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Sample records for anatomic subsites results

  1. Global gene expression profiling of oral cavity cancers suggests molecular heterogeneity within anatomic subsites

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Patricia; Alvares, Adriana M; Michaluart, Pedro; Okamoto, Oswaldo K; Nunes, Fabio D; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A; Tajara, Eloiza H

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a frequent neoplasm, which is usually aggressive and has unpredictable biological behavior and unfavorable prognosis. The comprehension of the molecular basis of this variability should lead to the development of targeted therapies as well as to improvements in specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis. Results Samples of primary OSCCs and their corresponding surgical margins were obtained from male patients during surgery and their gene expression profiles were screened using whole-genome microarray technology. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis were used for data visualization and One-way Analysis of Variance was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Samples clustered mostly according to disease subsite, suggesting molecular heterogeneity within tumor stages. In order to corroborate our results, two publicly available datasets of microarray experiments were assessed. We found significant molecular differences between OSCC anatomic subsites concerning groups of genes presently or potentially important for drug development, including mRNA processing, cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, cell cycle and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results corroborate literature data on molecular heterogeneity of OSCCs. Differences between disease subsites and among samples belonging to the same TNM class highlight the importance of gene expression-based classification and challenge the development of targeted therapies. PMID:19014556

  2. Disparities Between Blacks and Whites in Stage at Diagnosis, Incidence, and Anatomic Subsite of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hobley, James; Lindsay II, Jerome A.; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Background A disparity in colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality has been reported for black men and women in the United States. Objective To determine the magnitude and direction of temporal change in black/white disparity, by anatomic subsites of the colon and rectum. Design Population-based, epidemiologic study. Setting Pennsylvania, 1997–2002. Measurements Black/white ratios of the percentage of cases diagnosed at late stage and of age-adjusted incidence rates, by anatomic subsite, for four 3-year time periods. Results In 2000–2002, 54.6% of CRC cases among blacks were diagnosed at late stage, compared with 51.3% among whites. The percentage of cases in the cecum, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and recto-sigmoid diagnosed at a late stage was larger among blacks than among whites. The disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at a late stage in the colon and rectum, transverse colon, and descending colon increased during the study period (P<.05). In 2000–2002, incidence was greater among blacks (64.1/100,000) than among whites (59.8/100,000). Incidence for segments of the proximal colon tended to be higher among blacks than among whites. The disparity in the incidence in the transverse colon increased during the study period (P=.021), while the increase in the disparity in the appendix approached statistical significance (P=.051). Limitations The effect of race may have been confounded by unavailable data, including socioeconomic position. Conclusions The black/white disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at late stage increased during the study period. The disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at a late stage and incidence for the transverse colon also increased. Efforts to increase screening for CRC, especially among blacks, should be enhanced.

  3. Sex disparities in colorectal cancer incidence by anatomic subsite, race and age.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Devesa, Susan S; Cross, Amanda J; Inskip, Peter D; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B

    2011-04-01

    Although incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States has declined in recent years, rates remain higher in men than in women and the male-to-female incidence rate ratio (MF IRR) increases progressively across the colon from the cecum to the rectum. Rates among races/ethnicities other than Whites or Blacks have not been frequently reported. To examine CRC rates by sex across anatomic subsite, age and racial/ethnic groups, we used the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program for cases diagnosed among residents of 13 registries during 1992-2006. Incidence rates were expressed per 100,000 person-years and age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Population; MF IRR and 95% confidence intervals were also calculated. Among each racial/ethnic group, the MF IRR increased fairly monotonically from close to unity for cecal cancers to 1.81 (Hispanics) for rectal cancers. MF IRRs increased with age most rapidly for distal colon cancers from <1.0 at ages <50 years to 1.4-1.9 at older ages. The MF IRR for rectal cancers also rose with age from about 1.0 to 2.0. For proximal cancer, the MF IRR was consistently <1.5; among American Indian/Alaska Natives, it was <1.0 across all ages. The MF IRRs for CRC vary markedly according to subsite and age but less by racial/ethnic group. These findings may partially reflect differences in screening experiences and access to medical care but also suggest that etiologic factors may be playing a role.

  4. Racial/ethnic variation in the anatomic subsite location of in situ and invasive cancers of the colon.

    PubMed Central

    Shavers, Vickie L.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Approximately 145,000 Americans were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 56,000 died from colorectal cancer in 2006. Although colorectal screening can reduce mortality and incidence, U.S. screening rates are particularly low for racial/ethnic minorities. Racial differences in the subsite location of colon cancers could have implications for colorectal screening. This study examines the anatomic subsite distribution of tumors among African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American/Pacific-Islander and non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients with colon cancer. METHODS: Surveillance and End Results program data for 254,469 primary in situ and invasive colon cancers for patients from 1973-2002 are included in this analysis. Descriptive analyses and logistic regression are used to describe and examine variations in the proportion of colon cancers diagnosed at sites proximal to the sigmoid colon or proximal to the splenic flexure over three successive time periods. RESULTS: The proportion of colon cancers diagnosed at the sigmoid colon was 15.6-21.3% lower, while diagnoses at the descending colon were 40.5.0-45.3.0% higher for African Americans than NHWs over the three time periods. In logistic regression analyses adjusted for gender, age group and year of diagnosis, the odds of a diagnosis of cancer proximal to the sigmoid colon or proximal to the splenic flexure was significantly higher for African Americans but lower for Hispanics and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders compared to NHWs. DISCUSSION: The higher proportion of cancers among African Americans diagnosed at sites that are generally attempted but not always reached with a sigmoidscope suggest that African Americans may benefit from screening colonoscopy. They also highlight the need for systems that collect data that would allow a direct examination of the role that the differential use of specific colon screening tests and polypectomy play in racial/ethnic variation in colon cancer incidence and in the

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W. )

    1990-11-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM.

  6. Meat-related compounds and colorectal cancer risk by anatomical subsite.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paige E; Lazarus, Philip; Lesko, Samuel M; Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi; Laio, Jason; Zhu, Jay; Harper, Gregory; Muscat, Joshua E; Hartman, Terryl J

    2013-01-01

    Since meat may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, associations between meat-related compounds were examined to elucidate underlying mechanisms in a population-based case-control study. Participants (989 cases/1,033 healthy controls) completed a food frequency questionnaire with a meat-specific module. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between meat variables and colorectal cancer; polytomous logistic regression was used for subsite-specific analyses. The following significant positive associations were observed for meat-related compounds: 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and colorectal, distal colon, and rectal tumors; 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and colorectal and colon cancer tumors; nitrites/nitrates and proximal colon cancer; 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and rectal cancer; and benzo[a]pyrene and rectal cancer (P-trends < 0.05). For analyses by meat type, cooking method, and doneness preference, positive associations between red processed meat and proximal colon cancer and pan-fried red meat and colorectal cancer were found (P-trends < 0.05). Inverse associations were observed between unprocessed poultry and colorectal, colon, proximal colon, and rectal tumors; grilled/barbequed poultry and proximal colon cancer; and well-done/charred poultry and colorectal, colon, and proximal colon tumors (P-trends < 0.05). HCAs, PAHs, nitrites, and nitrates may be involved in colorectal cancer etiology. Further examination into the unexpected inverse associations between poultry and colorectal cancer is warranted.

  7. Influence of anatomical subsite on the incidence of microsatellite instability, and KRAS and BRAF mutation rates in patients with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benedix, Frank; Meyer, Frank; Kube, Rainer; Kropf, Siegfried; Kuester, Doerthe; Lippert, Hans; Roessner, Albert; Krüger, Sabine

    2012-10-15

    There is a growing amount of data supporting the concept that cancers originating from the proximal and distal colon are distinct clinicopathological entities. The incidence of MSI and BRAF mutation is strongly associated with right sided tumor location, whereas there are conflicting results for KRAS mutation rates. However, to date, no data exist whether and to what extent defined colonic subsites influence MSI status, KRAS and BRAF mutation rates. We selected primary colon cancer from 171 patients operated on at our institution between 2007 and 2010. BRAF, KRAS mutation rates and microsatellite instability were determined and correlated with clinicopathological features and tumor location. MSI-h cancers were significantly associated with poor histological grade but a lower rate of distant metastases. KRAS-mutated tumors were linked to lower T-stage and better differentiation. Colon carcinomas with BRAF mutation were significantly associated with distant metastatic spread and poor histological grade. Furthermore, we found that MSI-h status, KRAS and BRAF mutation rates varied remarkably among the colonic subsites irrespective of right- and left-sided origin, respectively. The results of the current study provide further evidence that a simple classification into right- and left-sided colon carcinoma does not represent the complexity of this tumor entity.

  8. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and risk of oral cavity cancer by subsite: results of a French population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    PubMed

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Cyr, Diane; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Guida, Florence; Schmaus, Annie; Cénée, Sylvie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Carton, Matthieu; Lapôtre-Ledoux, Bénédicte; Delafosse, Patricia; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-05-01

    The objective was to examine the role of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in the incidence of oral cavity cancer by subsite in France, a high-incidence area. We analysed detailed data on lifelong tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking from 772 oral cavity cancer cases and 3555 controls included in a population-based case-control study, the ICARE study. Tobacco smoking increased the risk of oral cavity cancer even for the smaller quantities and durations, whereas alcohol drinking increased this risk only in heavy drinkers who were also ever smokers. The combined effect of smoking and drinking was greater than multiplicative. The floor of the mouth was the subsite that was the most affected by the harmful effects of tobacco and alcohol, whereas the gums were less susceptible. The risk associated with tobacco and alcohol consumption did not differ between intraoral cavity and subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue). Population-attributable risks for oral cavity cancer were 78.6% for tobacco smoking, 7.3% for alcohol drinking and 80.7% for tobacco and/or alcohol consumption. These results indicate that regular oral check-ups should be targeted at smokers and heavy drinkers, and that prevention efforts should be focused on smoking cessation.

  9. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Hachem, Maher Abou; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kramhøft, Birte; Svensson, Birte

    2006-09-18

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as binding barriers. Barley alpha-amylase 1 mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in alpha-amylases.

  10. Two subsites in the binding domain of the acetylcholine receptor: an aromatic subsite and a proline subsite.

    PubMed

    Kachalsky, S G; Jensen, B S; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S

    1995-11-07

    The ligand binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is localized in the alpha-subunit within a domain containing the tandem Cys-192 and -193. By analyzing the binding-site region of AcChoR from animal species that are resistant to alpha-neurotoxins, we have previously shown that four residues in this region, at positions 187, 189, 194, and 197, differ between animals sensitive (e.g., mouse) and resistant (e.g., mongoose and snake) to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX). In the present study, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on a fragment of the mongoose AcChoR alpha-subunit (residues 122-205) and exchanged residues 187, 189, 194, and 197, either alone or in combination, with those present in the mouse alpha-subunit sequence. Only the mongoose fragment in which all four residues were mutated to the mouse ones exhibited alpha-BTX binding similar to that of the mouse fragment. The mongoose double mutation in which Leu-194 and His-197 were replaced with proline residues, which are present at these positions in the mouse AcChoR and in all other toxin binders, bound alpha-BTX to approximately 60% of the level of binding exhibited by the mouse fragment. In addition, replacement of either Pro-194 or -197 in the mouse fragment with serine and histidine, respectively, markedly decreased alpha-BTX binding. All other mutations resulted in no or just a small increase in alpha-BTX binding. These results have led us to propose two subsites in the binding domain for alpha-BTX: the proline subsite, which includes Pro-194 and -197 and is critical for alpha-BTX binding, and the aromatic subsite, which includes amino acid residues 187 and 189 and determines the extent of alpha-BTX binding.

  11. Two subsites in the binding domain of the acetylcholine receptor: an aromatic subsite and a proline subsite.

    PubMed Central

    Kachalsky, S G; Jensen, B S; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S

    1995-01-01

    The ligand binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is localized in the alpha-subunit within a domain containing the tandem Cys-192 and -193. By analyzing the binding-site region of AcChoR from animal species that are resistant to alpha-neurotoxins, we have previously shown that four residues in this region, at positions 187, 189, 194, and 197, differ between animals sensitive (e.g., mouse) and resistant (e.g., mongoose and snake) to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX). In the present study, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on a fragment of the mongoose AcChoR alpha-subunit (residues 122-205) and exchanged residues 187, 189, 194, and 197, either alone or in combination, with those present in the mouse alpha-subunit sequence. Only the mongoose fragment in which all four residues were mutated to the mouse ones exhibited alpha-BTX binding similar to that of the mouse fragment. The mongoose double mutation in which Leu-194 and His-197 were replaced with proline residues, which are present at these positions in the mouse AcChoR and in all other toxin binders, bound alpha-BTX to approximately 60% of the level of binding exhibited by the mouse fragment. In addition, replacement of either Pro-194 or -197 in the mouse fragment with serine and histidine, respectively, markedly decreased alpha-BTX binding. All other mutations resulted in no or just a small increase in alpha-BTX binding. These results have led us to propose two subsites in the binding domain for alpha-BTX: the proline subsite, which includes Pro-194 and -197 and is critical for alpha-BTX binding, and the aromatic subsite, which includes amino acid residues 187 and 189 and determines the extent of alpha-BTX binding. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479887

  12. Computer-aided subsite mapping of α-amylases.

    PubMed

    Mótyán, János A; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Harangi, János; Bagossi, Péter

    2011-02-15

    Subsite mapping is a crucial procedure in the characterization of α-amylases (EC 3.2.1.1), which are extensively used in starch-based industries and in diagnosis of pancreatic and salivary glands disorders. A computer-aided method has been developed for subsite mapping of α-amylases, which substitutes the difficult, expensive, and time-consuming experimental determination of action patterns to crystal structures based energy calculations. Interaction energies between enzymes and carbohydrate substrates were calculated after short energy minimization by a molecular mechanics program. A training set of wild type and mutant amylases with known experimental action patterns of 13 enzymes of wide range of origin was used to set up the procedure. Calculations for training set resulted in good correlation in case of subsite binding energies (r(2)=0.827-0.929) and bond cleavage frequencies (r(2)=0.727-0.835). A set of eight novel barley amylase 1 mutants was used to test our model. Subsite binding energies were predicted with r(2)=0.502 correlation coefficient, while bond cleavage frequency prediction resulted in r(2)=0.538. Our computer-aided procedure may supplement the experimental subsite mapping methods to predict and understand characteristic features of α-amylases.

  13. Effect of temperature on subsite map of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Remenyik, Judit; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Lipták, A

    2006-09-01

    To elucidate how temperature effects subsite mapping of a thermostable alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA), a comparative study was performed by using 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl (CNP) beta-maltooligosides with degree of polymerisation (DP) 4-10 as model substrates. Action patterns, cleavage frequencies and subsite binding energies were determined at 50 degrees C, 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C. Subsite map at 80 degrees C indicates more favourable bindings compared to the hydrolysis at 50 degrees C. Hydrolysis at 100 degrees C resulted in a clear shift in the product pattern and suggests significant differences in the active site architecture. Two preferred cleavage modes were seen for all substrates in which subsite (+2) and (+3) were dominant, but CNP-G1 was never formed. In the preferred binding mode of shorter oligomers, CNP-G2 serves as the leaving group (79%, 50%, 59% and 62% from CNP-G4, CNP-G5, CNP-G6 and CNP-G7, respectively), while CNP-G3 is the dominant hydrolysis product from CNP-G8, CNP-G9, and CNP-Gl0 (62%, 68% and 64%, respectively). The high binding energy value (-17.5 kJ/mol) found at subsite (+2) is consistent with the significant formation of CNP-G2. Subsite mapping at 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C confirms that there are no further binding sites despite the presence of longer products.

  14. Associations of Census-Tract Poverty with Subsite-Specific Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates and Stage of Disease at Diagnosis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Sherman, Recinda L.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Lin, Ge; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Boscoe, Francis P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. It remains unclear whether neighborhood poverty contributes to differences in subsite-specific colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. We examined associations between census-tract poverty and CRC incidence and stage by anatomic subsite and race/ethnicity. Methods. CRC cases diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 from 15 states and Los Angeles County (N = 278,097) were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on census-tract poverty. Age-adjusted and stage-specific CRC incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated. Analyses were stratified by subsite (proximal, distal, and rectum), sex, race/ethnicity, and poverty. Results. Compared to the lowest poverty areas, CRC IRs were significantly higher in the most impoverished areas for men (IRR = 1.14 95% CI 1.12–1.17) and women (IRR = 1.06 95% CI 1.05–1.08). Rate differences between high and low poverty were strongest for distal colon (male IRR = 1.24 95% CI 1.20–1.28; female IRR = 1.14 95% CI 1.10–1.18) and weakest for proximal colon. These rate differences were significant for non-Hispanic whites and blacks and for Asian/Pacific Islander men. Inverse associations between poverty and IRs of all CRC and proximal colon were found for Hispanics. Late-to-early stage CRC IRRs increased monotonically with increasing poverty for all race/ethnicity groups. Conclusion. There are differences in subsite-specific CRC incidence by poverty, but associations were moderated by race/ethnicity. PMID:25165475

  15. Extended binding inhibitors of chymotrypsin that interact with leaving group subsites S1'-S3'.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, B; Abeles, R H

    1987-07-14

    We have synthesized inhibitors of chymotrypsin, based on fluoromethyl ketones, that bind at S and S' subsites. "Small" inhibitors of serine proteases, which have previously been synthesized, only interact with S subsites. The parent compound is Ac-Leu-ambo-Phe-CF2H (1) (Ki = 25 X 10(-6) M). This inhibitor was modified by successively replacing H of the -CF2H group by -CH2CH2CONHCH3, (4), -CH2CH2CONH-Leu-NHMe (5), -CH2CH2CONH-Leu-Val-OEt (6), and -CH2CH2CONH-Leu-Arg-OMe (7). Corresponding Ki values are 7.8 (4), 0.23 (5), 0.21 (6), and 0.014 (7) microM. Extending 5 to 6 by addition of Val-OEt at P3' does not decrease Ki. In contrast, extension of 5 to 7 by incorporating Arg-OMe at P3' decreases Ki approximately 15-fold, suggesting interaction between Arg and the S3' subsite but no corresponding interaction at that subsite with Val. These results are in accordance with results obtained with the homologous family of avian ovomucoid third domain proteins. Proteins with Arg at the P3' position show highly favorable interactions with the protease at the S3' subsite [Park, S. J. (1985) Ph.D. Thesis, Purdue University; M. Laskowski, Jr., personal communication]. These results establish that incorporation of residues which interact with S' subsites significantly increases the efficacy of inhibitors and that valuable information concerning the most effective amino acid composition of small inhibitors can be obtained from the amino acid sequence of protein inhibitors.

  16. Mechanism-Based Inhibitors of Serine Proteases with High Selectivity Through Optimization of S’ Subsite Binding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Dou, Dengfeng; He, Guijia; Lushington, Gerald H.; Groutas, William C.

    2009-01-01

    A series of mechanism-based inhibitors designed to interact with the S’ subsites of serine proteases was synthesized and their inhibitory activity toward the closely-related serine proteases human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and proteinase 3 (PR 3) was investigated. The compounds were found to be time-dependent inhibitors of HNE and were devoid of any inhibitory activity toward PR 3. The results suggest that highly selective inhibitors of serine proteases whose primary substrate specificity and active sites are similar can be identified by exploiting differences in their S’ subsites. The best inhibitor (compound 16) had a kinact/KI value of 4580 M−1 s−1. PMID:19394830

  17. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  18. CD14 and IL18 gene polymorphisms associated with colorectal cancer subsite risks among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiqun; Yoshida, Kengo; Cologne, John B; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide, and chronic inflammation is a risk factor for CRC. In this study, we carried out a cohort study among the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor population to investigate any association between immune- and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms and CRC. We examined the effects of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CD14 and IL18 on relative risks (RRs) of CRC. Results showed that RRs of CRC, overall and by anatomic subsite, significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. The CD14-911A/A genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for all CRC and distal CRC compared with the other two genotypes. In addition, the IL18-137 G/G genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for proximal colon cancer compared with the other two genotypes. In phenotype-genotype analyses, the CD14-911A/A genotype presented significantly higher levels of membrane and soluble CD14 compared with the other two genotypes, and the IL18-137 G/G genotype tended to be lower levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-18 compared with the other two genotypes. These results suggest the potential involvement of a CD14-mediated inflammatory response in the development of distal CRC and an IL18-mediated inflammatory response in the development of proximal colon cancer among A-bomb survivors.

  19. CD14 and IL18 gene polymorphisms associated with colorectal cancer subsite risks among atomic bomb survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yiqun; Yoshida, Kengo; Cologne, John B; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide, and chronic inflammation is a risk factor for CRC. In this study, we carried out a cohort study among the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor population to investigate any association between immune- and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms and CRC. We examined the effects of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CD14 and IL18 on relative risks (RRs) of CRC. Results showed that RRs of CRC, overall and by anatomic subsite, significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. The CD14–911A/A genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for all CRC and distal CRC compared with the other two genotypes. In addition, the IL18–137 G/G genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for proximal colon cancer compared with the other two genotypes. In phenotype–genotype analyses, the CD14–911A/A genotype presented significantly higher levels of membrane and soluble CD14 compared with the other two genotypes, and the IL18–137 G/G genotype tended to be lower levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-18 compared with the other two genotypes. These results suggest the potential involvement of a CD14-mediated inflammatory response in the development of distal CRC and an IL18-mediated inflammatory response in the development of proximal colon cancer among A-bomb survivors. PMID:27081544

  20. Subsite-specific contributions of different aromatic residues in the active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase family 12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Xiuyun; Liu, Shijia; Li, Dandan; Xu, Hao; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-01-01

    The active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase (GH) is a contiguous subregion of the enzyme constituted by residues clustered in the three-dimensional space, recognizing the monomeric unit of ligand through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Mutations of the key residues in the active site architecture of the GH12 family exerted different impacts on catalytic efficiency. Binding affinities between the aromatic amino acids and carbohydrate rings were quantitatively determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the quantum mechanical (QM) method, showing that the binding capacity order of Tyr>Trp>His (and Phe) was determined by their side-chain properties. The results also revealed that the binding constant of a certain residue remained unchanged when altering its location, while the catalytic efficiency changed dramatically. Increased binding affinity at a relatively distant subsite, such as the mutant of W7Y at the −4 subsite, resulted in a marked increase in the intermediate product of cellotetraose and enhanced the reactivity of endoglucanase by 144%; while tighter binding near the catalytic center, i.e. W22Y at the −2 subsite, enabled the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze smaller oligosaccharides. Clarification of the specific roles of the aromatics at different subsites may pave the way for a more rational design of GHs. PMID:26670009

  1. Creation of a Neovagina by Laparoscopic Modified Vecchietti Technique: Anatomic and Functional Results.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Eduardo; Carvalho, Giselda; Nobre, Carlos; Dias, Isabel; Torgal, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To evaluate the anatomic and functional results of a laparoscopic modified Vecchietti technique for the creation of a neovagina in patients with congenital vaginal aplasia. Methods Retrospective study of nine patients with congenital vaginal aplasia submitted to the laparoscopic Vecchietti procedure, in our department, between 2006 and 2013. The anatomical results were evaluated by assessing the length, width and epithelialization of the neovagina at the postoperative visits. The functional outcome was evaluated using the Rosen Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire and comparing the patients' results to those of a control group of 20 healthy women. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Statistics version 19.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), Student t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test. Results The condition underlying the vaginal aplasia was Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome in eight cases, and androgen insensitivity syndrome in one case. The average preoperative vaginal length was 2.9 cm. At surgery, the mean age of the patients was 22.2 years. The surgery was performed successfully in all patients and no intra or postoperative complications were recorded. At the first postoperative visit (6 to 8 weeks after surgery), the mean vaginal length was 8.1 cm. In all cases, the neovagina was epithelialized and had an appropriate width. The mean FSFI total and single domain scores did not differ significantly from those of the control group: 27.5 vs. 30.6 (total); 4.0 vs. 4.2 (desire); 4.4 vs. 5.2 (arousal); 5.2 vs. 5.3 (lubrication); 4.2 vs. 5.0 (orgasm); 5.3 vs. 5.5 (satisfaction) and 4.4 vs. 5.4 (comfort). Conclusions This modified laparoscopic Vecchietti technique is a simple, safe and effective procedure, which allows patients with congenital vaginal aplasia to have a satisfactory sexual activity, comparable to that of normal controls.

  2. Anatomic Results and Complications of Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S.-R.; Vora, N.; Jovin, T.G.; Gupta, R.; Thomas, A.; Kassam, A.; Lee, K.; Gologorsky, Y.; Jankowitz, B.; Panapitiya, N.; Aleu, A.; Sandhu, E.; Crago, E.; Hricik, A.; Gallek, M.; Horowitz, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report our anatomic results and complications associated with stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms using the Neuroform stent. From September 2003 to August 2007, 127 consecutive patients (ruptured 50, 39.4%; unruptured 77, 60.6%) underwent 129 stent-assisted coil embolization procedures to treat 136 aneurysms at our institution. Anatomic results at follow-up, procedure-related complications, and morbidity/mortality were retrospectively reviewed. Stent deployment was successful in 128 out of 129 procedures (99.2%). Forty-seven patients presented with 53 procedure-related complications (37.0%, 47/127). Thromboembolic events (n=17, 13.4%) were the most common complications, followed by intraoperative rupture (n=8, 6.3%), coil herniation (n=5, 3.9%), and postoperative rupture (n=4, 3.1%). For thromboembolic events, acute intra-procedural in-stent thromboses were observed in two patients and subacute or delayed in-stent thromboses in three patients. Overall mortality rate was 16.5% (21/127) and procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates were 5.5% (7/127) and 8.7% (11/127) retrospectively. Patients with poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (Hunt and Hess grade IV or V; 25/127, 19.7%) exhibited 56% (14/25) overall mortality rate and 24% (6/25) procedure-related mortality rate. Immediate angiographic results showed complete occlusion in 31.7% of aneurysms, near-complete occlusion in 45.5%, and partial occlusion in 22.8%. Sixty nine patients in 70 procedures with 77 aneurysms underwent angiographic follow-up at six months or later. Mean follow-up period was 13.7 months (6 to 45 months). Complete occlusion was observed in 57 aneurysms (74.0%) and significant in-stent stenosis was not found. Thromboembolism and intra/postoperative aneurysm ruptures were the most common complications and the main causes of procedure-related morbidity and mortality. Patients with poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

  3. [Bilateral cleft lip and palate. Anatomic and clinical characteristics and therapeutic results].

    PubMed

    Morand, B; Raphaël, B

    2004-09-01

    Treatment teams that conceive and nourish their ideas in a multi-disciplinary environment are best suited to elaborate therapeutic protocols. Their concepts should be based on consistent evaluation of their treatment results as documented by precise and reproducible records. In the wide array of maxillo-facial anatomical deformities presented clinically, bilateral cleft lips and palates are the rarest (20%), but they are also the most serious because of the inherent disconnection of maxillary structures that accompanies them and because of the grave disturbances they inflict on the development of the middle third of the face. Surgeons have devised an extraordinary gamut of protocols to correct these disorders and then abandoned them because of the problematical and ephemeral results they provided. The authors, after evaluating their own results, modified their therapeutic approach in 1994. They present their current protocol, which calls for an orthopedic phase carried out when the patient is 2 months old and two surgical phases when the patient is 3 and then 7 months old.

  4. [Use of the anatomical cemented femoral stem SAS I: mid-term results].

