representing the core genera of the Planistromellaceae formed a clade and evaluation of its topology revealed that previous morphology-based definitions of genera resulted in an artificial classification system. Alpakesa, Kellermania, Piptarthron, Planistroma, and Planistromella are herein recognised as belonging to the single genus Kellermania. The following new combinations are proposed: Kellermania crassispora, K. dasylirionis, K. macrospora, K. plurilocularis, and K. unilocularis. Five new species are described, namely K. con- fusa, K. dasylirionicola, K. micranthae, K. ramaleyae, and K. rostratae. Descriptions of species in vitro and a key to species known from culture are provided.

  12. Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov., Wickerhamiella pterostichi f.a., sp. nov. and Wickerhamiella qilinensis f.a., sp. nov., three yeast species isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Yun; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Hui, Feng-Li

    2016-10-01

    Eight strains representing three novel yeast species were isolated from insects distributed in three localities in Nanyang, Henan Province, Central China during 2014 and 2015. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene revealed that these species are members of the Wickerhamiella clade. These three novel species have a greater than 2.5 % difference from each other or their closest known species in the D1/D2 sequences. The three yeast species can also be separated from their closest known species in terms of physiological characteristics. Moreover, a sexual state could not be found in these three novel yeast species on various sporulation media. Therefore, the three novel species are described as Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 15885T=CICC 33092T=CBS 14176T), Wickerhamiellapterostichi f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 15896T=CICC 33093T=CBS 14177T) and Wickerhamiellaqilinensis f.a., sp. nov. (type strain, NYNU 146103T=CICC 33062T=CBS 13929T). The MycoBank numbers of Wickerhamiella brachini f.a., sp. nov., Wickerhamiellapterostichi f.a., sp. nov. and Wickerhamiellaqilinensis f.a., sp. nov. are MB 816962, MB 816963 and MB 816964, respectively.

  13. Volatile composition and sensory properties of Shiraz wines as affected by nitrogen supplementation and yeast species: rationalizing nitrogen modulation of wine aroma.

    PubMed

    Ugliano, Maurizio; Travis, Brooke; Francis, I Leigh; Henschke, Paul A

    2010-12-08

    The effects of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) supplementation on Shiraz volatile composition and sensory properties have been investigated. A low YAN Shiraz must (YAN 100 mg/L) was supplemented with nitrogen in the form of diammonium phosphate (DAP) to a final YAN of either 250 or 400 mg/L. Fermentation was carried out with either Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Saccharomyces bayanus , with maceration on skins. For both yeast strains, high DAP additions increased the ratings of positive sensory attributes such as "red fruit" and "dark fruit" and decreased the "yeast/cheese", "vegetal", and "earth/dirty" attributes. For the S. cerevisiae yeast moderate DAP addition resulted in higher "reduced" attribute scores. DAP supplementation had a strong influence on formation of acetates, fatty acid ethyl esters, higher alcohols, hydrogen sulfide, ethyl mercaptan, methyl mercaptan, DMS, and DES. Partial least-squares regression analysis of chemical and sensory data indicated that esters, sulfides, and mercaptans were associated with fruit-related descriptors, whereas hydrogen sulfide was associated with the "reduced" attribute. Nitrogen-related variations in the concentration of other yeast metabolites such as ethanol and 2- and 3-methylbutanoic acids also affected perceived fruitiness. Depending on yeast species DAP supplementation to a low nitrogen must can result in increased reduction off-odor.

  14. Candida phyllophila sp. nov. and Candida vitiphila sp. nov., two novel yeast species from grape phylloplane in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk

    2013-01-01

    Three strains (K59(T), K60 and K70 (T)) representing two novel yeast species were isolated from the external surface of leaves of different wine grape (Vitis vinifera) plants, which were collected from the Kanchanaburi Research Station (N14°07'15.1″ E099°19'05.6″), Wang Dong Sub-district, Mueang District, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand, by an enrichment technique. The sequences of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene of two strains (K59(T) and K60) were identical and differed from that of strain K70(T). In terms of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 domain, the closest species to the three strains was Candida asparagi but with 2.3% nucleotide substitutions for strains K59(T) and K60, and 2.1% nucleotide substitutions for strain K70(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics and the sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene, the three strains were assigned to be two novel Candida species. Two strains (K59(T) and K60) were assigned as Candida phyllophila sp. nov. (type strain K59(T)=BCC 42662(T)=NBRC 107776(T)=CBS 12671(T)). Candida vitiphila sp. nov. is proposed for strain K70(T) (=BCC 42663(T)=NBRC 107777(T)=CBS 12672(T)).

  15. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  16. Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov., a xylanolytic, ustilaginomycetous yeast species isolated from an insect pest of sugarcane roots.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; Borges, Thuanny A; Corrêa dos Santos, Renato Augusto; Freitas, Larissa F D; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    A novel ustilaginomycetous yeast isolated from the intestinal tract of an insect pest of sugarcane roots in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil, represents a novel species of the genus Pseudozyma based on molecular analyses of the D1/D2 rDNA large subunit and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1+ITS2) regions. The name Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. is proposed for this species, with GHG001(T) ( = CBS 13268(T) = UFMG-CM-Y307(T)) as the type strain. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is a sister species of Pseudozyma vetiver, originally isolated from leaves of vetiver grass and sugarcane in Thailand. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is able to grow well with xylan as the sole carbon source and produces high levels of an endo-1,4-xylanase that has a higher specific activity in comparison with other eukaryotic xylanases. This enzyme has a variety of industrial applications, indicating the great biotechnological potential of P. brasiliensis.

  17. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  18. Description of a New Yeast Species, Malassezia japonica, and Its Detection in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Takashi; Takashima, Masako; Kodama, Minako; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2003-01-01

    Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia are part of the normal cutaneous microflora and are considered one of the factors that trigger atopic dermatitis (AD). We isolated two strains of Malassezia from a healthy Japanese female. Analysis of the D1/D2 26S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer region sequences of the isolates suggested that they are new members of the genus Malassezia. We propose the name Malassezia japonica sp. nov. for the isolates. M. japonica is easily distinguished from the seven known lipophilic species by its ability to assimilate Tween 40 and Tween 60 and its inability to assimilate Tween 20 and Tween 80 and to grow at 40°C. Furthermore, by applying transparent dressings to the skin lesions of 36 patients with AD and the skin of 22 healthy subjects, M. japonica DNA was detected by a non-culture-based method consisting of nested PCR with M. japonica species-specific primers. M. japonica DNA was detected from 12 of the 36 patients (33.3%) and 3 of the 22 healthy subjects (13.6%). Although it is not known whether M. japonica plays a role in AD, this species was part of the microflora in both patients with AD and healthy subjects. PMID:14532205

  19. Description of a new yeast species, Malassezia japonica, and its detection in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Takashi; Takashima, Masako; Kodama, Minako; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2003-10-01

    Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia are part of the normal cutaneous microflora and are considered one of the factors that trigger atopic dermatitis (AD). We isolated two strains of Malassezia from a healthy Japanese female. Analysis of the D1/D2 26S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer region sequences of the isolates suggested that they are new members of the genus Malassezia. We propose the name Malassezia japonica sp. nov. for the isolates. M. japonica is easily distinguished from the seven known lipophilic species by its ability to assimilate Tween 40 and Tween 60 and its inability to assimilate Tween 20 and Tween 80 and to grow at 40 degrees C. Furthermore, by applying transparent dressings to the skin lesions of 36 patients with AD and the skin of 22 healthy subjects, M. japonica DNA was detected by a non-culture-based method consisting of nested PCR with M. japonica species-specific primers. M. japonica DNA was detected from 12 of the 36 patients (33.3%) and 3 of the 22 healthy subjects (13.6%). Although it is not known whether M. japonica plays a role in AD, this species was part of the microflora in both patients with AD and healthy subjects.

  20. Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species found in mainland Ecuador and on the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Portero Barahona, Patricia; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-04-01

    Seven strains representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Kazachstania were found at several collection sites on both mainland Ecuador (Yasuní National Park) and the Galápagos (Santa Cruz Island). Two strains (CLQCA 20-132(T) and CLQCA 24SC-045) were isolated from rotten wood samples, two further strains (CLQCA 20-280 and CLQCA 20-348) were isolated from soil samples, and three strains (CLQCA 20-198, CLQCA 20-374 and CLQCA 20-431) were isolated from decaying fruits. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to Kazachstania servazzii and Kazachstania unispora. Although the strains could not be distinguished from one another based upon their differing geographical origins, they could be differentiated according to their isolation source (fruit, soil or wood) by ITS sequencing. The species name Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with CLQCA 20-132(T) ( = CBS 13946(T) = NCYC 4008(T)) designated the type strain.

  1. New Yeast Species, Malassezia dermatis, Isolated from Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Takashi; Takashima, Masako; Shinoda, Takako; Suto, Hajime; Unno, Tetsushi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2002-01-01

    Malassezia species are considered to be one of the exacerbating factors in atopic dermatitis (AD). During examination of the cutaneous colonization of Malassezia species in AD patients, we found a new species on the surface of the patients' skin. Analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences suggested that the isolates belonged to the genus Malassezia. They did not grow in Sabouraud dextrose agar but utilized specific concentrations of Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80 as a lipid source. Thus, we concluded that our isolates were new members of the genus Malassezia and propose the name Malassezia dermatis sp. nov. for these isolates. PMID:11923357

  2. New yeast species, Malassezia dermatis, isolated from patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Takashi; Takashima, Masako; Shinoda, Takako; Suto, Hajime; Unno, Tetsushi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2002-04-01

    Malassezia species are considered to be one of the exacerbating factors in atopic dermatitis (AD). During examination of the cutaneous colonization of Malassezia species in AD patients, we found a new species on the surface of the patients' skin. Analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences suggested that the isolates belonged to the genus MALASSEZIA: They did not grow in Sabouraud dextrose agar but utilized specific concentrations of Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80 as a lipid source. Thus, we concluded that our isolates were new members of the genus Malassezia and propose the name Malassezia dermatis sp. nov. for these isolates.

  3. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  4. Pichia dushanensis sp. nov. and Hyphopichia paragotoi sp. nov., two sexual yeast species associated with insects and rotten wood.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Si-Tong; Li, Ying; Hui, Feng-Li

    2015-09-01

    Seven yeast strains were isolated from the gut of insect larvae and decayed wood, which were collected from three localities near Nanyang, Henan Province, China. These strains were identified as two novel species through comparison of sequences in the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and other taxonomic characteristics. Pichia dushanensis sp. nov. was closely related to species in the Pichia clade and produced one to four spheroid ascospores in a deliquescent ascus. The D1/D2 sequence of P. dushanensis sp. nov. differed from its closest relative, Issatchenkia (Pichia) sp. NRRL Y-12824, by 3.6% sequence divergence (16 substitutions and 4 gaps). The species also differed from its four closest known species, Candida rugopelliculosa, Pichia occidentalis, Pichia exigua and Candida phayaonensis, by 4.1-4.4% sequence divergence (22-24 substitutions and 0-2 gaps) in the D1/D2 sequences. Hyphopichia paragotoi sp. nov. belonged to the Hyphopichia clade, and its nearest phylogenetic neighbours were Candida gotoi, Candida pseudorhagii, Candida rhagii and Hyphopichia heimii with 3.2-4.2% sequence divergence (16-21 substitutions and 1 gap) in the D1/D2 sequences. In comparison with previously established species, H. paragotoi sp. nov. formed one hat-shaped ascospore in a persistent ascus. The type strain of P. dushanensis sp. nov. is NYNU 14658(T) ( = CICC 33049(T) = CBS 13912(T)), and the type strain of H. paragotoi sp. nov. is NYNU 14666(T) ( = CICC 33048(T) = CBS 13913(T)).

  5. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Galpert, Deborah; del Río, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification. PMID:26605337

  6. Shared Physiological Traits of Exophiala Species in Cold-Blooded Vertebrates, as Opportunistic Black Yeasts.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Mariana Machado Fidelis; de Hoog, G Sybren; Gomes, Renata Rodrigues; Furuie, Jason Lee; Gelinski, Jane Mary Lafayette; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Boeger, Walter Antonio Pereira; Vicente, Vania Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    Several species of the genus Exophiala are found as opportunistic pathogens on humans, while others cause infections in cold-blooded waterborne vertebrates. Opportunism of these fungi thus is likely to be multifactorial. Ecological traits [thermotolerance and pH tolerance, laccase activity, assimilation of mineral oil, and decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR)] were studied in a set of 40 strains of mesophilic Exophiala species focused on the salmonis-clade mainly containing waterborne species. Thermophilic species and waterborne species outside the salmonis-clade were included for comparison. Strains were able to tolerate a wide range of pHs, although optimal growth was observed between pH 4.0 and 5.5. All strains tested were laccase positive. Strains were able to grow in the presence of the compounds (mineral oil and RBBR) with some differences in assimilation patterns between strains tested and also were capable of degrading the main chromophore of RBBR. The study revealed that distantly related mesophilic species behave similarly, and no particular trend in evolutionary adaptation was observed.

  7. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  8. Control of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes with fungicides, aerated steam and supercritical fluid CO2-seed extraction

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; Donald G. Lester; Brian K. Luckenbill

    2008-01-01

    The effects of soil drenches with systemic fungicides on viability of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes, non-choke inducing endosymbiotic fungi of the genus Neotyphodium that systemically infect grasses, were tested in endophyte-infected seedlings of Hordeum brevisubulatum subsp. violaceum, Lolium perenne...

  9. Cyanonectria, a new genus for “Nectria” cyanostoma and its Fusarium anamorph

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The new genus Cyanonectria is proposed for Nectria cyanostoma (= Cyanonectria cyanostoma comb. nov.). This genus is characterized by Nectria-like, red perithecia that have a bluish-purple papilla and a Fusarium anamorph. DNA sequences (large subunit and internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear rD...

  10. Molecular typing of the yeast species Dekkera bruxellensis and Pichia guilliermondii recovered from wine related sources.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Barata, André; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Fernández-Espinar, M Teresa; Loureiro, Virgilio; Querol, Amparo

    2006-01-15

    A total of 63 strains of Dekkera bruxellensis and 32 strains of Pichia guilliermondii isolated from wine related environments were identified by restriction analysis of the 5.8S-ITS region of the rDNA. These strains were subjected to intraspecific discrimination using mtDNA restriction and RAPD-PCR analysis. The isolates identified as D. bruxellensis yielded 3 different molecular patterns of mtDNA restriction using the endonuclease HinfI. The pattern A was the most frequent (58 strains) among strains from different sources, regions and countries. Pattern B (4 strains) and C (one strain) were determined in isolates from Portuguese wines. The discrimination among the pattern A strains was achieved by a RAPD-PCR assay with 3 primers (OPA-2, OPA-3 and OPA-9). A total of 12 haplotypes were obtained with the combination of the patterns provided by the 3 OPAs. The pattern 2 was the most frequent and extensively distributed being found in strains from different countries and from different sources like wine, barrique wood and insects. The strains of P. guilliermondii were characterized with restriction of mtDNA using the endonuclease HinfI yielding 7 different restriction patterns. These patterns were associated with different efficiencies of 4-ethylphenol production. Patterns A to D corresponded to 19 strains producing low levels of 4-ethylphenol (<1 mg/l) while patterns F and G grouped 13 strains producing high levels of 4-ethylphenol (>50 mg/l), when grown in synthetic media supplemented with 100 mg/l of p-coumaric acid. The high degree of polymorphism observed shows that intraspecific typing is essential for accurate yeast dissemination studies in wine related environments.

  11. Synthetic Core Promoters as Universal Parts for Fine-Tuning Expression in Different Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Portela, Rui M C; Vogl, Thomas; Kniely, Claudia; Fischer, Jasmin E; Oliveira, Rui; Glieder, Anton

    2017-03-17

    Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering experiments frequently require the fine-tuning of gene expression to balance and optimize protein levels of regulators or metabolic enzymes. A key concept of synthetic biology is the development of modular parts that can be used in different contexts. Here, we have applied a computational multifactor design approach to generate de novo synthetic core promoters and 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) for yeast cells. In contrast to upstream cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), core promoters are typically not subject to specific regulation, making them ideal engineering targets for gene expression fine-tuning. 112 synthetic core promoter sequences were designed on the basis of the sequence/function relationship of natural core promoters, nucleosome occupancy and the presence of short motifs. The synthetic core promoters were fused to the Pichia pastoris AOX1 CRM, and the resulting activity spanned more than a 200-fold range (0.3% to 70.6% of the wild type AOX1 level). The top-ten synthetic core promoters with highest activity were fused to six additional CRMs (three in P. pastoris and three in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Inducible CRM constructs showed significantly higher activity than constitutive CRMs, reaching up to 176% of natural core promoters. Comparing the activity of the same synthetic core promoters fused to different CRMs revealed high correlations only for CRMs within the same organism. These data suggest that modularity is maintained to some extent but only within the same organism. Due to the conserved role of eukaryotic core promoters, this rational design concept may be transferred to other organisms as a generic engineering tool.

  12. Synthetic Core Promoters as Universal Parts for Fine-Tuning Expression in Different Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering experiments frequently require the fine-tuning of gene expression to balance and optimize protein levels of regulators or metabolic enzymes. A key concept of synthetic biology is the development of modular parts that can be used in different contexts. Here, we have applied a computational multifactor design approach to generate de novo synthetic core promoters and 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) for yeast cells. In contrast to upstream cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), core promoters are typically not subject to specific regulation, making them ideal engineering targets for gene expression fine-tuning. 112 synthetic core promoter sequences were designed on the basis of the sequence/function relationship of natural core promoters, nucleosome occupancy and the presence of short motifs. The synthetic core promoters were fused to the Pichia pastoris AOX1 CRM, and the resulting activity spanned more than a 200-fold range (0.3% to 70.6% of the wild type AOX1 level). The top-ten synthetic core promoters with highest activity were fused to six additional CRMs (three in P. pastoris and three in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Inducible CRM constructs showed significantly higher activity than constitutive CRMs, reaching up to 176% of natural core promoters. Comparing the activity of the same synthetic core promoters fused to different CRMs revealed high correlations only for CRMs within the same organism. These data suggest that modularity is maintained to some extent but only within the same organism. Due to the conserved role of eukaryotic core promoters, this rational design concept may be transferred to other organisms as a generic engineering tool. PMID:27973777

  13. Estrogenic activity of isolated compounds and essential oils of Pimpinella species from Turkey, evaluated using a recombinant yeast screen.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Khan, Shabana I; Bedir, Erdal; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Willett, Kristine; Khan, Ikhlas A; Kirimer, Nese; Baser, K Husnu Can

    2004-08-01

    Several plants and plant-derived pure compounds, designated as phytoestrogens, have been reported to cause estrogenic effects. They have been used for alleviation of menopausal symptoms, prevention of osteoporosis, heart disease and cancer. There is an increased interest in studying phytoestrogens such as isoflavones and lignans for their use as replacements for synthetic estrogens. In this study, the estrogenic activity of essential oils of eleven Pimpinella species and the compounds isolated from these species were evaluated using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. The essential oils containing (E)-anethole as major compound showed estrogenic activity in the YES assay, except for the aerial parts without fruits of P. anisetum and P. flabellifolia. The percent maximal response produced by most anethole-containing oils was 30-50%. Fruits of P. isaurica and P. peucedanifolia were estrogenic in spite of the absence or trace amount of anethole, respectively. This study indicates that the estrogenic activity of Pimpinella oils is not solely due to the presence of anethole. Components other than anethole may be responsible for contributing towards the estrogenic activity. The essential oils from different species varied in their estrogenic potencies (relative potency from 8.3 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-6) compared to 17 beta-estradiol) and among the different plant parts, the fruit oils of most species were estrogenic followed by the aerial parts without fruits and the root oils and their EC50 values varied from 45 micrograms/mL to 650 micrograms/mL.

  14. Analysis of RNA species of various sizes from stationary-phase planktonic yeast cells of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Uppuluri, Priya; Perumal, Palani; Chaffin, W LaJean

    2007-01-01

    We initiated a comparison of Candida albicans stationary-phase gene expression with other growth states. The widely used hot acid phenol method for RNA extraction did not extract rRNA from late stationary-phase cells. The RNA from growing yeast cells, hyphae and biofilm was biased towards small-sized RNA. The 2 : 1 ratio between the two large rRNA bands was rarely obtained. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine mRNA extraction by several methods for OXR1, IRA2, RAD50, PNC1 and CHS2, which have 300 bp-8 kb coding regions, and ACT1, EFB1 and TDH3, sometimes used as internal standards. Only smaller-sized cDNA species were amplified from some extracts. Crushing cells with glass beads in liquid nitrogen before RNA extraction by the hot phenol method (CGB) yielded an unbiased distribution for rRNA and mRNA as verified by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. With the CGB method, the large mRNA species, RAD50, IRA2 and OXR1, were present throughout the stationary phase, whereas the CSH2 transcript increased. The ACT1, EFB1 and TDH3 transcripts decreased in the stationary phase, making them unsuitable for standardization. The CGB method yielded high-quality RNA with the various growth conditions and permitted the comparison of stationary-phase transcripts with those obtained under other conditions.

