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Sample records for anaphylatoxin c3a induced

  1. Anaphylatoxin C3a induced mediator release from mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herrscher, R.; Hugli, T.E.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the biochemical and functional consequences of the binding of highly purified human C3a to isolated rat serosal mast cells. C3a caused a dose-dependent (1-30 ..mu..M), noncytotoxic release of up to 64% (+/- 7 SEM) of the mast cell histamine content. C3a (10..mu..M) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake 8.2- fold (+/- 2.2 SEM) above unstimulated control values within 10 minutes. Arachidonyl-diacylglycerol and arachidonyl-monoacylglycerol levels increased significantly within 2 minutes after C3a (10 ..mu..M) stimulation. Turnover of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine were increased within 15 minutes. In contrast to antigen, C3a stimulation (10 ..mu..M) was not enhanced by exogenous phosphatidylserine, and was not inhibited by ethanol (100 ..mu..mM). C3a suppressed arachidonic acid (AA) release to 38% (+/- 9 SEM) below baseline, and did not cause PGD/sub 2/ formation. C3a and the desarginine form of C3a caused identical responses in all experiments. These studies indicate that C3a stimulation activates mast cell preformed mediator release in a manner very similar to antigen-IgE stimulation, but C3a suppresses free AA levels and does not stimulate PGD/sub 2/ synthesis.

  2. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  3. The complement anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR) contributes to the inflammatory response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wende, Elisabeth; Laudeley, Robert; Bleich, André; Bleich, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A; Glage, Silke; Klos, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are a critical public health issue, and as treatment options remain limited, there is a need to unravel the underlying pathomechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets. Complement activation was found in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease, and the complement anaphylatoxin C5a and its receptor C5aR have been implicated in disease pathogenesis in animal models of bowel inflammation. To further characterize complement-related pathomechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease, we have investigated the role of the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor in acute dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. For this, colitis was induced in C3a receptor-deficient BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, and disease severity was evaluated by clinical and histological examination, and by measuring the mRNA expression or protein levels of inflammatory mediators in the tissue. C3a receptor deficiency was partially protective in BALB/c mice, which had significantly reduced weight loss, clinical and histological scores, colon shortening, and CXCL-1/KC mRNA, myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6 tissue levels compared to the corresponding wild type mice. In C57BL/6 mice the differences between wild type and C3a receptor-deficient animals were much smaller and reached no significance. Our data demonstrate that the contribution of C3a receptor to disease pathogenesis and severity of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice depends on the genetic background. Further studies will be required to clarify whether targeting of C3a receptor, possibly in combination with C5a receptor, might be considered as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. The receptor for the complement C3a anaphylatoxin (C3aR) provides host protection against Listeria monocytogenes-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Morales, John E; Wetsel, Rick A

    2014-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium that is acquired through tainted food and may lead to systemic infection and possible death. Despite the importance of the innate immune system in fighting L. monocytogenes infection, little is known about the role of complement and its activation products, including the potent C3a anaphylatoxin. In a model of systemic L. monocytogenes infection, we show that mice lacking the receptor for C3a (C3aR(-/-)) are significantly more sensitive to infection compared with wild-type mice, as demonstrated by decreased survival, increased bacterial burden, and increased damage to their livers and spleens. The inability of the C3aR(-/-) mice to clear the bacterial infection was not caused by defective macrophages or by a reduction in cytokines/chemokines known to be critical in the host response to L. monocytogenes, including IFN-γ and TNF-α. Instead, TUNEL staining, together with Fas, active caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression data, indicates that the increased susceptibility of C3aR(-/-) mice to L. monocytogenes infection was largely caused by increased L. monocytogenes-induced apoptosis of myeloid and lymphoid cells in the spleen that are required for ultimate clearance of L. monocytogenes, including neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells. These findings reveal an unexpected function of C3a/C3aR signaling during the host immune response that suppresses Fas expression and caspase-3 activity while increasing Bcl-2 expression, thereby providing protection to both myeloid and lymphoid cells against L. monocytogenes-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. The Receptor for the Complement C3a Anaphylatoxin (C3aR) Provides Host Protection against Listeria monocytogenes Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L.; Morales, John E.; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium that is acquired through tainted food and may lead to systemic infection and possible death. Despite the importance of the innate immune system in fighting LM infection, little is known about the role of complement and its activation products, including the potent C3a anaphylatoxin. In a model of systemic LM infection, we show here that mice lacking the receptor for C3a (C3aR-/-) are significantly more sensitive to infection compared to WT mice as demonstrated by decreased survival, increased bacterial burden, and increased damage to their livers and spleens. The inability of the C3aR-/- mice to clear the bacterial infection was not caused by defective macrophages or by reduction of cytokines/chemokines known to be critical in the host response to LM, including IFN-γ and TNF-α. Instead, TUNEL staining together with Fas, active caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression data indicate that the increased susceptibility of C3aR-/- mice to LM infection was largely caused by increased LM-induced apoptosis of myeloid and lymphoid cells in the spleen that are required for ultimate clearance of LM, including neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells. These findings reveal an unexpected function of C3a/C3aR signaling during the host immune response that suppresses Fas expression and caspase-3 activity while increasing Bcl-2 expression, thereby providing protection to both myeloid and lymphoid cells against LM-induced apoptosis. PMID:24981453

  6. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Incubation of /sup 125/I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 0/sup 0/C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu). Degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis.

  7. Functional analysis and quantification of the complement C3 derived anaphylatoxin C3a with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, R; Bader, A; Kirschfink, M; Rother, U; Schrod, L; Wörner, I; Zilow, G

    1987-01-01

    The C3 fragment C3a belongs to the anaphylatoxins. It has immune regulatory activity and contributes to the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The low molecular weight (9 kD) of C3a complicates the production of antibodies to C3a. We obtained a monoclonal antibody (designated H13) to human C3a. It reacts with C3a or C3a-desArg and with native C3 but not with C5 or C5a. In immunoblot analysis it reacts with the alpha- but not with beta-chain of C3 and binds to a protein with a mol. wt of about 10 kD present in zymosan-activated sera which is only marginally detectable in nonactivated serum and absent in plasma. H13 crossreacts with the analogous proteins of rabbit, guinea pig and sheep. H13 has the capacity to bind 125I-radiolabelled C3a efficiently but fails totally to react with 125I-C5a or with other C3 alpha-chain fragments. H13 blocks C3a functional activity. It markedly inhibits C3a-induced 3H-serotonin release from platelets in vitro and similarly inhibits the C3a-induced extravasation of Evans blue into the skin in vivo. H13 does not interfere with the haemolytic activity of C3. An ELISA system was established using H13 which permits quantification of C3a in sera of polytrauma patients. The antibody H13 should facilitate further functional analysis of C3a in experimental systems. It should be useful for quantification of C3a in diagnostic assays and also for application in immunopathology. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3498585

  8. Expression of cytokines by human astrocytomas following stimulation by C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins: specific increase in interleukin-6 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sayah, S; Ischenko, A M; Zhakhov, A; Bonnard, A S; Fontaine, M

    1999-06-01

    C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins are two proinflammatory peptides generated during complement activation that act through distinct Gi protein-coupled receptors named C3aR and C5aR, respectively. We have demonstrated previously that human astrocytes expressed C3aR and C5aR constitutively and were able to produce a functional complement. In this study, we examined the effect of an anaphylatoxin stimulation on cytokine expression by human astrocyte cell lines. Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Whereas IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA levels remained unchanged, stimulation of astrocytoma cells (T98G, CB193, U118MG) by C3a, C5a, and peptidic C3aR and C5aR agonists induced an increase in the IL-6 mRNA level. The amount of IL-6 was markedly increased at 3 and 6 h and returned to the basal level at 9 h of stimulation. This response was specific, because pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin or with polyclonal anti-C3aR or anti-C5aR antibodies completely blocked the IL-6 mRNA increase. The IL-6 response was also investigated at the protein level, but IL-6 protein was detected neither in cell lysates nor in supernatants of stimulated cells. The anaphylatoxin-mediated transcriptional activation of IL-6 gene suggests that C3a and C5a could play a role in priming glial cells during the inflammatory process in the brain.

  9. Complement anaphylatoxin receptors C3aR and C5aR are required in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingjun; Bell, Brent A; Yu, Minzhong; Chan, Chi-Chao; Peachey, Neal S; Fung, John; Zhang, Xiaoming; Caspi, Rachel R; Lin, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that reagents inhibiting complement activation could be effective in treating T cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune uveitis. However, the precise role of the complement anaphylatoxin receptors (C3a and C5a receptors) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis remains elusive and controversial. We induced experimental autoimmune uveitis in mice deficient or sufficient in both C3a and C5a receptors and rigorously compared their retinal phenotype using various imaging techniques, including indirect ophthalmoscopy, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, topical endoscopic fundus imaging, and histopathological analysis. We also assessed retinal function using electroretinography. Moreover, we performed Ag-specific T cell recall assays and T cell adoptive transfer experiments to compare pathogenic T cell activity between wild-type and knockout mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis. These experiments showed that C3a receptor/C5a receptor-deficient mice developed much less severe uveitis than did control mice using all retinal examination methods and that these mice had reduced pathogenic T cell responses. Our data demonstrate that both complement anaphylatoxin receptors are important for the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis, suggesting that targeting these receptors could be a valid approach for treating patients with autoimmune uveitis.

  10. Negative regulation of pulmonary Th17 responses by C3a anaphylatoxin during allergic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoyong; Kim, Young Uk; Drouin, Scott M; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey; Yun, Kyoungah; Morschl, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A; Chung, Yeonseok

    2012-01-01

    Activation of complement is one of the earliest immune responses to exogenous threats, resulting in various cleavage products including anaphylatoxin C3a. In addition to its contribution to host defense, C3a has been shown to mediate Th2 responses in animal models of asthma. However, the role of C3a on pulmonary Th17 responses during allergic inflammation remains unclear. Here, we show that mice deficient in C3a receptor (C3aR) exhibited (i) higher percentages of endogenous IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells in the lungs, (ii) higher amounts of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and (iii) more neutrophils in the lungs than wild-type mice when challenged with intranasal allergens. Moreover, adoptive transfer experiments showed that the frequencies of antigen-specific IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells were significantly higher in the lungs and bronchial lymph nodes of C3aR-deficient recipients than those of wild-types recipients. Bone-marrow reconstitution study indicated that C3aR-deficiency on hematopoietic cells was required for the increased Th17 responses. Furthermore, C3aR-deficient mice exhibited increased percentages of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells; however, depletion of these cells minimally affected the induction of antigen-specific Th17 cell population in the lungs. Neutralization of IL-17 significantly reduced the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of C3aR-deficient mice. Our findings demonstrate that C3a signals negatively regulate antigen-specific Th17 responses during allergic lung inflammation and the size of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell population in the periphery.

  11. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D.; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cad-herin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cad-herin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  12. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  13. Anaphylatoxin-mediated regulation of the immune response. I. C3a- mediated suppression of human and murine humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The C3a fragment of the third component of complement was found to have immunosuppressive properties. C3a is capable of suppressing both specific and polyclonal antibody responses. In contrast, C3a had no effect on antigen- or mitogen-induced B or T cell proliferative responses. The carboxy-terminal arginine is essential for C3a to exhibit its immunosuppressive properties. The serum carboxypeptidase inhibitor 2-mercaptomethyl-5-guanodinopentanoic acid, which prevents cleavage of the terminal arginine that would produce C3ades Arg-77, allowed us to assay the effects of C3a on in vitro immune response systems where serum is required. When the terminal arginine is removed from C3a, the resulting C3ades Arg-77 molecule is nonsuppressive. Helper T lymphocytes are the target of C3a-mediated suppression of the immune response. Substitution of T cells by soluble T cell factors was found to abrogate the C3a suppressive activity. PMID:6978374

  14. The Complement Anaphylatoxin Receptors Are Not Required for the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Read, Russell W.; Vogt, Susan D.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    To determine if complement anaphylatoxin-mediated inflammation contributes to the development and progression of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), we induced disease in wild type and complement anaphylatoxin receptor-deficient mice (C3a receptor−/−, C5a receptor−/− and C3aR−/−/C5aR−/−) and evaluated eyes three weeks post-induction. No differences in disease severity or in disease incidence were seen between wild type controls and anaphylatoxin receptor-deficient mice. Our data indicate that C3a and C5a-mediated functions are not critical to the development of EAU. PMID:24035596

  15. The complement anaphylatoxin receptors are not required for the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Read, Russell W; Vogt, Susan D; Barnum, Scott R

    2013-11-15

    To determine if complement anaphylatoxin-mediated inflammation contributes to the development and progression of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), we induced disease in wild type and complement anaphylatoxin receptor-deficient mice (C3a receptor(-/-), C5a receptor(-/-) and C3aR(-/-)/C5aR(-/-)) and evaluated the eyes three weeks post-induction. No differences in disease severity or in disease incidence were seen between wild type controls and anaphylatoxin receptor-deficient mice. Our data indicate that C3a and C5a-mediated functions are not critical to the development of EAU.

  16. Degradation of human anaphylatoxin C3a by rat peritoneal mast cells: a role for the secretory granule enzyme chymase and heparin proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasoni, J.E. Jr.; Conrad, D.H.; Hugli, T.E.; Schwartz, L.B.; Ruddy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human C3a was iodinated (/sup 125/I-C3a) and used to study the interaction of labeled peptide with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC). Cellular binding of /sup 125/I-C3a occurred within 30 sec, followed by a rapid dissociation from the cell. Once /sup 125/I-C3a was exposed to RMC, it lost the ability to rebind to a second batch of RMC. Analysis of the supernatants by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation and electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels (SDS PAGE) revealed a decrease in the fraction of /sup 125/I precipitable by TCA and the appearance of /sup 125/-C3a cleavage fragments. Pretreatment of RMC with enzyme inhibitors specific for chymotrypsin, but not trypsin, abrogated the degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a. Treatment of RMC bearing /sup 125/I-C3a with bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS/sup 3/) covalently cross-linked the /sup 125/I-C3a to chymase, the predominant enzyme found in the secretory granules. Indirect immunofluorescence of RMC by using the IgG fraction of goat anti-rat chymase showed that chymase is present on the surface of unstimulated cells. Neither purified chymase nor heparin proteoglycan alone had any appreciable effect on /sup 125/I-C3a, but together they resulted in prompt degradation of the /sup 125/I-C3a.

  17. The Complement Anaphylatoxins C5a and C3a Suppress IFN-β Production in Response to Listeria monocytogenes by Inhibition of the Cyclic Dinucleotide-Activated Cytosolic Surveillance Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Calame, Daniel G; Shenoi, Nancy; Li, Yi-Dong; Wetsel, Rick A

    2017-04-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces expression of type I IFNs (IFN-α/IFN-β) during infection. These cytokines are detrimental to the host during infection by priming leukocytes to undergo L. monocytogenes-mediated apoptosis. Our previous studies showed that C5aR1(-/-) and C3aR(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection as a result of increased IFN-β-mediated apoptosis of major leukocyte cell populations, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. However, the mechanisms by which C3a and C5a modulate IFN-β expression during L. monocytogenes infection were not examined in these initial investigations. Accordingly, we report in this article that C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production in response to L. monocytogenes via cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a secondary messenger molecule of L. monocytogenes, in J774A.1 macrophage-like cells and in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Moreover, C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production by acting through their respective receptors, because no inhibition was seen in C5aR1(-/-) or C3aR(-/-) BMDCs, respectively. C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production in a manner that is dependent on Bruton's tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), as demonstrated by the individual use of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, and TBK1 inhibitors. Pretreatment of cells with C5a and C3a reduced the expression of the IFN-β signaling molecules DDX41, STING, phosphorylated TBK1, and phosphorylated p38 MAPK in wild-type BMDCs following treatment with c-di-AMP. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C3a and C5a, via direct signaling through their specific receptors, suppress IFN-β expression by modulation of a distinct innate cytosolic surveillance pathway involving DDX41, STING, and other downstream molecular targets of L. monocytogenes-generated c-di-AMP. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Interplay between invertebrate C3a with vertebrate macrophages: functional characterization of immune activities of amphioxus C3a.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    Our current knowledge of the structure and function of C3a comes from the study of vertebrate C3a anaphylatoxins, virtually nothing is known about the structure and function of C3a molecules in invertebrates. Here we demonstrated that C3a from the invertebrate chordate Branchiostoma japonicum, BjC3a, was similar to vertebrate C3a possessing potential antibacterial activity, as revealed by sequence analysis and computational modeling. The antibacterial activity of BjC3a was definitely confirmed by both antibacterial assay and TEM observation showing that recombinant BjC3a was directly bactericidal. Additionally, recombinant BjC3a, like vertebrate C3a, was capable of inducing sea bass macrophage migration and enhancing macrophage phagocytosis and respiratory burst response. Moreover, recombinant BjC3a-desArg (generated by removal of the C-terminal arginine), like mammalian C3a-desArg, retained the immunological activities of BjC3a such as antibacterial and respiratory burst-stimulating activities, indicating that the immunological functions of C3a-desArg were conserved throughout chordate evolution. Altogether, our findings show that invertebrate (amphioxus) BjC3a is able to interact with vertebrate (sea bass) macrophages and mediate immune activities, suggesting the emergence of the inflammatory pathway of the complement system similar to that of vertebrates in the basal chordate amphioxus.

  19. Complement fragments C3a and C5a: the salt and pepper of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Steven H

    2010-03-01

    The influence of complement on B-cell responses has been known for many years, but the notion that T-cell recognition, expansion and differentiation are complement dependent has only recently gained impetus. DC, and to a lesser extent T cells, produce a range of complement components necessary for complement activation, and these cells also express receptors that detect complement-activation products such as C3a and C5a (anaphylatoxins). In the absence of C3a-receptor (C3aR) signalling, DC lose their capacity to induce potent Th1 responses against alloantigen and also favour the emergence of Treg. A study in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology not only spotlights the importance of C5aR signalling in DC interaction with T cells, but also shows how cooperation with other signalling pathways determines the outcome of T-cell activation. Remove C5aR from the equation, TLR2-stimulated DC induce naive CD4(+) Th cells to undergo differentiation not only mainly to Th17 cells but also to Treg, via a TGF-beta-dependent pathway. Thus, anaphylatoxins in conjunction with other danger signalling pathways modify the function of DC in antigen presentation and help to shape the primary immune response. Future work will need to address the impact of anaphylatoxins on protective immunity in vivo and determine the wider implications of anaphylatoxins for allo- and autoimmunity.

  20. Complement C3a enhances CXCL12 (SDF-1)-mediated chemotaxis of bone marrow hematopoietic cells independently of C3a receptor.

    PubMed

    Honczarenko, Marek; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Silberstein, Leslie E

    2005-09-15

    Complement C3a promotes CXCL12-induced migration and engraftment of human and murine hemopoietic progenitor cells, suggesting a cross-influence between anaphylatoxin and chemokine axes. Here we have explored the underlying mechanism(s) of complement anaphylatoxin and chemokine cooperation. In addition to C3a, C3a-desArg and C4a but not C5a, are potent enhancers of CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of human and murine bone marrow (BM) stem/progenitor cells and B lineage cells. C3a enhancement of chemotaxis is chemokine specific because it is also observed for chemotaxis to CCL19 but not to CXCL13. The potentiating effect of C3a on CXCL12 is independent of the classical C3a receptor (C3aR). First, human BM CD34(+) and B lineage cells do not express C3aR by flow cytometry. Second, the competitive C3aR inhibitor SB290157 does not affect C3a-mediated enhancement of CXCL12-induced chemotaxis. Third, enhancement of chemotaxis of hemopoietic cells is also mediated by C3a-desArg, which does not bind to C3aR. Finally, C3a enhances CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of BM cells from C3aR knockout mice similar to BM cells from wild-type mice. Subsequent studies revealed that C3a increased the binding affinity of CXCL12 to human CXCR4(+)/C3aR(-), REH pro-B cells, which is compatible with a direct interaction between C3a and CXCL12. BM stromal cells were able to generate C3a, C3a-desArg, C4a, as well as CXCL12, suggesting that this pathway could function in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrate a C3a-CXCL12 interaction independent of the C3aR, which may provide a mechanism to modulate the function of CXCL12 in the BM microenvironment.

  1. Potentiation of the anaphylatoxins in vivo using an inhibitor of serum carboxypeptidase N (SCPN). I. Lethality and pathologic effects on pulmonary tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Huey, R.; Bloor, C. M.; Kawahara, M. S.; Hugli, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase N (EC 3.4.12.7) (SCPN) is a plasma enzyme that efficiently inactivates the anaphylatoxins C3a and C4a and significantly reduces C5a spasmogenic activity by removing the C-terminal arginyl residue from each of these factors. The arginine analog DL-2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropanoic acid (SCPN-INH) is a potent competitive inhibitor of SCPN with a Ki for this carboxypeptidase in serum of 2 x 10(-9) M. Therefore, we have used the SCPN inhibitor to potentiate biologic activity of the anaphylatoxins in vivo. Infusion via the carotid artery of about 40 mg of SCPN-INH into each of 8 adult guinea pigs inactivated the SCPN for at least 3 hours and caused no measurable toxic effects. When cobra venom factor (CVF) is infused into guinea pigs, it activates the alternative pathway of complement, thereby generating the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Ordinarily, infusion of CVF is nonlethal, because the generated anaphylatoxins are rapidly converted to C3a des Arg and C5a des Arg by SCPN. However, CVF (200 micrograms) plus SCPN-INH delivered intravenously in 5 animals induced a lethal reaction in less than 5 minutes. The authors conclude that the lethal effect is due largely to the anaphylatoxins. Histologic sections of the lungs from treated animals show dramatic structural changes consistent with peripheral small airway constriction, bronchial constriction, and vasoconstriction of small muscular arteries. Also, cell aggregates are present in blood vessels. Other histologic changes include severe congestion, pulmonary edema, and an interstitial infiltrate of mononuclear cells. Large doses of chlorpheniramine prevent this lethal reaction. Lethality is apparently attributable to asphyxia and is dependent on the level of CVF administered: eg, 100 micrograms CVF was not lethal in 4 animals given SCPN inhibitor, although signs of respiratory distress were observed. On histologic examination of lungs from guinea pigs given CVF and SCPN-INH, the features are

  2. C4a: An Anaphylatoxin in Name Only.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of complement leads to generation of the 3 anaphylatoxins C3a, C4a, and C5a. Although all 3 peptides are structurally similar, only C3a and C5a share a similar functional profile that includes the classic inflammatory activities and, more recently, developmental homing and regenerative properties among others. In contrast, the functional profile of C4a is questionable in most cases owing to contamination of C4a preparations with physiologically relevant levels of C3a and/or C5a. Combined with the absence of an identified C4a receptor and the inability of C4a to signal through the C3a and C5a receptors, it is clear that C4a should not be included in the family of complement anaphylatoxins.

  3. Demonstration of a specific C3a receptor on guinea pig platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1988-05-15

    Guinea pig platelets reportedly contain receptors specific for the anaphylatoxin C3a based on both ligand-binding studies and functional responses. A portion of the human 125I-C3a that binds to guinea pig platelets is competitively displaced by excess unlabeled C3a; however, the majority of ligand uptake was nonspecific. Uptake of 125I-C3a by guinea pig platelets is maximal in 1 min, and stimulation of guinea pig platelets by thrombin, ADP, or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 showed little influence on binding of the ligand. Scatchard analysis indicated that approximately 1200 binding sites for C3a exist per cell with an estimated Kd of 8 x 10(-10) M. Human C3a des Arg also binds to guinea pig platelets, but Scatchard analysis indicated that no specific binding occurred. Because the ligand-binding studies were complicated by high levels of nonspecific uptake, we attempted to chemically cross-link the C3a molecule to a specific component on the platelet surface. Cross-linkage of 125I-C3a to guinea pig platelets with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate revealed radioactive complexes at 105,000 and 115,000 m.w. on SDS-PAGE gels by autoradiographic analysis. In the presence of excess unlabeled C3a, complex formation was inhibited. No cross-linkage could be demonstrated between the inactive 125I-C3a des Arg and the putative C3a-R on guinea pig platelets. Human C3a, but not C3a des Arg induces serotonin release and aggregation of the guinea pig platelets. Human C3a was unable to induce either serotonin release or promote aggregation of human platelets. Uptake of human 125I-C3a by human platelets was not saturable, and Scatchard analysis was inconclusive. Attempts to cross-link 125I-C3a to components on the surface of human platelets also failed to reveal a ligand-receptor complex. Therefore, we conclude that guinea pig platelets have specific surface receptors to C3a and that human platelets appear devoid of receptors to the anaphylatoxin.

  4. Intratracheal administration of anaphylatoxin C5a potentiates antigen-induced pulmonary reactions through the prolonged production of cysteinyl-leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    Kodani, M; Sakata, N; Takano, Y; Kamiya, H; Katsuragi, T; Hugli, T E; Abe, M

    2000-09-01

    quantitation of N-acetyl-leukotriene E(4) (N-Ac-LTE(4)), a major metabolite of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs), in the bile indicated a significantly greater and longer excretion of cysLTs, from 1 to 6 h after the combined challenge, than that after either OA or ZAS alone. This suggested a prolonged generation of cysLTs in the lung by the combined challenge.In conclusion, our findings suggest that anaphylatoxin C5a may mediate the airway inflammatory response induced by a specific antigen challenge partly through a prolonged production of cysLTs and the release of histamine.

  5. Inhibition by prostaglandin E(2) of anaphylatoxin C5a- but not zymosan-induced prostanoid release from rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Jungermann, Kurt; Götze, Otto; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2002-04-01

    The proinflammatory anaphylatoxin C5a induces the release of prostanoids, ie, prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxane (TX), from the resident liver macrophages (Kupffer cells [KC]). Because KC themselves express prostanoid receptors, prostanoids--besides having paracrine functions--might regulate their own release in an autocrine loop. So far, such a possible feedback regulation has not been investigated systematically, probably because of methodological difficulties to measure newly synthesized prostanoids in the presence of added prostanoids. Here, after prelabeling of phospholipids with [(14)C]arachidonate, cellularly formed [(14)C]prostanoids were determined in the presence of added unlabelled prostanoids by thin layer chromatography. In cultured KC, recombinant rat C5a (rrC5a) rapidly increased PGD(2), PGE(2), and TXA(2) release, which was strongly reduced by PGE(2), but neither by PGD(2) nor by the TXA(2) analog U46619. The inhibitory effect of PGE(2) was mimicked by cAMP, indicating that the G(s)-coupled PGE(2) receptors type 2 or 4 were involved. Zymosan also enhanced prostanoid release from KC, but with slightly slower kinetics; this action was neither inhibited by PGE(2) nor by cAMP. Also in perfused rat livers, rrC5a enhanced prostanoid release from KC as shown by prostanoid overflow and thereby indirectly increased glucose output from hepatocytes. Again, PGE(2), but not PGD(2), inhibited rrC5a-elicited prostanoid overflow. This resulted in a complete inhibition of rrC5a-induced, prostanoid-mediated glucose output. Thus, PGE(2) can inhibit specifically the C5a-induced prostanoid release from KC via a feedback mechanism and thereby limit prostanoid-mediated hepatocellular defense reactions, eg, glucose release.

  6. Coagulation induced by C3aR-dependent NETosis drives protumorigenic neutrophils during small intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guglietta, Silvia; Chiavelli, Andrea; Zagato, Elena; Krieg, Carsten; Gandini, Sara; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Bazolli, Barbara; Lu, Bao; Penna, Giuseppe; Rescigno, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Excessive activation of blood coagulation and neutrophil accumulation have been described in several human cancers. However, whether hypercoagulation and neutrophilia are linked and involved in cancer development is currently unknown. Here we show that spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis correlates with the accumulation of low-density neutrophils with a pro-tumorigenic N2 phenotype and unprompted neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation. We find that increased circulating lipopolysaccharide induces upregulation of complement C3a receptor on neutrophils and activation of the complement cascade. This leads to NETosis, induction of coagulation and N2 polarization, which prompts tumorigenesis, showing a novel link between coagulation, neutrophilia and complement activation. Finally, in a cohort of patients with small but not large intestinal cancer, we find a correlation between neutrophilia and hypercoagulation. This study provides a mechanistic explanation for the tumour-promoting effects of hypercoagulation, which could be used as a new biomarker or as a therapeutic target. PMID:26996437

  7. C5L2, the Second C5a Anaphylatoxin Receptor, Suppresses LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruobing; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Gerard, Norma P

    2016-11-01

    LPS-induced lung injury in the mouse is one of the most robust experimental models used for studies of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome in humans. Prior clinical and experimental studies support an important role for complement activation, particularly production of C5a, in the pathophysiology of human ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome. In the mouse model, however, the precise role of C5a and its receptors is unclear. C5L2, an enigmatic second receptor for C5a, has been characterized, and results have generated substantial debate regarding its in vivo function. Our previous work with human neutrophils revealed a unique role for C5L2 in negatively modulating C5a-C5a receptor (C5aR)-mediated cellular activation, in which antibody-mediated blockade of C5L2 resulted in augmented C5a-C5aR responses. Here, we demonstrate that C5L2(-/-) mice (BALB/c background) administered intranasal LPS exhibit significantly more airway edema and hemorrhage than do wild-type animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates have significantly more neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity, as well as proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. When a blocking antibody against the C5aR was administered before LPS administration, the increased neutrophilic infiltration and cytokine levels were reversed. Thus, our data show not only that C5a contributes significantly to LPS-induced ALI in the mouse, but also that C5L2 plays an important antiinflammatory role in this model through actions resulting at least in part from negative modulation of C5a receptor activation.

  8. THE MECHANISM OF ANAPHYLATOXIN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, James W.; Petersen, William

    1914-01-01

    1. The unsaturated lipoids (serum antitrypsin) can be adsorbed from guinea pig serum, rabbit serum, and horse serum by kaolin, starch, agar, and bacteria. 2. Diphtheria toxin and cobra venom also reduce the serum antitrypsin, possibly because of their affinity for lipoids. 3. Anaphylatoxins represent sera rendered toxic by partial removal of serum antitrypsin. 4. The matrix of the protein split products lies in the serum proteins so exposed. 5. The amount of removal of serum antitrypsin depends on definite quantitative relations; very large amounts and very small amounts of adsorbing substances are least effective (kaolin, starch, and bacteria). 6. Bacteria previously treated with serum or with oils do not adsorb serum antitrypsin. 7. Bacteria treated with serum become more resistant to the action of trypsin. PMID:19867801

  9. Targeted Disruption of the Gene Encoding the Murine Small Subunit of Carboxypeptidase N (CPN1) Causes Susceptibility to C5a Anaphylatoxin-Mediated Shock1

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L.; Wang, Dachun; Morales, John E.; Li, Li; Chang, Jui-Yoa; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase N (CPN) is a plasma zinc metalloprotease, which consists of two enzymatically active small subunits (CPN1) and two large subunits (CPN2) that protect the protein from degradation. Historically, CPN has been implicated as a major regulator of inflammation by its enzymatic cleavage of functionally important arginine and lysine amino acids from potent phlogistic molecules, such as the complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Because of no known complete CPN deficiencies, the biological impact of CPN in vivo has been difficult to evaluate. Here, we report the generation of a mouse with complete CPN deficiency by targeted disruption of the CPN1 gene. CPN1−/− mice were hypersensitive to lethal anaphylactic shock due to acute complement activation by cobra venom factor. This hypersensitivity was completely resolved in CPN1−/−/C5aR−/− but not in CPN1−/−/C3aR−/− mice. Moreover, CPN1−/− mice given C5a i.v., but not C3a, experienced 100% mortality. This C5a-induced mortality was reduced to 20% when CPN1−/− mice were treated with an antihistamine before C5a challenge. These studies describe for the first time a complete deficiency of CPN and demonstrate 1) that CPN plays a requisite role in regulating the lethal effects of anaphylatoxin-mediated shock, 2) that these lethal effects are mediated predominantly by C5a-induced histamine release, and 3) that C3a does not contribute significantly to shock following acute complement activation. PMID:19414808

  10. Neutrophils Induce Astroglial Differentiation and Migration of Human Neural Stem Cells via C1q and C3a Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Francisca; Flanagan, Lisa; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory processes play a key role in pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases/trauma, but the effect of immune cells and factors on neurotransplantation strategies remains unclear. We hypothesized that cellular and humoral components of innate immunity alter fate and migration of human neural stem cells (hNSC). In these experiments, conditioned media collected from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) selectively increased hNSC astrogliogenesis and promoted cell migration in vitro. PMN were shown to generate C1q and C3a; exposure of hNSC to PMN-synthesized concentrations of these complement proteins promoted astrogliogenesis and cell migration. Furthermore, in vitro, Abs directed against C1q and C3a reversed the fate and migration effects observed. In a proof-of-concept in vivo experiment, blockade of C1q and C3a transiently altered hNSC migration and reversed astroglial fate after spinal cord injury. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the innate/humoral inflammatory microenvironment may impact the potential of cell-based therapies for recovery and repair following CNS pathology. PMID:28687659

  11. Evaluation of C3a receptor expression on human leucocytes by the use of novel monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    ZWIRNER, J; GÖTZE, O; BEGEMANN, G; KAPP, A; KIRCHHOFF, K; WERFEL, T

    1999-01-01

    Varying results have been published in the past regarding the reactivity of different leucocyte subpopulations, including neutrophils, monocytes and B lymphocytes, to the anaphylatoxin C3a and its degradation product C3a(desArg). To better characterize the cellular distribution of C3a receptor (C3aR) expression, monoclonal antibodies against two different epitopes on the third extracellular domain of the human C3aR were generated. Quantification of C3aR as compared with C5aR densities was performed on peripheral blood leucocytes by quantitative indirect immunofluorescence. Eosinophils and basophils expressed similar numbers of C3aR and C5aR molecules/cell. On eosinophils 10 700±4500 (mean±SD) C3aR and 14 700±4100 C5aR were found, whereas basophils carried 8100±2100 C3aR and 13 500±3800 C5aR. Monocytes expressed approximately six times more C5aR than C3aR molecules on their surface (6000±2500 C3aR versus 34 100±9300 C5aR molecules) whereas on neutrophils, the expression of C5aR was more than 20 times higher than the expression of C3aR (3100±1000 C3aR versus 63 500±12 200 C5aR). No C3aR expression was detectable on peripheral blood-derived B lymphocytes and on tonsillar B cells before and after stimulation with interleukin-2/Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I. Our findings correspond well with the paucity of data on C3a-induced functional activities in monocytes and neutrophils and suggest that eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes represent the primary effector cells in the peripheral blood which can be stimulated by C3a. PMID:10447728

  12. Role of C3a receptors, C5a receptors, and complement protein C6 deficiency in collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Banda, Nirmal K; Hyatt, Stephanie; Antonioli, Alexandra H; White, Jason T; Glogowska, Magdalena; Takahashi, Kazue; Merkel, Tod J; Stahl, Gregory L; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey; Wetsel, Rick; Arend, William P; Holers, V Michael

    2012-02-01

    The complement system, especially the alternative pathway, plays essential roles in the induction of injury in collagen Ab-induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice. The goal of the current study was to directly compare the roles of receptors for C3a and C5a, as well as the membrane attack complex, as effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CAIA. Clinical disease activity in C3aR(-/-), C5aR(-/-), and C6-deficient (C6-def) mice was decreased by 52, 94, and 65%, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. Decreases in histopathologic injury as well as in IgG and C3 deposition paralleled the clinical disease activity. A decrease in the percentage of synovial neutrophils was observed in C3aR(-/-), C5aR(-/-), and C6-def mice, and a decrease in macrophages was observed in C3aR(-/-) and C5aR(-/-), but not in C6-def, mice. Synovial mRNA obtained by laser capture microdissection exhibited a decrease in TNF-α in C5aR(-/-) mice and in IL-1β in both C5aR(-/-) and C6-def mice, whereas C3aR(-/-) mice demonstrated no change in either cytokine. Our findings show that absent C3aR-, C5aR-, or membrane attack complex-initiated effector mechanisms each decrease susceptibility to CAIA, with clinical effects most pronounced in C5aR-deficient mice. Although the absence of C3aR, C5aR, or C6 led to differential deficiencies in effector mechanisms, decreased proximal joint IgG and C3 deposition was common to all three genotypes in comparison with wild-type mice. These data suggest the existence of positive-feedback amplification pathways downstream of all three effectors that promote additional IgG deposition and C3 activation in the joint.