    PubMed

    Mikláš, M; Pink, M; Valoušek, T

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In view of increasing interest in a relationship between the surface of an implant and its behaviour and longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA), the aim of this study is to present the clinical and radiographic results, as well as complications, of hip replacement surgery using the cemented femoral stem SAS I. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 298 cemented femoral stems SAS I were implanted in 275 patients at our department between 1996 and 2005. The patient average age was 72.1 years, with the range from 64 to 92 years. The pre-operative diagnoses were as follows: primary osteoarthritis in 179 (30.1%); post-dysplastic osteoarthritis in 41 (13.7%); femoral neck fracture in 44 (14.8%); avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 23 (7.7%); rheumatoid arthritis in nine (3%) and other causes in two (0.7%) patients. Of the 275 patients who had the surgery, 186 (204 THAs) underwent clinical and X-ray examination at an average follow-up of 11.5 years (range, 8 to 17 years). The clinical results were used to calculate the Harris hip score and radiographic evaluation was based on antero-posterior views. RESULTS The group of 186 assessed patients (204 THAs) comprised 106 women and 80 men, who were on average 85.4 years old on evaluation (range, 72 to 92 years). Of the remaining patients, 62 patients (64 THAs) died from causes unrelated to the surgery and 27 patients (30 THAs) were lost to follow-up. The functional outcome of surgery assessed by the Harris hip score was excellent in 61 (32.8%), good in 94 (50.5%), satisfactory in 26 (14%) and poor in five (2.7%) patients. The 93.1% SAS I stem longevity was recorded in relation to aseptic loosening; reimplantation for this indication was performed in 14 THAs. No revision surgery for failure due to valgus/varus deviations of the stem was carried out. Of the 204 hips, 188 had femoral stems aligned in neutral, 12 (5.9%) in valgus and four (2%) in varus positions. DISCUSSION The anatomical femoral stem SAS I

  5. Brainstem arteriovenous malformations: anatomical subtypes, assessment of “occlusion in situ” technique, and microsurgical results

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seunggu J.; Englot, Dario J.; Kim, Helen; Lawton, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECT The surgical management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) might benefit from the definition of anatomical subtypes and refinements of resection techniques. Many brainstem AVMs sit extrinsically on pia mater rather than intrinsically in the parenchyma, allowing treatment by occluding feeding arteries circumferentially, interrupting draining veins after arteriovenous shunting is eliminated, and leaving the obliterated nidus behind. The authors report here the largest series of brainstem AVMs to define 6 subtypes, assess this “occlusion in situ” technique, and analyze the microsurgical results. METHODS Brainstem AVMs were categorized as 1 of 6 types: anterior midbrain, posterior midbrain, anterior pontine, lateral pontine, anterior medullary, and lateral medullary AVMs. Data from a prospectively maintained AVM registry were reviewed to evaluate multidisciplinary treatment results. RESULTS During a 15-year period, the authors treated 29 patients with brainstem AVMs located in the midbrain (1 anterior and 6 posterior), pons (6 anterior and 7 lateral), and medulla (1 anterior and 8 lateral). The nidus was pial in 26 cases and parenchymal in 3 cases. Twenty-three patients (79%) presented with hemorrhage. Brainstem AVMs were either resected (18 patients, 62%) or occluded in situ (11 patients, 38%). All lateral pontine AVMs were resected, and the occlusion in situ rate was highest with anterior pontine AVMs (83%). Angiography confirmed complete obliteration in 26 patients (89.6%). The surgical mortality rate was 6.9%, and the rate of permanent neurological deterioration was 13.8%. At follow-up (mean 1.3 years), good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score ≤ 2) were observed in 18 patients (66.7%) and poor outcomes (mRS score of 3–5) were observed in 9 patients (33.3%). The mRS scores in 21 patients (77.8%) were unchanged or improved. The best outcomes were observed with lateral pontine (100%) and lateral medullary (75%) AVMs, and the rate of

  6. Does learning in clinical context in anatomical sciences improve examination results, learning motivation, or learning orientation?

    PubMed

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical knowledge within the surgical context of the course led to any improvement in learning motivation, learning orientation, and ultimately examination results in the gross anatomy course, as compared with a control group. Within the scope of five teaching sessions, the students learned surgical hand disinfection, suturing techniques, and the identification of commonly used surgical instruments. In addition, the students attended five surgical demonstrations performed by surgical colleagues on cadavers. Successful learning of these basic skills was then assessed based on an Objectively Structured Practical Examination. Learning motivation and learning orientation in both subgroups was determined using the SELLMO-ST motivation test and the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory test. While a significant increase in work avoidance was identified in the control group, this was not the case for FOP participants. Similarly, an increase in the "deep approach" to learning, as well as a decrease in the "surface approach," was able to be documented among the FOP participants following completion of the course. The results suggest that students enrolled in the gross anatomy course, who were simultaneously provided with the opportunity to learn in clinical context, were more likely to be successful at maintaining learning motivation and learning orientation required for the learning process, than students who attended the gross anatomy course alone.

  7. Importance of independent evaluation of initial anatomic results after endovascular coiling for ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Taki, Waro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2013-04-01

    Initial incomplete occlusion is been an important predictor of aneurysm recurrence, rebleeding or retreatment after endovascular coiling. In 129 patients in the Prospective Registry of Subarachnoid Aneurysms Treatment (PRESAT) cohort, ruptured aneurysms were coiled within 14days of onset, and initial post-coiling and 1-year follow-up aneurysm-occlusion status were evaluated by both local investigators and independent reviewers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether self-reported evaluations of initial aneurysm occlusion by treating physicians predicted incomplete aneurysm occlusion at 1year after coiling for ruptured cerebral aneurysms as well as that done by independent evaluations. The relationships between self-reported or independent evaluations of initial anatomic results and 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion (retreatment within 1year, or residual aneurysms at 1year) were determined. Both initial and 1-year aneurysm-occlusion status were judged significantly worse by independent reviewers than by local investigators (p<0.001). One-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion was identified in 59 patients: 10 patients, including two patients with re-ruptured aneurysms, were retreated and 49 other patients were judged to have residual aneurysms by independent reviewers. On immediate post-coiling angiograms, both residual neck or aneurysm judged by local investigators, and residual aneurysm judged by independent reviewers, were predictive for 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion on univariate analyses. However, multivariate analyses found that the initial aneurysm occlusion status judged by independent reviewers (p=0.02, odds ratio=2.83, 95% confidence interval=1.15-6.95), but not by local investigators, was a significant predictor for 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion. This study demonstrates the importance of independent evaluations of aneurysm occlusion status for management of coiled aneurysms.

  8. Mapping glycoside hydrolase substrate subsites by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Cogan, Uri; Adir, Noam; Solomon, Vered; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    Relating thermodynamic parameters to structural and biochemical data allows a better understanding of substrate binding and its contribution to catalysis. The analysis of the binding of carbohydrates to proteins or enzymes is a special challenge because of the multiple interactions and forces involved. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a direct measure of binding enthalpy (ΔHa) and allows the determination of the binding constant (free energy), entropy, and stoichiometry. In this study, we used ITC to elucidate the binding thermodynamics of xylosaccharides for two xylanases of family 10 isolated from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6. The change in the heat capacity of binding (ΔCp = ΔH/ΔT) for xylosaccharides differing in one sugar unit was determined by using ITC measurements at different temperatures. Because hydrophobic stacking interactions are associated with negative ΔCp, the data allow us to predict the substrate binding preference in the binding subsites based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. The proposed positional binding preference was consistent with mutants lacking aromatic binding residues at different subsites and was also supported by tryptophan fluorescence analysis. PMID:15277671

  9. Aminoalcohols as Probes of the Two-subsite Active Site of Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation state of catalytic base (D14, pKa 5.0) and catalytic acid (E186, pKa 7.2) which reside in subsite -1 of the two-subsite active site. Cationic aminoalcohols are shown to bind exclusively to subsite -1 of the ...

  10. Can intestinal innervation be preserved in pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer? Results of an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Dal Corso, H; Ferronato, M; Solej, M; Hornung, J P

    2003-04-01

    Twenty dissections were carried out, in all of which the splanchnic nerves, celiac plexuses, capital pancreatic plexus and superior mesenteric plexus were identified and traced. The capital pancreatic plexus was formed from two bundles, the first taking its origin from the right celiac plexus, the second from the superior mesenteric plexus. These two bundles joined together just behind the head of the pancreas. Two preganglionic bundles, a ganglion and two postganglionic bundles composed the superior mesenteric plexus. Postganglionic bundles received fibers from both right and left celiac plexuses. In small cancers a thin layer of nervous tissue around the superior mesenteric artery might be spared in order to avoid diarrhea from intestinal denervation. This study has provided anatomical evidence that a part of the mesenteric plexus, which receives fibers from both left and right celiac plexuses, maintains a sufficient intestinal innervation.

  11. Location, number and morphology of parathyroid glands: results from a large anatomical series.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Dimitrios; Noussios, George; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Adamidou, Fotini; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2012-09-01

    Surgical management of parathyroid gland disease may sometimes be difficult, due mainly to the surgeon's failure to successfully detect parathyroids in unusual locations. The records of 942 cadavers (574 men and 368 women) who underwent autopsy in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Athens during the period 1988-2009 were reviewed. In total, 3,796 parathyroid glands were resected and histologically verified. Parathyroid glands varied in number. In 47 cases (5 %), one supernumerary (fifth) parathyroid was found, while in 19 cases (2 %) three parathyroid glands found. Superior glands were larger than inferior ones. However, there was no significant difference between the genders with respect to gland size. In 324 (8.5 %) out of 3,796, the glands were detected in an ectopic location: 7 (0.2 %) in the thyroid parenchyma, 79 (2 %) in different sites in the neck and 238 (6.3 %) in the mediastinum, 152 (4.1 %) of which were found in the upper and 86 (2.2 %) in the lower mediastinum. Significant anatomical variations of normal parathyroid glands may exist regarding number and location-knowledge that is essential for their successful identification and surgical management.

  12. Computational docking, molecular dynamics simulation and subsite structure analysis of a maltogenic amylase from Bacillus lehensis G1 provide insights into substrate and product specificity.

    PubMed

    Manas, Nor Hasmaliana Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Illias, Rosli Md

    2016-06-01

    Maltogenic amylase (MAG1) from Bacillus lehensis G1 displayed the highest hydrolysis activity on β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to produce maltose as a main product and exhibited high transglycosylation activity on malto-oligosaccharides with polymerization degree of three and above. These substrate and product specificities of MAG1 were elucidated from structural point of view in this study. A three-dimensional structure of MAG1 was constructed using homology modeling. Docking of β-CD and malto-oligosaccharides was then performed in the MAG1 active site. An aromatic platform in the active site was identified which is responsible in substrate recognition especially in determining the enzyme's preference toward β-CD. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed MAG1 structure is most stable when docked with β-CD and least stable when docked with maltose. The docking analysis and MD simulation showed that the main subsites for substrate stabilization in the active site are -2, -1, +1 and +2. A bulky residue, Trp359 at the +2 subsite was identified to cause steric interference to the bound linear malto-oligosaccharides thus prevented it to occupy subsite +3, which can only be reached by a highly bent glucose molecule such as β-CD. The resulted modes of binding from docking simulation show a good correlation with the experimentally determined hydrolysis pattern. The subsite structure generated from this study led to a possible mode of action that revealed how maltose was mainly produced during hydrolysis. Furthermore, maltose only occupies subsite +1 and +2, therefore could not be hydrolyzed or transglycosylated by the enzyme. This important knowledge has paved the way for a novel structure-based molecular design for modulation of its catalytic activities.

  13. Challenging Breast Augmentations: The Influence of Preoperative Anatomical Features on the Final Result

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Yalcin; Zor, Fatih; Karagoz, Huseyin; Kulahci, Yalcin; Afifi, Ahmed M.; Ozturk, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Background Achieving satisfactory results may be difficult in augmentation mammaplasty patients in the presence of breast, chest wall, or vertebral deformities. These deformities have not been classified previously, and the impact of each deformity or combination of deformities has not been defined. Objectives The aims of this study are to determine the complicating factors in augmentation mammaplasty, to classify these factors according to their influence on surgical outcome, and to develop an identification system for simplifying the recognition of challenging cases. Methods We retrospectively analyzed photographs and records of 100 consecutive patients who underwent augmentation mammaplasty. We observed suboptimal results in 18 cases. Preoperative deformities of the breast, chest wall, and vertebra were recorded in order to determine which factor or factors had complicated the surgeries. Eventually, the relationship between suboptimal surgical results and complicating factors was evaluated. Results We observed that some deformities alone caused suboptimal results, whereas others did not. Deformities that caused suboptimal results alone were called major complicating factors, and any others were called minor complicating factors. We observed that suboptimal results were also obtained in patients who had four minor complicating factors. Patients who had suboptimal results because of major or minor complicating factors were considered challenging cases. Conclusions In this study, complicating factors for augmentation mammaplasty were defined and classified as major or minor depending on their effect on the surgical outcome. We suggest an identification system that simplifies the recognition of challenging cases in breast augmentation. Level of Evidence: 4 Therapeutic PMID:26420774

  14. Eligibility for Renal Denervation: Anatomical Classification and Results in Essential Resistant Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Pellerin, Olivier; Savard, Sébastien; Curis, Emmanuel; Monge, Matthieu; Frank, Michael; Bobrie, Guillaume; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Plouin, Pierre-François; Azizi, Michel; Sapoval, Marc

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo classify the renal artery (RA) anatomy based on specific requirements for endovascular renal artery denervation (RDN) in patients with drug-resistant hypertension (RH).Materials and MethodsThe RA anatomy of 122 consecutive RH patients was evaluated by computed tomography angiography and classified as two types: A (main RA ≥20 mm in length and ≥4.0 mm in diameter) or B (main RA <20 mm in length or main RA <4.0 mm in diameter). The A type included three subtypes: A1 (without accessory RAs), A2 (with accessory RAs <3.0 mm in diameter), and A3 (with accessory RAs ≥3.0 mm in diameter]. A1 and A2 types were eligible for RDN with the Simplicity Flex catheter. Type B included twi subtypes based on the main RA length and diameter. Patients were accordingly classified into three eligibility categories: complete (CE; both RAs were eligible), partial (PE; one eligible RA), and noneligibility (NE; no eligible RA).ResultsBilateral A1 type was the most prevalent and was observed in 48.4 % of the patients followed by the A1/A2 type (18 %). CE, PE, and NE were observed in 69.7, 22.9, and 7.4 % of patients, respectively. The prevalence of accessory RAs was 41 %.ConclusionsOf RH patients, 30.3 % were not eligible for bilateral RDN with the current Simplicity Flex catheter. This classification provides the basis for standardized reporting to allow for pooling of results of larger patient cohorts in the future.

  15. Subsite, T Class, and N Class Cannot be Used to Exclude the Retropharyngeal Nodes From Treatment De-Intensification in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Matthew E.; Chinn, Steven B.; Bellile, Emily; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Kang, Stephen Y.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Carey, Thomas E.; Worden, Francis P.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chepeha, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Understanding the drainage patterns to the retropharyngeal nodes is an important consideration in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) because treatment of these nodes is related to increased morbidity. Prediction of these drainage patterns could not only help minimize treatment morbidity, but could also prevent failures in at-risk patients, as de-escalation trials are underway for this disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of pathologic retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) in OPSCC relative to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Design Retrospective review from 2003–2010 Setting Academic Referral Center Participants 205 previously untreated, advanced stage (III, IV), pathologically confirmed patients with OPSCC Exposure: Concurrent chemoradiation Main Outcome Measures Radiologic evidence of pathologic RPA was tabulated and related to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Results Pathologic RPA was identified in 18% of patients. There were pathologic retropharyngeal lymph nodes in 12/89 (13%) base of tongue cancers, 24/109 (22%) tonsil cancers, and 1/7 (14%) other oropharyngeal subsite cancers. Increasing prevalence of RPA was positively correlated with closer proximity to the posterior tonsillar pillar. A multivariate predictive regression model using the oropharyngeal subsite, involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar, number of metastatic nodes, T classification, and N classification, showed that the number of metastatic nodes was statistically significant with an odds ratio of 1.436 (p=0.0001, 95% confidence interval: 1.203 – 1.714). Conclusions and Relevance The prevalence of pathologic RPA in this cohort was 18% and patients with multiple nodes had the highest risk for pathologic RPA, followed by involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar. However, this data suggests that there is no clear

  16. Printed Three-dimensional Anatomic Templates for Virtual Preoperative Planning Before Reconstruction of Old Pelvic Injuries: Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin-Bao; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Sun, Xu; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Zi-An; Li, Yu-Neng; Wang, Man-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Old pelvis fractures are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of their complex anatomy, difficult-to-access surgical sites, and the relatively low incidence of such cases. Proper evaluation and surgical planning are necessary to achieve the pelvic ring symmetry and stable fixation of the fracture. The goal of this study was to assess the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for surgical management of old pelvic fractures. Methods: First, 16 dried human cadaveric pelvises were used to confirm the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models printed based on radiographic data. Next, nine clinical cases between January 2009 and April 2013 were used to evaluate the surgical reconstruction based on the 3D printed models. The pelvic injuries were all type C, and the average time from injury to reconstruction was 11 weeks (range: 8–17 weeks). The workflow consisted of: (1) Printing patient-specific bone models based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans, (2) virtual fracture reduction using the printed 3D anatomic template, (3) virtual fracture fixation using Kirschner wires, and (4) preoperatively measuring the osteotomy and implant position relative to landmarks using the virtually defined deformation. These models aided communication between surgical team members during the procedure. This technique was validated by comparing the preoperative planning to the intraoperative procedure. Results: The accuracy of the 3D printed models was within specification. Production of a model from standard CT DICOM data took 7 hours (range: 6–9 hours). Preoperative planning using the 3D printed models was feasible in all cases. Good correlation was found between the preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up X-ray in all nine cases. The patients were followed for 3–29 months (median: 5 months). The fracture healing time was 9–17 weeks (mean: 10 weeks). No delayed incision healing, wound infection, or nonunions occurred. The

  17. The Munich Anatomical Institute under National Socialism. First results and prospective tasks of an ongoing research project.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Mathias; Waschke, Jens; Marckmann, Georg; Steger, Florian

    2013-07-01

    While research into the history of German anatomy under National Socialist rule has increased during the last decade, the story of one of the most important anatomical institutes of the time, the Anatomische Anstalt Munich, has not yet been explored. This study presents the results of an ongoing, cooperative research project at the universities of Halle and Munich and focuses on the history of the institution, its personnel and organization, and its interactions with the National Socialist regime. It reveals continuity and disruption within the institute following Munich anatomists' involvement with the regime's policies and ideology as well as their becoming victims to these policies. Also documented is the manner in which the Munich anatomy benefited from the massive increase in executions, especially during the Second World War, by receiving and using the bodies of prisoners executed at the Stadelheim prison in Munich for scientific purposes. Finally, an outlook is presented regarding planned research aiming to fully understand the history of the Anatomische Anstalt during National Socialism.

  18. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy combined with anatomical resection of feline injection-site sarcoma: results in 21 cats.

    PubMed

    Bray, J; Polton, G

    2016-06-01

    This study assesses the outcome of two combined treatment strategies for the treatment of feline injection-site sarcoma (FISS). Twenty-one cats with primary or recurrent FISS received 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin (25 mg m(-2) ), then an anatomical resection of the entire muscle compartment containing the tumour was performed based on the findings of co-axial imaging. Cats then received a further 3 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Follow-up was performed by telephone contact with a median follow-up time of 1072 days. Three cats (14%) developed local tumour recurrence at days 264, 664 and 1573 after surgery. A median survival time could not be calculated as over 80% of the study population remained alive or were censored due to death from other causes. When compared to historical controls, the results of this study demonstrate superior rates of tumour-free survival and disease-free interval.

  19. Cartilage graft or fascia in tympanoplasty in patients with low middle ear risk index (anatomical and audological results).

    PubMed

    Callioglu, Elif Ersoy; Ceylan, B Tijen; Kuran, Gokhan; Demirci, Sule; Tulaci, Kamil Gokce; Caylan, Refik

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare anatomic and audiological results of cartilage graft with temporal fascia graft in type 1 tympanoplasty patients with low middle ear risk index (MERI). In this retrospective study, 63 patients that underwent type 1 tympanoplasty with chondroperichondrial island graft between July 2009 and November 2010 were compared with 45 patients in whom temporal muscle fascia was used. Patients in both groups had low MERI values varying between 1 and 3. Five and nine patients underwent masteidectomy in cartilage and fascia group, respectively. Mean duration of follow-up was 11.9 ± 3.7 (5-17) months. Mean value was calculated at pre-operative and post-operative hearing threshold 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz, and air bone gap (ABG) gain was compared in both cartilage and fascia groups. when pre-operative and post-operative ABG gain were compared, significant decrease was seen in ABG levels (p < 0.001). However, no significant difference was seen in ABG gain values (p = 0.608), which was 10.1 ± 7.00 dB in cartilage group and 10.8 ± 5.38 dB in fascia group. In both groups, age, sex, and the addition of mastoidectomy procedure had no significant effect on ABG gain and success. Cartilage is a graft material that may be preferred without concern about the effects on hearing results, especially, in patients with low MERI values. The addition of mastoidectomy had no impact on the outcome of operation and audiological results. However, further studies with larger case series may be carried out to further clarify the issue.

  20. Variations in the predominant cultivable microflora of dental plaque at defined subsites on approximal tooth surfaces in children.

    PubMed

    Babaahmady, K G; Marsh, P D; Challacombe, S J; Newman, H N

    1997-02-01

    The distribution and composition of the resident microflora were determined in approximal gingival margin plaque from 21 premolars extracted from schoolchildren (mean age 12.0 +/- 1.8 yr). Indigo carmine (5% w v) was used to visualize plaque to facilitate sampling. About 1 mm2 of plaque was removed from sites away from (A), to the side of (S), and below (B) the contact area. Plaque samples were dispersed, serially diluted, and cultured on selective and non-selective agar media. An average of seven to nine species was found at each subsite. Streptococcus and Actinomyces were subdivided on the basis of a range of biochemical tests. The predominant Actinomyces and streptococcal species at most subsites were A. naeslundii and Strep. mitis biovar I. A. naeslundii and A. odontolyticus were isolated more often at subsite B (90.5 and 57.1%, respectively), and A. israelii at subsite S (66.7%) Strep. mitis 1 and Strep. sanguis were found more frequently at subsite S (76.2 and 66.7% respectively), whereas Strep mutans, Strep. sobrinus, Strep. gordonii and Veillonella spp. were recovered most commonly from subsite B (85.7, 33.3, 38.1 and 76.2%, respectively). The isolation frequencies of Strep. mutans and Strep. sobrinus were significantly higher at subsite B (A B p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Veillonella spp. were significantly higher at subsites B and S (A < B, p > 0.01; B > S, p < 0.05), while Neisseria spp. were most common at subsite A (A > B. p > 0.03). IgAl protease-producing species were found at each subsite, but they formed only a small proportion of the total Streptococcus population. This study has shown that local variations were evident at different subsites, both with respect to species prevalence and to proportions of each species within each subsite. The population shifts in gingival margin plaque appear to relate to the location of plaque in relation to the most caries-prone site below the contact area B.

  1. Exploration of subsite binding specificity of human cathepsin D through kinetics and rule-based molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, P. E.; Guruprasad, K.; Topham, C.; Richo, G. R.; Conner, G. E.; Blundell, T. L.; Dunn, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The family of aspartic proteinases includes several human enzymes that may play roles in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. The human lysosomal aspartic proteinase cathepsin D is thought to function in the normal degradation of intracellular and endocytosed proteins but has also emerged as a prognostic indicator of breast tumor invasiveness. Presented here are results from a continuing effort to elucidate the factors that contribute to specificity of ligand binding at individual subsites within the cathepsin D active site. The synthetic peptide Lys-Pro-Ile-Glu-Phe*Nph-Arg-Leu has proven to be an excellent chromogenic substrate for cathepsin D yielding a value of kcat/Km = 0.92 x 10(-6) s-1 M-1 for enzyme isolated from human placenta. In contrast, the peptide Lys-Pro-Ala-Lys-Phe*Nph-Arg-Leu and all derivatives with Ala-Lys in the P3-P2 positions are either not cleaved at all or cleaved with extremely poor efficiency. To explore the binding requirements of the S3 and S2 subsites of cathepsin D, a series of synthetic peptides was prepared with systematic replacements at the P2 position fixing either Ile or Ala in P3. Kinetic parameters were determined using both human placenta cathepsin D and recombinant human fibroblast cathepsin D expressed in Escherichia coli. A rule-based structural model of human cathepsin D, constructed on the basis of known three-dimensional structures of other aspartic proteinases, was utilized in an effort to rationalize the observed substrate selectivity. PMID:8443603

  2. Modified metaphyseal-loading anterolaterally flared anatomic femoral stem: five- to nine-year prospective follow-up evaluation and results of three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Yasuo; Uchida, Kenzo; Oki, Hisashi; Negoro, Kohei; Nagamune, Kouki; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takeno, Kenichi; Yayama, Takafumi; Nakajima, Hideaki; Sugita, Daisuke; Yoshida, Ai; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-02-01

    We have designed a proximal-fitting, anterolaterally flared, arc-deposit hydroxyapatite-coated anatomical femoral stem (FMS-anatomic stem; KYOCERA Medical, Osaka, Japan) for cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) for Japanese patients with dysplastic hip osteoarthritis, using a nonlinear three-dimensional finite element analysis simulating loading conditions. The Anatomic Fit stem was modified in the region of the arc-sprayed surface, to allow more proximal appearance of spot welds. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients who underwent THA using this stem. We reviewed 73 consecutive patients (79 hips; 13 men 16 hips; 60 women 63 hips; age at surgery, 57.6 years, range, 35-78) who underwent cementless THA using the Anatomic Fit stem, at a follow-up period of 7.1 years (range, 5.1-9.4). Harris Hip score improved from 40.7 ± 17.1 before surgery to 91.0 ± 5.2 points at follow-up. The 7.1-year stem survival rate was 100%. Radiographs at follow-up confirmed the stability of the femoral stems within the femoral canal in all cases, with sufficient bone ingrowth. None of the patients had subsidence of the stem exceeding 2.0 mm within the femoral canal or changes in varus or valgus position of more than 2.0°. The Anatomic Fit stem provided excellent results. The nonlinear three-dimensional finite element analysis demonstrated that the stem-bone relative motion was 10 µm at the proximal end of the stem and proximal load transfer. Our analysis confirmed reduced radiolucency around the stem, minimal subsidence, appropriate stress shielding, and promising medium-term stability within the femoral canal.

  3. Effects of guanidine hydrochloride and high pressure on subsite flexibility of beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Kajimoto, Sachie; Mitani, Daisuke; Kunugi, Shigeru

    2002-04-29

    We investigated the effects of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and high pressure on the conformational flexibility of the active site of sweet potato beta-amylase by monitoring the sulfhydryl reaction and the enzymatic activity. The reactivity of Cys345 at the active site, one of six inert half cystine residues of this enzyme, was enhanced by GuHCl at concentrations below 0.5 M. A GuHCl-induced change of the active site was also observed through an intensity change in the near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. On the other hand, the native conformation of sweet potato beta-amylase observed through fluorescence polarization, far-UV CD spectrum and intrinsic fluorescence was not influenced by GuHCl at concentrations below 0.5 M. Therefore, Cys345 reaction caused by GuHCl was due to an alteration of the local conformation of the active site. GuHCl-induced reaction of Cys345, located in the vicinity of subsites 3 and 4, is attributed to enhanced subsite flexibility, which is responsible for substrate slipping in a single-chain attack mechanism. Due to the flexible conformation, the local region of the subsite is more susceptible to GuHCl perturbation than the molecule overall. The enzymatic activity of sweet potato beta-amylase was reversibly inhibited by GuHCl at concentrations below 0.5 M, and kinetic analysis of the enzymatic mechanism showed that GuHCl decreases the kcat value. High pressure below 400 MPa also inactivated sweet potato beta-amylase with an increase in Cys345 reactivity. These findings indicated that excessively enhanced subsite flexibility reduced the enzymatic activity of sweet potato beta-amylase.