  15. Identification of Medically Relevant Species of Arthroconidial Yeasts by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories. PMID:23678074

  16. Identification of medically relevant species of arthroconidial yeasts by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories.

  17. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  18. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  19. Species-specific PCR primers for the rapid identification of yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Muir, Alastair; Stratford, Malcolm; Wheals, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Species-specific primer pairs that produce a single band of known product size have been developed for members of the Zygosaccharomyces clade including Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. An existing primer pair for the provisional new species Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii has been confirmed as specific. The HIS3 gene, encoding imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratase, was used as the target gene. This housekeeping gene evolves slowly and is thus well conserved among different isolates, but shows a significant number of base pair changes between even closely related species, sufficient for species-specific primer design. The primers were tested on type and wild strains of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and on members of the Saccharomycetaceae. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of rDNA was used to confirm the identification of all nonculture collection isolates. This approach used extracted genomic DNA, but in practice, it can be used efficiently with a rapid colony PCR protocol. The method also successfully detected known and new hybrid strains of Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii. The method is rapid, robust and inexpensive. It requires little expertise by the user and is thus useful for preliminary, large-scale screens.

  20. Yeasts Occurring in Surface and Mouth Cavity of Two Chelonian Species, Podocnemis expansa Schweigger and P. unifilis Troschel (Reptilia: Chelonia: Pelomedusidae), in the Javaés River Border of Araguaia National Park in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Paula Benevides; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Tavares, Inara Brito; de Garcia, Virginia; Rosa, Carlos Augusto

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight specimens of free-ranging Podocnemis expansa (Amazon turtle) and 22 of P. unifilis (Tracajá) were screened for yeast isolation from surface (plastron, skin, and nails), eye, and mouth cavity. A hundred and eighteen yeast isolates belonging to 39 species were obtained. Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida galli, C. sake, and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these chelonians. Species diversity measured by Shannon's index was shown to be low and a degree of dominance could be detected as species known as potential pathogens were commonly isolated. The effective number of species in plastron of P. expansa was higher than in mouth samples, but not in P. unifilis probably due to dietary factors. P. expansa animals were captured on the beaches, and the superficial yeast populations may include terrestrial species. P. unifilis animals were captured in the water and the yeasts from superficial sites may represent species from river water. PMID:20936145

  1. Yeasts Occurring in Surface and Mouth Cavity of Two Chelonian Species, Podocnemis expansa Schweigger and P. unifilis Troschel (Reptilia: Chelonia: Pelomedusidae), in the Javaés River Border of Araguaia National Park in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Paula Benevides; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Tavares, Inara Brito; de Garcia, Virginia; Rosa, Carlos Augusto

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight specimens of free-ranging Podocnemis expansa (Amazon turtle) and 22 of P. unifilis (Tracajá) were screened for yeast isolation from surface (plastron, skin, and nails), eye, and mouth cavity. A hundred and eighteen yeast isolates belonging to 39 species were obtained. Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida galli, C. sake, and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these chelonians. Species diversity measured by Shannon's index was shown to be low and a degree of dominance could be detected as species known as potential pathogens were commonly isolated. The effective number of species in plastron of P. expansa was higher than in mouth samples, but not in P. unifilis probably due to dietary factors. P. expansa animals were captured on the beaches, and the superficial yeast populations may include terrestrial species. P. unifilis animals were captured in the water and the yeasts from superficial sites may represent species from river water.

  2. Comparison of three commercial systems for the identification of germ-tube negative yeast species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Sand, C; Rennie, R P

    1999-04-01

    Three commercial systems were evaluated for their ability to identify 171 germ-tube negative yeasts isolated from clinical specimens. The Yeast Biochemical Card and Analytical Profile Index 20 AUX identified 97% of 171 strains tested. The Biolog system had poor clinical utility: only 48% of strains were identified. For Yeast Biochemical Card and Analytical Profile Index 20 AUX, 9% and 6%, respectively, required repeat testing and both systems required supplemental tests for 28% of the strains. These observations indicate that considerable expertise and a battery of reagents in addition to the basic systems are required for accurate identification of germ-tube negative yeasts.

  3. Formation of In Vitro Mixed-Species Biofilms by Lactobacillus pentosus and Yeasts Isolated from Spanish-Style Green Table Olive Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    León-Romero, Ángela; Domínguez-Manzano, Jesús; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé

    2015-01-01

    The present work details the in vitro interactions between Lactobacillus pentosus and yeast strains isolated from table olive processing to form mixed biofilms. Among the different pairs assayed, the strongest biofilms were obtained from L. pentosus and Candida boidinii strain cocultures. However, biofilm formation was inhibited in the presence of d-(+)-mannose. In addition, biofilm formation by C. boidinii monoculture was stimulated in the absence of cell-cell contact with L. pentosus. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a sort of “sticky” material formed by the yeasts contributed to substrate adherence. Hence, the data obtained in this work suggest that yeast-lactobacilli biofilms may be favored by the presence of a specific mate of yeast and L. pentosus, and that more than one mechanism might be implicated in the biofilm formation. This knowledge will help in the design of appropriate mixed starter cultures of L. pentosus-yeast species pairs that are able to improve the quality and safety of Spanish-style green table olive processing. PMID:26567305

  4. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Adriana; Santos Muñoz, Daniella; Zimin, Aleksey; Yorke, James A

    2016-11-11

    The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. We have created a method (based on our new "ping-pong algorithm) for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-regulated genes. An example is illustrative. A rewiring has been reported by Hogues et al. that RAP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae substitutes for TBF1/CBF1 in Candida albicans for ribosomal RP genes. There one transcription factor substitutes for another on some collection of genes. Such a substitution is referred to as a "rewiring". We agree with this finding of rewiring as far as it goes but the situation is more complicated. Many transcription factors can regulate a gene and our algorithm finds that in this example a "team" (or collection) of three transcription factors including RAP1 substitutes for TBF1 for 19 genes. The switch occurs for a branch of the phylogenetic tree containing 10 species (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae), while the remaining 13 species (Candida albicans) are regulated by TBF1. To gain insight into more general evolutionary mechanisms, we have created a mathematical algorithm that finds such general switching events and we prove that it converges. Of course any such computational discovery should be validated in the biological tests. For each branch of the phylogenetic tree and each gene module, our algorithm finds a sub-group of co-regulated genes and a team of transcription factors that substitutes for another team of transcription factors. In most cases the signal will be small but in some cases we find a strong signal of switching. We report our findings for 23 Ascomycota fungi species.

  5. A new putative Zygosaccharomyces yeast species isolated from traditional balsamic vinegar.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Cassanelli, Stefano; Giudici, Paolo

    2007-05-01

    The taxonomic status and species number of the genus Zygosaccharomyces have rapidly changed in the last years. In this study, two new osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces strains isolated from traditional balsamic vinegar, viz. ABT301 and ABT601, were investigated to elucidate their taxonomic relationships with Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species. A multi-gene sequence approach was employed, including regions of the rDNA repeat [5.8S, two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and the 26S D1/D2 domain], COX2 mitochondrial gene and two nuclear genes (SOD2 and HIS3). Cloning and sequence analysis of 5.8S-ITS rDNA revealed that these strains bear an unusual polymorphism for this region. Three highly divergent 5.8S-ITS sequences were detected, one identical to Z. rouxii, the other two showing some relatedness to Z. mellis. Sequence and gene number polymorphism was also observed for the protein-encoding nuclear genes SOD2 and HIS3, as two copies for each gene different from those found in Z. rouxii were detected. Analysis of the D1/D2 26S domain showed that ABT301 and ABT601 have only one type of D1/D2 sequence statistically different from that of Z. rouxii. The findings obtained in this work suggest that the genomic background of strains ABT301 and ABT601 is different from the other Zygosaccharomyces species. We speculated that they could belong to a new putative species related to Z. rouxii. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Candida bromeliacearum sp. nov. and Candida ubatubensis sp. nov., two yeast species isolated from the water tanks of Canistropsis seidelii (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Ruivo, Carla C C; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A; Bacci, Maurício; Pagnocca, Fernando C

    2005-09-01

    Strains belonging to two novel yeast species, Candida bromeliacearum and Candida ubatubensis, were isolated from the bromeliad tank of Canistropsis seidelii (Bromeliaceae) in a sandy coastal plain (restinga) ecosystem site in an Atlantic rainforest of south-eastern Brazil. These species were genetically distinct from all other currently accepted ascomycetous yeasts, based on sequence divergence in the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rDNA and in the small-subunit rDNA. The species occupy basal positions in the Metschnikowiaceae clade. The type strains are Candida bromeliacearum UNESP 00-103(T) (=CBS 10002(T)=NRRL Y-27811(T)) and Candida ubatubensis UNESP 01-247R(T) (=CBS 10003(T)=NRRL Y-27812(T)).

  7. [Comparison of Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel and API® ID 32C commercial systems for the identification of Candida species isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Gayibova, Ülkü; Dalyan Cılo, Burcu; Ağca, Harun; Ener, Beyza

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are one of the important causes of nosocomial infections, and several different types of yeasts, especially Candida species are increasingly recovered from immunocompromised patients. Since many of the yeasts are resistant to the commonly used antifungal agents, the introduction of appropriate therapy depends on rapid and accurate identification. The aims of this study were to compare the commercial identification systems namely API® ID 32C (bioMerieux, France) and Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, USA) for the identification of Candida species and to evaluate the effect of morphological findings in the identification process. A total of 211 yeast strains isolated from different clinical samples (111 urine, 34 blood/vascular catheter, 27 upper/lower respiratory tract, 16 abscess/pus, 13 throat/vagina swabs and 10 sterile body fluids) of 137 patients hospitalized in Uludag University Health and Research Center between October 2013 to January 2014, were included in the study. Samples were cultured on blood agar, chromogenic agar (CHROMagar Candida, BD, USA) and Saboraud's dextrose agar (SDA), and isolated yeast colonies were evaluated with germ tube test and morphological examination by microscopy on cornmeal/Tween-80 agar. The isolates were identified as well by two commercial systems according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Discrepant results between the systems were tried to be resolved by using morphological characteristics of the yeasts. Of the isolates 159 were identified identical by both of the systems, and the concordance between those systems were estimated as 75.4%. According to the concordant identification, the most frequently isolated species was C.albicans (44.1%) followed by C.tropicalis (9.9%), C.glabrata (9.5%), C.parapsilosis (8.5%) and C.kefyr (8.1%). The concordance rate was 81.7% in identification of frequently isolated species (C.albicans, C.tropicalis, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C

  8. Papiliotrema siamense f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Surussawadee, Janjira; Khunnamwong, Pannida; Srisuk, Nantana; Limtong, Savitree

    2014-09-01

    Two strains representing a novel species were isolated from the external surface of a sugar cane leaf (DMKU-SP85(T)) and tissue of a rice leaf (DMKU-RE97) collected in Thailand. On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the two strains were determined to represent a novel species of the genus Papiliotrema although sexual reproduction was not observed. The sequences of the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and ITS region of the two strains were identical, but differed from those of the type strain of Cryptococcus nemorosus by 0.6 % nucleotide substitutions (four nucleotide substitutions out of 597 nucleotides) in the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and 1.8 % nucleotide substitutions (nine nucleotide substitutions out of 499 nucleotides) in the ITS region. The name Papiliotrema siamense f.a., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DMKU-SP85(T)( = BCC 69499(T) = CBS 13330(T)).

  9. Molecular comparisons for identification of food spoilage yeasts and prediction of species that may develop in different food products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spoilage of foods and beverages by yeasts is often characterized by objectionable odors, appearance, taste, texture or build-up of gas in packaging containers, resulting in loss of the product. Seldom is human health compromised by products spoiled by yeasts even though some spoilage is caused by sp...

  10. Adaptive response to acetic acid in the highly resistant yeast species Zygosaccharomyces bailii revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is the most tolerant yeast species to acetic acid-induced toxicity, being able to grow in the presence of concentrations of this food preservative close to the legal limits. For this reason, Z. bailii is the most important microbial contaminant of acidic food products but the mechanisms behind this intrinsic resistance to acetic acid are very poorly characterized. To gain insights into the adaptive response and tolerance to acetic acid in Z. bailii, we explored an expression proteomics approach, based on quantitative 2DE, to identify alterations occurring in the protein content in response to sudden exposure or balanced growth in the presence of an inhibitory but nonlethal concentration of this weak acid. A coordinate increase in the content of proteins involved in cellular metabolism, in particular, in carbohydrate metabolism (Mdh1p, Aco1p, Cit1p, Idh2p, and Lpd1p) and energy generation (Atp1p and Atp2p), as well as in general and oxidative stress response (Sod2p, Dak2p, Omp2p) was registered. Results reinforce the concept that glucose and acetic acid are coconsumed in Z. bailii, with acetate being channeled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. When acetic acid is the sole carbon source, results suggest the activation of gluconeogenic and pentose phosphate pathways, based on the increased content of several proteins of these pathways after glucose exhaustion.

  11. Sporadic Gene Loss After Duplication Is Associated with Functional Divergence of Sirtuin Deacetylases Among Candida Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Rupert, Christopher B.; Heltzel, Justin M. H.; Taylor, Derek J.; Rusche, Laura N.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication promotes the diversification of protein functions in several ways. Ancestral functions can be partitioned between the paralogs, or a new function can arise in one paralog. These processes are generally viewed as unidirectional. However, paralogous proteins often retain related functions and can substitute for one another. Moreover, in the event of gene loss, the remaining paralog might regain ancestral functions that had been shed. To explore this possibility, we focused on the sirtuin deacetylase SIR2 and its homolog HST1 in the CTG clade of yeasts. HST1 has been consistently retained throughout the clade, whereas SIR2 is only present in a subset of species. These NAD+-dependent deacetylases generate condensed chromatin that represses transcription and stabilizes tandemly repeated sequences. By analyzing phylogenetic trees and gene order, we found that a single duplication of the SIR2/HST1 gene occurred, likely prior to the emergence of the CTG clade. This ancient duplication was followed by at least two independent losses of SIR2. Functional characterization of Sir2 and Hst1 in three species revealed that these proteins have not maintained consistent functions since the duplication. In particular, the rDNA locus is deacetylated by Sir2 in Candida albicans, by Hst1 in C. lusitaniae, and by neither paralog in C. parapsilosis. In addition, the subtelomeres in C. albicans are deacetylated by Sir2 rather than by Hst1, which is orthologous to the sirtuin associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae subtelomeres. These differences in function support the model that sirtuin deacetylases can regain ancestral functions to compensate for gene loss. PMID:27543294

  12. Discrimination between Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Species of the Genus Candida by Their Differential Sensitivities to Toxins of a Panel of Killer Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Buzzini, P.; Martini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The differential sensitivities to toxins produced by a short panel of four killer yeasts allowed discrimination between 91 strains of the yeast Candida albicans and 223 non-C. albicans Candida strains. One hundred percent of C. albicans isolates exhibited negative results to the toxin panel, while 100% of non-C. albicans cultures gave well-defined and reproducible positive results to at least one of the four killer toxins. Among C. albicans strains only 96 and 87% gave germ tube (GT)- and chlamydospore-positive results, respectively. In addition a few GT-false-positive strains were detected among non-C. albicans isolates. Susceptibility to the toxin panel is apparently expressed more consistently than either GT or chlamydospore production and may constitute a promising basis for a new simple and easy-to-use procedure for routine discrimination between the species C. albicans and other species of the genus Candida. PMID:11526179

  13. Draft genome sequence of Sugiyamaella xylanicola UFMG-CM-Y1884(T), a xylan-degrading yeast species isolated from rotting wood samples in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Batista, Thiago M; Moreira, Rennan G; Hilário, Heron O; Morais, Camila G; Franco, Glória R; Rosa, Luiz H; Rosa, Carlos A

    2017-03-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of the type strain of the yeast Sugiyamaella xylanicola UFMG-CM-Y1884(T) (= UFMG-CA-32.1(T) = CBS 12683(T)), a xylan-degrading species capable of fermenting d-xylose to ethanol. The assembled genome has a size of ~ 13.7 Mb and a GC content of 33.8% and contains 5971 protein-coding genes. We identified 15 genes with significant similarity to the d-xylose reductase gene from several other fungal species. The draft genome assembled from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of the yeast Sugiyamaella xylanicola UFMG-CM-Y1884(T) (= UFMG-CA-32.1(T) = CBS 12683(T)) has been deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number MQSX00000000 under version MQSX01000000.

  14. Nonminimally coupled inflation with initial conditions from a preinflation anamorphic contracting era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John

    2016-08-01

    Inflation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field, as first proposed by Salopek, Bardeen and Bond (SBB), is in good agreement with the observed value of the spectral index and constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Here we explore the possibility that SBB inflation represents the late stage of a Universe which emerges from an early contracting era. We present a model in which the Universe smoothly transitions from an anamorphic contracting era to late-time SBB inflation without encountering a singular bounce. This corresponds to a continuous expansion in the Einstein frame throughout. We show that the anamorphic contracting era is able to provide the smooth superhorizon initial conditions necessary for subsequent SBB inflation to occur. The model predicts corrections to the nonminimal coupling, kinetic term and potential of SBB inflation which can observably increase the spectral index relative to its SBB prediction.

  15. Characterization of the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon in Liquid Crystal on Silicon displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, L.; Lizana, A.; Márquez, A.; Moreno, I.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.; Yzuel, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    The diffractive efficiency of Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) displays can be greatly diminished by the appearance of temporal phase fluctuations in the reflected beam, depolarization effects and also because of phase modulation depths smaller than 2π. In order to maximize the efficiency of the Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) implemented in the LCoS device, the Minimum Euclidean Distance principle can be applied. However, not all the diffractive elements can be corrected in the same way due to the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon, which is related to the LCoS response, largely dependending on the period and the spatial orientation of the generated DOE. Experimental evidence for the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon is provided in this paper, as well as a comparative study between the efficiency obtained for binary gratings of different periods

  16. Candida konsanensis sp. nov., a new yeast species isolated from Jasminum adenophyllum in Thailand with potentially carboxymethyl cellulase-producing capability.

    PubMed

    Sarawan, Somporn; Mahakhan, Polson; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Vichitphan, Kanit; Vichitphan, Sukanda; Sawaengkaew, Jutaporn

    2013-08-01

    A new yeast species (KKU-FW10) belonging to the Candida genus was isolated from Jasminum adenophyllum in the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under The Royal Initiative of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn area, Chulabhorn Dam, Konsan district within Chaiyaphum province in Thailand. The strain was identified via analysis of nucleotide sequences from the D1/D2 domain of 26S ribosomal DNA and based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. The sequence obtained from yeast isolate KKU-FW10 was 97 percent identical to that of Candida chanthaburiensis (GenBank accession number AB500861.1), with 506/517 (nucleotides identity/total nucleotides) matching nucleotides, nine substitutions and two gaps being detected. This species belonged to the Candida clade. Regarding morphological characteristics, isolate KKU-FW10 presents cream-colored butyrous colonies, vegetative reproduction through budding and, round cells without filaments or ascospores. The major ubiquinone detected was Q-9. The above results suggest that isolate KKU-FW10 is a new member of the genus Candida, and the name Candida konsanensis is proposed for this yeast. The type strain of the new species is KKU-FW10(T) (= BCC 52588(T), = NBRC 109082(T), = CBS 12666(T)). In addition, this KKU-FW10 could potentially produce 58.24 Units/ml of carboxymethyl cellulase when it was cultured in YP broth containing 1.0 % carboxymethyl cellulose for 24 h.