  13. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae), comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s) present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process. PMID:22248157

  14. Complement activation pathways in murine immune complex-induced arthritis and in C3a and C5a generation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banda, N K; Levitt, B; Wood, A K; Takahashi, K; Stahl, G L; Holers, V M; Arend, W P

    2010-01-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) of complement alone is capable of mediating immune complex-induced arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. Whether the classical pathway (CP) or lectin pathway (LP) alone can mediate CAIA is not known. Using mice genetically deficient in different complement components, our results reported herein establish that the CP and LP alone are each incapable of mediating CAIA. A lower level or absence of C3 and/or C5 activation by the CP may be possible explanations for the importance of the AP in CAIA and in many murine models of disease. In addition, other investigators have reported that CP C5 convertase activity is absent in mouse sera. To address these questions, we employed an in vitro system of adherent immunoglobulin (Ig)G-induced complement activation using plates coated with murine anti-collagen monoclonal antibody (mAb). These experiments used complement-deficient mouse sera and wild-type mouse or normal human sera under conditions inactivating either the CP (Ca++ deficiency) or the AP (mAb inhibitory to factor B). Robust generation of both C3a and C5a by either the AP or CP alone were observed with both mouse and human sera, although there were some small differences between the species of sera. We conclude that neither the CP nor LP alone is capable of mediating CAIA in vivo and that mouse sera exhibits a high level of IgG-induced C5a generation in vitro through either the CP or AP. PMID:19843088

  15. Molecular analysis of the bovine anaphylatoxin C5a receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nemali, Sailasree; Siemsen, Daniel W.; Nelson, Laura K.; Bunger, Peggy L.; Faulkner, Craig L.; Rainard, Pascal; Gauss, Katherine A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of phagocytes to inflammatory sites involves the coordinated action of several chemoattractants, including the anaphylatoxin C5a. While the C5a receptor (C5aR) has been well characterized in humans and rodents, little is known about the bovine C5aR. Here, we report cloning of bovine C5R1, the gene encoding bovine C5aR. We also analyzed genomic sequence upstream of the C5R1 translation start site. Although the bovine C5aR amino acid sequence was well conserved among species, significant differences in conserved features were found, including major differences in the N terminus, intracellular loop 3, and transmembrane domain VII. Analysis of C5aR expression by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy demonstrated high levels of C5aR on all bovine neutrophils and a subset of bovine monocytes. C5aR was not expressed on resting or activated bovine lymphocytes, although C5aR message was present in these cells. C5aR was also expressed on a small subset of bovine mammary epithelial cells. Pharmacological analysis of bovine C5aR-mediated responses showed that bovine C5a and C5adesArg both induced dose-dependent calcium fluxes and chemotaxis in bovine neutrophils, with similar efficacy for both agonists. Treatment of bovine neutrophils with C5a or C5adesArg resulted in homologous desensitization of bovine C5aR and cross-desensitization to interleukin 8 (IL-8) and platelet-activating factor (PAF); whereas, treatment with IL-8 or PAF did not cross-desensitize the cells to C5a or C5adesArg. Overall, these studies provide important information regarding distinct structural and functional features that may contribute to the unique pharmacological properties of bovine C5aR. PMID:18480166

  16. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  17. Deletion of both the C3a and C5a receptors fails to protect against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-12-31

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which inflammation, leukocyte infiltration, and ultimately, demyelination occur as a result of innate and adaptive immune-mediated mechanisms. The pathophysiological role of the complement system, a major component of innate immunity, in the development and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS has been extensively examined. Previous studies from our lab have shown that the complement receptor for the anaphylatoxin C3a, but not for C5a plays an important role in EAE. Based on the important contributions of the complement anaphylatoxin receptors to other inflammatory conditions in the CNS, we reasoned that deletion of both receptors may reveal underlying interactions between them that are important to EAE pathology. We performed EAE in C3aR/C5aR double knockout mice (C3aR/C5aR(-/-)) and observed delayed onset of disease but no attenuation of disease severity compared to wild type mice. Interestingly there was trend toward greater infiltration of CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T cells, in C3aR/C5aR(-/-) mice with EAE, suggesting altered trafficking of these cells. Antigen-specific T cells isolated from C3aR/C5aR(-/-) mice during acute EAE produced elevated levels of TNF-alpha, but markedly reduced levels of IFN-gamma and IL-12 compared to wild type mice. It remains unclear how the changes in these disease parameters contribute to the loss of the protective effect seen in C3aR(-/-) mice, however our data indicate a level of cross-modulation between the C3aR and C5aR during EAE.

  18. Deletion of Both the C3a and C5a Receptors Fails to Protect Against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which inflammation, leukocyte infiltration, and ultimately, demyelination occur as a result of innate and adaptive immune-mediated mechanisms. The pathophysiological role of the complement system, a major component of innate immunity, in the development and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS has been extensively examined. Previous studies from our lab have shown that the complement receptor for the anaphylatoxin C3a, but not for C5a plays an important role in EAE. Based on the important contributions of the complement anaphylatoxin receptors to other inflammatory conditions in the CNS, we reasoned that deletion of both receptors may reveal underlying interactions between them that are important to EAE pathology. We performed EAE in C3aR/C5aR double knockout mice (C3aR/C5aR−/−) and observed delayed onset of disease but no attenuation of disease severity compared to wild type mice. Interestingly there was trend toward greater infiltration of CD4+, but not CD8+ T cells, in C3aR/C5aR−/− mice with EAE, suggesting altered trafficking of these cells. Antigen-specific T cells isolated from C3aR/C5aR−/− mice during acute EAE produced elevated levels of TNF-α, but markedly reduced levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 compared to wild type mice. It remains unclear how the changes in these disease parameters contribute to the loss of the protective effect seen in C3aR−/− mice, however our data indicate a level of cross modulation between the C3aR and C5aR during EAE. PMID:19850104

  19. Renal expression of the C3a receptor and functional responses of primary human proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, Michael C; Reins, Rose Y; Li, Tong-Bin; Hollmann, Travis J; Dutta, Ranjan; Rick, Wetsel A; Teng, Ba-Bie; Ke, Baozhen

    2004-09-15

    Although complement activation and deposition have been associated with a variety of glomerulopathies, the pathogenic mechanisms by which complement directly mediates renal injury remain to be fully elucidated. Renal parenchymal tissues express a limited repertoire of receptors that directly bind activated complement proteins. We report the renal expression of the receptor for the C3 cleavage product C3a, a member of the anaphylatoxin family. C3aR is highly expressed in normal human and murine kidney, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Its distribution is limited to epithelial cells only, as glomerular endothelial and mesangial cells showed no evidence of C3aR expression. The C3aR is also expressed by primary renal proximal tubular epithelial cells in vitro as demonstrated by FACS, Western blot, and RT-PCR. In vitro C3aR is functional in terms of its capacity to bind 125I-labeled C3a and generate inositol triphosphate. Finally, using microarray analysis, four novel genes were identified and confirmed as transcriptionally regulated by C3aR activation in proximal tubular cells. These studies define a new pathway by which complement activation may directly modulate the renal response to immunologic injury.

  20. The complement C3a receptor is critical in defense against Chlamydia psittaci in mouse lung infection and required for antibody and optimal T cell response.

    PubMed

    Dutow, Pavel; Fehlhaber, Beate; Bode, Jenny; Laudeley, Robert; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Glage, Silke; Wetsel, Rick A; Pabst, Oliver; Klos, Andreas

    2014-04-15

    The complement system protects against extracellular pathogens and links innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we investigated the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR) in Chlamydia psittaci lung infection and elucidated C3a-dependent adaptive immune mechanisms. Survival, body weight, and clinical score were monitored in primary mouse infection and after serum transfer. Bacterial load, histology, cellular distribution, cytokines, antibodies, and lymphocytes were analyzed. C3aR(-/-) mice showed prolonged pneumonia with decreased survival, lower weight, and higher clinical score. Compared to wild-type mice bacterial clearance was impaired, and inflammatory parameters were increased. In lung-draining lymph nodes of C3aR(-/-) mice the total number of B cells, CD4(+) T cells, and Chlamydia-specific IFN-γ(+) (CD4(+) or CD8(+)) cells was reduced upon infection, and the mice were incapable of Chlamydia-specific immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin G production. Performed before infection, transfer of hyperimmune serum prolonged survival of C3aR(-/-) mice. C3a and its receptor are critical for defense against C. psittaci in mouse lung infection. In this model, C3a acts via its receptor as immune modulator. Enhancement of specific B and T cell responses upon infection with an intracellular bacterium were identified as hitherto unknown features of C3a/C3aR. These new functions might be of general immunological importance.

  1. C5a of Cynoglossus semilaevis has anaphylatoxin-like properties and promotes antibacterial and antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-fei; Hu, Yong-hua

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the complement system leads to the cleavage of component factor C5 into C5a and C5b. C5a can induce chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in mammals. The function of C5a in fish is poorly understood. In this study, we report the identification and analysis of a C5 homologue, CsC5, from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsC5 is composed of 1683 amino acid residues that include an anaphylatoxin homologous domain. Expression of CsC5 could be detected in a variety of tissues and was up-regulated by bacterial or viral pathogen infection. Purified recombinant CsC5a (rCsC5a) could bind to peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stimulate PBL chemotaxis, proliferation, respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytosis. Tongue sole administered rCsC5a exhibited enhanced resistance against bacterial and viral infections. These results indicate that CsC5a is an anaphylatoxin with a role in innate immune defense against bacterial and viral infections.

  2. The Complement C3a Receptor Is Critical in Defense against Chlamydia psittaci in Mouse Lung Infection and Required for Antibody and Optimal T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dutow, Pavel; Fehlhaber, Beate; Bode, Jenny; Laudeley, Robert; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Glage, Silke; Wetsel, Rick A.; Pabst, Oliver; Klos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background. The complement system protects against extracellular pathogens and links innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we investigated the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR) in Chlamydia psittaci lung infection and elucidated C3a-dependent adaptive immune mechanisms. Methods. Survival, body weight, and clinical score were monitored in primary mouse infection and after serum transfer. Bacterial load, histology, cellular distribution, cytokines, antibodies, and lymphocytes were analyzed. Results. C3aR−/− mice showed prolonged pneumonia with decreased survival, lower weight, and higher clinical score. Compared to wild-type mice bacterial clearance was impaired, and inflammatory parameters were increased. In lung-draining lymph nodes of C3aR−/− mice the total number of B cells, CD4+ T cells, and Chlamydia-specific IFN-γ+ (CD4+ or CD8+) cells was reduced upon infection, and the mice were incapable of Chlamydia-specific immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin G production. Performed before infection, transfer of hyperimmune serum prolonged survival of C3aR−/− mice. Conclusions. C3a and its receptor are critical for defense against C. psittaci in mouse lung infection. In this model, C3a acts via its receptor as immune modulator. Enhancement of specific B and T cell responses upon infection with an intracellular bacterium were identified as hitherto unknown features of C3a/C3aR. These new functions might be of general immunological importance. PMID:24273177

  3. Complement peptide C3a stimulates neural plasticity after experimental brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Stokowska, Anna; Atkins, Alison L; Morán, Javier; Pekny, Tulen; Bulmer, Linda; Pascoe, Michaela C; Barnum, Scott R; Wetsel, Rick A; Nilsson, Jonas A; Dragunow, Mike; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke induces endogenous repair processes that include proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells and extensive rewiring of the remaining neural connections, yet about 50% of stroke survivors live with severe long-term disability. There is an unmet need for drug therapies to improve recovery by promoting brain plasticity in the subacute to chronic phase after ischaemic stroke. We previously showed that complement-derived peptide C3a regulates neural progenitor cell migration and differentiation in vitro and that C3a receptor signalling stimulates neurogenesis in unchallenged adult mice. To determine the role of C3a-C3a receptor signalling in ischaemia-induced neural plasticity, we subjected C3a receptor-deficient mice, GFAP-C3a transgenic mice expressing biologically active C3a in the central nervous system, and their respective wild-type controls to photothrombotic stroke. We found that C3a overexpression increased, whereas C3a receptor deficiency decreased post-stroke expression of GAP43 (P < 0.01), a marker of axonal sprouting and plasticity, in the peri-infarct cortex. To verify the translational potential of these findings, we used a pharmacological approach. Daily intranasal treatment of wild-type mice with C3a beginning 7 days after stroke induction robustly increased synaptic density (P < 0.01) and expression of GAP43 in peri-infarct cortex (P < 0.05). Importantly, the C3a treatment led to faster and more complete recovery of forepaw motor function (P < 0.05). We conclude that C3a-C3a receptor signalling stimulates post-ischaemic neural plasticity and intranasal treatment with C3a receptor agonists is an attractive approach to improve functional recovery after ischaemic brain injury.

  4. Identification of classical anaphylatoxin as the des-Arg form of the C5a molecule: Evidence of a modulator role for the oligosaccharide unit in human des-Arg74-C5a

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Craig; Hugli, Tony E.

    1981-01-01

    A functionally active and potentially lethal fragment of the fifth component of complement (C5) is generated during complement activation in serum from animals of various species. This factor, termed the “classical” anaphylatoxin, was isolated from porcine serum and was identified chemically as the des-Arg derivative of the well-characterized C5a molecule. Unlike the C3a and C4a anaphylatoxins, porcine C5a does not require the COOH-terminal arginyl residue for spasmogenic activity. Further degradation of porcine des-Arg74-C5a by carboxypeptidase Y removed glycine-73 and leucine-72 and decreased the intrinsic spasmogenic activity by >90%. Hence, we conclude that, although the arginyl residue is not essential, the COOH-terminal sequence Leu-Gly-Arg contributes structural information that accounts for >90% of C5a activity. Human des-Arg74-C5a, like its porcine counterpart, has instrinsic anaphylatoxin activity; however, higher concentrations were needed to contract the guinea pig ileal tissue (i.e., 1 μM for human des-Arg74-C5a versus 1 nM for porcine des-Arg74-C5a). Furthermore, the des-Arg form of human C5a was only 0.1% as active as porcine des-Arg74-C5a for enhancing vascular permeability in guinea pig skin. In addition to these biological differences, numerous chemical differences exist between the human and porcine des-Arg74-C5a molecules, the most prominent feature being an oligosaccharide entity associated uniquely with the human C5a. When the oligosaccharide unit of human des-Arg74-C5a was removed by glycosidases, leaving a single glucosamine residue attached to the side chain of asparagine-64, activity was enhanced. The human des-Arg74-C5a molecule devoid of the complex oligosaccharide unit exhibited 10-fold stronger spasmogenic activity and 20- to 50-fold greater permeability-enhancing activity than did human des-Arg74-C5a containing the oligosaccharide. Consequently, the oligosaccharide associated with human C5a modulates or suppresses potentially

  5. Receptor for complement peptide C3a: a therapeutic target for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Järlestedt, Katarina; Rousset, Catherine I; Ståhlberg, Anders; Sourkova, Hana; Atkins, Alison L; Thornton, Claire; Barnum, Scott R; Wetsel, Rick A; Dragunow, Mike; Pekny, Milos; Mallard, Carina; Hagberg, Henrik; Pekna, Marcela

    2013-09-01

    Complement is an essential component of inflammation that plays a role in ischemic brain injury. Recent reports demonstrate novel functions of complement in normal and diseased CNS, such as regulation of neurogenesis and synapse elimination. Here, we examined the role of complement-derived peptide C3a in unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), a model of neonatal HI encephalopathy. HI injury was induced at postnatal day 9 (P9), and loss of hippocampal tissue was determined on P31. We compared WT mice with transgenic mice expressing C3a under the control of glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which express biologically active C3a only in CNS and without the requirement of a priori complement activation. Further, we injected C3a peptide into the lateral cerebral ventricle of mice lacking the C3a receptor (C3aR) and WT mice and assessed HI-induced memory impairment 41 d later. We found that HI-induced tissue loss in C3a overexpressing mice was reduced by 50% compared with WT mice. C3a peptide injected 1 h after HI protected WT but not C3aR-deficient mice against HI-induced memory impairment. Thus, C3a acting through its canonical receptor ameliorates behavioral deficits after HI injury, and C3aR is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of neonatal HI encephalopathy.

  6. Cytolytic effects of the complement cleavage product, C3a.

    PubMed Central

    Ferluga, J.; Schorlemmer, H. U.; Baptista, L. C.; Allison, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Purified C3a, a cleavage product of the third component of complement,was incubated with various cell types of human and mouse origin. All the tumour cell types tested were lysed by low concentrations of C3a, whereas normal human lymphocytes were relatively resistant. No lysis was produced by C3 or C3b. The possible role of C3a in immunity against tumours is discussed. PMID:827304

  7. Stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangguo; He, Chao; Bai, Yun; Ma, Baoguo; Wang, Guandong; Tan, Hongbo

    2014-03-15

    Hazardous wastes are usually used in the Portland cement production in order to save energy, costs and/or stabilize toxic substances and heavy metals inside the clinker. This work focus on the stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix. The immobilization rate of chromium in C(3)A and the leaching characteristics of the C(3)A hydrated matrixes containing chromium were investigated by ICP-AES. The results indicated that C(3)A had a good solidifying effect on chromium using the clinkering process, however, the Cr leaching content of Cr-doped C(3)A was higher than that of hydrated C(3)A matrix in Cr(NO(3))3 solution and was lower than that of the hydrated C(3)A matrix in K(2)CrO(4) solution, no matter the leachant was sulphuric acid & nitric acid or water. To explain this, C(3)A formation, chemical valence states of chromium in C(3)A, hydration products and Cr distribution in the C(3)A-gypsum hydrated matrixes were studied by XRD, XPS and FESEM-EDS. The investigation showed that part of Cr(3+) was oxidized to Cr(6+) in the clinkering process and identified as the chromium compounds Ca(4)Al(6)O(12)CrO(4) (3CaO·Al(20O(3)·CaCrO(4)), which resulted in the higher leaching of hydrated matrix of Cr-doped C(3)A.

  8. Activation of C3a receptor is required in cigarette smoke-mediated emphysema.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Shan, M; You, R; Frazier, M V; Hong, M J; Wetsel, R A; Drouin, S; Seryshev, A; Song, L-Z; Cornwell, L; Rossen, R D; Corry, D B; Kheradmand, F

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke can initiate sterile inflammatory responses in the lung and activate myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) that induce differentiation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the emphysematous lungs. Consumption of complement proteins increases in acute inflammation, but the contribution of complement protein 3 (C3) to chronic cigarette smoke-induced immune responses in the lung is not clear. Here, we show that following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, C3-deficient (C3(-/-)) mice develop less emphysema and have fewer CD11b(+)CD11c(+) mDCs infiltrating the lungs as compared with wild-type mice. Proteolytic cleavage of C3 by neutrophil elastase releases C3a, which in turn increases the expression of its receptor (C3aR) on lung mDCs. Mice deficient in the C3aR (C3ar(-/-)) partially phenocopy the attenuated responses to chronic smoke observed in C3(-/-) mice. Consistent with a role for C3 in emphysema, C3 and its active fragments are deposited on the lung tissue of smokers with emphysema, and smoke-exposed mice. Together, these findings suggest a critical role for C3a through autocrine/paracrine induction of C3aR in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke-induced sterile inflammation and provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of emphysema.

  9. Activation of C3a receptor is required in cigarette smoke-mediated emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoyi; Shan, Ming; You, Ran; Frazier, Michael V.; Hong, Monica Jeongsoo; Wetsel, Rick A.; Drouin, Scott; Seryshev, Alexander; MD, Li-zhen Song; Cornwell, Lorraine; Rossen, Roger D; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke can initiate sterile inflammatory responses in the lung and activate myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) that induce differentiation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the emphysematous lungs. Consumption of complement proteins increases in acute inflammation, but the contribution of complement protein 3 (C3) to chronic cigarette smoke-induced immune responses in the lung is not clear. Here we show that following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, C3 deficient (C3−/−) mice develop less emphysema and have fewer CD11b+CD11c+ mDCs infiltrating the lungs as compared to wild type mice. Proteolytic cleavage of C3 by neutrophil elastase releases C3a, which in turn increases expression of its receptor (C3aR) on lung mDCs. Mice deficient in the C3aR (C3ar−/−) partially phenocopy the attenuated responses to chronic smoke observed in C3−/− mice. Consistent with a role for C3 in emphysema C3 and its active fragments are deposited on the lung tissue of smokers with emphysema, and smoke exposed mice. Together, these findings suggest a critical role for C3a through autocrine/paracrine induction of C3aR in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke induced sterile inflammation and provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of emphysema. PMID:25465103

  10. Human C5a anaphylatoxin: gene cloning and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bautsch, W; Emde, M; Kretzschmar, T; Köhl, J; Suckau, D; Bitter-Suermann, D

    1992-06-01

    A gene coding for the human anaphylatoxin C5a was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A combination of reverse transcription of mRNA of the U937 cell line with subsequent preparative polymerase chain reaction was employed to obtain the gene. The sequence was cloned into the plasmid vector pKK 233-2 behind an ATG initiation codon under the control of a trc promotor. After purification by ion exchange chromatography and reversed phase FPLC a mixture of predominantly non-glycosylated recombinant human C5a with a beta-mercaptoethanol adduct at cysteine 27 and the N-methionyl derivative was obtained which was homogeneous on silver-stained gels, immunoreactive with C5a-specific monoclonal antibodies and functionally active in releasing myeloperoxidase from human granulocytes and ATP from guinea pig platelets. The final yield was about 0.4-0.8 mg purified recombinant C5a per liter bacterial culture.

  11. Complement component C3aR constitutes a novel regulator for chick eye morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Bierly, Jeffrey; Haynes, Tracy; Reis, Edimara S; Han, Zeyu; Gutierrez, Christian; McKinney, Zachary; Tzekou, Apostolia; Lambris, John D; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2017-08-01

    Complement components have been implicated in a wide variety of functions including neurogenesis, proliferation, cell migration, differentiation, cancer, and more recently early development and regeneration. Following our initial observations indicating that C3a/C3aR signaling induces chick retina regeneration, we analyzed its role in chick eye morphogenesis. During eye development, the optic vesicle (OV) invaginates to generate a bilayer optic cup (OC) that gives rise to the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. We show by immunofluorescence staining that C3 and the receptor for C3a (the cleaved and active form of C3), C3aR, are present in chick embryos during eye morphogenesis in the OV and OC. Interestingly, C3aR is mainly localized in the nuclear compartment at the OC stage. Loss of function studies at the OV stage using morpholinos or a blocking antibody targeting the C3aR (anti-C3aR Ab), causes eye defects such as microphthalmia and defects in the ventral portion of the eye that result in coloboma. Such defects were not observed when C3aR was disrupted at the OC stage. Histological analysis demonstrated that microphthalmic eyes were unable to generate a normal optic stalk or a closed OC. The dorsal/ventral patterning defects were accompanied by an expansion of the ventral markers Pax2, cVax and retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme raldh-3 (aldh1a3) domains, an absence of the dorsal expression of Tbx5 and raldh-1 (aldh1a1) and a re-specification of the ventral RPE to neuroepithelium. In addition, the eyes showed overall decreased expression of Gli1 and a change in distribution of nuclear β-catenin, suggesting that Shh and Wnt pathways have been affected. Finally, we observed prominent cell death along with a decrease in proliferating cells, indicating that both processes contribute to the microphthalmic phenotype. Together our results show that C3aR is necessary for the proper morphogenesis of the OC. This is the first report implicating C3aR in

  12. Characterization of a functional C3A liver spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Harriet; Sharma, Parveen; Colley, Helen E; Murdoch, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Webb, Steven D

    2016-06-01

    More predictive in vitro liver models are a critical requirement for preclinical screening of compounds demonstrating hepatotoxic liability. 3D liver spheroids have been shown to have an enhanced functional lifespan compared to 2D monocultures; however a detailed characterisation of spatiotemporal function and structure of spheroids still needs further attention before widespread use in industry. We have developed and characterized the structure and function of a 3D liver spheroid model formed from C3A hepatoma cells. Spheroids were viable and maintained a compact in vivo-like structure with zonation features for up to 32 days. MRP2 and Pgp transporters had polarised expression on the canalicular membrane of cells in the spheroids and were able to functionally transport CMFDA substrate into these canalicular structures. Spheroids expressed CYP2E1 and were able to synthesise and secrete albumin and urea to a higher degree than monolayer C3A cultures. Penetration of doxorubicin throughout the spheroid core was demonstrated. Spheroids showed increased susceptibility to hepatotoxins when compared to 2D cultures, with acetaminophen having an IC50 of 7.2 mM in spheroids compared to 33.8 mM in monolayer culture. To conclude, we developed an alternative method for creating C3A liver spheroids and demonstrated cellular polarisation and zonation, as well as superior liver-specific functionality and more sensitive toxicological response compared to standard 2D liver models, confirming a more in vivo-like liver model.

  13. Intranasal C3a treatment ameliorates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Stokowska, Anna; Walker, Frederik R; Mallard, Carina; Hagberg, Henrik; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal asphyxia-induced brain injury is often associated with irreversible neurological complications such as intellectual disability and cerebral palsy but available therapies are limited. Novel neuroprotective therapies as well as approaches stimulating neural plasticity mechanism that can compensate for cell death after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are urgently needed. We previously reported that single i.c.v. injection of complement-derived peptide C3a 1h after HI induction prevented HI-induced cognitive impairment when mice were tested as adults. Here, we tested the effects of intranasal treatment with C3a on HI-induced cognitive deficit. Using the object recognition test, we found that intranasal C3a treated mice were protected from HI-induced impairment of memory function assessed 6weeks after HI induction. C3a treatment ameliorated HI-induced reactive gliosis in the hippocampus, while it did not affect the extent of hippocampal tissue loss, neuronal cell density, expression of the pan-synaptic marker synapsin I or the expression of growth associated protein 43. In conclusion, our results reveal that brief pharmacological treatment with C3a using a clinically feasible non-invasive mode of administration ameliorates HI-induced cognitive impairment. Intranasal administration is a plausible route to deliver C3a into the brain of asphyxiated infants at high risk of developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  14. Drusen complement components C3a and C5a promote choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Miho; Raisler, Brian J.; Sakurai, Eiji; Sarma, J. Vidya; Barnum, Scott R.; Lambris, John D.; Chen, Yali; Zhang, Kang; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Baffi, Judit Z.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2006-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized nations, affecting 30–50 million people worldwide. The earliest clinical hallmark of AMD is the presence of drusen, extracellular deposits that accumulate beneath the retinal pigmented epithelium. Although drusen nearly always precede and increase the risk of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), the late vision-threatening stage of AMD, it is unknown whether drusen contribute to the development of CNV. Both in patients with AMD and in a recently described mouse model of AMD, early subretinal pigmented epithelium deposition of complement components C3 and C5 occurs, suggesting a contributing role for these inflammatory proteins in the development of AMD. Here we provide evidence that bioactive fragments of these complement components (C3a and C5a) are present in drusen of patients with AMD, and that C3a and C5a induce VEGF expression in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that C3a and C5a are generated early in the course of laser-induced CNV, an accelerated model of neovascular AMD driven by VEGF and recruitment of leukocytes into the choroid. We also show that genetic ablation of receptors for C3a or C5a reduces VEGF expression, leukocyte recruitment, and CNV formation after laser injury, and that antibody-mediated neutralization of C3a or C5a or pharmacological blockade of their receptors also reduces CNV. Collectively, these findings establish a mechanistic basis for the clinical observation that drusen predispose to CNV, revealing a role for immunological phenomena in angiogenesis and providing therapeutic targets for AMD. PMID:16452172

  15. Expression cloning of a receptor for C5a anaphylatoxin on differentiated HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boulay, F.; Mery, L.; Tardif, M.; Brouchon, L.; Vignais, P. )

    1991-03-26

    A cDNA clone encoding the human C5a anaphylatoxin receptor has been isolated by expression cloning from a CDM8 expression library prepared from mRNA of human myeloid HL-60 cells differentiated to the granulocyte phenotype with dibutyryladenosine cyclic monophosphate. The cDNA clone was able to transfer to COS-7 cells the capacity to specifically bind iodinated human recombinant C5a. The cDNA was 2.3 kb long, with an open reading frame encoding a 350-residue polypeptide. Cross-linking of iodinated C5a to the plasma membrane of transfected COS cells revealed a complex with an apparent molecular mass of 52-55 kDa, similar to that observed for the constitutively expressed receptor in differentiated HL-60 cells or human neutrophils. Although differentiated HL-60 cells display a single class of binding sites, with a dissociation constant of approximately 800-900 pM, the C5a-R cDNA, expressed in COS cells, generates both high-affinity (1.7 nM) and low-affinity (20-25 nM) receptors. Sequence comparison established that the degree of sequence identity between the C5a receptor and the N-formlypeptide receptor is 34%.

  16. Differences in the involvement of prostanoids from Kupffer cells in the mediation of anaphylatoxin C5a-, zymosan-, and lipopolysaccharide-dependent hepatic glucose output and flow reduction.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Schlaf, Gerald; Götze, Otto; Jungermann, Kurt; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2003-12-01

    Various inflammatory stimuli such as anaphylatoxin C5a, zymosan, and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have been reported both to enhance glucose output in the perfused rat liver and to induce prostanoid (ie, prostaglandin and thromboxane) release from Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages. Because prostanoids can enhance glucose output from hepatocytes, it was the aim of this study to compare the possible roles of prostanoids released after C5a, zymosan, and LPS in the mediation of hepatic glucose output. In perfused livers both C5a and zymosan immediately enhanced glucose output, reduced flow, and induced prostanoid overflow into the hepatic vein, but with different quantities and kinetics. Only the C5a-induced but not the zymosan-induced effects were abrogated by inhibitors of prostanoid signaling as the prostanoid synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the thromboxane receptor antagonist daltroban. In contrast to C5a and zymosan, LPS had no effect on glucose output, flow rate, or prostanoid overflow. In isolated Kupffer cells, C5a and zymosan induced maximal release of prostaglandins D(2) and E(2) and of thromboxane A(2) within a period of 0 to 2 minutes and 5 to 15 minutes, respectively. In pulse-chase experiments, maximal prostanoid release was already observed after 2 minutes of continuous stimulation with C5a, but only after 10 to 15 minutes of continuous stimulation with zymosan. LPS-dependent prostanoid release was not seen before 1 hour. Thus, even though C5a, zymosan, and LPS induced prostanoid release from Kupffer cells, only C5a quickly regulated hepatic glucose metabolism in a prostanoid-dependent manner (due to the kinetics and quantities of prostanoids released).

  17. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti

  18. Peptidyl arginine deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis abolishes anaphylatoxin C5a activity.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J; Prossnitz, Eric R; Blom, Anna M; Potempa, Jan

    2014-11-21

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis.

  19. Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis Abolishes Anaphylatoxin C5a Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Blom, Anna M.; Potempa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis. PMID:25324545

  20. A previously unrecognized role of C3a in proteinuric progressive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Morigi, Marina; Locatelli, Monica; Rota, Cinzia; Buelli, Simona; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Conti, Debora; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte loss is the initial event in the development of glomerulosclerosis, the structural hallmark of progressive proteinuric nephropathies. Understanding mechanisms underlying glomerular injury is the key challenge for identifying novel therapeutic targets. In mice with protein-overload induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA), we evaluated whether the alternative pathway (AP) of complement mediated podocyte depletion and podocyte-dependent parietal epithelial cell (PEC) activation causing glomerulosclerosis. Factor H (Cfh−/−) or factor B-deficient mice were studied in comparison with wild-type (WT) littermates. WT+BSA mice showed podocyte depletion accompanied by glomerular complement C3 and C3a deposits, PEC migration to capillary tuft, proliferation, and glomerulosclerosis. These changes were more prominent in Cfh−/− +BSA mice. The pathogenic role of AP was documented by data that factor B deficiency preserved glomerular integrity. In protein-overload mice, PEC dysregulation was associated with upregulation of CXCR4 and GDNF/c-Ret axis. In vitro studies provided additional evidence of a direct action of C3a on proliferation and CXCR4-related migration of PECs. These effects were enhanced by podocyte-derived GDNF. In patients with proteinuric nephropathy, glomerular C3/C3a paralleled PEC activation, CXCR4 and GDNF upregulation. These results indicate that mechanistically uncontrolled AP complement activation is not dispensable for podocyte-dependent PEC activation resulting in glomerulosclerosis. PMID:27345360

  1. Complement C3a binding to its receptor as a negative modulator of Th2 response in liver injury in trichloroethylene-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Zha, Wan-sheng; Zhang, Jia-xiang; Li, Shu-long; Wang, Hui; Ye, Liang-ping; Shen, Tong; Wu, Chang-hao; Zhu, Qi-xing

    2014-08-17

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major occupational health hazard and causes occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis (OMLDT) and liver damage. Recent evidence suggests immune response as a distinct mode of action for TCE-induced liver damage. This study aimed to explore the role of the key complement activation product C3a and its receptor C3aR in TCE-induced immune liver injury. A mouse model of skin sensitization was induced by TCE in the presence and absence of the C3aR antagonist SB 290157. Liver function was evaluated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in conjunction with histopathological characterizations. C3a and C3aR were detected by immunohistochemistry and C5b-9 was assessed by immunofluorescence. IFN-γ and IL4 expressions were determined by flow cytometry and ELISA. The total sensitization rate was 44.1%. TCE sensitization caused liver cell necrosis and inflammatory infiltration, elevated serum ALT and AST, expression of C3a and C3aR, and deposition of C5b-9 in the liver. IFN-γ and IL-4 expressions were up-regulated in spleen mononuclear cells and their serum levels were also increased. Pretreatment with SB 290157 resulted in more inflammatory infiltration in the liver, higher levels of AST, reduced C3aR expression on Kupffer cells, and decreased IL-4 levels while IFN-γ remained unchanged. These data demonstrate that blocking of C3a binding to C3aR reduces IL4, shifts IFN-γ and IL-4 balance, and aggravates TCE-sensitization induced liver damage. These findings reveal a novel mechanism whereby modulation of Th2 response by C3a binding to C3a receptor contributes to immune-mediated liver damage by TCE exposure.

  2. Characterization of a C3a receptor in rainbow trout and Xenopus: the first identification of C3a receptors in nonmammalian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boshra, Hani; Wang, Tiehui; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Hansen, John D.; Li, Jun; Matlapudi, Anjun; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tort, Lluis; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2005-01-01

    Virtually nothing is known about the structure, function, and evolutionary origins of the C3aR in nonmammalian species. Because C3aR and C5aR are thought to have arisen from the same common ancestor, the recent characterization of a C5aR in teleost fish implied the presence of a C3aR in this animal group. In this study we report the cloning of a trout cDNA encoding a 364-aa molecule (TC3aR) that shows a high degree of sequence homology and a strong phylogenetic relationship with mammalian C3aRs. Northern blotting demonstrated that TC3aR was expressed primarily in blood leukocytes. Flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Abs raised against TC3aR stained to a high degree all blood B lymphocytes and, to a lesser extent, all granulocytes. More importantly, these Abs inhibited trout C3a-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization in trout leukocytes. A fascinating structural feature of TC3aR is the lack of a significant portion of the second extracellular loop (ECL2). In all C3aR molecules characterized to date, the ECL2 is exceptionally large when compared with the same region of C5aR. However, the exact function of the extra portion of ECL2 is unknown. The lack of this segment in TC3aR suggests that the extra piece of ECL2 was not necessary for the interaction of the ancestral C3aR with its ligand. Our findings represent the first C3aR characterized in nonmammalian species and support the hypothesis that if C3aR and C5aR diverged from a common ancestor, this event occurred before the emergence of teleost fish.

  3. Different activation signals induce distinct mast cell degranulation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Marichal, Thomas; Reber, Laurent L.; Cenac, Nicolas; McNeil, Benjamin D.; Dong, Xinzhong; Hernandez, Joseph D.; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit; Hammel, Ilan; Roers, Axel; Valitutti, Salvatore; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) influence intercellular communication during inflammation by secreting cytoplasmic granules that contain diverse mediators. Here, we have demonstrated that MCs decode different activation stimuli into spatially and temporally distinct patterns of granule secretion. Certain signals, including substance P, the complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and endothelin 1, induced human MCs rapidly to secrete small and relatively spherical granule structures, a pattern consistent with the secretion of individual granules. Conversely, activating MCs with anti-IgE increased the time partition between signaling and secretion, which was associated with a period of sustained elevation of intracellular calcium and formation of larger and more heterogeneously shaped granule structures that underwent prolonged exteriorization. Pharmacological inhibition of IKK-β during IgE-dependent stimulation strongly reduced the time partition between signaling and secretion, inhibited SNAP23/STX4 complex formation, and switched the degranulation pattern into one that resembled degranulation induced by substance P. IgE-dependent and substance P–dependent activation in vivo also induced different patterns of mouse MC degranulation that were associated with distinct local and systemic pathophysiological responses. These findings show that cytoplasmic granule secretion from MCs that occurs in response to different activating stimuli can exhibit distinct dynamics and features that are associated with distinct patterns of MC-dependent inflammation. PMID:27643442

  4. Contribution of anaphylatoxin C5a to late airway responses after repeated exposure of antigen to allergic rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Shibata, K; Akatsu, H; Shimizu, N; Sakata, N; Katsuragi, T; Okada, H

    2001-10-15

    We attempted to elucidate the contribution of complement to allergic asthma. Rat sensitized to OVA received repeated intratracheal exposures to OVA for up to 3 consecutive days, and pulmonary resistance was then estimated for up to 6 h after the last exposure. Whereas the immediate airway response (IAR) in terms of R(L) tended to decrease in proportion to the number of OVA exposures, late airway response (LAR) became prominent only after three. Although premedication with two kinds of complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) or nafamostat mesylate, resulted in inhibition of the IAR after either a single or a double exposure, the LAR was inhibited after the triple. Premedication with a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA) before every exposure to OVA also inhibited the LAR after three. Repeated OVA exposure resulted in eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration into the bronchial submucosa which was suppressed by premedication with sCR1 or C5aRA. Up-regulation of C5aR mRNA was shown in lungs after triple OVA exposure, but almost no up-regulation of C3aR. Pretreatment with sCR1 or C5aRA suppressed the up-regulation of C5aR expression as well as cytokine messages in the lungs. The suppression of LAR by pretreatment with sCR1 was reversed by intratracheal instillation of rat C5a desArg the action of which was inhibited by C5aRA. In contrast, rat C3a desArg or cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 induced cellular infiltration into the bronchial submucosa by costimulation with OVA, but these had no influence on the LAR. These differences might be explained by the fact that costimulation with OVA and C5a synergistically potentiated IAR, whereas that with OVA and either C3a or cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 did not. C5a generated by Ag-Ab complexes helps in the production of cytokines and contributes to the LAR after repeated exposure to Ag.

  5. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  6. Apolipoprotein A1/C3/A5 haplotypes and serum lipid levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein (Apo) A1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster and serum lipid profiles is inconsistent. The present study was undertaken to detect the association between the ApoA1/C3/A5 gene polymorphisms and their haplotypes with serum lipid levels ...

  7. Targeting C3a/C5a Receptors Inhibits Human Mesangial Cell Proliferation and Alleviates IgA Nephropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yan, Xianli; Zhao, Ting; Xu, Qihe; Peng, Qi; Hu, Ruimin; Quan, Songxia; Zhou, Yali; Xing, Guolan

    2017-03-15

    Complement activation has a deep pathogenic influence in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). C3a and C5a, small cleavage fragments generated by complement activation, are key mediators of inflammation. The fragments exert broad pro-inflammatory effects by binding to specific receptors (C3aR and C5aR, respectively). However, no studies thus far have investigated the effects of C3a, C5a and their receptors on IgAN. We observed that C3aR and C5aR antagonists repressed IgA-induced cell proliferation and IL-6 and MCP-1 production in cultured human mesangial cells (HMCs). Furthermore, an IgAN mouse model induced by Sendai virus infection was employed to investigate the effects of C3aR and C5aR on IgAN in vivo for the first time. Wild-type (WT) and several knockout mouse strains (C3aR(-/-) or C5aR(-/-) ) were immunised intranasally with increasing doses of inactivated virus for 14 weeks and were subjected to two intravenous viral challenges during the indicated time period. In the Sendai virus-induced IgAN model, C3aR/C5aR-deficient mice had significantly reduced proteinuria, lower renal IgA and C3 deposition, less histologic damage and reduced mesangial proliferation compared with WT mice. Both C3aR deficiency and C5aR deficiency, especially C3aR deficiency, significantly inhibited renal TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1 expression. However, C3aR/C5aR-deficient and WT mice with IgAN did not differ with respect to their BUN and SCr levels. Our findings provide further support for the idea that C3aR and C5aR are crucially important in IgAN and suggest that pharmaceutically targeting C3aR/C5aR may hold promise for the treatment of IgAN. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural basis for the targeting of complement anaphylatoxin C5a using a mixed L-RNA/L-DNA aptamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatime, Laure; Maasch, Christian; Hoehlig, Kai; Klussmann, Sven; Andersen, Gregers R.; Vater, Axel

    2015-04-01

    L-Oligonucleotide aptamers (Spiegelmers) consist of non-natural L-configured nucleotides and are of particular therapeutic interest due to their high resistance to plasma nucleases. The anaphylatoxin C5a, a potent inflammatory mediator generated during complement activation that has been implicated with organ damage, can be efficiently targeted by Spiegelmers. Here, we present the first crystallographic structures of an active Spiegelmer, NOX-D20, bound to its physiological targets, mouse C5a and C5a-desArg. The structures reveal a complex 3D architecture for the L-aptamer that wraps around C5a, including an intramolecular G-quadruplex stabilized by a central Ca2+ ion. Functional validation of the observed L-aptamer:C5a binding mode through mutational studies also rationalizes the specificity of NOX-D20 for mouse and human C5a against macaque and rat C5a. Finally, our structural model provides the molecular basis for the Spiegelmer affinity improvement through positional L-ribonucleotide to L-deoxyribonucleotide exchanges and for its inhibition of the C5a:C5aR interaction.