  4. Iterative Saturation Mutagenesis of −6 Subsite Residues in Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans To Improve Maltodextrin Specificity for 2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-Ascorbic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruizhi; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), a stable l-ascorbic acid derivative, is usually synthesized by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase), which contains nine substrate-binding subsites (from +2 to −7). In this study, iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) was performed on the −6 subsite residues (Y167, G179, G180, and N193) in the CGTase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve its specificity for maltodextrin, which is a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for AA-2G synthesis. Site saturation mutagenesis of four sites—Y167, G179, G180, and N193—was first performed and revealed that four mutants—Y167S, G179R, N193R, and G180R—produced AA-2G yields higher than those of other mutant and wild-type CGTases. ISM was then conducted with the best positive mutant as a template. Under optimal conditions, mutant Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.12 g/liter, which was 84% higher than that (1.15 g/liter) produced by the wild-type CGTase. Kinetics analysis of AA-2G synthesis using mutant CGTases confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity and showed that compared to the wild-type CGTase, the mutants had no cyclization activity but high hydrolysis and disproportionation activities. A possible mechanism for the enhanced substrate specificity was also analyzed through structure modeling of the mutant and wild-type CGTases. These results indicated that the −6 subsite played crucial roles in the substrate binding and catalytic reactions of CGTase and that the obtained CGTase mutants, especially Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R, are promising starting points for further development through protein engineering. PMID:24077706

  5. Iterative saturation mutagenesis of -6 subsite residues in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-12-01

    2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), a stable l-ascorbic acid derivative, is usually synthesized by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase), which contains nine substrate-binding subsites (from +2 to -7). In this study, iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) was performed on the -6 subsite residues (Y167, G179, G180, and N193) in the CGTase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve its specificity for maltodextrin, which is a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for AA-2G synthesis. Site saturation mutagenesis of four sites-Y167, G179, G180, and N193-was first performed and revealed that four mutants-Y167S, G179R, N193R, and G180R-produced AA-2G yields higher than those of other mutant and wild-type CGTases. ISM was then conducted with the best positive mutant as a template. Under optimal conditions, mutant Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.12 g/liter, which was 84% higher than that (1.15 g/liter) produced by the wild-type CGTase. Kinetics analysis of AA-2G synthesis using mutant CGTases confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity and showed that compared to the wild-type CGTase, the mutants had no cyclization activity but high hydrolysis and disproportionation activities. A possible mechanism for the enhanced substrate specificity was also analyzed through structure modeling of the mutant and wild-type CGTases. These results indicated that the -6 subsite played crucial roles in the substrate binding and catalytic reactions of CGTase and that the obtained CGTase mutants, especially Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R, are promising starting points for further development through protein engineering.

  6. Internally quenched fluorescent peptide substrates disclose the subsite preferences of human caspases 1, 3, 6, 7 and 8.

    PubMed Central

    Stennicke, H R; Renatus, M; Meldal, M; Salvesen, G S

    2000-01-01

    Subsite interactions are considered to define the stringent specificity of proteases for their natural substrates. To probe this issue in the proteolytic pathways leading to apoptosis we have examined the P(4), P(1) and P(1)' subsite preferences of human caspases 1, 3, 6, 7 and 8, using internally quenched fluorescent peptide substrates containing o-aminobenzoyl (also known as anthranilic acid) and 3-nitro-tyrosine. Previous work has demonstrated the importance of the S(4) subsite in directing specificity within the caspase family. Here we demonstrate the influence of the S(1) and S(1)' subsites that flank the scissile peptide bond. The S(1) subsite, the major specificity-determining site of the caspases, demonstrates tremendous selectivity, with a 20000-fold preference for cleaving substrates containing aspartic acid over glutamic acid at this position. Thus caspases are among the most selective of known endopeptidases. We find that the caspases show an unexpected degree of discrimination in the P(1)' position, with a general preference for small amino acid residues such as alanine, glycine and serine, with glycine being the preferred substituent. Large aromatic residues are also surprisingly well-tolerated, but charged residues are prohibited. While this describes the general order of P(1)' subsite preferences within the caspase family, there are some differences in individual profiles, with caspase-3 being particularly promiscuous. Overall, the subsite preferences can be used to predict natural substrates, but in certain cases the cleavage site within a presumed natural substrate cannot be predicted by looking for the preferred peptide cleavage sites. In the latter case we conclude that second-site interactions may overcome otherwise sub-optimal cleavage sequences. PMID:10947972

  7. Probing the S2' Subsite of the Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Using Novel N-Alkylated Hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Chiu, Ting-Lan; Solberg, Jonathan; Francis, Subhashree; Maize, Kimberly M; Fernandez, Jenna; Johnson, Rodney L; Hawkinson, Jon E; Walters, Michael A; Finzel, Barry C; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2015-11-12

    The lethal factor (LF) enzyme secreted by Bacillus anthracis is a zinc hydrolase that is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related cell death. Although many studies of the design of small molecule LF inhibitors have been conducted, no LF inhibitor is yet available as a therapeutic agent. Inhibitors with considerable chemical diversity have been developed and investigated; however, the LF S2' subsite has not yet been systematically explored as a potential target for lead optimization. Here we present synthesis, experimental evaluation, modeling, and structural biology for a novel series of sulfonamide hydroxamate LF inhibitor analogues specifically designed to extend into, and probe chemical preferences of, this S2' subsite. We discovered that this region accommodates a wide variety of chemical functionalities and that a broad selection of ligand structural modifications directed to this area can be incorporated without significant deleterious alterations in biological activity. We also identified key residues in this subsite that can potentially be targeted to improve inhibitor binding.

  8. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed

    Snell, J R; Green, R; Stott, G; Van Baerle, S

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk.

  9. Preliminary results by flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging after Tiron David I procedure with an anatomically shaped ascending aortic graft.

    PubMed

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Berger, Alexander; Stalder, Aurélien F; Markl, Michael

    2009-08-01

    We present preliminary data of the vascular hemodynamics in a novel, anatomically shaped ascending aortic graft in comparison to non-operated individuals by use of 3D magnetic resonance (MR) flow measurements. We examined a 72-year-old male patient after Tiron David I valve sparing aortic root reconstruction and replacement of the ascending aorta (AAo) with an anatomically curved prosthesis. Results from flow-sensitive MR at 3T were compared to 12 age-matched individuals with comparable diameters of the AAo. For 3D flow visualization, streamlines and time-resolved particle traces were applied. A visual analysis of hemodynamic properties including blood flow helicity, vorticity and retrograde flow was performed. In contrast to reported highly disturbed flow of straight aortic grafts in the literature, the patient analysis revealed smooth blood flow through the graft which gave rise to a right-handed helical flow in the reconstructed aorta. In comparison to non-operated volunteers, blood flow helicity was more pronounced. Flow jets or vortices were not encountered. While physiological retrograde flow was seen in the volunteers, it was absent in the patient which may be explained by the altered aortic compliance and thus reduced Windkessel effect. This promising finding will have to prove its validity in further comparative studies.

  10. Long-term administration of cocaine or serotonin reuptake inhibitors results in anatomical and neurochemical changes in noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonin pathways.

    PubMed

    Horne, Malcolm K; Lee, Joohyung; Chen, Feng; Lanning, Katherine; Tomas, Doris; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2008-08-01

    The catechol and indole pathways are important components underlying plasticity in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia. This study demonstrates that administering rats either cocaine or a selective serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for 16 weeks results in reduced density of dopaminergic and noradrenergic terminals in the striatum and olfactory bulb, respectively, reflecting pruning of the terminal arbor of ventral midbrain dopaminergic and locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurones. In the striatum of cocaine-treated animals, basal dopamine levels, as well as cocaine-induced dopamine release, is diminished compared with controls. In contrast, serotonergic fibers, projecting from the raphe, sprout and have increased terminal density in the lateral septal nucleus and frontal cortex, following long-term cocaine or SSRI treatment. This is associated with elevated basal 5-HT and enhanced cocaine-induced 5-HT release in the frontal cortex. The anatomical and neurochemical changes in serotonergic fibers following cocaine or SSRI treatment may be explained by attenuated 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor function in the raphe. This study demonstrates extensive plasticity in the morphology and neurochemistry of the catechol and indole pathways that contribute to drug-induced plasticity of the corticostriatal (and other) projections. Moreover, our data suggest that drug-induced plastic adaptation is anatomically widespread and consequently, likely to have multiple and complex consequences.

  11. The use of a modular system to convert an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty: Clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Alfke, D; Agneskirchner, J D

    2015-12-01

    If a modular convertible total shoulder system is used as a primary implant for an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty, failure of the prosthesis or the rotator cuff can be addressed by converting it to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), with retention of the humeral stem and glenoid baseplate. This has the potential to reduce morbidity and improve the results. In a retrospective study of 14 patients (15 shoulders) with a mean age of 70 years (47 to 83) we reviewed the clinical and radiological outcome of converting an anatomical shoulder arthroplasty (ASA) to a RSA using a convertible prosthetic system (SMR system, Lima, San Daniele, Italy). The mean operating time was 64 minutes (45 to 75). All humeral stems and glenoid baseplates were found to be well-fixed and could be retained. There were no intra-operative or early post-operative complications and no post-operative infection. The mean follow-up was 43 months (21 to 83), by which time the mean visual analogue scale for pain had decreased from 8 pre-operatively to 1, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score from 12 to 76, the mean Oxford shoulder score from 3 to 39, the mean Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Score from 1618 to 418 and the mean Subjective shoulder value from 15 to 61. On radiological review, one patient had a lucency around the humeral stem, two had stress shielding. There were no fatigue fractures of the acromion but four cases of grade 1 scapular notching. The use of a convertible prosthetic system to revise a failed ASA reduces morbidity and minimises the rate of complications. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this technique are promising.

  12. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  13. Recognition of chitooligosaccharides and their N-acetyl groups by putative subsites of chitin deacetylase from a deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    PubMed

    Tokuyasu, K; Mitsutomi, M; Yamaguchi, I; Hayashi, K; Mori, Y

    2000-08-01

    The reaction pattern of an extracellular chitin deacetylase from a Deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum ATCC 56676, was investigated by use of chitooligosaccharides [(GlcNAc)(n)(), n = 3-6] and partially N-deacetylated chitooligosaccharides as substrates. When 0.5% of (GlcNAc)(n)() was deacetylated, the corresponding monodeacetylated products were initially detected without any processivity, suggesting the involvement of a multiple-chain mechanism for the deacetylation reaction. The structural analysis of these first-step products indicated that the chitin deacetylase strongly recognizes a sequence of four N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residues of the substrate (the subsites for the four GlcNAc residues are defined as -2, -1, 0, and +1, respectively, from the nonreducing end to the reducing end), and the N-acetyl group in the GlcNAc residue positioned at subsite 0 is exclusively deacetylated. When substrates of a low concentration (100 microM) were deacetylated, the initial deacetylation rate for (GlcNAc)(4) was comparable to that of (GlcNAc)(5), while deacetylation of (GlcNAc)(3) could not be detected. Reaction rate analyses of partially N-deacetylated chitooligosaccharides suggested that subsite -2 strongly recognizes the N-acetyl group of the GlcNAc residue of the substrate, while the deacetylation rate was not affected when either subsite -1 or +1 was occupied with a D-glucosamine residue instead of GlcNAc residue. Thus, the reaction pattern of the chitin deacetylase is completely distinct from that of a Zygomycete, Mucor rouxii, which produces a chitin deacetylase for accumulation of chitosan in its cell wall.

  14. Conformational dynamics of threonine 195 and the S1 subsite in functional trypsin variants.

    PubMed

    Gokey, Trevor; Baird, Teaster T; Guliaev, Anton B

    2012-11-01

    Replacing the catalytic serine in trypsin with threonine (S195T variant) leads to a nearly complete loss of catalytic activity, which can be partially restored by eliminating the C42-C58 disulfide bond. The 0.69 μs of combined explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed continuous rearrangement of T195 with different conformational preferences between five trypsin variants tested. Among three conformational families observed for the T195 residue, one showed the T195 hydroxyl in a conformation analogous to that of the serine residue in wild-type trypsin, positioning the hydroxyl oxygen atom for attack on the carbonyl carbon of the peptide substrate. MD simulations demonstrated that this conformation was more populated for the C42A/C58V/S195T and C42A/C58A/S195T triple variants than for the catalytically inactive S195T variant and correlated with restored enzymatic activities for triple variants. In addition, observation of the increased motion of the S214-G219 segment in the S195T substituted variants suggested an existence of open and closed conformations for the substrate binding pocket. The closed conformation precludes access to the S1 binding site and could further reduce enzymatic activities for triple variants. Double variants with intact serine residues (C42A/C58A/S195 and C42A/C58V/S195) also showed interchange between closed and open conformations for the S214-G219 segment, but to a lesser extent than the triple variants. The increased conformational flexibility of the S1 subsite, which was not observed for the wild-type, correlated with reduced enzymatic activities and suggested a possible mode of substrate regulation for the trypsin variants tested.

  15. The degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity varies by primary tumor sub-site

    PubMed Central

    Eterovic, Agda Karina; Wick, Jo; Chen, Ken; Zhao, Hao; Tazi, Loubna; Manna, Pradip; Kerley, Spencer; Joshi, Radhika; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion I.; Garnett, James David; Tsue, Terance Ted; Chien, Jeremy; Mills, Gordon B.; Grandis, Jennifer Rubin; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an era where mutational profiles inform treatment options, it is critical to know the extent to which tumor biopsies represent the molecular profile of the primary and metastatic tumor. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arise primarily in the mucosal lining of oral cavity and oropharynx. Despite aggressive therapy the 5-year survival rate is at 50%. The primary objective of this study is to characterize the degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity in HNSCC. We used multi-region sequencing of paired primary and metastatic tumor DNA of 24 spatially distinct samples from seven patients with HNSCC of larynx, floor of the mouth (FOM) or oral tongue. Full length, in-depth sequencing of 202 genes implicated in cancer was carried out. Larynx and FOM tumors had more than 69.2% unique SNVs between the paired primary and metastatic lesions. In contrast, the oral tongue HNSCC had only 33.3% unique SNVs across multiple sites. In addition, HNSCC of the oral tongue had fewer mutations than larynx and FOM tumors. These findings were validated on the Affymetrix whole genome 6.0 array platform and were consistent with data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This is the first report demonstrating differences in mutational heterogeneity varying by subsite in HNSCC. The heterogeneity within laryngeal tumor specimens may lead to an underestimation of the genetic abnormalities within tumors and may foster resistance to standard treatment protocols. These findings are relevant to investigators and clinicians developing personalized cancer treatments based on identification of specific mutations in tumor biopsies. PMID:27034009

  16. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed Central

    Snell, J. R.; Green, R.; Stott, G.; Van Baerle, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk. Images Figure 1 PMID:1807707

  17. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  18. SARS-CoV 3CL protease cleaves its C-terminal autoprocessing site by novel subsite cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Tomonari; Takemoto, Chie; Kim, Yong-Tae; Wang, Hongfei; Nishii, Wataru; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The 3C-like protease (3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) cleaves 11 sites in the polyproteins, including its own N- and C-terminal autoprocessing sites, by recognizing P4–P1 and P1′. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of 3CLpro with the C-terminal prosequence and the catalytic-site C145A mutation, in which the enzyme binds the C-terminal prosequence of another molecule. Surprisingly, Phe at the P3′ position [Phe(P3′)] is snugly accommodated in the S3′ pocket. Mutations of Phe(P3′) impaired the C-terminal autoprocessing, but did not affect N-terminal autoprocessing. This difference was ascribed to the P2 residue, Phe(P2) and Leu(P2), in the C- and N-terminal sites, as follows. The S3′ subsite is formed by Phe(P2)-induced conformational changes of 3CLpro and the direct involvement of Phe(P2) itself. In contrast, the N-terminal prosequence with Leu(P2) does not cause such conformational changes for the S3′ subsite formation. In fact, the mutation of Phe(P2) to Leu in the C-terminal autoprocessing site abolishes the dependence on Phe(P3′). These mechanisms explain why Phe is required at the P3' position when the P2 position is occupied by Phe rather than Leu, which reveals a type of subsite cooperativity. Moreover, the peptide consisting of P4–P1 with Leu(P2) inhibits protease activity, whereas that with Phe(P2) exhibits a much smaller inhibitory effect, because Phe(P3′) is missing. Thus, this subsite cooperativity likely exists to avoid the autoinhibition of the enzyme by its mature C-terminal sequence, and to retain the efficient C-terminal autoprocessing by the use of Phe(P2). PMID:27799534

  19. SU-D-17A-04: The Impact of Audiovisual Biofeedback On Image Quality During 4D Functional and Anatomic Imaging: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, P; Pollock, S; Yang, J; Diehn, M; Berger, J; Graves, E; Loo, B; Yamamoto, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ability of audiovisual (AV) biofeedback to improve breathing regularity has not previously been investigated for functional imaging studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT image quality in a prospective clinical trial. We hypothesized that motion blurring in 4D-PET images and the number of artifacts in 4D-CT images are reduced using AV biofeedback. Methods: AV biofeedback is a real-time, interactive and personalized system designed to help a patient self-regulate his/her breathing using a patient-specific representative waveform and musical guides. In an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-PET and 4D-CT images of 10 lung cancer patients were acquired with AV biofeedback (AV) and free breathing (FB). The 4D-PET images in 6 respiratory bins were analyzed for motion blurring by: (1) decrease of GTVPET and (2) increase of SUVmax in 4-DPET compared to 3D-PET. The 4D-CT images were analyzed for artifacts by: (1) comparing normalized cross correlation-based scores (NCCS); and (2) quantifying a visual assessment score (VAS). A two-tailed paired t-test was used to test the hypotheses. Results: The impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT images varied widely between patients, suggesting inconsistent patient comprehension and capability. Overall, the 4D-PET decrease of GTVPET was 2.0±3.0cm3 with AV and 2.3±3.9cm{sup 3} for FB (p=0.61). The 4D-PET increase of SUVmax was 1.6±1.0 with AV and 1.1±0.8 with FB (p=0.002). The 4D-CT NCCS were 0.65±0.27 with AV and 0.60±0.32 for FB (p=0.32). The 4D-CT VAS was 0.0±2.7 (p=ns). Conclusion: A 10-patient study demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of motion blurring of AV over FB for 1/2 functional 4D-PET imaging metrics. No difference between AV and FB was found for 2 anatomic 4D-CT imaging metrics. Future studies will focus on optimizing the human-computer interface and including patient training sessions for improved

  20. [Improving maltodextrin specificity by site-saturation engineering of subsite +1 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiaoyan; Han, Ruizhi; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    By engineering the subsite +1 of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans, we improved its maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) synthesis. Specifically, we conducted site-saturation mutagenesis on Leu194, Ala230, and His233 in subsite +1 separately and gained 3 mutants L194N (leucine --> asparagine), A230D (alanine --> aspartic acid), and H233E (histidine --> glutamic acid) produced higher AA-2G yield than the wild-type and the other mutant CGTases. Therefore, the 3 mutants L194N, A230D, and H233E were further used to construct the double and triple mutations. Among the 7 obtained combinational mutants, the triple mutant L194N/A230D/H233E produced the highest AA-2G titer of 1.95 g/L, which was increased by 62.5% compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. Then, we modeled the reaction kinetics of all the mutants and found a substrate inhibition by high titer of L-AA for the mutants. The optimal temperature, pH, and reaction time of all the mutants were also determined. The structure modeling indicated that the enhanced maltodextrin specificity may be related with the changes of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue at the three positions (194, 230 and 233) and the substrate sugars.

  1. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  2. Biochemical and milk-clotting properties and mapping of catalytic subsites of an extracellular aspartic peptidase from basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; de Oliveira, Arthur H C; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-06-15

    For a long time, proteolytic enzymes have been employed as key tools of industrial processes, especially in the dairy industry. In the present work, we used Phanerochaete chrysosporium for biochemical characterization and analysis of catalytic specificity of an aspartic peptidase. Our results revealed an aspartic peptidase with molecular mass ∼38kDa, maximal activity at pH 4.5 and 50°C, and stability above 80% in the pH range of 3-8 and temperature up to 55°C for 1h. In a milk-clotting assay, this peptidase showed maximal milk clotting activity at 60-65°C and maintenance of enzymatic activity above 80% in the presence of 20mM CaCl2. In a specificity assay, we observed stronger restriction of catalysis at the S1 subsite, with a preference for lysine, arginine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine residues. The restricted proteolysis and milk-clotting potential are attractive properties for the use in cheese production.

  3. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  4. A synthetic model of the Mn₃Ca subsite of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Kanady, Jacob S; Tsui, Emily Y; Day, Michael W; Agapie, Theodor

    2011-08-05

    Within photosynthetic organisms, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II generates dioxygen from water using a catalytic Mn(4)CaO(n) cluster (n varies with the mechanism and nature of the intermediate). We report here the rational synthesis of a [Mn(3)CaO(4)](6+) cubane that structurally models the trimanganese-calcium-cubane subsite of the OEC. Structural and electrochemical comparison between Mn(3)CaO(4) and a related Mn(4)O(4) cubane alongside characterization of an intermediate calcium-manganese multinuclear complex reveals potential roles of calcium in facilitating high oxidation states at manganese and in the assembly of the biological cluster.

  5. Subsite structure of the endo-type chitin deacetylase from a deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum: an investigation using steady-state kinetic analysis and MS.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Omid; Tokuyasu, Ken; Withers, Stephen G

    2003-09-01

    The endo-type chitin deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.41) from a deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (ATCC 56676), catalyses the hydrolysis of the acetamido group of GlcNAc (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) residues in chitin or chito-oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization (n) equal to or greater than 2. The steady-state kinetic parameters for the initial deacetylation reactions of (GlcNAc)(2-6) were determined using a direct, continuous spectrophotometric assay in combination with ESI-MS (electrospray ionization MS) analysis of the products. The dependence of the observed K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) on n suggests the presence of four enzyme subsites (-2, -1, 0 and +1) that interact with GlcNAc residues from the non-reducing end to the reducing end of the substrate. The turnover number (k (cat), 7 s(-1)) is independent of n and represents the intrinsic rate constant (k(int)) for the hydrolysis of the acetamido group in subsite 0. The subsite affinities for the GlcNAc residues were calculated from the observed k(cat)/K(m) values (A (-2), -11.0; A (-1), -1.5; A (0), -7.7; A (+1), -12.5 kJ x mol(-1)). The increments in the subsite affinities due to the recognition of the acetamido groups were calculated [DeltaDelta G ((N-acetyl))=3.3, 0, 4.0 and 0 kJ x mol(-1) for subsites -2, -1, 0 and +1 respectively]. The steady-state kinetic parameters for the second deacetylation reaction of (GlcNAc)(4) were also determined using (GlcNAcGlcNAcGlcNGlcNAc) as the substrate. The comparison of the experimental and theoretical values (calculated using the subsite affinities) suggests that the mono-deacetylated substrate binds strongly in a non-productive mode occupying all four subsites, thereby inhibiting the second deacetylation reaction.

  6. Meat, fish and fat intake in relation to subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer: The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumi; Kono, Suminori; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Moore, Malcolm A; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Yasunami, Yohichi; Maekawa, Takafumi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Imaizumi, Nobutoshi

    2007-04-01

    High intake of red meat has been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer in Western countries. There has been much interest in the role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in colorectal cancer prevention, but epidemiological findings are limited and inconsistent. The objective of our study was to examine associations of meat, fish and fat intake with risk of colorectal cancer, paying particular attention to the subsite within the colorectum. Data were from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, covering 782 cases and 793 controls. Diet was assessed by interview, using newly developed personal-computer software for registering semiquantitative food frequencies. The intake of beef/pork, processed meat, total fat, saturated fat or n-6 PUFA showed no clear association with the overall or subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer. There was an almost significant inverse association between n-3 PUFA and the risk of colorectal cancer; the covariate-adjusted odds ratio for the highest (median 3.94 g/day) versus lowest (median 1.99 g/day) quintile of energy-adjusted intake was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.52-1.06, trend P=0.050). The consumption of fish and fish products was similarly inversely related to the risk although the association was not statistically significant. These associations were more evident for distal colon cancer; adjusted odds ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of n-3 PUFA intake was 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.92, trend P=0.02). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of red meat increases colorectal cancer risk but do suggest that high intake of fish may decrease the risk, particularly of distal colon cancer.

  7. Non-combinatorial library screening reveals subsite cooperativity and identifies new high-efficiency substrates for kallikrein-related peptidase 14.

    PubMed

    de Veer, Simon J; Swedberg, Joakim E; Parker, Edward A; Harris, Jonathan M

    2012-04-01

    An array of substrates link the tryptic serine protease, kallikrein-related peptidase 14 (KLK14), to physiological functions including desquamation and activation of signaling molecules associated with inflammation and cancer. Recognition of protease cleavage sequences is driven by complementarity between exposed substrate motifs and the physicochemical signature of an enzyme's active site cleft. However, conventional substrate screening methods have generated conflicting subsite profiles for KLK14. This study utilizes a recently developed screening technique, the sparse matrix library, to identify five novel high-efficiency sequences for KLK14. The optimal sequence, YASR, was cleaved with higher efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=3.81 ± 0.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) than favored substrates from positional scanning and phage display by 2- and 10-fold, respectively. Binding site cooperativity was prominent among preferred sequences, which enabled optimal interaction at all subsites as indicated by predictive modeling of KLK14/substrate complexes. These simulations constitute the first molecular dynamics analysis of KLK14 and offer a structural rationale for the divergent subsite preferences evident between KLK14 and closely related KLKs, KLK4 and KLK5. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of binding site cooperativity in protease substrate recognition, which has implications for discovery of optimal substrates and engineering highly effective protease inhibitors.

  8. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  9. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  10. Crystal structure of papain-E64-c complex. Binding diversity of E64-c to papain S2 and S3 subsites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Yamamoto, D; Matsumoto, K; Inoue, M; Ishida, T; Mizuno, H; Sumiya, S; Kitamura, K

    1992-11-01

    In order to investigate the binding mode of E64-c (a synthetic cysteine proteinase inhibitor) to papain at the atomic level, the crystal structure of the complex was analysed by X-ray diffraction at 1.9 A (1 A is expressed in SI units as 0.1 nm) resolution. The crystal has a space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with a = 43.37, b = 102.34 and c = 49.95 A. A total of 21,135 observed reflections were collected from the same crystal, and 14811 unique reflections of up to 1.9 A resolution [Fo > 3 sigma(Fo)] were used for the structure solution and refinement. The papain structure was determined by means of the molecular replacement method, and then the inhibitor was observed on a (2 magnitude of Fo-magnitude of Fc) difference Fourier map. The complex structure was finally refined to R = 19.4% including 207 solvent molecules. Although this complex crystal (Form II) was polymorphous as compared with the previously analysed one (Form I), the binding modes of leucine and isoamylamide moieties of E64-c were significantly different from each other. By the calculation of accessible surface area for each complex atom, these two different binding modes were both shown to be tight enough to prevent the access of solvent molecules to the papain active site. With respect to the E64-c-papain binding mode, molecular-dynamics simulations proposed two kinds of stationary states which were derived from the crystal structures of Forms I and II. One of these, which corresponds to the binding mode simulated from Form I, was essentially the same as that observed in the crystal structure, and the other was somewhat different from the crystal structure of Form II, especially with respect to the binding of the isoamylamide moiety with the papain S subsites. The substrate specificity for the papain active site is discussed on the basis of the present results.

  11. Anatomic hemispherectomy: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Robinson, Shenandoah; Nair, Ajith Rajappan; Sivanandapanicker, Jyothish L; Cohen, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The history of surgical treatment for hemispheric epilepsy is rich with colorful twists and turns. The authors trace the evolution of the surgical treatment of hemispheric epilepsy from radical anatomic resections to current less invasive disconnection procedures. Anatomic hemispherectomy (AH) was first described by Dandy in 1928 as a treatment for gliomas. The first report of this technique to control seizures was by McKenzie in 1938. AH gained wide popularity but began to fall out of favor after the description of superficial cerebral hemosiderosis in 1966. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with AH, Rasmussen introduced functional hemispherectomy in 1974. The technique of hemispherotomy was introduced in the 1990 s to minimize the extent of brain removal while maximizing the white matter disconnections. Thus, surgery for hemispheric epilepsy has undergone dramatic transformation since the technique was first introduced. Less invasive techniques have been developed to reduce surgical morbidity. Although optimal seizure control is best achieved with radical AH, the newer less invasive disconnection techniques appear to achieve near-comparable postoperative seizure control with a significantly lower rate of complications.