  17. Phenotypic and molecular identification and clustering of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts from wheat (species Triticum durum and Triticum aestivum) sourdoughs of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, A; Lavermicocca, P; Morea, M; Baruzzi, F; Tosti, N; Gobbetti, M

    2001-02-28

    The microflora of 25 wheat sourdoughs from the Apulia region, Southern Italy, was characterized. The sourdoughs were mainly produced from Triticum durum wheat. The number of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts ranged from ca. log 7.5 to log 9.3 colony forming units (cfu)/g and from log 5.5 to log 8.4 cfu/g, respectively. About 38% of the 317 isolates of lactic acid bacteria were identified by conventional physiological and biochemical tests. Phenotypic identification was confirmed by 16S rDNA and 16S/23S rRNA spacer region PCR. Overall, 30% of the isolates were identified as Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, 20% as Lb. alimentarius, 14% as Lb. brevis, 12% as Leuconostoc citreum, 7% as Lb. plantarum, 6% as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, 4% as Lb. fermentum and Lb. acidophilus, 2% as Weissella confusa and 1% as Lb. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii. Some of these species have not been previously isolated from sourdoughs. Since bakers yeast is widely used in sourdough production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was largely found. The phenotypical relationships within the main lactic acid bacteria identified were established by using cluster analysis. A microbial map of the 25 sourdoughs was plotted showing characteristic associations among lactic acid bacteria and differences in the lactic acid bacteria species which were mainly due to the species of wheat flour, use of bakers yeast and type of bread.

  18. Astigmatic wavefront correction of a gain-guided laser-diode array using anamorphic diffractive microlenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, J.R.; Scott, M.L.; Bundman, P.; Griswold, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    A diffractive microlens array was used to collimate a one-dimensional array of gain-guided AlGaAs lasers. The astigmatism of the lasers was removed by using anamorphic microlenses. The Strehl ratio of the resulting wavefront was 0.98. The microlens array was placed in an external cavity to produce a single coherent diffraction-limited beam from the AlGaAs laser array.

  19. Ogataea kanchanaburiensis sp. nov. and Ogataea wangdongensis sp. nov., two novel methylotrophic yeast species from phylloplane in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Groenewald, Marizeth

    2013-03-01

    Three strains (KM03(T), KM13 (T) and KM15) representing two novel methylotrophic yeast species were isolated from the external surface of plant leaves, which were collected from Kanchanaburi province, Thailand, by three-consecutive enrichments in methanol broth. Strain KM03(T) was isolated from phylloplane of a mango tree (Mangifera indica) and two strains, KM13(T) and KM15, were obtained from phylloplane of different wine grapes (Vitis vinifera). The sequences of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene of the two strains (KM13(T) and KM15) were identical and differed markedly from that of strain KM03(T). In terms of pairwise sequence similarity of the D1/D2 region the closest species to the strains KM13(T) and KM15 were Candida suzukii (CBS 9253(T)) and Candida nitratophila (CBS 2027(T)) but with 2.1 % nucleotide substitutions. Strain KM03(T) differed from Ogataea wickerhamii (CBS 4307(T)), its closest relative, by 2.3 % nucleotide substitutions. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 sequences placed the three strains in the Ogataea clade. On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the sequence analyses of the D1/D2 and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (nrRNA) operon, the three strains represent two novel Ogataea species although formation of ascospores was not observed. Ogataea kanchanaburiensis sp. nov. is proposed for strain KM03(T) (=BCC 47626(T) = NBRC 108603(T) = CBS 12673(T)). Two strains, KM13(T) and KM15, were assigned to Ogataea wangdongensis sp. nov. (type strain KM13(T) = BCC 42664(T) = NBRC 107778(T) = CBS 12674(T)). GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ accession numbers for the sequences of the D1/D2 and the ITS regions of O. kanchanaburiensis KM03(T) are AB734090 and AB734093, respectively, of O. wangdongensis KM13(T) are AB734091 and AB734094, respectively, and of O. wangdongensis KM15 are AB734092 and AB734095, respectively.

  20. Mitophagy plays an essential role in reducing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and mutation of mitochondrial DNA by maintaining mitochondrial quantity and quality in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yusuke; Kanki, Tomotake; Aoki, Yoshimasa; Hirota, Yuko; Saigusa, Tetsu; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Kang, Dongchon

    2012-01-27

    In mammalian cells, the autophagy-dependent degradation of mitochondria (mitophagy) is thought to maintain mitochondrial quality by eliminating damaged mitochondria. However, the physiological importance of mitophagy has not been clarified in yeast. Here, we investigated the physiological role of mitophagy in yeast using mitophagy-deficient atg32- or atg11-knock-out cells. When wild-type yeast cells in respiratory growth encounter nitrogen starvation, mitophagy is initiated, excess mitochondria are degraded, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondria is suppressed; as a result, the mitochondria escape oxidative damage. On the other hand, in nitrogen-starved mitophagy-deficient yeast, excess mitochondria are not degraded and the undegraded mitochondria spontaneously age and produce surplus ROS. The surplus ROS damage the mitochondria themselves and the damaged mitochondria produce more ROS in a vicious circle, ultimately leading to mitochondrial DNA deletion and the so-called "petite-mutant" phenotype. Cells strictly regulate mitochondrial quantity and quality because mitochondria produce both necessary energy and harmful ROS. Mitophagy contributes to this process by eliminating the mitochondria to a basal level to fulfill cellular energy requirements and preventing excess ROS production.

  1. Anamorphic quasiperiodic universes in modified and Einstein gravity with loop quantum gravity corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Marcelo M.; Aschheim, Raymond; Bubuianu, Laurenţiu; Irwin, Klee; Vacaru, Sergiu I.; Woolridge, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this work is to elaborate on new geometric methods of constructing exact and parametric quasiperiodic solutions for anamorphic cosmology models in modified gravity theories, MGTs, and general relativity, GR. There exist previously studied generic off-diagonal and diagonalizable cosmological metrics encoding gravitational and matter fields with quasicrystal like structures, QC, and holonomy corrections from loop quantum gravity, LQG. We apply the anholonomic frame deformation method, AFDM, in order to decouple the (modified) gravitational and matter field equations in general form. This allows us to find integral varieties of cosmological solutions determined by generating functions, effective sources, integration functions and constants. The coefficients of metrics and connections for such cosmological configurations depend, in general, on all spacetime coordinates and can be chosen to generate observable (quasi)-periodic/aperiodic/fractal/stochastic/(super) cluster/filament/polymer like (continuous, stochastic, fractal and/or discrete structures) in MGTs and/or GR. In this work, we study new classes of solutions for anamorphic cosmology with LQG holonomy corrections. Such solutions are characterized by nonlinear symmetries of generating functions for generic off-diagonal cosmological metrics and generalized connections, with possible nonholonomic constraints to Levi–Civita configurations and diagonalizable metrics depending only on a time like coordinate. We argue that anamorphic quasiperiodic cosmological models integrate the concept of quantum discrete spacetime, with certain gravitational QC-like vacuum and nonvacuum structures. And, that of a contracting universe that homogenizes, isotropizes and flattens without introducing initial conditions or multiverse problems.

  2. Candida aechmeae sp. nov. and Candida vrieseae sp. nov., novel yeast species isolated from the phylloplane of bromeliads in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Billodre, Raisa; Ramos, Jesus P; Leoncini, Orílio; Vainstein, Marilene H; Valente, Patrícia

    2010-01-01

    Two novel yeast species, Candida aechmeae sp. nov. and Candida vrieseae sp. nov., were isolated from bromeliads in Itapuã Park, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. These species are genetically isolated from all other currently recognized ascomycetous yeasts based on their sequence divergence in the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rRNA gene. C. aechmeae sp. nov. is phylogenetically close to Candida ubatubensis, a species also isolated from bromeliads in Brazil, but the novel species can be differentiated on the basis of differences in the D1/D2 domain and positive results for the assimilation of l-arabinose, raffinose, inulin and citrate. Candida vrieseae sp. nov. is phylogenetically placed in a clade near Candida membranifaciens that is composed of several species associated with insects, but the novel species can be differentiated from them by the D1/D2 and ITS gene sequences, positive results for the assimilation of nitrite and a negative result for the assimilation of ethylamine. The type strain for Candida aechmeae sp. nov. is BI153(T) (=CBS 10831(T)=NRRL Y-48456(T)) and the type strain for C. vrieseae sp. nov. is BI146(T) (=CBS 10829(T)=NRRL Y-48461(T)).

  3. Species distribution and susceptibility profile of yeasts isolated from blood cultures: results of a multicenter active laboratory-based surveillance study in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Susana; Vivot, Walter; Bosco-Borgeat, Maria E; Taverna, Constanza; Szusz, Wanda; Murisengo, Omar; Isla, Guillermina; Davel, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    The Mycology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas "Dr. C. Malbrán", conducted the Second National Multicenter Survey on Fungemia due to Yeasts in Argentina. The aim was to obtain updated data of the frequency of the causative species encountered and their in vitro susceptibility to seven antifungal agents. Yeast species were identified by micromorphological and biochemical studies. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by the reference microdilution method E.Def 7.1 of the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). A total of 461 viable yeasts were identified. The most frequent species were: Candida albicans (38.4 %), Candida parapsilosis (26 %), Candida tropicalis (15.4 %) and Candida glabrata (4.3 %). Other uncommon species, such as Candida viswanathii (0.6 %), Candida haemulonii (0.4 %), Candida inconspicua (0.2 %) and Candida fermentati (0.2 %) were also isolated. Among the Candida spp., 5.4 % and 1.6 % were resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Itraconazole and caspofungin were the most efficient agents against all Candida spp. tested (MIC < 1 mg/l). For anidulafungin, 21.6 % of C. parapsilosis showed a MIC value of 4 mg/l. Fluconazole was less active against 53.1 % of Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC > 8 mg/l), 75 % of Trichosporon spp., and 100 % of Rhodotorula spp., Geotrichum candidum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The global percentage of mortality was 20 %. The presence of uncommon species reinforces the need for performing continuous laboratory surveillance in order to monitor possible changes, not only in the epidemiological distribution of species, but also in the resistance to antifungal drugs.

  4. Functional complementation in yeast reveals a protective role of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin against reactive nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Tsukamoto, Shigefumi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ueda-Hashimoto, Manami; Takahashi, Misa; Suzuki, Hitomi; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2003-03-01

    The importance of nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule to various plant physiological and pathophysiological processes is becoming increasingly evident. However, little is known about how plants protect themselves from nitrosative and oxidative damage mediated by NO and NO-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Peroxynitrite, the product of the reaction between NO and superoxide anion, is considered to play a central role in RNS-induced cytotoxicity, as a result of its potent ability to oxidize diverse biomolecules. Employing heterologous expression in bacteria and yeast, we investigated peroxynitrite-scavenging activity in plants of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2CPRX), originally identified as a hydroperoxide-reducing peroxidase that is ubiquitously distributed among organisms. The putative mature form of a chloroplast-localized 2CPRX from Arabidopsis thaliana was overproduced in Escherichia coli as an amino-terminally hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein. The purified recombinant 2CPRX, which was catalytically active as peroxidase, efficiently prevented the peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of a sensitive compound. We also examined in vivo the ability of the Arabidopsis 2CPRX to complement the 2CPRX deficiency of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant. Functional expression in the mutant strain of the Arabidopsis 2CPRX not only increased cellular tolerance to hydrogen peroxide, but also complemented the hypersensitive growth defect induced by nitrite-mediated cytotoxicity. The complemented cells significantly enhanced the capacity to reduce RNS-mediated oxidative damages. The results presented here demonstrate a new role of plant 2CPRX as a critical determinant of the resistance to RNS, and support the existence of a plant enzymatic basis for RNS metabolism.

  5. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Jarosław A.; Puckett, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5′ end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  6. The diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from water tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species in Brazil, and the description of Occultifur brasiliensis f.a., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fátima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Marques, Andrea R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Carvalho, Cláudia; Lachance, Marc-André; Sampaio, José Paulo; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of yeast species collected from the bromeliad tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species, and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes were studied. Water samples were collected from 30 tanks of bromeliads living in a rupestrian field site located at Serrada Piedade, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during both the dry and rainy seasons. Thirty-six species were isolated, representing 22 basidiomycetous and 14 ascomycetous species. Occultifur sp., Cryptococcus podzolicus and Cryptococcus sp. 1 were the prevalent basidiomycetous species. The yeast-like fungus from the order Myriangiales, Candida silvae and Aureobasidium pullulans were the most frequent ascomycetous species. The diversity of the yeast communities obtained between seasons was not significantly different, but the yeast composition per bromeliad was different between seasons. These results suggest that there is significant spatial heterogeneity in the composition of populations of the yeast communities within bromeliad tanks, independent of the season. Among the 352 yeast isolates tested, 282 showed at least one enzymatic activity. Protease activity was the most widely expressed extracellular enzymatic activity, followed by xylanase, amylase, pectinase and cellulase activities. These enzymes may increase the carbon and nitrogen availability for the microbial food web in the bromeliad tank of V. minarum. Sequence analyses revealed the existence of 10 new species, indicating that bromeliad tanks are important sources of new yeasts. The novel species Occultifur brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the most frequently isolated yeast associated with V. minarum. The type strain of O. brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y375(T) (= CBS 12687(T)). The Mycobank number is MB 809816.

  7. Detection of bacterial and yeast species with the Bactec 9120 automated system with routine use of aerobic, anaerobic, and fungal media.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Alfredo; Palmeri, Angelo; Amato, Teresa; Immordino, Rita; Distefano, Salvatore; Giammanco, Anna

    2008-12-01

    During the period 2006 and 2007, all blood cultures required by four units at high infective risk and most of those required by other units of the University Hospital of Palermo, Palermo, Italy were performed using a Bactec 9120 automated blood culture system with a complete set of Plus Aerobic/F, Plus Anaerobic/F, and Mycosis IC/F bottles. The aim of the study was to enable the authors to gain firsthand experience of the culture potentialities of the three different media, to obtain information regarding the overall and specific recovery of bacteria and yeasts from blood cultures in the hospital, and to reach a decision as to whether and when to utilize anaerobic and fungal bottles. Although very few bloodstream infections (1.8%) were associated with obligate anaerobes, the traditional routine use of anaerobic bottles was confirmed because of their usefulness, not only in the detection of anaerobes, but also in that of gram-positive cocci and fermentative gram-negative bacilli. In this study, Mycosis IC/F bottles detected 77.4% of all the yeast isolates, 87.0% of yeasts belonging to the species Candida albicans, and 45.7% of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli resistant to chloramphenicol and tobramycin. In order to improve the diagnosis of fungemia in high-risk patients, the additional routine use of fungal bottles was suggested when, as occurred in the intensive-care unit and in the hematology unit of the University Hospital of Palermo, high percentages of bloodstream infections are associated with yeasts, and/or antibiotic-resistant bacteria and/or multiple bacterial isolates capable of inhibiting yeast growth in aerobic bottles.

  8. Detection of Bacterial and Yeast Species with the Bactec 9120 Automated System with Routine Use of Aerobic, Anaerobic, and Fungal Media▿

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Alfredo; Palmeri, Angelo; Amato, Teresa; Immordino, Rita; Distefano, Salvatore; Giammanco, Anna

    2008-01-01

    During the period 2006 and 2007, all blood cultures required by four units at high infective risk and most of those required by other units of the University Hospital of Palermo, Palermo, Italy were performed using a Bactec 9120 automated blood culture system with a complete set of Plus Aerobic/F, Plus Anaerobic/F, and Mycosis IC/F bottles. The aim of the study was to enable the authors to gain firsthand experience of the culture potentialities of the three different media, to obtain information regarding the overall and specific recovery of bacteria and yeasts from blood cultures in the hospital, and to reach a decision as to whether and when to utilize anaerobic and fungal bottles. Although very few bloodstream infections (1.8%) were associated with obligate anaerobes, the traditional routine use of anaerobic bottles was confirmed because of their usefulness, not only in the detection of anaerobes, but also in that of gram-positive cocci and fermentative gram-negative bacilli. In this study, Mycosis IC/F bottles detected 77.4% of all the yeast isolates, 87.0% of yeasts belonging to the species Candida albicans, and 45.7% of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli resistant to chloramphenicol and tobramycin. In order to improve the diagnosis of fungemia in high-risk patients, the additional routine use of fungal bottles was suggested when, as occurred in the intensive-care unit and in the hematology unit of the University Hospital of Palermo, high percentages of bloodstream infections are associated with yeasts, and/or antibiotic-resistant bacteria and/or multiple bacterial isolates capable of inhibiting yeast growth in aerobic bottles. PMID:18923011

  9. Ammonia production and its possible role as a mediator of communication for Debaryomyces hansenii and other cheese-relevant yeast species.

    PubMed

    Gori, K; Mortensen, H D; Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L

    2007-11-01

    Ammonia production by yeasts may contribute to an increase in pH during the ripening of surface-ripened cheeses. The increase in pH has a stimulatory effect on the growth of secondary bacterial flora. Ammonia production of single colonies of Debaryomyces hansenii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Geotrichum candidum was determined on glycerol medium (GM) agar and cheese agar. The ammonia production was found to vary, especially among yeast species, but also within strains of D. hansenii. In addition, variations in ammonia production were found between GM agar and cheese agar. Ammonia production was positively correlated to pH measured around colonies, which suggests ammonia production as an additional technological parameter for selection of secondary starter cultures for cheese ripening. Furthermore, ammonia appeared to act as a signaling molecule in D. hansenii as reported for other yeasts. On GM agar and cheese agar, D. hansenii showed ammonia production oriented toward neighboring colonies when colonies were grown close to other colonies of the same species; however, the time to oriented ammonia production differed among strains and media. In addition, an increase of ammonia production was determined for double colonies compared with single colonies of D. hansenii on GM agar. In general, similar levels of ammonia production were determined for both single and double colonies of D. hansenii on cheese agar.

  10. Deep fungal dermatitis in three inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) caused by the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Michelle R; Paré, Jean A; Sigler, Lynne; Naeser, John P; Sladky, Kurt K; Hanley, Chris S; Helmer, Peter; Phillips, Lynette A; Brower, Alexandra; Porter, Robert

    2007-06-01

    The Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii (CANV), a keratinophilic fungus that naturally and experimentally causes severe and often fatal dermatitis in multiple reptile species, was isolated in pure culture from skin samples of three inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) with deep granulomatous dermatomycosis. The first animal presented with a focal maxillary swelling involving the skin and gingiva. This lizard died while undergoing itraconazole and topical miconazole therapy. The second presented with focally extensive discoloration and thickening of the skin of the ventrum and was euthanized after 10 weeks of itraconazole therapy. A third lizard presented with hyperkeratotic exudative dermatitis on a markedly swollen forelimb. Amputation and itraconazole therapy resulted in a clinical cure. Histopathology of tissue biopsies in all cases demonstrated granulomatous dermatitis with intralesional hyphae morphologically consistent with those produced by the CANV. The second lizard also had granulomatous hepatitis with intralesional hyphae. Evidence in this report suggests that the CANV is the etiologic agent of an emerging condition in captive bearded dragons that has been called 'yellow fungus disease'.

  11. Moonlighting Proteins in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Gancedo, Carlos; Flores, Carmen-Lisset

    2008-01-01

    Proteins able to participate in unrelated biological processes have been grouped under the generic name of moonlighting proteins. Work with different yeast species has uncovered a great number of moonlighting proteins and shown their importance for adequate functioning of the yeast cell. Moonlighting activities in yeasts include such diverse functions as control of gene expression, organelle assembly, and modification of the activity of metabolic pathways. In this review, we consider several well-studied moonlighting proteins in different yeast species, paying attention to the experimental approaches used to identify them and the evidence that supports their participation in the unexpected function. Usually, moonlighting activities have been uncovered unexpectedly, and up to now, no satisfactory way to predict moonlighting activities has been found. Among the well-characterized moonlighting proteins in yeasts, enzymes from the glycolytic pathway appear to be prominent. For some cases, it is shown that despite close phylogenetic relationships, moonlighting activities are not necessarily conserved among yeast species. Organisms may utilize moonlighting to add a new layer of regulation to conventional regulatory networks. The existence of this type of proteins in yeasts should be taken into account when designing mutant screens or in attempts to model or modify yeast metabolism. PMID:18322039

  12. The yeast Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Akihiko

    2012-04-01

    The Golgi apparatus is an organelle that has been extensively studied in the model eukaryote, yeast. Its morphology varies among yeast species; the Golgi exists as a system of dispersed cisternae in the case of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas the Golgi cisternae in Pichia pastoris and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are organized into stacks. In spite of the different organization, the mechanism of trafficking through the Golgi apparatus is believed to be similar, involving cisternal maturation, in which the resident Golgi proteins are transported backwards while secretory cargo proteins can stay in the cisternae. Questions remain regarding the organization of the yeast Golgi, the regulatory mechanisms that underlie cisternal maturation of the Golgi and transport machinery of cargo proteins through this organelle. Studies using different yeast species have provided hints to these mechanisms.

  13. A laboratory-based study on patients with Parkinson's disease and seborrheic dermatitis: the presence and density of Malassezia yeasts, their different species and enzymes production.