  9. Mice lacking C1q are protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and impaired glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hillian, Antoinette D; McMullen, Megan R; Sebastian, Becky M; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Rowchowdhury, Sanjoy; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Kirwan, John P; Feldstein, Ariel E; Nagy, Laura E

    2013-08-02

    Complement activation is implicated in the development of obesity and insulin resistance, and loss of signaling by the anaphylatoxin C3a prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. Here we have identified C1q in the classical pathway as required for activation of complement in response to high fat diets. After 8 weeks of high fat diet, wild-type mice became obese and developed glucose intolerance. This was associated with increased apoptotic cell death and accumulation of complement activation products (C3b/iC3b/C3c) in liver and adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that high fat diet-induced apoptosis is dependent on Bid; here we report that Bid-mediated apoptosis was required for complement activation in adipose and liver. Although C1qa deficiency had no effect on high fat diet-induced apoptosis, accumulation of complement activation products and the metabolic complications of high fat diet-induced obesity were dependent on C1q. When wild-type mice were fed a high fat diet for only 3 days, hepatic insulin resistance was associated with the accumulation of C3b/iC3b/C3c in the liver. Mice deficient in C3a receptor were protected against this early high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance, whereas mice deficient in the negative complement regulator CD55/DAF were more sensitive to the high fat diet. C1qa(-/-) mice were also protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and complement activation. Evidence of complement activation was also detected in adipose tissue of obese women compared with lean women. Together, these studies reveal an important role for C1q in the classical pathway of complement activation in the development of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance.

  10. Anaphylatoxin C5a fails to promote prostacyclin release from cultured human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lunberg, C.; Marceau, F.; Huey, R.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-03-01

    A predominantly relaxing effect of C5a on isolated blood vessels has been reported, which is associated with prostacyclin release from the vessel wall. Further, the well known hypothensive effect of C5a, also associated with increased prostacyclin output and preventable by indomethacin, indicates an involvement of endothelial cells in this reaction. In this study the authors characterized the response to C5a of cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical vein as measured by prostacyclin release. Prostacyclin was quantitated by radioimmunoassay as 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. Subcultured cells respond to histamine and mellitin with increased prostacyclin production, but do not respond to leukotriene C4 (LTC/sub 4/). Primary cultures, on the other hand, respond to LTC/sub 4/ and the histamine response is 7-fold greater for these cells than for subcultured cells. However, neither primary nor subcultured cells release prostacyclin following application of either human C5a (100 nM) or C3a (1 ..mu..M). Also, these cells fail to show specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-C5a. In contrast, endothelial cells in the presence of human PMNs challenged with C5a release prostacyclin. These data suggest that C5a has no direct effect on the endothelial cell, but rather activates this cell indirectly via mediators from other cells known to respond to C5a.

  11. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  12. TLR-Induced Murine Dendritic Cell (DC) Activation Requires DC-Intrinsic Complement.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joong-Hyuk; Strainic, Michael G; Liu, Jinbo; Zhang, Weijia; Yi, Zhengzi; Medof, M Edward; Heeger, Peter S

    2017-07-01

    Induction of proinflammatory T cell immunity is augmented by innate dendritic cell (DC) maturation commonly initiated by TLR signaling. We demonstrate that ligation of TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 induces murine DC production of complement components and local production of the anaphylatoxin C5a. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo analyses show that TLR-induced DC maturation, as assessed by surface phenotype, expression profiling by gene array, and functional ability to stimulate T cell responses, requires autocrine C3a receptor and C5a receptor (C3ar1/C5ar1) signaling. Studies using bone marrow chimeric animals and Foxp3-GFP/ERT2-Cre/dTomato fate-mapping mice show that TLR-initiated DC autocrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling causes expansion of effector T cells and instability of regulatory T cells and contributes to T cell-dependent transplant rejection. Together, our data position immune cell-derived complement production and autocrine/paracrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling as crucial intermediary processes that link TLR stimulation to DC maturation and the subsequent development of effector T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Calculation of the C3A Percentage in High Sulfur Clinker

    PubMed Central

    Horkoss, Sayed; Lteif, Roger; Rizk, Toufic

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the influence of the clinker SO3 on the amount of C3A. The calculation of the cement phases percentages is based on the research work, Calculation of the Compounds in Portland Cement, published by Bogue in 1929 .The usage of high sulphur fuels, industrial wastes, and tires changes completely the working condition of Bogue because the assumed phase compositions may change. The results prove that increasing the amount of SO3 in the low alkali clinker decreases the percentages of C3A due to the high incorporation of alumina in the clinker phases mainly C2S and C3S. The correlation is linear till the clinker SO3 reaches the 2%. Over that the influence of the clinker SO3 became undetectable. A new calculation method for the determination of the C3A in the high sulphur and low alkali clinker was proposed. PMID:20689732

  14. The receptor for complement component C3a mediates protection from intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by inhibiting neutrophil mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mike C. L.; Brennan, Faith H.; Lynch, Jason P. L.; Mantovani, Susanna; Phipps, Simon; Wetsel, Rick A.; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2013-01-01

    C3a is a key complement activation fragment, yet its neutrophil-expressed receptor (C3aR) still has no clearly defined role. In this study, we used a neutrophil-dependent mouse model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to explore the role of C3aR in acute tissue injuries. C3aR deficiency worsened intestinal injury, which corresponded with increased numbers of tissue-infiltrating neutrophils. Circulating neutrophils were significantly increased in C3aR−/− mice after intestinal ischemia, and C3aR−/− mice also mobilized more circulating neutrophils after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor infusion compared with WT mice, indicating a specific role for C3aR in constraining neutrophil mobilization in response to intestinal injury. In support of this role, C3aR−/− mice reconstituted with WT bone marrow reversed IR pathology back to WT levels. Complement C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonism in C3aR−/− mice also rectified the worsened pathology after intestinal IR injury but had no effect on circulating neutrophils, highlighting the opposing roles of C3a and C5a in disease pathogenesis. Finally, we found that using a potent C3a agonist to activate C3aR in vivo reduced neutrophil mobilization and ameliorated intestinal IR pathology in WT, but not C3aR−/−, mice. This study identifies a role for C3aR in regulating neutrophil mobilization after acute intestinal injury and highlights C3aR agonism as a potential treatment option for acute, neutrophil-driven pathologies. PMID:23696668

  15. The receptor for complement component C3a mediates protection from intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by inhibiting neutrophil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mike C L; Brennan, Faith H; Lynch, Jason P L; Mantovani, Susanna; Phipps, Simon; Wetsel, Rick A; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Taylor, Stephen M; Woodruff, Trent M

    2013-06-04

    C3a is a key complement activation fragment, yet its neutrophil-expressed receptor (C3aR) still has no clearly defined role. In this study, we used a neutrophil-dependent mouse model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to explore the role of C3aR in acute tissue injuries. C3aR deficiency worsened intestinal injury, which corresponded with increased numbers of tissue-infiltrating neutrophils. Circulating neutrophils were significantly increased in C3aR(-/-) mice after intestinal ischemia, and C3aR(-/-) mice also mobilized more circulating neutrophils after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor infusion compared with WT mice, indicating a specific role for C3aR in constraining neutrophil mobilization in response to intestinal injury. In support of this role, C3aR(-/-) mice reconstituted with WT bone marrow reversed IR pathology back to WT levels. Complement C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonism in C3aR(-/-) mice also rectified the worsened pathology after intestinal IR injury but had no effect on circulating neutrophils, highlighting the opposing roles of C3a and C5a in disease pathogenesis. Finally, we found that using a potent C3a agonist to activate C3aR in vivo reduced neutrophil mobilization and ameliorated intestinal IR pathology in WT, but not C3aR(-/-), mice. This study identifies a role for C3aR in regulating neutrophil mobilization after acute intestinal injury and highlights C3aR agonism as a potential treatment option for acute, neutrophil-driven pathologies.

  16. Complement Fragment C3a Controls Mutual Cell Attraction during Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Theveneau, Eric; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tada, Masazumi; Woods, Mae; Page, Karen M.; Parsons, Maddy; Lambris, John D.; Mayor, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Collective cell migration is a mode of movement crucial for morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. However, little is known about how migratory cells coordinate collectively. Here we show that mutual cell-cell attraction (named here coattraction) is required to maintain cohesive clusters of migrating mesenchymal cells. Coattraction can counterbalance the natural tendency of cells to disperse via mechanisms such as contact inhibition and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Neural crest cells are coattracted via the complement fragment C3a and its receptor C3aR, revealing an unexpected role of complement proteins in early vertebrate development. Loss of coattraction disrupts collective and coordinated movements of these cells. We propose that coattraction and contact inhibition act in concert to allow cell collectives to self-organize and respond efficiently to external signals, such as chemoattractants and repellents. PMID:22118769

  17. Complement fragment C3a controls mutual cell attraction during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Theveneau, Eric; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tada, Masazumi; Woods, Mae; Page, Karen M; Parsons, Maddy; Lambris, John D; Mayor, Roberto

    2011-12-13

    Collective cell migration is a mode of movement crucial for morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. However, little is known about how migratory cells coordinate collectively. Here we show that mutual cell-cell attraction (named here coattraction) is required to maintain cohesive clusters of migrating mesenchymal cells. Coattraction can counterbalance the natural tendency of cells to disperse via mechanisms such as contact inhibition and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Neural crest cells are coattracted via the complement fragment C3a and its receptor C3aR, revealing an unexpected role of complement proteins in early vertebrate development. Loss of coattraction disrupts collective and coordinated movements of these cells. We propose that coattraction and contact inhibition act in concert to allow cell collectives to self-organize and respond efficiently to external signals, such as chemoattractants and repellents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spongy polyethersulfone membrane for hepatocyte cultivation: studies on human hepatoma C3A cells.

    PubMed

    Kinasiewicz, Andrzej; Smietanka, Anna; Dudziński, Konrad; Chwojnowski, Andrzej; Gajkowska, Barbara; Weryński, Andrzej

    2008-09-01

    There are different types of membranes used for hepatocyte cultivation. In our studies, spongy polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were examined as a support for hepatic cell cultivation in vitro. The extended surface of the membranes allows to introduce a high cell number especially in three-dimensional gel structure. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that C3A cells used in our experiments grew well on PES membranes forming microvilli characteristic for normal hepatocytes. Analysis of cell viability proved that spongy PES membrane is well tolerated by J774 macrophages and did not stimulate nitric oxide synthesis. Bile canalicular structures were observed in fluorescence microscopy after F-actin staining with tetramethyl rhodamine iso-thiocyanate (TRITC)-phalloidin. The C3A cells showed high affinity to the PES membranes and adhered to almost 90% during the initial 24 h of incubation. Albumin production increased during static culture from the value of 805.2 +/- 284.4 (ng/24 h/initial 10(6) cells) during the first days, to 2017.6 +/- 505.9 (ng/24 h/initial 10(6) cells) after 10 days of culture. In conclusion, the spongy PES membranes can be used as scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation, especially for the creation of three-dimensional environments.

  19. Lie superbialgebra structures on the Lie superalgebra (C3+A) and deformation of related integrable Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghbali, A.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A.

    2017-06-01

    Admissible structure constants related to the dual Lie superalgebras of particular Lie superalgebra (C3+A ) are found by straightforward calculations from the matrix form of super Jacobi and mixed super Jacobi identities which are obtained from adjoint representation. Then, by making use of the automorphism supergroup of the Lie superalgebra (C3+A ) , the Lie superbialgebra structures on the Lie superalgebra (C3+A ) are obtained and classified into inequivalent 31 families. We also determine all corresponding coboundary and bi-r-matrix Lie superbialgebras. The quantum deformations associated with some Lie superbialgebras (C3+A ) are obtained, together with the corresponding deformed Casimir elements. As an application of these quantum deformations, we construct a deformed integrable Hamiltonian system from the representation of the Hopf superalgebra Uλ (Cp=1 2 ,𝜖⊕A1 ,1 )(C3+A).

  20. CNS-specific expression of C3a and C5a exacerbate demyelination severity in the cuprizone model.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Sarah A; Martin, Carol B; Barnum, Scott R; Martin, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is known to involve several immune effector mechanisms, including complement proteins. Local production of complement by glial cells in the brain can be both harmful and protective. To investigate the roles of C3a and C5a in demyelination and remyelination pathology we utilized the cuprizone model. Transgenic mice expressing C3a or C5a under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter had exacerbated demyelination and slightly delayed remyelination in the corpus callosum compared to WT mice. C3a and C5a transgenic mice had increased cellularity in the corpus callosum due to increase activation and/or migration of microglia. Oligodendrocytes migrated to the corpus callosum in higher numbers during early remyelination events in C3a and C5a transgenic mice, thus enabling these mice to remyelinate as effectively as WT mice by the end of the 10 week study. To determine the effects of C3a and/or C5a on individual glial subsets, we created murine recombinant C3a and C5a proteins. When microglia and mixed glial cultures were stimulated with C3a and/or C5a, we observed an increase in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In contrast, astrocytes had decreased cytokine and chemokine production in the presence of C3a and/or C5a. We also found that the MAPK pathway proteins JNK and ERK1/2 were activated in glia upon stimulation with C3a and C5a. Overall, our findings show that although C3a and C5a production in the brain play a negative role during demyelination, these proteins may aid in remyelination.

  1. Celastrol attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation in palmitate-mediated insulin resistance in C3A hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Tan, Joo Shun; Mohamad Rosdi, Mohamad Norisham

    2017-03-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction-induced inflammation is among the convergence points for the greatest hallmarks of hepatic insulin resistance. Celastrol, an anti-inflammatory compound from the root of Tripterygium Wilfordii has been reported to mitigate insulin resistance and inflammation in animal disease models. Nevertheless, the specific mechanistic actions of celastrol in modulating such improvements at the cellular level remain obscure. The present study sought to explore the mechanistic roles of celastrol upon insulin resistance induced by palmitate in C3A human hepatocytes. The hepatocytes exposed to palmitate (0.75mM) for 48h exhibited reduced both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to increased mitochondrial oxidative stress with diminished fatty acid oxidation. Elevated expressions of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways and the amplified release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and CRP were observed following palmitate treatment. Consistently, palmitate reduced and augmented phosphorylated Tyrosine-612 and Serine-307 of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) proteins, respectively in hepatocytes. However, celastrol at the optimum concentration of 30nM was able to reverse these deleterious occasions and protected the cells from mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Importantly, we presented evidence for the first time that celastrol efficiently prevented palmitate-induced insulin resistance in hepatocytes at least, via improved mitochondrial functions and insulin signaling pathways. In summary, the present investigation underlines a conceivable mechanism to elucidate the cytoprotective potential of celastrol in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation against the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Crystal Structure of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from the Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen A. vaginae, an Immunoevasive Factor that Interacts with the Human C5a Anaphylatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Querol-García, Javier; Fernández, Francisco J.; Marin, Ana V.; Gómez, Sara; Fullà, Daniel; Melchor-Tafur, Cecilia; Franco-Hidalgo, Virginia; Albertí, Sebastián; Juanhuix, Jordi; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Regueiro, José R.; Vega, M. Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic human pathogenic bacterium Atopobium vaginae causes most diagnosed cases of bacterial vaginosis as well as opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. In addition to its well-established role in carbohydrate metabolism, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Streptococcus pyogenes and S. pneumoniae have been reported to act as extracellular virulence factors during streptococcal infections. Here, we report the crystal structure of GAPDH from A. vaginae (AvGAPDH) at 2.19 Å resolution. The refined model has a crystallographic Rfree of 22.6%. AvGAPDH is a homotetramer wherein each subunit is bound to a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) molecule. The AvGAPDH enzyme fulfills essential glycolytic as well as moonlight (non-glycolytic) functions, both of which might be targets of chemotherapeutic intervention. We report that AvGAPDH interacts in vitro with the human C5a anaphylatoxin and inhibits C5a-specific granulocyte chemotaxis, thereby suggesting the participation of AvGAPDH in complement-targeted immunoevasion in a context of infection. The availability of high-quality structures of AvGAPDH and other homologous virulence factors from Gram-positive pathogens is critical for drug discovery programs. In this study, sequence and structural differences between AvGAPDH and related bacterial and eukaryotic GAPDH enzymes are reported in an effort to understand how to subvert the immunoevasive properties of GAPDH and evaluate the potential of AvGAPDH as a druggable target. PMID:28443070

  3. Complement effectors, C5a and C3a, in cystic fibrosis lung fluid correlate with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Sass, Laura A.; Vazifedan, Turaj; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2017-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, inflammation and tissue destruction. The complement system is a major mediator of inflammation for many diseases with the effectors C5a and C3a often playing important roles. We have previously shown in a small pilot study that CF sputum soluble fraction concentrations of C5a and C3a were associated with clinical measures of CF disease. Here we report a much larger study of 34 CF subjects providing 169 testable sputum samples allowing longitudinal evaluation comparing C5a and C3a with clinical markers. Levels of the strongly pro-inflammatory C5a correlated negatively with FEV1% predicted (P < 0.001), whereas the often anti-inflammatory C3a correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (P = 0.01). C5a concentrations correlated negatively with BMI percentile (P = 0.017), positively with worsening of an acute pulmonary exacerbation score (P = 0.007) and positively with P. aeruginosa growth in sputum (P = 0.002). C5a levels also correlated positively with concentrations of other sputum markers associated with worse CF lung disease including neutrophil elastase (P < 0.001), myeloperoxidase activity (P = 0.006) and DNA concentration (P < 0.001). In contrast to C5a, C3a levels correlated negatively with worse acute pulmonary exacerbation score and correlated negatively with sputum concentrations of neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase activity and DNA concentration. In summary, these data suggest that in CF sputum, increased C5a is associated with increased inflammation and poorer clinical measures, whereas increased C3a appears to be associated with less inflammation and improved clinical measures. PMID:28278205

  4. C3a Increases VEGF and Decreases PEDF mRNA Levels in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Qin; Cao, Xiaoguang; Bian, Ailing; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation, specifically complement 3 (C3) activation and C3a generation, contributes to an imbalance between angiogenic stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenic inhibition by pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF), leading to pathological angiogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of C3a and small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting C3 on the levels of VEGF and PEDF mRNAs in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were cultured in the presence of exogenous C3a at 0.1 μM and 0.3 μM C3a for 24, 48, and 72 hours. 0.1 pmol/μL duplexes of siRNA targeting C3 were applied for C3a inhibition by transfecting ARPE-19 cells for 48 hours. RT-PCR was performed to examine the level of VEGF and PEDF mRNA. A random siRNA duplex was set for control siRNA. Results demonstrated that exogenous C3a significantly upregulated VEGF and downregulated PEDF mRNA levels in cultured ARPE-19 cells, and siRNA targeting C3 transfection reversed the above changes, significantly reducing VEGF and enhancing PEDF mRNAs level in ARPE-19 cells compared to the control. The present data provided evidence that reducing C3 activation can decreases VEGF and increase PEDF mRNA level in RPE and may serve as a potential therapy in pathological angiogenesis.

  5. C3a Increases VEGF and Decreases PEDF mRNA Levels in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qin; Cao, Xiaoguang; Bian, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation, specifically complement 3 (C3) activation and C3a generation, contributes to an imbalance between angiogenic stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenic inhibition by pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF), leading to pathological angiogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of C3a and small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting C3 on the levels of VEGF and PEDF mRNAs in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were cultured in the presence of exogenous C3a at 0.1 μM and 0.3 μM C3a for 24, 48, and 72 hours. 0.1 pmol/μL duplexes of siRNA targeting C3 were applied for C3a inhibition by transfecting ARPE-19 cells for 48 hours. RT-PCR was performed to examine the level of VEGF and PEDF mRNA. A random siRNA duplex was set for control siRNA. Results demonstrated that exogenous C3a significantly upregulated VEGF and downregulated PEDF mRNA levels in cultured ARPE-19 cells, and siRNA targeting C3 transfection reversed the above changes, significantly reducing VEGF and enhancing PEDF mRNAs level in ARPE-19 cells compared to the control. The present data provided evidence that reducing C3 activation can decreases VEGF and increase PEDF mRNA level in RPE and may serve as a potential therapy in pathological angiogenesis. PMID:27747237

  6. A novel protocol for the subcellular fractionation of C3A hepatoma cells using sucrose density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Kitambi Satish; Chandrasekar, Gayathri; Srivastava, Renu; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2004-07-30

    In this paper, we describe a method to obtain a relatively pure mitochondrial and microsomal fractions by subcellular fractionation of human hepatoma cell line C3A using sucrose as the hypoosmotic medium. The cells were subjected to osmotic stress with sucrose and homogenized. Osmolarity was then restored to the cells and the organelles were separated by density gradient centrifugation. The protein profiles were examined by SDS-PAGE and the purity was analysed by marker enzymes and Western blotting. Our results indicate a good separation of mitochondrial and microsomal fractions from human hepatoma C3A cells.

  7. The effect of FUT-175 (Nafamstat Mesilate) on C3a, C4a and C5a generation in vitro and inflammatory reactions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, A C; Roland, D M; Patrick, R A

    1990-01-01

    FUT-175 is a synthetic protease inhibitor and an inhibitor of the classical and alternate pathways of complement activation. In human serum, FUT-175 inhibited C3a, C4a and C5a generation induced by heat aggregated IgG, zymosan and Cobra venom factor with IC50 values in the range of 3-43 microM depending on the stimulus and the fragments. To assess in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, inflammatory reactions induced in the skin of rabbits were quantitated by using 125I-albumin extravasation, 51Cr-labelled leukocyte accumulation and 86RbCl accumulation as a measure of hyperemia. Infusion of FUT-175 at 2 mg/kg/h inhibited all three parameters by 50-80% in dermal reactions induced by killed E. coli, zymosan, immune complexes, the reversed Arthus reaction, zymosan activated plasma (ZAP), f-norleu-leu-phe (FNLP) and LTB4. In contrast, the response to endotoxin (0.1 microgram) was not effected by FUT-175 treatment. The effect of FUT-175 was comparable to that of local or systemic therapy with indomethacin, but unlike indomethacin, the effect of FUT-175 was not reversed by local PGE2 administration. Furthermore, indomethacin and FUT-175 had additive anti-inflammatory effects. These results suggest that although FUT-175 is a potent inhibitor of C3a, C4a and C5a generation, it has novel and broad anti-inflammatory effects, possibly through actions in addition to complement inhibition as indicated by inhibition of FNLP-, LTB4- and ZAP-induced reactions.

  8. Augmentation of Antitumor T-Cell Responses by Increasing APC T-Cell C5a/C3a-C5aR/C3aR Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    signaling which drives Th1/ Th17 effector cell responses (14). While we described the connection of C3aR/C5aR signaling with the PI-3Kγ- AKT-mTOR...involved in controlling the anti-tumor immune response, i.e. biasing between Th1/ Th17 effector cell vs Treg commitment, but also directly involved in

  9. Linkage and association of haplotypes at the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 genecluster to familial combined hyperlipidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Eichenbaum-Voline, Sophie; Olivier, Michael; Jones, Emma L.; Naoumova, Rossitza P.; Jones, Bethan; Gau, Brian; Seed, Mary; Betteridge,D. John; Galton, David J.; Rubin, Edward M.; Scott, James; Shoulders,Carol C.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2002-09-15

    Combined hyperlipidemia (CHL) is a common disorder of lipidmetabolism that leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Thelipid profile of CHL is characterised by high levels of atherogeniclipoproteins and low levels of high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol.Apolipoprotein (APO) A5 is a newly discovered gene involved in lipidmetabolism located within 30kbp of the APOA1/C3/A4 gene cluster. Previousstudies have indicated that sequence variants in this cluster areassociated with increased plasma lipid levels. To establish whethervariation at the APOA5 gene contributes to the transmission of CHL, weperformed linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) tests on a large cohortof families (n=128) with familial CHL (FCHL). The linkage data producedevidence for linkage of the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 genomic interval to FCHL (NPL= 1.7, P = 0.042). The LD studies substantiated these data. Twoindependent rare alleles, APOA5c.56G and APOC3c.386G of this gene clusterwere over-transmitted in FCHL (P = 0.004 and 0.007, respectively), andthis was associated with a reduced transmission of the most commonAPOA1/C3/A4/A5 haplotype (frequency 0.4425) to affected subjects (P =0.013). The APOA5c.56G allele was associated with increased plasmatriglyceride levels in FCHL probands, whereas the second, andindependent, APOC3c.386G allele was associated with increased plasmatriglyceride levels in FCHL pedigree founders. Thus, this allele (or anallele in LD) may mark a quantitative trait associated with FCHL, as wellas representing a disease susceptibility locus for the condition. Thisstudy establishes that sequence variation in the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 genecluster contributes to the transmission of FCHL in a substantialproportion of affected families, and that these sequence variants mayalso contribute to the lipid abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome,which is present in up to 40 percent of persons with cardiovasculardisease.

  10. Simulation of oxygen carrier mediated oxygen transport to C3A hepatoma cells housed within a hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jesse P; Gordon, Jason E; Palmer, Andre F

    2006-02-05

    A priori knowledge of the dissolved oxygen (O2) concentration profile within a hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactor is important in developing an effective bioartificial liver assist device (BLAD). O2 provision is limiting within HF bioreactors and we hypothesize that supplementing a hepatic HF bioreactor's circulating media with bovine red blood cells (bRBCs), which function as an O2 carrier, will improve oxygenation. The dissolved O2 concentration profile within a single HF (lumen, membrane, and representative extra capillary space (ECS)) was modeled with the finite element method, and compared to experimentally measured data obtained on an actual HF bioreactor with the same dimensions housing C3A hepatoma cells. Our results (experimental and modeling) indicate bRBC supplementation of the circulating media leads to an increase in O2 consumed by C3A cells. Under certain experimental conditions (pO2,IN) = 95 mmHg, Q = 8.30 mL/min), the addition of bRBCs at 5% of the average in vivo human red blood cell concentration (% hRBC) results in approximately 50% increase in the O2 consumption rate (OCR). By simply adjusting the operating conditions (pO2,IN) = 25 mmHg, Q = 1.77 mL/min) and increasing bRBC concentration to 25% hRBC the OCR increase is approximately 10-fold. However, the improved O2 concentration profile experienced by the C3A cells could not duplicate the full range of in vivo O2 tensions (25-70 mmHg) typically experienced within the liver sinusoid with this particular HF bioreactor. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the O2 transport model accurately predicts O2 consumption within a HF bioreactor, thus setting up the modeling framework for improving the design of future hepatic HF bioreactors. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Generation of fluorescently labeled cell lines, C3A hepatoma cells, and human adult skin fibroblasts to study coculture models.

    PubMed

    Samluk, Anna; Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures are widely used in studies on the role of homo- and heterotypic interactions in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, for the first time, establishment of the coculture model employing hepatoma C3A cells and human skin fibroblasts, stably expressing fluorescent markers, is described. Suitability of the model in studying coculture conditions using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry was examined. C3A cells spontaneously formed island-like growth patterns surrounded by fibroblasts. The "islands" size and resulting intensity of the homo- and heterotypic interactions can easily be tuned by applying various plated cells ratios. We examined the capability of the hepatoma cells to produce albumin in hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that greater number of fibroblasts in coculture, resulting in smaller sizes of hepatoma "islands," and thus, a larger heterotypic interface, promoted higher albumin synthesis. The use of fluorescently labeled cells in flow cytometry measurements enabled us to separately gate two cell populations and to evaluate protein expression only in/on cells of interest. Flow cytometry confirmed ELISA results indicating the highest albumin production in hepatoma cells cocultured with the greatest number of fibroblasts and the inhibited protein synthesis in coculture with osteosarcoma cells.

  12. Replication of association of the apolipoprotein A1-C3-A4 gene cluster with the risk of gout.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Humaira; Phipps-Green, Amanda J; Topless, Ruth; Smith, Malcolm D; Hill, Catherine; Lester, Susan; Rischmueller, Maureen; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Timothy L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; So, Alexander; van Rij, Andre; Jones, Gregory T; McCormick, Sally P; Harrison, Andrew A; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Tony R

    2016-08-01

    Gout is associated with dyslipidaemia. Association of the apolipoprotein A1-C3-A4 gene cluster with gout has previously been reported in a small study. To investigate a possible causal role for this locus in gout, we tested the association of genetic variants from APOA1 (rs670) and APOC3 (rs5128) with gout. We studied data for 2452 controls and 2690 clinically ascertained gout cases of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. Data were also used from the publicly available Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (n = 5367) and the Framingham Heart Study (n = 2984). Multivariate adjusted logistic and linear regression was used to test the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms with gout risk, serum urate, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In Polynesians, the T-allele of rs670 (APOA1) increased (odds ratio, OR = 1.53, P = 4.9 × 10(-6)) and the G-allele of rs5128 (APOC3) decreased the risk of gout (OR = 0.86, P = 0.026). In Europeans, there was a strong trend to a risk effect of the T-allele for rs670 (OR = 1.11, P = 0.055), with a significant protective effect of the G-allele for rs5128 being observed after adjustment for triglycerides and HDL-C (OR = 0.81, P = 0.039). The effect at rs5128 was specific to males in both Europeans and Polynesians. Association in Polynesians was independent of any effect of rs670 and rs5128 on triglyceride and HDL-C levels. There was no evidence for association of either single-nucleotide polymorphism with serum urate levels (P ⩾ 0.10). Our data, replicating a previous study, supports the hypothesis that the apolipoprotein A1-C3-A4 gene cluster plays a causal role in gout. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Eggshell membrane ameliorates hepatic fibrogenesis in human C3A cells and rats through changes in PPARγ-Endothelin 1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Huijuan; Aw, Wanping; Saito, Kenji; Hanate, Manaka; Hasebe, Yukio; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Our previous nutrigenomic findings indicate that eggshell membrane (ESM) may prevent liver fibrosis. Here we investigated the effects and mechanisms underlying ESM intervention against liver injury by using DNA microarray analysis and comparative proteomics. In vitro hydrolyzed ESM attenuated the TGFβ1-induced procollagen production of human hepatocyte C3A cells and inhibited the expression of Endothelin 1 (EDN1) and its two receptors, and extracellular matrix components. In vivo male Wistar rats were allocated into a normal control group, a CCl4 group (hypodermic injection of 50% CCl4 2×/wk) and an ESM group (20 g ESM/kg diet with CCl4 injection) for 7 wks. Dietary ESM ameliorated the elevated activity of ALT/AST, oxidative stress and collagen accumulation in liver, accompanied by the down-regulated expression of Edn1 signaling and notable profibrogenic genes and growth factors as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Concomitantly, the decreased expressions of Galectin-1 and Desmin protein in the ESM group indicated the deactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Through a multifaceted integrated omics approach, we have demonstrated that ESM can exert an antifibrotic effect by suppressing oxidative stress and promoting collagen degradation by inhibiting HSCs' transformation, potentially via a novel modulation of the PPARγ-Endothelin 1 interaction signaling pathway. PMID:25503635

  14. Risk Assessment via Metabolism and Cell Growth Inhibition in a HepG2/C3A Cell Line Upon Treatment with Arpadol and its Active Component Harpagoside.

    PubMed

    Biazi, Bruna Isabela; D'Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Zanetti, Thalita Alves; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tempesta; Ribeiro, Lucia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2017-03-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens (Hp) has been used as antiinflammatory and analgesic agent for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. The principal active component of Hp is harpagoside (HA). We tested the toxicity of this new therapeutic agent in a hepatic cell line (HepG2/C3A). Hp was found to be cytotoxic, and HA was found to decrease the number of cells in S phase, increase the number of cells in G2/M phase and induce apoptosis. Neither Hp nor HA was genotoxic. The expression of CDK6 and CTP3A4 was reduced by Hp, and both HA and Hp caused a significant reduction of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 expression. It is possible that the cytotoxicity caused by HA and Hp does not involve transcriptional regulation of the cyclins and CDKs tested but is instead related to the inhibition of metabolism. This is evidenced by the results of an MTT assay and changes in the expression of genes related to drug metabolism, leading to cell death. Indeed, the cells exhibited decreased proliferation upon exposure to Hp and HA. The data show that treatment with either Hp or HA can be cytotoxic, and this should be taken into consideration when balancing the risks and benefits of treatments for rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Activation of the endothelium by IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids results in major increase of complement C3 and factor B production and generation of C3a.

    PubMed Central

    Coulpier, M; Andreev, S; Lemercier, C; Dauchel, H; Lees, O; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive secretion of complement C3 and factor B by the endothelial cell (EC) is lowered by therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids such as hydrocortisone or dexamethasone, whereas regulatory protein factor H production is increased by these hormones. In contrast, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 alpha has a stimulatory effect on C3 and factor B secretion by the endothelium and an inhibitory effect on factor H secretion. In this study, we examined the combined effect of IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids on C3 and factor B expression by the endothelial cell. When dexamethasone or hydrocortisone were added to IL-1 alpha, significant potentialization of IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of C3 and factor B production was observed, occurring at various concentrations of either stimuli. Dose-response experiments indicate that, in vitro, optimal concentrations are in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-5) M for dexamethasone and 50-200 U for IL-1 alpha. In contrast, dexamethasone counteracts, in an additive way, the inhibitory effect of IL-1 alpha on regulatory complement protein factor H production by EC. Such a potentialization between glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha was not observed for another marker of endothelial activation, IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of coagulation tissue factor expression. The association of glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha therefore appears to be a specific and major stimulus for the secretion of complement C3 and factor B, two acute-phase proteins, by the endothelium. As a result of the in vitro endothelium stimulation by glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha, C3a is generated in the vicinity of the endothelial cell. This study further suggests that complement activation, with its deleterious consequences, may result from the stimulation of endothelium in situations where high levels of IL-1 alpha and endogenous glucocorticoids coexist, such as in septic shock. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7621583

  16. DMSO/Tf2O-mediated cross-coupling of tryptamine with substituted aniline to access C3a-N1'-linked pyrroloindoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tayu, Masanori; Ishizaki, Takako; Higuchi, Kazuhiro; Kawasaki, Tomomi

    2015-04-07

    The cross-coupling of tryptamine with substituted aniline to access C3a-nitrogen-linked pyrroloindolines has been developed via the consecutive cyclization of tryptamine with DMSO/Tf2O and the substitution of 3a-pyrroloindolylthionium intermediate with aniline. The use of 2,3-dihydrotryptamine instead of aniline enabled easy access to 3a-(1-indolyl)pyrroloindoline and the concise synthesis of C3a-N1'-linked pyrroloindoline alkaloid (±)-psychotriasine was accomplished.

  17. Dynamics of the reaction of C3(a3Πu) radicals with C2H2: A new source for the formation of C5H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Jian; Sun, Yi-Lun; Chin, Chih-Hao; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2014-09-01

    The reaction C3(a3Πu) + C2H2 → C5H + H was investigated at collision energy 10.9 kcal mol-1 that is less than the enthalpy of ground-state reaction C3(X1Σg+) + C2H2 → C5H + H. C3(a3Πu) radicals were synthesized from 1% C4F6/He by pulsed high-voltage discharge. The title reaction was conducted in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus equipped with a quadrupole-mass filter. Product C5H was interrogated with time-of-flight spectroscopy and synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. Reactant C3(a3Πu) and product C5H were identified using photoionization spectroscopy. The ionization thresholds of C3(X1Σg+) and C3(a3Πu) are determined as 11.6 ± 0.2 eV and 10.0 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. The C5H product is identified as linear pentynylidyne that has an ionization energy 8.4 ± 0.2 eV. The title reaction releases translational energy 10.6 kcal mol-1 in average and has an isotropic product angular distribution. The quantum-chemical calculation indicates that the C3(a3Πu) radical attacks one of the carbon atoms of C2H2 and subsequently a hydrogen atom is ejected to form C5H + H, in good agreement with the experimental observation. As far as we are aware, the C3(a3Πu) + C2H2 reaction is investigated for the first time. This work gives an implication for the formation of C5H from the C3(a3Πu) + C2H2 reaction occurring in a combustion or discharge process of C2H2.