  12. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia.

  13. An investigation of anatomical competence in junior medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M; Kooloos, Jan G M; Bolhuis, Sanneke M; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an attempt to delineate the nature of anatomical competence. The research question is: what kind of anatomical knowledge do junior medical doctors use during a consultation with a patient presenting with a shoulder complaint? Ten junior medical doctors participated in this stimulated recall study. Each of them was videotaped while performing a consultation with a standardized patient with a complex shoulder complaint. The recording was viewed immediately after. Participants were videotaped again while verbalizing the thoughts they remembered having during the consultation. Verbatim transcriptions were coded by two coders using the qualitative data analysis ATLAS.ti software. Results were that these junior medical doctors used anatomical knowledge in all phases of the consultation, especially during physical examination. The use of anatomical terms was strongly associated with clinical reasoning and it was apparent that every subject visualized relevant anatomical information. Conclusion is that young medical doctors actively use their anatomical knowledge and it seems that the relevant anatomy consists largely of adequate visual representations in memory. Anatomy teachers should focus the students' learning activity on building an adequate visual representation of anatomical structures. This should be supported by assessments that test the quality of the students' visual representations.

  14. Subsite specificity (S3, S2, S1', S2' and S3') of oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei using fluorescent quenched peptides: comparative study and identification of specific carboxypeptidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hemerly, Jefferson P; Oliveira, Vitor; Del Nery, Elaine; Morty, Rory E; Andrews, Norma W; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the extended substrate binding site of recombinant oligopeptidase B enzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc-OP) and Trypanosoma brucei (Tb-OP), evaluating the specificity of their S3, S2, S1', S2' and S3' subsites. Five series of internally quenched fluorescent peptides based on the substrate Abz-AGGRGAQ-EDDnp [where Abz is o -aminobenzoic acid and EDDnp is N -(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine] were designed to contain amino acid residues with side chains of a minimum size, and each residue position of this substrate was modified. Synthetic peptides of different lengths derived from the human kininogen sequence were also examined, and peptides of up to 17 amino acids were found to be hydrolysed by Tc-OP and Tb-OP. These two oligopeptidases were essentially arginyl hydrolases, since for all peptides examined the only cleavage site was the Arg-Xaa bond. We also demonstrated that Tc-OP and Tb-OP have a very specific carboxypeptidase activity for basic amino acids, which depends on the presence of at least of a pair of basic amino acids at the C-terminal end of the substrate. The peptide with triple Arg residues (Abz-AGRRRAQ-EDDnp) was an efficient substrate for Tc-OP and Tb-OP: the Arg-Ala peptide bond was cleaved first and then two C-terminal Arg residues were successively removed. The S1' subsite seems to be an important determinant of the specificity of both enzymes, showing a preference for Tyr, Ser, Thr and Gln as hydrogen donors. The presence of these amino acids at P1' resulted in substrates that were hydrolysed with K (m) values in the sub-micromolar range. Taken together, this work supports the view that oligopeptidase B is a specialized protein-processing enzyme with a specific carboxypeptidase activity. Excellent substrates were obtained for Tb-OP and Tc-OP (Abz-AMRRTISQ-EDDnp and Abz-AHKRYSHQ-EDDnp respectively), which were hydrolysed with remarkably high k (cat) and low K (m) values. PMID:12737623

  15. [Graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces in a virtual 3D setting. Scanning technologies and soft provides a greater flexibility in the digitization of surfaces and a higher resolution and accuracy. An alternative cheap method for the reconstruction of 3D anatomic surfaces is presented in connection with some studies and international projects developed by Medical Design research team.

  16. Motivation and Organizational Principles for Anatomical Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Cornelius; Mejino, José L.; Modayur, Bharath R.; Jakobovits, Rex; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Conceptualization of the physical objects and spaces that constitute the human body at the macroscopic level of organization, specified as a machine-parseable ontology that, in its human-readable form, is comprehensible to both expert and novice users of anatomical information. Design: Conceived as an anatomical enhancement of the UMLS Semantic Network and Metathesaurus, the anatomical ontology was formulated by specifying defining attributes and differentia for classes and subclasses of physical anatomical entities based on their partitive and spatial relationships. The validity of the classification was assessed by instantiating the ontology for the thorax. Several transitive relationships were used for symbolically modeling aspects of the physical organization of the thorax. Results: By declaring Organ as the macroscopic organizational unit of the body, and defining the entities that constitute organs and higher level entities constituted by organs, all anatomical entities could be assigned to one of three top level classes (Anatomical structure, Anatomical spatial entity and Body substance). The ontology accommodates both the systemic and regional (topographical) views of anatomy, as well as diverse clinical naming conventions of anatomical entities. Conclusions: The ontology formulated for the thorax is extendible to microscopic and cellular levels, as well as to other body parts, in that its classes subsume essentially all anatomical entities that constitute the body. Explicit definitions of these entities and their relationships provide the first requirement for standards in anatomical concept representation. Conceived from an anatomical viewpoint, the ontology can be generalized and mapped to other biomedical domains and problem solving tasks that require anatomical knowledge. PMID:9452983

  17. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  18. Analysis of Molecular Markers by Anatomic Tumor Site in Stage III Colon Carcinomas from Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial NCCTG N0147 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Sinicrope, Frank A.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Yoon, Harry H.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Nelson, Garth D.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Alberts, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the frequency and prognostic association of molecular markers by anatomic tumor site in patients with stage III colon carcinomas. Experimental Design In a randomized trial of adjuvant FOLFOX + cetuximab, BRAFV600E and KRAS (exon 2) mutations and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins were analyzed in tumors (N=3,018) in relationship to tumor location including subsite. Cox models were used to assess clinical outcome including overall survival (OS). RESULTS KRAS codon 12 mutations were most frequent at the splenic flexure and cecum; codon 13 mutations were evenly distributed. BRAF mutation frequency sharply increased from transverse colon to cecum in parallel with deficient (d) MMR. Non-mutated BRAF or KRAS tumors progressively decreased from sigmoid to transverse (all p<0.0001). Significantly poorer OS was found for mutant KRAS in distal [HR, 1.98 (1.49–2.63); p<.0001] vs proximal [1.25 (0.97–1.60), p=.079] cancers. BRAF status and outcome were not significantly associated with tumor site. Proximal vs distal dMMR tumors had significantly better outcome. An interaction test was significant for tumor site by KRAS (padjusted=.043) and MMR (padjusted=.010) for OS. Significant prognostic differences for biomarkers by tumor site were maintained in the FOLFOX arm. Tumor site was independently prognostic with a stepwise improvement from cecum to sigmoid (OS: padjusted=0.001). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in BRAF or KRAS codon 12 were enriched in proximal cancers whereas non-mutated BRAF/KRAS were increased in distal tumors. Significant differences in outcome for KRAS mutations and dMMR were found by tumor site, indicating that their interpretation should occur in the context of tumor location. PMID:26187617

  19. Anatomical entity mention recognition at literature scale

    PubMed Central

    Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Anatomical entities ranging from subcellular structures to organ systems are central to biomedical science, and mentions of these entities are essential to understanding the scientific literature. Despite extensive efforts to automatically analyze various aspects of biomedical text, there have been only few studies focusing on anatomical entities, and no dedicated methods for learning to automatically recognize anatomical entity mentions in free-form text have been introduced. Results: We present AnatomyTagger, a machine learning-based system for anatomical entity mention recognition. The system incorporates a broad array of approaches proposed to benefit tagging, including the use of Unified Medical Language System (UMLS)- and Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO)-based lexical resources, word representations induced from unlabeled text, statistical truecasing and non-local features. We train and evaluate the system on a newly introduced corpus that substantially extends on previously available resources, and apply the resulting tagger to automatically annotate the entire open access scientific domain literature. The resulting analyses have been applied to extend services provided by the Europe PubMed Central literature database. Availability and implementation: All tools and resources introduced in this work are available from http://nactem.ac.uk/anatomytagger. Contact: sophia.ananiadou@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24162468

  20. An Investigation of Anatomical Competence in Junior Medical Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an…

  1. Modeling the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and the [NiFeu] subsite of the C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases: low-spin iron(II) versus high-spin iron(II).

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Erdem, Özlen F; Bill, Eckhard; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-16

    A series of four [S2Ni(μ-S)2FeCp*Cl] compounds with different tetradentate thiolate/thioether ligands bound to the Ni(II) ion is reported (Cp* = C5Me5). The {S2Ni(μ-S)2Fe} core of these compounds resembles structural features of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Detailed analyses of the electronic structures of these compounds by Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and density functional theory calculations reveal the oxidation states Ni(II) low spin and Fe(II) high spin for the metal ions. The same electronic configurations have been suggested for the Cred1 state of the C-cluster [NiFeu] subsite in carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH). The Ni-Fe distance of ∼3 Å excludes a metal-metal bond between nickel and iron, which is in agreement with the computational results. Electrochemical experiments show that iron is the redox active site in these complexes, performing a reversible one-electron oxidation. The four complexes are discussed with regard to their similarities and differences both to the [NiFe] hydrogenases and the C-cluster of Ni-containing CODH.

  2. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  3. Developmental Dyslexia: Current Anatomical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert

    1983-01-01

    Findings from anatomical research are highlighted in a discussion of the role of anomalous lateralization and asymmetry in the dyslexic brain. Studies of animal asymmetry are cited along with studies of humans. (CL)

  4. Incorporating anatomical side information into PET reconstruction using nonlocal regularization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2013-10-01

    With the introduction of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) or PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, there is an increasing emphasis on reconstructing PET images with the aid of the anatomical side information obtained from X-ray CT or MRI scanners. In this paper, we propose a new approach to incorporating prior anatomical information into PET reconstruction using the nonlocal regularization method. The nonlocal regularizer developed for this application is designed to selectively consider the anatomical information only when it is reliable. As our proposed nonlocal regularization method does not directly use anatomical edges or boundaries which are often used in conventional methods, it is not only free from additional processes to extract anatomical boundaries or segmented regions, but also more robust to the signal mismatch problem that is caused by the indirect relationship between the PET image and the anatomical image. We perform simulations with digital phantoms. According to our experimental results, compared to the conventional method based on the traditional local regularization method, our nonlocal regularization method performs well even with the imperfect prior anatomical information or in the presence of signal mismatch between the PET image and the anatomical image.

  5. Two functionally distinct subsites for the binding of internal blockers to the pore of voltage-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Baukrowitz, Thomas; Yellen, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Many blockers of Na+ and K+ channels act by blocking the pore from the intracellular side. For Shaker K+ channels, such intracellular blockers vary in their functional effect on slow (C-type) inactivation: Some blockers interfere with C-type inactivation, whereas others do not. These functional differences can be explained by supposing that there are two overlapping “subsites” for blocker binding, only one of which inhibits C-type inactivation through an allosteric effect. We find that the ability to bind to these subsites depends on specific structural characteristics of the blockers, and correlates with the effect of mutations in two distinct regions of the channel protein. These interactions are important because they affect the ability of blockers to produce use-dependent inhibition. PMID:8917595

  6. The anatomical diaspora: evidence of early American anatomical traditions in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Phoebe R

    2011-09-01

    The current focus in forensic anthropology on increasing scientific certainty in ancestry determination reinforces the need to examine the ancestry of skeletal remains used for osteology instruction. Human skeletal remains were discovered on the University of North Dakota campus in 2007. After recovery, the osteological examination resulted in a profile for a 33- to 46-year-old woman of African descent with stature ranging from 56.3 to 61.0 in. The pattern of postmortem damage indicated that the remains had been prepared for use as an anatomical teaching specimen. Review of the American history of anatomical teaching revealed a preference for Black subjects, which apparently extended to states like North Dakota despite extremely low resident populations of people of African descent. This study emphasizes the need to examine the ancestry of older teaching specimens that lack provenience, rather than assuming they are derived from typical (i.e., Indian) sources of anatomical material.

  7. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information.

  8. Anatomical and functional imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    In endocrine hypertension, hormonal excess results in clinically significant hypertension. The functional imaging (such as radionuclide imaging) complements anatomy-based imaging (such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) to facilitate diagnostic localization of a lesion causing endocrine hypertension. The aim of this review article is to familiarize general radiologists, endocrinologists, and clinicians with various anatomical and functional imaging techniques used in patients with endocrine hypertension. PMID:23087854

  9. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  10. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected. PMID:28044087

  11. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Kunjin; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected.

  12. [Anatomical limits of endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Prades, J M; Veyret, C; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    Constant anatomic boundaries of the lateral mass of the ethnoid are described, based on data from microdissections, endoscopic examinations, computed tomography imaging and histology in 12 subjects. As with surgical progression, identification of these boundaries follows the lateral orbital and superior craniofrontal surfaces. The "starred groove formation", ethmoidal roof lamina and ethmoidosphenoidal recesses are the safety beacons for endonasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopic control.

  13. Matching and anatomical labeling of human airway tree

    PubMed Central

    Tschirren, Juerg; McLennan, Geoffrey; Palágyi, Kálmán; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Matching of corresponding branchpoints between two human airway trees, as well as assigning anatomical names to the segments and branchpoints of the human airway tree, are of significant interest for clinical applications and physiological studies. In the past these tasks were often performed manually due to the lack of automated algorithms that can tolerate false branches and anatomical variability typical for in vivo trees. In this paper we present algorithms that perform both matching of branchpoints and anatomical labeling of in vivo trees without any human intervention and within a short computing time. No hand-pruning of false branches is required. The results from the automated methods show a high degree of accuracy when validated against reference data provided by human experts. 92.9% of the verifiable branchpoint matches found by the computer agree with experts’ results. For anatomical labeling, 97.1% of the automatically assigned segment labels were found to be correct. PMID:16353371

  14. Anatomical correlates of blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Focal dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by unwanted muscle spasms. Blepharospasm is a focal dystonia producing an involuntary closure of the eyelid. Its etiology is unknown. Objective To investigate if there are structural changes in the white and grey matter of blepharospasm patients, and if the changes are related to disease features. Methods T1 and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans were collected from 14 female blepharospasm patients and 14 healthy matched controls. Grey matter volumes, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity maps were compared between the groups. Based on grey matter differences within the facial portion of the primary motor cortex, the corticobulbar tract was traced and compared between groups. Results Changes in grey matter in patients included the facial portion of the sensorimotor area and anterior cingulate gyrus. These changes did not correlate with disease duration. Corticobulbar tract volume and peak tract connectivity were decreased in patients compared with controls. There were no significant differences in FA or mean diffusivity between groups. Conclusions Grey matter changes within the primary sensorimotor and the anterior cingulate cortices in blepharospasm patients may help explain involuntary eyelid closure and the abnormal sensations often reported in this condition. PMID:23210426

  15. Anatomically-aided PET reconstruction using the kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchcroft, Will; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper extends the kernel method that was proposed previously for dynamic PET reconstruction, to incorporate anatomical side information into the PET reconstruction model. In contrast to existing methods that incorporate anatomical information using a penalized likelihood framework, the proposed method incorporates this information in the simpler maximum likelihood (ML) formulation and is amenable to ordered subsets. The new method also does not require any segmentation of the anatomical image to obtain edge information. We compare the kernel method with the Bowsher method for anatomically-aided PET image reconstruction through a simulated data set. Computer simulations demonstrate that the kernel method offers advantages over the Bowsher method in region of interest quantification. Additionally the kernel method is applied to a 3D patient data set. The kernel method results in reduced noise at a matched contrast level compared with the conventional ML expectation maximization algorithm.

  16. Partial ACL tears: anatomic reconstruction versus nonanatomic augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Parma, Alessandro; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Luciani, Deianira; Ramponi, Laura; Castagnini, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears requires ACL remnant preservation. The goal of this study was to compare the outcome of anatomic reconstruction of the torn bundle with nonanatomic augmentation using the over-the-top femoral route. Fifty-two athletes (mean age, 23.3 years) with partial ACL lesions underwent anatomic reconstruction (n=26) or nonanatomic augmentation (n=26). Intraoperative damage of the healthy bundle that required a standard ACL reconstruction occurred in 2 patients in the anatomic reconstruction group. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner score, and arthrometer evaluation were used pre-operatively and at follow-up for up to 5 years postoperatively. One failure occurred in the anatomic reconstruction group. Mean IKDC subjective score at follow-up was 88.2 ± 5.7 in the anatomic reconstruction group and 90.2 ± 4.7 in the nonanatomic augmentation group. According to the IKDC objective score at final follow-up, 96% of knees in the nonanatomic augmentation group were normal vs 87.5% in the anatomic reconstruction group. No significative differences were observed between the 2 groups at final follow-up. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction showed significantly lower IKDC subjective and objective scores and higher residual instability values as evaluated with the arthrometer compared with posterolateral bundle reconstruction (P=.017). The surgical treatment of ACL partial tears is demanding. Adapted portals, perfect control of the tunnel drilling process, and intercondylar space management are required in anatomic reconstruction. The nonanatomic augmentation technique is simpler, providing excellent durable results over time with a lower complication rate. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction is associated with a poorer outcome, especially when performed with anatomic reconstruction.

  17. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  18. Steps towards automatic building of anatomical atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subsol, Gerard; Thirion, Jean-Philippe; Ayache, Nicholas

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a general scheme for the building of anatomical atlases. We propose to use specific and stable features, the crest lines (or ridge lines) which are automatically extracted from 3D images by differential geometry operators. We have developed non-rigid registration techniques based on polynomial transformations to find correspondences between lines. We got encouraging results for the building of atlases of the crest lines of the skull and of the brain based on several CT-Scan and MRI images of different patients.

  19. Bronchopulmonary segments approximation using anatomical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busayarat, Sata; Zrimec, Tatjana

    2007-03-01

    Bronchopulmonary segments are valuable as they give more accurate localization than lung lobes. Traditionally, determining the segments requires segmentation and identification of segmental bronchi, which, in turn, require volumetric imaging data. In this paper, we present a method for approximating the bronchopulmonary segments for sparse data by effectively using an anatomical atlas. The atlas is constructed from a volumetric data and contains accurate information about bronchopulmonary segments. A new ray-tracing based image registration is used for transferring the information from the atlas to a query image. Results show that the method is able to approximate the segments on sparse HRCT data with slice gap up to 25 millimeters.

  20. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  1. Anatomical modeling of the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Gerrit; Klinder, Tobias; Blaffert, Thomas; Bülow, Thomas; Wiemker, Rafael; Lorenz, Cristian

    2010-02-01

    The bronchial tree is of direct clinical importance in the context of respective diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It furthermore constitutes a reference structure for object localization in the lungs and it finally provides access to lung tissue in, e.g., bronchoscope based procedures for diagnosis and therapy. This paper presents a comprehensive anatomical model for the bronchial tree, including statistics of position, relative and absolute orientation, length, and radius of 34 bronchial segments, going beyond previously published results. The model has been built from 16 manually annotated CT scans, covering several branching variants. The model is represented as a centerline/tree structure but can also be converted in a surface representation. Possible model applications are either to anatomically label extracted bronchial trees or to improve the tree extraction itself by identifying missing segments or sub-trees, e.g., if located beyond a bronchial stenosis. Bronchial tree labeling is achieved using a naïve Bayesian classifier based on the segment properties contained in the model in combination with tree matching. The tree matching step makes use of branching variations covered by the model. An evaluation of the model has been performed in a leaveone- out manner. In total, 87% of the branches resulting from preceding airway tree segmentation could be correctly labeled. The individualized model enables the detection of missing branches, allowing a targeted search, e.g., a local rerun of the tree-segmentation segmentation.

  2. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  3. Combining multiple anatomical MRI measures improves Alzheimer's disease classification.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Frank; Schouten, Tijn M; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Dopper, Elise G P; van Swieten, John C; de Rooij, Mark; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2016-05-01

    Several anatomical MRI markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been identified. Hippocampal volume, cortical thickness, and grey matter density have been used successfully to discriminate AD patients from controls. These anatomical MRI measures have so far mainly been used separately. The full potential of anatomical MRI scans for AD diagnosis might thus not yet have been used optimally. In this study, we therefore combined multiple anatomical MRI measures to improve diagnostic classification of AD. For 21 clinically diagnosed AD patients and 21 cognitively normal controls, we calculated (i) cortical thickness, (ii) cortical area, (iii) cortical curvature, (iv) grey matter density, (v) subcortical volumes, and (vi) hippocampal shape. These six measures were used separately and combined as predictors in an elastic net logistic regression. We made receiver operating curve plots and calculated the area under the curve (AUC) to determine classification performance. AUC values for the single measures ranged from 0.67 (cortical thickness) to 0.94 (grey matter density). The combination of all six measures resulted in an AUC of 0.98. Our results demonstrate that the different anatomical MRI measures contain complementary information. A combination of these measures may therefore improve accuracy of AD diagnosis in clinical practice. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1920-1929, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis longus tendon and intracompartmental septations. Results: The average length of the extensor retinaculum from its proximal to distal extent measured approximately 2.2 cm. The distal aspect of the radial styloid was 0.3 cm distal to the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum, and the distance between the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum and the APL-Lister's-Scaphoid juncture was approximately 0.5 cm. A separate compartment for the extensor pollicis brevis was noted in 35% of the specimens. The abductor pollicis longus tendon demonstrated great variability with 1, 2, 3, or 4 slips in 9%, 30%, 43%, or 26% of the specimens, respectively. Conclusion: The superficial bony prominences of the radial wrist can be used reliably as anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. PMID:19092992

  5. Retinal vascular tree reconstruction with anatomical realism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Shun; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Chih-Hsiangng; Sofka, Michal; Chen, Shih-Jen; Lin, Wei-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of automatically extracting vessel segments and constructing retinal vascular trees with anatomical realism, this paper presents and analyses an algorithm that combines vessel segmentation and grouping of the extracted vessel segments. The proposed method aims to restore the topology of the vascular trees with anatomical realism for clinical studies and diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases, which manifest abnormalities in either venous and/or arterial vascular systems. Vessel segments are grouped using extended Kalman filter which takes into account continuities in curvature, width, and intensity changes at the bifurcation or crossover point. At a junction, the proposed method applies the minimum-cost matching algorithm to resolve the conflict in grouping due to error in tracing. The system was trained with 20 images from the DRIVE dataset, and tested using the remaining 20 images. The dataset contained a mixture of normal and pathological images. In addition, six pathological fluorescein angiogram sequences were also included in this study. The results were compared against the groundtruth images provided by a physician, achieving average success rates of 88.79% and 90.09%, respectively.

  6. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  7. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App.

    PubMed

    Hong, Trudy; Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application.

  8. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  9. Anatomist on the dissecting table? Dutch anatomical professionals' views on body donation.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Sophie; Venbrux, Eric; Eisinga, Rob; Gerrits, Peter O

    2012-03-01

    Anatomical professionals know better than anyone else that donated bodies are a valuable asset to anatomical science and medical education. They highly value voluntary donations, since a dearth of bodies negatively affects their profession. With this in mind, we conducted a survey (n = 54) at the 171st scientific meeting of the Dutch Anatomical Society in 2009 to see to what extent anatomical professionals are willing to donate their own body. The results reveal that none of the survey participants are registered as a whole body donor and that only a quarter of them would consider the possibility of body donation. We argue that the two main constraints preventing Dutch anatomical professionals from donating their own body are their professional and their social environments. In contrast to the absence of registered body donors, half of the anatomical professionals are registered as an organ donor. This figure far exceeds the proportion of registered organ donors among the general Dutch population.

  10. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  11. Visualizing the spine using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Craig W.; Fellingham, Linda L.

    1990-08-01

    In vivo anatomy is now routinely displayed as 2-D and 3-D images obtained from Computed X-ray Tomograpy (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and other diagnostic modalities. Most current medical visualization methods rely on pixel intensities to segment the data into tissues. However, structural features must be differentiated by a human operator, and geometric measurements of the anatomy are tedious and error prone to compute. This paper describes processing and imaging methods to aid the interpretation of CT studies of the spine. These procedures incorporate knowledge of the symmetry, shapes, and spatial relationships of vertebrae to locate the spinal cord and major components of vertebral bone from CT slices of the spine and automatically compute anatomical measurements. Results of these methods are shown as applied to the cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions of the spine.

  12. Effect of anatomical backgrounds on detectability in volumetric cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-03-01

    As anatomical noise is often a dominating factor affecting signal detection in medical imaging, we investigate the effects of anatomical backgrounds on signal detection in volumetric cone beam CT images. Signal detection performances are compared between transverse and longitudinal planes with either uniform or anatomical backgrounds. Sphere objects with diameters of 1mm, 5mm, 8mm, and 11mm are used as the signals. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomical backgrounds are generated using an anatomical noise power spectrum, 1/fβ, with β=3, equivalent to mammographic background [1]. The mean voxel value of the 3D anatomical backgrounds is used as an attenuation coefficient of the uniform background. Noisy projection data are acquired by the forward projection of the uniform and anatomical 3D backgrounds with/without sphere lesions and by the addition of quantum noise. Then, images are reconstructed by an FDK algorithm [2]. For each signal size, signal detection performances in transverse and longitudinal planes are measured by calculating the task SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels. In the uniform background case, transverse planes yield higher task SNR values for all sphere diameters but 1mm. In the anatomical background case, longitudinal planes yield higher task SNR values for all signal diameters. The results indicate that it is beneficial to use longitudinal planes to detect spherical signals in anatomical backgrounds.

  13. Sequencing human ribs into anatomical order by quantitative multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Henneberg, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Little research has focussed on methods to anatomically sequence ribs. Correct anatomical sequencing of ribs assists in determining the location and distribution of regional trauma, age estimation, number of puncture wounds, number of individuals, and personal identification. The aim of the current study is to develop a method for placing fragmented and incomplete rib sets into correct anatomical position. Ribs 2-10 were used from eleven cadavers of an Australian population. Seven variables were measured from anatomical locations on the rib. General descriptive statistics were calculated for each variable along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ANOVA with Bonferroni statistics. Considerable overlap was observed between ribs for univariate methods. Bivariate and multivariate methods were then applied. Results of the ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni statistics show that ratios of various dimensions of a single rib could be used to sequence it within adjacent ribs. Using multiple regression formulae, the most accurate estimation of the anatomical rib number occurs when the entire rib is found in isolation. This however, is not always possible. Even when only the head and neck of the rib are preserved, a modified multivariate regression formula assigned 91.95% of ribs into correct anatomical position or as an adjacent rib. Using multivariate methods it is possible to sequence a single human rib with a high level of accuracy and they are superior to univariate methods. Left and right ribs were found to be highly symmetrical. Some rib dimensions were greater in males than in females, but overall the level of sexual dimorphism was low.

  14. [Videothoracoscopic anatomic pulmonary segmentary: an initial single-center experience].

    PubMed

    Reis, João Eurico; Bravio, Ivan; Baptista, Pedro; Martelo, Fernando Palma

    2012-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of lung cancer has been growing worldwide. Between May 2008 and November 2012, we performed 24 videothoracoscopic anatomical lung resections in our department. This includes 22 lobectomies and 2 anatomic segmentectomies, which is known to be a more complex surgery, since it demands a finer dissection of sub-lobar structures. We report the clinical cases of two patients who underwent anatomic segmentectomies. The first one was a 63 year old woman, smoker and with a history of breast cancer 20 years earlier. An incidental 9 mm node was found in the lingula. The patient underwent an anatomic lingulectomy and the frozen section was suggestive of a primary lung cancer. Therefore, we proceeded to a full lymphadenectomy. The final pathology evaluation showed a typical carcinoid tumour (pT1aN0). The second patient was a 50 year old woman, a smoker and with a heavy family history of lung cancer. In a screening CT scan a 8 mm ground glass opacity was identified in the left lower lobe (segment VI). After a VATS wedge resection of the node the frozen section evaluation was compatible with adenocarcinoma. We then proceeded to an anatomic segmentectomy with lymphadenectomy. The definitive pathology evaluation confirmed that it was a pT1a N0 bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma. The patients now have 5 and 2 months of follow up respectivelly and neither of them has signs of recurrence and the surgical incision showed a good aesthetic result. Anatomic segmentectomy is the indicated surgery especially in patients with low grade tumours, in early stage lung cancers or in patients without pulmonary function for a lobar resection, and it can be done safely using VATS.