    PubMed

    Arsic Arsenijevic, Valentina S; Milobratovic, Danica; Barac, Aleksandra M; Vekic, Berislav; Marinkovic, Jelena; Kostic, Vladimir S

    2014-03-14

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are frequently associated conditions. Aims of this study were: to determine severity of SD, presence of different species and density of Malassezia yeasts; to assess yeast lipases and phosphatases production in vitro and to compare these results between SD patients with and without PD. This case-control prospective study was conducted at the Dermatology and Neurology Units, Clinical Centre of Serbia and at the National Medical Mycology Reference Laboratory, University of Belgrade Medical School, Serbia. A total of 90 patients and 70 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 60 patients with SD (SDN) and 30 patients with SD and PD (SDP). Culture-based mycological examination was carried out on lesional skin (LS) and non-lesional skin (NLS). A yeasts density was determined by counting the Malassezia colony forming units per tape (CFU/tape). Enzymes production by isolated Malassezia was investigated. The most patients with SD were male (76.7%; SDP and 63.3%; SDN) and the intensity of SD was dominantly severe or moderate (76.7%; SDP and 75%; SDN). The presence of Malasseziа was high on LS in both groups (87.3%; SDP and 86.7%; SDN) (p=0.667).The highest yeasts density (mean CFU/tape=67.8) was detected on LS in 53% of SDP group and in 21.7% of SDN group (mean CFU/tape=31.9) (p < 0.01). The presence of negative cultures was lower in SDP group (13.3%) in comparison to HC and SDN groups (37% and 31.7%, respectively). Malassezia density on NLS in SDP group (mean CFU/tape=44.3) was significantly higher in comparison to SDN and HC (p=0.018). M. globosa was the most abundant species identified amongst isolates from the SDP group (42.3%) and exhibited high production of phosphatase and lipase in vitro. From this laboratory-based study a positive correlation between SD, PD, M. globosa incidence, high yeast density and high phosphatase and lipase activity was established. Our data lead to conclusion that local skin

  14. A laboratory-based study on patients with Parkinson’s disease and seborrheic dermatitis: the presence and density of Malassezia yeasts, their different species and enzymes production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are frequently associated conditions. Aims of this study were: to determine severity of SD, presence of different species and density of Malassezia yeasts; to assess yeast lipases and phosphatases production in vitro and to compare these results between SD patients with and without PD. Methods This case–control prospective study was conducted at the Dermatology and Neurology Units, Clinical Centre of Serbia and at the National Medical Mycology Reference Laboratory, University of Belgrade Medical School, Serbia. A total of 90 patients and 70 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 60 patients with SD (SDN) and 30 patients with SD and PD (SDP). Culture-based mycological examination was carried out on lesional skin (LS) and non-lesional skin (NLS). A yeasts density was determined by counting the Malassezia colony forming units per tape (CFU/tape). Enzymes production by isolated Malassezia was investigated. Results The most patients with SD were male (76.7%; SDP and 63.3%; SDN) and the intensity of SD was dominantly severe or moderate (76.7%; SDP and 75%; SDN). The presence of Malasseziа was high on LS in both groups (87.3%; SDP and 86.7%; SDN) (p=0.667). The highest yeasts density (mean CFU/tape=67.8) was detected on LS in 53% of SDP group and in 21.7% of SDN group (mean CFU/tape=31.9) (p < 0.01). The presence of negative cultures was lower in SDP group (13.3%) in comparison to HC and SDN groups (37% and 31.7%, respectively). Malassezia density on NLS in SDP group (mean CFU/tape=44.3) was significantly higher in comparison to SDN and HC (p=0.018). M. globosa was the most abundant species identified amongst isolates from the SDP group (42.3%) and exhibited high production of phosphatase and lipase in vitro. Conclusion From this laboratory-based study a positive correlation between SD, PD, M. globosa incidence, high yeast density and high phosphatase and lipase activity was established. Our data

  15. Endomelanconiopsis, a new anamorph genus in the Botryosphaeriaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The new species Endomelanconium endphyticum was common among endophytes isolated from healthy leaves of Theobroma cacao (cacao, Malvaceae) and Heisteria concinna (Oleaceae) in Panama. A total of fifteen endophytic cultures representing both hosts were selected for sequencing and morphological chara...

  16. Hypocrea britdaniae and H. foliicola: two remarkable new European species

    PubMed Central

    Jaklitsch, Walter M.; Voglmayr, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Hypocrea are added here to the European funga. Hypocrea britdaniae, a fungus with unknown anamorph and large, conspicuous stromata resembling basidiomata of a corticiaceous fungus, is a sister species to the Longibrachiatum clade, while H. foliicola, a leaf-dwelling species that forms pulvinate stromata, is recognized as an additional member of the pachybasium core group. Hypocrea foliicola sporulates in culture in a reduced verticillium-like manner, while it produces a white, typical pachybasium-like anamorph in nature. Ecologically H. foliicola is remarkable in inhabiting leaves, a substrate rarely recorded for Hypocrea. All relevant morphological teleomorphic and anamorphic traits are given. The phylogenetic placement of the new species within Hypocrea/Trichoderma was determined with combined analyses of rpb2 and tef1 exon sequences. PMID:22505436

  17. Design of anamorphic magnification high-numerical aperture objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography by curvatures combination method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yanqiu; Cao, Zhen

    2016-06-20

    An anamorphic magnification extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic objective could increase the size of the exposure field at a wafer in the orthogonal scanning direction to improve the throughput of the lithographic system. In this paper, we present a curvatures combination method for an anamorphic magnification EUV lithographic objective with high numerical aperture (NA). This method achieves an anamorphic magnification initial structure by use of the double-curvature surfaces, which are formed by combining the curvatures of the corresponding surfaces into two coaxial spherical systems. A series of control measures is taken to design the two coaxial spherical systems for ensuring the rationalities of the initial structure and the surfaces after combining. The image quality of the anamorphic initial structure is optimized by a gradual optimization process. Finally, as an example, we design an Mx1/4 and My1/8 anamorphic magnification EUV lithographic objective with the presented design method. This objective achieves 0.5 NA and a 26  mm×16.5  mm exposure field at the wafer. The wavefront error RMS reaches 0.06λ (λ=13.5  nm), and the distortion is less than 2.8 nm. The design result proves the availability of the curvatures combination method.

  18. Fast, Noninvasive Method for Molecular Detection and Differentiation of Malassezia Yeast Species on Human Skin and Application of the Method to Dandruff Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Gemmer, Christina M.; DeAngelis, Yvonne M.; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Jr., Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    Malassezia fungi have been the suspected cause of dandruff for more than a century. Previously referred to as Pityrosporum ovale, Pityrosporum orbiculare, or Malassezia, these fungi are now known to consist of at least seven Malassezia species. Each species has a specific ecological niche, as well as specific biochemical and genetic characteristics. Malassezia yeasts have fastidious culture conditions and exceedingly different growth rates. Therefore, the results of surveys of Malassezia based on culture methods can be difficult to interpret. We developed a molecular technique, terminal fragment length polymorphism analysis, to more accurately survey the ecology of Malassezia yeasts without bias from culture. This technique involves fluorescent nested PCR of the intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) ITS I and ITS II region ribosomal gene clusters. All known Malassezia species can be differentiated by unique ITS fragment lengths. We have used this technique to directly analyze scalp samples from subjects enrolled in a demographic scalp health study. Results for subjects assigned composite adherent scalp flaking scores (ASFS) <10 were compared to those for subjects assigned composite ASFS >24. Malassezia restricta and M. globosa were found to be the predominant Malassezia species present in both groups. Importantly, we found no evidence of M. furfur in either group, indicating that M. furfur can be eliminated as the causal organism for dandruff. Both groups also showed the presence of non-Malassezia fungi. This method, particularly when it is used in combination with existing fungal ITS databases, is expected to be useful in the diagnosis of multiple other fungal infections. PMID:12202578

  19. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Hooykaas, Paul J J; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Bundock, Paul; Soltani, Jalal; van Attikum, Haico; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic organisms. This species has enabled a detailed study of the (genetic) requirements for Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transformation. For instance research with this yeast has led to the recognition that the transforming DNA molecules integrate into the eukaryotic chromosomes either by homologous recombination, which is the preferred pathway in S. cerevisiae, or by nonhomologous end-joining. Based on the protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of S. cerevisiae methodology has been developed for the transformation of many other yeast and fungal species.

  20. Ogataea paradorogensis sp. nov., a novel methylotrophic ascomycetous yeast species isolated from galleries of ambrosia beetles in Japan, with a close relation to Pichia dorogensis.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Takashi; Ninomiya, Shinya; Imanishi, Yumi; Nakagiri, Akira; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Limtong, Savitree

    2008-12-01

    Two yeast strains isolated from galleries of ambrosia beetles in Japan and maintained in NITE Biological Resource Center (NBRC) as Pichia pini were found to represent a hitherto undescribed species. This species shows close relationship to Pichia dorogensis by the sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA but is clearly differentiated from it by a DNA-DNA reassociation experiment. It is described as Ogataea paradorogensis sp. nov. The vegetative cells and asci of this species are surrounded with distinct capsules like P. dorogensis. One to four hat-shaped ascospores, which tend to be liberated from the asci at maturation, are formed in the ascus.

  1. Species-specific identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts by fluorescently labeled DNA probes targeting the 26S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; König, Helmut; Fröhlich, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all Dekkera/Brettanomyces species colonizing different beverages revealed the potential for a specific primer and probe design to support diagnostic PCR approaches and FISH. By analysis of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all five currently known Dekkera/Brettanomyces species (Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. nanus and B. naardenensis), several regions with high nucleotide sequence variability yet distinct from the D1/D2 domains were identified. FISH species-specific probes targeting the 26S rRNA gene's most variable regions were designed. Accessibility of probe targets for hybridization was facilitated by the construction of partially complementary 'side'-labeled probes, based on secondary structure models of the rRNA sequences. The specificity and routine applicability of the FISH-based method for yeast identification were tested by analyzing different wine isolates. Investigation of the prevalence of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in the German viticultural regions Wonnegau, Nierstein and Bingen (Rhinehesse, Rhineland-Palatinate) resulted in the isolation of 37 D. bruxellensis strains from 291 wine samples.

  2. Chrysosporium anamorph Nannizziopsis vriesii: an emerging fungal pathogen of captive and wild reptiles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark A; Walden, Michael R

    2013-09-01

    Chrysosporium anamorph Nannizziopsis vriesii is a recent pathogen associated with infections in lizards, snakes, and crocodilians. It seems to be an obligate pathogen. It has been isolated from wild reptiles in addition to captive animals. Affected animals often present with aggressive, pyogranulomatous lesions that can affect the integument and musculoskeletal systems. Diagnosis can be done using culture, histopathology, and polymerase chain reaction assay. Ancillary diagnostic tests can be useful in characterizing the health status of the affected reptile and aid in planning supportive care and therapy. Treatment using antifungals has shown mixed results.

  3. A novel kanamycin/G418 resistance marker for direct selection of transformants in Escherichia coli and different yeast species.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael; Romanova, Nina; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a set of cloning vectors possessing a modified Tn903 kanamycin resistance gene that enables the selection of both kanamycin-resistant transformants in Escherichia coli and G418-resistant transformants in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hansenula polymorpha and Pichia pastoris. Expression of this gene in yeast is controlled by the H. polymorpha glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter, while expression in E. coli is governed by an upstream E. coli lacZ promoter. Applicability of the vectors for gene disruption in H. polymorpha and S. cerevisiae was demonstrated by inactivation of the HpMAL1 and URA3 genes, respectively. One of the vectors possesses a H. polymorpha ARS allowing plasmid maintenance in an episomal state. The small size of the vectors (2-2.5 kb) makes them convenient for routine DNA cloning. In addition, we report a novel approach for construction of gene disruption cassettes.

  4. Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of phospholipid molecular species from Antarctic and non-Antarctic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Tucker, David; Watson, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    High performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was applied to the comprehensive analysis of phospholipids from seven Antarctic and seven non-Antarctic yeasts. Identification of specific fatty acyl moieties to the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) were determined by relative abundance of fragment ions associated with formation of carboxylate anions and loss of fragment ions as free fatty carboxylic acid and ketene. Modulations with growth temperature in fatty acyl moieties in the sn-1 and sn-2 positions were characterized. Principal component analysis demonstrated that PE, PC and to a lesser extent PS, but not PI, were grouped into three distinct clusters consisting of seven Antarctic yeasts (Cryptococcus victoriae, Holtermanniella wattica, H. nyarrowii, Candida psychrophila, Leucosporidium fellii, Glaciozyma antarctica, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa), four non-Antarctic yeasts (C. albicans, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Cr. humicolus, R. mucilaginosa) and three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of anonymous DNA markers in assessing worldwide relatedness in the yeast species Pichia kluyveri Bedford and Kudrjavzev.

    PubMed

    Ganter, P F; de Barros Lopes, M

    2000-11-01

    Pichia kluyveri, a sexual ascomycetous yeast from cactus necroses and acidic fruit, is divided into three varieties. We used physiological, RAPD, and AFLP data to compare 46 P. kluyveri strains collected worldwide to investigate relationships among varieties. Physiology did not place all strains into described varieties. Although the combined AFLP and RAPD data produced a single most parsimonious tree, separate analysis of AFLP and RAPD data resulted in significantly different trees (by the partition homogeneity test). We then compared the distribution of strains per band to an expected distribution. This suggested we could separate both the AFLP and RAPD datasets into bands from rapidly and slowly changing DNA regions. When only bands from slowly changing regions (from each dataset) were included in the analysis, both the RAPD and AFLP datasets supported a single tree. This second tree did not differ significantly from the cladogram based on all of the DNA data, which we accepted as the best estimate of the phylogeny of these yeast strains. Based on this phylogeny, we were able to demonstrate the strong influence of geography on the population structure of this yeast, confirm the monophyly of one variety, question the utility of maintaining another variety, and demonstrate that the physiological differences used to separate the varieties did not do so in all cases.

  6. Glycolytic functions are conserved in the genome of the wine yeast Hanseniaspora uvarum and pyruvate kinase limits its capacity for alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Langenberg, Anne-Kathrin; Bink, Frauke J; Wolff, Lena; Walter, Stefan; von Wallbrunn, Christian; Grossmann, Manfred; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Schmitz, Hans-Peter

    2017-09-08

    Hanseniaspora uvarum (anamorph Kloeckera apiculata) is a predominant yeast on wine grapes and other fruits and has a strong influence on wine quality, even when Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures are employed. In this work we sequenced and annotated approximately 93% of the H. uvarum genome. Southern and synteny analyses were employed to construct a map of the seven chromosomes present in a type strain. Comparative determinations of specific enzyme activities within the fermentative pathway in H. uvarum and S. cerevisiae indicated that the reduced capacity for ethanol production of the former yeast is primarily caused by an approximately ten-fold lower activity of the key glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase. Heterologous expression of the encoding gene HuPYK1 and the two genes encoding the phosphofructokinase subunits, HuPFK1 and HuPFK2, in the respective deletion mutants of S. cerevisiae confirmed their functional homology.IMPORTANCEHanseniaspora uvarum is a predominant yeast species on grapes and other fruits. It contributes significantly to the production of desired as well as unfavorable aroma compounds and thus determines the final product quality, especially in wine. Despite this obvious importance, knowledge on its genetics is scarce. As a basis for targeted metabolic modifications, we here provide the results of a genomic sequencing approach, including the annotation of 3010 protein coding genes, e.g. encoding the entire sugar fermentation pathway, key components of stress-response signaling pathways, and enzymes catalyzing the production of aroma compounds. Comparative analyses suggest that the low fermentative capacity of H. uvarum as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be attributed to a low pyruvate kinase activity. The data reported here are expected to aid in establishing H. uvarum as a non-Saccharomyces yeast in starter cultures for wine and cider fermentations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Fusarium Species from Nepalese Rice and Production of Mycotoxins and Gibberellic Acid by Selected Species

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, A. E.; Manandhar, H. K.; Plattner, R. D.; Manandhar, G. G.; Poling, S. M.; Maragos, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    Infection of cereal grains with Fusarium species can cause contamination with mycotoxins that affect human and animal health. To determine the potential for mycotoxin contamination, we isolated Fusarium species from samples of rice seeds that were collected in 1997 on farms in the foothills of the Nepal Himalaya. The predominant Fusarium species in surface-disinfested seeds with husks were species of the Gibberella fujikuroi complex, including G. fujikuroi mating population A (anamorph, Fusarium verticillioides), G. fujikuroi mating population C (anamorph, Fusarium fujikuroi), and G. fujikuroi mating population D (anamorph, Fusarium proliferatum). The widespread occurrence of mating population D suggests that its role in the complex symptoms of bakanae disease of rice may be significant. Other common species were Gibberella zeae (anamorph, Fusarium graminearum) and Fusarium semitectum, with Fusarium acuminatum, Fusarium anguioides, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium equiseti, and Fusarium oxysporum occasionally present. Strains of mating population C produced beauvericin, moniliformin, and gibberellic acid, but little or no fumonisin, whereas strains of mating population D produced beauvericin, fumonisin, and, usually, moniliformin, but no gibberellic acid. Some strains of G. zeae produced the 8-ketotrichothecene nivalenol, whereas others produced deoxynivalenol. Despite the occurrence of fumonisin-producing strains of mating population D, and of 8-ketotrichothecene-producing strains of G. zeae, Nepalese rice showed no detectable contamination with these mycotoxins. Effective traditional practices for grain drying and storage may prevent contamination of Nepalese rice with Fusarium mycotoxins. PMID:10698766

  8. Isaria takamizusanensis is the anamorph of Cordyceps ryogamimontana, warranting a new combination, Purpureocillium takamizusanense comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Ban, Sayaka; Azuma, Yuta; Sato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Nakagiri, Akira

    2015-08-01

    The entomogenous anamorphic fungus Isaria takamizusanensis has not been resolved clearly in its teleomorphic state. We succeeded in inducing ascostroma formation by incubating conidiomata of I. takamizusanensis on cicada adults in a moist chamber. We observed the ascostroma and conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on ITS rDNA and EF-1α genes. The morphology of the ascostroma was identical to that of Cordyceps ryogamimontana. In the phylogenetic tree inferred from EF-1α, the isolate from the partspores grouped with nine strains derived from conidia of I. takamizusanensis, which was distinct from a clade including Purpureocillium lilacinum. Moreover, a conidial structure identical to that of I. takamizusanensis was rediscovered on the holotype specimen of C. ryogamimontana. As a result, we propose a new name, Purpureocillium takamizusanense, which is a combination of the teleomorph-anamorph connection of C. ryogamimontana-I. takamizusanensis, in accordance with the 'one fungus, one name' concept of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (ICN).

  9. Image slicing with a twist: spatial and spectral Nyquist sampling without anamorphic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecza, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Integral field spectrographs have become mainstream instruments at modern telescopes because of their efficient way of collecting data-cubes. Image slicer based integral field spectrographs achieve the highest fill-factor on the detector, but due to the need to Nyquist-sample the spectra, their spatial sampling on the sky is rectangular. Using anamorphic pre-optics before the image slicer overcomes this effect further maximising the fill-factor, but introduces optical aberrations, throughput losses, and additional alignment and calibration requirements, compromising overall instrument performance. In this paper I present a concept for an image-slicer that achieves both spatial and spectral Nyquist-sampling without anamorphic pre-optics. Rotating each slitlet by 45° with respect to the dispersion direction, and arranging them into a saw-tooth pseudo-slit, leads to a lozenge shaped sampling element on the sky, however, the centres of the lozenges lie on a regular and square grid, satisfying the Nyquist sampling criterion in both spatial directions.

  10. Comparative physiology and fermentation performance of Saaz and Frohberg lager yeast strains and the parental species Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian R; Storgårds, Erna; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve

    2013-07-01

    Two distinct genetic groups (Saaz and Frohberg) exist within the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus) taxon. However, physiological/technological differences that exist between the two groups are not known. Fermentative capability of the parental S. eubayanus has likewise never been studied. Here, 58 lager strains were screened to determine which hybrid group they belonged to, and selected strains were characterized to determine salient characteristics. In 15 °P all-malt wort fermentations at 22 °C, Frohberg strains showed greater growth and superior fermentation (80% apparent attenuation, 6.5% alcohol by volume in 3-4 days) compared to all other strains and maintained highest viability values (>93%). Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at the same temperature (33% apparent attenuation, 2.7% alcohol by volume at 6 days and viability reduced to 75%). Saaz strains and S. eubayanus were the least sensitive to cold (10 °C), though this did not translate to greater fermentation performance. Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at 10 °C but equal to or greater than that of the Saaz strains. Performance of Saaz yeast/S. eubayanus was limited by an inability to use wort maltotriose. [(14)C]-Maltotriose transport assays also showed negligible activity in these strains (≤0.5 µmol min(-1) g(-1) dry yeast). Beers from Saaz fermentations were characterized by two- to sixfold lower production of the flavour compounds methyl butanol, ethyl acetate and 3-methylbutyl acetate compared to Frohberg strains. Higher alcohol and ester production by S. eubayanus was similar to that of Frohberg strains.