  18. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy Study of Cubic and Orthorhombic C3A and Their Hydration Products in the Presence of Gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Rheinheimer, Vanessa; Chae, Sejung Rosie; Rodríguez, Erich D.; Geng, Guoqing; Kirchheim, Ana Paula; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows the microstructural differences and phase characterization of pure phases and hydrated products of the cubic and orthorhombic (Na-doped) polymorphs of tricalcium aluminate (C3A), which are commonly found in traditional Portland cements. Pure, anhydrous samples were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and demonstrated differences in the chemical and mineralogical composition as well as the morphology on a micro/nano-scale. C3A/gypsum blends with mass ratios of 0.2 and 1.9 were hydrated using a water/C3A ratio of 1.2, and the products obtained after three days were assessed using STXM. The hydration process and subsequent formation of calcium sulfate in the C3A/gypsum systems were identified through the changes in the LIII edge fine structure for Calcium. The results also show greater Ca LII binding energies between hydrated samples with different gypsum contents. Conversely, the hydrated samples from the cubic and orthorhombic C3A at the same amount of gypsum exhibited strong morphological differences but similar chemical environments. PMID:28773865

  19. Complement split products C3a and C4a are early markers of acute lyme disease in tick bite patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; Giclas, Patricia C; Crowder, Chris; House, Dennis; Glovsky, M Michael

    2008-01-01

    Current laboratory markers do not readily detect acute Lyme disease. We assessed the utility of complement and its split products as markers of Lyme disease in patients shortly after a tick bite. Thirty-one consecutive acute Lyme disease patients, 14 with and 17 without erythema migrans (EM) skin rash, seen by a physician within 96 h of a tick bite were matched with 24 consecutive tick bite patients without Lyme disease symptoms and 46 healthy control subjects. Complement and split products measured included factor B, Bb, C4, C3c, C3a(des Arg), C4a(des Arg), C1q- and C3d-containing immune complexes, and C2. C2, C4, C3 and factor B levels were within normal ranges in all groups. C3a and C4a levels were significantly higher in acute Lyme disease patients than in tick bite and healthy control groups (both p < 0.001). All acute Lyme disease patients, regardless of EM, had elevated levels of C3a or C4a. Few tick bite controls had elevated levels of C3a (2/20) or C4a (5/24) and only 1 of the healthy control subjects had elevated C3a (0/46) or C4a (1/32). These findings suggest that C3a and C4a may be useful markers of Lyme disease in patients seen shortly after tick bite, even in those without EM. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Effects of variations in the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster on different parameters of postprandial lipid metabolism in healthy young men

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster encodes important regulators of fasting lipids, but the majority of lipid metabolism takes place in the postprandial state, and knowledge about gene regulation in this state is scarce. With the aim of characterizing possible regulators of lipid metabolism...

  1. The APOA1/C3/A4/A5 cluster and markers of allostatic load in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The APOA1/C3/A4/A5 cluster encodes key regulators of plasma lipids. Interactions between dietary factors and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the cluster have been reported. Allostatic load, or physiological dysregulation in response to stress, has been implicated in shaping health disparit...

  2. C5a-induced hemodynamic and hematologic changes in the rabbit. Role of cyclooxygenase products and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, C.; Marceau, F.; Hugli, T. E.

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamic and hematologic changes occurring after intravascular complement activation have implicated the anaphylatoxins in this response. In this study, the hemodynamic and hematologic effects of purified C5a were investigated in rabbits; and involvement of prostanoids, histamine, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were examined. The anaphylatoxin C5a induces a reversible systemic arterial hypotension which coincides with an increase in central venous pressure (CVP), decreased cardiac output (CO), increased plasma prostanoid levels, as well as neutropenia. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) remained unchanged. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin abolished the C5a-induced hypotension and normalized plasma prostanoid levels without altering the C5a-induced neutropenia. The thromboxane (Tx) A2 synthetase inhibitor dazoxiben reduced TxB2 plasma levels and increased 6-keto-prostaglandin PGF1 alpha and PGE2 levels without altering the hypotensive response. However, with dazoxiben treatment both TPR and CVP decreased. The H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine reduced C5a-induced hypotension and diminished prostanoid release. Both the hypotensive response and elevated prostanoid release were observed after C5a challenge in animals rendered neutropenic prior to challenge. It is concluded that C5a-induced arterial hypotension in the rabbit is a PMN-independent reaction, mediated through cyclooxygenase products and, to some degree, by histamine. The mechanism producing systemic arterial hypotension does not seem to involve peripheral vasodilation but appears to be a secondary effect of pulmonary vasoconstriction, possibly mediated by TxA2. PMID:3115110

  3. AgNTf2-Mediated Allylation with Allylsilanes at C3a-Position of Hexahydropyrroloindoles: Application to Total Syntheses of Amauromine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hakamata, Hiroyuki; Sato, Soichiro; Ueda, Hirofumi; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-19

    A protocol for the allylation at the C3a-position of hexahydropyrroloindole using allylsilanes is developed. AgNTf2 proved to be an efficient activator of halopyrroloindoline substrates. This method is applicable to the introduction of various allyl groups including the reverse prenyl group. The utility of this reaction is demonstrated by total synthesis of amauromine alkaloids. Stepwise bromocyclizations of the bis-indolylmethyl diketopiperazine derivative and subsequent double reverse prenylation furnished (+)-novoamauromine and (-)-epiamauromine.

  4. C5 Modulates Airway Hyperreactivity and Pulmonary Eosinophilia during Enhanced Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease by Decreasing C3a Receptor Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Melendi, Guillermina A.; Hoffman, Scott J.; Karron, Ruth A.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Laham, Federico R.; Humbles, Alison; Schofield, Brian; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Rabold, Richard; Thumar, Bhagvanji; Thumar, Adeep; Gerard, Norma P.; Mitzner, Wayne; Barnum, Scott R.; Gerard, Craig; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2007-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory syncytial virus disease, a serious pulmonary disorder that affected recipients of an inactivated vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in the 1960s, has delayed the development of vaccines against the virus. The enhanced disease was characterized by immune complex-mediated airway hyperreactivity and a severe pneumonia associated with pulmonary eosinophilia. In this paper, we show that complement factors contribute to enhanced-disease phenotypes. Mice with a targeted disruption of complement component C5 affected by the enhanced disease displayed enhanced airway reactivity, lung eosinophilia, and mucus production compared to wild-type mice and C5-deficient mice reconstituted with C5. C3aR expression in bronchial epithelial and smooth muscle cells in the lungs of C5-deficient mice was enhanced compared to that in wild-type and reconstituted rodents. Treatment of C5-deficient mice with a C3aR antagonist significantly attenuated airway reactivity, eosinophilia, and mucus production. These results indicate that C5 plays a crucial role in modulating the enhanced-disease phenotype, by affecting expression of C3aR in the lungs. These findings reveal a novel autoregulatory mechanism for the complement cascade that affects the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:17079327

  5. The Effects of Choline on Hepatic Lipid Metabolism, Mitochondrial Function and Antioxidative Status in Human Hepatic C3A Cells Exposed to Excessive Energy Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Wu, Yang; Tang, Qingya; Leng, Yan; Cai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Choline plays a lipotropic role in lipid metabolism as an essential nutrient. In this study, we investigated the effects of choline (5, 35 and 70 μM) on DNA methylation modifications, mRNA expression of the critical genes and their enzyme activities involved in hepatic lipid metabolism, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in C3A cells exposed to excessive energy substrates (lactate, 10 mM; octanoate, 2 mM and pyruvate, 1 mM; lactate, octanoate and pyruvate-supplemented medium (LOP)). Thirty five micromole or 70 μM choline alone, instead of a low dose (5 μM), reduced hepatocellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, protected Δψm from decrement and increased GSH-Px activity in C3A cells. The increment of TG accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Δψm disruption were observed under LOP treatment in C3A cells after 72 h of culture, which were counteracted by concomitant treatment of choline (35 μM or 70 μM) partially via reversing the methylation status of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) gene promoter, upregulating PPARα, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I) and downregulating fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression, as well as decreasing FAS activity and increasing CPT-I and GSH-Px activities. These findings provided a novel insight into the lipotropic role of choline as a vital methyl-donor in the intervention of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:25010553

  6. The C5a anaphylatoxin receptor (C5aR1) protects against Listeria monocytogenes infection by inhibiting type 1 IFN expression.

    PubMed

    Calame, Daniel G; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Morales, John E; Wetsel, Rick A

    2014-11-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a major cause of mortality resulting from food poisoning in the United States. In mice, C5 has been genetically linked to host resistance to listeriosis. Despite this genetic association, it remains poorly understood how C5 and its activation products, C5a and C5b, confer host protection to this Gram-positive intracellular bacterium. In this article, we show in a systemic infection model that the major receptor for C5a, C5aR1, is required for a normal robust host immune response against L. monocytogenes. In comparison with wild-type mice, C5aR1(-/-) mice had reduced survival and increased bacterial burden in their livers and spleens. Infected C5aR1(-/-) mice exhibited a dramatic reduction in all major subsets of splenocytes, which was associated with elevated caspase-3 activity and increased TUNEL staining. Because type 1 IFN has been reported to impede the host response to L. monocytogenes through the promotion of splenocyte death, we examined the effect of C5aR1 on type 1 IFN expression in vivo. Indeed, serum levels of IFN-α and IFN-β were significantly elevated in L. monocytogenes-infected C5aR1(-/-) mice. Similarly, the expression of TRAIL, a type 1 IFN target gene and a proapoptotic factor, was elevated in NK cells isolated from infected C5aR1(-/-) mice. Treatment of C5aR1(-/-) mice with a type 1 IFNR blocking Ab resulted in near-complete rescue of L. monocytogenes-induced mortality. Thus, these findings reveal a critical role for C5aR1 in host defense against L. monocytogenes through the suppression of type 1 IFN expression. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses in mouse choroidal neovascularization via the anaphylatoxin C5a and γδT-cells

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Beth; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Joseph, Kusumam; Raikwar, Himanshu; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Johnson, Krista; Moore, Kristi; Wang, Yi; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). An overactive complement system is associated with AMD pathogenesis, and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, are elevated in AMD patients. IL-17 is produced by complement C5a-receptor-expressing T-cells. In murine CNV, infiltrating γδT- rather than Th17-cells produce the IL-17 measurable in lesioned eyes. Here we asked whether C5a generated locally in response to CNV recruits IL-17-producing T-cells to the eye. CNV lesions were generated using laser photocoagulation and quantified by imaging; T-lymphocytes were characterized by QRT-PCR. CNV resulted in an increase in splenic IL-17-producing γδT- and Th17-cells; yet in the CNV eye, only elevated levels of γδT-cells were observed. Systemic administration of anti-C5- or anti-C5a-blocking antibodies blunted the CNV-induced production of splenic Th17- and γδT-cells, reduced CNV size and eliminated ocular γδT-cell infiltration. In ARPE-19 cell monolayers, IL-17 triggered a pro-inflammatory state; and splenocyte proliferation was elevated in response to ocular proteins. Thus, we demonstrated that CNV lesions trigger a systemic immune response, augmenting local ocular inflammation via the infiltration of IL-17-producing γδT-cells, which are presumably recruited to the eye in a C5a-dependent manner. Understanding the complexity of complement-mediated pathological mechanisms will aid in the development of an AMD treatment. PMID:27029558

  8. Effects of variations in the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster on different parameters of postprandial lipid metabolism in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Ruano, Juan; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Fuentes, Francisco; Criado-Garcia, Juan; Parnell, Laurence D; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Ordovas, Jose M; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster encodes important regulators of fasting lipids, but the majority of lipid metabolism takes place in the postprandial state and knowledge about gene regulation in this state is scarce. With the aim of characterizing possible regulators of lipid metabolism, we studied the effects of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during postprandial lipid metabolism. Eighty-eight healthy young men were genotyped for APOA1 -2630 (rs613808), APOA1 -2803 (rs2727784), APOA1 -3012 (rs11216158), APOC3 -640 (rs2542052), APOC3 -2886 (rs2542051), APOC3 G34G (rs4520), APOA4 N147S (rs5104), APOA4 T29T (rs5092), and A4A5_inter (rs1263177) and were fed a saturated fatty acid-rich meal (1g fat/kg of weight with 60% fat, 15% protein and 25% carbohydrate). Serial blood samples were extracted for 11 h after the meal. Total cholesterol and fractions [HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, trifacylglycerols (TGs) in plasma, TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) (large TRLs and small TRLs), apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B] were determined. APOA1 -2803 homozygotes for the minor allele and A4A5_inter carriers showed a limited degree of postprandial lipemia. Carriers of the rare alleles of APOA4 N147S and APOA4 T29T had lower APOA1 plasma concentration during this state. APOC3 -640 was associated with altered TG kinetics but not its magnitude. We have identified new associations between SNPs in the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster and altered postprandial lipid metabolism.

  9. Haplotypes in the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene cluster affect plasma lipids in both humans and baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian-fei; Liu, Xin; O'Connell, Jeff; Peng, Ze; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rainwater, David L.; VandeBerg, John L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-15

    Genetic studies in non-human primates serve as a potential strategy for identifying genomic intervals where polymorphisms impact upon human disease-related phenotypes. It remains unclear, however, whether independently arising polymorphisms in orthologous regions of non-human primates leads to similar variation in a quantitative trait found in both species. To explore this paradigm, we studied a baboon apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOA1/C3/A4/A5) for which the human gene orthologs have well established roles in influencing plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Our extensive polymorphism analysis of this 68 kb gene cluster in 96 pedigreed baboons identified several haplotype blocks each with limited diversity, consistent with haplotype findings in humans. To determine whether baboons, like humans, also have particular haplotypes associated with lipid phenotypes, we genotyped 634 well characterized baboons using 16 haplotype tagging SNPs. Genetic analysis of single SNPs, as well as haplotypes, revealed an association of APOA5 and APOC3 variants with HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, respectively. Thus, independent variation in orthologous genomic intervals does associate with similar quantitative lipid traits in both species, supporting the possibility of uncovering human QTL genes in a highly controlled non-human primate model.

  10. Cellular localization and effects of ectopically expressed hepatitis A virus proteins 2B, 2C, 3A and their intermediates 2BC, 3AB and 3ABC.

    PubMed

    Seggewiß, Nicole; Kruse, Hedi Verena; Weilandt, Rebecca; Domsgen, Erna; Dotzauer, Andreas; Paulmann, Dajana

    2016-04-01

    In the course of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections, the seven nonstructural proteins and their intermediates are barely detectable. Therefore, little is known about their functions and mechanisms of action. Ectopic expression of the presumably membrane-associated proteins 2B, 2C, 3A and their intermediates 2BC, 3AB and 3ABC allowed the intracellular localization of these proteins and their possible function during the replication cycle of HAV to be investigated. In this study, we used rhesus monkey kidney cells, which are commonly used for cell culture experiments, and human liver cells, which are the natural target cells. We detected specific associations of these proteins with distinct membrane compartments and the cytoskeleton, different morphological alterations of the respective structures, and specific effects on cellular functions. Besides comparable findings in both cell lines used with regard to localization and effects of the proteins examined, we also found distinct differences. The data obtained identify so far undocumented interactions with and effects of the HAV proteins investigated on cellular components, which may reflect unknown aspects of the interaction of HAV with the host cell, for example the modification of the ERGIC (ER-Golgi intermediate compartment) structure, an interaction with lipid droplets and lysosomes, and inhibition of the classical secretory pathway.

  11. HepG2/C3A cells respond to cysteine deprivation by induction of the amino acid deprivation/integrated stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-In; Dominy, John E; Sikalidis, Angelos K; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Wang, Wei; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2008-04-22

    To further define genes that are differentially expressed during cysteine deprivation and to evaluate the roles of amino acid deprivation vs. oxidative stress in the response to cysteine deprivation, we assessed gene expression in human hepatoma cells cultured in complete or cysteine-deficient medium. Overall, C3A cells responded to cysteine deprivation by activation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2alpha kinase-mediated integrated stress response to inhibit global protein synthesis; increased expression of genes containing amino acid response elements (ASNS, ATF3, CEBPB, SLC7A11, and TRIB3); increased expression of genes for amino acid transporters (SLC7A11, SLC1A4, and SLC3A2), aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (CARS), and, to a limited extent, amino acid metabolism (ASNS and CTH); increased expression of genes that act to suppress growth (STC2, FOXO3A, GADD45A, LNK, and INHBE); and increased expression of several enzymes that favor glutathione synthesis and maintenance of protein thiol groups (GCLC, GCLM, SLC7A11, and TXNRD1). Although GCLC, GCLM, SLC7A11, HMOX, and TXNRD1 were upregulated, most genes known to be upregulated via oxidative stress were not affected by cysteine deprivation. Because most genes known to be upregulated in response to eIF2alpha phosphorylation and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) synthesis were differentially expressed in response to cysteine deprivation, it is likely that many responses to cysteine deprivation are mediated, at least in part, by the general control nondepressible 2 (GCN2)/ATF4-dependent integrated stress response. This conclusion was supported by the observation of similar differential expression of a subset of genes in response to leucine deprivation. A consequence of sulfur amino acid restriction appears to be the upregulation of the cellular capacity to cope with oxidative and chemical stresses via the integrated stress response.

  12. Investigation of acetaminophen toxicity in HepG2/C3a microscale cultures using a system biology model of glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Eric; Hamon, Jeremy; Claude, Isabelle; Jellali, Rachid; Naudot, Marie; Bois, Frederic

    2015-06-01

    We have integrated in vitro and in silico information to investigate acetaminophen (APAP) and its metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) toxicity in liver biochip. In previous works, we observed higher cytotoxicity of HepG2/C3a cultivated in biochips when exposed to 1 mM of APAP for 72 h as compared to Petri cultures. We complete our investigation with the present in silico approach to extend the mechanistic interpretation of the intracellular kinetics of the toxicity process. For that purpose, we propose a mathematical model based on the coupling of a drug pharmacokinetic model (PK) with a systemic biology model (SB) describing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NAPQI and the subsequent glutathione (GSH) depletion. The SB model was parameterized using (i) transcriptomic data, (ii) qualitative results of time lapses ROS fluorescent curves for both control and 1-mM APAP-treated experiments, and (iii) additional GSH literature data. The PK model was parameterized (i) using the in vitro kinetic data (at 160 μM, 1 mM, 10 mM), (ii) using the parameters resulting from a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) literature model for APAP, and (iii) by literature data describing NAPQI formation. The PK-SB model predicted a ROS increase and GSH depletion due to the NAPQI formation. The transition from a detoxification phase and NAPQI and ROS accumulation was predicted for a NAPQI concentration ranging between 0.025 and 0.25 μM in the cytosol. In parallel, we performed a dose response analysis in biochips that shows a reduction of the final hepatic cell number appeared in agreement with the time and doses associated with the switch of the NAPQI detoxification/accumulation. As a result, we were able to correlate in vitro extracellular APAP exposures with an intracellular in silico ROS accumulation using an integration of a coupled mathematical and experimental liver on chip approach.

  13. Microbial Neuraminidase Induces a Moderate and Transient Myelin Vacuolation Independent of Complement System Activation.

    PubMed

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María Dolores; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Fernández-Arjona, María Del Mar; Hughes, Timothy R; Johnson, Krista; Morgan, B Paul; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; Grondona, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Some central nervous system pathogens express neuraminidase (NA) on their surfaces. In the rat brain, a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of NA induces myelin vacuolation in axonal tracts. Here, we explore the nature, the time course, and the role of the complement system in this damage. The spatiotemporal analysis of myelin vacuolation was performed by optical and electron microscopy. Myelin basic protein-positive area and oligodendrocyte transcription factor (Olig2)-positive cells were quantified in the damaged bundles. Neuronal death in the affected axonal tracts was assessed by Fluoro-Jade B and anti-caspase-3 staining. To evaluate the role of the complement, membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on damaged bundles was analyzed using anti-C5b9. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a were studied for myelin damage. In addition, NA-induced vacuolation was studied in rats with different degrees of complement inhibition: normal rats treated with anti-C5-blocking antibody and C6-deficient rats. The stria medullaris, the optic chiasm, and the fimbria were the most consistently damaged axonal tracts. Vacuolation peaked 7 days after NA injection and reverted by day 15. Olig2+ cell number in the damaged tracts was unaltered, and neurodegeneration associated with myelin alterations was not detected. MAC was absent on damaged axonal tracts, as revealed by C5b9 immunostaining. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a displayed no myelin injury. When the complement system was experimentally or constitutively inhibited, NA-induced myelin vacuolation was similar to that observed in normal rats. Microbial NA induces a moderate and transient myelin vacuolation that is not caused either by neuroinflammation or complement system activation.

  14. A functional variant in APOA5/A4/C3/A1 gene cluster contributes to elevated triglycerides and severity of CAD by interfering with microRNA 3201 binding efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanglin; Li, Zongzhe; Li, Rui; Huang, Jin; Wang, Haoran; Zhang, Lina; Ding, Hu; Wang, Dao Wen

    2014-07-22

    Recent genome-wide association studies identified the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 gene cluster polymorphisms influencing triglyceride level and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purposes of this study were to fine-map triglyceride association signals in the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 gene cluster and then explore the clinical relevance in CAD and potential underlying mechanisms. We resequenced the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 gene cluster in 200 patients with extremely high triglyceride levels (≥10 mm/l) and 200 healthy control subjects who were ethnically matched and genotyped 20 genetic markers among 4,991 participants with Chinese Han ethnicity. Subsequently, 8 risk markers were investigated in 917 early-onset and 1,149 late-onset CAD patients, respectively. The molecular mechanism was explored. By resequencing, a number of newly and potentially functional variants were identified, and both the common and rare variants have remarkable cumulative effects on hypertriglyceridemia risk. Of note, gene dosage of rs2266788 demonstrated a robust association with triglyceride level (p = 1.39 × 10(-19)), modified Gensini scores (p = 1.67 × 10(-3)), and numbers of vascular lesions in CAD patients (odds ratio: 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.31 to 2.14, p = 8.96 × 10(-4)). Functional study demonstrated that the rs2266788 C allele destroyed microRNA 3201 binding to the 3' UTR of APOA5, resulting in prolonging the half-life of APOA5 messenger RNA and increasing its expression levels. Genetic variants in APOA5/A4/C3/A1 gene cluster play an important role in the regulation of plasma triglyceride levels by an increased APOA5 concentration and contribute to the severity of CAD. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A.A.; Hakvoort, Theodorus B.M.; Hendriks, Erik J.; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Chamuleau, Robert A.F.M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application. PMID:27489500

  16. Complement C5a regulates IL-17 by affecting the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells in CLP-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruonan; Wang, Renxi; Han, Gencheng; Wang, Jianan; Chen, Guojiang; Wang, Liyan; Li, Xia; Guo, Renfeng; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan

    2010-04-01

    Complement 5a (C5a) and Interleukin-17 (IL-17) are two important inflammatory mediators in sepsis. Here we studied the mechanisms underlying regulation of IL-17 by anaphylatoxin C5a. We found that C5a blockade increased the survival rate of mice following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and decreased IL-17 expression in vivo. IL-17 was secreted mainly by gammadelta T cells in this model. Importantly, our data suggest that C5a participates in the regulation of IL-17 secretion by gammadelta T cells. Dendritic cells (DC) were found to act as a "bridge" between C5a and gammadelta T cells in a mechanism involving IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). These results imply that C5a affects the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells during sepsis development, and this may result in a large production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-17.

  17. Comparison of metabolism-mediated effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in a HepG2/C3A cell-S9 co-incubation system and quantification of their glutathione conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tamta, Hemlata; Pawar, Rahul S; Wamer, Wayne G; Grundel, Erich; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Rader, Jeanne I

    2012-10-01

    1. Toxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) largely depends on their metabolic activation by hepatic enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, to become chemically reactive pyrrolic derivatives. These then spontaneously release the esterifying acids to generate carbonium ions that form covalent adducts with cellular nucleophiles to exhibit toxicity. 2. In our investigation, metabolism-mediated toxicity of monocrotaline, retrorsine, lycopsamine, echimidine (retronecine-type PAs), heliotrine (a heliotridine-type PA) and senkirkine (an otonecine-type PA) was studied using an in vitro co-incubation assay. 3. Human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2/C3A) cells were incubated with PAs in the presence and absence of rat liver S9 fraction and the toxicity was assessed as lowered mitochondrial activity. 4. Bioactivation potential was measured by incubating PAs with rat liver S9 fraction, NADPH and GSH in a cell free system. Pyrrolic metabolites generated were entrapped as glutathione conjugates (7-GSH-DHP and 7,9-di-GSHDHP) which were quantified using LC-MS-MS analysis. 5. Our results indicated that PAs were metabolized by rat liver S9 fraction into reactive pyrrolic derivatives which were toxic to HepG2/C3A cells. This approach can be used to determine and compare bioactivation potential and metabolism-mediated toxicity of various PAs.

  18. β-(1→3,1→6)-d-glucans produced by Diaporthe sp. endophytes: Purification, chemical characterization and antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and HepG2-C3A cells.

    PubMed

    Orlandelli, Ravely Casarotti; Corradi da Silva, Maria de Lourdes; Vasconcelos, Ana Flora Dalberto; Almeida, Igor Vivian; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta; Prieto, Alicia; Hernandez, Maria Dolores Diaz; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pamphile, João Alencar

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the characterization and antiproliferative activity of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by submerged cultures of the endophytes Diaporthe sp. JF766998 and Diaporthe sp. JF767007 isolated from the medicinal plant Piper hispidum Sw. Both strains secreted a crude EPS that, upon size exclusion chromatography, showed to contain a heteropolysaccharide (galactose, glucose and mannose) and a high-molecular weight glucan. Data from methylation analysis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, COSY, TOCSY and HSQC-DEPT) indicated that the purified glucan consisted of a main chain of glucopyranosyl β-(1→3) linkages substituted at O-6 by glucosyl residues. According to MTT assay, some treatments of both β-glucans have antiproliferative activity against human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2-C3A) cells after 24 and 48h of treatment, exhibiting a degree of inhibition ratio that reached the highest values at 400μg/mL: 58.0% (24h) and 74.6% (48h) for MCF-7 cells, and 61.0% (24h) and 83.3% (48h) for HepG2-C3A cells. These results represent the first reports on the characterization and antiproliferative effect of β-glucans from Diaporthe species and also expand the knowledge about bioactive polysaccharides from endophytic sources.

  19. Rs964184 (APOA5-A4-C3-A1) is related to elevated plasma triglyceride levels, but not to an increased risk for vascular events in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease.

    PubMed

    van de Woestijne, Anton P; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Bakker, Paul I W; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Spiering, Wilko; Visseren, Frank L J

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the APOA5-A4-C3-A1 gene complex are associated with elevated plasma triglycerides and elevated vascular risk in healthy populations. In patients with clinically manifest vascular disease, hypertriglyceridemia and metabolic syndrome are frequently present, but the contribution of these single nucleotide polymorphisms to plasma triglycerides, effect modification by obesity and risk of recurrent vascular events is unknown in these patients. Prospective cohort study of 5547 patients with vascular disease. Rs964184 (APOA5-A4-C3-A1 gene complex) was genotyped, and we evaluated the relation with plasma lipid levels, presence of metabolic syndrome and the risk for new vascular events. The minor allele of rs964184 was strongly associated with log plasma triglycerides (β 0.12; 95%CI 0.10-0.15, p = 1.1*10(-19)), and was also associated with 0.03 mmol/L lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (95%CI 0.01-0.04), and 0.14 mmol/L higher non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (95%CI 0.09-0.20). The minor allele frequency increased from 10.9% in patients with plasma triglycerides <1 mmol/L to 24.6% in patients with plasma triglycerides between 4 and 10 mmol/L. The relation between rs964184 and plasma triglycerides was modified by body mass index in patients with one minor allele (β 0.02; (95%CI -0.04-0.09) if body mass index <24 kg/m2, β 0.17 (95%CI 0.12-0.22) if body mass index >27 kg/m2, p for interaction = 0.02). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased from 52% for patients with two copies of the major allele to 62% for patients with two copies of the minor allele (p = 0.01). Rs964184 was not related with recurrent vascular events (HR 0.99; 95%CI 0.86-1.13). The single nucleotide polymorphism rs964184 (APOA5-A4-C3-A1) is associated with elevated plasma triglycerides concentrations in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease. In carriers of one minor allele, the effect on plasma triglycerides was modified

  20. SNPs at the APOA5 gene account for the strong association with hypertriglyceridaemia at the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 locus on chromosome 11q23 in the Northern Irish population.

    PubMed

    Wright, William T; Young, Ian S; Nicholls, D Paul; Patterson, Chris; Lyttle, Kelly; Graham, Colin A

    2006-04-01

    Serum triglyceride levels (TG) are important independent risk factors for coronary heart disease. The apolipoproteins C-III (apoCIII) and A-V (apoAV) are central to normal TG metabolism and the complete sequence analysis of these genes was carried out in severe cases (TG > 9 mmol/l) and controls (TG < 2 mmol/l). A total of 53 SNPs were identified in these genes with 17 being novel to this study. Further analysis defined four APOC3 SNPs and three APOA5 SNPs showing strong association with TG levels. Analysis of the two major SNPs from APOA5 [c.56C > G, c.-3A > G] and from APOC3 [c.102C > T, c.340C > G] using THESIAS has identified two major haplotypes relative to the most common CACC haplotype showing very strong association with hypertriglyceridaemia, CGTG and GATC (odds ratio 7.45 and 5.26). Logistic regression analysis of these four SNPs revealed that, carriage of the APOA5 c.56 G allele (odd ratios 4.49) and the APOA5 c.-3 G allele (odds ratio 3.23) were strong independent predictors of hypertriglyceridaemia (P < 0.001), whereas in contrast, carriage of the APOC3 c102 T allele (odds ratio 1.35) and the APOC3 c.340 G allele (odds ratio 1.37), did not show any significant effects that were independent of APOA5.

  1. The characteristics and antigenic properties of recently emerged subclade 3C.3a and 3C.2a human influenza A(H3N2) viruses passaged in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yipu; Wharton, Stephen A; Whittaker, Lynne; Dai, Mian; Ermetal, Burcu; Lo, Janice; Pontoriero, Andrea; Baumeister, Elsa; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2017-05-01

    Two new subclades of influenza A(H3N2) viruses became prominent during the 2014-2015 Northern Hemisphere influenza season. The HA glycoproteins of these viruses showed sequence changes previously associated with alterations in receptor-binding properties. To address how these changes influence virus propagation, viruses were isolated and propagated in conventional MDCK cells and MDCK-SIAT1 cells, cells with enhanced expression of the human receptor for the virus, and analysed at each passage. Gene sequence analysis was undertaken as virus was passaged in conventional MDCK cells and MDCK-SIAT1 cells. Alterations in receptor recognition associated with passage of virus were examined by haemagglutination assays using red blood cells from guinea pigs, turkeys and humans. Microneutralisation assays were performed to determine how passage-acquired amino acid substitutions and polymorphisms affected virus antigenicity. Viruses were able to infect MDCK-SIAT1 cells more efficiently than conventional MDCK cells. Viruses of both the 3C.2a and 3C.3a subclades showed greater sequence change on passage in conventional MDCK cells than in MDCK-SIAT1 cells, with amino acid substitutions being seen in both HA and NA glycoproteins. However, virus passage in MDCK-SIAT1 cells at low inoculum dilutions showed reducing infectivity on continued passage. Current H3N2 viruses should be cultured in the MDCK-SIAT1 cell line to maintain faithful replication of the virus, and at an appropriate multiplicity of infection to retain infectivity. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Small Molecule-Induced Complement Factor D (Adipsin) Promotes Lipid Accumulation and Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Song, No-Joon; Kim, Suji; Jang, Byung-Hyun; Chang, Seo-Hyuk; Yun, Ui Jeong; Park, Ki-Moon; Waki, Hironori; Li, Dean Y; Tontonoz, Peter; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are differentiated by various transcriptional cascades integrated on the master regulator, Pparγ. To discover new genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, preadipocytes were treated with three newly identified pro-adipogenic small molecules and GW7845 (a Pparγ agonist) for 24 hours and transcriptional profiling was analyzed. Four genes, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparγ), human complement factor D homolog (Cfd), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 9 (Ccl9), and GIPC PDZ Domain Containing Family Member 2 (Gipc2) were induced by at least two different small molecules but not by GW7845. Cfd and Ccl9 expressions were specific to adipocytes and they were altered in obese mice. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated knockdown of Cfd in preadipocytes inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte markers during adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of Cfd promoted adipocyte differentiation, increased C3a production, and led to induction of C3a receptor (C3aR) target gene expression. Similarly, treatments with C3a or C3aR agonist (C4494) also promoted adipogenesis. C3aR knockdown suppressed adipogenesis and impaired the pro-adipogenic effects of Cfd, further suggesting the necessity for C3aR signaling in Cfd-mediated pro-adipogenic axis. Together, these data show the action of Cfd in adipogenesis and underscore the application of small molecules to identify genes in adipocytes.

  3. Small Molecule-Induced Complement Factor D (Adipsin) Promotes Lipid Accumulation and Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Byung-Hyun; Chang, Seo-Hyuk; Yun, Ui Jeong; Park, Ki-Moon; Waki, Hironori; Li, Dean Y.; Tontonoz, Peter; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are differentiated by various transcriptional cascades integrated on the master regulator, Pparγ. To discover new genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, preadipocytes were treated with three newly identified pro-adipogenic small molecules and GW7845 (a Pparγ agonist) for 24 hours and transcriptional profiling was analyzed. Four genes, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparγ), human complement factor D homolog (Cfd), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 9 (Ccl9), and GIPC PDZ Domain Containing Family Member 2 (Gipc2) were induced by at least two different small molecules but not by GW7845. Cfd and Ccl9 expressions were specific to adipocytes and they were altered in obese mice. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated knockdown of Cfd in preadipocytes inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte markers during adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of Cfd promoted adipocyte differentiation, increased C3a production, and led to induction of C3a receptor (C3aR) target gene expression. Similarly, treatments with C3a or C3aR agonist (C4494) also promoted adipogenesis. C3aR knockdown suppressed adipogenesis and impaired the pro-adipogenic effects of Cfd, further suggesting the necessity for C3aR signaling in Cfd-mediated pro-adipogenic axis. Together, these data show the action of Cfd in adipogenesis and underscore the application of small molecules to identify genes in adipocytes. PMID:27611793

  4. C3: A Collaborative Web Framework for NASA Earth Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foughty, E.; Fattarsi, C.; Hardoyo, C.; Kluck, D.; Wang, L.; Matthews, B.; Das, K.; Srivastava, A.; Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a new collaboration platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing. NEX combines NASA advanced supercomputing resources, Earth system modeling, workflow management, NASA remote sensing data archives, and a collaborative communication platform to deliver a complete work environment in which users can explore and analyze large datasets, run modeling codes, collaborate on new or existing projects, and quickly share results among the Earth science communities. NEX is designed primarily for use by the NASA Earth science community to address scientific grand challenges. The NEX web portal component provides an on-line collaborative environment for sharing of Eearth science models, data, analysis tools and scientific results by researchers. In addition, the NEX portal also serves as a knowledge network that allows researchers to connect and collaborate based on the research they are involved in, specific geographic area of interest, field of study, etc. Features of the NEX web portal include: Member profiles, resource sharing (data sets, algorithms, models, publications), communication tools (commenting, messaging, social tagging), project tools (wikis, blogs) and more. The NEX web portal is built on the proven technologies and policies of DASHlink.arc.nasa.gov, (one of NASA's first science social media websites). The core component of the web portal is a C3 framework, which was built using Django and which is being deployed as a common framework for a number of collaborative sites throughout NASA.

  5. A novel “complement–metabolism–inflammasome axis” as a key regulator of immune cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Arbore, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that induce and regulate the generation of the key pro‐inflammatory cytokines IL‐1β and IL‐18 in response to infectious microbes and cellular stress. The activation of inflammasomes involves several upstream signals including classic pattern or danger recognition systems such as the TLRs. Recently, however, the activation of complement receptors, such as the anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors and the complement regulator CD46, in conjunction with the sensing of cell metabolic changes, for instance increased amino acid influx and glycolysis (via mTORC1), have emerged as additional critical activators of the inflammasome. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge about complement‐mediated inflammasome activation, with a specific focus on a novel “complement – metabolism – NLRP3 inflammasome axis.” PMID:27184294

  6. A novel "complement-metabolism-inflammasome axis" as a key regulator of immune cell effector function.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that induce and regulate the generation of the key pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in response to infectious microbes and cellular stress. The activation of inflammasomes involves several upstream signals including classic pattern or danger recognition systems such as the TLRs. Recently, however, the activation of complement receptors, such as the anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors and the complement regulator CD46, in conjunction with the sensing of cell metabolic changes, for instance increased amino acid influx and glycolysis (via mTORC1), have emerged as additional critical activators of the inflammasome. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge about complement-mediated inflammasome activation, with a specific focus on a novel "complement - metabolism - NLRP3 inflammasome axis."

  7. Biocompatibility of surfactant-templated polyurea-nanoencapsulated macroporous silica aerogels with plasma platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Venkitachalam, Subramaniam M; Jarrett, Ellen; Staggs, Sarah; Leventis, Nicholas; Lu, Hongbing; Rubenstein, David A

    2010-03-15

    The recently synthesized polyurea-nanoencapsulated surfactant-templated aerogels (X-aerogels) are porous materials with significantly improved mechanical strengths. Surface-wise they resemble polyurethane, a common biocompatible material, but their biocompatibility has never been investigated. As lightweight and strong materials, if X-aerogels also have acceptable biocompatibility, they may be used in many implantable devices. The goal of this study was to investigate their biocompatibility toward platelets, blood plasma, and vascular endothelial cells, in terms of cell activation and inflammatory responses. Platelets were incubated with X-aerogel and platelet activation was measured through CD62P and phosphatidylserine expression. Platelet aggregation was also measured. Contact with X-aerogel did not induce platelet activation or impair aggregation. To determine X-aerogel-induced inflammation, plasma anaphylatoxin C3a level was measured after incubation with X-aerogel. Results showed that X-aerogel induced no changes in plasma C3a levels. SEM and SDS-PAGE were used to examine cellular/protein deposition on X-aerogel samples after plasma incubation. No structural change or organic deposition was detected. Furthermore, X-aerogel samples did not induce any significant changes in vascular endothelial cell culture parameters after 5 days of incubation. These observations suggest that X-aerogels have a suitable biocompatibility toward platelets, plasma, and vascular endothelial cells, and they have potential for use in blood implantable devices.