  15. Detectability of radiological images: the influence of anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R.; Hessler, Christian; Valley, Jean-Francois

    1995-04-01

    Radiological image quality can be objectively quantified by the statistical decision theory. This theory is commonly applied with the noise of the imaging system alone (quantum, screen and film noises) whereas the actual noise present on the image is the 'anatomical noise' (sum of the system noise and the anatomical texture). This anatomical texture should play a role in the detection task. This paper compares these two kinds of noises by performing 2AFC experiments and computing the area under the ROC-curve. It is shown that the 'anatomical noise' cannot be considered as a noise in the sense of Wiener spectrum approach and that the detectability performance is the same as the one obtained with the system noise alone in the case of a small object to be detected. Furthermore, the statistical decision theory and the non- prewhitening observer does not match the experimental results. This is especially the case in the low contrast values for which the theory predicts an increase of the detectability as soon as the contrast is different from zero whereas the experimental result demonstrates an offset of the contrast value below which the detectability is purely random. The theory therefore needs to be improved in order to take this result into account.

  16. Iridium-192 interstitial brachytherapy for equine periocular tumours: treatment results and prognostic factors in 115 horses.

    PubMed

    Théon, A P; Pascoe, J R

    1995-03-01

    One hundred and fifteen horses with periocular tumours were treated with iridium-192 interstitial brachytherapy. Tumours included squamous cell carcinomas (n = 52) and sarcoids (n = 63). All horses were scheduled to receive 60 Gy (minimal tumour dose) given at a low dose rate (0.034 +/- 0.010 Gy/h). The mean and median follow-up times to last contact or death were 24 and 16 months, respectively. Chronic radiation reactions included palpebral fibrosis (10.4%), cataract (7.8%), keratitis and corneal ulceration (6.9%). Cosmetic changes included permanent epilation (21.7%) and hair dyspigmentation (78.3%). The one year progression-free survival (PFS) rates for sarcoids and carcinomas were 86.6% and 81.8% and the 5 year PFS rates were 74.0% and 63.5%, respectively. The horse age and sex, histopathological type, anatomical subsite and classification (WHO T1-3) were included in the analysis of prognostic factors. The only significant prognostic factor that independently affected PFS time was the WHO T-classification (P = 0.009, relative risk = 0.85). When compared to horses with T1 lesions, horses with T2 and T3 lesions had 1.8-fold and 3.4-fold increased risks, respectively, for tumour recurrence (relative excess risk). The one year PFS rates for T1, T2 and T3 lesions were 95.2%, 89.5% and 66.2%, respectively. The 5 year PFS rates were 72.2%, 74.0% and 53.1%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that irradiation is an effective treatment option for horses with T1-2 lesions and should be part of a combined treatment modality for horses with T3 lesions.

  17. Improving maltodextrin specificity for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid by site-saturation engineering of subsite-3 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Xu, Qiaoyan; Han, Ruizhi; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-20

    In this work, the subsite-3 of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was engineered to improve maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) synthesis. Specifically, the site-saturation mutagenesis of tyrosine 89, asparagine 94, aspartic acid 196, and aspartic acid 372 in subsite-3 was separately performed, and three mutants Y89F (tyrosine→phenylalanine), N94P (asparagine→proline), and D196Y (aspartic acid→tyrosine) produced higher AA-2G titer than the wild-type and the other mutants. Previously, we found the mutant K47L (lysine→leucine) also had a higher maltodextrin specificity. Therefore, the four mutants K47L, Y89F, N94P, and D196Y were further used to construct the double, triple, and quadruple mutations. Among the 11 combinational mutants, the quadruple mutant K47L/Y89F/N94P/D196Y produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.23g/L, which was increased by 85.8% compared to that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics of all the mutants were modeled, and the pH and thermal stabilities of all the mutants were analyzed. The structure modeling indicated that the enhanced maltodextrin specificity may be related with the changes of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue at the four positions (47, 89, 94, and 196) and the substrate sugars.

  18. An anatomical signature for literacy.

    PubMed

    Carreiras, Manuel; Seghier, Mohamed L; Baquero, Silvia; Estévez, Adelina; Lozano, Alfonso; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2009-10-15

    Language is a uniquely human ability that evolved at some point in the roughly 6,000,000 years since human and chimpanzee lines diverged. Even in the most linguistically impoverished environments, children naturally develop sophisticated language systems. In contrast, reading is a learnt skill that does not develop without intensive tuition and practice. Learning to read is likely to involve ontogenic structural brain changes, but these are nearly impossible to isolate in children owing to concurrent biological, environmental and social maturational changes. In Colombia, guerrillas are re-integrating into mainstream society and learning to read for the first time as adults. This presents a unique opportunity to investigate how literacy changes the brain, without the maturational complications present in children. Here we compare structural brain scans from those who learnt to read as adults (late-literates) with those from a carefully matched set of illiterates. Late-literates had more white matter in the splenium of the corpus callosum and more grey matter in bilateral angular, dorsal occipital, middle temporal, left supramarginal and superior temporal gyri. The importance of these brain regions for skilled reading was investigated in early literates, who learnt to read as children. We found anatomical connections linking the left and right angular and dorsal occipital gyri through the area of the corpus callosum where white matter was higher in late-literates than in illiterates; that reading, relative to object naming, increased the interhemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right angular gyri; and that activation in the left angular gyrus exerts top-down modulation on information flow from the left dorsal occipital gyrus to the left supramarginal gyrus. These findings demonstrate how the regions identified in late-literates interact during reading, relative to object naming, in early literates.

  19. Validation and detection of vessel landmarks by using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Bernhardt, Dominik; Biermann, Christina; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    The detection of anatomical landmarks is an important prerequisite to analyze medical images fully automatically. Several machine learning approaches have been proposed to parse 3D CT datasets and to determine the location of landmarks with associated uncertainty. However, it is a challenging task to incorporate high-level anatomical knowledge to improve these classification results. We propose a new approach to validate candidates for vessel bifurcation landmarks which is also applied to systematically search missed and to validate ambiguous landmarks. A knowledge base is trained providing human-readable geometric information of the vascular system, mainly vessel lengths, radii and curvature information, for validation of landmarks and to guide the search process. To analyze the bifurcation area surrounding a vessel landmark of interest, a new approach is proposed which is based on Fast Marching and incorporates anatomical information from the knowledge base. Using the proposed algorithms, an anatomical knowledge base has been generated based on 90 manually annotated CT images containing different parts of the body. To evaluate the landmark validation a set of 50 carotid datasets has been tested in combination with a state of the art landmark detector with excellent results. Beside the carotid bifurcation the algorithm is designed to handle a wide range of vascular landmarks, e.g. celiac, superior mesenteric, renal, aortic, iliac and femoral bifurcation.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  1. Absence of Flexor Carpi Radialis during an Elective Carpometacarpal Arthroplasty of the Thumb: A Rare Anatomical Variation.

    PubMed

    Sofos, Stratos S; Riaz, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We present an extremely rare anatomical variation of unilateral flexor carpi radialis (FCR) absence. This rare anatomical variation posed a clinical dilemma to us and we highlight the importance of the surgeon being aware of this anatomical variation of an important structure both as a reconstruction tool and as an anatomical landmark. Methods. This anatomical variation of the unilaterally absent FCR was found upon dissection during a carpometacarpal arthroplasty of the thumb. Results. Upon the discovery of an absent FCR tendon, we proceeded with a simple trapeziectomy. Conclusions. We present an extremely rare anatomical variation of unilateral FCR absence. This rare anatomical variation may pose clinical dilemmas to the operating surgeon who aims to utilise the FCR either for tendon transfer, for tendon graft, or, as seen in our case, in the reconstruction of a carpometacarpal excision at the thumb. We highlight this diagnosis of suspicion, which may influence the clinical procedure.

  2. Sensitivity of Noninvasive Cardiac Electrophysiological Imaging to Variations in Personalized Anatomical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Noninvasive cardiac electrophysiological (EP) imaging techniques rely on anatomically-detailed heart-torso models derived from high-quality tomographic images of individual subjects. However, anatomical modeling involves variations that lead to unresolved uncertainties in the outcome of EP imaging, bringing questions to the robustness of these methods in clinical practice. In this study, we design a systematic statistical approach to assess the sensitivity of EP imaging methods to the variations in personalized anatomical modeling. Methods We first quantify the variations in personalized anatomical models by a novel application of statistical shape modeling. Given the statistical distribution of the variation in personalized anatomical models, we then employ unscented transform to determine the sensitivity of EP imaging outputs to the variation in input personalized anatomical modeling. Results We test the feasibility of our proposed approach using two of the existing EP imaging methods: epicardial-based electrocardiographic imaging and transmural electrophysiological imaging. Both phantom and real-data experiments show that variations in personalized anatomical models have negligible impact on the outcome of EP imaging. Conclusion This study verifies the robustness of EP imaging methods to the errors in personalized anatomical modeling and suggests the possibility to simplify the process of anatomical modeling in future clinical practice. Significance This study proposes a systematic statistical approach to quantify anatomical modeling variations and assess their impact on EP imaging, which can be extended to find a balance between the quality of personalized anatomical models and the accuracy of EP imaging that may improve the clinical feasibility of EP imaging. PMID:25615906

  3. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  4. Anatomical reasoning in the informatics age: Principles, ontologies, and agendas.

    PubMed

    Trelease, Robert B

    2006-03-01

    Reasoning about anatomy shares historical scientific roots with formal logic and artificial intelligence. With advances in computer-based intelligent programming, high-level biological structural knowledge may be exploited directly for biomedical research, clinical tasks, and educational applications. We consider the special nature of anatomical domain knowledge, emphasizing the complex concepts and semantics that must be represented in the development of ontologies, formally structured databases of biological information. We review the evolution of the fundamental scientific principles of logic and artificial intelligence needed for building machines that can make use of anatomical knowledge. We look at methods for compiling ontologies and compare the structural designs of the Foundational Model of Anatomy and Open GALEN ontologies. We further consider issues related to mapping developing anatomy resources with other biological ontologies in genomics, proteomics, and physiology. Although early results are promising, considerable resources and continuing effort must be committed to completing and extending anatomical ontologies for the ultimate success of computer-based anatomical reasoning. Anat Rec (Part B: New Anat) 289B:72-84, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Anatomic considerations for abdominally placed permanent left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Parnis, S M; McGee, M G; Igo, S R; Dasse, K; Frazier, O H

    1989-01-01

    To determine anatomic parameters for a permanent, electrically actuated left ventricular assist device (LVAD), the effects of abdominal placement of pneumatic LVADs used as temporary support for patients awaiting heart transplantation was studied. Understanding the anatomic constraints imposed by the abdominal viscera in LVAD placement is crucial, because improper placement can result in compression or obstruction of adjacent structures. Anatomic compatibility was assessed in four men (age 22-48 years) who were supported by the LVAD for over 1 month (range 35-132 days). The pump was intraperitoneally placed in the left upper quadrant. Radiographic techniques were employed, including CT scanning (with patients supine) and contrast imaging (patients in anatomical position), and the pump and conduits appeared to be properly positioned, with minimal compression of the body of the stomach, and no obstruction of adjacent organs. Three patients returned to a solid food diet and exercised daily by stationary cycling and walking. No signs of migration or erosion of the pump were present at the time of LVAD removal and cardiac transplantation. Successful clinical experience with short-term use of the LVAD suggests that the electrically actuated device can be well tolerated in patients requiring permanent left ventricular assistance.

  6. Handedness and cerebral anatomical asymmetries in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Pierre-Yves; Crivello, Fabrice; Perchey, Guy; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2006-02-15

    Using voxel-based morphometry, we measured the cerebral anatomical asymmetries in a sample of 56 young right-handed males and then compared voxelwise asymmetry indices of these subjects to those of 56 young left-handed males. In the right-handed, the clusters of grey matter asymmetry corresponding to the leftward occipital petalia and planum temporale asymmetries were retrieved. Strong rightward temporo-parietal asymmetries were also observed, but the rightward grey matter asymmetry in the frontal lobe was less massive than previously described. Group comparisons of left- and right-handed subjects' asymmetry maps, performed at a statistical threshold not corrected for multiple comparisons, revealed significant effects of handedness on this pattern of anatomical asymmetry in frontal regions, notably in the lower central and precentral sulci, and also in the planum temporale, with right-handed subjects being more leftward asymmetric. Concerning white matter, although almost no focal differences between left- and right-handed subjects were detected, volumetric analyses at the hemispheric level revealed a leftward asymmetry, which happened to be significantly less marked in the left-handed. This latter result, together with the pattern of leftward white matter asymmetries, suggested that anatomical correlates of the left hemispheric specialization for language would exist in white matter. In the population we studied, differences in anatomical asymmetry between left- and right-handed subjects provided structural arguments for a greater functional ambilaterality in left-handed subjects.

  7. Anatomical Basis for the Cardiac Interventional Electrophysiologist

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Doblado-Calatrava, Manuel; Cabrera, José Angel; Macías, Yolanda; Saremi, Farhood

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of radiofrequency catheter ablation techniques as the mainstay in the treatment of tachycardia has renewed new interest in cardiac anatomy. The interventional arrhythmologist has drawn attention not only to the gross anatomic details of the heart but also to architectural and histological characteristics of various cardiac regions that are relevant to the development or recurrence of tachyarrhythmias and procedural related complications of catheter ablation. In this review, therefore, we discuss some anatomic landmarks commonly used in catheter ablations including the terminal crest, sinus node region, Koch's triangle, cavotricuspid isthmus, Eustachian ridge and valve, pulmonary venous orifices, venoatrial junctions, and ventricular outflow tracts. We also discuss the anatomical features of important structures in the vicinity of the atria and pulmonary veins, such as the esophagus and phrenic nerves. This paper provides basic anatomic information to improve understanding of the mapping and ablative procedures for cardiac interventional electrophysiologists. PMID:26665006

  8. Giving ourselves: the ethics of anatomical donation.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical appeals might anatomists, physicians, and other health professionals make to patients and family members for anatomical donation? Two models of giving, egoistic and liberal, merit close examination.

  9. [Establishment of anatomical terminology in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    The history of anatomical terminology in Japan began with the publication of Waran Naikei Ihan-teimŏ in 1805 and Chŏtei Kaitai Shinsho in 1826. Although the establishment of Japanese anatomical terminology became necessary during the Meiji era when many western anatomy books imported into Janan were translated, such terminology was not unified during this period and varied among translators. In 1871, Tsukumo Ono's Kaibŏgaku Gosen was published by the Ministry of Education. Although this book is considered to be the first anatomical glossary terms in Japan, its contents were incomplete. Overseas, the German Anatomical Society established a unified anatomical terminology in 1895 called the Basle Nomina Anatomica (B.N.A.). Based on this development, Kaibŏgaku Meishŭ which follows the BNA, by Buntarŏ Suzuki was published in 1905. With the subsequent establishment in 1935 of Jena Nomina Anatomica (J.N.A.), the unification of anatomical terminology was also accelerated in Japan, leading to the further development of terminology.

  10. Anatomical entity recognition with a hierarchical framework augmented by external resources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Hua, Ji; Ni, Zhaoheng; Chen, Qinlang; Fan, Yubo; Ananiadou, Sophia; Chang, Eric I-Chao; Tsujii, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    References to anatomical entities in medical records consist not only of explicit references to anatomical locations, but also other diverse types of expressions, such as specific diseases, clinical tests, clinical treatments, which constitute implicit references to anatomical entities. In order to identify these implicit anatomical entities, we propose a hierarchical framework, in which two layers of named entity recognizers (NERs) work in a cooperative manner. Each of the NERs is implemented using the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) model, which use a range of external resources to generate features. We constructed a dictionary of anatomical entity expressions by exploiting four existing resources, i.e., UMLS, MeSH, RadLex and BodyPart3D, and supplemented information from two external knowledge bases, i.e., Wikipedia and WordNet, to improve inference of anatomical entities from implicit expressions. Experiments conducted on 300 discharge summaries showed a micro-averaged performance of 0.8509 Precision, 0.7796 Recall and 0.8137 F1 for explicit anatomical entity recognition, and 0.8695 Precision, 0.6893 Recall and 0.7690 F1 for implicit anatomical entity recognition. The use of the hierarchical framework, which combines the recognition of named entities of various types (diseases, clinical tests, treatments) with information embedded in external knowledge bases, resulted in a 5.08% increment in F1. The resources constructed for this research will be made publicly available.

  11. Altered anatomical network in early blindness revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-09-28

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. Diffusion MRI studies have revealed the efficient small-world properties and modular structure of the anatomical network in normal subjects. However, no previous study has used diffusion MRI to reveal changes in the brain anatomical network in early blindness. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 17 early blind subjects and 17 age- and gender-matched sighted controls. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions using deterministic tractography. Compared with controls, early blind subjects showed a decreased degree of connectivity, a reduced global efficiency, and an increased characteristic path length in their brain anatomical network, especially in the visual cortex. Moreover, we revealed some regions with motor or somatosensory function have increased connections with other brain regions in the early blind, which suggested experience-dependent compensatory plasticity. This study is the first to show alterations in the topological properties of the anatomical network in early blindness. From the results, we suggest that analyzing the brain's anatomical network obtained using diffusion MRI data provides new insights into the understanding of the brain's re-organization in the specific population with early visual deprivation.

  12. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-03-23

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  13. Characterizing anatomical variability in breast CT images

    PubMed Central

    Metheany, Kathrine G.; Abbey, Craig K.; Packard, Nathan; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work [Burgess , Med. Phys. 28, 419–437 (2001)] has shown that anatomical noise in projection mammography results in a power spectrum well modeled over a range of frequencies by a power law, and the exponent (β) of this power law plays a critical role in determining the size at which a growing lesion reaches the threshold for detection. In this study, the authors evaluated the power-law model for breast computed tomography (bCT) images, which can be thought of as thin sections through a three-dimensional (3D) volume. Under the assumption of a 3D power law describing the distribution of attenuation coefficients in the breast parenchyma, the authors derived the relationship between the power-law exponents of bCT and projection images and found it to be βsection=βproj−1. They evaluated this relationship on clinical images by comparing bCT images from a set of 43 patients to Burgess’ findings in mammography. They were able to make a direct comparison for 6 of these patients who had both a bCT exam and a digitized film-screen mammogram. They also evaluated segmented bCT images to investigate the extent to which the bCT power-law exponent can be explained by a binary model of attenuation coefficients based on the different attenuation of glandular and adipose tissue. The power-law model was found to be a good fit for bCT data over frequencies from 0.07to0.45cyc∕mm, where anatomical variability dominates the spectrum. The average exponent for bCT images was 1.86. This value is close to the theoretical prediction using Burgess’ published data for projection mammography and for the limited set of mammography data available from the authors’ patient sample. Exponents from the segmented bCT images (average value: 2.06) were systematically slightly higher than bCT images, with substantial correlation between the two (r=0.84). PMID:18975714

  14. Anatomical eponyms - unloved names in medical terminology.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Dworzański, W; Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M; Burdan, M; Dworzańska, A

    2016-01-01

    Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

  15. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kleber M.; Costa, Suelen F.; Sampaio, Francisco J.B.; Favorito, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes) with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes) with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV). To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (p <0.05). Results: The fetuses ranged in age from 26 to 35 weeks post-conception (WPC) and the 20 patients with retractile testis ranged in ages from 1 to 12 years (average of 5.8). Of the 50 fetal testes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4%) and epididymal anomalies (EAs) in 1 testis (2%). Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4%) and EA in 4 (14.28%). When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116). Conclusions: Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processus vaginalis and epididymal anomalies. PMID:27564294

  16. Ipsilesional neglect: behavioural and anatomical features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M; Na, D; Kim, G; Adair, J; Lee, K; Heilman, K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To learn more about the behavioural and anatomical features of ipsilesional neglect.
METHODS—Thirty consecutive patients with spatial neglect were tested on cancellation and line bisection tasks. To learn if patients with ipsilesional neglect demonstrate the sensory-attentional or motor-intentional type of neglect, a video apparatus was used that dissociates these determinants.
RESULTS—Five patients showed evidence of ipsilesional neglect. This phenomenon was seen only on the line bisection task. All patients with ipsilesional neglect had lesions involving frontal-subcortical regions. Although ipsilesional neglect evolved from early in three of five cases, the other patients displayed ipsilesional neglect without initial contralateral neglect, suggesting that ipsilesional neglect cannot be fully attributed to a compensatory strategy. The results of the tests that used the video apparatus indicate that right sided frontal or subcortical injury may induce contralateral attentional or intentional "approach" behaviours.
CONCLUSIONS—Ipsilesional neglect is most often associated with frontal-subcortical lesions, cannot be entirely attributed to a compensatory strategy, and may be induced by an attentional bias, an intentional bias, or both.

 PMID:10369819

  17. The anatomical distribution of genetic associations

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Alan; Kopp, Nathan; Xu, Xiaoxiao; O'Brien, David R.; Yang, Wei; Nehorai, Arye; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Kopan, Raphael; Dougherty, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Deeper understanding of the anatomical intermediaries for disease and other complex genetic traits is essential to understanding mechanisms and developing new interventions. Existing ontology tools provide functional, curated annotations for many genes and can be used to develop mechanistic hypotheses; yet information about the spatial expression of genes may be equally useful in interpreting results and forming novel hypotheses for a trait. Therefore, we developed an approach for statistically testing the relationship between gene expression across the body and sets of candidate genes from across the genome. We validated this tool and tested its utility on three applications. First, we show that the expression of genes in associated loci from GWA studies implicates specific tissues for 57 out of 98 traits. Second, we tested the ability of the tool to identify novel relationships between gene expression and phenotypes. Specifically, we experimentally confirmed an underappreciated prediction highlighted by our tool: that white blood cell count – a quantitative trait of the immune system – is genetically modulated by genes expressed in the skin. Finally, using gene lists derived from exome sequencing data, we show that human genes under selective constraint are disproportionately expressed in nervous system tissues. PMID:26586807

  18. Analysis of anatomic variability in children with low mathematical skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaoying; Fuchs, Lynn; Davis, Nikki; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    Mathematical difficulty affects approximately 5-9% of the population. Studies on individuals with dyscalculia, a neurologically based math disorder, provide important insight into the neural correlates of mathematical ability. For example, cognitive theories, neuropsychological studies, and functional neuroimaging studies in individuals with dyscalculia suggest that the bilateral parietal lobes and intraparietal sulcus are central to mathematical performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate morphological differences in a group of third grade children with poor math skills. We compare population averages of children with low math skill (MD) to gender and age matched controls with average math ability. Anatomical data were gathered with high resolution MRI and four different population averaging methods were used to study the effect of the normalization technique on the results. Statistical results based on the deformation fields between the two groups show anatomical differences in the bilateral parietal lobes, right frontal lobe, and left occipital/parietal lobe.

  19. ["The Venus of Pest"--expedition of an anatomical beauty].

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, H

    1990-01-01

    The Semmelweis-Museum in Budapest, Hungary, has a small collection of anatomical wax models. Studying the correspondence of the Austrian emperor Joseph II., then King of Hungary with representatives of the Hungarian administration, we were able to find out the origin of these models, their transportation to Hungary and their large significance in anatomical teaching at the end of the 18th century in Hungary. These models are the result of a long-lasting cooperation between artists and anatomists, particularly in Italy. Their artistic climax is reached during the second term of the 18th century, reflecting the complex interaction of contemporary sociocultural trends i.e. popularization of results of scientific research, traits of enlightenment combined with an artistic hyperidealistic typization as known from classical antiquity and sponsored financially as a means of imperial representation. The aim of the study was to point to the eminent importance of this collection as a monument of cultural heritage.

  20. Anatomical variations in human carotid bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Q; Heath, D; Smith, P

    1988-01-01

    The variations in anatomical structure and position of both carotid bodies were noted in 100 consecutive subjects who came to necropsy. Considerable variations in form were found. Although most carotid bodies (83% on the right and 86% on the left) were of the classic ovoid type, an appreciable minority was bilobed (9% on the right and 7% on the left) or double (7% on the right and 6% on the left); 1% were leaf shaped. All these anatomical variants have to be distinguished from the pathologically enlarged carotid body that may have a smooth or finely nodular surface. Anatomical variants (such as the bilobed) may themselves enlarge as a consequence of carotid body hyperplasia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3209707

  1. Anatomical significance in aortoiliac occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Candace; Hayat, Munawar; du Plessis, Maira; Cesmebasi, Alper; Koesterer, Michael; Daly, Kevin P; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    Aortoiliac occlusive disease is a subset of peripheral arterial disease involving an atheromatous occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, common iliac arteries, or both. The disease, as it is known today, was described by the French surgeon René Leriche as a thrombotic occlusion of the end of the aorta. Leriche successfully linked the anatomic location of the occlusion with a unique triad of symptoms, including claudication, impotence, and decreased peripheral pulses. The anatomical location of the atheromatous lesions also has a direct influence on classification of the disease, as well as choice of treatment modality. Considering its impact on diagnosis and treatment, we aimed to provide a detailed understanding of the anatomical structures involved in aortoiliac occlusive disease. Familiarity with these structures will aid the physician in interpretation of radiologic images and surgical planning.

  2. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    PubMed Central

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  3. Anatomical Volume Visualization with Weighted Distance Fields.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Thomas; Hittle, Brad; Shen, Han-Wei; Stredney, Don; Wiet, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    We describe the use of the weighted distance transform (WDT) to enhance applications designed for volume visualization of segmented anatomical datasets. The WDT is presented as a general technique to generate a derived characteristic of a scalar field that can be used in multiple ways during rendering. We obtain real-time interaction with the volume by calculating the WDT on the graphics card. Several examples of this technique as it applies to an application for teaching anatomical structures are detailed, including rendering embedded structures, fuzzy boundaries, outlining, and indirect lighting estimation.

  4. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  5. Age prediction on the basis of brain anatomical measures.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, S A; Hänggi, J; Mérillat, S; Jäncke, L

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we examined whether age can be predicted on the basis of different anatomical features obtained from a large sample of healthy subjects (n = 3,144). From this sample we obtained different anatomical feature sets: (1) 11 larger brain regions (including cortical volume, thickness, area, subcortical volume, cerebellar volume, etc.), (2) 148 cortical compartmental thickness measures, (3) 148 cortical compartmental area measures, (4) 148 cortical compartmental volume measures, and (5) a combination of the above-mentioned measures. With these anatomical feature sets, we predicted age using 6 statistical techniques (multiple linear regression, ridge regression, neural network, k-nearest neighbourhood, support vector machine, and random forest). We obtained very good age prediction accuracies, with the highest accuracy being R(2)  = 0.84 (prediction on the basis of a neural network and support vector machine approaches for the entire data set) and the lowest being R(2)  = 0.40 (prediction on the basis of a k-nearest neighborhood for cortical surface measures). Interestingly, the easy-to-calculate multiple linear regression approach with the 11 large brain compartments resulted in a very good prediction accuracy (R(2)  = 0.73), whereas the application of the neural network approach for this data set revealed very good age prediction accuracy (R(2)  = 0.83). Taken together, these results demonstrate that age can be predicted well on the basis of anatomical measures. The neural network approach turned out to be the approach with the best results. In addition, it was evident that good prediction accuracies can be achieved using a small but nevertheless age-representative dataset of brain features. Hum Brain Mapp 38:997-1008, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Anatomical and psychometric relationships of behavioral neglect in daily living.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Allart, Etienne; Bernati, Thérèse; Saj, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    Spatial neglect has been related to both cortical (predominantly at the temporal-parietal junction) and subcortical (predominantly of the superior longitudinal fasciculus) lesions. The objectives of this observational study were to specify the anatomical relationships of behavioral neglect in activities of daily living (N-ADLs), and the anatomical and psychometric relationships of N-ADLs on one hand and components of neglect (peripersonal neglect and personal neglect) and anosognosia on the other. Forty five patients were analyzed for behavioral difficulties in daily living (on the Catherine Bergego scale) and the main components of neglect (using conventional clinical assessments) during the first months post right hemisphere stroke. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify brain areas within which lesions explained the severity of bias in each assessment (non-parametric permutation test; p<0.01, one tailed). N-ADLs was associated with lesions centered on the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and extending to the temporo-parietal junction, temporo-occipital junction and subcortical white matter (including the superior longitudinal fasciculus). Peripersonal neglect resulted from extended cortical lesions centered on the superior temporal gyrus and the inferior parietal gyrus, with subcortical extension. Personal neglect resulted predominantly from lesions centered on the somatosensory cortex and at a lesser degree on the superior temporal sulcus. Anosognosia resulted from lesions of the posterior inferior temporal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. In anatomic terms, N-ADLs was strongly related to peripersonal neglect, and those relationships were also shown by the psychometric analysis. In conclusions, superior temporal gyrus and superior longitudinal fasciculus lesions have a pivotal role in N-ADLs. N-ADLs is principally related (anatomically and psychometrically) to peripersonal neglect, and at a lesser degree to anosognosia and

  7. [Anatomical quantification of the tibial part of the plantar aponeurosis].