  11. A monograph of Allantonectria, Nectria, and Pleonectria (Nectriaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota) and their pycnidial, sporodochial, and synnematous anamorphs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although Nectria is the type genus of Nectriaceae (Hypocreales, Sordariomycetes, Pezizomycotina, Ascomycota), the systematics of the teleomorphic and anamorphic state of Nectria sensu Rossman has not been studied in detail. The objectives of this study were to 1) provide a phylogenetic overview to d...

  12. The use of parsimony network analysis for the formal delineation of phylogenetic species of yeasts: Candida apicola, Candida azyma, and Candida parazyma sp. nov., cosmopolitan yeasts associated with floricolous insects.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc-André; Dobson, Jessica; Wijayanayaka, Dilini N; Smith, Allison M E

    2010-02-01

    Parsimony network analysis of rDNA sequences was used to delimit phylogenetic species of yeasts in an objective, formal manner. Many strains assigned to Candida apicola (Starmerella clade), when compared to the type, fell outside the inclusion limits proposed by Kurtzman and Robnett (1998) based on a pair-wise comparison of the large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domains. However, when these sequences were analyzed jointly with ITS rDNA sequences by parsimony network analysis, 28 of the 30 strains formed a cohesive set. Two strains, MUCL 45721 and CBS 4353, were excluded from the species, but there was no evident justification to subdivide the rest. A similar analysis of 81 isolates originally assigned to Candida azyma (Wickerhamiella clade) yielded dramatically different results, giving rise to six independent networks corresponding to Candida azyma sensu stricto (18 strains), Candida azymoides (2 strains), a pair of isolates from Australian hibiscus flowers, a single isolate from the same substrate, a single isolate from Malaysian bertam palm nectar, and 57 isolates that are assigned to the new species Candida parazyma (type = UWOPS 91-652.1(T) = CBS 11563(T) = NRRL Y-48669(T)). The strains retained in C. azyma sensu stricto differed from one another by up to four substitutions in their D1/D2 sequences, but their polymorphism at the level of the ITS was considerable and suggested a history of divergence resulting from dispersal. Strains of C. parazyma fell into seven variant haplotypes based on sequences of the rDNA ITS and D1/D2 regions. The most abundant haplotype occurred across the global range of the species. Others were either endemic to Belize, Costa Rica, Rarotonga, or Tennessee, suggestive of vicariance, or occurred across remote localities, offering partial support to the notion of rapid dispersal.

  13. Application of a yeast estrogen screen in non-biomarker species Varicorhinus barbatulus fish with two estrogen receptor subtypes to assess xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Keng-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yuan; Chang, Whei-Meih

    2007-06-01

    Xenoestrogens can interfere with normal estrogen signaling by competitively binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) and activating transcription of target genes. In this study, we cloned the estrogen receptor alpha (vbERalpha) and beta 2 (vbERbeta2) genes from liver of the indigenous Taiwanese cyprinid fish Varicorhinus barbatulus and tested the direct impact of several xenoestrogens on these ERs. Transcriptional activity of xenoestrogens was measured by the enzymatic activity of estrogen responsive element (ERE)-containing beta-galactosidase in a yeast reporter system. The xenoestrogens tested were phenol derivatives, DDT-related substances, phthalic acid esters, and polychlorinated biphenyls, with 17beta-estradiol (E2) as a subjective standard. The phenol derivatives [4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) and bisphenol A (BPA)] exhibited significant dose-dependent responses in both ligand potency and ligand efficiency. Consistent with yeast assays using human or rainbow trout ERs, we observed a general subtype preference in that vbERalpha displayed higher relative potencies and efficiencies than vbERbeta2, although our assays induced a stronger response for xenoestrogens than did human or trout ERs. Whereas 4-NP and 4-t-OP have similar EC50 values relative to E2 for both ER subtypes, the strong estrogenic response of BPA markedly differentiates vbERalpha from vbERbeta2, suggesting possible species-specific BPA sensitivity. We report that the ameliorative yeast tool is readily applicable for indigenous wildlife studies of the bio-toxic influence of xenoestrogens with wildlife-specific estrogen receptors.

  14. Zymoseptoria gen. nov.: a new genus to accommodate Septoria-like species occurring on graminicolous hosts.

    PubMed

    Quaedvlieg, W; Kema, G H J; Groenewald, J Z; Verkley, G J M; Seifbarghi, S; Razavi, M; Mirzadi Gohari, A; Mehrabi, R; Crous, P W

    2011-06-01

    The Mycosphaerella complex is both poly- and paraphyletic, containing several different families and genera. The genus Mycosphaerella is restricted to species with Ramularia anamorphs, while Septoria is restricted to taxa that cluster with the type species of Septoria, S. cytisi, being closely related to Cercospora in the Mycosphaerellaceae. Species that occur on graminicolous hosts represent an as yet undescribed genus, for which the name Zymoseptoria is proposed. Based on the 28S nrDNA phylogeny derived in this study, Zymoseptoria is shown to cluster apart from Septoria. Morphologically species of Zymoseptoria can also be distinguished by their yeast-like growth in culture, and the formation of different conidial types that are absent in Septoria s.str. Other than the well-known pathogens such as Z. tritici, the causal agent of septoria tritici blotch on wheat, and Z. passerinii, the causal agent of septoria speckled leaf blotch of barley, both for which epitypes are designated, two leaf blotch pathogens are also described on graminicolous hosts from Iran. Zymoseptoria brevis sp. nov. is described from Phalaris minor, and Z. halophila comb. nov. from leaves of Hordeum glaucum. Further collections are now required to elucidate the relative importance, host range and distribution of these species.

  15. Fungal infection of mantis shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria) caused by two anamorphic fungi found in Japan.

    PubMed

    Duc, Pham Minh; Hatai, Kishio; Kurata, Osamu; Tensha, Kozue; Yoshitaka, Uchida; Yaguchi, Takashi; Udagawa, Shun-ichi

    2009-05-01

    Two fungal pathogens of the mantis shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria) in Yamaguchi and Aichi Prefectures, Japan are described as the new species Plectosporium oratosquillae and Acremonium sp. (a member of the Emericellopsis marine clade). Both fungi infect the gills of the mantis shrimp, which become brown or black due to melanization. The former species is characterized by its slow growth on artificial seawater yeast extract peptone glucose (PYGS) agar, pale yellow to pale orange or grayish yellow colonies, short cylindrical solitary phialides with a wavy tip, and one-celled ellipsoidal conidia. Although lacking the two-celled conidia demonstrated by the type species Plectosporium tabacinum, the taxonomic placement of the new species was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA (ITS1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS2). Acremonium sp., the other causal pathogen, differs from P. oratosquillae by its fast growth on PYGS agar, pale orange to salmon-colored colonies, long, slender conidiophores consisting of solitary phialides with tips lacking an undulate outline, and typically cylindrical conidia. Analysis of ITS and beta-tubulin gene sequences placed this fungus within the phylogenetically distinct Emericellopsis (anam. Acremonium) marine clade. Various physiological characteristics of both pathogens were also investigated. This is the first report of a fungal infection found on the mantis shrimp in Japan.

  16. Orthonormal aberration polynomials for anamorphic optical imaging systems with circular pupils.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Virendra N

    2012-06-20

    In a recent paper, we considered the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical imaging system with a rectangular pupil, representing the terms of a power series expansion of its aberration function. These aberrations are inherently separable in the Cartesian coordinates (x,y) of a point on the pupil. Accordingly, there is x-defocus and x-coma, y-defocus and y-coma, and so on. We showed that the aberration polynomials orthonormal over the pupil and representing balanced aberrations for such a system are represented by the products of two Legendre polynomials, one for each of the two Cartesian coordinates of the pupil point; for example, L(l)(x)L(m)(y), where l and m are positive integers (including zero) and L(l)(x), for example, represents an orthonormal Legendre polynomial of degree l in x. The compound two-dimensional (2D) Legendre polynomials, like the classical aberrations, are thus also inherently separable in the Cartesian coordinates of the pupil point. Moreover, for every orthonormal polynomial L(l)(x)L(m)(y), there is a corresponding orthonormal polynomial L(l)(y)L(m)(x) obtained by interchanging x and y. These polynomials are different from the corresponding orthogonal polynomials for a system with rotational symmetry but a rectangular pupil. In this paper, we show that the orthonormal aberration polynomials for an anamorphic system with a circular pupil, obtained by the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization of the 2D Legendre polynomials, are not separable in the two coordinates. Moreover, for a given polynomial in x and y, there is no corresponding polynomial obtained by interchanging x and y. For example, there are polynomials representing x-defocus, balanced x-coma, and balanced x-spherical aberration, but no corresponding y-aberration polynomials. The missing y-aberration terms are contained in other polynomials. We emphasize that the Zernike circle polynomials, although orthogonal over a circular pupil, are not suitable for an anamorphic system as

  17. Hypersaline conditions induce changes in cell-wall melanization and colony structure in a halophilic and a xerophilic black yeast species of the genus Trimmatostroma.

    PubMed

    Kogej, Tina; Gorbushina, Anna A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2006-06-01

    Melanized yeast-like meristematic fungi are characteristic inhabitants of highly stressed environments and are rare eukaryotic extremophiles. Therefore, they are attractive organisms for studies of adaptations. In this study we compared two meristematic species of the genus Trimmatostroma on media of differing water potentials isolated from distinct water-stressed environments: T. salinum from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern, and T. abietis from a marble monument in Crimea. The morphology and melanization of both isolates in response to sodium chloride-induced water stress were investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. We describe and compare the colony form and structure, ultrastructure, and degree of cell-wall melanization of both species in reaction to salinity and to inhibited melanin synthesis. The halophilic T. salinum responded to changed salinity conditions on the level of individual cell ultrastructure and degree of cell wall melanization, whereas the xerophilic rock-inhabiting T. abietis responded with modification of its colony structure. Surprisingly, both the halophilic and the xerophilic Trimmatostroma species were able to adapt to hypersaline growth conditions, although their growth patterns show distinct adaptation of each species to their natural ecological niches.

  18. Volatile flavour profile of reduced alcohol wines fermented with the non-conventional yeast species Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Varela, C; Sengler, F; Solomon, M; Curtin, C

    2016-10-15

    Production of quality wines with decreased alcohol concentration continues to be one of the major challenges facing wine producers. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the isolation or generation of wine yeasts less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol. We recently demonstrated that Metschnikowia pulcherrima AWRI1149 and Saccharomyces uvarum AWRI2846 were both able to produce reduced alcohol wine when used in sequential inoculation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This effect is additive when both strains are co-inoculated in grape must. Here we describe the volatile flavour profile of Chardonnay and Shiraz wines produced with these two strains. Wines fermented with M. pulcherrima showed concentrations of ethyl acetate likely to affect negatively wine aroma. Wines fermented with S. uvarum and with a combination of M. pulcherrima and S. uvarum were characterised by increased concentrations of 2-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate, both associated with positive sensory attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dermatitis and cellulitis in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) caused by the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii.

    PubMed

    Toplon, D E; Terrell, S P; Sigler, L; Jacobson, E R

    2013-07-01

    An epizootic of ulcerative to nodular ventral dermatitis was observed in a large breeding colony of 8-month to 5-year-old leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) of both sexes. Two representative mature male geckos were euthanized for diagnostic necropsy. The Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii (CANV) was isolated from the skin lesions, and identification was confirmed by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene. Histopathology revealed multifocal to coalescing dermal and subcutaneous heterophilic granulomas that contained septate fungal hyphae. There was also multifocal epidermal hyperplasia with hyperkeratosis, and similar hyphae were present within the stratum corneum, occasionally with terminal chains of arthroconidia consistent with the CANV. In one case, there was focal extension of granulomatous inflammation into the underlying masseter muscle. This is the first report of dermatitis and cellulitis due to the CANV in leopard geckos.

  20. Full-parallax 360 degrees horizontal viewing integral imaging using anamorphic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Baasantseren, Ganbat; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Nam; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Jang, Young-Hee; Yoo, Kwan-Hee

    2011-03-01

    We propose full-parallax integral imaging display with 360 degree horizontal viewing angle. Two-dimensional (2D) elemental images are projected by a high-speed DMD projector and integrated into three-dimensional (3D) image by a lens array. The anamorphic optic system tailors the horizontal and vertical viewing angles of the integrated 3D images in order to obtain high angular ray density in horizontal direction and large viewing angle in vertical direction. Finally, the mirror screen that rotates in synchronization with the DMD projector presents the integrated 3D images to desired direction accordingly. Full-parallax and 360 degree horizontal viewing angle 3D images with both of monocular and binocular depth cues can be achieved by the proposed method.

  1. Fractional fourier domain encrypted holographic memory by use of an anamorphic optical system.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, G; Joseph, J; Singh, K

    2001-01-10

    We propose and demonstrate a fractional Fourier domain encrypted holographic memory using an anamorphic optical system. The encryption is done by use of two statistically independent random-phase codes in the fractional Fourier domain. If the two random-phase codes are statistically independent white sequences, the encrypted data are stationary white noise. We exploit the capability of an optical system to process information in two dimensions by using two different sets of parameters along the two orthogonal axes to encode the data. The fractional Fourier transform parameters along with the random-phase codes constitute the key to the encrypted data. The knowledge of the key is essential to the successful decryption of data. The decoding of the encoded data is done by use of phase conjugation. We present a few experimental results.

  2. Free-forms optics into astronomical use: the case of an all-mirror anamorphic collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Up to now, optical design of astronomical instrumentation has been based onto "classical" surfaces, i.e. plano surfaces, spherical surfaces, and some classes of aspheric surfaces. More complex surfaces (like cylinders), are used from time to time to correct for aberrations. A new class of more general surfaces, i.e. non-rotationally symmetrical and completely "free-form" surfaces have been recently introduced. Their use in astronomy, however, has not widely used so far. We propose a new layout for an anamorphic collimator based onto two "free-form" cylinder surfaces, giving diffraction limited images. This collimator can be used to create an elliptical pupil, and allows reducing size of optical systems, too. Two interesting cases of application in astronomy are shown: a very-high resolution spectrograph for large telescopes, and an interferometer cavity to test large plano optics.

  3. Species distribution and susceptibility profile to fluconazole, voriconazole and MXP-4509 of 551 clinical yeast isolates from a Romanian multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Minea, B; Nastasa, V; Moraru, R F; Kolecka, A; Flonta, M M; Marincu, I; Man, A; Toma, F; Lupse, M; Doroftei, B; Marangoci, N; Pinteala, M; Boekhout, T; Mares, M

    2015-02-01

    This is the first multi-centre study regarding yeast infections in Romania. The aim was to determine the aetiological spectrum and susceptibility pattern to fluconazole, voriconazole and the novel compound MXP-4509. The 551 isolates were identified using routine laboratory methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and DNA sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing was performed using the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) method and breakpoints. The yeasts originated from superficial infections (SUP, 51.5 %), bloodstream infections (BSI, 31.6 %) and deep-seated infections (DEEP, 16.9 %), from patients of all ages. Nine genera and 30 species were identified. The 20 Candida species accounted for 94.6 % of all isolates. C. albicans was the overall leading pathogen (50.5 %). Lodderomyces elongisporus is reported for the first time as a fungaemia cause in Europe. C. glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the non-Candida spp. and non-albicans Candida spp. groups, showed decreased fluconazole susceptibility (<75 %). The overall fluconazole resistance was 10.2 %. C. krusei accounted for 27 of the 56 fluconazole-resistant isolates. The overall voriconazole resistance was 2.5 % and was due mainly to C. glabrata and C. tropicalis isolates. Fluconazole resistance rates for the three categories of infection were similar to the overall value; voriconazole resistance rates differed: 4 % for BSI, 3.2 % for DEEP and 1.4 % for SUP. The antifungal activity of MXP-4509 was superior to voriconazole against C. glabrata and many fluconazole-resistant isolates. There was a large percentage of non-albicans Candida isolates. A large part of the high fluconazole resistance was not acquired but intrinsic, resulting from the high percentage of C. krusei.

  4. The expanding large-spored Metschnikowia clade: Metschnikowia matae sp. nov., a yeast species with two varieties from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Santos, Ana Raquel; Perri, Ami M; Andrietta, Maria da Graça Stupiello; Rosa, Carlos A; Lachance, Marc-André

    2015-09-01

    Fifty-two yeast isolates from flowers and associated nitidulid beetles of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Mata Atlântica) region were found to represent a new species in the large-spored Metschnikowia clade. The species is heterothallic, haploid, and allogamous, and produces asci with two aciculate ascospores that can reach 80 μm in length, as is typical in the clade. Analysis of sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster indicates that the new species is closely related to Metschnikowia lochheadii, which ranges across Central America to northern Brazil, occurs as an adventive species in Hawaii, but is rarely found in central Brazil. The species is not readily distinguishable from relatives based on morphology or growth responses, but is well delineated from M. lochheadii on reproductive isolation. Based on an intron splice site PCR screen, we selected 26 isolates for further study. The sequence of the region that includes the complete internal transcribed spacer/5.8S rRNA gene segment as well as the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene contained three polymorphic segments and 14 haplotypes were identified. Of these, a single divergent isolate from the southernmost of four sampled localities exhibited diminished mating success when crossed with others. We describe two varieties, Metschnikowia matae var. matae sp. nov. var. nov. (type UFMG-CM-Y395(T), CBS 13986(T), NRRL Y-63736(T); allotype UFMG-CM-Y391(A), CBS 13987(A), NRRL Y-63735(A)) and Metschnikowia matae var. maris sp. nov. var. nov. (type UFMG-CM-Y397(T), CBS 13985(T), NRRL Y-63737(T)). We also report on the discovery of the h (+) mating type of Candida ipomoeae and transfer of the species to Metschnikowia ipomoeae comb. nov. (allotype UWOPS 12-660.1(A), CBS 13988(A), NRRL Y-63738(A)).

  5. Trends in Antifungal Susceptibility among Swedish Candida Species Bloodstream Isolates from 1994 to 1998: Comparison of the E-test and the Sensititre YeastOne Colorimetric Antifungal Panel with the NCCLS M27-A Reference Method

    PubMed Central

    Chryssanthou, Erja

    2001-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the NCCLS macrodilution method, the E-test, and the Sensititre YeastOne Colorimetric Antifungal Panel for the susceptibility testing of fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, and flucytosine was conducted with 233 blood isolates of Candida species collected between 1994 and 1998 in Sweden. Antifungal susceptibility profiles of Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species remained essentially unchanged within the 5-year study period. The overall agreement rates for the E-test and the NCCLS MICs and for the YeastOne and the NCCLS MICs were ≥86 and ≥87%, respectively, within ±1 dilution for fluconazole, amphotericin B, and flucytosine, and ≥66 and ≥57%, respectively, for itraconazole. The E-test and the YeastOne panels are equivalent, and both are convenient methods for routine use. PMID:11682555

  6. Growth Inhibition of Various Enterobacteriaceae Species by the Yeast Hansenula anomala during Storage of Moist Cereal Grain

    PubMed Central

    Olstorpe, Matilda; Schnürer, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Eleven of 13 Enterobacteriaceae species tested grew in moist stored wheat, highlighting a potential risk of this energy-saving airtight storage method. When Hansenula anomala was coinoculated, all Enterobacteriaceae species were significantly inhibited after 2 months of storage, six of them to below the detection limit. PMID:22020520

  7. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese.

  8. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Yeast Species Isolated from Stool Samples of Children with Suspected or Diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorders and In Vitro Susceptibility Against Nystatin and Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, A Serda; Kiraz, Nuri; Aydin, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a general term for a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders of brain development that limits a person's ability to function normally. Etiology has not been clearly defined up to date. However, gut microbiota and the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and brain, the so-called microbiota-gut-brain axis, are hypothesized, which may be involved in the etiology of several mental disorders. Recent reports suggest that Candida, particularly Candida albicans, growth in intestines may cause lower absorption of carbohydrates and minerals and higher toxin levels which are thought to contribute autistic behaviors. The aim of this study was to identify the 3-year deposited yeasts isolated from stool samples of children with diagnosed or suspected ASD and to determine in vitro activity of nystatin and fluconazole against these isolates using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 guidelines. A 17-year retrospective assessment was also done using our laboratory records. Among the species identified, intrinsically fluconazole-resistant Candida krusei (19.8 %) and Candida glabrata (14.8 %) with elevated MICs were remarkable. Overall, C. albicans (57.4 %) was the most commonly isolated species in 17 years. The species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility tests have to be performed using the strain isolated from stool sample, to select the appropriate antifungal agent, if antimycotic therapy is needed.