  8. Glucose-based dialysis fluids inhibit innate defense against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Hair, Pamela S; Rister, Nicholas S; Lawrence, Courtney; Raafat, Reem H; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis is a serious complication of Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis (CPD) and associated with a higher risk for severe and recurrent infections compared with other bacteria. We have previously shown that complement-mediated effectors essential for optimal opsonophagocytosis of S. aureus are inhibited by high glucose concentrations. Since most commonly used peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids are glucose-based, we hypothesized that glucose-based PD fluids likely inhibit complement host defenses against S. aureus. Commercially available PD fluids were tested: glucose-based (Dianeal), Dianeal supplemented with amino acids, icodextrin-based (Extraneal) and amino acid-based (Nutrineal). Control PD fluid was generated to simulate Dianeal excluding the glucose. Three commercially available glucose concentrations were tested: Dianeal 1.5% (15 gm/1000 ml), Dianeal 2.5% (25 gm/1000 ml) and Dianeal 4.25% (42.5 gm/1000 ml). Complement effectors against S. aureus were analyzed including opsonization with C3-fragments, anaphylatoxin generation, and phagocytosis efficiency. We also evaluated clinical strains, including MRSA strains, and specific complement activation pathways. Glucose-based PD fluids inhibited complement opsonization of S. aureus (≥7-fold reduction) and inhibited S. aureus-induced generation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a (>10-fold reduction) compared to non-glucose based PD fluids. Dianeal 1.5%, 2.5% and 4.25%, all similarly inhibited C3-mediated opsonization. Glucose-based PD fluids showed a ≥4-fold reduction in opsonization of clinical strains of S.aureus, including MRSA strains. Decreased opsonization of S.aureus in the glucose-based PD fluid compared with non-glucose based fluids correlated with decreased phagocytosis by neutrophils. Complement-mediated opsonophagocytosis of S. aureus and anaphylatoxin generation were severely inhibited in glucose-based PD fluids compared with non-glucose-based PD fluids. By inhibiting complement host

  9. The Membrane Attack Complex of Complement is Required for the Development of Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Darley, Meghan M.; Hu, Xianzhen; Billker, Oliver; Rayner, Julian C.; Ahras, Malika; Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection and accounts for a large number of malaria fatalities worldwide. Recent studies demonstrated that C5−/− mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and suggested that protection was due to loss of C5a-induced inflammation. Surprisingly, we observed that C5aR−/− mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that C5a is not required for ECM. C3aR−/− and C3aR−/− × C5aR−/− mice were equally as susceptible to ECM as wild type mice, indicating that neither complement anaphylatoxin receptor is critical for ECM development. In contrast, C9 deposition in the brains of mice with ECM suggested an important role for the terminal complement pathway. Treatment with anti-C9 antibody significantly increased survival time and reduced mortality in ECM. Our data indicate that protection from ECM in C5−/− mice is mediated through inhibition of MAC formation and not through C5a-induced inflammation. PMID:21572031

  10. Cutting edge: the membrane attack complex of complement is required for the development of murine experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Darley, Meghan M; Hu, Xianzhen; Billker, Oliver; Rayner, Julian C; Ahras, Malika; Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2011-06-15

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection and accounts for a large number of malaria fatalities worldwide. Recent studies demonstrated that C5(-/-) mice are resistant to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) and suggested that protection was due to loss of C5a-induced inflammation. Surprisingly, we observed that C5aR(-/-) mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that C5a is not required for ECM. C3aR(-/-) and C3aR(-/-) × C5aR(-/-) mice were equally susceptible to ECM as were wild-type mice, indicating that neither complement anaphylatoxin receptor is critical for ECM development. In contrast, C9 deposition in the brains of mice with ECM suggested an important role for the terminal complement pathway. Treatment with anti-C9 Ab significantly increased survival time and reduced mortality in ECM. Our data indicate that protection from ECM in C5(-/-) mice is mediated through inhibition of membrane attack complex formation and not through C5a-induced inflammation.

  11. Cloning and preliminary pharmacological characterization of the anaphylatoxin C5a receptor in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Bachvarov, D R; Houle, S; Bachvarova, M; Bouthillier, J; St-Pierre, S A; Fukuoka, Y; Ember, J A; Marceau, F

    1999-09-01

    1 The rabbit receptor for C5a was cloned from a genomic library and found to be 79.5% identical to the human homologue, the highest degree of similarity found so far in nonprimate laboratory animals. 2 The rabbit C5a receptor stably expressed in RBL cells binds human 125I-C5a (2 nM). Unlabelled C5a and the C-terminal analogue N-acetyl-Tyr-Ser-Phe-Lys-Pro-Met-Pro-Leu-D-Ala-Arg (Ac-YSFKPMPLaR) were found to be competitors of that binding, the peptide analogue retaining approximately 0.1% of the affinity of human C5a. 3 The order of potency human C5a>Ac-YSFKPMPLaR was conserved in bioassays based on rabbits (relaxation of the isolated portal vein and pulmonary artery; acute in vivo neutropenia), but with a decreasing potency gap between the two compounds, a likely consequence of the resistance to peptidases of the analogue. 4 The molecular definition of the rabbit C5a receptor evidenced a high preservation degree of sequence and pharmacologic properties relative to the human ortholog receptor, thus defining a set of molecular tools for the investigation of the role of C5a in physiologic and pathologic models based on the rabbit (e.g. atherosclerosis, inflammation).

  12. A regulatory role for the C5a anaphylatoxin in type 2 immunity in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Köhl, Jörg; Baelder, Ralf; Lewkowich, Ian P.; Pandey, Manoj K.; Hawlisch, Heiko; Wang, Lihua; Best, Jennifer; Herman, Nancy S.; Sproles, Alyssa A.; Zwirner, Jörg; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Gerard, Craig; Sfyroera, Georgia; Lambris, John D.; Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2006-01-01

    Complement component 5 (C5) has been described as either promoting or protecting against airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in experimental allergic asthma, suggesting pleomorphic effects of C5. Here we report that local pharmacological targeting of the C5a receptor (C5aR) prior to initial allergen sensitization in murine models of inhalation tolerance or allergic asthma resulted in either induction or marked enhancement of Th2-polarized immune responses, airway inflammation, and AHR. Importantly, C5aR-deficient mice exhibited a similar, increased allergic phenotype. Pulmonary allergen exposure in C5aR-targeted mice resulted in increased sensitization and accumulation of CD4+CD69+ T cells associated with a marked increase in pulmonary myeloid, but not plasmacytoid, DC numbers. Pulmonary DCs from C5aR-targeted mice produced large amounts of CC chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17) and CCL22 ex vivo, suggesting a negative impact of C5aR signaling on pulmonary homing of Th2 cells. In contrast, C5aR targeting in sensitized mice led to suppressed airway inflammation and AHR but was still associated with enhanced production of Th2 effector cytokines. These data suggest a dual role for C5a in allergic asthma, i.e., protection from the development of maladaptive type 2 immune responses during allergen sensitization at the DC/T cell interface but enhancement of airway inflammation and AHR in an established inflammatory environment. PMID:16511606

  13. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2 deficient mice have reduced house dust mite-evoked allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Van't Veer, Cornelis; Stroo, Ingrid; van der Meer, Anne J; de Vos, Alex F; van der Zee, Jaring S; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is abundantly expressed in the pulmonary compartment. House dust mite (HDM) is a common cause of allergic asthma and contains multiple PAR2 agonistic proteases. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PAR2 in HDM-induced allergic lung inflammation. For this, the extent of allergic lung inflammation was studied in wild type (Wt) and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice after repeated airway exposure to HDM. HDM exposure of Wt mice resulted in a profound influx of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and accumulation of eosinophils in lung tissue, which both were strongly reduced in PAR2 KO mice. PAR2 KO mice demonstrated attenuated lung pathology and protein leak in the bronchoalveolar space, accompanied by lower BALF levels of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. This study reveals, for the first time, an important role for PAR2 in allergic lung inflammation induced by the clinically relevant allergens contained in HDM.

  15. Investigating possible biological targets of Bj-CRP, the first cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom.

    PubMed

    Lodovicho, Marina E; Costa, Tássia R; Bernardes, Carolina P; Menaldo, Danilo L; Zoccal, Karina F; Carone, Sante E; Rosa, José C; Pucca, Manuela B; Cerni, Felipe A; Arantes, Eliane C; Tytgat, Jan; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Pereira-Crott, Luciana S; Sampaio, Suely V

    2017-01-04

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are commonly described as part of the protein content of snake venoms, nevertheless, so far, little is known about their biological targets and functions. Our study describes the isolation and characterization of Bj-CRP, the first CRISP isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom, also aiming at the identification of possible targets for its actions. Bj-CRP was purified using three chromatographic steps (Sephacryl S-200, Source 15Q and C18) and showed to be an acidic protein of 24.6kDa with high sequence identity to other snake venom CRISPs. This CRISP was devoid of proteolytic, hemorrhagic or coagulant activities, and it did not affect the currents from 13 voltage-gated potassium channel isoforms. Conversely, Bj-CRP induced inflammatory responses characterized by increase of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, after 1 and 4h of its injection in the peritoneal cavity of mice, also stimulating the production of IL-6. Bj-CRP also acted on the human complement system, modulating some of the activation pathways and acting directly on important components (C3 and C4), thus inducing the generation of anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a and C5a). Therefore, our results for Bj-CRP open up prospects for better understanding this class of toxins and its biological actions.

  16. Anticomplementary activity of horse IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Squaiella-Baptistão, Carla Cristina; Marcelino, José Roberto; Ribeiro da Cunha, Luiz Eduardo; Gutiérrez, José María; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2014-03-01

    Envenomation by poisonous animals is a neglected condition according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Antivenoms are included in the WHO Essential Medicines List. It has been assumed that immunoglobulin G (IgG) antivenoms could activate the complement system through Fc and induce early adverse reactions (EARs). However, data in the literature indicate that F(ab')2 fragments can also activate the complement system. Herein, we show that several batches of IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms from the Butantan, Vital Brazil, and Clodomiro Picado Institutes activated the complement classical pathway and induced the production of C3a; however, only those antivenoms from Clodomiro Picado generated C5a. Different protein profiles (IgG heavy chain, protein contaminants, and aggregates) were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analyses. Our results show that various antivenoms from different producers are able to activate the classical pathway of the complement system and generate anaphylatoxins, and these findings suggest that factors, such as composition, contaminant proteins, and aggregates, may influence the anticomplementary activity of antivenoms in vitro. Therefore, there is a need to further improve antivenom production methods to reduce their anticomplementary activity and potential to cause EARs.

  17. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Lentil (Lens culinaris) lipid transfer protein Len c 3: a novel legume allergen.

    PubMed

    Akkerdaas, J; Finkina, E I; Balandin, S V; Santos Magadán, S; Knulst, A; Fernandez-Rivas, M; Asero, R; van Ree, R; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2012-01-01

    Lentils are increasingly consumed in many parts of the world.Two allergens, Len c 1 and 2, have been reported previously. Recently, peanut and green bean lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been identified as the first two members of an important group of allergens that might be associated with severe food allergies. To investigate lentil LTP as a potential new allergen. Efficacy of LTP extraction was monitored at different acidic pH values, using immunoblotting with cross-reactive anti-peach LTP antiserum. Natural LTP was purified from lentil extract and expressed as recombinant allergen in Escherichia coli. Sera from 10 lentil-allergic and/or -sensitized patients (Spain: 6, Italy: 1 and the Netherlands: 3) were used to further characterize lentil LTP. Natural lentil LTP, purified from the homogenized germinated seeds and optimally extracted at pH 3, was identified and designated as allergen Len c 3. By CAP, 9/10 sera showed specific IgE to Len c 3. Recombinant (r) Len c 3 was successfully purified. The natural (n) Len c 3 CAP was completely inhibited by rLen c 3/rPru p 3. IgE binding to lentil pH 3 extract blot was completely inhibited by rLen c 3. The availability of immunochemically active nLen/rLen c 3 as a novel legume allergen facilitates further development and implementation of a third (next to peanut and green bean) legume LTP in component-resolved diagnosis strategies and contributes to evaluate the clinical importance of legume LTPs. Preferential extraction of Len c 3 (pH 3) will affect the production of sensitive extract-based diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. C3: A Command-line Catalogue Cross-matching tool for modern astrophysical survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giuseppe; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano; Mercurio, Amata; di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Molinari, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    In the current data-driven science era, it is needed that data analysis techniques has to quickly evolve to face with data whose dimensions has increased up to the Petabyte scale. In particular, being modern astrophysics based on multi-wavelength data organized into large catalogues, it is crucial that the astronomical catalog cross-matching methods, strongly dependant from the catalogues size, must ensure efficiency, reliability and scalability. Furthermore, multi-band data are archived and reduced in different ways, so that the resulting catalogues may differ each other in formats, resolution, data structure, etc, thus requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features. We present C 3 (Command-line Catalogue Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues from modern surveys. Conceived as a stand-alone command-line process or a module within generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, it provides the maximum flexibility, in terms of portability, configuration, coordinates and cross-matching types, ensuring high performance capabilities by using a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and a sky partitioning algorithm.

  20. C 3, A Command-line Catalog Cross-match Tool for Large Astrophysical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giuseppe; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano; Mercurio, Amata; di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Molinari, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Modern Astrophysics is based on multi-wavelength data organized into large and heterogeneous catalogs. Hence, the need for efficient, reliable and scalable catalog cross-matching methods plays a crucial role in the era of the petabyte scale. Furthermore, multi-band data have often very different angular resolution, requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features, mainly in terms of region shape and resolution. In this work we present C 3 (Command-line Catalog Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogs. It is based on a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and conceived to be executed as a stand-alone command-line process or integrated within any generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, providing the maximum flexibility to the end-user, in terms of portability, parameter configuration, catalog formats, angular resolution, region shapes, coordinate units and cross-matching types. Using real data, extracted from public surveys, we discuss the cross-matching capabilities and computing time efficiency also through a direct comparison with some publicly available tools, chosen among the most used within the community, and representative of different interface paradigms. We verified that the C 3 tool has excellent capabilities to perform an efficient and reliable cross-matching between large data sets. Although the elliptical cross-match and the parametric handling of angular orientation and offset are known concepts in the astrophysical context, their availability in the presented command-line tool makes C 3 competitive in the context of public astronomical tools.

  1. Multigap Superconductivity in Y2C3: A 13C-NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, A.; Akutagawa, S.; Miyamichi, Y.; Mukuda, H.; Kitaoka, Y.; Akimitsu, J.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the superconducting properties of Y2C3 with a relatively high transition temperature Tc = 15.7 K investigated by 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) measurements under a magnetic field. The 13C Knight shift has revealed a significant decrease below Tc, suggesting a spin-singlet superconductivity. From an analysis of the temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the superconducting state, Y2C3 is demonstrated to be a multigap superconductor that exhibits a large gap 2Δ/kBTc=5 at the main band and a small gap 2Δ/kBTc=2 at other bands. These results have revealed that Y2C3 is a unique multigap s-wave superconductor similar to MgB2.

  2. Communications, the Forgotten Element of C3: A Study of Wargaming, Modeling, and Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    gaming efforts. MODELO A review of models, simulations, and wargames, as well as interviews with designers of future software clearly shows that...Week and Space Technoloay, June 4, 1990, pp 72-73. Anderson, Jack & Van Atta, Dale, " U.S. Weapons at Mercy of Computers", The Washington Post...E., "Commanders Still Must Go See", Army, June 1991, pp 18-26. 30 Allen, Thomas B., War Gamea, McGraw Hill, 1987. Allard, G. Kenneth, Command

  3. Senior Leader Airborne C3: A Case for a Streamlined Approach to Funding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-13

    separate Air Force organization such as AF/ CVA to fund SLC3S-A upgrades yet still keep the aircraft operating and generally funded under AMC and 18th Air...resourcing a Pentagon-based organization such as AF/ CVA to manage and fund these upgrades, the potential exists for leveraging the 89 AW’s Future

  4. Inducements revisited.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Martin; Moore, Andrew

    1999-04-01

    The paper defends the permissibility of paying inducements to research subjects against objections not covered in an earlier paper in Bioethics. The objections are that inducements would cause inequity, crowd out research, and undesirably commercialize the researcher-subject relationship. The paper shows how these objections presuppose implausible factual and/or normative claims. The final position reached is a qualified defence of freedom of contract which not only supports the permissibility of inducements but also offers guidance to ethics committees in dealing with practical problems that might arise if inducements are offered.

  5. [Induced acne].

    PubMed

    Humbert, Philippe

    2002-04-15

    Induced acne belongs to the clinical forms of acne. Some dermatoses present with acne-like patterns. They can be induced or perpetuated by non physiological factors. Among these factors, medicines must always be considered, taken either topically (dermocorticoids, sulfur, anti-acneic topics) or generally (androgens, oral corticoids, ACTH, anti-epileptics, anti-depressive drugs, anti-tuberculosis medications). Halogens (iodine, bromine) found in inhaled or orally taken pharmaceutical products, or associated with occupational contact, can also induce acne. Acne of exogenous origin has been described in some specific occupations, and are induced by exposure to chlorine, industrial oils, tar. Sun exposure, PUVA therapy and ionizing radiation are potentially acneigenous. Finally acne caused by cosmetics includes acne cosmetica, brilliantine and oily creams acne and detergent acne.

  6. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  7. The pathomechanism of acetylsalicylic acid intolerance. A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kallós, P; Schlumberger, H D

    1980-05-01

    In a number of individuals suffering from chronic asthma or chronic urticaria, acetylsalicylic acid and structurally unrelated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and other compounds, e.g. tartrazine, elicit an intolerance syndrome that mimics the signs and symptoms of an immediate-type allergic (anaphylactic) reaction. An immunological basis for this reaction could be excluded. It is assumed that the eliciting agents activate complement and that the intolerant individuals lack plasma carboxypeptidase B, that normally inactivates C3a and C5a in statu nascendi. The anaphylatoxins, if not immediately inactivated, release the endogenous mediators of the anaphylactic reaction from the tissue mast cells.

  8. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... inducing labor is to "break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic exam and will guide a small plastic probe with a hook on the end through your cervix to create a hole in the membrane. This does not hurt you ...

  9. Inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal-mediated catabolic process, which through degradation of different cytoplasmic components aids in maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival during exposure to extra- or intracellular stresses. Ammonia is a potential toxic and stress-inducing byproduct of glutamine catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites supported that MTOR activity was not affected, but indicated increased MAPK3 activity, regulation of proteins involved in Rho signal transduction, and a novel phosphorylation motif, serine-proline-threonine (SPT), which could be linked to cytoskeleton-associated proteins. MAPK3 could not be identified as the primary driver of ammonia-induced autophagy but instead the data suggested an upregulation of AMPK and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which might link ammonia to autophagy induction. Support of UPR induction was further obtained from the finding of increased protein levels of the ER stress markers DDIT3/CHOP and HSPA5 during ammonia treatment. The large-scale data set presented here comprises extensive high-quality quantitative information on phosphoprotein regulation in response to 2 very different autophagy inducers and should therefore be considered a general resource for the community. PMID:24300666

  10. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  11. Anti-inflammatory and immunological effects of Centaurea cyanus flower-heads.

    PubMed

    Garbacki, N; Gloaguen, V; Damas, J; Bodart, P; Tits, M; Angenot, L

    1999-12-15

    Centaurea cyanus flower-heads are used in European phytotherapy for the treatment of minor ocular inflammations. Different pharmacological experiments (inhibition of carrageenan, zymosan and croton oil-induced oedemas, inhibition of plasma haemolytic activity, induction of anaphylatoxin activity) showed that polysaccharides extracted from C. cyanus flower-heads had anti-inflammatory properties and interfered with complement. Moreover, these polysaccharides were found to be mainly composed of galacturonic acid, arabinose, glucose, rhamnose and galactose.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 4 Replication in the Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2/C3A

    PubMed Central

    Shier, Medhat K.; El-Wetidy, Mohammad S.; Ali, Hebatallah H.; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The lack of a reliable cell culture system allowing persistent in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) propagation is still restraining the search for novel antiviral strategies. HepG2 cells transfection with HCV allows for viral replication. However, the replication is weak presumably because of HepG2 lack of miRNA-122, which is essential for viral replication. Other agents such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been shown to increase the efficiency of infection with other viruses. This study included comparison of HCV genotype 4 5′UTR and core RNA levels and HCV core protein expression at different time intervals in the absence or presence of PEG and/or DMSO postinfection. Materials and Methods: We used serum with native HCV particles in infecting HepG2 cells in vitro. HCV replication was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection of HCV RNA and immunofluorescence and flow cytometry for detection of HCV core protein. Results: HCV 5′UTR and core RNA expression was evident at different time intervals after viral infection, especially after cells were treated with PEG. HCV core protein was also evident at different time intervals using both immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. PEG, not DMSO, has increased the HCV core protein expression in the treated cells, similar to its effect on viral RNA expression. Conclusions: These expression profiles suggest that the current model of cultured HepG2 cells allows the study of HCV genotype 4 replication and different stages of the viral life cycle. PMID:27184644

  13. Deletion of Carboxypeptidase N Delays Onset of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Darley, M. M.; Ramos, T.N.; Wetsel, R.A.; Barnum, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Complement contributes to inflammation during pathogen infections, however less is known regarding its role during malaria and, the severest form of the disease, cerebral malaria. Recent studies have shown that deletion of the complement anaphylatoxins receptors, C3aR and C5aR, does alter disease susceptibility in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). This does not however, preclude C3a- and C5a-mediated contributions to inflammation in ECM and raises the possibility that carboxypeptidase regulation of anaphylatoxin activity rapidly over rides their functions. To address this question we performed ECM using carboxypeptidase N-deficient (CPN−/−) mice. Unexpectedly, we found that CPN−/− mice survived longer than wild type mice but were fully susceptible to ECM. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration was not reduced at the peak of disease in CPN−/− mice and there was no corresponding reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Our results indicate that carboxypeptidases contribute to the pathogenesis of ECM and that, studies examining the contribution of other carboxypeptidase families and family members may provide greater insight into the role these enzymes play in malaria. PMID:22708514

  14. Deletion of carboxypeptidase N delays onset of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Darley, M M; Ramos, T N; Wetsel, R A; Barnum, S R

    2012-01-01

    Complement contributes to inflammation during pathogen infections; however, less is known regarding its role during malaria and in the severest form of the disease, cerebral malaria. Recent studies have shown that deletion of the complement anaphylatoxins receptors, C3aR and C5aR, does not alter disease susceptibility in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). This does not, however, preclude C3a- and C5a-mediated contributions to inflammation in ECM and raises the possibility that carboxypeptidase regulation of anaphylatoxin activity rapidly over rides their functions. To address this question, we performed ECM using carboxypeptidase N-deficient (CPN(-/-)) mice. Unexpectedly, we found that CPN(-/-) mice survived longer than wild-type mice, but they were fully susceptible to ECM. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration was not reduced at the peak of disease in CPN(-/-) mice, and there was no corresponding reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Our results indicate that carboxypeptidases contribute to the pathogenesis of ECM and that studies examining the contribution of other carboxypeptidase families and family members may provide greater insight into the role these enzymes play in malaria. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Immune Response to Snake Envenoming and Treatment with Antivenom; Complement Activation, Cytokine Production and Mast Cell Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; Ariaratnam, Ariaranee; Jacoby-Alner, Tamara E.; Cotterell, Claire L.; Brown, Simon G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper) and antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI), anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation), mast cell tryptase (MCT), and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%), satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%). Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%). All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high levels of mast

  16. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  17. [Complications caused by protamine. 1: Pharmacology and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Hobbhahn, J; Habazettl, H; Conzen, P; Peter, K

    1991-07-01

    Protamine is a strongly alkaline polypeptide with a molecular weight of about 4500. Protamine solutions contain paraben compounds as antimicrobial agents. Rapid neutralization of heparin by protamine may cause an anaphylactoid reaction characterized by a non-immunogenic histamine release and by unknown mediators mechanisms. This response is associated with systemic peripheral vasodilation resulting in slight to moderate hypotension. Weak negative inotropic effects by mechanisms different from the reduction of ionized calcium concentrations may also contribute to systemic hypotension. Apart from these mostly slight reactions, severe reactions may occur with life-threatening systemic hypotension, bronchospasm and, in rare cases, death. They are caused by anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions resulting in catastrophic pulmonary vasoconstriction which induces right and eventually global ventricular failure. Sensitization to protamine (anaphylactic) and anaphylactoid reactions are the underlying mechanisms. The majority of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions are associated with complement activation and the release of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. These activate the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of the arachidonic acid metabolism in yet unidentified cells, probably within the lung. As a result, thromboxane and prostaglandins are released. Thromboxane is the pivotal mediator responsible for the pulmonary vasoconstriction and, presumably, also for the bronchospasm during protamine reactions. The pronounced activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the decrease in platelet counts may reflect a mere epiphenomenon. The degree of right ventricular afterload increase at which systemic hypotension requiring immediate therapy would occur depends mainly on the contractile state of the heart. Potential risk patients for severe protamine reactions are depot insulin-dependent diabetics and patients with prior exposure to protamine.

  18. Swim-stress-induced antinociception in young rats.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, H. C.; Kitchen, I.

    1989-01-01

    1. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms have been implicated in the phenomenon of stress-induced antinociception in adult rodents. We have studied stress-induced antinociception in developing rats and characterized differences in the neurochemical basis of this effect in pre- and post-weanling animals. 2. Twenty and 25 day old rats were stressed using warm water (20 degrees C) swimming for 3 or 10 min periods and antinociception was assessed by the tail immersion test (50 degrees C). 3. A 3 min swim in 20 and 25 day old rats produced marked antinociception which was blocked by naloxone, Mr 1452, 16-methyl cyprenorphine and levallorphan but not Mr 1453 or N-methyl levallorphan. The delta-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 174,864 attenuated stress-induced antinociception in 25 day old rats but was without effect in 20 day old animals. 4. A 10 min swim in 25 day old rats produced antinociception which was non-opioid in nature. In contrast, antinociception was not observed in 20 day old rats after a 10 min swim-stress. 5. Pretreatment of animals with dexamethasone blocked 3 min swim-stress antinociception in 20 and 25 day old animals but had no effect on antinociception induced by a 10 min swim. 6. Swim-stress-induced antinociception can be observed in young rats and dissociated into opioid and non-opioid types dependent on the duration of swimming stress. The non-opioid type appears to develop more slowly and cannot be observed in preweanling rats. The opioid type is a predominantly mu-receptor phenomenon in preweanling animals but delta-receptor components are observable in postweanling rats. PMID:2720296

  19. Complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Johnson, Alex C; Lojovich, Sarah J; Bauer, Ashley J; Marsh, Henry C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetric problem defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria associated with compromised placental perfusion. Although activation of the complement system is increased in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, it remains unclear whether excess complement activation is a cause or consequence of placental ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension. We employed the reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia in the rat to induce hypertension in the third trimester and evaluated the effect of inhibiting complement activation with a soluble recombinant form of an endogenous complement regulator, human complement receptor 1 (sCR1; CDX-1135). On day 14 of a 21-day gestation, rats received either RUPP or Sham surgery and 15 mg/kg/day sCR1 or saline intravenously on days 14-18. Circulating complement component 3 decreased and complement activation product C3a increased in RUPP vs. Sham (p<0.05), indicating complement activation had occurred. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) measured on day 19 increased in RUPP vs. Sham rats (109.8±2.8 mmHg vs. 93.6±1.6 mmHg). Treatment with sCR1 significantly reduced elevated MAP in RUPP rats (98.4±3.6 mmHg, p<0.05) and reduced C3a production. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in RUPP compared to Sham rats, and the decrease in VEGF was not affected by sCR1 treatment. Thus, these studies have identified a mechanistic link between complement activation and the pregnancy complication of hypertension apart from free plasma VEGF and have identified complement inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in preeclampsia.

  20. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma Print A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  1. Neuroprotective effect of schizandrin A on oxygen and glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced cell injury in primary culture of rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-Ping; Li, Gui-Cai; Shi, Yun-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Chuan; Li, Jian-Long; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Fei; Liang, Xin-Miao

    2014-09-01

    Brain ischemia appears to be associated with innate immunity. Recent reports showed that C3a and C5a, as potent targets, might protect against ischemia induced cell death. In traditional Chinese medicine, the fruit of Schizandra chinesis Baill (Fructus schizandrae) has been widely used as a tonic. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of schizandrin A, a composition of S. chinesis Baill, against oxygen and glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion (OGD/R)-induced cell death in primary culture of rat cortical neurons, and to test whether C3a and C5a affected cortical neuron recovery from ischemic injury after schizandrin A treatment. The results showed that schizandrin A significantly reduced cell apoptosis and necrosis, increased cell survival, and decreased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in primary culture of rat cortical neurons after OGD/R. Mechanism studies suggested that the modulation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38, as well as caspase-3 activity played an important role on the progress of neuronal apoptosis. C5aR participated in the neuroprotective effect of schizandrin A in primary culture of rat cortical neurons after OGD/R. Our findings suggested that schizandrin A might act as a candidate therapeutic target drug used for brain ischemia and related diseases.

  2. Chemical-Induced Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Harris, John E

    2017-04-01

    Chemical-induced depigmentation of the skin has been recognized for more than 75 years, first as an occupational hazard but then extending to those using household commercial products as common as hair dyes. Since their discovery, these chemicals have been used therapeutically in patients with severe vitiligo to depigment their remaining skin and improve their appearance. Because chemical-induced depigmentation is clinically and histologically indistinguishable from nonchemically induced vitiligo, and because these chemicals appear to induce melanocyte autoimmunity, this phenomenon should be known as "chemical-induced vitiligo," rather than less accurate terms that have been previously used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  4. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  5. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  6. Investigation of ifosfamide nephrotoxicity induced in a liver-kidney co-culture biochip.

    PubMed

    Choucha-Snouber, Leila; Aninat, Caroline; Grsicom, Laurent; Madalinski, Geoffrey; Brochot, Céline; Poleni, Paul Emile; Razan, Florence; Guillouzo, Christiane Guguen; Legallais, Cécile; Corlu, Anne; Leclerc, Eric

    2013-02-01

    nephrotoxicity in a liver-kidney micro fluidic co-culture model using HepaRG-MDCK cells is induced by the metabolism of ifosfamide into chloroacetaldehyde whereas this pathway is not functional in HepG2/C3a-MDCK model. This study demonstrates the interest in the development of systemic organ-organ interactions using micro fluidic biochips. It also illustrated their potential in future predictive toxicity model using in vitro models as alternative methods.

  7. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-04-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms.

  8. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms. PMID:12692435

  9. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  10. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  11. Teacher-Induced Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Kent C.

    Students of English as a second language (ESL) often come to the classroom with little or no experience in writing in any language and with inaccurate assumptions about writing. Rather than correct these assumptions, teachers often seem to unwittingly reinforce them, actually inducing errors into their students' work. Teacher-induced errors occur…

  12. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  13. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Feldweg, Anna M

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is an uncommon disorder in which anaphylaxis occurs in response to physical exertion. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a disorder with similar symptoms, although symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating and, in most cases, only if a specific food is eaten. Management includes education about safe conditions for exercise, the importance of ceasing exercise immediately if symptoms develop, appropriate use of epinephrine, and, for patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, avoidance of the culprit food for at least 4 hours before exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  15. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  16. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Gonzalez, Luis S

    2014-08-01

    Coagulopathy is the inability of blood to coagulate normally; in trauma patients, it is a multifactorial and complex process. Seriously injured trauma patients experience coagulopathies during the acute injury phase. Risk factors for trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, metabolic acidosis, hypoperfusion, hemodilution, and fluid replacement. In addition to the coagulopathy induced by trauma, many patients may also be taking medications that interfere with hemostasis. Therefore, medication-induced coagulopathy also is a concern. Traditional laboratory-based methods of assessing coagulation are being supported or even replaced by point-of-care tests. The evidence-based management of trauma-induced coagulopathy should address hypothermia, fluid resuscitation, blood components administration, and, if needed, medications to reverse identified coagulation disorders. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  18. Drug-induced catatonia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-09-01

    Catatonia is a heterogeneous syndrome that varies in etiology, presentation, course and sequelae. Initially conceptualized as a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur not only with other psychiatric conditions but also with medical conditions and drug-induced and toxic states. While drug-induced catatonia is now a recognized entity, most studies club it with catatonia due to general medical conditions or organic catatonia, thus precluding any meaningful interpretation of such cases. The literature on drug-induced catatonia mostly draws from scattered case reports. This article attempts to review the available literature in this realm and integrate the information in an attempt to explore the epidemiology, etiology, mechanism and treatment of drug-induced catatonia.

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Awareness of the need for prevention of glucocorticoid-induced fractures is growing, but glucocorticoid administration is often overlooked as the most common cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis develops in 9-40% of patients receiving long-term therapy although it may also occur with short-term exposure to high doses, after intra-articular injection, and without glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The name, osteonecrosis, is misleading because the primary histopathological lesion is osteocyte apoptosis. Apoptotic osteocytes persist because they are anatomically unavailable for phagocytosis and, with glucocorticoid excess, decreased bone remodeling retards their replacement. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and unrepairable defect, uniquely disrupts the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system and thus starts the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head. Current evidence indicates that bisphosphonates may rapidly reduce pain, increase ambulation, and delay joint collapse in patients with osteonecrosis.

  20. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression.

  1. Electromagnetically induced phase grating.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E

    2010-04-01

    I propose an electromagnetically induced phase grating based on the giant Kerr nonlinearity of an atomic medium under electromagnetically induced transparency. The atomic phase grating behaves similarly to an ideal sinusoidal phase grating, and it is capable of producing a pi phase excursion across a weak probe beam along with high transmissivity. The grating is created with arbitrarily weak fields, and diffraction efficiencies as high as 30% are predicted.

  2. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin.

  3. Levodopa-induced myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Klawans, H L; Goetz, C; Bergen, D

    1975-05-01

    Twelve parkinsonian patients on long-term levodopa therapy developed intermittent, myoclonic body jerks. The movements consisted of single unilateral or bilateral abrupt jerks of the extremities and occurred most frequently during sleep. Although directly related to daily dosage of levodopa, the myoclonus was specifically blocked by the serotonin antagonist, methysergide. Levodopa-induced myoclonus may be related to intermittent increases of activity of serotonin in the brain and results from levodopa-induced dysregulation of serotonin activity.

  4. Lorazepam-induced diplopia.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia - seeing double - is a symptom with many potential causes, both neurological and ophthalmological. Benzodiazepine induced ocular side-effects are rarely reported. Lorazepam is one of the commonly used benzodiazepine in psychiatric practice. Visual problems associated with administration of lorazepam are rarely reported and the frequency of occurrence is not established. We report a rare case of lorazepam-induced diplopia in a newly diagnosed case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

  5. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B S; Das, Subhash

    2014-10-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprolactinemic galactorrhea at different time with a pituitary incidentaloma.

  6. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B. S.; Das, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprolactinemic galactorrhea at different time with a pituitary incidentaloma. PMID:25568484

  7. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  8. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-11-03

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts.

  9. Decreased synthesis of serum carboxypeptidase N (SCPN) in familial SCPN deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.P.; Curd, J.G.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Serum carboxypeptidase N (SCPN) is the primary inactivator of the C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins as well as an inactivator of bradykinin. Thus, SCPN deficiency potentially could result in significant pathophysiologic consequences. Previous studies identified a deficient subject afflicted with frequent episodes of angioedema, and other family members also had SCPN deficiency. To delineate this abnormality further, the fractional catabolic rate (FRC) and enzyme synthesis were determined in three members of the afflicted kindred as well as in five normal persons following the infusion of homogeneous /sup 125/I-SCPN. The mean FCR and synthesis rates for SCPN in the normal subjects were 1.3%/hr and 20,793 U/kg/hr, respectively. Reduced synthesis was concluded to be primarily responsible for the low SCPN levels in the afflicted kindred. The high FRC of SCPN discourages attempted maintenance therapy with infusions of enriched SCPN preparations.

  10. Complement components in Nigerians with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Onyemelukwe, G C

    1989-10-01

    Serum complement components C1q, C3, C4, factor B, and C3d breakdown products were measured in asthmatic Nigerians and in age-matched and sex-matched controls. C3 mean level was higher than in controls while C1q and C4 mean levels were lower than in controls. High levels of C3d in asthmatic patients suggest the possible role of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins in the etiopathogenesis of perennial asthma in Nigerian patients in a tropical environment with ubiquitous airborne allergens and infective agents. The significantly elevated levels of IgM and IgG may suggest recurrent respiratory challenge of perennial antigens in our environment.

  11. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  12. Therapeutic effects of sesame oil on monosodium urate crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chen, Si-Jin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2013-01-01

    Sesame oil has been used in traditional Taiwanese medicine to relieve the inflammatory pain in people with joint inflammation, toothache, scrapes, and cuts. However, scientific evidence related to the effectiveness or action mechanism of sesame oil on relief of pain and inflammation has not been examined experimentally. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of sesame oil on monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats. Air pouch, a pseudosynovial cavity, was established by injecting 24 mL of filtered sterile air subcutaneously in the backs of the rats. At day 0, inflammation in air pouch was induced by injecting MSU crystal (5 mg/rat, suspended in sterilized phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4), while sesame oil (0, 1, 2, or 4 mL/kg, orally) was given 6 h after MSU crystal injection. Parameters in lavage and skin tissue from the air pouches were assessed 6 h after sesame oil was given. Sesame oil decreased MSU crystal-induced total cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels in lavage and pouch tissue. Sesame oil significantly decreased leukocyte and neutrophil counts in lavage compared with MSU crystal alone group. Sesame oil decreased activated mast cell counts in skin tissue in MSU crystal-treated rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and IL-4 level in isolated mast cells from rats treated with MSU crystal. Furthermore, sesame oil decreased lavage complement proteins C3a and C5a levels in MSU crystal-treated rats. In conclusion, sesame oil shows a potent therapeutic effect against MSU crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats.

  13. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Lillegard, Kathryn E.; Bauer, Ashley J.; Elmquist, Barbara J.; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  14. Cloning, expression, cellular distribution, and role in chemotaxis of a C5a receptor in rainbow trout: the first identification of a C5a receptor in a nonmammalian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boshra, Hani; Li, Jun; Peters, Rodney; Hansen, John; Matlapudi, Anjan; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2004-01-01

    C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins generated during complement activation play a key role in inflammation. C5a is the most potent of the three anaphylatoxins in eliciting biological responses. The effects of C5a are mediated by its binding to C5a receptor (C5aR, CD88). To date, C5aR has only been identified and cloned in mammalian species, and its evolutionary history remains ill-defined. To gain insights into the evolution, conserved structural domains, and functions of C5aR, we have cloned and characterized a C5aR in rainbow trout, a teleost fish. The isolated cDNA encoded a 350-aa protein that showed the highest sequence similarity to C5aR from other species. Genomic analysis revealed the presence of one continuous exon encoding the entire open reading frame. Northern blot analysis showed significant expression of the trout C5a receptor (TC5aR) message in PBLs and kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed that two Abs generated against two different areas of the extracellular N-terminal region of TC5aR positively stained the same leukocyte populations from PBLs. B lymphocytes and granulocytes comprised the majority of cells recognized by the anti-TC5aR. More importantly, these Abs inhibited chemotaxis of PBLs toward a chemoattractant fraction purified from complement-activated trout serum. Our data suggest that the split between C5aR and C3aR from a common ancestral molecule occurred before the emergence of teleost fish. Moreover, we demonstrate that the overall structure of C5aR as well as its role in chemotaxis have remained conserved for >300 million years.