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Y

    1983-03-01

    The metrical analysis of the anatomical characteristics is important because of its objectiveness. As it is concerned with the organs belonging to the locomotor system, the metrical method of the bones has already been systematized by Martin (1928), whereas the same kind of method for use on other organs remains undeveloped. The author aims to establish the metrical method of the plantar aponeurosis. The method for measuring the tibial part of the aponeurosis developed in this paper is sufficiently applicable for obtaining its principal anatomical characteristics. The results show that the tibial portion of the plantar aponeurosis becomes statistically significantly wider and thinner in its anterior part, and that the thickness of the tibial portion of the aponeurosis in the anterior part is larger on the right side than on the left side.

  8. Preliminary Study on Appearance-Based Detection of Anatomical Point Landmarks in Body Trunk CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Hanaoka, Shohei; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Yoshioka, Naoki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    Anatomical point landmarks as most primitive anatomical knowledge are useful for medical image understanding. In this study, we propose a detection method for anatomical point landmark based on appearance models, which include gray-level statistical variations at point landmarks and their surrounding area. The models are built based on results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of sample data sets. In addition, we employed generative learning method by transforming ROI of sample data. In this study, we evaluated our method with 24 data sets of body trunk CT images and obtained 95.8 ± 7.3 % of the average sensitivity in 28 landmarks.

  9. Statistical approach to anatomical landmark extraction in AP radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Rok; Pernus, Franjo

    2001-07-01

    A novel method for the automated extraction of important geometrical parameters of the pelvis and hips from APR images is presented. The shape and intensity variations in APR images are encompassed by the statistical shape and appearance models built from a set of training images for each of the three anatomies, i.e., pelvis, right and left hip, separately. The identification of the pelvis and hips is defined as a flexible object recognition problem, which is solved by generating anatomically plausible object instances and matching them to the APR image. The criterion function minimizes the resulting match error and considers the object topology. The obtained flexible object defines the positions of anatomical landmarks, which are further used to calculate the hip joint contact stress. A leave-one-out test was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method on a set of 26 APR images. The results show the method is able to properly treat image variations and can reliably and accurately identify anatomies in the image and extract the anatomical landmarks needed in the hip joint contact stress calculation.

  10. Small-world anatomical networks in the human brain revealed by cortical thickness from MRI.

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Chen, Zhang J; Evans, Alan C

    2007-10-01

    An important issue in neuroscience is the characterization for the underlying architectures of complex brain networks. However, little is known about the network of anatomical connections in the human brain. Here, we investigated large-scale anatomical connection patterns of the human cerebral cortex using cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance images. Two areas were considered anatomically connected if they showed statistically significant correlations in cortical thickness and we constructed the network of such connections using 124 brains from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping database. Significant short- and long-range connections were found in both intra- and interhemispheric regions, many of which were consistent with known neuroanatomical pathways measured by human diffusion imaging. More importantly, we showed that the human brain anatomical network had robust small-world properties with cohesive neighborhoods and short mean distances between regions that were insensitive to the selection of correlation thresholds. Additionally, we also found that this network and the probability of finding a connection between 2 regions for a given anatomical distance had both exponentially truncated power-law distributions. Our results demonstrated the basic organizational principles for the anatomical network in the human brain compatible with previous functional networks studies, which provides important implications of how functional brain states originate from their structural underpinnings. To our knowledge, this study provides the first report of small-world properties and degree distribution of anatomical networks in the human brain using cortical thickness measurements.

  11. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Valente, Giordano; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Campen, Anke; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-07-16

    Scaled generic musculoskeletal models are commonly used to drive dynamic simulations of motions. It is however, acknowledged that not accounting for variability in musculoskeletal geometry and musculotendon parameters may confound the simulation results, even when analysing control subjects. This study documents the three-dimensional anatomical variability of musculotendon origins and insertions of 33 lower limb muscles determined based on magnetic resonance imaging in six subjects. This anatomical variability was compared to the musculotendon point location in a generic musculoskeletal model. Furthermore, the sensitivity of muscle forces during gait, calculated using static optimization, to perturbations of the musculotendon point location was analyzed with a generic model. More specific, a probabilistic approach was used: for each analyzed musculotendon point, the three-dimensional location was re-sampled with a uniform Latin hypercube method within the anatomical variability and the static optimization problem was then re-solved for all perturbations. We found that musculotendon point locations in the generic model showed only variable correspondences with the anatomical variability. The anatomical variability of musculotendon point location did affect the calculated muscle forces: muscles most sensitive to perturbations within the anatomical variability are iliacus and psoas. Perturbation of the gluteus medius anterior, iliacus and psoas induces the largest concomitant changes in muscle forces of the unperturbed muscles. Therefore, when creating subject-specific musculoskeletal models, these attachment points should be defined accurately. In addition, the size of the anatomical variability of the musculotendon point location was not related to the sensitivity of the calculated muscle forces.

  12. Anatomical Data for Analyzing Human Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plagenhoef, Stanley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Anatomical data obtained from cadavers and from water displacement studies with living subjects were used to determine the weight, center of gravity, and radius of gyration for 16 body segments. A lead model was used to study movement patterns of the trunk section of the body. (Authors/PP)

  13. Giving Ourselves: The Ethics of Anatomical Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical…

  14. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  15. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  16. [Anatomic variants of Meckel's cave on MRI].

    PubMed

    Benoudiba, F; Hadj-Rabia, M; Iffenecker, C; Fuerxer, F; Bekkali, F; Francke, J P; Doyon, D

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives an accurate analysis of Meckel's cave variability. Images were acquired in 50 patients with several sections for anatomical comparison. Using several sections, MRI is a suitable method for better analysis of the trigeminal cistern. The most frequent findings are symmetrical trigeminal cisterns. Expansion of Meckel's cave or its disappearance has pathological significance.

  17. Anatomical and functional neuroimaging in awake, behaving marmosets.

    PubMed

    Silva, Afonso C

    2017-03-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small New World monkey that has gained significant recent interest in neuroscience research, not only because of its compatibility with gene editing techniques, but also due to its tremendous versatility as an experimental animal model. Neuroimaging modalities, including anatomical (MRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), complemented by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and electrophysiology, have been at the forefront of unraveling the anatomical and functional organization of the marmoset brain. High-resolution anatomical MRI of the marmoset brain can be obtained with remarkable cytoarchitectonic detail. Functional MRI of the marmoset brain has been used to study various sensory systems, including somatosensory, auditory, and visual pathways, while resting-state fMRI studies have unraveled functional brain networks that bear great correspondence to those previously described in humans. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of the marmoset brain has enabled the simultaneous recording of neuronal activity from thousands of neurons with single cell spatial resolution. In this article, we aim to review the main results obtained by our group and by our colleagues in applying neuroimaging techniques to study the marmoset brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 373-389, 2017.

  18. Robust Anatomical Correspondence Detection by Hierarchical Sparse Graph Matching

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanrong; Wu, Guorong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Robust anatomical correspondence detection is a key step in many medical image applications such as image registration and motion correction. In the computer vision field, graph matching techniques have emerged as a powerful approach for correspondence detection. By considering potential correspondences as graph nodes, graph edges can be used to measure the pairwise agreement between possible correspondences. In this paper, we present a novel, hierarchical graph matching method with sparsity constraint to further augment the power of conventional graph matching methods in establishing anatomical correspondences, especially for the cases of large inter-subject variations in medical applications. Specifically, we first propose to measure the pairwise agreement between potential correspondences along a sequence of intensity profiles which reduces the ambiguity in correspondence matching. We next introduce the concept of sparsity on the fuzziness of correspondences to suppress the distraction from misleading matches, which is very important for achieving the accurate, one-to-one correspondences. Finally, we integrate our graph matching method into a hierarchical correspondence matching framework, where we use multiple models to deal with the large inter-subject anatomical variations and gradually refine the correspondence matching results between the tentatively deformed model images and the underlying subject image. Evaluations on both synthetic data and public hand X-ray images indicate that the proposed hierarchical sparse graph matching method yields the best correspondence matching performance in terms of both accuracy and robustness when compared with several conventional graph matching methods. PMID:23070298

  19. Robust anatomical correspondence detection by hierarchical sparse graph matching.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanrong; Wu, Guorong; Jiang, Jianguo; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-02-01

    Robust anatomical correspondence detection is a key step in many medical image applications such as image registration and motion correction. In the computer vision field, graph matching techniques have emerged as a powerful approach for correspondence detection. By considering potential correspondences as graph nodes, graph edges can be used to measure the pairwise agreement between possible correspondences. In this paper, we present a novel, hierarchical graph matching method with sparsity constraint to further augment the power of conventional graph matching methods in establishing anatomical correspondences, especially for the cases of large inter-subject variations in medical applications. Specifically, we first propose to measure the pairwise agreement between potential correspondences along a sequence of intensity profiles which reduces the ambiguity in correspondence matching. We next introduce the concept of sparsity on the fuzziness of correspondences to suppress the distraction from misleading matches, which is very important for achieving the accurate, one-to-one correspondences. Finally, we integrate our graph matching method into a hierarchical correspondence matching framework, where we use multiple models to deal with the large inter-subject anatomical variations and gradually refine the correspondence matching results between the tentatively deformed model images and the underlying subject image. Evaluations on both synthetic data and public hand X-ray images indicate that the proposed hierarchical sparse graph matching method yields the best correspondence matching performance in terms of both accuracy and robustness when compared with several conventional graph matching methods.

  20. Alterations in Anatomical Covariance in the Prematurely Born.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty R; Schneider, Karen C; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2015-10-22

    Preterm (PT) birth results in long-term alterations in functional and structural connectivity, but the related changes in anatomical covariance are just beginning to be explored. To test the hypothesis that PT birth alters patterns of anatomical covariance, we investigated brain volumes of 25 PTs and 22 terms at young adulthood using magnetic resonance imaging. Using regional volumetrics, seed-based analyses, and whole brain graphs, we show that PT birth is associated with reduced volume in bilateral temporal and inferior frontal lobes, left caudate, left fusiform, and posterior cingulate for prematurely born subjects at young adulthood. Seed-based analyses demonstrate altered patterns of anatomical covariance for PTs compared with terms. PTs exhibit reduced covariance with R Brodmann area (BA) 47, Broca's area, and L BA 21, Wernicke's area, and white matter volume in the left prefrontal lobe, but increased covariance with R BA 47 and left cerebellum. Graph theory analyses demonstrate that measures of network complexity are significantly less robust in PTs compared with term controls. Volumes in regions showing group differences are significantly correlated with phonological awareness, the fundamental basis for reading acquisition, for the PTs. These data suggest both long-lasting and clinically significant alterations in the covariance in the PTs at young adulthood.

  1. Long-range population dynamics of anatomically defined neocortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry L; Voigt, Fabian F; Javadzadeh, Mitra; Krueppel, Roland; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of activity across neocortical areas is essential for mammalian brain function. Understanding this process requires simultaneous functional measurements across the cortex. In order to dissociate direct cortico-cortical interactions from other sources of neuronal correlations, it is furthermore desirable to target cross-areal recordings to neuronal subpopulations that anatomically project between areas. Here, we combined anatomical tracers with a novel multi-area two-photon microscope to perform simultaneous calcium imaging across mouse primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory whisker cortex during texture discrimination behavior, specifically identifying feedforward and feedback neurons. We find that coordination of S1-S2 activity increases during motor behaviors such as goal-directed whisking and licking. This effect was not specific to identified feedforward and feedback neurons. However, these mutually projecting neurons especially participated in inter-areal coordination when motor behavior was paired with whisker-texture touches, suggesting that direct S1-S2 interactions are sensory-dependent. Our results demonstrate specific functional coordination of anatomically-identified projection neurons across sensory cortices. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14679.001 PMID:27218452

  2. Role of Anatomic variations of Uncinate Process in Frontal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mohit; Tyagi, Sushant

    2016-12-01

    The osteomeatal complex plays an important role in the development of Chronic rhinosinusitis. The ethmoidal infundibulum is bordered medially by the uncinate process, and the anatomic relationship between the ethmoidal infundibulum and the frontal recess may depend upon the types of attachment of the uncinate process. The osteomeatal complex is the main area targeted in chronic rhinosinusitis and within it uncinate process is the first anatomical structure encountered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the types of attachment of the uncinate process and its implications in the development of sinus inflammation. The significance of anatomical variations of uncinate process in chronic sinusitis were evaluated. A prospective CT scan study on 64 patients of chronic sinusitis (128 uncinate processes) was done. The results were tabulated and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science 16.0. Type I superior attachment of uncinate process into the lamina papyracea was the most common variety in all ages and both sexes and a statistically significant association between Type 1 Uncinate process and frontal sinusitis was found. (P < 0.05). The superior attachment of uncinate process alters the frontal sinus drainage and causes the frontal sinusitis.

  3. Anatomically corrected malposition of great arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R H; Becker, A E; Losekoot, T G; Gerlis, L M

    1975-01-01

    Four anomalous hearts are described in which the great arteries arise in unusual fashion from their morphologically appropriate ventricles. This malformation, previously termed anatomically corrected transposition, is now termed anatomically corrected malposition. This is because, following the precedent of Van Praagh and his associates, we now reserve the term 'transposition' to describe the situation in which both great arteries arise from separate morphologically inappropriate ventricles. All the hearts examined exhibited atrioventricular concordance, I with viscero-atrial situs inversus, and 3 with situs solitus. However, there were considerable variations in ventricular morphology between the cases. Thus, 2 cases exhibited atresia of the right atrioventricular valve, and in the remaining 2 cases right and levt ventricular sinuses were both identified. Two of the cases also had pulmonary atresia, and coronary artery anomalies were present in all 4. The cases emphasize the fact that the term anatomically corrected malposition describes not a discrete anomaly but only a ventriculo-arterial relation, which is one of ventriculo-arterial concordance. Doubt has previously been cast upon the existence of this as an anatomical entity. It is concluded that the relation does indeed exist, and furthermore can coexist with all varieties of atrioventricular relations. It is suggested that the differing atrioventricular relations can be distinguished by usage of the terms 'concordant' or 'discordant' anatomically corrected malposition. Finally, it is emphasized that it is necessary to distinguish this anomaly, which in most cases presents with left-sided anterior aorta, from the left-sided anterior aorta more frequently encountered in classically corrected transposition'. Images PMID:1191424

  4. Collaborative Regression-based Anatomical Landmark Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g., for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods recently have drawn much attention due to robustness and efficiency. In such methods, landmarks are localized through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to 1) inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and 2) lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. 1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localize landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for the informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed in the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. 2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of “difficult-to-detect” landmarks by using spatial guidance from “easy-to-detect” landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography (CT) images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26579736

  5. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Anatomical Variation of Human Collector Channel Orifices

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Michael D.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the anatomical variation of normal human collector channel orifices and their relationship with Schlemm's canal. Methods Ten human anterior segments fixed by immersion or perfusion were dissected radially and further divided by fine dissection into corresponding inner and outer wall segments. The tissues were dehydrated, critical-point dried, sputter coated, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Images were obtained at magnifications from ×200 to ×10,000. Selected radial collector channel regions were processed for plastic embedding. Results Two classes of collector channel orifices were identified. Simple oval orifices (54.7 ± 4.6–μm diameter) were lined with endothelial cells and most often occurred on a planar region of Schlemm's canal outer wall. Complex orifices (62.7 ± 3.4–μm diameter) were often found associated with septal columns and bridges, and typically covered with flap-like structures (10–40 μm) that extended between the inner and outer wall and over the collector channel orifices. Both simple and complex orifices had complete or partial lip-like rims. In orifices with partial rims, a trough-like groove was often visible on the outer wall surface opposite the lip. Transected septa and inner and outer wall adhesion sites were often found in association with complex collector channel orifices. Conclusions Collector channel orifice structure varied from simple ovals to complex tethered flaps and bridges. Collector channel orifices with complex flaps connect the inner and outer walls of Schlemm's canal, and may serve to enhance and regulate aqueous outflow in these regions. PMID:26975026

  7. Early life body fatness and risk of colorectal cancer in US women and men – results from two large cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Colditz, Graham A.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Nimptsch, Katharina; Ogino, Shuji; Wei, Esther K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between body fatness before adulthood and later risk of colorectal cancer remains unclear. We hypothesized that, independent of adult body fatness, early life body fatness would be associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods We assessed body fatness during childhood and adolescence using a validated 9-level somatotype and inquired body weight in young adulthood in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used Cox proportional hazard regression modeling to estimate relative risks (RRs, 95% CIs) adjusting for adult body mass index (BMI) and other known colorectal cancer risk factors. Results We identified 2,100 incident colorectal cancer cases (1,292 in women and 808 in men) during 22 years of follow-up. Among women, the RR(95% CI) for childhood body fatness of level 5 or higher versus level 1 was 1.28(1.04-1.58, p-trend=0.08) and for adolescent body fatness, it was 1.27(1.01-1.60, p-trend = 0.23). The corresponding RRs for men were 1.04(0.82-1.31, p-trend=0.48) and 0.98(0.75-1.27, p-trend=0.20), respectively. Results were generally similar across anatomic subsites within the colorectum. Additionally, the RRs comparing BMI categories ≥ 27.5 to < 19 kg/m2 were 1.44(1.06-1.95, at age 18, p-trend=0.009) for women and 1.18(0.84-1.65, at age 21, p-trend=0.57) for men. Conclusion Increased body fatness in early life, independent of adult obesity, might be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in women, but we observed a weaker association in men. Impact Our findings support the growing evidence that early life body fatness affects the risk of colorectal cancer many decades later. PMID:25777804

  8. Anatomical calibration for wearable motion capture systems: Video calibrated anatomical system technique.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita; Caroselli, Alessio; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Inertial sensors are becoming widely used for the assessment of human movement in both clinical and research applications, thanks to their usability out of the laboratory. This work aims to propose a method for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame with an ease to use, portable and low cost device. An off-the-shelf camera, a stick and a pattern, attached to the inertial sensor, compose the device. The proposed technique is referred to as video Calibrated Anatomical System Technique (vCAST). The absolute orientation of a synthetic femur was tracked both using the vCAST together with an inertial sensor and using stereo-photogrammetry as reference. Anatomical landmark calibration showed mean absolute error of 0.6±0.5 mm: these errors are smaller than those affecting the in-vivo identification of anatomical landmarks. The roll, pitch and yaw anatomical frame orientations showed root mean square errors close to the accuracy limit of the wearable sensor used (1°), highlighting the reliability of the proposed technique. In conclusion, the present paper proposes and preliminarily verifies the performance of a method (vCAST) for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame: the technique is low time consuming, highly portable, easy to implement and usable outside laboratory.

  9. Anatomical accuracy of brain connections derived from diffusion MRI tractography is inherently limited.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cibu; Ye, Frank Q; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Modi, Pooja; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Leopold, David A; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2014-11-18

    Tractography based on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is widely used for mapping the structural connections of the human brain. Its accuracy is known to be limited by technical factors affecting in vivo data acquisition, such as noise, artifacts, and data undersampling resulting from scan time constraints. It generally is assumed that improvements in data quality and implementation of sophisticated tractography methods will lead to increasingly accurate maps of human anatomical connections. However, assessing the anatomical accuracy of DWI tractography is difficult because of the lack of independent knowledge of the true anatomical connections in humans. Here we investigate the future prospects of DWI-based connectional imaging by applying advanced tractography methods to an ex vivo DWI dataset of the macaque brain. The results of different tractography methods were compared with maps of known axonal projections from previous tracer studies in the macaque. Despite the exceptional quality of the DWI data, none of the methods demonstrated high anatomical accuracy. The methods that showed the highest sensitivity showed the lowest specificity, and vice versa. Additionally, anatomical accuracy was highly dependent upon parameters of the tractography algorithm, with different optimal values for mapping different pathways. These results suggest that there is an inherent limitation in determining long-range anatomical projections based on voxel-averaged estimates of local fiber orientation obtained from DWI data that is unlikely to be overcome by improvements in data acquisition and analysis alone.

  10. Enhancing our understanding of anatomical diversity in Tomentella ectomycorrhizas: characterization of six new morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Erős-Honti, Zsolt; Seress, Diána; Kovács, Gábor M

    2015-08-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) formed by Tomentella species (Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) were collected in beech forests of Hungary and studied using anatomical and molecular phylogenetic methods. The mycobionts were identified by analysing the sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions together with sequences obtained from public databases. At the sampling plots, we found the occurrence of 11 Tomentella morphotypes. Among these, six morphotypes (four identified, Tomentella atroarenicolor, Tomentella bryophila, Tomentella lapida, Tomentella subclavigera, and two unidentified) were morpho-anatomically characterized for the first time. Although the six morphotypes differed anatomically from each other and from Tomentella ectomycorrhizas described previously, they shared anatomical features common to tomentelloid ectomycorrhizas fungi. These results expand our understanding of the diversity of this widely distributed ectomycorrhizal genus.

  11. Reduction of variance in measurements of average metabolite concentration in anatomically-defined brain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Ryan J.; Newman, Michael; Nikolaidis, Aki

    2016-11-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed for using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) to measure representative metabolite concentrations of anatomically-defined brain regions. Generally these methods require spectral analysis, quantitation of the signal, and reconciliation with anatomical brain regions. However, to simplify processing pipelines, it is practical to only include those corrections that significantly improve data quality. Of particular importance for cross-sectional studies is knowledge about how much each correction lowers the inter-subject variance of the measurement, thereby increasing statistical power. Here we use a data set of 72 subjects to calculate the reduction in inter-subject variance produced by several corrections that are commonly used to process MRSI data. Our results demonstrate that significant reductions of variance can be achieved by performing water scaling, accounting for tissue type, and integrating MRSI data over anatomical regions rather than simply assigning MRSI voxels with anatomical region labels.

  12. Anatomical Knee Variants in Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tears

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Xu; Li, Jian; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Yang; Kang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Discoid lateral meniscus was a common meniscal dysplasia and was predisposed to tear. There were some anatomical knee variants in patients with discoid lateral meniscus. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between anatomical knee variants and discoid lateral meniscal tears. Methods: There were totally 125 cases of discoid lateral meniscus enrolled in this study from February 2008 to December 2013. Eighty-seven patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for right torn discoid lateral meniscus were enrolled in the torn group. An additional 38 patients who were incidentally identified as having intact discoid lateral menisci on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were included in the control group. All patients were evaluated for anatomical knee variants on plain radiographs, including lateral joint space distance, height of the lateral tibial spine, height of the fibular head, obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau, squaring of the lateral femoral condyle, cupping of the lateral tibial plateau, lateral femoral condylar notch, and condylar cutoff sign. The relationship between anatomical variants and meniscal tear was evaluated. These anatomical variants in cases with complete discoid meniscus were also compared with those in cases with incomplete discoid meniscus. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in lateral joint space distance (P = 0.528), height of the lateral tibial spine (P = 0.927), height of the fibular head (P = 0.684), obliquity of the lateral tibial plateau (P = 0.672), and the positive rates of squaring of the lateral femoral condyle (P = 0.665), cupping of the lateral tibial plateau (P = 0.239), and lateral femoral condylar notch (P = 0.624). The condylar cutoff sign was significantly different between the two groups, with the prominence ratio in the torn group being smaller than that in the control group (0.74 ± 0.11 vs. 0.81 ± 0.04, P = 0.049). With the decision value of the

  13. Modeling anatomical spatial relations with description logics.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Hahn, U.; Romacker, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although spatial relations are essential for the anatomy domain, spatial reasoning is only weakly supported by medical knowledge representation systems. To remedy this shortcoming we express spatial relations that can intuitively be applied to anatomical objects (such as 'disconnected', 'externally connected', 'partial overlap' and 'proper part') within the formal framework of description logics. A special encoding of concept descriptions (in terms of SEP triplets) allows us to emulate spatial reasoning by classification-based reasoning. PMID:11079990

  14. Procedure Planning: Anatomical Determinants of Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hanratty, Colm; Walsh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary practice there are three main methods that can be employed when attempting to open a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of a coronary artery; antegrade or retrograde wire escalation, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde dissection re-entry. This editorial will attempt to clarify the anatomical features that can be identified to help when deciding which of these strategies to employ initially and help understand the reasons for this decision. PMID:24694102

  15. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  16. Engineering anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Warren L; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Chan, M Ete; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Wan, Leo Q; Liu, X Sherry; Guo, X Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-02-23

    The ability to engineer anatomically correct pieces of viable and functional human bone would have tremendous potential for bone reconstructions after congenital defects, cancer resections, and trauma. We report that clinically sized, anatomically shaped, viable human bone grafts can be engineered by using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and a "biomimetic" scaffold-bioreactor system. We selected the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar bone as our tissue model, because of its clinical importance and the challenges associated with its complex shape. Anatomically shaped scaffolds were generated from fully decellularized trabecular bone by using digitized clinical images, seeded with hMSCs, and cultured with interstitial flow of culture medium. A bioreactor with a chamber in the exact shape of a human TMJ was designed for controllable perfusion throughout the engineered construct. By 5 weeks of cultivation, tissue growth was evidenced by the formation of confluent layers of lamellar bone (by scanning electron microscopy), markedly increased volume of mineralized matrix (by quantitative microcomputer tomography), and the formation of osteoids (histologically). Within bone grafts of this size and complexity cells were fully viable at a physiologic density, likely an important factor of graft function. Moreover, the density and architecture of bone matrix correlated with the intensity and pattern of the interstitial flow, as determined in experimental and modeling studies. This approach has potential to overcome a critical hurdle-in vitro cultivation of viable bone grafts of complex geometries-to provide patient-specific bone grafts for craniofacial and orthopedic reconstructions.

  17. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of a cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to a magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1 mm×1.4 mm in about 6 min of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discussed. We discuss several measures to increase the sensitivity to reach a resolution 1 mm×1 mm.

  18. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  19. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed Central

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-01-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  20. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-02-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable.