  9. The production of reactive oxygen species is a universal action mechanism of Amphotericin B against pathogenic yeasts and contributes to the fungicidal effect of this drug.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Román, Elvira; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique; Argüelles, Juan Carlos; Pla, Jesús; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB) is an antifungal drug that binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, causing the loss of ions. In addition, AMB induces the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and although these molecules have multiple deleterious effects on fungal cells, their specific role in the action mechanism of AMB remains unknown. In this work, we studied the role of ROS in the action mechanism of AMB. We determined the intracellular induction of ROS in 44 isolates of different pathogenic yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii). We also characterized the production of ROS in AMB-resistant isolates. We found that AMB induces the formation of ROS in all the species tested. The inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by rotenone blocked the induction of ROS by AMB and provided protection from the killing action of the antifungal. Moreover, this phenomenon was absent in strains that displayed resistance to AMB. These strains showed an alteration in the respiration rate and mitochondrial membrane potential and also had higher catalase activity than that of the AMB-susceptible strains. Consistently, AMB failed to induce protein carbonylation in the resistant strains. Our data demonstrate that the production of ROS by AMB is a universal and important action mechanism that is correlated with the fungicidal effect and might explain the low rate of resistance to the molecule. Finally, these data provide an opportunity to design new strategies to improve the efficacy of this antifungal.

  10. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (Esi-Ms/Ms) Analysis of the Lipid Molecular Species Composition of Yeast Subcellular Membranes Reveals Acyl Chain-Based Sorting/Remodeling of Distinct Molecular Species En Route to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Schneiter, Roger; Brügger, Britta; Sandhoff, Roger; Zellnig, Günther; Leber, Andrea; Lampl, Manfred; Athenstaedt, Karin; Hrastnik, Claudia; Eder, Sandra; Daum, Günther; Paltauf, Fritz; Wieland, Felix T.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    1999-01-01

    Nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS/MS) was employed to determine qualitative differences in the lipid molecular species composition of a comprehensive set of organellar membranes, isolated from a single culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Remarkable differences in the acyl chain composition of biosynthetically related phospholipid classes were observed. Acyl chain saturation was lowest in phosphatidylcholine (15.4%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; 16.2%), followed by phosphatidylserine (PS; 29.4%), and highest in phosphatidylinositol (53.1%). The lipid molecular species profiles of the various membranes were generally similar, with a deviation from a calculated average profile of ∼± 20%. Nevertheless, clear distinctions between the molecular species profiles of different membranes were observed, suggesting that lipid sorting mechanisms are operating at the level of individual molecular species to maintain the specific lipid composition of a given membrane. Most notably, the plasma membrane is enriched in saturated species of PS and PE. The nature of the sorting mechanism that determines the lipid composition of the plasma membrane was investigated further. The accumulation of monounsaturated species of PS at the expense of diunsaturated species in the plasma membrane of wild-type cells was reversed in elo3Δ mutant cells, which synthesize C24 fatty acid-substituted sphingolipids instead of the normal C26 fatty acid-substituted species. This observation suggests that acyl chain-based sorting and/or remodeling mechanisms are operating to maintain the specific lipid molecular species composition of the yeast plasma membrane. PMID:10459010

  11. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  12. Wickerhamiella allomyrinae f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from the gut of the rhinoceros beetle Allomyrina dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong-Cheng; Wang, Yun; Chen, Liang; Ke, Tao; Hui, Feng-Li

    2014-11-01

    Two strains representing Wickerhamiella allomyrinae f.a., sp. nov. were isolated from the gut of Allomyrina dichotoma (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae) collected from the Baotianman National Nature Reserve, Nanyan, Henan Province, China. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene revealed that this novel species was located in the Wickerhamiella clade (Saccharomycetes, Saccharomycetales), with three described species of the genus Candida, namely Candida musiphila, Candida spandovensis and Candida sergipensis, as the most closely related species. The novel species differed from these three species by 9.3-9.8% sequence divergence (35-45 nt substitutions) in the D1/D2 sequences. The species could also be distinguished from the closely related species, C. musiphila, C. spandovensis and C. sergipensis, by growth on vitamin-free medium and at 37 °C. The type strain is Wickerhamiella allomyrinae sp. nov. NYNU 13920(T) ( =CICC 33031(T) =CBS 13167(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  13. Insights into the Life Cycle of Yeasts from the CTG Clade Revealed by the Analysis of the Millerozyma (Pichia) farinosa Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Noémie; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Sacerdot, Christine; Casaregola, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Among ascomycetous yeasts, the CTG clade is so-called because its constituent species translate CTG as serine instead of leucine. Though the biology of certain pathogenic species such as Candida albicans has been much studied, little is known about the life cycles of non-pathogen species of the CTG clade. Taking advantage of the recently obtained sequence of the biotechnological Millerozyma (Pichiasorbitophila) farinosa strain CBS 7064, we used MLST to better define phylogenic relationships between most of the Millerozyma farinosa strains available in public collections. This led to the constitution of four phylogenetic clades diverging from 8% to 15% at the DNA level and possibly constituting a species complex (M. farinosa) and to the proposal of two new species:Millerozyma miso sp. nov. CBS 2004T ( = CLIB 1230T) and Candida pseudofarinosa sp. nov.NCYC 386T( = CLIB 1231T).Further analysis showed that M. farinosa isolates exist as haploid and inter-clade hybrids. Despite the sequence divergence between the clades, secondary contacts after reproductive isolation were evidenced, as revealed by both introgression and mitochondria transfer between clades. We also showed that the inter-clade hybrids do sporulate to generate mainly viable vegetative diploid spores that are not the result of meiosis, and very rarely aneuploid spores possibly through the loss of heterozygosity during sporulation. Taken together, these results show that in this part of the CTG clade, non-Mendelian genetic exchanges occur at high rates through hybridization between divergent strainsfrom distinct clades and subsequent massive loss of heterozygosity. This combination of mechanisms could constitute an alternative sexuality leading to an unsuspected biodiversity. PMID:22574125

  14. Comparison of fermentative capacities of industrial baking and wild-type yeasts of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae in different sugar media.

    PubMed

    Bell, P J; Higgins, V J; Attfield, P V

    2001-04-01

    To compare the fermentative capacity of wild and domesticated isolates of the genus Saccharomyces. The fermentative capacity of yeasts from a variety of wild and domesticated sources was tested in synthetic dough media that mimic major bread dough types. Domesticated yeast strains were found to have better maltose-utilizing capacity than wild yeast strains. The capacity to ferment sugars under high osmotic stress was randomly distributed amongst wild and baking strains of Saccharomyces. The domestication of bakers' yeast has enhanced the ability of yeasts to ferment maltose, without a similar impact on the fermentative capacity under high osmotic conditions. This study, combined with molecular studies of both wild and domesticated yeast, showed that domestication of bakers' yeast has resulted in improved maltose utilization, apparently via the duplication and mutation of the MAL genes.

  15. XYLH encodes a xylose/H+ symporter from the highly related yeast species Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Danielly; Nobre, Alexandra; Silva, Marta Luisa; Faria-Oliveira, Fábio; Tulha, Joana; Ferreira, Célia; Lucas, Cândida

    2013-11-01

    The closely related yeasts Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces hansenii are excellent xylose consumers. We previously described the activity of a high-affinity xylose/H(+) symport from an industrial strain of D. hansenii subsequently reclassified as D. fabryi. We now report the identification of the gene encoding this permease, AY347871.2. This was retrieved from D. fabryi gDNA using a degenerate primer PCR strategy, based on conserved regions from the amino acid sequences of three well-characterized bacterial xylose/H(+) symporters. This sequence is 86% identical to another, DEHA2C11374p from D. hansenii type strain. DEHA2C11374p was conceptually ascribed to the major facilitator superfamily. The putative amino acid sequence of AY347871.2 and DEHA2C11374p presented a hydrophobicity pattern compatible with plasma membrane proteins. The last was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sensitivity of transport activity to a protonophore confirmed its dependence on proton motive force, as expected from a symporter. We named D. fabryi AY347871.2 and D. hansenii DEHA2C11374p as XYLH from Xylose/H(+) symport. Based on the very high similarity, we suggested that Scheffersomyces stipitis Xut3 and Aspergillus nidulans AN8400.2 may also encode xylose high-affinity permeases. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Catching speciation in the act: Metschnikowia bowlesiae sp. nov., a yeast species found in nitidulid beetles of Hawaii and Belize.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc-André; Fedor, Alexandra N

    2014-03-01

    We describe the species Metschnikowia bowlesiae sp. nov. based on the recovery of six isolates from Hawaii and Belize. The species belongs to the Metschnikowia arizonensis subclade of the large-spored Metschnikowia clade. The isolates are haploid and heterothallic. Both Hawaiian strains had the mating type h(+) and the Belizean strains were h(-). Paraphyletic species structures observed in some ribosomal DNA sequence analyses suggest that M. bowlesiae sp. nov. might represent an intermediate stage in a succession of peripatric speciation events from Metschnikowia dekortorum to Metschnikowia similis and might even hybridize with these species. The type of M. bowlesiae sp. nov. is strain UWOPS 04-243x5 (CBS 12940(T), NRRL Y-63671) and the allotype is strain UWOPS 12-619.1 (CBS 12939(A), NRRL Y-63670).

  17. Molecular Characterization of Reptile Pathogens Currently Known as Members of the Chrysosporium Anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii Complex and Relationship with Some Human-Associated Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, Sarah; Paré, Jean A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii (CANV), Chrysosporium guarroi, Chrysosporium ophiodiicola, and Chrysosporium species have been reported as the causes of dermal or deep lesions in reptiles. These infections are contagious and often fatal and affect both captive and wild animals. Forty-nine CANV isolates from reptiles and six isolates from human sources were compared with N. vriesii based on their cultural characteristics and DNA sequence data. Analyses of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer and small subunit of the nuclear ribosomal gene revealed that the reptile pathogens and human isolates belong in well-supported clades corresponding to three lineages that are distinct from all other taxa within the family Onygenaceae of the order Onygenales. One lineage represents the genus Nannizziopsis and comprises N. vriesii, N. guarroi, and six additional species encompassing isolates from chameleons and geckos, crocodiles, agamid and iguanid lizards, and humans. Two other lineages comprise the genus Ophidiomyces, with the species Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola occurring only in snakes, and Paranannizziopsis gen. nov., with three new species infecting squamates and tuataras. The newly described species are Nannizziopsis dermatitidis, Nannizziopsis crocodili, Nannizziopsis barbata, Nannizziopsis infrequens, Nannizziopsis hominis, Nannizziopsis obscura, Paranannizziopsis australasiensis, Paranannizziopsis californiensis, and Paranannizziopsis crustacea. Chrysosporium longisporum has been reclassified as Paranannizziopsis longispora. N. guarroi causes yellow fungus disease, a common infection in bearded dragons and green iguanas, and O. ophiodiicola is an emerging pathogen of captive and wild snakes. Human-associated species were not recovered from reptiles, and reptile-associated species were recovered only from reptiles, thereby mitigating concerns related to zoonosis. PMID:23926168

  18. Molecular characterization of reptile pathogens currently known as members of the chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii complex and relationship with some human-associated isolates.

    PubMed

    Sigler, Lynne; Hambleton, Sarah; Paré, Jean A

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the Chrysosporium anamorph of Nannizziopsis vriesii (CANV), Chrysosporium guarroi, Chrysosporium ophiodiicola, and Chrysosporium species have been reported as the causes of dermal or deep lesions in reptiles. These infections are contagious and often fatal and affect both captive and wild animals. Forty-nine CANV isolates from reptiles and six isolates from human sources were compared with N. vriesii based on their cultural characteristics and DNA sequence data. Analyses of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer and small subunit of the nuclear ribosomal gene revealed that the reptile pathogens and human isolates belong in well-supported clades corresponding to three lineages that are distinct from all other taxa within the family Onygenaceae of the order Onygenales. One lineage represents the genus Nannizziopsis and comprises N. vriesii, N. guarroi, and six additional species encompassing isolates from chameleons and geckos, crocodiles, agamid and iguanid lizards, and humans. Two other lineages comprise the genus Ophidiomyces, with the species Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola occurring only in snakes, and Paranannizziopsis gen. nov., with three new species infecting squamates and tuataras. The newly described species are Nannizziopsis dermatitidis, Nannizziopsis crocodili, Nannizziopsis barbata, Nannizziopsis infrequens, Nannizziopsis hominis, Nannizziopsis obscura, Paranannizziopsis australasiensis, Paranannizziopsis californiensis, and Paranannizziopsis crustacea. Chrysosporium longisporum has been reclassified as Paranannizziopsis longispora. N. guarroi causes yellow fungus disease, a common infection in bearded dragons and green iguanas, and O. ophiodiicola is an emerging pathogen of captive and wild snakes. Human-associated species were not recovered from reptiles, and reptile-associated species were recovered only from reptiles, thereby mitigating concerns related to zoonosis.

  19. Multigene Assessment of the Species Boundaries and Sexual Status of the Basidiomycetous Yeasts Cryptococcus flavescens and C. terrestris (Tremellales)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Lav; Carvalho, Cláudia; Fonseca, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus flavescens and C. terrestris are phenotypically indistinguishable sister species that belong to the order Tremellales (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota) and which may be mistaken for C. laurentii based on phenotype. Phylogenetic separation between C. flavescens and C. terrestris was based on rDNA sequence analyses, but very little is known on their intraspecific genetic variability or propensity for sexual reproduction. We studied 59 strains from different substrates and geographic locations, and used a multilocus sequencing (MLS) approach complemented with the sequencing of mating type (MAT) genes to assess genetic variation and reexamine the boundaries of the two species, as well as their sexual status. The following five loci were chosen for MLS: the rDNA ITS-LSU region, the rDNA IGS1 spacer, and fragments of the genes encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB1), the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1) and the p21-activated protein kinase (STE20). Phylogenetic network analyses confirmed the genetic separation of the two species and revealed two additional cryptic species, for which the names Cryptococcus baii and C. ruineniae are proposed. Further analyses of the data revealed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity within C. flavescens as well as evidence for recombination between lineages detected for this species. Strains of C. terrestris displayed higher levels of similarity in all analysed genes and appear to make up a single recombining group. The two MAT genes (STE3 and SXI1/SXI2) sequenced for C. flavescens strains confirmed the potential for sexual reproduction and suggest the presence of a tetrapolar mating system with a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus and a multiallelic HD locus. In C. terrestris we could only sequence STE3, which revealed a biallelic P/R locus. In spite of the strong evidence for sexual recombination in the two species, attempts at mating compatible strains of both species on culture media were

  20. Nomenclatural realignment of Neotyphodium species with genus Epichloe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nomenclatural rule changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants made at the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 require that a single name is used for all fungi. Since the anamorphic stages of Epichloë species have been classified i...

  1. Observations on Neobarya, including new species and new combinations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New combinations and new species are proposed in Neobarya: N. aurantiaca comb. nov., N. byssicola comb. nov., N. lichenicola comb. nov., N. lutea sp. nov., N. peltigerae sp. nov., N. xylariicola sp. nov. Neobarya agaricicola, and N. parasitica are redescribed. Anamorphs associated with N. agaricico...

  2. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  3. Anamorphic imaging at high-NA EUV: mask error factor and interaction between demagnification and lithographic metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiglieri, Gerardo; Last, Thorsten; Colina, Alberto; van Setten, Eelco; Rispens, Gijsbert; van Schoot, Jan; van Ingen Schenau, Koen

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents some of the main imaging properties introduced with the design of a possible new EUV High-NA (NA > 0.5) exposure system with anamorphic projection lens, a concept not new in optics but applied for the first time in semiconductor lithography. The system is projected to use a demagnification of 4 in the X-direction and of 8 in the Y-direction. We show that a new definition of the Mask Error Factor needs to be used in order to describe correctly the property introduced by the anamorphic optics. Moreover, for both 1-Dimensional (1D) and 2-Dimensional (2D) features the reticle writing error in the low demagnification direction X is more critical than the error in high demagnification direction Y. The effects of the change in demagnification on imaging are described on an elementary case, and are ultimately linked to the basic physical phenomenon of diffraction.

  4. Mycosphaerella species associated with Eucalyptus in south-western Australia: new species, new records and a key.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Aaron; Dell, Bernie; Neumeister-Kemp, Heike G; St J Hardy, Giles E

    2003-03-01

    Mycosphaerella ambiphylla sp. nov. (anamorph: Phaeophleospora) and Mycosphaerella aurantia sp. nov., are described from diseased Eucalyptus globulus leaves. In addition, a new fungal record in Australia, M. mexicana, and two new records for Western Australia, M. gregaria and M. parva, are discussed. A key is provided to Mycosphaerella species on E. globulus in Western Australia.

  5. Molecular and Genetic Evidence for a Tetrapolar Mating System in the Basidiomycetous Yeast Kwoniella mangrovensis and Two Novel Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Marco A.; Springer, Deborah J.; Rodrigues, Joana A.; Rusche, Laura N.; Findley, Keisha; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Kwoniella mangrovensis has been described as a sexual species with a bipolar mating system. Phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes places this species together with Kwoniella heveanensis in the Kwoniella clade, a sister clade to that containing two pathogenic species of global importance, Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, within the Tremellales. Recent studies defining the mating type loci (MAT) of species in these clades showed that, with the exception of C. neoformans and C. gattii, which are bipolar with a single biallelic multigene MAT locus, several other species feature a tetrapolar mating system with two unlinked loci (homeodomain [HD] and pheromone/receptor [P/R] loci). We characterized several strains from the original study describing K. mangrovensis; two MAT regions were amplified and sequenced: the STE20 gene (P/R locus) and the divergently transcribed SXI1 and SXI2 genes (HD locus). We identified five different mating types with different STE20/SXI allele combinations that together with results of mating experiments demonstrate that K. mangrovensis is not bipolar but instead has a tetrapolar mating system. Sequence and gene analysis for a 43-kb segment of the K. mangrovensis type strain MAT locus revealed remarkable synteny with the homologous K. heveanensis MAT P/R region, providing new insights into slower evolution of MAT loci in the Kwoniella compared to the Cryptococcus clade of the Tremellales. The study of additional isolates from plant substrates in Europe and Botswana using a combination of multilocus sequencing with MAT gene analysis revealed two novel sibling species that we name Kwoniella europaea and Kwoniella botswanensis and which appear to also have tetrapolar mating systems. PMID:23524993

  6. Evolutionary History of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    2014-06-06

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comparison of these with several other previously published yeast genomes have added increased confidence to the phylogenetic positions of previously poorly placed species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that yeasts with alternative nuclear codon usage where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes with Lipomyces starkeyi and the previously published Pneumocystis jirovecii being notable exceptions. Intron analysis suggests that early diverging species have more introns. We also observed a large number of unclassified lineage specific non-simple repeats in these genomes.

  7. Derxomyces amylogenes sp. nov., Derxomyces bambusicola sp. nov. and Derxomyces corylopsis sp. nov., three ballistoconidium-forming yeast species isolated from subtropical plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Zhan; Wang, Qi-Ming; Boekhout, Teun; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2012-04-01

    Among ballistoconidium-forming yeast strains isolated from various plant leaves collected from subtropical forests in eastern and central China, four strains forming cream to yellowish coloured colonies were revealed to represent three novel Derxomyces species by conventional and molecular characterization. Phylogenetic analysis based on combined sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain showed that strains GT-753 and ZJJ-890T were conspecific and closely related to Derxomyces boninensis, Derxomyces mrakii and Derxomyces qinlingensis. Strain ZJJ-394T was basal to the branch formed by Derxomyces komagatae, Derxomyces pseudoschimicola and Derxomyces schimicola with strong bootstrap support. Strain GT-475T was closely related to Derxomyces linzhiensis. The strains differed significantly from their close relatives in D1/D2 and ITS sequences and in physiological criteria. Three novel species are proposed: Derxomyces amylogenes sp. nov. (type strain ZJJ-890T=CGMCC 2.4407T=CBS 12233T), Derxomyces bambusicola sp. nov. (type strain GT-475T=CGMCC 2.4411T=CBS 12234T) and Derxomyces corylopsis sp. nov. (type strain ZJJ-394T=CGMCC 2.4409T=CBS 12259T).

  8. The effect of radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the structural and functional properties of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH).