  15. Immune receptors and adhesion molecules in human pulmonary leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Del Carlo Bernardi, Fabiola; Ctenas, Bruno; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Mauad, Thais

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis has been increasingly reported in the last 20 years, being related to the severity and mortality of the disease. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis is not understood. Lung endothelial cells have been proposed as targets in the pathogenesis of lung involvement in leptospirosis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 or the complement system, which stimulates the release of cytokines that lead to the activation of adhesion molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of immune pathways and of the intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule, respectively) in the lungs of patients with pulmonary involvement of leptospirosis. We studied the lungs of 18 patients who died of leptospirosis and compared them with 2 groups of controls: normal and noninfectious hemorrhagic lungs. Using immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we quantified the expression of the C3a anaphylatoxin receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, and Toll-like receptor 2 in small pulmonary vessels and in the alveolar septa. There was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P < .03) and C3a anaphylatoxin receptor (P < .008) in alveolar septa in the leptospirosis group compared with the normal and hemorrhagic controls. In the vessels of the leptospirosis group, there was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P = .004), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P = .030), and Toll-like receptor 2 (P = .042) compared with the normal group. Vascular cell adhesion molecule expression in vessels was higher in the leptospirosis group compared with the hemorrhagic group (P = .015). Our results indicate that immune receptors and adhesion molecules participate in the phenomena leading to pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelaers, Win; Lahorte, Philippe

    This chapter is part one of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced bioradicals is discussed. Bioradicals play a pivotal role in the complex chain of processes starting with the absorption of radiation in biological materials and ending with the radiation-induced biological after-effects. The general aspects of the four consecutive stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) are discussed from an interdisciplinary point of view. The close relationship between radiation dose and track structure, induced DNA damage and cell survival or killing is treated in detail. The repair mechanisms that cells employ, to insure DNA stability following irradiation, are described. Because of their great biomedical importance tumour suppressor genes involved in radiation-induced DNA repair and in checkpoint activation will be treated briefly, together with the molecular genetics of radiosensitivity. Part two of this review will deal with modern theoretical methods and experimental instrumentation for quantitative studies in this research field. Also an extensive overview of the applications of radiation-induced bioradicals will be given. A comprehensive list of references allows further exploration of this research field, characterised in the last decade by a substantial advance, both in fundamental knowledge and in range of applications.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2010-12-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy, and 8% would decline chemotherapy because of fear of hair loss. A number of agents have been evaluated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration but could not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, although most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Because chemotherapy-induced toxicity has been associated with nutritional status, nutritional assessment and support might confer beneficial effects. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacological agents are under evaluation including: anti-oxidants, cytokines and growth factors, cell cycle and proliferation modifiers, and inhibitors of apoptosis. At present, no approved pharmacologic treatment of chemotherapy-induced hair loss exists. The incidence and severity of the condition are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. Fortunately, chemotherapy-induced hair loss is mostly reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care and temporarily wearing a wig may be the most effective coping strategy.

  18. P7C3 Attenuates the Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Lu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Memory impairment is the most common symptom in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the memory enhancing effects of P7C3, a recently identified compound with robust proneurogenic and neuroprotective effects, on the cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. Different behavior tests including the Y-maze, Morris water maze, and passive avoidance tests were performed to measure cognitive functions. Scopolamine significantly decreased the spontaneous alternation and step-through latency of C57BL/6J mice in Y-maze test and passive avoidance test, whereas increased the time of mice spent to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze test. Importantly, intraperitoneal administration of P7C3 effectively reversed those Scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, P7C3 treatment significantly enhanced the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the cortex and hippocampus, and the usage of selective BDNF signaling inhibitor fully blocked the anti-amnesic effects of P7C3. Therefore, these findings suggest that P7C3 could improve the scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment possibly through activation of BDNF signaling pathway, thereby exhibiting a cognition-enhancing potential.

  19. Drug-induced mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Peters, S

    1995-02-01

    Mania can occur by chance association during drug treatment, particularly in patients predisposed to mood disorder. Single case reports are unreliable, and evidence must be sought from large series of treated patients, particularly those with a matched control group. Drugs with a definite propensity to cause manic symptoms include levodopa, corticosteroids and anabolic-androgenic steroids. Antidepressants of the tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor classes can induce mania in patients with pre-existing bipolar affective disorder. Drugs which are probably capable of inducing mania, but for which the evidence is less scientifically secure, include other dopaminergic anti-Parkinsonian drugs, thyroxine, iproniazid and isoniazid, sympathomimetic drugs, chloroquine, baclofen, alprazolam, captopril, amphetamine and phencyclidine. Other drugs may induce mania rarely and idiosyncratically. Management involves discontinuation or dosage reduction of the suspected drug, if this is medically possible, and treatment of manic symptoms with antipsychotic drugs or lithium.

  20. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  1. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  2. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  3. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement.

  4. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement. PMID:28289500

  5. Surgery induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian V; Peter, Mark B; Shenoy, Hrishikesh G; Horgan, Kieran; Hughes, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia result in a variety of metabolic and endocrine responses, which result in a generalised state of immunosuppression in the immediate post-operative period. Surgery induced immunosuppression has been implicated in the development of post-operative septic complications and tumour metastasis formation. In addition the effectiveness of many treatments in the adjuvant setting is dependent on a functioning immune system. By understanding the mechanisms contributing to surgery-induced immunosuppression, surgeons may undertake strategies to minimise its effect and reduce potential short-term and long-term consequences to patients.

  6. Geomagnetism and induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-07-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of conceptual integrated science over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is initiated by the change in the magnetic flux due to the Earth's magnetic field and movement. This simple and enjoyable experiment will demonstrate how basic concepts in physics and geology can help us think about possible health effects due to the induced voltage.

  7. Drug-induced photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert S; Ibbotson, Sally H

    2014-07-01

    Drug-induced photosensitivity is common. The principal mechanism of systemic drug photosensitivity is phototoxicity and the principal mechanism of topical drug photosensitivity is photoallergy. Photopatch testing is helpful to determine suspected topical agent photoallergies (eg, from ultraviolet filters in sunscreens) but generally not helpful in detecting systemic drug photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is usually best managed by stopping the suspected drug. Other measures, including phototherapy using wavelengths that do not elicit the response, are sometimes necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Topological induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton’s coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological quantum-field theory (TQFT).

  9. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  10. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  11. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  12. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  13. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  14. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  15. Exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Storms, William W

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is a relatively common condition that affects both recreational and elite athletes. The latest data suggest that it is an inflammatory process, especially in elite athletes. Proper diagnosis is important to differentiate EIB from other respiratory conditions. Effective treatment usually controls this condition.

  16. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  17. Pyrazinamide induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Surya; Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Vaibhav; Anand, Sunish C.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of certain antitubercular drugs and is characterized by rapid destruction of platelets whenever offending drug is taken by a susceptible person. We report a case of pyrazinamide-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient receiving anti tubercular drugs. PMID:20711377

  18. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  20. Drug-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates. PMID:23522744

  1. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  2. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  3. Calotropis procera -induced keratitis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Nidhi; Chandrakar, A K; Garg, M L; Patel, Santosh Singh

    2009-01-01

    Calotropis procera produces copious amounts of latex, which has been shown to possess several pharmacological properities. Its local application produces intense inflammatory response. In the 10 cases of Calotropis procera -induced keratitis reported here, the clinical picture showed corneal edema with striate keratopathy without any evidence of intraocular inflammation. The inflammation was reversed by the local application of steroid drops.

  4. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  5. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  6. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  7. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  8. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  9. Lovastatin induces platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Ming; Chen, Mengxing; Zhou, Ling; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng

    2016-03-01

    Statins are widely used in the prevention of atherosclerosis and treatment of coronary artery disease because of pleiotropic effects on thrombosis. Thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage occurred in some statin-treated patients, but the reason remains unclear. In the current study, we show that lovastatin dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, leading to up-regulation of Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-XL, and activation of caspase-3/8/9. Lovastatin treatment did not increase the surface expression of P-selectin or PAC-1 binding but led to strongly reduced collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. The integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist, RGDS, inhibited lovastatin-induced apoptosis in both human platelets and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing integrin αIIbβ3. The number of circulating platelets in mice was significantly reduced after intraperitoneal injections with lovastatin. Taken together, these data indicate that lovastatin induced caspase-dependent platelet apoptosis. Lovastatin does not incur platelet activation, whereas impairs platelet function and reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage in patients treated with statins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  11. Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Gounden, Ronald; Blockman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is an acquired, transient prothrombotic disorder caused by heparin. The predominant problem is the creation of a prothrombotic milieu, accompanied by a fall in the platelet count. This explains the apparent paradox of thrombosis in the face of thrombocytopaenia and why non-heparin antithrombotic agents are integral to its management.

  12. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed Oct. 1, 2014. Stickland MK, et al. Effect of warm-up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma action plans: Help patients take control. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  13. Warfarin-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey J; Robertson, Ivan; James, Daniel; McMeniman, Erin

    2015-02-01

    Erythroderma is a potentially serious and life-threatening skin disease with a number of possible aetiologies. Drug reactions are well-documented causes, with carbamazepine, penicillin and allopurinol being the most commonly implicated. This case describes a unique presentation of warfarin-induced erythroderma in a 78-year-old female patient.

  14. Plume-induced subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Dominant present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves consequences of plate tectonics. In contrast, recently discovered plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without pre-existing plate tectonics. Here, we investigate this new mechanism with high-resolution 3D numerical thermomechanical modeling experiments. We show that typical plume-induced subduction dynamics is subdivided into five different stages: (1) oceanic plateau formation by arrival of a mantle plume head; (2) formation of an incipient trench and a descending nearly-circular slab at the plateau margins; (3) tearing of the circular slab; (4) formation of several self-sustained retreating subduction zones and (5) cooling and spreading of the new lithosphere formed between the retreating subduction zones. At the final stage of plume-induced subduction initiation, a mosaic of independently moving, growing and cooling small oceanic plates heading toward individual retreating subduction zones forms. The plates are separated by spreading centers, triple junctions and transform faults and thus the newly formed multi-slab subduction system operates as an embryonic plate tectonic cell. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained plume-induced subduction: (1) old negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) intense weakening of the lithosphere by plume-derived magmas; and (3) lubrication of the forming subduction interface by hydrated oceanic crust. We furthermore discuss that plume-induced subduction, which is rare at present day conditions, may have been common in the Precambrian time and likely started global plate tectonics on Earth.

  15. C5a Regulates IL-1β Production and Leukocyte Recruitment in a Murine Model of Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Hanif J; Ho, Adrian W S; Laudisi, Federica; Derks, Heidi; Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Teng, Gim Gee; Mortellaro, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Gouty arthritis results from the generation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals within joints. These MSU crystals elicit acute inflammation characterized by massive infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes that are mobilized by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. MSU crystals also activate the complement system, which regulates the inflammatory response; however, it is unclear whether or how MSU-mediated complement activation is linked to IL-1β release in vivo, and the various roles that might be played by individual components of the complement cascade. Here we show that exposure to MSU crystals in vivo triggers the complement cascade, leading to the generation of the biologically active complement proteins C3a and C5a. C5a, but not C3a, potentiated IL-1β and IL-1α release from LPS-primed MSU-exposed peritoneal macrophages and human monocytic cells in vitro; while in vivo MSU-induced C5a mediated murine neutrophil recruitment as well as IL-1β production at the site of inflammation. These effects were significantly ameliorated by treatment of mice with a C5a receptor antagonist. Mechanistic studies revealed that C5a most likely increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and not through increased transcription of inflammasome components. Therefore we conclude that C5a generated upon MSU-induced complement activation increases neutrophil recruitment in vivo by promoting IL-1 production via the generation of ROS, which activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Identification of the C5a receptor as a key determinant of IL-1-mediated recruitment of inflammatory cells provides a novel potential target for therapeutic intervention to mitigate gouty arthritis.

  16. C5a Regulates IL-1β Production and Leukocyte Recruitment in a Murine Model of Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Khameneh, Hanif J.; Ho, Adrian W. S.; Laudisi, Federica; Derks, Heidi; Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Teng, Gim Gee; Mortellaro, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Gouty arthritis results from the generation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals within joints. These MSU crystals elicit acute inflammation characterized by massive infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes that are mobilized by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. MSU crystals also activate the complement system, which regulates the inflammatory response; however, it is unclear whether or how MSU-mediated complement activation is linked to IL-1β release in vivo, and the various roles that might be played by individual components of the complement cascade. Here we show that exposure to MSU crystals in vivo triggers the complement cascade, leading to the generation of the biologically active complement proteins C3a and C5a. C5a, but not C3a, potentiated IL-1β and IL-1α release from LPS–primed MSU-exposed peritoneal macrophages and human monocytic cells in vitro; while in vivo MSU–induced C5a mediated murine neutrophil recruitment as well as IL-1β production at the site of inflammation. These effects were significantly ameliorated by treatment of mice with a C5a receptor antagonist. Mechanistic studies revealed that C5a most likely increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and not through increased transcription of inflammasome components. Therefore we conclude that C5a generated upon MSU-induced complement activation increases neutrophil recruitment in vivo by promoting IL-1 production via the generation of ROS, which activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Identification of the C5a receptor as a key determinant of IL-1-mediated recruitment of inflammatory cells provides a novel potential target for therapeutic intervention to mitigate gouty arthritis. PMID:28167912

  17. C5a receptor (CD88) inhibition improves hypothermia-induced neuroprotection in an in vitro ischemic model.

    PubMed

    Thundyil, John; Pavlovski, Dale; Hsieh, Yu-Hsuan; Gelderblom, Mathias; Magnus, Tim; Fairlie, David P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-03-01

    The concept of 'salvageble penumbra' has prompted both scientists and physicians to explore various neuroprotective approaches that could be beneficial during stroke therapy. Unfortunately, most of them have proved ineffective in targeting multiple cellular death cascades incited within the ischemic penumbra. Hypothermia has been shown to be capable of addressing this problem to some extent. Although many studies have shown that hypothermia targets several cellular processes, its effects on innate immune receptor-mediated apoptotic death still remain unclear. Moreover, whether inhibiting the signaling of innate immune receptors like complement anaphylatoxin C5a receptor (CD88) plays a role in this hypothermic neuroprotection still need to be deciphered. Using various types of ischemic insults in different neuronal cells, we confirm that hypothermia does indeed attenuate apoptotic neuronal cell death in vitro and this effect can be further enhanced by pharmacologically blocking or knocking out CD88. Thus, our study raises a promising therapeutic possibility of adding CD88 antagonists along with hypothermia to improve stroke outcomes.

  18. Identification of high-risk Listeria monocytogenes serotypes in lineage I (serotype 1/2a, 1/2c, 3a and 3c) using multiplex PCR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: Using molecular subtyping techniques, Listeria monocytogenes is divided into three major phylogenetic lineages, and a multiplex PCR method can differentiate five L. monocytogenes subgroups: 1/2a-3a, 1/2c-3c, 1/2b-3b-7, 4b-4d-4e, and 4a-4c. In the current study, we conducted genome comparison...

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Type Strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 and Sediminibacterium sp. Strain C3, a Novel Strain Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, Joaquín M.; Figuerola, Eva L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Sediminibacterium comprises species present in diverse natural and engineered environments. Here, we report for the first time the genome sequences of the type strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 (NBRC 103935) and Sediminibacterium sp. strain C3 (BNM541), isolated from activated sludge, a valuable model for the study of substrate-dependent autoaggregation. PMID:24435857

  20. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-23

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease.

  1. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vasek, Michael J.; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M.; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K.; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K.; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R.; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K.; Garbow, Joel R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Suthar, Mehul S.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae1,2. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually3, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development4,5. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein6,7 leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34−/− mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease. PMID:27337340

  2. Buckling-Induced Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  3. Cocaine-Induced Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Mark; Paran, Daphna; Elkayam, Ori

    2016-01-01

    The use of cocaine continues to grow worldwide. One of the possible side-effects of cocaine is vasculitis. Two distinct vasculitic syndromes have been described due to cocaine. One is cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion, secondary to a direct vasoconstrictor effect of cocaine, inducing ischemic necrosis of the septal cartilage and perforation of the nasal septum, mimicking findings of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the upper airways. The other is ANCA-associated vasculitis, attributed to the levamisole component that contaminates about 70% of the cocaine. This type of vasculitis may be myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) positive, and its main manifestations are typical cutaneous findings, arthralgia, otolaryngologic involvement, and agranulocytosis. A high degree of suspicion and awareness is needed in order properly to diagnose and treat these patients. PMID:27824551

  4. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  5. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  6. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  8. Current induced interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Peter M.; Heide, Carsten; Zhang, Shufeng; Fert, Albert

    2001-03-01

    It has recently been shown that a perpendicular current in a magnetically multilayered structures induces an unusual bilinear coupling between the magnetizations of the layers [1]. While this was demonstrated in the ballistic regime, transport is likely to be diffusive in the structures where this may be relevant to the role of currents in switching the magnetization of the layers. We have derived the current induced coupling by using the Boltzmann equation in terms of the parameters used to describe the giant magnetoresistance of magnetically layered structures, and thereby estimate the strength of this coupling. Work supported in part by DARPA and ONR. [1] C.Heide and R.J.Elliott, Europhys. Lett. 50, 271 (2000).

  9. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Buckling-Induced Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  11. Drug-induced Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zuba, Ewelina Bogumiła; Koronowska, Sandra; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered the main environmental physical hazard to the skin. It is responsible for photoaging, sunburns, carcinogenesis, and photodermatoses, including drug-induced photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is an abnormal skin reaction either to sunlight or to artificial light. Drugs may be a cause of photoallergic, phototoxic, and photoaggravated dermatitis. There are numerous medications that can be implicated in these types of reactions. Recently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to be a common cause of photosensitivity. As both systemic and topical medications may promote photosensitive reactions, it is important to take into consideration the potential risk of occurrence such reactions, especially in people chronically exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

  12. Drug-induced hypokalaemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Hmouda, Houssem; Bouraoui, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    Hypokalaemia (defined as a plasma potassium concentration<3.5 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Drugs are a common cause of either asymptomatic or symptomatic hypokalaemia. Drug-induced hypokalaemia is an important problem particularly in the elderly and in patients with cardiovascular, renal or hepatic disease. Hypokalaemia can complicate the use of the drug in the therapeutic concentration range, and can also be precipitated with overdose or conditions leading to drug intoxication. Because the etiologies of hypokalaemia are numerous, the diagnosis of drug-induced hypokalaemia may be overlooked. Physicians should always pay close attention to this common side effect. Evaluation and management of a hypokalaemic patient should include a careful review of medications history to determine if a drug capable of causing or aggravating this electrolyte abnormality is present.

  13. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  14. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Powers, Albert R; Gancsos, Mark G; Finn, Emily S; Morgan, Peter T; Corlett, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At subanesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations, a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo-controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of 3 participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced auditory verbal hallucinations in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the MRI scanner and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis - the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs, and it does so more in situations of altered perceptual input. The altered perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine. Such circumstances induce aberrant percepts, including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of auditory verbal hallucinations and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  16. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  17. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  18. Allopurinol induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Geeta; Govil, Dinesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely prescribed urate lowering agent is responsible for various adverse drug reactions, including erythroderma. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of fever, redness and scaling all over the body after 3-4 weeks of allopurinol treatment for asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Elevated liver enzymes were detected in his blood analysis. Skin biopsy was consistent with drug induced erythroderma. Allopurinol was stopped and steroids were started. Patient improved over a period of 2 weeks.

  19. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  20. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  2. Induced QCD I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-11-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU( N c ) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N b can be as small as N c . In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U( N c ) to SU( N c ), (ii) derive refined bounds on N b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  3. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  4. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made.

  5. Baby universes with induced gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yihong; Gao, Hongbo

    1989-12-01

    Some quantum effects of baby universes with induced gravity are discussed. The authors prove that the interactions between the baby-parent universes are non-local, and argue that the induced low-energy cosmological constant is zero. This argument does not depend on the detail of the induced potential.

  6. Coleus forskohlii extract induces hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Virgona, Nantiga; Yokotani, Kaori; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shimura, Fumio; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Taki, Yuko; Yamada, Shizuo; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2012-03-01

    Coleus forskohlii root extract (CFE) is popular for use as a weight loss dietary supplement. In this study, the influence of standardized CFE containing 10% active component forskolin on the hepatic drug metabolizing system was investigated to evaluate the safety through its drug interaction potential. Male ICR mice were fed AIN93G-based diets containing 0-5% CFE or 0.05% pure forskolin for 2-3 weeks. Intake of two different sources of 0.5% CFE significantly increased the relative liver weight, total content of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) and induced CYPs (especially 2B, 2C, 3A types) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. CFE significantly increased mRNA expression of CYPs and GST with dose related responses. However, unlike the CFE, intake of 0.05% pure forskolin was found to be associated with only weak induction in CYP3A and GST activities with no significant increases in relative liver weight, total hepatic content or other CYPs activities. The inductions of CYPs and GST by CFE were observed at 1 week of feeding and rapidly recovered by discontinuation of CFE. These results indicated the induction potential of CFE on CYPs, and that this effect was predominantly due to other, as yet unidentified constituents, and not forskolin contained in CFE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  8. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-08

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation.

  9. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W.; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  10. Complement 5a induces in vivo synthesis of cysteinyl leukotrienes in rats.

    PubMed

    Gulbins, E; Siow, Y; Vitale, G C

    1993-04-01

    The complement derived anaphylatoxin complement 5a (C5a) is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of various types of diseases including endotoxic or anaphylactic shock. Studies in our laboratory demonstrated a marked and sustained reduction in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate after infusion of a low dose of recombinant C5a (rC5a). Renal rC5a effects were inhibited by leukotriene (LT) and thromboxane antagonists suggesting that the effects were mediated by LT. To elucidate the mechanisms of C5a effects, we monitored the biliary excretion rate of the stable metabolite, N-acetyl-LTE4, by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Rats in the experimental group were administered rC5a intravenously at 0.5 micrograms/min for 10 min. Biliary N-acetyl-LTE4 excretion was significantly increased following rC5a infusion, 0.03 ng/microliters bile to 0.129 ng/microliters. The bile flow in the experimental group was reduced about 39% by rC5a, while bile flow of the control group increased by 20% during the observation period. Infusion of rC5a resulted in an increase of arterial hematocrit from 44.7% to 48.7%, whereas blood pressure was not significantly altered in experimental and control groups. Our results suggest the in vivo effects of C5a to be mediated by cysteinyl leukotrienes, which may be important in the pathogenesis of septic, anaphylactic or traumatic shock.

  11. Having excess levels of PCSK9 is not sufficient to induce complex formation between PCSK9 and the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Catherine J; Adcock, Audrey F; Agina-Obu, DaTonye I; Lopez, Dayami

    2014-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) acts mainly by forming complexes with the LDL receptor at the cell surface, which are then degraded in the lysosome. Studies were performed to determine whether excess levels of PCSK9 was sufficient to induce PCSK9/LDL receptor complex formation in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells. It was demonstrated using ELISA that instead of considering the overall levels of PCSK9 protein that is produced in response to certain treatment, what is critical is how much PCSK9 is actually capable of forming complexes. Despite the high levels, most of the PCSK9 produced as a result of incubating cells with a medium supplemented with BD™ MITO+ serum extender (MITO+ medium) appeared to be inhibited by a secreted factor. Having lower levels of PCSK9/LDL receptor complexes did not prevent an increase in the degradation rate of LDL receptors in MITO+ medium as compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium (Regular medium), an effect that did not correlate with an increase in protein levels of the inducible degrader of LDL receptors (IDOL), as demonstrated using Western blotting analysis. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism(s) for the degradation of the LDL receptor and/or to identify the secreted inhibitor of PCSK9.

  12. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  13. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  14. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  15. [Drug-induced dyschromatopsias].

    PubMed

    Perdriel, G; Manent, P J

    1982-01-01

    Drug-induced dyschromatopsias are defined as functional or objective alterations of color sense following drug treatment. Drug induced chromatopsias are characterized by a perception of white surfaces as colored and occur following modifications of normally transparent structures or alterations of the chorioretina or higher centers. Digitalic intoxication is responsible for incorrect perception of yellow or blue; the retinal origin of the disorder is confirmed by electroretinograms and histologic modifications in the photoreceptor synapses. Santonin in doses exceeding 1 cg is associated with various color misperceptions due to injury to a peripheral neuron or problems of rhodopsin formation. Some sulfas and antibiotics may cause misperception of yellow, and the anticonvulsant drug Tridione may cause an almost complete disappearance of some colors. Chromotopsias of central origin due to direct action on cerebral neurons are rare but may follow use of phenacetine or atropine. Drug induced dyschromatopsias are more common and may be the initial symptoms of various kinds of drug intoxication. Various simple and reliable tests enable the practicing clinician to detect such disorders at an early stage. Synthetic antimalarial drugs derived from chloroquine and used in longterm treatment of rheumatism or during antimalarial prophylaxis, indomethacine, and the phenotiazins may cause dyschromatopsias due to retinal intoxication. Oral contraceptives diminish the chromatic perception in 20% of cases according to 1 author, and often cause deficits of blue-yellow perception. Disulfiram, certain antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, nystatin, isoniazide, and other drugs may cause dyschromatopsias due to alterations in the optical fibers. Ethambutol is the most harmful to color perception; its effects are usually but not always reversible on discontinuation of the drug. Systematic tests of color perception should be administered prior to and during treatment with any drug known to

  16. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  17. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  18. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  19. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lisung, Fausto Gabriel; Shah, Ankit B; Levitt, Howard L; Coplan, Neil B

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her early 70s presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and diaphoresis 30 min after her husband expired in our hospital. Cardiac markers were elevated and there were acute changes in ECG suggestive for acute coronary syndrome. Echocardiogram showed apical akinesis, basal segment hyperkinesis with an ejection fraction of 30%. Cardiac catheterisation was performed showing non-obstructive coronary arteries, leading to the diagnosis of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The patient improved with medical management. Repeat echocardiogram 2 months later showed resolution of heart failure with an ejection fraction of 65–70%. PMID:25858931

  1. Antacid-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Devogelaer, J P; Malghem, J; Noel, H; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from generalized skeletal pain and multiple fractures accompanied by severe hypophosphataemia and low urinary phosphorus excretion is reported. She had been taking large amounts of antacids containing aluminum hydroxide for many years. A diagnosis of antacid-induced osteomalacia was made. It was confirmed by biological work-up, radiographs and bone biopsy. A dramatic biological, osteodensitometric, and clinical improvement was achieved by withdrawal of antacids and phosphorus administration. The literature concerning this unusual condition has been reviewed.

  2. [Amoxicillin-induced hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Jakob; Ferguson, Alan Hamilton

    2011-06-27

    Amoxicillin with and without clavulanic acid is a widely used antibiotic in adults and children alike. The drug is used prophylactically as well as therapeutically. In Denmark, it has not been described that amoxicillin alone can lead to hepatitis. In literature often referenced by Danish physicians (medicin.dk and Lægemiddelkataloget), hepatotoxicity is not listed as a side effect. However, in the present case, a 61 year-old male who suffered a tick bite and was treated prophylactically with amoxicillin without clavulanic acid presented with pharmacologically induced hepatitis 20 days after treatment.

  3. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  4. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  5. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism.

  6. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  7. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity.

  8. Inducing Pluripotency in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technologies in general and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in particular have opened the door to a vast number of practical applications in regenerative medicine and biotechnology. It also represents a possible alternative to the still evasive achievement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolation from refractory species such as Bos. taurus. Herein, we described a protocol for bovine iPSCs (biPSCs) generation and characterization. The protocol is based on the overexpression of the exogenous transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, using a pantropic retroviral system.

  9. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B [Chicago, IL; Hoek, Terry Vanden [Chicago, IL; Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  10. Isoniazid-induced pellagra.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Calka, Omer; Altun, Faruk

    2011-12-01

    Pellagra is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death occurring as a result of niacin or its precursor tryptophan deficiency. Although pellagra is a well-known complication of isoniazid (INH) therapy, the clinical diagnosis may be missed or delayed that may cause life-threatening consequences. Due to the diversity of pellagra-related signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be made with an appropriate index of suspicion. We report a 7-year-old boy presenting with INH-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of the niacin therapy.

  11. GEMCITABINE-INDUCED RETINOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2016-10-31

    To report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy associated with gemcitabine. The author reports a 68-year-old woman who presented with a 4-month history of bilateral vision loss. She had a history of diabetes, hypertension, and leiomyosarcoma, diagnosed 5 months before presentation and had completed 5 cycles of combination treatment with gemcitabine and docetaxel. Clinical examination revealed a Purtscher-like retinopathy that improved after gemcitabine cessation without the development of cystoid macular edema or retinal neovascularization. This case highlights the importance of recognizing gemcitabine-induced ischemic retinopathy that can be associated with life-threatening myocardial or renal ischemia.

  12. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  13. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  14. Voriconazole-Induced Photosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Malani, Anurag N.; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Voriconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent indicated for invasive aspergillosis, refractory Candida infections, and other emerging invasive fungal infections. Adverse cutaneous reactions associated with voriconazole therapy occur in fewer than 10% of treated patients and range from mild erythematous eruptions to life-threatening reactions such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Photosensitivity reactions are an uncommon but characteristic dermatitis in voriconazole recipients, particularly following chronic administration. We report a case of voriconazole-induced phototoxicity in a 50-year-old male with Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that reversed on discontinuation of the drug. PMID:18801950

  15. 5-fluorouracil induced pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Killu, Ammar; Madhavan, Malini; Prasad, Kavita; Prasad, Abhiram

    2011-04-15

    Cardiac toxicity is an infrequent, but potentially serious side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The reported incidence of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity is approximately 3%, although estimates vary from 1.2% to 18%. Cardiac death occurs in less than 1%. The prompt recognition of cardiac toxicity demands a thorough understanding of the myriad of potential cardiac manifestations and a high index of suspicion. The most common presentation is angina pectoris while other manifestations, namely myocardial infarction, left ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias and sudden death have been recognised. The authors report an unusual case of myopericarditis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

  16. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  17. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced lupus (DIL) refers to an idiosyncratic side effect of numerous, apparently unrelated, medications, in which symptoms overlap with those of systemic lupus erythematosus. DIL is reversible by discontinuation of the medication. The etiological mechanism underlying DIL is linked to the inherent susceptibility of the adaptive immune system to lapse into auto-reactivity. Clinical and laboratory features of DIL will be compared with those of idiopathic systemic lupus and with other types of drug reactions with overlapping features. Formerly commonly-used drugs conferred very high risk of developing DIL, although the probability of developing DIL has not been established with most lupus-inducing drugs. Pharmacological or physiochemical properties of the parent compounds are uninformative, but the importance of reactive drug metabolites in initiating autoimmunity will be discussed. As with most systemic autoimmune diseases, the pathogenesis of DIL is complex and obscure. The role of complement and human leukocyte allotypes as well as drug acetylator phenotype inform the underlying mechanism, and several of these non-mutually exclusive concepts will be described. The pros and cons of proposed mechanisms for DIL will be discussed in the context of current understanding of autoimmunity and immune tolerance to self.

  18. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  19. [Gluten induced diseases].

    PubMed

    Frič, P; Zavoral, M; Dvořáková, T

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cereals in human nutrition 10 000 years ago caused the occurrence of gluten induced diseases. This protein complex is involved in pathogenesis of wheat allergy, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. Wheat allergy and celiac disease are mediated by the system of adaptive immunity. Gluten sensitivity is a recently defined entity induced by innate immune mechanisms. These subjects present various intestinal and particularly extraintestinal symptoms. The differences between celiac disease and gluten intolerance include permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, histology of duodenal biopsy, and mucosal gene expression. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity may also have another genetic background of food intolerance independent of the HLADQ2, - DQ8 system and tissue transglutaminase (eg. in some psychiatric disorders). At present, there is no specific bio-marker of gluten sensitivity. The diagnosis is possible only by exclusion of other causes of symptoms and improvement on a glutenfree diet applied in a doubleblind placebo controlled manner with optional sequence of both stages to exclude the placebo effect due to nutritional intervention.

  20. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  1. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Nivolumab induced myxedema crisis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Uqba; Rizvi, Humaira; Sano, Dahlia; Chiu, Jane; Hadid, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-programmed cell death (anti-PD-1) monoclonal antibody that is approved by Food and Drug Administration for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, metastatic melanoma, relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma and advanced renal cell cancer. We report a rare case of myxedema crisis induced by nivolumab in a patient with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of lung. Fifty three-year old woman with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma currently on treatment with nivolumab presented with diffuse facial and tongue swelling, slurred speech, depressed mentation, fatigue and weakness. Initial evaluation revealed severe hypothyroidism with thyroid stimulating hormone of 237 micro Unit/mL (Normal Reference range: 0.27-4.20 micro unit/mL) and undetectable free T4. Patient was diagnosed with nivolumab induced myxedema crisis. She was treated successfully with levothyroxine with complete resolution of her symptoms. Nivolumab was safely restarted once the symptoms of myxedema resolved. Nivolumab can cause immune-mediated endocrinopathies including thyroiditis, hypophysitis, adrenal insufficiency and type 1 diabetes mellitus. High index of suspicion and periodic measurement of thyroid function tests are recommended in patients receiving nivolumab therapy. Our case also suggests that once the myxedema crisis is treated and symptoms are resolved, nivolumab can be safely re-challenged.

  3. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  4. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  5. [Induced abortion at home].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Hilde; Qvigstad, Erik; Jerve, Fridtjof; Melseth, Eldbjørg; Eskild, Anne; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2007-09-20

    Medically induced abortion through week 9 is a well established procedure. The article concerns satisfaction among women who choose to do this at home, and possible associations between satisfaction, socio-demographic--and clinical factors. 110 women with pregnancy duration < 7 weeks, who wished to medically terminate the pregnancy at home and presented themselves at Ullevaal University Hospital, were included in the study. The woman's satisfaction with the procedure was the main variable, but anxiety and pain were also recorded. Data were retrieved from hospital journals and questionnaires filled in before and 1 and 3 weeks after the abortion. The degree of satisfaction was recorded on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 was not content and 10 was very content. Follow-up data were available for 105 women. 90 of 105 women were very content (> 7 on the satisfaction scale) with the treatment. Discomfort and pain during the abortion and marital status seemed to influence the results. The degree of pain varied much. No serious complications were observed. The study showed a high degree of satisfaction with medically induced abortion at home early in the pregnancy. The study has a relatively small sample size and no control group, so the results on factors affecting satisfaction are uncertain. Medical abortion at home should be an opportunity for women applying for early pregnancy termination; as long as the women are well informed, are offered sufficient pain relief and a well functioning follow-up programme.

  6. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  7. Drug-induced exanthems.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2005-04-15

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs can comprise a broad spectrum of clinical and histopathological features. Recent evidence from immunohistological and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells suggest that distinct T-cell functions may be responsible for this broad spectrum of different clinical reactions. Maculopapular exanthems represent the most commonly encountered cutaneous drug eruption. Previous studies on maculopapular exanthems indicate that drug-specific CD4+ T cells expressing cytotoxic granule proteins such as perforin and granzyme B are critically involved in killing activated keratinocytes. These cells are particularly found at the dermo-epidermal junction and may contribute to the generation of vacuolar alteration and destruction of basal keratinocytes, which are typical found in drug-induced maculopapular exanthems. In contrast to maculopapular exanthems, the preferential activation of drug-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells may lead to more severe reactions like bullous drug eruptions. Furthermore, activation of drug-specific T with distinct cytokine and chemokines profiles may also explain the different clinical features of drug-induced exanthems. IL-5 and eotaxin are upregulated in maculopapular exanthems and explain the eosinophilia often found in these reactions.

  8. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels.

  9. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  10. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  11. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  12. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  13. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  14. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  15. Load Induced Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005d`) was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus—a phenomenon of load induced blindness. PMID:18823196

  16. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use.

  17. [Drug-induced asterixis].

    PubMed

    Rittmannsberger, H; Leblhuber, F

    1994-04-22

    A 54-year-old woman with acute schizoaffective psychosis was treated with lithium carbonate (1,350 mg daily) and zuclopenthixol. On admission, clozapine was added (250 mg daily). Because extrapyramidal symptoms (rigor, akinesia) developed, she was additionally given biperiden retard (4 mg daily) from the fourth hospital day onwards. Eleven days after admission she began to complain of "unsteadiness" and "tremors" in her arms and she had asterixis (flapping tremor) on holding up her arms. The electromyogram showed electrical pauses of 60-120 ms, typical for asterixis. There were no significant metabolic or organic cerebral changes that could have accounted for the symptoms which presumably had been induced by the drugs even though their dosage was not unusual. The symptoms in fact regressed completely after the clozapine dose had been reduced, at first to 125 mg then to 50 mg. Previous experience has suggested that the risk of asterixis is particularly high when lithium and clozapine are taken together.

  18. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    PubMed

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  19. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  20. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Susen, S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death in trauma patients who arrive alive at hospital. This type of hemorrhage has a "coagulopathic" component, specific to major trauma and associated with poor outcomes. Over the last decade, a better understanding of this trauma-induced coagulopathy lead to a new therapeutic approach requiring earlier and more aggressive management. This hemostatic resuscitation includes early activation of massive transfusion protocols with: 1) immediate delivery of blood packs with high ratios for RBC units: fresh frozen plasma: platelet-concentrates; 2) antifibrinolytics; 3) substitution of coagulation factors. However, early identification of coagulopathic patients requiring aggressive hemostatic resuscitation remains challenging, with an increasing role of point of care devices for hemostatic diagnosis and monitoring. Efforts have to be focused on the early diagnosis of coagulopathy for immediate delivery of blood products and coagulation factors to the right, accurately screened patients through pre-established protocols within the golden hour. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Pancytopenia induced by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Louise; Singer, Sylvia Titi; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2002-11-01

    Hypothermia has been demonstrated to induce pancytopenia in animals, but whether this association exists in humans is unknown. The authors report the case of an 8-year-old girl in whom hypothermia (temperature 33 degrees C-35 degrees C) is the cause of pancytopenia. The patient developed thermoregulatory dysfunction subsequent to surgical resection of a craniopharyngioma. Her recurrent cytopenias could not be explained by any etiology except chronic hypothermia. The pancytopenia improved upon rewarming the patient to a temperature of 36 degrees C. This association between hypothermia and pancytopenia has rarely been reported in humans and may be underdiagnosed especially in cases of transient or milder presentations. The authors recommend careful hematologic monitoring of patients with thermoregulatory dysfunction.