  1. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  2. Development of the anatomical quality assessment (AQUA) tool for the quality assessment of anatomical studies included in meta-analyses and systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2017-01-01

    Critical appraisal of anatomical studies is essential before the evidence from them undergoes meta-epidemiological synthesis. However, no instrument for appraising anatomical studies with inherent applicability to different study designs is available. We aim to develop a generic yet comprehensive tool for assessing the quality of anatomical studies using a formal consensus method. The study steering committee formulated an initial conceptual design and generated items for a preliminary tool on the basis of a literature review and expert opinion. A Delphi procedure was then adopted to assess the validity of the preliminary tool. Feedback from the Delphi panelists was used to improve it. The Delphi procedure involved 12 experts in anatomical research. It comprised two rounds, after which unanimous consensus was reached about the items to be included. The preliminary tool consisted of 20 items, which were phrased as signaling questions and organized into five domains: 1. Aim and subject characteristics, 2. Study design, 3. Characterization of methods, 4. Descriptive anatomy, and 5. Results reporting. Each domain was set to end with a risk of bias question. Following round 1, some of the items underwent major revision, although agreement was reached regarding inclusion of all the domains and signaling questions in the preliminary tool. The tool was revised only for minor language inaccuracies after round 2. The AQUA Tool was designed to assess the quality and reliability of anatomical studies. It is currently undergoing a validation process. Clin. Anat. 30:6-13, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Development of the Anatomical Quality Assurance (AQUA) checklist: Guidelines for reporting original anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kumar Ramakrishnan, Piravin; Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2017-01-01

    The rise of evidence-based anatomy has emphasized the need for original anatomical studies with high clarity, transparency, and comprehensiveness in reporting. Currently, inconsistencies in the quality and reporting of such studies have placed limits on accurate reliability and impact assessment. Our aim was to develop a checklist of reporting items that should be addressed by authors of original anatomical studies. The study steering committee formulated a preliminary conceptual design and began to generate items on the basis of a literature review and expert opinion. This led to the development of a preliminary checklist. The validity of this checklist was assessed by a Delphi procedure, and feedback from the Delphi panelists, who were experts in the area of anatomical research, was used to improve it. The Delphi procedure involved 12 experts in anatomical research. It comprised two rounds, after which unanimous consensus was reached regarding the items to be included in the checklist. The steering committee agreed to name the checklist AQUA. The preliminary AQUA Checklist consisted of 26 items divided into eight sections. Following round 1, some of the items underwent major revision and three new ones were introduced. The checklist was revised only for minor language inaccuracies after round 2. The final version of the AQUA Checklist consisted of the initial eight sections with a total of 29 items. The steering committee hopes the AQUA Checklist will improve the quality and reporting of anatomical studies. Clin. Anat. 30:14-20, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  5. Reflective Journals: Unmasking student perceptions of anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Lelika; Sookrajh, Reshma; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2017-03-01

    In medical education, reflection has been considered to be a core skill in professional competence. The anatomy laboratory is an ideal setting for faculty/student interaction and provides invaluable opportunities for active learning and reflection on anatomical knowledge. This study was designed to record student attitudes regarding human cadaveric dissection, explore their experiences of anatomy through an analysis of their journal-reflective writings and determine whether this type of creative writing had a beneficial effect on those students who chose to complete them. A total of seventy-five journals from Medical and Allied Health Science students were collected and analysed. Results were categorized according to the following themes: (i) Dissecting room stressors (27.6%); (ii) Educational value of dissection (26.3%); (iii) Appreciation, Gratitude, Respect & Curiosity for the cadaver (18.9%); (iv) Positive and negative sentiments expressed in the dissecting room (25.8%); (v) Benefit of alternate teaching modalities (4.6%); (vi) Spirituality/Religious Beliefs (3.7%); (vii) Shared humanity and emotional bonds (3.69%); (viii) Acknowledgement of human anatomical variations (3.2%); (ix) Beauty and complexity of the human body (1.8%) and (x) Psychological detachment (0.9%). Students appreciated the opportunity to share their emotions and reflect on the humanistic dimension of anatomy as a subject. Student reflections illustrated clearly their thoughts and some of the difficult issues with which they wrestled.. The anatomy laboratory is seen as the budding clinician's first encounter with a patient, albeit a cadaver. This was the first time that reflective journals were given to students in the discipline. Reflective journals allow students to express themselves in an open-ended and creative fashion. It also assists students to integrate anatomy and clinical medicine and assists in applying their basic anatomical knowledge in an authentic, yet safe environment.

  6. Anatomical and functional retinal changes in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, G; Romano, M R; Vecchio, E C; Minervino, C; della Guardia, C; Velotti, N; Carotenuto, A; Montella, S; Orefice, G; Cennamo, G

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of this study was to report anatomical changes of the ganglion cell complex (GCC), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and macular volume in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We also investigated the correlation between anatomical and functional changes in terms of visual acuity and macular sensitivity investigated and visual fields. Methods Prospective comparative study included 105 eyes of 53 consecutive patients. The patients were divided into two groups: group A included 56 eyes of 28 patients with diagnosis of MS; group B involved 49 eyes of 25 healthy patients. The examination included Goldmann tonometry, biomicroscopic and fundus oculi examination, retinography, GCC examination, circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL), and macular volume. The functional test included measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual field, and MP. Results MS group showed a significant reduced GCC, cpRNFL, macular volume, BCVA, visual field, and macular sensitivity compared with the control group (P<0.001). This reduction was more representative (P<0.001) in patients with MS complicated by optic neuritis (ON). We found in the MS group a strong correlation between GCC thickness and macular volume (r2=0.59, P<0.001) and also between GCC and RNFL thickness (r2=0.48, P<0.001). There was also a correlation between macular sensitivity and macular volume reduction (r2=0.25, P<0.001) and also between RNFL and macular volume (r2=0.43, P<0.001). Conclusions The significant statistical evidence and the strong correlation between anatomical and functional parameters support the use of OCT and MP in the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients diagnosed with MS. PMID:26681148

  7. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  8. Anatomical considerations on the discomalleolar ligament

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-VÁZQUEZ, J. F.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. R.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. A.; JIMÉNEZ-COLLADO, J.

    1998-01-01

    A study was carried out on the discomalleolar ligament by dissection of adult human cadavers. The ligament corresponds to the most internal portion of the superior lamina of the temporomandibular joint capsule. It extends from the posterointernal portion of the temporomandibular joint disc, penetrates the petrotympanic fissure and reaches the malleus of the middle ear. Because of its morphology and anatomical arrangement the discomalleolar ligament should be considered as an intrinsic ligament of the temporomandibular joint and distinguished from the tympanic portion of the sphenomandibular ligament (anterior ligament of the malleus). PMID:9723988

  9. A multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing EVARREST™ fibrin sealant patch to standard of care in controlling bleeding following elective hepatectomy: anatomic versus non-anatomic resection

    PubMed Central

    Koea, Jonathan B.; Batiller, Jonathan; Aguirre, Nicolas; Shen, Jessica; Kocharian, Richard; Bochicchio, Grant; Garden, O. James

    2016-01-01

    Background This multicentre, randomized clinical trial assessed the safety and effectiveness of the EVARREST™ Fibrin Sealant Patch (FP) in treating parenchymal bleeding following anatomic and non-anatomic liver resections. Methods One hundred and two patients were stratified according to the type of hepatic resection (anatomic/non-anatomic), and randomized (1:1) after identification of an appropriate bleeding site, to FP vs Standard of Care (SoC, manual compression ± topical haemostat). The primary endpoint was haemostasis at 4 min from bleeding site identification with no re-bleeding requiring re-treatment. Results The FP was superior in achieving haemostasis at 4 min (96%, 48/50) to SoC (46%, 24/52; p < 0.001). Stratification for resection type showed treatment differences for primary endpoint for anatomic (24/25 FP vs 13/23 SoC; p = 0.001) and non-anatomic liver resections (24/25FP vs 11/29 SoC; p < 0.001). Adverse events related to the study procedure were reported in 40/50 patients (80%) in the FP group and 43/52 patients (83%) in the SoC group. One (2%) adverse event (infected intra-abdominal fluid collection) was possibly related to study treatment. Conclusion This clinical trial confirms that the FP is safe and highly effective in controlling parenchymal bleeding following hepatectomy regardless of the type of resection. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01993888. PMID:27017161

  10. [Measurement and analysis of anatomical parameter values in tree shrews].

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Rong-Ping; Li, Jin-Tao; He, Bao-Li; Zhen, Hong; Wang, Li-Mei; Jiao, Jian-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Anatomical parameter values in tree shrews are major biological characteristic indicators in laboratory animals. Body size, bones and mammilla, organ weights, coefficient intestinal canal and other anatomical data were measured and analyzed in laboratory domesticated tree shrews (7 to 9 months of age). Measurement of 31 anatomical parameters showed that body height, width of the right ear, ileum and colon had significant differences between males and females (P<0.05). Highly significant differences were also found in body slanting length, chest depth, torso length, left and right forelimb length, right hind limb length, left and right ear length, left ear width, keel bone length, left and right tibia length, duodenum and jejunum (P<0.01). With body length as the dependent variable, and tail length, torso length, right and left forelimb length, and left and right hind limb length as independent variables for stepwise regression analysis, the regression equation for body length = 13.90 + tail length × 0.16. The results of 37 organs weights between female and male tree shrews showed very significant differences (P<0.01) for weight of heart, lungs, spleen, left and right kidney, bladder, left and right hippocampus, left submandibular gland, and left and right thyroid gland, as well as significant (P<0.05) differences in the small intestine, right submandibular gland, and left adrenal gland. The coefficient of heart, lung, stomach, bladder, small and large intestine, brain, right hippocampus, and left adrenal gland showed highly significant differences (P<0.01), while differences in the right kidney, left hippocampus, left submandibular gland, right adrenal gland, and left and right thyroid gland were significant (P<0.05). With animal weight as the dependent variable and indicators of heart, lung, liver, spleen, left and right kidney and brain as independent variables for stepwise regression analysis, the regression equation showed that weight = 62.73 + left kidney

  11. The Anatomical and Functional Organization of the Human Visual Pulvinar

    PubMed Central

    Pinsk, Mark A.; Kastner, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The pulvinar is the largest nucleus in the primate thalamus and contains extensive, reciprocal connections with visual cortex. Although the anatomical and functional organization of the pulvinar has been extensively studied in old and new world monkeys, little is known about the organization of the human pulvinar. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, we identified two visual field maps within the ventral pulvinar, referred to as vPul1 and vPul2. Both maps contain an inversion of contralateral visual space with the upper visual field represented ventrally and the lower visual field represented dorsally. vPul1 and vPul2 border each other at the vertical meridian and share a representation of foveal space with iso-eccentricity lines extending across areal borders. Additional, coarse representations of contralateral visual space were identified within ventral medial and dorsal lateral portions of the pulvinar. Connectivity analyses on functional and diffusion imaging data revealed a strong distinction in thalamocortical connectivity between the dorsal and ventral pulvinar. The two maps in the ventral pulvinar were most strongly connected with early and extrastriate visual areas. Given the shared eccentricity representation and similarity in cortical connectivity, we propose that these two maps form a distinct visual field map cluster and perform related functions. The dorsal pulvinar was most strongly connected with parietal and frontal areas. The functional and anatomical organization observed within the human pulvinar was similar to the organization of the pulvinar in other primate species. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The anatomical organization and basic response properties of the visual pulvinar have been extensively studied in nonhuman primates. Yet, relatively little is known about the functional and anatomical organization of the human pulvinar. Using neuroimaging, we found multiple representations of visual space within the ventral

  12. Isolated Male Epispadias: Anatomic Functional Restoration Is the Primary Goal

    PubMed Central

    Bruneel, Elke; Ploumidis, Achilles; Van Laecke, Erik; Hoebeke, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Isolated male epispadias (IME) is a rare congenital penile malformation, as often part of bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC). In its isolated presentation, it consists in a defect of the dorsal aspect of the penis, leaving the urethral plate open. Occurrence of urinary incontinence is related to the degree of dorsal displacement of the meatus and the underlying underdevelopment of the urethral sphincter. The technique for primary IME reconstruction, based on anatomic restoration of the urethra and bladder neck, is here illustrated. Patients and Methods. A retrospective database was created with patients who underwent primary IME repair between June 1998 and February 2014. Intraoperative variables, postoperative complications, and outcomes were assessed. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results and Limitations. Eight patients underwent primary repair, with penopubic epispadias (PPE) in 3, penile epispadias (PE) in 2, and glandular epispadias (GE) in 3. Median age at surgery was 13.0 months [7–47]; median follow-up was 52 months [9–120]. Complications requiring further surgery were reported in two patients, while further esthetic surgeries were required in 4 patients. Conclusion. Anatomical restoration in primary IME is safe and effective, with acceptable results given the initial pathology. PMID:27722172

  13. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  14. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

  15. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. Using 3D modeling techniques to enhance teaching of difficult anatomical concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Baldwin, Michael; Nassiri, Joshua; Kikinis, Ron; Shaffer, Kitt

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Anatomy is an essential component of medical education as it is critical for the accurate diagnosis in organs and human systems. The mental representation of the shape and organization of different anatomical structures is a crucial step in the learning process. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of developing innovative teaching modules for anatomy education of first-year medical students based on 3D reconstructions from actual patient data. Materials and Methods A total of 196 models of anatomical structures from 16 anonymized CT datasets were generated using the 3D Slicer open-source software platform. The models focused on three anatomical areas: the mediastinum, the upper abdomen and the pelvis. Online optional quizzes were offered to first-year medical students to assess their comprehension in the areas of interest. Specific tasks were designed for students to complete using the 3D models. Results Scores of the quizzes confirmed a lack of understanding of 3D spatial relationships of anatomical structures despite standard instruction including dissection. Written task material and qualitative review by students suggested that interaction with 3D models led to a better understanding of the shape and spatial relationships among structures, and helped illustrate anatomical variations from one body to another. Conclusion The study demonstrates the feasibility of one possible approach to the generation of 3D models of the anatomy from actual patient data. The educational materials developed have the potential to supplement the teaching of complex anatomical regions and help demonstrate the anatomic variation among patients. PMID:26897601

  17. Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

  18. Tubular Surface Segmentation for Extracting Anatomical Structures From Medical Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This work provides a model for tubular structures, and devises an algorithm to automatically extract tubular anatomical structures from medical imagery. Our model fits many anatomical structures in medical imagery, in particular, various fiber bundles in the brain (imaged through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI)) such as the cingulum bundle, and blood vessel trees in computed tomography angiograms (CTAs). Extraction of the cingulum bundle is of interest because of possible ties to schizophrenia, and extracting blood vessels is helpful in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. The tubular model we propose has advantages over many existing approaches in literature: fewer degrees-of-freedom over a general deformable surface hence energies defined on such tubes are less sensitive to undesirable local minima, and the tube (in 3-D) can be naturally represented by a 4-D curve (a radius function and centerline), which leads to computationally less costly algorithms and has the advantage that the centerline of the tube is obtained without additional effort. Our model also generalizes to tubular trees, and the extraction algorithm that we design automatically detects and evolves branches of the tree. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on 20 datasets of DW-MRI data and 32 datasets of CTA, and quantify the results of our algorithm when expert segmentations are available. PMID:21118754

  19. Functional Connectivity Patterns of Visual Cortex Reflect its Anatomical Organization.

    PubMed

    Genç, Erhan; Schölvinck, Marieke Louise; Bergmann, Johanna; Singer, Wolf; Kohler, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The brain is continuously active, even without external input or task demands. This so-called resting-state activity exhibits a highly specific spatio-temporal organization. However, how exactly these activity patterns map onto the anatomical and functional architecture of the brain is still unclear. We addressed this question in the human visual cortex. We determined the representation of the visual field in visual cortical areas of 44 subjects using fMRI and examined resting-state correlations between these areas along the visual hierarchy, their dorsal and ventral segments, and between subregions representing foveal versus peripheral parts of the visual field. We found that retinotopically corresponding regions, particularly those representing peripheral visual fields, exhibit strong correlations. V1 displayed strong internal correlations between its dorsal and ventral segments and the highest correlation with LGN compared with other visual areas. In contrast, V2 and V3 showed weaker correlations with LGN and stronger between-area correlations, as well as with V4 and hMT+. Interhemispheric correlations between homologous areas were especially strong. These correlation patterns were robust over time and only marginally altered under task conditions. These results indicate that resting-state fMRI activity closely reflects the anatomical organization of the visual cortex both with respect to retinotopy and hierarchy.

  20. Anatomic patterning in the expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.; McAllen, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes (VSR) is related to a nerve's anatomic location rather than its target organ, we compared VSR recorded from the same type of postganglionic fiber [muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC)] located at three different rostrocaudal levels: hindlimb, forelimb, and face. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats, and vestibular afferents were stimulated electrically. Single MVC unit activity was extracted by spike shape analysis of few-fiber recordings, and unit discrimination was confirmed by autocorrelation. Poststimulus time histogram analysis revealed that about half of the neurons were initially inhibited by vestibular stimulation (type 1 response), whereas the other MVC fibers were initially strongly excited (type 2 response). MVC units with types 1 and 2 responses were present in the same nerve fascicle. Barosensitivity was equivalent in the two groups, but fibers showing type 1 responses fired significantly faster than those giving type 2 responses (0.29 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 Hz). Nerve fibers with type 1 responses were most common in the hindlimb (21 of 29 units) and least common in the face (2 of 11 units), the difference in relative proportion being significant (P < 0.05, chi(2) test). These results support the hypothesis that VSR are anatomically patterned.

  1. Zinc deficiency affects physiological and anatomical characteristics in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Mattiello, Edson M; Ruiz, Hugo A; Neves, Julio C L; Ventrella, Marília C; Araújo, Wagner L

    2015-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential microelement involved in several plant physiological processes. Therefore, it is important to identify Zn deficiencies promptly--before extensive damage occurs to the plant. The diagnostic tools that are used to identify Zn deficiencies are very important in areas where Zn deficiencies occur. Such diagnostic tools are vital for nutritional management and fertilizer recommendations. The current study investigated the effects of Zn deficiency on maize plants by recording a number of physiological and anatomical parameters. A Zn omission trial (from 0 to 22 days) was carried out to produce plants that had varying degrees of Zn deficiency. Typical symptoms of Zn deficiency (e.g. chlorotic stripes and purple shades on the edges and leaf sheath) appeared 16 days after the omission of Zn from nutrient solutions. As the time of Zn omission increased, there were significant decreases in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, maximal efficiency of photosystem I (evaluated by Fv/Fm), biomass (dry weight) and Zn concentrations in plants. Zinc-deficient plants also had a lower vascular bundle proportion coupled with a higher stomata density. These physiological and anatomical changes negatively impacted plant growth. Moreover, they occurred before visible symptoms of Zn deficiency were observed. Zinc concentrations were recorded for younger leaves, rather than for more mature leaves, which is usually recommended for plant analysis. The results demonstrate that the analysis of Zn in young leaves of maize is a very sensitive indicator of Zn status.

  2. Tubular surface segmentation for extracting anatomical structures from medical imagery.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vandana; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-12-01

    This work provides a model for tubular structures, and devises an algorithm to automatically extract tubular anatomical structures from medical imagery. Our model fits many anatomical structures in medical imagery, in particular, various fiber bundles in the brain (imaged through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI)) such as the cingulum bundle, and blood vessel trees in computed tomography angiograms (CTAs). Extraction of the cingulum bundle is of interest because of possible ties to schizophrenia, and extracting blood vessels is helpful in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. The tubular model we propose has advantages over many existing approaches in literature: fewer degrees-of-freedom over a general deformable surface hence energies defined on such tubes are less sensitive to undesirable local minima, and the tube (in 3-D) can be naturally represented by a 4-D curve (a radius function and centerline), which leads to computationally less costly algorithms and has the advantage that the centerline of the tube is obtained without additional effort. Our model also generalizes to tubular trees, and the extraction algorithm that we design automatically detects and evolves branches of the tree. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on 20 datasets of DW-MRI data and 32 datasets of CTA, and quantify the results of our algorithm when expert segmentations are available.

  3. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Nomina anatomica. Anatomic terminology and the old French terminology.

    PubMed

    Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Passos, Luiz Fernando De Souza; Euzébio Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo

    A surprising finding in our seminars in Latin America and Spain was that approximately half of the participants continued to use the old French anatomical nomenclature. The substance of this paper is a table in which we compare the anatomical names for the items reviewed in our seminar, in a Spanish version of the old French nomenclature and in the Spanish, Portuguese, and English versions of the currently employed anatomical terms.

  5. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  6. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  7. Bidirectional mereological reasoning in anatomical knowledge bases.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mereological relationships--relationships between parts and wholes--are essential for ontological engineering in the anatomical domain. We propose a knowledge engineering approach that emulates mereological reasoning by taxonomic reasoning based on SEP triplets, a special data structure for the encoding of part-whole relations, which is fully embedded in the formal framework of standard description logics. We extend the SEP formalism in order to account not only for the part-of but also for the has-part relation, both being considered transitive in our domain. Furthermore we analyze the distinction between the ontological primitives singletons, collections and mass concepts in the anatomy domain and sketch how reasoning about these kinds of concepts can be accounted for in a knowledge representation language, using the extended SEP formalism. PMID:11825258

  8. Ballistics and anatomical modelling - A review.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2016-11-01

    Ballistics is the study of a projectiles motion and can be broken down into four stages: internal, intermediate, external and terminal ballistics. The study of the effects a projectile has on a living tissue is referred to as wound ballistics and falls within terminal ballistics. To understand the effects a projectile has on living tissues the mechanisms of wounding need to be understood. These include the permanent and temporary cavities, energy, yawing, tumbling and fragmenting. Much ballistics research has been conducted including using cadavers, animal models and simulants such as ballistics ordnance gelatine. Further research is being conducted into developing anatomical, 3D, experimental and computational models. However, these models need to accurately represent the human body and its heterogeneous nature which involves understanding the biomechanical properties of the different tissues and organs. Further research is needed to accurately represent the human tissues with simulants and is slowly being conducted.

  9. Anatomic brain asymmetry in vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Woods, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe.

  10. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. How spatial abilities and dynamic visualizations interplay when learning functional anatomy with 3D anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material presentation formats, spatial abilities, and anatomical tasks. First, to understand the cognitive challenges a novice learner would be faced with when first exposed to 3D anatomical content, a six-step cognitive task analysis was developed. Following this, an experimental study was conducted to explore how presentation formats (dynamic vs. static visualizations) support learning of functional anatomy, and affect subsequent anatomical tasks derived from the cognitive task analysis. A second aim was to investigate the interplay between spatial abilities (spatial visualization and spatial relation) and presentation formats when the functional anatomy of a 3D scapula and the associated shoulder flexion movement are learned. Findings showed no main effect of the presentation formats on performances, but revealed the predictive influence of spatial visualization and spatial relation abilities on performance. However, an interesting interaction between presentation formats and spatial relation ability for a specific anatomical task was found. This result highlighted the influence of presentation formats when spatial abilities are involved as well as the differentiated influence of spatial abilities on anatomical tasks.

  12. MRI anatomical variants of mammillary bodies.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, Micaela; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallucci, Massimo; Caulo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MBs) are classically defined as a pair of small round structures located on the undersurface of the diencephalon. The systematic observation of MR brain images of patients with neurological diseases, but also of healthy subjects enrolled in research protocols, reveals, however, a greater anatomical variability. The aim of the present study was to define the spectrum of such variability using spatial normalized 3D TFE T1-weighted MR images in a group of 151 healthy right-handed young subjects (78 females, age range 16-39 years). The MBs were identified on reformatted coronal and axial images and classified according to morphological, positional and numerical criteria. On the basis of coronal images, MBs were first divided into symmetrical (86.1 %) and asymmetrical (13.9 %), depending on their respective height. Symmetrical MBs were further subdivided into three variants [type A (2.7 %), B (76.2 %), C (7.3 %)] according to the depth of the intermammillary sulcus. Two morphological variants were defined on axial images, depending on whether the MBs were circular (63.6 %) or elliptic (36.4 %). This latter group was further divided in two subgroups, depending on whether the MBs were parallel (21.9 %) or convergent (14.6 %). Finally, two subjects (1.3 %) presented a supernumeral MB. The transverse size of the third ventricle was greater in the type A compared to the type B and C groups. Gender did not significantly affect the frequency of MBs variants, except for the three symmetrical subgroups in which the variants A and C were more frequent in males than in females. These findings suggest the presence of an anatomical variability of the MBs, in contrast to their classical definition. Therefore, atypical presentation of MBs can be the expression of this variability rather than a marker of neurological disorders (i.e. cerebral malformation, mesial temporal sclerosis, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome).

  13. Variation in Stem Anatomical Characteristics of Campanuloideae Species in Relation to Evolutionary History and Ecological Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Schweingruber, Fritz Hans; Říha, Pavel; Doležal, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Background The detailed knowledge of plant anatomical characters and their variation among closely related taxa is key to understanding their evolution and function. We examined anatomical variation in 46 herbaceous taxa from the subfamily Campanuloideae (Campanulaceae) to link this information with their phylogeny, ecology and comparative material of 56 woody tropical taxa from the subfamily Lobelioideae. The species studied covered major environmental gradients from Mediterranean to Arctic zones, allowing us to test hypotheses on the evolution of anatomical structure in relation to plant competitive ability and ecological preferences. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the evolution of anatomical diversity, we reconstructed the phylogeny of studied species from nucleotide sequences and examined the distribution of anatomical characters on the resulting phylogenetic tree. Redundancy analysis, with phylogenetic corrections, was used to separate the evolutionary inertia from the adaptation to the environment. A large anatomical diversity exists within the Campanuloideae. Traits connected with the quality of fibres were the most congruent with phylogeny, and the Rapunculus 2 (“phyteumoid”) clade was especially distinguished by a number of characters (absence of fibres, pervasive parenchyma, type of rays) from two other clades (Campanula s. str. and Rapunculus 1) characterized by the dominance of fibres and the absence of parenchyma. Septate fibres are an exclusive trait in the Lobelioideae, separating it clearly from the Campanuloideae where annual rings, pervasive parenchyma and crystals in the phellem are characteristic features. Conclusions/Significance Despite clear phylogenetic inertia in the anatomical features studied, the ecological attributes and plant height had a significant effect on anatomical divergence. From all three evolutionary clades, the taller species converged towards similar anatomical structure, characterized by a smaller number

  14. Can the Misinterpretation Amendment Rate Be Used as a Measure of Interpretive Error in Anatomic Pathology?: Implications of a Survey of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Vinita; Fadare, Oluwole; Dewar, Rajan; Nakhleh, Raouf; Cooper, Kumarasen

    2017-03-01

    A repeat survey of the Association of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology, done 10 years after the original was used to assess trends and variability in classifying scenarios as errors, and the preferred post signout report modification for correcting error by the membership of the Association of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology. The results were analyzed to inform on whether interpretive amendment rates might act as surrogate measures of interpretive error in pathology. An analyses of the responses indicated that primary level misinterpretations (benign to malignant and vice versa) were universally qualified as error; secondary-level misinterpretations or misclassifications were inconsistently labeled error. There was added variability in the preferred post signout report modification used to correct report alterations. The classification of a scenario as error appeared to correlate with severity of potential harm of the missed call, the perceived subjectivity of the diagnosis, and ambiguity of reporting terminology. Substantial differences in policies for error detection and optimal reporting format were documented between departments. In conclusion, the inconsistency in labeling scenarios as error, disagreement about the optimal post signout report modification for the correction of the error, and variability in error detection policies preclude the use of the misinterpretation amendment rate as a surrogate measure for error in anatomic pathology. There is little change in uniformity of definition, attitudes and perception of interpretive error in anatomic pathology in the last 10 years.

  15. Identifying Mismatches in Alignments of Large Anatomical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to propose a model of matching errors for identifying mismatches in alignments of large anatomical ontologies. Methods: Three approaches to identifying mismatches are utilized: 1) lexical, based on the presence of modifiers in the names of the concepts aligned; 2) structural, identifying conflicting relations resulting from the alignment; and 3) semantic, based on disjoint top-level categories across ontologies. Results: 83% of the potential mismatches identified by the HMatch system are identified by at least one of the approaches. Conclusions: Although not a substitute for a careful validation of the matches, these approaches significantly reduce the need for manual validation by effectively characterizing most mismatches. PMID:18693957

  16. [Historical development of modern anatomical education in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuo

    2008-12-01

    The medical schools in the beginning of Meiji era were diverse both in the founders and in the way of education, frequently employing foreign teachers of various nationalities. In 1871, German teachers were appointed to organized medical education at the medical school of the university of Tokyo. The anatomical education in the school was conducted by German teachers, i.e. Miller (1871-1873), Dönitz (1873-1877), Gierke (1877-1880) and Disse (1880-1885), followed by Koganei who returned from the study in Germany. In 1882 (Meiji 15th), the general rule for medical school was enforced so that the medical schools were practically obliged to employ numbers of graduates of the university of Tokyo. In 1887 (Meiji 20th), the educational system was reformed so that many of the medical schools were closed, and the medical schools were integrated into one university, five national senior high schools and three prefectural ones in addition to four private ones. After that most of anatomical teachers were either graduates of the university of Tokyo or those who studied in the anatomical department of the university. Before 1877 (Meiji 10th), the anatomical books were mainly translated from English books, and foreign teachers of various nationality were employed in many medical schools in Japan. After 1877 (Meiji 10th), the anatomical books based on the lectures by German teachers at the university of Tokyo were published. The anatomical books after 1887 (Meiji 20th) were written based on German books, and the German anatomical terms were utilized. After 1905 (Meiji 38th), the original Japanese anatomical books appeared, employing international anatomical terms. At the first meeting of Japanese Association of Anatomists in 1893 (Meiji 26th), the Japanese anatomical teachers met together and most of them were graduates of the university of Tokyo or fellows of its anatomical department.