    PubMed

    Rodacka, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    To determine the mechanism underlying oxidative modifications caused by radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elucidate their effect on the structure and function of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), a zinc-containing protein. YADH was exposed to water radiolysis products in an air atmosphere. YADH oxidation products were determined by spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods. The extent to which oxidative modifications affected enzyme activity was also studied. Water radiolysis products oxidized thiol groups leading to the release of zinc ions and the destruction of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. Those processes were accompanied by alterations in protein structure such as increased surface hydrophobicity, greater tryptophan accessibility to acrylamide, and changes in the secondary structure. Structural modifications were correlated with lower enzyme activity. During the process of functional and structural changes in YADH exposed to reactive oxygen species, a key part is the oxidation of cysteine residues attached to zinc and the release of zinc ions from the molecule. It may be assumed that ROS induce similar changes in many other zinc-containing proteins.

  9. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  10. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster.

  11. Ribosomal DNA sequence polymorphism and the delineation of two ascosporic yeast species: Metschnikowia agaves and Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Marc-André; Wijayanayaka, Tishara M; Bundus, Joanna D; Wijayanayaka, Dilini N

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between mating success and sequence divergence in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)/5.8S-D1/D2 rDNA region was examined in isolates tentatively assigned to Metschnikowia agaves and Starmerella bombicola. Both species are haplontic and heterothallic, such that the formation of mature asci can be used as a measure of genetic compatibility. Parsimony haplotype network analysis and mating success confirmed that all known isolates of M. agaves are conspecific. The previously reported D1/D2 polymorphism of five substitutions was not corroborated; the maximum divergence observed between any two strains was three substitutions, four with ITS. Of 39 putative S. bombicola strains, 36 formed an ITS-D1/D2 haplotype network using the 95% criterion. Thirty-five strains could mate with one or more compatible partner. The excluded strains did not mate. Mature asci arose from crosses between individuals differing by as many as five, but not six or seven substitutions in the D1/D2 domain. All strains capable of mating formed mature asci with at least one partner and all network members could be linked to another member by three or fewer substitutions. These results support the use of sequence divergence as a criterion for species delineation, but caution against describing poorly sampled species solely on the basis of that criterion.

  12. A new species of Hydropisphaera, H. bambusicola, is the sexual state of Gliomastix fusigera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Hydropisphaera, H. bambusicola sp. nov., is described and illustrated based on a collection from Bambusa vulgaris in Martinique. The asexual state was obtained in culture and identified as Gliomastix fusigera. Gliomastix fusigera is an anamorph species that occurs on members of the ...

  13. The Production of Reactive Oxygen Species Is a Universal Action Mechanism of Amphotericin B against Pathogenic Yeasts and Contributes to the Fungicidal Effect of This Drug

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Román, Elvira; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique; Argüelles, Juan Carlos; Pla, Jesús; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB) is an antifungal drug that binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, causing the loss of ions. In addition, AMB induces the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and although these molecules have multiple deleterious effects on fungal cells, their specific role in the action mechanism of AMB remains unknown. In this work, we studied the role of ROS in the action mechanism of AMB. We determined the intracellular induction of ROS in 44 isolates of different pathogenic yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii). We also characterized the production of ROS in AMB-resistant isolates. We found that AMB induces the formation of ROS in all the species tested. The inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by rotenone blocked the induction of ROS by AMB and provided protection from the killing action of the antifungal. Moreover, this phenomenon was absent in strains that displayed resistance to AMB. These strains showed an alteration in the respiration rate and mitochondrial membrane potential and also had higher catalase activity than that of the AMB-susceptible strains. Consistently, AMB failed to induce protein carbonylation in the resistant strains. Our data demonstrate that the production of ROS by AMB is a universal and important action mechanism that is correlated with the fungicidal effect and might explain the low rate of resistance to the molecule. Finally, these data provide an opportunity to design new strategies to improve the efficacy of this antifungal. PMID:25155595

  14. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  15. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  16. Yno1p/Aim14p, a NADPH-oxidase ortholog, controls extramitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, apoptosis, and actin cable formation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Büttner, Sabrina; Laun, Peter; Heeren, Gino; Felder, Thomas K.; Klinger, Harald; Weinberger, Martin; Stolze, Klaus; Grousl, Tomas; Hasek, Jiri; Benada, Oldrich; Frydlova, Ivana; Klocker, Andrea; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Jansko, Bettina; Breitenbach-Koller, Hannelore; Eisenberg, Tobias; Gourlay, Campbell W.; Madeo, Frank; Burhans, William C.; Breitenbach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The large protein superfamily of NADPH oxidases (NOX enzymes) is found in members of all eukaryotic kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi, and protists. The physiological functions of these NOX enzymes range from defense to specialized oxidative biosynthesis and to signaling. In filamentous fungi, NOX enzymes are involved in signaling cell differentiation, in particular in the formation of fruiting bodies. On the basis of bioinformatics analysis, until now it was believed that the genomes of unicellular fungi like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe do not harbor genes coding for NOX enzymes. Nevertheless, the genome of S. cerevisiae contains nine ORFs showing sequence similarity to the catalytic subunits of mammalian NOX enzymes, only some of which have been functionally assigned as ferric reductases involved in iron ion transport. Here we show that one of the nine ORFs (YGL160W, AIM14) encodes a genuine NADPH oxidase, which is located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and produces superoxide in a NADPH-dependent fashion. We renamed this ORF YNO1 (yeast NADPH oxidase 1). Overexpression of YNO1 causes YCA1-dependent apoptosis, whereas deletion of the gene makes cells less sensitive to apoptotic stimuli. Several independent lines of evidence point to regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by Yno1p. PMID:22586098

  17. Gene order in a 10 275 bp fragment of Yarrowia lipolytica, including adjacent YlURA5 and YlSEC65 genes conserved in four yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M; Domínguez, A

    2001-06-30

    We have determined the sequence of a 10275 bp DNA segment of Yarrowia lipolytica located on chromosome VI. The sequence contains six complete open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids and two more partial ORFs at both ends. Two of the ORFs encode for the well-characterized genes YlURA5 (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase) and YlSEC65 (encoding a subunit of the signal recognition particle). These two genes show an identical organization-located on opposite strands and in opposite orientations-in four yeast species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis, Candida albicans and Y. lipolytica. One ORF and the two partial ORFs code for putative proteins showing significant homology with proteins from other organisms. YlVI-108w (partial) and YlVI-103w show 39% and 54% identity, respectively, with YDR430c and YHR088w from S. cerevisiae. YlVI-102c (partial) shows significant homology with a matrix protein, lustrin A from Haliotis rufescens, and with the PGRS subfamily (Gly-rich proteins) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The three remaining ORFs show weak or non-significant homology with previously sequenced genes. The nucleotide sequence has been submitted to the EMBL database under Accession No. AI006754.

  18. Implications of Planck2015 for inflationary, ekpyrotic and anamorphic bouncing cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-02-01

    The results from Planck2015, when combined with earlier observations from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, Atacama Cosmology Telescope, South Pole Telescope and other experiments, were the first observations to disfavor the ‘classic’ inflationary paradigm. To satisfy the observational constraints, inflationary theorists have been forced to consider plateau-like inflaton potentials that introduce more parameters and more fine-tuning, problematic initial conditions, multiverse-unpredictability issues, and a new ‘unlikeliness problem’. Some propose turning instead to a ‘postmodern’ inflationary paradigm in which the cosmological properties in our observable Universe are only locally valid and set randomly, with completely different properties (and perhaps even different physical laws) existing in most regions outside our horizon. By contrast, the new results are consistent with the simplest versions of ekpyrotic cyclic models in which the Universe is smoothed and flattened during a period of slow contraction followed by a bounce, and another promising bouncing theory, anamorphic cosmology, has been proposed that can produce distinctive predictions.

  19. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  20. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Roots of classical yeast genetics go back to the early work of Lindegreen in the 1930s, who studied thallism, sporulation and inheritance of wine yeast strains belonging to S. cerevisiae. Consequent mutation and hybridization of heterothallic S. cerevisae strains resulted in the discovery of life cycle and mating type system, as well as construction of the genetic map. Elaboration of induced mutation and controlled hybridization of yeast strains opened up new possibilities for the genetic analysis of technologically important properties and for the production of improved industrial strains, but a big drawback was the widely different genetic properties of laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Genetic analysis and mapping of industrial strains were generally hindered because of homothallism, poor sporulation and/or low spore viability of brewing and wine yeast strains [1, 2]. In spite of this, there are a few examples of the application of sexual hybridization in the study of genetic control of important technological properties, e.g. sugar utilization, flocculation and flavor production in brewing yeast strains [3] or in the improvement of ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains [4]. Rare mating and application of karyogamy deficient (kar-) mutants also proved useful in strain improvement [5]. Importance of yeasts in biotechnology is enormous. This includes food and beverage fermentation processes where a wide range of yeast species are playing role, but S. cerevisiae is undoubtedly the most important species among them. New biotechnology is aiming to improve these technologies, but besides this, a completely new area of yeast utilization has been emerged, especially in the pharmaceutical and medical areas. Without decreasing the importance of S. cerevisiae, numerous other yeast species, e.g. Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing potentialities in the modern

  1. The diversity of ant-associated black yeasts: insights into a newly discovered world of symbiotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Voglmayr, Hermann; Mayer, Veronika; Maschwitz, Ulrich; Moog, Joachim; Djieto-Lordon, Champlain; Blatrix, Rumsaïs

    2011-10-01

    Based on pure culture studies and DNA phylogenetic analyses, black yeasts (Chaetothyriales, Ascomycota) are shown to be widely distributed and important components of numerous plant-ant-fungus networks, independently acquired by several ant lineages in the Old and New World. Data from ITS and LSU nu rDNA demonstrate that a high biodiversity of fungal species is involved. There are two common ant-fungus symbioses involving black yeasts: (1) on the carton walls of ant nests and galleries, and (2) the fungal mats growing within non-pathogenic naturally hollow structures (so-called domatia) provided by myrmecophytic plants as nesting space for ants (ant-plant symbiosis). Most carton- and domatia-inhabiting fungi stem from different phylogenetic lineages within Chaetothyriales, and almost all of the fungi isolated are still undescribed. Despite being closely related, carton and domatia fungi are shown to differ markedly in their morphology and ecology, indicating that they play different roles in these associations. The carton fungi appear to improve the stability of the carton, and several species are commonly observed to co-occur on the same carton. Carton fungi commonly have dark-walled monilioid hyphae, colouring the carton blackish and apparently preventing other fungi from invading the carton. Despite the simultaneous presence of usually several species of fungi, forming complex associations on the carton, little overlap is observed between carton fungi from different ant species, even those that co-occur in nature, indicating at least some host specificity of fungi. Most fungi present on carton belong to Chaetothyriales, but in a few samples, Capnodiales are also an important component. Carton fungi are difficult to assign to anamorph genera, as most lack conidiation. The domatia fungi are more specific. In domatia, usually only one or two fungal species co-occur, producing a dense layer on living host plant tissue in domatia. They have hyaline or light brown

  2. Ogataea chonburiensis sp. nov. and Ogataea nakhonphanomensis sp. nov., thermotolerant, methylotrophic yeast species isolated in Thailand, and transfer of Pichia siamensis and Pichia thermomethanolica to the genus Ogataea.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Srisuk, Nantana; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nakase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Two thermotolerant, methylotrophic yeast strains, PT44(T) and S051(T), were respectively isolated from a tree exudate and soil collected in Thailand. They were categorized as thermotolerant strains on the basis of their good growth below 20 degrees C and up to a relatively high temperature (37 degrees C). The major characteristics of the two strains that place them in the genus Ogataea are the formation of four helmet- or hat-shaped ascospores in a deliquescent ascus that may be produced parthenogenetically or by conjugation between a cell and its bud or between independent cells; multilateral budding; assimilation of nitrate; the presence of ubiquinone Q7; negative for Diazonium blue B colour and urease reactions; and the absence of arthroconidia and ballistoconidia. Analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rDNA sequence revealed that strain PT44(T) was differentiated from the strain S051(T) by 25 nucleotide substitutions and 1 gap in 554 nt, which was sufficient to justify the description of two separate species. The closest recognized species in terms of pairwise sequences similarity to PT44(T) was Pichia (Ogataea) dorogensis, with 13 nucleotide substitutions and 1 gap in 554 nt. Strain S051(T) was closest to Pichia thermomethanolica, with 7 nucleotide substitutions in 566 nt. Phenotypic characteristics of strains PT44(T) and S051(T) allowed them to be differentiated from each other and from the closest related species. On the basis of the above finding, the two strains represent two novel species of the genus Ogataea, for which the names Ogataea chonburiensis sp. nov. (type strain PT44(T) =BCC 21227(T) =NBRC 101965(T) =CBS 10363(T)) and Ogataea nakhonphanomensis sp. nov. (type strain S051(T) =BCC 21228(T) =NBRC 101966(T) =CBS 10362(T)) are proposed. We also propose the transfer of two thermotolerant methylotrophic members of the genus Pichia described previously to the genus Ogataea: Pichia siamensis is renamed Ogataea siamensis (Limtong, Srisuk

  3. [Association of yeasts of the Cryptococcus genus with Eucalyptus species in Santafé de Bogotá].

    PubMed

    Duarte, A; Ordoñez, N; Castañeda, E

    1994-01-01

    Environmental isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii was first made in Australia in 1989 by ELLIS. He established a specific association with the tree species Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. tereticornis. Based on his findings, ELLIS proposed that the fungus could be exported from Australia to others regions, including Colombia, by means of infected seeds. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify Cryptococcus sp., associated with Eucalyptus trees; this is the first ecological evaluation of C. neoformans var. gattii in our country. A total of 100 Eucalyptus trees, distributed among 13 zones, located in the center, northeast, east and west of Santafé de Bogotá, were studied. Flowers, fruits, leaves, barks and Eucalyptus debris were collected. The samples were processed by extraction with saline solution containing antibiotics, cultured in selective media and the isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical characterístics. Twenty-seven isolates of 9 Cryptococcus sp. were recovered from 21 Eucalyptus trees, from 5 zones. One C. neoformans var. neoformans serotype A was recovered. The Cryptococcus associated with Eucalyptus is important because this is the first study done in our country.

  4. Kodamaea transpacifica f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from ephemeral flowers and insects in the Galapagos Islands and Malaysia: further evidence for ancient human transpacific contacts.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Larissa F D; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Barahona, Patricia Portero; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-11-01

    Twenty-four yeast strains were isolated from ephemeral flowers of Ipomoea spp. and Datura sp. and their associated insects in the Galápagos Archipelago, Ecuador, and from Ipomoea spp. and associated insects in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. Sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene indicated that these strains belong to a novel yeast species of the Kodamaea clade, although the formation of ascospores was not observed. The closest relative is Candida restingae. The human-mediated dispersion of this species by transpacific contacts in ancient times is suggested. The name Kodamaea transpacifica f.a., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is CLQCA-24i-070(T) ( = CBS 12823(T) = NCYC 3852(T)); MycoBank number MB 803609.

  5. Yeasts vectored by migratory birds collected in the Mediterranean island of Ustica and description of Phaffomyces usticensis f.a. sp. nov., a new species related to the cactus ecoclade.

    PubMed

    Francesca, Nicola; Carvalho, Cláudia; Sannino, Ciro; Guerreiro, Marco A; Almeida, Pedro M; Settanni, Luca; Massa, Bruno; Sampaio, José P; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-09-01

    Nine yeast species belonging to genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Phaffomyces, Rhodotorula and Wickerhamomyces, and one species of Aureobasidium genus were isolated from the cloaca of migratory birds. Candida glabrata and C. inconspicua were the species most frequently isolated and Wickerhamomyces sylviae, which has recently been described as a new species isolated from bird cloaca, was again found. The majority of isolates showed the ability to grow up to 40 °C and/or at pH 3.0, two environmental conditions typical of the digestive tract of birds. The phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rRNA gene placed the cultures of Phaffomyces in a new lineage that differed from the closest species, P. opuntiae, by 13 nucleotide substitutions. The new species was able to grow at 40 °C and at pH 2.5, which suggests a possible adaptation to the bird cloaca. Moreover, the ability to grow in the presence of digitonin at pH 3.7 and the assimilation of ethyl acetate indicates a potential cactophilic origin. For the first time, the presence of yeasts belonging to the Phaffomyces clade in Europe and also in non-cactus environments is reported. The new species is formally described as P. usticensis sp. nov. (PYCC 6346(T) = CBS 12958(T)). © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Geographical differences in human oral yeast flora.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping; Mitchell, Thomas G

    2003-01-15

    The oral yeast flora of healthy humans from eastern North America and China were sampled and compared. Chinese persons harbored a greater number and diversity of yeast species in the mouth. Furthermore, Candida albicans, which is the predominant commensal and etiologic species of candidiasis in Europe and the Western Hemisphere, was relatively rare in China.

  7. Genetic diversity of Dekkera bruxellensis yeasts isolated from Australian wineries.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Chris D; Bellon, Jennifer R; Henschke, Paul A; Godden, Peter W; de Barros Lopes, Miguel A

    2007-05-01

    Yeasts of the genus Dekkera and its anamorph Brettanomyces represent a significant spoilage issue for the global wine industry. Despite this, there is limited knowledge of genetic diversity and strain distribution within wine and winery-related environments. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was conducted on 244 Dekkera bruxellensis isolates from red wine made in 31 winemaking regions of Australia. The results indicated there were eight genotypes among the isolates, and three of these were commonly found across multiple winemaking regions. Analysis of 26S rRNA gene sequences provided further evidence of three common, conserved groups, whereas a phylogeny based upon the AFLP data demonstrated that the most common D. bruxellensis genotype (I) in Australian red wine was highly divergent from the D. bruxellensis type strain (CBS 74).

  8. An In-House Assay Is Superior to Sepsityper for Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeast Species in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bidart, Marie; Bonnet, Isabelle; Hennebique, Aurélie; Kherraf, Zine Eddine; Pelloux, Hervé; Berger, François; Cornet, Muriel; Bailly, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We developed an in-house assay for the direct identification, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, of yeasts in blood culture. Sixty-one representative strains from 12 species were analyzed in spiked blood cultures. Our assay accurately identified 95 of 107 (88.8%) positive blood cultures and outperformed the commercial Sepsityper kit (81.7% identification). PMID:25762771

  9. A Synopsis of the Taxonomic Revisions in the Genus Ceratocystis Including a Review of Blue-Staining Species Associated with Dendroctonus Bark Beetles

    Treesearch

    Thelma J. Perry

    1991-01-01

    Taxonomic revisions in both the teleomorphic (sexual) and anamorphic (asexual) forms of the genus Ceratocystis Ellis & Halstead are chronicled in this review. Recognized species associated with Dendroctonus Erichson bark beetles are summarized, and several species that have been published as recombinations, species that were...