  2. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  3. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  4. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  5. Catatonia induced by levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Marie-Josée; Nguyen, Dang-Khoa; Clément, Jean-François; Bruneau, Marie-Andrée

    2006-02-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug approved as adjunctive treatment for adults with partial onset seizures. Although the drug is generally well tolerated, behavioral side effects have been reported in variable frequency. Most behavioral problems are mild in nature (agitation, hostility, anxiety, emotional lability, apathy, depression) and quickly resolve with discontinuation of medication. However, serious psychiatric adverse events may also occur with rare cases of psychosis and suicidal behavior. We report here the case of a 43-year-old woman who developed symptoms compatible with catatonia after being exposed to levetiracetam for the treatment of epilepsy. To our knowledge, it is the first reported case of catatonia induced by levetiracetam. We review the difficulties that may be encountered in the differential diagnosis of medical catatonia.

  6. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  7. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  8. Laser Induced Thermal Keratoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Householder, John; Horwitz, Larry S.; Lowe, Kenneth W.; Murrillo, Adolfo

    1989-09-01

    A technique of corneal surgery that is thermally induced and relatively nonenvasive has been studied by the authors, and the preliminary results of the thermal keratoplasty performed on live rabbits are reported here. A carbon dioxide laser was used with simple optical and pointing systems to thermally induce several arbitrary patterns of corneal reformation. Endothelial photographs were taken before the procedure and then again ten days after. They indicated no damage in the Descemet's membrane nor was there damage observed to the endothelium. As much, as 14 "diopters" of change occurred in the corneal keratometry with both positive and negative directions signs. The magnitude and direction of the change were recorded as functions of the pattern of the therapy produced and the laser energy deposited in the stroma. Any corneal reformation was tracked as a function of time subsequent to the procedure. A-minor decay was observed within the first three days of the procedure and the majority of the reformations have maintained at the time of this writing. Since radiation at this wavelength is highly attenuated and absorbed in cornea, no change was observed beyond mid-stroma and the lens and retina appeared uneffective. The authors believe that this technology will be a significant contributor to corneal refractive procedures in the near future. Unlike any refractive surgery currently practiced, this technology may lead to a procedure that: 1) is reversible, 2) is re.eatable, 3) stren thens rather then weakens the cornea, 4) is a..arentl more stable, 5) is more flexible in the types of corneal curvature changes it can produce, 6) results in very clean mires, 7) is painless, and 8) results in total corneal clarity.

  9. Pertussis-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kay; Harnden, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) is one of the commonest vaccine preventable diseases in the UK, despite vaccination coverage being maintained for the last 15 years at over 90% among infants and the addition of a pre-school booster to the UK national immunisation programme in 2001. However, it is known that pertussis vaccine does not confer long-term immunity to clinical infection. Evidence of pertussis infection has been reported in 37% of children presenting in UK primary care and 20% of adolescents and adults presenting in Canadian health centres with persistent cough. In children and adults with persistent cough, paroxysmal coughing is the most sensitive indicator of pertussis, but has poor specificity and limited diagnostic value. Vomiting and whooping, particularly in combination, are stronger predictors of pertussis. Cough duration is longer in children than in adults with pertussis (median cough duration 112 days versus 42 days); individuals may take even longer to recover fully and regain previous levels of exercise tolerance. A diagnosis of pertussis may be confirmed by culture, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) or serology. Single estimates of anti-pertussis toxin (PT) antibody titres in blood or oral fluid samples are highly specific. There are currently no proven efficacious treatments for pertussis-induced cough. Treatment with macrolide antibiotics reduces the duration of an individual's infectious period, but does not alter the duration of cough. Further research is needed to re-examine the epidemiology of pertussis in countries with different vaccination schedules, find efficacious treatments and develop methods of measuring cough frequency and severity in patients with pertussis-induced cough. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Clusterin protects the lung from leukocyte-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R; Fiedler, Fritz; Braun, Philipp; Stehr, Sebastian N; Bödeker, Hans; Koch, Thea

    2003-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional 75- to 80-kDa glycoprotein that is upregulated during cellular stress and might represent a defense mechanism during local cellular damage. Mechanisms discussed are antiapoptotic, antioxidative, and anticomplement properties as well as chaperone-like features protecting stressed proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate potential protective effects of CLU on pulmonary vasculature after in situ PMN activation in isolated rabbit lungs. The experiments were performed on 24 isolated and ventilated rabbit lungs that were perfused with 200 mL of Krebs-Henseleit-10% blood buffer with a constant flow of 150 mL/min in a recirculating system. It was tested whether pretreatment with CLU (2.5 microg/ml; n = 8) or catalase (CAT, 5000 U/ml; n = 8) before N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP; 10(-8) M) injection influenced pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) peak airway pressures (PAW) and edema formation as compared with controls (n = 8). Baseline values of PAP were 9-11 mmHg and PAW 11-13 cm H2O. Application of fMLP resulted in an acute significant (P < 0.01) increase of PAP (48 +/- 29 mmHg) within 2 min in the control group and PAW increased to 35 +/- 7 cm H2O within 30 min. Pretreatment with CLU completely suppressed the PAP and PAW response as a result of the fMLP challenge (P < 0.001), whereas a transient PAW increase up to 27 +/- 15 mmHg was observed after CAT. Complement factor C3a release was suppressed by CAT, whereas CLU blocked the complement cascade at the level of C5b-9 formation. Moreover, generation of thromboxane A(2) was reduced after CLU and CAT. Lung edema occurred in the fMLP group but was absent (P < 0.001) after CLU and CAT treatment. Both CLU and CAT prevented fMLP-induced lung injury. Stabilizing effects of CLU, point towards complement regulating features at the level of the terminal complement sequence. Elevated levels of CLU during inflammation could reflect a compensatory organ protective mechanism. Further studies are

  11. Properdin deficiency protects from 5-fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a complement activation-independent, interleukin-10-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jain, U; Midgen, C A; Woodruff, T M; Schwaeble, W J; Stover, C M; Stadnyk, A W

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a serious complication of chemotherapy that leads to significant morbidity that may require dose or drug adjustments. Specific mitigating strategies for mucositis are unavailable, due partly to an incomplete understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms. We have previously shown an effect of properdin, a positive regulator of complement activation, in models of colitis. Here we use properdin-deficient (P(KO) ) mice to interrogate the role of properdin and complement in small intestinal mucositis. Mucositis was induced by five daily injections of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in wild-type (WT), P(KO) , interleukin (IL)-10(-/-) and properdin/IL-10(-/-) double knock-out (DKO) mice. At the time of euthanasia their jejunum was collected for histology, immunohistochemistry and cytokine and complement activation measurements. Complement became activated in mice receiving 5-FU, indicated by increased intestinal levels of C3a and C5a. Compared to WT, P(KO) mice experienced significantly less mucositis, despite C3a levels as high as inflamed WT mice and slightly less C5a. Conversely, P(KO) mice had higher intestinal levels of IL-10. IL-10 expression was mainly by epithelial cells in both uninflamed and inflamed P(KO) mice. IL-10(-/-) mice proved to be highly susceptible to mucositis and DKO mice were equally susceptible, demonstrating that a lack of properdin does not protect mice lacking IL-10. We interpret our findings to indicate that, to a significant extent, the inflammation of mucositis is properdin-dependent but complement activation-independent. Additionally, the benefit achieved in the absence of properdin is associated with increased IL-10 levels, and IL-10 is important in limiting mucositis. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Complement and cytokine response in acute Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, John-Paul; Langley, Kathryn; Heelas, Edward; Machin, Samuel J; Scully, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Complement dysregulation is key in the pathogenesis of atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (aHUS), but no clear role for complement has been identified in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). We aimed to assess complement activation and cytokine response in acute antibody-mediated TTP. Complement C3a and C5a and cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor, interferon-γ and IL-17a) were measured in 20 acute TTP patients and 49 remission cases. Anti-ADAMTS13 immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtypes were measured in acute patients in order to study the association with complement activation. In acute TTP, median C3a and C5a were significantly elevated compared to remission, C3a 63·9 ng/ml vs. 38·2 ng/ml (P < 0·001) and C5a 16·4 ng/ml vs. 9·29 ng/ml (P < 0·001), respectively. Median IL-6 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the acute vs. remission groups, IL-6: 8 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P = 0·003), IL-10: 6 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P < 0·001). C3a levels correlated with both anti-ADAMTS13 IgG (rs = 0·604, P = 0·017) and IL-10 (rs = 0·692, P = 0·006). No anti-ADAMTS13 IgG subtype was associated with higher complement activation, but patients with the highest C3a levels had 3 or 4 IgG subtypes present. These results suggest complement anaphylatoxin levels are higher in acute TTP cases than in remission, and the complement response seen acutely may relate to anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibody and IL-10 levels. PMID:24372446

  13. Raynaud's phenomenon induced by sulphasalazine.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J.; Holt, S.; Housley, E.; Sneddon, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Sulphasalazine-induced Raynaud's phenomenon is reported in a patient who showed no other features of a drug-induced lupus syndrome. The vascular disturbance disappeared when the drug was withdrawn on 3 occasions. A simple technique for assessing the circulatory abnormality in Raynaud's phenomenon is described. PMID:6104805

  14. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  15. Fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Bababekov, Yanik J; Stanelle, Eric J; Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2015-05-20

    We review the literature and describe a case of fishbone-induced appendicitis. A 63-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Work up including a focused history and imaging revealed fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis. The patient was managed safely and successfully with laparoscopic removal of the foreign body and appendectomy.

  16. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Uller, Lena; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Alenmyr, Lisa; Korsgren, Magnus; Ulven, Trond; Högberg, Thomas; Andersson, Gunnar; Persson, Carl GA; Kostenis, Evi

    2007-01-01

    Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban. PMID:17328802

  17. Inductive source induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, David; Haber, Eldad; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2013-02-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly performed to map the distribution of electrical chargeability that is a diagnostic physical property in mineral exploration and in many environmental problems. Although these surveys have been successful in the past, the galvanic sources required for traditional IP and magnetic IP (MIP) surveys prevent them from being applied in some geological settings. We develop a new methodology for processing frequency domain EM data to identify the presence of IP effects in observations of the magnetic fields arising from an inductive source. The method makes use of the asymptotic behaviour of the secondary magnetic fields at low frequency. A new quantity, referred to as the ISIP datum, is defined so that it equals zero at low frequencies for any frequency-independent (non-chargeable) conductivity distribution. Thus, any non-zero response in the ISIP data indicates the presence of chargeable material. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the method can be applied even in complicated geological situations. A 3-D inversion algorithm is developed to recover the chargeability from the ISIP data and the inversion is demonstrated on synthetic examples.

  18. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  19. Opioid-induced Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Kersten, Judy R.; Riess, Matthias L.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction continue to be leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Activation of opioid, adenosine, bradykinin, adrenergic and other G-protein coupled receptors have been found to be cardioprotective. κ- and/or δ-opioid receptor activation is involved in direct myocardial protection, while the role of μ-opioid receptors seems less clear. In addition, differential affinities to the three opioid-receptor subtypes by various agonists and cross-talk among different G-protein coupled receptors render conclusions regarding opioid-mediated cardioprotection challenging. The present review will focus on the protective effects of endogenously released opioid peptides as well as exogenously administered opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, remifentanil, butorphanol, and methadone against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Receptor heterodimerization and cross-talk as well as interactions with other cardioprotective techniques will be discussed. Implications for opioid-induced cardioprotection in humans and for future drug development to improve myocardial salvage will be provided. PMID:24502571

  20. Laughter-induced syncope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Alexander J; Frishman, William H

    2012-01-01

    Reported cases of syncope caused directly by laughter are rare. The common scenario described in a few reports involved episodes of fortuitous laughter, sometimes followed by a short prodrome of lightheadedness, facial flushing, and dizziness, followed by an episode of definite syncope. There were no seizure-like movements, automatisms, or bladder or bowel incontinence. After the syncopal episodes that were seconds in length, the patients regained consciousness, and at that point were fully oriented. These episodes could recur in a similar situation with such laughter. Many of these patients subsequently underwent full syncope workups, without elucidating a primary cardiac or neurologic cause. In this review of laughter-induced syncope, we describe a patient of ours who fit these descriptions. This phenomenon is likely a subtype of benign Valsalva-related syncope, with autonomic reflex arcs coming into play that ultimately result in global cerebral hypoperfusion. Besides the Valsalva produced by a great fit of laughter, laughter itself has its own neuroendocrine and vasculature effects that may play a role.

  1. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  2. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  3. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  4. [Swimming-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Fjellbirkeland, L; Gulsvik, A; Walløe, A

    1995-06-30

    Swimming is said to have low asthmogeneity especially when compared with other physical activities. Four young athletes who participated in heavy swimming exercise are reported as having symptoms of exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Three of them started to develop the symptoms after several years of training and had no former history of asthma. In the fourth, the asthma was diagnosed in childhood but the EIA-symptoms here exacerbated by swimming. All four experienced more symptoms when the air in the swimming pool was warm, or when there was a strong smell of chlorine. Two of the athletes reported having no symptoms when they swam in outdoor pools and had only minor symptoms, or none at all, when they did other formes of physical exercise, including running. In all four their swimming performance was hampered by their respiratory symptoms. Two of the swimmers improved when they inhaled steroids and adrenerg-beta 2 agonists, and continued their swimming carrier. The cases suggest that an irritant may provoke asthma symptoms in susceptible swimmers. Volatile compounds from chlorination of the pools are suspected as possible irritant agents.

  5. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1980-08-01

    Sixteen patients were seen because of possibly life-threatening exercise-associated symptoms similar to anaphylactic reactions. Asthma attacks, cholinergic urticaria and angioedema, and cardiac arrythmias are recognized as exertion-related phenomena in predisposed patients but are distinct from the syndrome described here. A syndrome characterized by the exertion-related onset of cutaneous pruritus and warmth, the development of generalized urticaria, and the appearance of such additional manifestations as collapse in 12 patients, gastrointestinal tract symptoms in five patients, and upper respiratory distress in 10 patients has been designated exercise-induced anaphylaxis, because of the striking similarity of this symptom complex to the anaphylactic syndrome elicited by ingestion or injection of a foreign antigenic substance. There is a family history of atopic desease for 11 patients and cold urticaria for two others and a personal history of atopy in six. The size of the wheals, the failure to develop an attack with a warm bath or shower or a fever, and the prominence of syncope rule against the diagnosis of conventional cholinergic urticaria. There is no history or evidence of an encounter with an environmental source of antigen during the exercise period.

  6. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  7. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  8. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Hypoxia-Induced Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Skuli, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The vascular network delivers oxygen (O2) and nutrients to all cells within the body. It is therefore not surprising that O2 availability serves as a primary regulator of this complex organ. Most transcriptional responses to low O2 are mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), highly conserved transcription factors that control the expression of numerous angiogenic, metabolic, and cell cycle genes. Accordingly, the HIF pathway is currently viewed as a master regulator of angiogenesis. HIF modulation could provide therapeutic benefit for a wide array of pathologies, including cancer, ischemic heart disease, peripheral artery disease, wound healing, and neovascular eye diseases. Hypoxia promotes vessel growth by upregulating multiple pro-angiogenic pathways that mediate key aspects of endothelial, stromal, and vascular support cell biology. Interestingly, recent studies show that hypoxia influences additional aspects of angiogenesis, including vessel patterning, maturation, and function. Through extensive research, the integral role of hypoxia and HIF signaling in human disease is becoming increasingly clear. Consequently, a thorough understanding of how hypoxia regulates angiogenesis through an ever-expanding number of pathways in multiple cell types will be essential for the identification of new therapeutic targets and modalities. PMID:22866203

  10. Loperamide-induced hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Catherine; Gan, Earn H; Pearce, Simon H S

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is the most commonly used antidiarrhoeal medication in the UK. We report a serious and hitherto undocumented adverse effect of chronic use in a 45-year-old man with inflammatory bowel disease. He presented to the endocrine clinic with fatigue and low libido; biochemical assessment revealed hypogonadism and adrenal insufficiency without any elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone. When symptoms allowed, loperamide was reduced and a short synacthen test (SST) showed a ‘clear pass’ with a normal peak cortisol of 833 nmol/L. Later, worsening diarrhoea necessitated an escalation in loperamide use again. While taking a daily dose of 15–20 mg (recommended daily maximum 16 mg) reassessment revealed a fall in peak cortisol on SST to 483 nmol/L, a subnormal response. Clinicians should exercise caution when relying on loperamide to manage their patients’ chronic diarrhoea and remain mindful of the possibility of drug-induced life-threatening adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27681351

  11. Ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Chiva, E; Díaz-Rangel, M; Monsalve-Naharro, J Á; Cuesta-Montero, P; Catalá-Ripoll, J V; García-Martínez, E M

    2017-05-27

    Ceftazidime is an antibiotic belonging to the group of third generation cephalosporins, frequently used in clinical practice for its broad antibacterial spectrum. A case report is presented on a 78-year-old man who entered the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure secondary to nosocomial pneumonia in the postoperative period of a laparoscopic hepatic bisegmentectomy for a hepatocarcinoma. It required invasive mechanical ventilation and was treated with ceftazidime, developing a progressive decrease in platelet count after the onset of this drug and after re-exposure to it, not coinciding with the introduction of other drugs. The adverse reaction was reported to the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system and according to the Naranjo algorithm the causal relationship was probable. Since no case of ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia was found in the literature, we consider knowledge of it relevant as an adverse effect to be taken into account given its potential severity, especially when it cannot be explained by other causes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Load induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James S P; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-10-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005, for a review). Here we varied the level of perceptual load in a letter-search task and assessed its effect on the conscious perception of a search-irrelevant shape stimulus appearing in the periphery, using a direct measure of awareness (present/absent reports). Detection sensitivity (d') was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus--a phenomenon of load induced blindness.

  13. Coffee-induced Hypokalaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Taking an excess amount of caffeine (e.g. overdrinking caffeinated beverages) sometimes causes hypokalaemia. Although the detailed mechanism has not been clarified yet, an increased loss of potassium via the urine stream caused by the diuretic action of caffeine is proposed as one of the possibilities. We report the case of a 50-year-old female outpatient who rapidly developed severe generalized muscle weakness and fatigue. Her symptoms were considered to be principally due to hypokalaemia. Since her blood urea nitrogen concentration decreased greatly, it was suggested that she had massive polyuria due to overhydration (i.e. dilution of her body fluids). Initially, we considered that a urinary tract infection might have caused her illness. However, we found that she was a heavy coffee drinker and had constantly experienced massive diuresis. After a course of oral antibiotics, potassium replacement and stopping coffee (caffeine) ingestion, her symptoms resolved quickly. In conclusion, it was considered that overdrinking coffee (caffeine) induced her hypokalaemia. Probably, loss of potassium via the urine stream with secondary aldosteronism was the main cause of the hypokalaemia. PMID:21769248

  14. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  15. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nissar

    2011-01-01

    In the last 7 decades heparin has remained the most commonly used anticoagulant. Its use is increasing, mainly due to the increase in the number of vascular interventions and aging population. The most feared complication of heparin use is heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). HIT is a clinicopathologic hypercoagulable, procoagulant prothrombotic condition in patients on heparin therapy, and decrease in platelet count by 50% or to less than 100,000, from 5 to 14 days of therapy. This prothrombotic hypercoagulable state in HIT patient is due to the combined effect of various factors, such as platelet activation, mainly the formation of PF4/heparin/IgG complex, stimulation of the intrinsic factor, and loss of anticoagulant effect of heparin. Diagnosis of HIT is done by clinical condition, heparin use, and timing of thrombocytopenia, and it is confirmed by either serotonin release assay or ELISA assay. Complications of HIT are venous/arterial thrombosis, skin gangrene, and acute platelet activation syndrome. Stopping heparin is the basic initial treatment, and Direct Thrombin Inhibitors (DTI) are medication of choice in these patients. A few routine but essential procedures performed by using heparin are hemodialysis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, and Cardiopulmonary Bypass; but it cannot be used if a patient develops HIT. HIT patients with unstable angina, thromboembolism, or indwelling devices, such as valve replacement or intraaortic balloon pump, will require alternative anticoagulation therapy. HIT can be prevented significantly by keeping heparin therapy shorter, avoiding bovine heparin, using low-molecular weight heparin, and stopping heparin use for flush and heparin lock.

  16. Methods for induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Phillip G; Carr-Ellis, Sacheen; Borgatta, Lynn

    2004-07-01

    We describe present methods for induced abortion used in the United States. The most common procedure is first-trimester vacuum curettage. Analgesia is usually provided with a paracervical block and is not completely effective. Pretreatment with nonsteroidal analgesics and conscious sedation augment analgesia but only to a modest extent. Cervical dilation is accomplished with conventional tapered dilators, hygroscopic dilators, or misoprostol. Manual vacuum curettage is as safe and effective as the electric uterine aspirator for procedures through 10 weeks of gestation. Common complications and their management are presented. Early abortion with mifepristone/misoprostol combinations is replacing some surgical abortions. Two mifepristone/misoprostol regimens are used. The rare serious complications of medical abortion are described. Twelve percent of abortions are performed in the second trimester, the majority of these by dilation and evacuation (D&E) after laminaria dilation of the cervix. Uterine evacuation is accomplished with heavy ovum forceps augmented by 14-16 mm vacuum cannula systems. Cervical injection of dilute vasopressin reduces blood loss. Operative ultrasonography is reported to reduce perforation risk of D&E. Dilation and evacuation procedures have evolved to include intact D&E and combination methods for more advanced gestations. Vaginal misoprostol is as effective as dinoprostone for second-trimester labor-induction abortion and appears to be replacing older methods. Mifepristone/misoprostol combinations appear more effective than misoprostol alone. Uterine rupture has been reported in women with uterine scars with misoprostol abortion in the second trimester. Fetal intracardiac injection to reduce multiple pregnancies or selectively abort an anomalous twin is accepted therapy. Outcomes for the remaining pregnancy have improved with experience.

  17. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  18. Drug-induced visceral angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim; Lubin, Fritz; Karnik, Reena; Bhasin, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is due to the accumulation of bradykinin and its metabolites. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce anti-hypertensive effects by blocking the angiotensin II AT1 receptor action; hence bradykinin-related side effects are not expected. However, we notice the occurrence of ARB-induced angioedema as not a very rare side effect. Visceral drug-induced angioedema has been reported with ACEIs, not with ARBs. This underlying review will help educate readers on the pathophysiology and recent guidelines pertaining to ACEI- and ARB-induced visceral angioedema. PMID:25317271

  19. Inducible Lysis in Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Lawrence M.; Altenbern, Robert A.

    1967-01-01

    Lysis was induced in seven strains of Clostridium tetani by exposure to mitomycin C. The search for a suitable indicator strain to detect bacteriophage in lysates has, so far, been unsuccessful. Inhibition studies on macromolecular synthesis during induction have shown that deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein syntheses are all involved in the lysis induced by mitomycin C. In experiments comparing toxin and protein content in induced and uninduced cells of C. tetani, the toxin-protein ratio proved to be the same in both systems up to the point of lysis. Several possible hypotheses deduced from these results are discussed. PMID:4226682

  20. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  1. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  2. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  3. Phentermine induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Emily Ximin; Wilson, Gregory John; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2017-03-09

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) has a number of medication-related aetiologies. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes; however, any medication has the potential to cause drug-induced AIN. We report the first case of phentermine-induced AIN. A Caucasian woman aged 43 years presented with a 5-week history of lethargy, left-sided lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She had been taking phentermine for weight loss for 9 months and had recently ceased the medication. The patient underwent a renal biopsy that showed a predominantly lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate with a moderate number of eosinophils consistent with AIN. Phentermine is increasingly used for weight loss in obese patients. This is the first case implicating phentermine as the causative agent for drug-induced AIN. While rare, phentermine-induced AIN is a possible adverse reaction of phentermine. Physicians and patients need to be aware of this risk.

  4. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is similar to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is an autoimmune disorder. This means ... 2015:chap 132. Wright B, Bharadwaj S, Abelson A. Systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Carey WD, ed. Cleveland Clinic: Current Clinical ...

  5. Drug-induced urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary.

  6. Groundwater: Climate-induced pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurdak, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater resources are directly affected by climate variability via precipitation, evapotranspiration and recharge. Analyses of US and India trends reveal that climate-induced pumping indirectly influences groundwater depletion as well.

  7. Drug-Induced Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary. PMID:16985842

  8. [Medical induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Bettahar, K; Pinton, A; Boisramé, T; Cavillon, V; Wylomanski, S; Nisand, I; Hassoun, D

    2016-12-01

    Updated clinical recommendations for medical induced abortion procedure. A systematic review of French and English literature, reviewing the evidence relating to the provision of medical induced abortion was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and international scientific societies recommendations. The effectiveness of medical abortion is higher than 95% when the protocols are adjusted to gestational age (EL1). Misoprostol alone is less effective than a combination of mifepristone and misoprostol (EL1). Gemeprost is less effective than misoprostol (EL2). The dose of 200mg of mifepristone should be preferred to 600mg (NP1, Rank A). Mifepristone can be taken at home (professional agreement). The optimum interval between mifepristone and misoprostol intake should be 24 to 48 hours (EL1, grade A). Before 7 weeks LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol should be given orally (EL1, grade A) eventually repeated after 3hours if no bleeding occurs. For optimal effectiveness between 7 and 14 LMP, the interval between mifepristone and misoprostol should not be shortened to less than 8hours (grade 1). An interval of 24 to 48hours will not affect the effectiveness of the method provided misoprostol dosage is 800μg (EL1). Vaginal, sublingual or buccal routes of administration are more effective and better tolerated than the oral route, which should be abandoned (EL1). An amount of 800μg sublingual or buccal misoprostol route has the same effectiveness than the vaginal route but more gastrointestinal side effects (EL1, grade A). Between 7 and 9 LMP, it does not seem necessary to repeat misoprostol dose whereas it should be repeated beyond 9 SA (grade B). Between 9 and 14 LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol given either vaginally, buccally or sublingually should be repeated every 3hours if needed (with a maximum of 5 doses) (EL2, grade B). There is no strong evidence supporting routine antibiotic prophylaxis for medical abortion (professional agreement). Rare contraindications

  9. Dress syndrome induced by levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Eleni, K

    2015-02-01

    The tremendous increase in the use of drugs has considerably increased their side effects. The aim of this work is to demonstrate Dress syndrome induced by levetiracetam an anti-epileptic drug. We describe a skin eruption observed in an-hospitalized in an intensive care unit patient who received levetiracetam. According to morphology of the rash and the laboratory findings the rash fulfills the criteria for Dress syndrome. Levetiracetam may induce Dress syndrome. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  11. Mitochondrial Swelling Induced by Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Schneider, Marion

    1959-01-01

    Reduced glutathione, in concentrations approximating those occurring in intact rat liver, causes swelling of rat liver mitochondria in vitro which is different in kinetics and extent from that yielded by L-thyroxine. The effect is also given by cysteine, which is more active, and reduced coenzyme A, but not by L-ascorbate, cystine, or oxidized glutathione. The optimum pH is 6.5, whereas thyroxine-induced swelling is optimal at pH 7.5. The GSH-induced swelling is not inhibited by DNP or dicumarol, nor by high concentrations of sucrose, serum albumin, or polyvinylpyrrolidone, in contrast to thyroxine-induced swelling. ATP inhibits the GSH swelling, but ADP and AMP are ineffective. Mn-+ is a very potent inhibitor, but Mg++ is ineffective. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate is also an effective inhibitor of GSH-induced swelling. The respiratory inhibitors amytal and antimycin A do not inhibit the swelling action of GSH, but cyanide does; these findings are consistent with the view that the oxidation-reduction state of the respiratory chain between cytochrome c and oxygen is a determinant of GSH-induced swelling. Reversal of GSH-induced swelling by osmotic means or by ATP in KCl media could not be observed. Large losses of nucleotides and protein occur during the swelling by GSH, suggesting that the action is irreversible. The characteristically drastic swelling action of GSH could be prevented if L-thyroxine was also present in the medium. PMID:13630941

  12. Victim-induced criminality.

    PubMed

    Fooner, M

    1966-09-02

    about the probable effects on the administration of criminal justice. These are pragmatic problems; there is a third problem which may at this time seem speculative, but is, nevertheless, quite important. 3) To what extent will a particular proposal for victim compensation contribute to a temptation-opportunity pattern in victim behavior? In previous studies it has been pointed out that large numbers of our fellow Americans have tended to acquire casual money-handling habits-generically designated "carelessness"-which contribute to the national growth of criminality. How the victim helps the criminal was sketched in reports of those studies (10). It was made abundantly clear that human beings in our affluent society cannot be assumed to be prudent or self-protective against the hazards of crime. Even when the "victim" is not overtly acting to commit a crime-as in the case of the property owner who hires an arsonist-he often tempts the offender. Among the victims of burglary-statistically the most prevalent crime in the United States-are a substantial number of Americans who keep cash, jewelry, and other valuables carelessly at home or in hotel rooms to which the burglar has easy access through door or window. Victims of automobile theft-one of the fastest growing classes of crime-include drivers who leave the vehicle or its contents invitingly accessible to thieves. And so on with other classes of crime. As pointed out in previous studies, when victim behavior follows a temptation-opportunity pattern, it (i) contributes to a "climate of criminal inducements," (ii) adds to the economic resources available to criminal societies, and (iii) detracts from the ability of lawenforcement agencies to suppress the growth of crime.

  13. Inducible NOS mediates CNP-induced relaxation of intestinal myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yishi; Chitapanarux, Taned; Wu, Jianfeng; Soon, Russell K.; Melton, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Contraction of intestinal myofibroblasts (IMF) contributes to the development of strictures and fistulas seen in inflammatory bowel disease, but the mechanisms that regulate tension within these cells are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) signaling in C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-induced relaxation of IMF. We found that treatment with ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, or NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) or NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), inhibitors of NO production, all impaired the relaxation of human and mouse IMF in response to CNP. ODQ, l-NNA, and l-NMMA also prevented CNP-induced elevations in cGMP concentrations, and l-NNA or l-NMMA blocked CNP-induced decreases in myosin light phosphorylation. IMF isolated from transgenic mice deficient in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) had reduced relaxation responses to CNP compared with IMF from control mice and were insensitive to the effects of ODQ, l-NNA, and l-NMMA on CNP treatment. Together these data indicate that stimulation of sGC though NO produced by iNOS activation is required for maximal CNP-induced relaxation in IMF. PMID:23348803

  14. Reprogramming with defined factors: from induced pluripotency to induced transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Masip, Manuel; Veiga, Anna; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Simón, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Ever since work on pluripotency induction was originally published, reporting the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) by the ectopic expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, high expectations regarding their potential use for regenerative medicine have emerged. Very recently, the direct conversion of fibroblasts into functional neurons with no prior pluripotent stage has been described. Interconversion between adult cells from ontogenically different lineages by an induced transdifferentiation process based on the overexpression of a cocktail of transcription factors, while avoiding transition through an embryonic stem cell-like state, provides a new impetus in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we review the induced reprogramming of somatic cells with defined factors and analyze their potential clinical use. Beginning with induced pluripotency, we summarize the initial objections including their extremely low efficiency and the risk of tumor generation. We also review recent reports describing iPS cells' capacity to generate viable offspring through tetraploid complementation, the most restrictive pluripotency criterion. Finally, we explore the available evidence for 'induced transdifferentiated cells' as a novel tool for adult cell fate modification.

  15. Pleiocarpa pycnantha leaves and its triterpenes induce apoptotic cell death in Caco-2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Omoyeni, Olubunmi Adenike; Hussein, Ahmed; Meyer, Mervin; Green, Ivan; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2015-07-14

    Recently, we reported that the crude fractions and pure triterpenes; ursolic acid (C1), 27-E and 27-Z p-coumaric esters of ursolic acid (C2, C3), together with a new triterpene 2,3-seco-taraxer-14-en-2,3-lactone [pycanocarpine (C4)] and its hydrolysed derivative - (2,3-seco-taraxen-4-hydroxy-14-en-2-oic acid) [pycanocarpene (C5)] from Pleiocarpa pycnantha leaves inhibit cell proliferation. However, there has not been any specific report on the use of Pleiocarpa pycnantha leaves and its constituents to kill colorectal adenocarcinoma cancer CaCo-2 cells. We performed in vitro study to evaluate the cytotoxic properties of the ethanolic extract of P. pycnantha P, compounds C2 and C3. A preliminary study of the potential mechanisms were also undertaken. Cell viability was measured by WST-1 assay. The Apoptosis level was evaluated by staining with APOPercentage(™) dye and the induction of caspases 3/7 and 9 using Caspase-Glo(®) assays. The exposure of an ethanolic extract from the leaves of P. pycnantha (0.1-1000 μg/ml) and the isolated compounds C2 and C3 (6,25-100 μg/ml) to human colorectal cancer cells reduced the cell viability with an IC50 > 100, 40.9, 36.3 μg/ml for P, C2 and C3 respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The APOPercentage(TM) assay also showed a considerable increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells after 24 h; (25-38% for P, 5-23% for C2 and 6-47 % for C3). Caspase 3 was also activated which is a hallmark of apoptosis. These findings suggest that the P. pycnantha and the isolated compounds induce cell apoptosis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. A further study with other cell lines is also recommended.

  16. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect.

  17. Amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh; Shoja, Mohammad Ali Mohajjel

    2006-11-01

    Drug-induced gingival hyperplasia is a serious concern both for the patient and the clinician. A 45 year-old Caucasian male patient with hypertension, who received amlodipine (10 mg/day, single dose orally) for two months, sought medical attention because of the new-onset gingival enlargement. On clinical examination a generalized and firm overgrowth of the gingival throughout the maxilla and the mandible were evident. The lack of gingival inflammation and purulent discharge were other features of the clinical scenario. Histological assessment of the biopsy specimen revealed the hyperplasia of connective tissue, epithelial acanthosis, and elongated rete ridges along with few inflammatory cells. The histological and the clinical evidences were consistent with amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia. We believe that the present report indicates the most rapidly developed case of amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia reported to date. The related literature is reviewed and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of this rare side-effect are discussed here.

  18. Risperidone-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Krebs, S; Dormann, H; Muth-Selbach, U; Hahn, E G; Brune, K; Schneider, H T

    2001-01-01

    Risperidone, a widely used atypical and potent neuroleptic drug, is assumed to induce fewer hepatic side-effects than phenothiazine anti-psychotics. Recently, we observed a case of risperidone-induced cholestatic hepatotoxicity. A 37-year-old male developed a rapid increase in liver enzymes and cholestatic parameters after starting treatment with risperidone for paranoid psychosis. Work-up for other potential aetiologies was negative. The results of a percutaneous liver biopsy were consistent with drug-induced liver injury and cholestasis. Over the course of one month after the discontinuance of all anti-psychotic agents, the liver function test results returned to near-normal values. This observation supports the need to monitor cholestatic parameters in addition to liver function enzymes during initiation and the first weeks of risperidone intake.

  19. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  20. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  1. Touch-induced visual illusion.

    PubMed

    Violentyev, Artem; Shimojo, Shinsuke; Shams, Ladan

    2005-07-13

    Although vision is considered the dominant modality, recent studies demonstrate the influence of other modalities on visual perception. For example, in the sound-induced flash illusion, two auditory stimuli cause one visual flash to be perceived as two. We report an extension of the sound-induced flash illusion to the tactile-visual domain, yielding the touch-induced flash illusion. Observers reported seeing two flashes on the majority of trials when a single flash was presented concurrently with two task-irrelevant brief tactile stimuli. Somatosensory stimulation changed the sensitivity (d') of detecting visual stimuli, which suggests that the observed effect is at least partly due to perceptual interactions. Together with other recent findings, these results challenge the notion that the processing of visual information is independent of activity in other modalities.

  2. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  3. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  4. Smoke exposure causes endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipid accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium through oxidative stress and complement activation.

    PubMed

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-05-23

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  5. Bradykinin-induced chemotaxis of human gliomas requires the activation of KCa3.1 and ClC-3

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Turner, Kathryn L.; Seifert, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that cell migration in the nervous system is associated with stereotypic changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), yet the target of these changes are largely unknown. We examined chemotactic migration/invasion of human gliomas to study how [Ca2+]i regulates cellular movement and to identify downstream targets. Gliomas are primary brain cancers which spread exclusively within the brain, frequently migrating along blood vessels to which they are chemotactically attracted by bradykinin activating G protein-coupled receptors. Using simultaneous Fura-2 Ca2+ imaging and amphotericin B perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology, we find that bradykinin raises [Ca2+]i and induces a biphasic voltage response. This voltage response is mediated by the coordinated activation of Ca2+-dependent, TRAM-34-sensitive KCa3.1 channels, and Ca2+-depdenent, DIDS- and gluconate-sensitive Cl− channels. A significant portion of these Cl− currents can be attributed to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation of ClC-3, a voltage-gated Cl−channel/transporter, since pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII or shRNA-mediated knockdown of ClC-3 inhibited Ca2+-activated Cl− currents. Western blots show that KCa3.1 and ClC-3 are expressed in tissue samples obtained from patients diagnosed with Grade IV gliomas. Both KCa3.1 and ClC-3 co-localize to the invading processes of glioma cells. Importantly, inhibition of either channel abrogates bradykinin-induced chemotaxis and reduces tumor expansion in mouse brain slices in situ. These channels should be further explored as future targets for anti-invasive drugs. Furthermore, this data elucidates a novel mechanism placing cation and anion channels downstream of ligand-mediated [Ca2+]i increases, which likely play similar roles in other migratory cells in the nervous system. PMID:23345219

  6. Induced abortion and contraception use

    PubMed Central

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of

  7. Validating induced seismicity forecast models—Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király-Proag, Eszter; Zechar, J. Douglas; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SaSS forecasts the spatial distribution better and gives better seismicity rate estimates before shut-in. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in.

  8. Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Nimno, Francis

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the diapir-induced reorientation of Enceladus is shown. The contents include: 1) Activity on Enceladus; 2) Miranda's Coronae: Origin above Diapirs; 3) Reorientation of Miranda; 4) Planetary Reorientation; 5) Modeling Diapir-Induced Reorientation; 6) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Results; 7) Tectonic Implications of Reorientation; 8) Additional Tests of Reorientation; 9) Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus: Conclusions; and 10) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Future Work

  9. Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Nimno, Francis

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the diapir-induced reorientation of Enceladus is shown. The contents include: 1) Activity on Enceladus; 2) Miranda's Coronae: Origin above Diapirs; 3) Reorientation of Miranda; 4) Planetary Reorientation; 5) Modeling Diapir-Induced Reorientation; 6) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Results; 7) Tectonic Implications of Reorientation; 8) Additional Tests of Reorientation; 9) Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus: Conclusions; and 10) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Future Work

  10. Baboon syndrome induced by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Ali Ihsan; Uslu, Esma; Başkan, Elife; Yavuzcan, Gizem; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir

    2014-12-01

    A 27-year-old male patient presented with a maculopapular eruption on the flexural areas and buttocks after using oral ketoconazole. The patient was diagnosed with drug-induced baboon syndrome based on his history, which included prior sensitivity to topical ketoconazole, a physical examination, and histopathological findings. Baboon syndrome is a drug- or contact allergen-related maculopapular eruption that typically involves the flexural and gluteal areas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ketoconazole-induced baboon syndrome in the English literature.