  10. Comparison of the Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing Proposed Standard and the E-Test with the NCCLS Broth Microdilution Method for Voriconazole and Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing of Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chryssanthou, Erja; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    The proposed standard of the Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (AFST-EUCAST) and the E-test procedures were compared with the NCCLS reference broth microdilution method for voriconazole and caspofungin susceptibility testing of 102 clinical Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates. The voriconazole MIC at which 50% of strains were inhibited (MIC50) was ≤0.125 mg/liter for all yeast species except for Candida glabrata and Candida krusei, which yielded MIC50 values of 0.25 to 1 mg/liter depending on the method. Caspofungin exhibited in vitro activity (MIC50 of ≤0.125 to 2 mg/liter) against all yeast species except for Candida guilliermondii. The agreements between MICs within ±2 dilutions obtained by the NCCLS method and the EUCAST standard were 97% for voriconazole and 96% for caspofungin. Intraclass correlation coefficients were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The agreements between voriconazole MICs provided by the E-test and the NCCLS and between the E-test and the AFST-EUCAST method were 100 and 90%, respectively. Because of lower caspofungin MICs provided by the E-test, the agreement was slightly poorer with the NCCLS method (89%) than with the AFST-EUCAST procedure (94%). Both the EUCAST and the E-test procedures can be reliable techniques for susceptibility testing of yeasts to voriconazole and caspofungin. PMID:12354895

  11. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  12. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Carlos M.; de Vega, Clara; Canto, Azucena; Pozo, María I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims One peculiarity of floral nectar that remains relatively unexplored from an ecological perspective is its role as a natural habitat for micro-organisms. This study assesses the frequency of occurrence and abundance of yeast cells in floral nectar of insect-pollinated plants from three contrasting plant communities on two continents. Possible correlations between interspecific differences in yeast incidence and pollinator composition are also explored. Methods The study was conducted at three widely separated areas, two in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and one in the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico). Floral nectar samples from 130 species (37–63 species per region) in 44 families were examined microscopically for the presence of yeast cells. For one of the Spanish sites, the relationship across species between incidence of yeasts in nectar and the proportion of flowers visited by each of five major pollinator categories was also investigated. Key Results Yeasts occurred regularly in the floral nectar of many species, where they sometimes reached extraordinary densities (up to 4 × 105 cells mm−3). Depending on the region, between 32 and 44 % of all nectar samples contained yeasts. Yeast cell densities in the order of 104 cells mm−3 were commonplace, and densities >105 cells mm−3 were not rare. About one-fifth of species at each site had mean yeast cell densities >104 cells mm−3. Across species, yeast frequency and abundance were directly correlated with the proportion of floral visits by bumble-bees, and inversely with the proportion of visits by solitary bees. Conclusions Incorporating nectar yeasts into the scenario of plant–pollinator interactions opens up a number of intriguing avenues for research. In addition, with yeasts being as ubiquitous and abundant in floral nectars as revealed by this study, and given their astounding metabolic versatility, studies focusing on nectar chemical features should carefully control for the presence

  13. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  14. Tropical species of Cladobotryum and Hypomyces producing red pigments

    PubMed Central

    Põldmaa, Kadri

    2011-01-01

    Twelve species of Hypomyces/Cladobotryum producing red pigments are reported growing in various tropical areas of the world. Ten of these are described as new, including teleomorphs for two previously known anamorphic species. In two species the teleomorph has been found in nature and in three others it was obtained in culture; only anamorphs are known for the rest. None of the studied tropical collections belongs to the common temperate species H. rosellus and H. odoratus to which the tropical teleomorphic collections had previously been assigned. Instead, taxa encountered in the tropics are genetically and morphologically distinct from the nine species of Hypomyces/Cladobotryum producing red pigments known from temperate regions. Besides observed host preferences, anamorphs of several species can spread fast on soft ephemeral agaricoid basidiomata but the slower developing teleomorphs are mostly found on polyporoid basidiomata or bark. While a majority of previous records from the tropics involve collections from Central America, this paper also reports the diversity of these fungi in the Paleotropics. Africa appears to hold a variety of taxa as five of the new species include material collected in scattered localities of this mostly unexplored continent. In examining distribution patterns, most of the taxa do not appear to be pantropical. Some species are known only from the Western Hemisphere, while others have a geographic range from southeastern Asia to Africa or Australia. The use of various morphological characters of anamorphs and teleomorphs as well as culture characteristics in species delimitation is evaluated. For detecting genetic segregation, partial sequences of the two largest subunits of the ribosomal polymerase perform the best in terms of providing informative sites and the number of well-supported groups recognised in the phylogenies. These are followed by the sequence data of the translation-elongation factor 1-alpha, while the ribosomal DNA

  15. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here.

  16. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history.

  17. Spathaspora brasiliensis sp. nov., Spathaspora suhii sp. nov., Spathaspora roraimanensis sp. nov. and Spathaspora xylofermentans sp. nov., four novel (D)-xylose-fermenting yeast species from Brazilian Amazonian forest.

    PubMed

    Cadete, Raquel M; Melo, Monaliza A; Zilli, Jerri E; Vital, Marcos J S; Mouro, Adriane; Prompt, Alice H; Gomes, Fátima C O; Stambuk, Boris U; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Four new D-xylose fermenting yeast species of the clade Spathaspora were recovered from rotting-wood samples in a region of Amazonian forest, Northern Brazil. Three species produced unconjugated asci with a single elongated ascospore with curved ends. These species are described as Spathaspora brasiliensis, Spathaspora suhii and Spathaspora roraimanensis. Two isolates of an asexually reproducing species belonging to the Spathaspora clade were also obtained and they are described as Spathaspora xylofermentans. All these species are able to ferment D-xylose during aerobic batch growth in rich YP (1 % yeast extract, 2 % peptone and 2 % D-xylose) medium, albeit with differing efficiencies. The type strains are Spathaspora brasiliensis sp. nov UFMG-HMD19.3 (=CBMAI 1425=CBS 12679), Spathaspora suhii sp. nov. UFMG-XMD16.2 (=CBMAI 1426=CBS 12680), Spathaspora roraimanensis sp. nov. UFMG-XMD23.2 (CBMAI 1427=CBS 12681) and Spathaspora xylofermentans sp. nov. UFMG-HMD23.3 (=CBMAI 1428=CBS 12682).

  18. [Yeast species in vulvovaginitis candidosa].

    PubMed

    Nemes-Nikodém, Éva; Tamási, Béla; Mihalik, Noémi; Ostorházi, Eszter

    2015-01-04

    Bevezetés: A leggyakoribb gombás megbetegedés a vulvovaginitis candidosa, de kevés információ áll rendelkezésre a kórokozók antimikrobiális érzékenységéről. Célkitűzés: A szerzők összehasonlítják a vulvovaginitis candidosából kitenyésztett sarjadzógomba-speciesek hagyományos, „gold standard” módszerrel és a Semmelweis Egyetemen bevezetésre került új molekuláris eljárással történő azonosítását. Módszer: Vulvovaginitis candidosából izolált 370 sarjadzógomba-tenyészet fenotipikus és Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight (MALDITOF) -módszerrel történő azonosítása. Eredmények: Leggyakoribb kórokozó a Candida albicans volt (85%), utána a Candida glabrata, majd egyéb Candida speciesek következtek. A MALDITOF-módszer segítségével azonosítható volt a hazánkban csak néhány esetben leírt flukonazolrezisztens Candida dubliniensis, és jól elkülöníthető volt a flukonazolérzékeny Candida albicanstól. Következtetések: Jelenleg nincs ajánlás a vulvovaginitisben előforduló patogén sarjadzó gombák antifungális érzékenységének értékelésére, csak a különböző speciesek természetes rezisztenciája ismert. Ezért lényeges a ritkább Candida speciesek felismerése és azonosítása is, amelyre elsősorban a MALDITOF-módszer alkalmas. Orv. Hetil., 2015, 156(1), 28–31.

  19. Yeasts colonizing the leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sláviková, Elena; Vadkertiová, Renata; Vránová, Dana

    2007-08-01

    The yeasts were isolated from the leaf surfaces of ten species of trees. The study site was a forest park (Zelezná Studnicka) of the Small Carpathians mountain range. One hundred and thirty seven yeast strains belonging to 13 genera were isolated from 320 samples of leaves and needles. Seventeen yeast species were isolated, but only seven occurred regularly: Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus laurentii, Pichia anomala, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomyces sp., Lachancea thermotolerans, and Rhodotorula glutinis. The remaining species were isolated from the leaves and needles of three or less tree species. A. pullulans, Cr. laurentii, and P. anomala were the most frequently found species and they occurred on leaves and needles of all ten tree species. Saccharomyces sp. occurred in leaf samples collected from eight kinds of trees. M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans were found in samples collected from six species of trees. Both these species occurred almost always on the leaves of deciduous trees. Rh. glutinis was the most frequently isolated carotenoids producing species. We have found out that the ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species were present in the leaf samples in approximately equal frequency, contrary to the soil samples taken from this forest park, where the ascomycetous species were found rarely.

  20. Evaluation of the Viabilities and Stabilities of Pathogenic Mold and Yeast Species Using Three Different Preservation Methods Over a 12-Year Period Along with a Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Karabıçak, Nilgün; Karatuna, Onur; Akyar, Işın

    2016-06-01

    Serious mycological work requires a reliable source of cultures that are maintained under safe long-term storage. In this study, 1186 clinical fungal isolates consisting of molds (20 species in 11 genera) and yeasts (21 species in seven genera) maintained in water, under mineral oil at room temperature and cryopreserved at -80 °C for periods ranging from 1 to 12 years, were evaluated for their viabilities and stabilities. The strains were subcultured onto either Sabouraud dextrose agar or potato dextrose agar to determine the viabilities and purities. The stabilities of the dermatophytes were investigated using urease test medium, the Trichophyton agar test and morphological examination. The stabilities of yeasts were evaluated by microscopic morphology and by determining the antifungal susceptibilities of random samples of yeasts (n = 120). Additionally, 365 strains (dermatophytes, n = 115; yeasts, n = 250) were further characterized by "matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry." After 12 years of preservation, the survival rates with the three different preservation techniques, i.e., in water, under mineral oil and by freezing, were assessed as 94.7, 82.0 and 97.4 %, respectively. Viability was generally unrelated to the duration of storage. More stable and consistent growth was achieved after storage in water and freezing compared with mineral oil preservation. Our results demonstrate that the procedure for maintaining fungal cultures in water is a simple and inexpensive method, next to cryopreservation, and that both can be reliably used for the long-term preservation of most fungal isolates.

  1. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  2. European species of Hypocrea Part I. The green-spored species

    PubMed Central

    Jaklitsch, Walter M.

    2009-01-01

    At present 75 species of Hypocrea have been identified in temperate Europe. Nineteen green-spored species and their Trichoderma asexual states are here described in detail. Extensive searches for Hypocrea teleomorphs in 14 European countries, with emphasis on Central Europe, yielded more than 620 specimens within five years. The morphology of fresh and dry stromata was studied. In addition, available types of species described from Europe were examined. Cultures were prepared from ascospores and used to study the morphology of cultures and anamorphs, to determine growth rates, and to extract DNA that was used for amplification and sequencing of three genetic markers. ITS was used for identification, while RNA polymerase II subunit b (rpb2) and translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef1) were analyzed for phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus. Several unexpected findings resulted from this project: 1) The previous view that only a small number of Trichoderma species form a teleomorph is erroneous. 2) All expectations concerning the number of species in Europe are by far exceeded. Seventy-five species of Hypocrea, two species of Protocrea, and Arachnocrea stipata, are herein identified in temperate Europe, based on the ITS identification routine using fresh material, on species described earlier without molecular data and on species recently described but not collected during this project. 3) Current data suggest that the biodiversity of Hypocrea / Trichoderma above soil exceeds the number of species isolated from soil. 4) The number of Trichoderma species forming hyaline conidia has been considered a small fraction. In Europe, 26 species of those forming teleomorphs produce hyaline conidia, while 42 green-conidial species are known. Three of the detected Hypocrea species do not form an anamorph in culture, while the anamorph is unknown in four species, because they have never been cultured. This work is a preliminary account of Hypocrea and their Trichoderma

  3. Comparative evaluation of 13 yeast species in the Yarrowia clade on lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate and genetic engineering of inhibitor tolerant strains for lipid and biofuel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast that has garnered interest for commercial production of single cell oil and other fatty acid-derived chemicals because of its GRAS status and genetic tractability. Three recent peer-reviewed studies have highlighted the possibility of lipid production by th...

  4. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of noncandidal yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion testing.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Bijie, H; Dzierzanowska, D; Klimko, N N; Letscher-Bru, V; Lisalova, M; Muehlethaler, K; Rennison, C; Zaidi, M

    2009-01-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results determined by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method for 11,240 isolates of noncandidal yeasts were collected from 134 study sites in 40 countries from June 1997 through December 2007. Data were collected for 8,717 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2007. A total of 22 different species/organism groups were isolated, of which Cryptococcus neoformans was the most common (31.2% of all isolates). Overall, Cryptococcus (32.9%), Saccharomyces (11.7%), Trichosporon (10.6%), and Rhodotorula (4.1%) were the most commonly identified genera. The overall percentages of isolates in each category (susceptible, susceptible dose dependent, and resistant) were 78.0%, 9.5%, and 12.5% and 92.7%, 2.3%, and 5.0% for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Less than 30% of fluconazole-resistant isolates of Cryptococcus spp., Cryptococcus albidus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Trichosporon beigelii/Trichosporon cutaneum, Rhodotorula spp., Rhodotorula rubra/Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Rhodotorula glutinis remained susceptible to voriconazole. Emerging resistance to fluconazole was documented among isolates of C. neoformans from the Asia-Pacific, Africa/Middle East, and Latin American regions but not among isolates from Europe or North America. This survey documents the continuing broad spectrum of activity of voriconazole against opportunistic yeast pathogens but identifies several of the less common species with decreased azole susceptibility. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and emphasize the importance of prompt and accurate species identification.

  5. Clinical and tree hollow populations of human pathogenic yeast in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada are different.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Chris; Yang, Jiaqi; Vogan, Aaron; Maganti, Harinad; Yamamura, Deborah; Xu, Jianping

    2014-05-01

    Yeast are among the most frequent pathogens in humans. The dominant yeast causing human infections belong to the genus Candida and Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species. However, several non-C. albicans species are becoming increasingly common in patients worldwide. The relationships between yeast in humans and the natural environments remain poorly understood. Furthermore, it is often difficult to identify or exclude the origins of disease-causing yeast from specific environmental reservoirs. In this study, we compared the yeast isolates from tree hollows and from clinics in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Our surveys and analyses showed significant differences in yeast species composition, in their temporal dynamics, and in yeast genotypes between isolates from tree hollows and hospitals. Our results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that yeast from trees constitute a significant source of pathogenic yeast in humans in this region. Similarly, the yeast in humans and clinics do not appear to contribute to yeast in tree hollows.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces japonicus: A Distinct Dimorphic Yeast Among the Fission Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Keita; Furuya, Kanji; Niki, Hironori

    2017-07-21

    Genomic sequencing data and morphological properties demonstrate evolutionary relationships among groups of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces Phylogenetically, S. japonicus is the furthest removed from other species of fission yeast. The basic characteristics of cell proliferation are shared among all fission yeast, including the process of binary fission during vegetative growth, conjugation and karyogamy with horsetail movement, mating-type switching, and sporulation. However, S. japonicus also exhibits characteristics that are unique to filamentous fungi. S. japonicus is a nonpathogenic yeast that exhibits dimorphism. Depending on the environmental conditions, S. japonicus transforms from yeast cells into filamentous cells (hyphae), and blue light triggers synchronous septation of hyphal cells. A rough version of the whole-genome sequence is now available, facilitating genetic manipulation of S. japonicus. Furthermore, the extensive genetic knowledge available for S. pombe is aiding the development of genetic tools for analyzing S. japonicus. S. japonicus will help shed light on the evolutionary relationships among the fission yeast. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Five novel Wickerhamomyces- and Metschnikowia-related yeast species, Wickerhamomyces chaumierensis sp. nov., Candida pseudoflosculorum sp. nov., Candida danieliae sp. nov., Candida robnettiae sp. nov. and Candida eppingiae sp. nov., isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Marizeth; Robert, Vincent; Smith, Maudy Th

    2011-08-01

    On the basis of nucleotide divergences in the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) domain of the rRNA gene, five novel yeast species, Wickerhamomyces chaumierensis sp. nov. (CBS 8565(T)  = JCM 17246(T)), Candida pseudoflosculorum sp. nov. (CBS 8584(T)  = JCM 17242(T)), Candida danieliae sp. nov. (CBS 8533(T)  = JCM 17247(T)), Candida robnettiae sp. nov. (CBS 8580(T)  = JCM 17243(T)) and Candida eppingiae sp. nov. (CBS 8586(T)  = JCM 17241(T)), isolated from plants in Thailand and Guyana, are proposed in this study.

  8. Anthracnose disease of centipedegrass turf caused by Colletotrichum eremochloae, a new fungal species closely related to Colletotrichum sublineola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Colletotrichum is a cosmopolitan anamorphic fungal genus responsible for anthracnose disease in hundreds of plant species worldwide, including members of the grass family Poaceae. Anthracnose disease of the widely planted, non-native, warm-season lawn grass, Eremochloa ophiuroides (centipedegrass),...

  9. Yeast and yeast-like diversity in the southernmost glacier of Europe (Calderone Glacier, Apennines, Italy).

    PubMed

    Branda, Eva; Turchetti, Benedetta; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Pecci, Massimo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Buzzini, Pietro

    2010-06-01

    The present study reports the characterization of psychrophilic yeast and yeast-like diversity in cold habitats (superficial and deep sediments, ice cores and meltwaters) of the Calderone Glacier (Italy), which is the southernmost glacier in Europe. After incubation at 4 and 20 degrees C, sediments contained about 10(2)-10(3) CFU of yeasts g(-1). The number of viable yeast cells in ice and meltwaters was several orders of magnitude lower. The concomitant presence of viable bacteria and filamentous fungi has also been observed. In all, 257 yeast strains were isolated and identified by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers (1 and 2) sequencing as belonging to 28 ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species of 11 genera (Candida, Cystofilobasidium, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Erythrobasidium, Guehomyces, Mastigobasidium, Mrakia, Mrakiella, Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces). Among them, the species Cryptococcus gastricus accounted for almost 40% of the total isolates. In addition, 12 strains were identified as belonging to the yeast-like species Aureobasidium pullulans and Exophiala dermatitidis, whereas 15 strains, presumably belonging to new species, yet to be described, were also isolated. Results herein reported indicate that the Calderone Glacier, although currently considered a vanishing ice body due to the ongoing global-warming phenomenon, still harbors viable psychrophilic yeast populations. Differences of yeast and yeast-like diversity between the glacier under study and other worldwide cold habitats are also discussed.

  10. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  11. Marine yeasts-a review.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Sreedevi N; Philip, Rosamma

    2008-07-01

    Yeasts are ubiquitous in their distribution and populations mainly depend on the type and concentration of organic materials. The distribution of species, as well as their numbers and metabolic characteristics were found to be governed by existing environmental conditions. Marine yeasts were first discovered from the Atlantic Ocean and following this discovery, yeasts were isolated from different sources, viz. seawater, marine deposits, seaweeds, fish, marine mammals and sea birds. Near-shore environments are usually inhabited by tens to thousands of cells per litre of water, whereas low organic surface to deep-sea oceanic regions contain 10 or fewer cells/litre. Aerobic forms are found more in clean waters and fermentative forms in polluted waters. Yeasts are more abundant in silty muds than in sandy sediments. The isolation frequency of yeasts fell as the depth of the sampling site is increased. Major genera isolated in this study were Candida, Cryptococcus, Debaryomyces and Rhodotorula. For biomass estimation ergosterol method was used. Classification and identification of yeasts were performed using different criteria, i.e. morphology, sexual reproduction and physiological/biochemical characteristics. Fatty acid profiling or molecular sequencing of the IGS and ITS regions and 28S gene rDNA ensured accurate identification. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Comparison of antifungal activities of gentian violet and povidone-iodine against clinical isolates of Candida species and other yeasts: a framework to establish topical disinfectant activities.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shigemi; Tabe, Yoko; Yamada, Toshihiko; Misawa, Shigeki; Oguri, Toyoko; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Miida, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated antifungal activity as assessed by the contact time in topical use of gentian violet (GV) and povidone-iodine (PI) against Candida strains. A total of 102 yeast isolates were used in this study. A markedly lower minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)(90) of GV than of PI was detected for all yeast isolates. No remarkable difference in the MICs was observed among the identical strains isolated from different clinical sites for both GV and PI. Although the minimal fungicidal activities (MFCs) of PI were identical for all tested time points, the fungicidal activity of GV decreased during the time course of incubation. These results indicate that, whereas GV is more effective than PI, the topical disinfectant efficacy of GV should be estimated using the MFC(5 min) and not the MIC or the MFC(24 h) for overall prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections and oral infections.

  13. Vertical viewing angle enhancement for the 360  degree integral-floating display using an anamorphic optic system.

    PubMed

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Yoo, Kwan-Hee; Baasantseren, Ganbat; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Eun-Soo; Kim, Nam

    2014-04-15

    We propose a 360 degree integral-floating display with an enhanced vertical viewing angle. The system projects two-dimensional elemental image arrays via a high-speed digital micromirror device projector and reconstructs them into 3D perspectives with a lens array. Double floating lenses relate initial 3D perspectives to the center of a vertically curved convex mirror. The anamorphic optic system tailors the initial 3D perspectives horizontally and vertically disperse light rays more widely. By the proposed method, the entire 3D image provides both monocular and binocular depth cues, a full-parallax demonstration with high-angular ray density and an enhanced vertical viewing angle.

  14. An anamorph of the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta capable of colonizing and degrading compact disc components.

    PubMed

    Romero, Elvira; Speranza, Mariela; García-Guinea, Javier; Martínez, Angel T; Martínez, María Jesús

    2007-10-01

    A Geotrichum-like fungus isolated from a biodeteriorated compact disc (CD) was able to degrade in vitro the components of different CD types. The fungal hyphae inside the CD fragments grew through the aluminium layer and produced the solubilization of this metal. Furthermore, examination of CDs by scanning electron microscopy showed that the fungus was able to destroy the pits and lands structures grooved in the polycarbonate layer, confirming degradation of this aromatic polymer. The fungus secretes aryl-alcohol oxidase and Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase, two kinds