  11. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  13. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  14. Food-Induced Red Eye.

    PubMed

    Rodgin, Susan G

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses the etiology of red eyes and a novel case of food-induced red eye. An 82-year-old white male patient reported 50 years of episodes of severe unilateral bulbar injection in either eye following ingestion of certain foods. Thinned scleras in this particular patient made the injection in his eyes more observable. Photodocumentation of this reaction after he ingested these foods is shown. It is hypothesized that this is a new explanation for an intermittent, unilateral, self-limited red eye-a food-induced red eye.

  15. Drug-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  16. Graphene with geometrically induced vorticity.

    PubMed

    Pachos, Jiannis K; Stone, Michael; Temme, Kristan

    2008-04-18

    At half filling, the electronic structure of graphene can be modeled by a pair of free two-dimensional Dirac fermions. We explicitly demonstrate that in the presence of a geometrically induced gauge field an everywhere-real Kekulé modulation of the hopping matrix elements can correspond to a nonreal Higgs field with nontrivial vorticity. This provides a natural setting for fractionally charged vortices with localized zero modes. For fullerenelike molecules we employ the index theorem to demonstrate the existence of six low-lying states that do not depend strongly on the Kekulé-induced mass gap.

  17. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  18. Induced activation in accelerator components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungau, Cristian; Bungau, Adriana; Cywinski, Robert; Barlow, Roger; Edgecock, Thomas Robert; Carlsson, Patrick; Danared, Hâkan; Mezei, Ferenc; Holm, Anne Ivalu Sander; Møller, Søren Pape; Thomsen, Heine Dølrath

    2014-08-01

    The residual activity induced in particle accelerators is a serious issue from the point of view of radiation safety as the long-lived radionuclides produced by fast or moderated neutrons and impact protons cause problems of radiation exposure for staff involved in the maintenance work and when decommissioning the facility. This paper presents activation studies of the magnets and collimators in the High Energy Beam Transport line of the European Spallation Source due to the backscattered neutrons from the target and also due to the direct proton interactions and their secondaries. An estimate of the radionuclide inventory and induced activation are predicted using the GEANT4 code.

  19. Efavirenz-induced exfoliative dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Sun, Yong-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at higher risk of developing adverse drug reactions. Multiple drugs are usually prescribed to patients with HIV infection for preventing the replication of HIV and for the treatment of the associated opportunistic infections. We report here the first case of an HIV-1-infected patient who developed an exfoliative dermatitis induced by efavirenz, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Physicians should be aware of the possible occurrence of efavirenz-induced skin eruptions from the start of antiviral treatment of HIV infection.

  20. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  1. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  2. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period.

  3. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  4. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  5. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    Gold Bond Powder Allopurinol (PIM 020F, French) Aluminum ophorite explosive. Methanol Aspirin Alphaprodine (PIM 878) Amatex. Aluminum Phosphide...can, directly or indirectly, change the electric charges of atoms or molecules . It is produced when radionuclides decay. LASER-INDUCED BREAKDOWN

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  7. Oxaliplatin-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arpan; Udwadia, Zarir F.; Almel, Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been approved for use as an adjuvant treatment in stage III colorectal carcinoma by the US-FDA. The majority of toxicity caused by this drug is manageable. However, rare, isolated cases of pulmonary fibrosis induced by this drug have been reported in literature. We report one such case of rapidly evolving pulmonary fibrosis following treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:20838550

  8. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  9. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  10. Calotropis procera-induced keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nidhi; Chandrakar, A K; Garg, M L; Patel, Santosh Singh

    2009-01-01

    Calotropis procera produces copious amounts of latex, which has been shown to possess several pharmacological properities. Its local application produces intense inflammatory response. In the 10 cases of Calotropis procera-induced keratitis reported here, the clinical picture showed corneal edema with striate keratopathy without any evidence of intraocular inflammation. The inflammation was reversed by the local application of steroid drops. PMID:19075415

  11. Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Rosas, Miguel; Jimenez-Santos, Cecilia Irene; García-González, Claudia Lorena

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed.

  12. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  13. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited.

  14. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380

  15. Diuretic-induced hypokalaemia inducing torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Chvilicek, J P; Hurlbert, B J; Hill, G E

    1995-12-01

    Torsades de pointes (TP), an unique polymorphous type of ventricular tachycardia, is associated with either an acquired or congenitally prolonged QT interval. Several reports have demonstrated TP to follow an acquired prolonged QT interval secondary to chronic hypocalcaemia, hypomagnesaemia, or hypokalaemia. We report a rapid onset, acute extracellular hypokalaemia not associated with other electrolyte disturbances inducing a prolonged QT interval followed by TP. This is the first case report of a rapid onset isolated acute extracellular hypokalaemia inducing TP. Since anaesthetists are involved in therapies that will rapidly reduce extracellular potassium (diuretic, catecholamine, and/or insulin administration, hyperventilation), this cae report serves as a warning that such therapy may have the risk of arrhythmia induction.

  16. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  17. Hydromechanics of Reservoir Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dura-Gomez, Inmaculada

    Data from five reservoirs were analyzed to investigate the various factors and possible pore pressure thresholds associated with Reservoir Induced Seismicity (RIS). Data was obtained from the following reservoirs: Koyna and Warna Reservoirs in India, Itoiz Reservoir in the western Pyrenees, Spain, and Jocassee and Monticello Reservoirs in South Carolina, U.S.A. Koyna Reservoir is one out of four reservoirs in the world where M≥6.0 induced earthquakes have occurred, whereas Warna Reservoir accounts for one out of ten cases with 5.0≤M≤5.9 induced earthquakes. Induced seismicity in the Koyna-Warna region is associated with annual filling cycles in the two reservoirs, large water level changes (30 to 45 m) and the presence of regional scale fractures. The Koyna-Warna case includes 19 M≥5.0 earthquakes at non-repeating hypocenters. The calculation of excess pore pressures associated with these earthquakes suggests values >300 kPa or >600 kPa, before or after 1993 respectively. The need for larger pore pressures from 1993 suggests that M≥5 earthquakes were induced on stronger faults in the region. The exceedance of the previous water level maxima (stress memory) is the most important, although not determining factor in inducing these M≥5.0 earthquakes. Itoiz Reservoir is one of twenty nine reservoirs with 4.0≤M≤4.9 induced earthquakes. The analysis of the RIS associated with the Itoiz Reservoir impoundment, between January 2004 and the end of 2008, shows that that pore pressures diffuse away from Itoiz Reservoir through the carbonate megabreccia systems of the Early to Middle Eocene Hecho Group, and a series of near-vertical thrust faults above the gently dipping Gavarnie thrust. Excess diffused pore pressures destabilize saturated critically stressed seismogenic fractures where RIS takes place. In particular, M≥3.0 earthquakes in the region are associated with excess pore pressures of the order of 100 to 200 kPa. Jocassee and Monticello Reservoirs in

  18. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  19. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  20. Amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Triveni, M. G.; Rudrakshi, C.; Mehta, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth represents an over-exuberant response to a variety of local and systemic conditions. Certain anticonvulsants, immuno-suppressive drugs and a number of calcium channel blockers have been shown to produce similar gingival overgrowths in certain susceptible patients. Amlodipine is a comparatively new calcium channel blocker and has been used with increasing frequency in the management of hypertension and angina. Although amlodipine is considered as a safe drug, very rarely it may induce gingival overgrowth also. A rare case of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth has been reported herein in a 50-year-old female patient. The treatment aspect included Phase-1 therapy, substitution of the drug, the surgical excision and the maintenance and supportive therapy resulting in excellent clinical outcome. PMID:20379416

  1. Disorder induced Floquet Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel; Rechtsman, Mikael; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of realizing a disorder induced topological state in two dimensional periodically driven systems. This phenomenon is akin to the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in equilibrium systems. We focus on graphene band structures, where in the presence of the driving electromagnetic field, but in the absence of disorder, the system starts off in a trivial state due to the presence of a sublattice potential. We show that by adding on-site disorder a topological state is induced in this system. We numerically compute the average Bott index (the analog of the Chern number for disordered systems) to show that starting from a trivial phase, topological behavior can be observed at finite disorder strength. In the topological phase, we detect chiral edge states by a numerical time evolution of wavepackets at the edge of the system. We propose an experimental set-up in photonic lattices to observe this phenomenon.

  2. Metformin-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kirkiz, Serap; Yarali, Nese; Arman Bilir, Ozlem; Tunc, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare side effect of metformin, an oral antidiabetic drug that is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A 17-year-old boy was hospitalized for receiving acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment that was composed of vincristine, L-asparaginase, daunorubicin, and prednisone. Hyperglycemia was determined without any clinical sign and metformin was started for steroid-induced insulin resistance. On the second day of metformin treatment, the patient's hemoglobin level decreased, and a direct Coombs test was positive for immunoglobulin G but negative for complement. An indirect Coombs test was negative. The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase level was within the normal range. Drug-induced hemolytic anemia was suspected and metformin was discontinued. The jaundice gradually disappeared and there was no requirement for red blood cell transfusions. This case showed that physicians should be aware of the potential side effect of metformin although it is infrequent. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins.

  4. Dipole-induced electromagnetic transparency.

    PubMed

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Sukharev, Maxim; Atabek, Osman; Charron, Eric

    2014-10-17

    We determine the optical response of a thin and dense layer of interacting quantum emitters. We show that, in such a dense system, the Lorentz redshift and the associated interaction broadening can be used to control the transmission and reflection spectra. In the presence of overlapping resonances, a dipole-induced electromagnetic transparency (DIET) regime, similar to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), may be achieved. DIET relies on destructive interference between the electromagnetic waves emitted by quantum emitters. Carefully tuning material parameters allows us to achieve narrow transmission windows in, otherwise, completely opaque media. We analyze in detail this coherent and collective effect using a generalized Lorentz model and show how it can be controlled. Several potential applications of the phenomenon, such as slow light, are proposed.

  5. Yessotoxin as an apoptotic inducer.

    PubMed

    Korsnes, Mónica Suárez; Espenes, Arild

    2011-06-01

    This work summarises current knowledge on how the marine toxin yessotoxin (YTX) induces apoptosis in different types of cells. The work also addresses perspectives for future research on this topic. YTX triggers apoptosis in a variety of cellular systems including cancer cells. The actual apoptotic pathways are not fully understood and seem to be cell-specific. YTX can induce the mitochondrial pathway in myoblast cell lines, but its potential to activate other signalling pathways and possible cross-talk between them has not been reported. Improvement in our understanding of death signalling induction by YTX may contribute to identifying novel molecular mechanisms of interest for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aloe-induced Toxic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ha Na; Kim, Young Mook; Kim, Byoung Ho; Sohn, Kyoung Min; Choi, Myung Jin; Choi, Young Hee

    2010-01-01

    Aloe has been widely used in phytomedicine. Phytomedicine describes aloe as a herb which has anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-aging effects. In recent years several cases of aloe-induced hepatotoxicity were reported. But its pharmacokinetics and toxicity are poorly described in the literature. Here we report three cases with aloe-induced toxic hepatitis. A 57-yr-old woman, a 62-yr-old woman and a 55-yr-old woman were admitted to the hospital for acute hepatitis. They had taken aloe preparation for months. Their clinical manifestation, laboratory findings and histologic findings met diagnostic criteria (RUCAM scale) of toxic hepatitis. Upon discontinuation of the oral aloe preparations, liver enzymes returned to normal level. Aloe should be considered as a causative agent in hepatotoxicity. PMID:20191055

  7. Drug-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    David, Stefan; Hamilton, James P

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is common and nearly all classes of medications can cause liver disease. Most cases of DILI are benign, and improve after drug withdrawal. It is important to recognize and remove the offending agent as quickly as possible to prevent the progression to chronic liver disease and/or acute liver failure. There are no definite risk factors for DILI, but pre-existing liver disease and genetic susceptibility may predispose certain individuals. Although most patients have clinical symptoms that are identical to other liver diseases, some patients may present with symptoms of systemic hypersensitivity. Treatment of drug and herbal-induced liver injury consists of rapid drug discontinuation and supportive care targeted to alleviate unwanted symptoms. PMID:21874146

  8. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  9. Abacavir-induced liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pezzani, Maria Diletta; Resnati, Chiara; Di Cristo, Valentina; Riva, Agostino; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abacavir-induced liver toxicity is a rare event almost exclusively occurring in HLA B*5701-positive patients. Herein, we report one case of abnormal liver function tests occurring in a young HLA B*5701-negative woman on a stable nevirapine-based regimen with no history of liver problems or alcohol abuse after switching to abacavir from tenofovir. We also investigated the reasons for abacavir discontinuation in a cohort of patients treated with abacavir-lamivudine-nevirapine.

  10. Indoxyl sulfate induces nephrovascular senescence.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Toshimitsu; Shimizu, Hidehisa

    2012-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate is markedly accumulated in the serum of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The oral sorbent AST-120 reduces serum levels of indoxyl sulfate in CKD patients by adsorbing indole, a precursor of indoxyl sulfate, in the intestine. Indoxyl sulfate is taken up by proximal tubular cells through organic anion transporters (OAT1, OAT3), and it induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) with impairment of cellular antioxidative system. Indoxyl sulfate stimulates progression of CKD by increasing renal expression of profibrotic cytokines such as transforming growth factor beta 1. Further, it promotes the expression of p53 by ROS-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B, thereby accelerating senescence of proximal tubular cells with progression of CKD. Administration of indoxyl sulfate to hypertensive rats reduces renal expression of Klotho and promotes cell senescence, with expression of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, p53, p21, p16, and retinoblastoma protein, accompanied by kidney fibrosis. Indoxyl sulfate downregulates Klotho expression in the kidneys through production of ROS and activation of nuclear factor kappa B in proximal tubular cells. It promotes cell senescence, with expression of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, p53, p21, p16, and retinoblastoma protein, in the aorta of hypertensive rats. It also promotes aortic calcification and aortic wall thickening in hypertensive rats with expression of osteoblast-specific proteins, induces ROS in vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular endothelial cells, stimulates proliferation and osteoblastic transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and inhibits viability and nitric oxide production of vascular endothelial cells. Thus, indoxyl sulfate accelerates the progression of not only CKD but also of cardiovascular disease by inducing nephrovascular cell senescence. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Entanglement-induced quantum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Satoshi; Tatsukawa, Rumi; Ueda, Kazushige; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-01

    Quantum entanglement of the Minkowski vacuum state between left and right Rindler wedges generates thermal behavior in the right Rindler wedge, which is known as the Unruh effect. In this paper, we show that there is another consequence of this entanglement, namely entanglement-induced quantum radiation emanating from a uniformly accelerated object. We clarify why it is in agreement with our intuition that incoming and outgoing energy fluxes should cancel each other out in a thermalized state.

  12. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  13. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne.

  14. Acyclovir-induced thrombotic microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goli, R.; Mukku, K. K.; Devaraju, S. B. R.; Uppin, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Acyclovir is a commonly used antiviral drug. Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to intratubular crystal precipitation and interstitial nephritis is well known. Here we present a case of acyclovir induced AKI in a 61 year old male with herpes zoster, which presented like thrombotic microangiopathy with acute interstitial nephritis. This is the first case report on acyclovir causing thrombotic microaniopathy with partial improvement in renal function after plasmapharesis. PMID:28356666

  15. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  16. Propulsion Induced Effects Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Won, Mark; Bencze, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this milestone is to assess the propulsion/airframe integration characteristics of the Technology Concept Airplane and design variations through computational analysis and experimental subsonic through supersonic wind tunnel testing. The Milestone will generate a comprehensive CFD and wind tunnel data base of the baseline, and design variations. Emphasis will be placed on establishing the propulsion induced effects on the flight performance of the Technology Concept Airplane with all appropriate wind tunnel corrections.

  17. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, {le}{approximately}{ovr J} {times} {approximately}{ovr B}{ge}, has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  18. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, [le][approximately][ovr J] [times] [approximately][ovr B][ge], has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  19. [Drug-induced lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Camus, Philippe

    2007-12-31

    Drug-induced interstitial pneumonias are systematically considered in the differential diagnosis of the interstitial pneumonias. The presentation may be acute, sub-acute or chronic, with the same drug possibly leading to either acute or subacute/chronic interstitial lung disease (e.g. amiodarone). There is no definite diagnostic criterion, the final diagnosis relying on the clinical and imaging features, the chronology of pulmonary manifestations, and the prevalence of reported cases with the suspected drug.

  20. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Charakorn, Natamon; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is an upper airway evaluation technique in which fiberoptic examination is performed under conditions of unconscious sedation. Unique information obtained from this 3-dimensional examination of the airway potentially provides additive benefits to other evaluation methods to guide treatment selection. This article presents recommendations regarding DISE technique and the VOTE Classification system for reporting DISE findings and reviews the evidence concerning DISE test characteristics and the association between DISE findings and treatment outcomes.

  1. [Drug-induced bronchospasm (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Strumeliev, S

    1978-01-01

    A detailed review of drug-induced bronchospasm is presented. Four types of reactions are described. Furthermore, pathogenesis, clinical picture, treatment and prophylaxis of the "Aspirin-induced asthma" are demonstrated.

  2. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  3. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  4. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  5. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  6. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  7. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  8. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  9. [Secondary osteoporosis induced by anticoagulants?].

    PubMed

    Riess, H; Loew, A; Himmelreich, G

    2001-07-01

    Generalized osteoporosis is a result of different causes and pathogenic mechanisms, which often combine forces to become clinically relevant. Among the different exogenic factors, drugs play an important role, frequently in connection with other factors such as immobilization or pregnancy. It has been suggested that anticoagulation therapy with heparins or coumarins may induce osteoporotic changes or enhance the development of osteoporosis for other reasons. According to in vitro experiments, preclinical trials, and clinical investigations, it seems reasonable to assume that heparins induce increased bone loss in a time- and dose-related manner. Low-molecular-weight heparins most likely have less effect on bone turnover when compared to unfractionated heparin. Oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K-antagonists is believed to have a weak effect on induction of osteoporosis, but clinical studies are contradictory. In spite of the fact that a relevant effect of these drugs on the induction of osteoporosis is questionable, it must be taken into consideration that anticoagulant drugs may enhance the negative effects on bone density of other risk factors capable of inducing osteoporosis such as immobilization, pregnancy, or endocrinological disorders.

  10. Interferon-induced Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Daniel; Nahir, Abraham Menahem; Hadad, Nuhad

    2002-12-01

    To review the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon. The medical literature was reviewed from 1967 to November 2001 with the assistance of a MEDLINE search using the key words: Raynaud, Interferon, ischemia, thrombosis and necrosis. A qualitative review was performed after the articles were abstracted and the relevant information was summarized. Twenty-four cases of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon (including our patient) are described. Interpheron-alpha was the most common causative agent (14 cases). The symptoms appeared weeks to years after beginning treatment and varied from mild vasospasm to occlusion of digital arteries and tissue necrosis (14 cases), sometimes necessitating finger amputation (6 patients). Digital plethysmography, arteriography and capillaroscopy were valuable diagnostic tools. In 4 cases, cardiac, ophthalmic, or central nervous system drug-induced ischemia accompanied the peripheral Raynaud's phenomenon. Of the 15 cases with a documented outcome, withdrawal of the drug alone resulted in complete (6 patients) or partial (1 patient) recovery. In the others, supportive therapy was needed. The recovery period lasted from 2 weeks to 3 months. In 2 patients, continuation of treatment was possible. Raynaud's phenomenon and related complications must be recognized as possible side effects of interferon therapy. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the drug may prevent unnecessary morbidity and disability. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Second-order nonlinearity induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y H; Zhang, S S; Shen, H Z; Yi, X X

    2017-04-01

    In analogy to electromagnetically induced transparency, optomechanically induced transparency was proposed recently in [Science330, 1520 (2010)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1195596]. In this Letter, we demonstrate another form of induced transparency enabled by second-order nonlinearity. A practical application of the second-order nonlinearity induced transparency is to measure the second-order nonlinear coefficient. Our scheme might find applications in quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  12. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  13. New insights into cold-induced sweetening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato tubers accumulate sugars when exposed to low temperatures. This process is referred to as cold-induced sweetening or low-temperature sweetening. The importance of cold-induced sweetening to the potato processing industry cannot be overemphasized. Cold-induced sweetening decreases potato tuber...

  14. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  15. A blockade of complement activation prevents rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mucosal mast cell degranulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, T; Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Saotome, T; Bamba, T

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to define the putative role of complement activation in association with mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation in the pathogenesis of rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We prepared complement activity-depleted rats by the administration of the anti-complement agent K-76COOH and the serine-protease inhibitor FUT-175. Autoperfused segments of the jejunum were exposed to 60 min of ischaemia, followed by reperfusion for various time periods, and the epithelial permeability was assessed by the 51Cr-EDTA clearance rate. The number of MMC was immunohistochemically assessed. In control rats, the maximal increase in mucosal permeability was achieved by 30–45 min of reperfusion. This increase was significantly attenuated by the administration of either K-76COONa alone or in combination with FUT-175. In contrast, the administration of carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI), which prevents the inactivation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins such as C5a, significantly enhanced the increase in I/R-induced mucosal permeability. These findings were confirmed morphologically by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the I/R-induced mucosal injury was accompanied by a marked decrease in the number of MMC, and administration of K-76COOH significantly inhibited this change. These results indicate that complement activation and the generation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins are key events in I/R-induced mucosal injury. It is likely that intestinal I/R-induced mucosal injury may be partially mediated by MMC activation associated with the complement activation. PMID:9528887

  16. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramon; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Here, we studied transcriptional regulation in homocysteine (Hcy)-induced gene expression in monocytes (MC). We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN gamma)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFN gamma -induced genes, but not that in TNF alpha -induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF as putative Hcy-responsive TFs.

  17. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramón; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study is to investigate transcriptional mechanism underlying homocysteine (Hcy)-induced and monocytes (MC)-derived inflammatory response. We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFNγ-induced genes, but not that in TNFα-induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF, which includes heat shock factor, MC enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells and Krueppel-like factor 4, as putative Hcy-responsive TFs. PMID:23276953

  18. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.

  19. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  20. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  1. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  2. Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Petrof, Basil J; Jaber, Samir; Matecki, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Diaphragmatic function is a major determinant of the ability to successfully wean patients from mechanical ventilation. There is increasing recognition of a condition termed ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction. The purpose of the present review is to present evidence that mechanical ventilation can itself be a cause of diaphragmatic dysfunction, to outline our current understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon, and to discuss the implications of recent research for future therapeutic strategies. Many critically ill patients demonstrate diaphragmatic weakness. A large body of evidence from animal models, and more limited data from humans, indicates that mechanical ventilation can cause muscle fiber injury and atrophy within the diaphragm. Current data support a complex underlying pathophysiology involving oxidative stress and the activation of several intracellular proteolytic pathways involved in degradation of the contractile apparatus. This includes the calpain, caspase, and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. In addition, there is a simultaneous downregulation of protein synthesis pathways. Studies in animal models suggest that future therapies may be able to specifically target these processes, whereas for the time being current preventive measures in humans are primarily based upon allowing persistent diaphragmatic activation during mechanical ventilation. Diaphragmatic dysfunction is common in mechanically ventilated patients and is a likely cause of weaning failure. Recently, there has been a great expansion in our knowledge of how mechanical ventilation can adversely affect diaphragmatic structure and function. Future studies need to better define the evolution and mechanistic basis for ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction in humans, in order to allow the development of mechanical ventilation strategies and pharmacologic agents that will decrease the incidence of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  3. Antidepressant-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    DeSanty, Kevin P; Amabile, Celene M

    2007-07-01

    To review principles of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), summarize characteristics of antidepressant-mediated liver injury, and provide recommendations for monitoring and management. A search relating to antidepressant-induced liver injury was performed using MEDLINE (1966-March 2007). Search terms included antidepressant, cholestasis, hepatotoxicity, jaundice, liver injury, toxic hepatitis, and transaminases. Reference citations not identified in the initial database search were also utilized. All English-language case reports, letters, and review articles identified from the data sources were used. Case reports and letters relating to hepatotoxicity from antidepressant overdose were excluded. Antidepressant-induced liver injury described in published cases were of the idiopathic type and, by definition, cannot be predicted based on dose or specific risk factors. Paroxetine had the largest number of cases within the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor class. Nefazodone, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, appeared to have the most serious cases and is the only antidepressant agent that carries a Food and Drug Administration Black Box Warning regarding hepatotoxicity. The tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are capable of producing hepatotoxicity, but fewer cases with these agents have been reported in the past 15 years, possibly due to a decline in their use. Causality has not been well established in all reports due to the concurrent use of other drugs and/or underlying liver disease. Most antidepressant agents have the potential to produce idiopathic liver injury. There is no way to prevent idiopathic DILI, but the severity of the reaction may be minimized with prompt recognition and early withdrawal of the agent. The clinician must be careful to provide ongoing therapy of the underlying depressive disorder and be aware of possible drug discontinuation syndromes should potential hepatotoxicity be suspected.

  4. Sad music induces pleasant emotion

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

  5. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  6. Ketotifen-induced nocturnal bruxism.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Bramanti, Placido; Militi, David; Mondello, Stefania; Calabro, Rocco Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Nocturnal bruxism is a common oromandibular movement disorder highly prevalent in children, but its pathophysiological mechanism has not been fully explained. Iatrogenic sleep bruxism has been described following treatment with several psychotropic medications. However, no case of antihistamine-induced bruxism has been reported to date. Herein, we describe a 4-year-old child who experienced nocturnal bruxism during treatment for bronchospasm and rhinitis with the antihistamine ketotifen. Drug rechallenge was also performed. The present case adds useful information to our knowledge of bruxism. Complex and poorly understood interactions between multiple central nervous system neurotransmitters, such as histamine, serotonin, and dopamine, are involved.

  7. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  8. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Pregnancy-induced haemolytic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Karagiozova, J; Masseva, A; Ivanov, St; Marinov, B; Kulinska, R; Boiadjiev, D; Jordanova, D

    2014-01-01

    This is the clinical case of a primiparous eight month pregnant female, presenting with symptoms of pregnancy-induced acute haemolytic anaemia (haemolytic aneamia provoked by an immune mechanism, intra- and extra-erythrocyte defects, and HELLP syndrome were excluded). The anaemia progressed to become life-threatening for both the pregnant women and the foetus, which brought the following questions into consideration: diagnosis of anaemia during pregnancy; dosing of corticosteroid therapy; possibility of giving birth to a viable foetus and prognosis for next pregnancies. Owing to the inter-disciplinary efforts, the life and health of this pregnant woman were preserved, but the foetus was lost.

  10. Fidelity based measurement induced nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuganesan, R.; Sankaranarayanan, R.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) using a metric based on fidelity to capture global nonlocal effect of a quantum state due to locally invariant projective measurements. This quantity is a remedy for local ancilla problem in the original definition of MIN. We present an analytical expression of the proposed version of MIN for pure bipartite state and 2 × n dimensional mixed state. We also provide an upper bound of the MIN for general mixed state. Finally, we compare this quantity with MINs based on Hilbert-Schmidt norm and skew information for higher dimensional Werner and isotropic states.

  11. Sertraline-induced ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishit H; Golwala, Harsh; Stavrakis, Stavros; Schechter, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which is a commonly used drug for major depressive disorder. Most frequently reported adverse effects of sertraline in patients receiving 50-150 mg/d are dry mouth, headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, sweating, and dizziness. We hereby report one of the few cases of sertraline-induced ventricular tachycardia, which has been for the first time objectively assessed by the Naranjo scale. We therefore urge the primary care physicians and the cardiologists to keep sertraline as a possible precipitating factor for evaluation of ventricular tachycardia.

  12. Electric current induced ultrafast demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Richard B.; Yang, Yang; Gorchon, Jon; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    We report the magnetic response of Co/Pt multilayers to picosecond electrical heating. Using photoconductive Auston switches, we generate electrical pulses with 5.5 ps duration and hundreds of pico-Joules to pass through Co/Pt multilayers. The electrical pulse heats the electrons in the Co/Pt multilayers and causes an ultrafast reduction in the magnetic moment. A comparison between optical and electrically induced demagnetization of the Co/Pt multilayers reveals significantly different dynamics for optical vs electrical heating. We attribute the disparate dynamics to the dependence of the electron-phonon interaction on the average energy and the total number of initially excited electrons.

  13. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs.

  14. Longitudinal melanonychia induced by capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Paravar, Taraneh; Hymes, Sharon R

    2009-10-15

    Capecitabine is an oral prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), used in the treatment of metastatic colon and breast cancers; it is also under investigation for use in gastric cancers. Multiple cutaneous adverse effects have been reported with the use of capecitabine including acral erythema, pyogenic granulomas, inflammation of actinic keratoses, cutaneous and mucosal hyperpigmentation, leopardlike vitiligo, radiation recall, onycholysis, onychomadesis, and subacute cutaneous lupus. To our knowledge, no cases of capecitabine-induced linear melanonychia have been reported to date in the literature.

  15. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  16. Cocaine-induced mesenteric ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J; Farreras, N; Ortiz De Zárate L; Bachs, E

    2000-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old man with distal ileum infarction after intravenous abuse of cocaine. He underwent resection of a gangrenous bowel segment and survived. We review the literature regarding intestinal ischaemia related to cocaine. To date, 19 cases have been published. Like most previously reported cases, our patient was young and had no previous history of arteriosclerosis. He suffered cocaine-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Mesenteric ischaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic abdominal pain in cocaine consumers.

  17. Break-Induced DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith P.; Lovett, Susan T.; Haber, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, often called break-induced replication (BIR), was initially invoked to explain recombination events in bacteriophage but it has recently been recognized as a fundamentally important mechanism to repair double-strand chromosome breaks in eukaryotes. This mechanism appears to be critically important in the restarting of stalled and broken replication forks and in maintaining the integrity of eroded telomeres. Although BIR helps preserve genome integrity during replication, it also promotes genome instability by the production of loss of heterozygosity and the formation of nonreciprocal translocations, as well as in the generation of complex chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:23881940

  18. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone

    PubMed Central

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients. PMID:24700048

  19. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-04-03

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients.

  20. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  1. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Laser-Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy ( LSCE ). The essential features of LSCE as applied to CdTe epitaxy involve: coadsorption of DMCd and DMTe on a GaAs...DIAGRAM OF THE LSCE PROCESS UHV environment 1M substra1e 9 /X Adsorbed thin film produced CH 3 -Cd-GH 3 CH 3 -Te-CH, by molecular beam source hv ’ CH...with Anneal W/// substraIe %/"/,’ Figure 1.1. Schematic of the LSCE process. (1-2) t I 2. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH 2.1 Experimental Apparatus The

  2. HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS.

    PubMed

    Confederat, Luminiţa; Constantin, Sandra; Lupaşcu, Florentina; Pânzariu, Andreea; Hăncianu, Monica; Profire, Lenuţa

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs.

  3. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  4. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  5. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  6. Coalescence-induced nanodroplet jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Xu, Chenyu; Sotelo, Jesus; Chun, Jae Min; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-10-01

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years due to the ability of such surfaces to shed microscale water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping, resulting in heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance enhancement. Here we report the coalescence-induced removal of water nanodroplets (R ≈500 nm ) from superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. The two-droplet coalescence time is measured for varying droplet Ohnesorge numbers, confirming that coalescence prior to jumping is governed by capillary-inertial dynamics. By varying the conformal hydrophobic coating thickness on the CNT surface, the minimum jumping droplet radius is shown to increase with increasing solid fraction and decreasing apparent advancing contact angle, allowing us to explore both hydrodynamic limitations stemming from viscous dissipation and surface adhesion limitations. We find that, even for the smallest nanostructure length scale (≤100 nm) and lowest surface adhesions, nonideal surface interactions and the evolved droplet morphology play defining roles in limiting the minimum size for jumping on real surfaces. The outcomes of this work demonstrate the ability to passively shed nanometric water droplets, which has the potential to further increase the efficiency of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of energy and water applications.

  7. Wind-induced ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  8. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This "rotating balance" was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  9. Stress proteins induced by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Del Razo, L M; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Brambila-Colombres, E; Calderón-Aranda, E S; Manno, M; Albores, A

    2001-12-01

    The elevated expression of stress proteins is considered to be a universal response to adverse conditions, representing a potential mechanism of cellular defense against disease and a potential target for novel therapeutics. Exposure to arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo in a variety of model systems has been shown to cause the induction of a number of the major stress protein families such as heat shock proteins (Hsp). Among them are members with low molecular weight, such as metallotionein and ubiquitin, as well as ones with masses of 27, 32, 60, 70, 90, and 110 kDa. In most of the cases, the induction of stress proteins depends on the capacity of the arsenical to reach the target, its valence, and the type of exposure, arsenite being the biggest inducer of most Hsp in several organs and systems. Hsp induction is a rapid dose-dependent response (1-8 h) to the acute exposure to arsenite. Thus, the stress response appears to be useful to monitor the sublethal toxicity resulting from a single exposure to arsenite. The present paper offers a critical review of the capacity of arsenicals to modulate the expression and/or accumulation of stress proteins. The physiological consequences of the arsenic-induced stress and its usefulness in monitoring effects resulting from arsenic exposure in humans and other organisms are discussed.

  10. Neutrino induced light element synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, D.H.; Mathews, G.; Weaver, T.A. ); Haxton, W.C. . Dept. of Physics); Woosley, S.E. California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA . Board of Studies in Astronomy and Astrophysics)

    1990-01-01

    As the core of a massive star collapses to form a neutron star, the flux of neutrinos in the overlying shells of heavy elements becomes so great that, despite the small cross section, substantial nuclear transmutation is induced. Neutrinos, especially the higher energy {mu}- and {tau}-neutrinos, excite heavy elements and even helium to particle unbound levels. The evaporation of a single neutron or proton, and the back reaction of these nucleons on other species present, significantly alters the outcome of traditional nucleosynthesis calculations leading to a new process: {nu}-nucleosynthesis. The process was first studied by Domogatsky et al. and Woosley. Recent work by Epstein, Colgate, and Haxton and Woosley and Haxton suggested that a large number of elements could owe their existence in nature to {nu}-induced reactions in supernovae. A parametrized study of this process including shock wave propagation was carried out by Woosley et al. for selected zones of a 20 M{sub {circle dot}} star. Here we give preliminary results for a 25 M{sub {circle dot}} star, including all {nu}-reactions in all stellar zones.

  11. Preference pulses induced by reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki; Silberberg, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Eight rats responded on concurrent Variable-Ratio 20 Extinction schedules for food reinforcement. The assignment of variable-ratio reinforcement to a left or right lever varied randomly following each reinforcer, and was cued by illumination of a stimulus light above that lever. Postreinforcement preference levels decreased substantially and reliably over time when the lever that just delivered reinforcement was now in extinction; however, if that lever was once again associated with variable ratio, this decrease in same-lever preference tended to be small, and for some subjects, not in evidence. The changes in preference level to the extinction lever were well described by a modified version of Killeen, Hanson, and Osborne's (1978) induction model. Consistent with this model's attribution of preference change to induction, we attribute preference change in this report to a brief period of reinforcer-induced arousal that energizes responding to the lever that delivered the last reinforcer. After a few seconds, this induced responding diminishes, and the operant responding that remains comes under the control of the stimulus light cuing the lever providing variable-ratio reinforcement.

  12. Cough-induced rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Sano, Atsushi; Tashiro, Ken; Fukuda, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    Occasionally, patients who complain of chest pain after the onset of coughing are diagnosed with rib fractures. We investigated the characteristics of cough-induced rib fractures. Between April 2008 and December 2013, 17 patients were referred to our hospital with chest pain after the onset of coughing. Rib radiography was performed, focusing on the location of the chest pain. When the patient had other signs and symptoms such as fever or persistent cough, computed tomography of the chest was carried out. We analyzed the data retrospectively. Rib fractures were found in 14 of the 17 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 14 to 86 years (median 39.5 years). Ten patients were female and 4 were male. Three patients had chronic lung disease. There was a single rib fracture in 9 patients, and 5 had two or more fractures. The middle and lower ribs were the most commonly involved; the 10th rib was fractured most frequently. Cough-induced rib fractures occur in every age group regardless of the presence or absence of underlying disease. Since rib fractures often occur in the lower and middle ribs, rib radiography is useful for diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Neutrino-Induced Meson Productions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi X.

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region, by extending the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of π N,γ N to π N,η N,KΛ ,KΣ reaction data for W ≤ 2.1 GeV. We analyze electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets to determine the vector current form factors up to Q2 ≤ 3.0 (GeV/c)2. Axial-current matrix elements are derived in accordance with the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) relation to the πN interactions of the DCC model. As a result, we can uniquely determine the interference pattern between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. Our calculated cross sections for neutrino-induced single-pion productions are compared with available data, and are found to be in reasonable agreement with the data. We also calculate the double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region, for the first time, with relevant resonance contributions and channel couplings. The result is compared with the double-pion production data. For a future development of a neutrino-nucleus reaction model and/or a neutrino event generator for analyses of neutrino experiments, the DCC model presented here can give a useful input.

  14. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    SciTech Connect

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  15. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  16. Induced polarization imaging of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, Andre; Soueid Ahmed, Abdellahi

    2017-04-01

    The first part of the presentation is related to the petrophysics of induced polarization of volcanic rocks. We described induced polarization of these rocks using a dynamic Stern layer model describing the polarization of the electrical double layer around the mineral grains. This model shows that the normalized chargeability and quadrature conductivity of volcanic rocks is sensitive to the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of these materials and therefore to their alteration. In the second part pf the presentation, we use a geostatistical inversion framework to image chargeability in 2.5D or in 3D. This new framework is benchmarked using synthetic data and data from various volcanoes (Kilaua, Furnas, Yellowstone). We show that chargeability tomography is very complementary to the now classical electrical resistivity tomography in order to image volcanic structures and to separate the conduction in the bulk pore network from interfacial effects such as surface conductivity. This approach appears to be promising as a first step toward joint inversion with seismic and gravity data.

  17. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  18. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher-frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  19. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  20. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, DH; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349