  17. Anatomical Connections of the Functionally Defined "Face Patches" in the Macaque Monkey.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Piercesare; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Tsao, Doris

    2016-06-15

    The neural circuits underlying face recognition provide a model for understanding visual object representation, social cognition, and hierarchical information processing. A fundamental piece of information lacking to date is the detailed anatomical connections of the face patches. Here, we injected retrograde tracers into four different face patches (PL, ML, AL, AM) to characterize their anatomical connectivity. We found that the patches are strongly and specifically connected to each other, and individual patches receive inputs from extrastriate cortex, the medial temporal lobe, and three subcortical structures (the pulvinar, claustrum, and amygdala). Inputs from prefrontal cortex were surprisingly weak. Patches were densely interconnected to one another in both feedforward and feedback directions, inconsistent with a serial hierarchy. These results provide the first direct anatomical evidence that the face patches constitute a highly specialized system and suggest that subcortical regions may play a vital role in routing face-related information to subsequent processing stages.

  18. A probabilistic framework to infer brain functional connectivity from anatomical connections.

    PubMed

    Deligianni, Fani; Varoquaux, Gael; Thirion, Bertrand; Robinson, Emma; Sharp, David J; Edwards, A David; Rueckert, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel probabilistic framework to learn across several subjects a mapping from brain anatomical connectivity to functional connectivity, i.e. the covariance structure of brain activity. This prediction problem must be formulated as a structured-output learning task, as the predicted parameters are strongly correlated. We introduce a model selection framework based on cross-validation with a parametrization-independent loss function suitable to the manifold of covariance matrices. Our model is based on constraining the conditional independence structure of functional activity by the anatomical connectivity. Subsequently, we learn a linear predictor of a stationary multivariate autoregressive model. This natural parameterization of functional connectivity also enforces the positive-definiteness of the predicted covariance and thus matches the structure of the output space. Our results show that functional connectivity can be explained by anatomical connectivity on a rigorous statistical basis, and that a proper model of functional connectivity is essential to assess this link.

  19. The semantic anatomical network: Evidence from healthy and brain-damaged patient populations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuxing; Han, Zaizhu; Zhong, Suyu; Gong, Gaolang; Song, Luping; Liu, Fangsong; Huang, Ruiwang; Du, Xiaoxia; Sun, Rong; Wang, Qiang; He, Yong; Bi, Yanchao

    2015-09-01

    Semantic processing is central to cognition and is supported by widely distributed gray matter (GM) regions and white matter (WM) tracts. The exact manner in which GM regions are anatomically connected to process semantics remains unknown. We mapped the semantic anatomical network (connectome) by conducting diffusion imaging tractography in 48 healthy participants across 90 GM "nodes," and correlating the integrity of each obtained WM edge and semantic performance across 80 brain-damaged patients. Fifty-three WM edges were obtained whose lower integrity associated with semantic deficits and together with their linked GM nodes constitute a semantic WM network. Graph analyses of this network revealed three structurally segregated modules that point to distinct semantic processing components and identified network hubs and connectors that are central in the communication across the subnetworks. Together, our results provide an anatomical framework of human semantic network, advancing the understanding of the structural substrates supporting semantic processing.

  20. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    PubMed Central

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort. PMID:25309338

  1. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections.

    PubMed

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort.

  2. A biomechanical comparison of conventional versus an anatomic plate and compression bolts for fixation of intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haili; Yang, Zhaoxu; Wu, Zhanpo; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ming; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability obtained by using our technique featured an anatomical plate and compression bolts versus that of the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws in the fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Eighteen fresh frozen lower limbs of cadavers were used to create a reproductive Sanders type-III calcaneal fracture model by using osteotomy. The calcaneus fractures were randomly selected to be fixed either using our anatomical plate and compression bolts or conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws. Reduction of fracture was evaluated through X radiographs. Each calcaneus was successively loaded at a frequency of 1 Hz for 1000 cycles through the talus using an increasing axial force 20 N to 200 N and 20 N to 700 N, representing the partial weight bearing and full weight bearing, respectively, and then the specimens were loaded to failure. Data extracted from the mechanical testing machine were recorded and used to test for difference in the results with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. No significant difference was found between our fixation technique and conventional technique in displacement during 20-200 N cyclic loading (P=0.06), while the anatomical plate and compression bolts showed a great lower irreversible deformation during 20-700 N cyclic loading (P=0.008). The load achieved at loss of fixation of the constructs for the two groups had significant difference: anatomic plate and compression bolts at 3839.6±152.4 N and anatomic plate and cancellous screws at 3087.3±58.9 N (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the ultimate displacements. Our technique featured anatomical plate and compression bolts for calcaneus fracture fixation was demonstrated to provide biomechanical stability as good as or better than the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws under the axial loading. The study supports the mechanical viability of using our plate and

  3. A Channelized Hotelling Observer Study of Lesion Detection in SPECT MAP Reconstruction Using Anatomical Priors

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, S.; Khurd, P.; Hsiao, I.; Zhou, L.; Gindi, G.

    2010-01-01

    In emission tomography, anatomical side information, in the form of organ and lesion boundaries, derived from intra-patient coregistered CT or MR scans can be incorporated into the reconstruction. Our interest is in exploring the efficacy of such side information for lesion detectability. To assess detectability we used the SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer and a signal-known exactly/background known exactly detection task. In simulation studies we incorporated anatomical side information into a SPECT MAP (maximum a posteriori) reconstruction by smoothing within but not across organ or lesion boundaries. A non-anatomical prior was applied by uniform smoothing across the entire image. We investigated whether the use of anatomical priors with organ boundaries alone or with perfect lesion boundaries alone would change lesion detectability relative to the case of a prior with no anatomical information. Furthermore, we investigated whether any such detectability changes for the organ-boundary case would be a function of the distance of the lesion to the organ boundary. We also investigated whether any detectability changes for the lesion-boundary case would be a function of the degree of proximity, i.e. a difference in the radius of the true functional lesion and the radius of the anatomical lesion boundary. Our results showed almost no detectability difference with vs without organ boundaries at any lesion-to-organ boundary distance. Our results also showed no difference in lesion detectability with and without lesion boundaries, and no variation of lesion detectability with degree of proximity. PMID:17664562

  4. Complex vestibular macular anatomical relationships need a synthetic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian vestibular maculae are anatomically organized for complex parallel processing of linear acceleration information. Anatomical findings in rat maculae are provided in order to underscore this complexity, which is little understood functionally. This report emphasizes that a synthetic approach is critical to understanding how maculae function and the kind of information they conduct to the brain.

  5. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  10. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  11. Craniofacial pain and anatomical abnormalities of the nasal cavities.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Jeferson Cedaro de; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    The causal relation between anatomical variations of the nose and headaches and facial pain is analyzed through literature review of the topic. The pathogenesis that can be involved in this relation proves to be wider than simple alteration of nasal septum and turbinates that can cause mechanical stimulus through contact between these structures, which covers infectious factors, neurogenic inflammation, correlation with migraines and the role of nasal obstruction. The clinical findings of a lot of authors including the test with topical anesthetic to prove this causal relation, the indication of surgical treatment, in addition to good results of this treatment, are reported. The mechanism of pain relief obtained through surgical correction of nasal septum and turbinate is discussed. These data make us conclude that there are multiple etiologic factors involved, which makes us question the fundamental role of the mechanical aspect.

  12. A Methodology for Anatomic Ultrasound Image Diagnostic Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lange, Theis; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods for the assessment of ultrasound image quality based on our experiences with evaluating new methods for anatomic imaging. It presents a methodology to ensure a fair assessment between competing imaging methods using clinically relevant evaluations. The methodology is valuable in the continuing process of method optimization and guided development of new imaging methods. It includes a three phased study plan covering from initial prototype development to clinical assessment. Recommendations to the clinical assessment protocol, software, and statistical analysis are presented. Earlier uses of the methodology has shown that it ensures validity of the assessment, as it separates the influences between developer, investigator, and assessor once a research protocol has been established. This separation reduces confounding influences on the result from the developer to properly reveal the clinical value. This paper exemplifies the methodology using recent studies of synthetic aperture sequential beamforming tissue harmonic imaging.

  13. [Aging of the respiratory system: anatomical changes and physiological consequences].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2012-10-01

    The respiratory system undergoes progressive involution with age, resulting in anatomical and functional changes that are exerted on all levels. The rib cage stiffens and respiratory muscles weaken. Distal bronchioles have reduced diameter and tend to be collapsed. Mobilized lung volumes decrease with age while residual volume increases. Gas exchanges are modified with a linear decrease of PaO(2) up to the age of 70 years and a decreased diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. Ventilatory responses to hypercapnia, hypoxia and exercise decrease in the elderly. Knowledge of changes in the respiratory system related to advancing age is a medical issue of great importance in order to distinguish the effects of aging from those of diseases.

  14. The anatomical and compositional basis of leaf mass per area.

    PubMed

    John, Grace P; Scoffoni, Christine; Buckley, Thomas N; Villar, Rafael; Poorter, Hendrik; Sack, Lawren

    2017-04-01

    Leaf dry mass per unit leaf area (LMA) is a central trait in ecology, but its anatomical and compositional basis has been unclear. An explicit mathematical and physical framework for quantifying the cell and tissue determinants of LMA will enable tests of their influence on species, communities and ecosystems. We present an approach to explaining LMA from the numbers, dimensions and mass densities of leaf cells and tissues, which provided unprecedented explanatory power for 11 broadleaved woody angiosperm species diverse in LMA (33-262 g m(-2) ; R(2)  = 0.94; P < 0.001). Across these diverse species, and in a larger comparison of evergreen vs. deciduous angiosperms, high LMA resulted principally from larger cell sizes, greater major vein allocation, greater numbers of mesophyll cell layers and higher cell mass densities. This explicit approach enables relating leaf anatomy and composition to a wide range of processes in physiological, evolutionary, community and macroecology.

  15. Joint Modeling of Anatomical and Functional Connectivity for Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Yogesh; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Golland, Polina

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel probabilistic framework to merge information from diffusion weighted imaging tractography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging correlations to identify connectivity patterns in the brain. In particular, we model the interaction between latent anatomical and functional connectivity and present an intuitive extension to population studies. We employ the EM algorithm to estimate the model parameters by maximizing the data likelihood. The method simultaneously infers the templates of latent connectivity for each population and the differences in connectivity between the groups. We demonstrate our method on a schizophrenia study. Our model identifies significant increases in functional connectivity between the parietal/posterior cingulate region and the frontal lobe and reduced functional connectivity between the parietal/posterior cingulate region and the temporal lobe in schizophrenia. We further establish that our model learns predictive differences between the control and clinical populations, and that combining the two modalities yields better results than considering each one in isolation. PMID:21878411

  16. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  17. Digital preservation of anatomical variation: 3D-modeling of embalmed and plastinated cadaveric specimens using uCT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, Colin W; Wilson, Timothy D; Rice, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy educators have an opportunity to teach anatomical variations as a part of medical and allied health curricula using both cadaveric and three-dimensional (3D) digital models of these specimens. Beyond published cadaveric case reports, anatomical variations identified during routine gross anatomy dissection can be powerful teaching tools and a medium to discuss several anatomical sub-disciplines from embryology to medical imaging. The purpose of this study is to document how cadaveric anatomical variation identified during routine dissection can be scanned using medical imaging techniques to create two-dimensional axial images and interactive 3D models for teaching and learning of anatomical variations. Three cadaveric specimens (2 formalin embalmed, 1 plastinated) depicting anatomical variations and an embryological malformation were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography (μCT) for visualization in cross-section and for creation of 3D volumetric models. Results provide educational options to enable visualization and facilitate learning of anatomical variations from cross-sectional scans. Furthermore, the variations can be highlighted, digitized, modeled and manipulated using 3D imaging software and viewed in the anatomy laboratory in conjunction with traditional anatomical dissection. This study provides an example for anatomy educators to teach and describe anatomical variations in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

  18. Swept-source anatomic optical coherence elastography of porcine trachea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Mitran, Sorin; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative endoscopic imaging is at the vanguard of novel techniques in the assessment upper airway obstruction. Anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) has the potential to provide the geometry of the airway lumen with high-resolution and in 4 dimensions. By coupling aOCT with measurements of pressure, optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be performed to characterize airway wall stiffness. This can aid in identifying regions of dynamic collapse as well as informing computational fluid dynamics modeling to aid in surgical decision-making. Toward this end, here we report on an anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system powered by a wavelength-swept laser source. The system employs a fiber-optic catheter with outer diameter of 0.82 mm deployed via the bore of a commercial, flexible bronchoscope. Helical scans are performed to measure the airway geometry and to quantify the cross-sectional-area (CSA) of the airway. We report on a preliminary validation of aOCT for elastography, in which aOCT-derived CSA was obtained as a function of pressure to estimate airway wall compliance. Experiments performed on a Latex rubber tube resulted in a compliance measurement of 0.68+/-0.02 mm2/cmH2O, with R2=0.98 over the pressure range from 10 to 40 cmH2O. Next, ex vivo porcine trachea was studied, resulting in a measured compliance from 1.06+/-0.12 to 3.34+/-0.44 mm2/cmH2O, (R2>0.81). The linearity of the data confirms the elastic nature of the airway. The compliance values are within the same order-of-magnitude as previous measurements of human upper airways, suggesting that this system is capable of assessing airway wall compliance in future human studies.

  19. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Wensheng; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right) mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  20. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Pei, Qiu-Yan; Li, Yun-Tao; Yang, Zhen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births. Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). FECG is not widely used, and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably. Thus, mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology. The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program. Methods: We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital. Each original database contained 400–700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels. We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company, Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software. The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations. The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training. Results: The database was rebuilt using the 3D software. The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically, continuously, and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles. The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG. The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs. We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG. Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education. Conclusions: The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of

  1. An interactive three-dimensional virtual body structures system for anatomical training over the internet.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Bharti; Acosta, Eric; Malvankar, Ameya; Vaidyanath, Sreeram

    2006-04-01

    The Visible Human digital datasets make it possible to develop computer-based anatomical training systems that use virtual anatomical models (virtual body structures-VBS). Medical schools are combining these virtual training systems and classical anatomy teaching methods that use labeled images and cadaver dissection. In this paper we present a customizable web-based three-dimensional anatomy training system, W3D-VBS. W3D-VBS uses National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Visible Human Male datasets to interactively locate, explore, select, extract, highlight, label, and visualize, realistic 2D (using axial, coronal, and sagittal views) and 3D virtual structures. A real-time self-guided virtual tour of the entire body is designed to provide detailed anatomical information about structures, substructures, and proximal structures. The system thus facilitates learning of visuospatial relationships at a level of detail that may not be possible by any other means. The use of volumetric structures allows for repeated real-time virtual dissections, from any angle, at the convenience of the user. Volumetric (3D) virtual dissections are performed by adding, removing, highlighting, and labeling individual structures (and/or entire anatomical systems). The resultant virtual explorations (consisting of anatomical 2D/3D illustrations and animations), with user selected highlighting colors and label positions, can be saved and used for generating lesson plans and evaluation systems. Tracking users' progress using the evaluation system helps customize the curriculum, making W3D-VBS a powerful learning tool. Our plan is to incorporate other Visible Human segmented datasets, especially datasets with higher resolutions, that make it possible to include finer anatomical structures such as nerves and small vessels.

  2. Arterial blood supply of the mesocolic areas. An anatomical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, E; Guidotti, A; Mancini, S

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on first observations on the vascularization of the areae mesocolicae which resulted from radioanatomical studies made in collaboration with the Institute of General Clinical Surgery of the University of Siena. Three areae can be distinguished: colocolica (Treitz), sigmoidea or intersigmoidea, and intercolica. The investigations were carried out using selective preoperative angiography and the injection of anatomical preparations.

  3. Anatomic basis for delayed diagnosis of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Poole, G V

    1990-07-01

    Gangrene or perforation of the appendix is often caused by failure to make an early diagnosis of appendicitis. Variability in the anatomic location of the appendix can be responsible for atypical manifestations of appendicitis and diagnostic errors. Over a 52-month period, 125 appendectomies were done for suspected appendicitis at a military hospital. After excluding cases in which the location of the appendix was not provided, 106 cases were available for review. Fifteen patients (14%) did not have appendicitis. The appendix was found in the true pelvis, was behind the ileum or ileocolic mesentery, or was both retrocolic and retroperitoneal in 11 of 16 patients (69%) with gangrenous or perforative appendicitis. In contrast, the appendix was in one of these three sites in only four of 75 patients (5%) with simple appendicitis (P less than .001). Both physicians and patients were responsible for diagnostic delays, but the paucity of symptoms and signs in patients with a "hidden" appendix was the most likely cause of failure to diagnose appendicitis before perforation.

  4. The anatomic basis of parathyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, C

    1976-03-01

    A study of 645 normal adult parathyroid glands in 160 cadavers revealed that there is a definite pattern of anatomic distribution on the basis of the embryologic development of the parathyroid, thyroid, and thymic glands. The sites of predilection of the upper gland (Parathyroid IV) are, in order of frequency, the cricothyroid junction; the dorsum of the upper pole of the thyroid; and the retropharyngeal space. Those of the lower gland (Parathyroid III) are at the lower pole of the thyroid and the thymic tongue; rarely in the upper, the lateral neck, or the mediastinum. An understanding of the developmental relationship of the parathyroid glands to the thyroid and the thymus is fundamental in the delineation of the embryologic origin of the parathyroid glands. The parathyroid gland, located within the surgical capsule of the thyroid (subcapsular), when diseased, remains in place locally. A gland outside of the capsule (extracapsular) is often displaced into the posterior or anterior mediastinum. A collective assessment of the size, weight, color, shape, and consistency of the parathyroid gland is mandatory in the determination of its normalcy. Frozen section examination for stromal and intracellular fatty content is an added assurance of normalcy. That parathyroid glands sink in saline solution, and fat globules float, may aid in differentiating the two types of tissue. Supernumerary, fused, and intrathyroidal parathyroids, albeit rare, are of surgical importance.

  5. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  6. Anatomical considerations on the corona mortis.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cergan, Romica; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Folescu, Roxana; Pop, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The corona mortis (CMOR) represents the vascular connection of the obturator and external iliac systems. We aimed to evaluate by dissections the morphological possibilities of the CMOR and their individual combinations. For the study we used 20 human adult cadavers that were bilaterally dissected (40 hemipelvises), with evidences of the vascular elements at the level of the superior pubic branch in 32 (80%) of hemipelvises. The morphological patterns we identified were classified in three types (I-III): I. arterial CMOR (10 hemipelvises): I.1. obturator artery (OA) from the external iliac artery (EIA); I.2. OA from the inferior epigastric artery (IEA); I.3. anastomosis of the OA and IEA; I.4. pubic branches of the OA, in the absence of any anastomosis with the EIA system; II. venous CMOR (6 hemipelvises): II.1. obturator vein (OV) draining into the external iliac vein (EIV); II.2. OV draining into the inferior epigastric vein (IEV); II.3. venous anastomosis of the OV and IEV and III combined, arterial and venous CMOR (16 hemipelvises). We classified the combined coronae mortis in nine different subtypes that mainly (but not exclusively) correspond to various combinations of types I and II. The surgical relevance of the vascular relations of the superior branch of pubis (in trauma, orthopedic approaches, hernia repair, embolizations and intra-arterial infusions) recommends a detailed knowledge of the morphological and topographical possibilities of the crown of death and the individual evaluation of this risky anatomical structure.

  7. Anatomical constraints for neuromagnetic source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, John S.; Lewis, Paul S.; Ranken, D. M.; Kaplan, L.; Wood, C. C.

    1991-07-01

    The localization of neural electromagnetic sources from measurements at the head surface requires the solution of an inverse problem; that is, the determination of the number, location, spatial configuration, strength, and time-course of the neuronal currents that give rise to the magnetic field or potential distribution. In most general form, the neuromagnetic and electrical inverse problems are ill-posed and have no unique solution; however, approximate solutions are possible if assumptions are made regarding the shape and conductivity of the head and the number and configuration of neuronal currents responsible for the surface distributions. To help resolve ambiguities and to reduce the number and range of free parameters required to model complex neuromagnetic sources, the authors are investigating strategies to constrain the locations of allowable sources, based on a knowledge of individual anatomy. The key assumption, justified by both physiological evidence and theoretical considerations, is that the dominant neuromagnetic sources which contribute to surface field distributions reside within the cortex. It is demonstrated that anatomically constrained source modeling strategies can produce significant improvements in source localization; however, the conclusion is that additional improvements in model fitting or source reconstruction procedures are required.

  8. Is the cervical fascia an anatomical proteus?

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Condino, Sara; Stecco, Antonio; Soldani, Paola; Belmonte, Monica Mattioli; Gesi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The cervical fasciae have always represented a matter of debate. Indeed, in the literature, it is quite impossible to find two authors reporting the same description of the neck fascia. In the present review, a historical background was outlined, confirming that the Malgaigne's definition of the cervical fascia as an anatomical Proteus is widely justified. In an attempt to provide an essential and a more comprehensive classification, a fixed pattern of description of cervical fasciae is proposed. Based on the morphogenetic criteria, two fascial groups have been recognized: (1) fasciae which derive from primitive fibro-muscular laminae (muscular fasciae or myofasciae); (2) fasciae which derive from connective thickening (visceral fasciae). Topographic and comparative approaches allowed to distinguish three different types of fasciae in the neck: the superficial, the deep and the visceral fasciae. The first is most connected to the skin, the second to the muscles and the third to the viscera. The muscular fascia could be further divided into three layers according to the relationship with the different muscles.

  9. Designing Allosteric Regulators of Thrombin. Exosite 2 Features Multiple Sub-Sites That Can Be Targeted By Sulfated Small Molecules for Inducing Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Abdel Aziz, May H.; Sarkar, Aurijit; Mehta, Akul Y.; Zhou, Qibing; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    We recently designed a group of novel exosite 2-directed, sulfated, small, allosteric inhibitors of thrombin. To develop more potent inhibitors, monosulfated benzofuran tri- and tetrameric homologs of the parent designed dimers were synthesized in 7–8 steps and found to exhibit a wide range of potencies. Among these, trimer 9a was found to be nearly 10-fold more potent than the first generation molecules. Michaelis-Menten studies indicated an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Competitive studies using a hirudin peptide (exosite 1 ligand) and, unfractionated heparin, heparin octasaccharide and γ′-fibrinogen peptide (exosite 2 ligands), demonstrated exosite 2 recognition in a manner different from the parent dimers. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of 12 Arg/Lys residues of exosite 2 revealed a defect in 9a potency for Arg233Ala thrombin only confirming the major difference in site of recognition between the two structurally related sulfated benzofurans. The results suggest that multiple avenues are available within exosite 2 for inducing thrombin inhibition. PMID:23718540

  10. Coordination chemistry of [HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)](-) and its derivatives: toward a model for the iron subsite of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Whaley, C Matthew; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Wilson, Scott R

    2009-05-18

    The photoreaction of Fe(CO)(5) and cyanide salts in MeCN solution affords the dianion [Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)](2-), conveniently isolated as [K(18-crown-6)](2)[Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)]. Solutions of [Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)](2-) oxidize irreversibly at -600 mV (vs Ag/AgCl) to give primarily [Fe(CN)(3)(CO)(3)](-). Protonation of the dianion affords the hydride [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)] with a pK(a) approximately 17 (MeCN). The ferrous hydride exhibits enhanced electrophilicity vs its dianionic precursor, which resists substitution. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)] with tertiary phosphines and phosphites gives isomeric mixtures of [HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(2)L](-) (L = P(OPh)(3) and PPh(3)). Carbonyl substitution on [1H(CO)(2)](-) by P(OPh)(3) is first-order in both the phosphite and iron (k = 0.18 M(-1) s(-1) at 22 degrees C) with DeltaH(double dagger) = 51.6 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS(double dagger) = -83.0 J K(-1) mol(-1). These ligands are displaced under an atmosphere of CO. With cis-Ph(2)PCH=CHPPh(2) (dppv), we obtained the monocarbonyl, [HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(dppv)](-), a highly basic hydride (pK(a) > 23.3) that rearranges in solution to a single isomer. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)] with Et(4)NCN resulted in rapid deprotonation to give [Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)](2-) and HCN. The tricyano hydride [HFe(CN)(3)(CO)(2)](2-) is prepared by the reaction of [HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(2)(PPh(3))](-) and [K(18-crown-6)]CN. Similar to the phosphine and phosphite derivatives, [HFe(CN)(3)(CO)(2)](2-) exists as a mixture of all three possible isomers. Protonation of the hydrides [HFe(CN)(2)(CO)(dppv)](-) and [HFe(CN)(3)(CO)(2)](-) in acetonitrile solutions releases H(2) and gives the corresponding acetonitrile complexes [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)(3)(NCMe)(CO)(2)] and Fe(CN)(2)(NCMe)(CO)(dppv). Alkylation of [K(18-crown-6)](2)[Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)] with MeOTf gives the thermally unstable [MeFe(CN)(2)(CO)(3)](-), which was characterized spectroscopically at -40 degrees C. Reaction of dppv with [Me

  11. OSTEOTOMIES OF THE CORACOID PROCESS: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; de Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Marczyk, Carlos Stanislaw Fleury; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Relate the main tendinous and ligamentous structures attached in the coracoid process, correlating it to several levels of osteotomy and describing the involved structures. Methods: Thirty shoulders were dissected. The coracoid process with mainly inserted anatomic structures was dissected, and five levels of osteotomy (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5; 3.0 cm) were made from the apex of the process and the mainly involved structures were recorded. Results: In osteotomies of 1.0 cm, in 100% of the cases only the conjoint tendon (CT). In osteotomies of 1.5 cm there were 63.33% of cases involved with the CT and the Pectoralis minor (PMi), in 20% of cases only the CT, and in 16.66% the CT, PMi, and the coracohumeral ligament (CUL). In osteotomies of 2.0 cm, in 80% of the shoulders, the osteotomies embraced the CT, PMi and the CUL, and in 20% only the CT and the PMi were involved. In the osteotomies of 2.5cm there was involvement of the CT, PMi and CUL in 100% of cases. In the osteotomies of 3.0cm, six cases (20%) have presented an injury on the trapezoid ligament, and in 100% of these osteotomies, the osteotomized distal fragment had embraced the CT, PMi, CUL. Conclusion: The knowledge of anatomic structures inserted and involved in the osteotomies cuts of the coracoid process is very importan to lead with osteotomies performed in the treatment techniques of the coracoid process. Osteotomies of 3.0 cm can injure the trapezoid ligament. PMID:27042643

  12. Identifying Anatomical Origins of Coexisting Oscillations in the Cortical Microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Hannah; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations are omnipresent in neural population signals, like multi-unit recordings, EEG/MEG, and the local field potential. They have been linked to the population firing rate of neurons, with individual neurons firing in a close-to-irregular fashion at low rates. Using a combination of mean-field and linear response theory we predict the spectra generated in a layered microcircuit model of V1, composed of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons and based on connectivity compiled from anatomical and electrophysiological studies. The model exhibits low- and high-γ oscillations visible in all populations. Since locally generated frequencies are imposed onto other populations, the origin of the oscillations cannot be deduced from the spectra. We develop an universally applicable systematic approach that identifies the anatomical circuits underlying the generation of oscillations in a given network. Based on a theoretical reduction of the dynamics, we derive a sensitivity measure resulting in a frequency-dependent connectivity map that reveals connections crucial for the peak amplitude and frequency of the observed oscillations and identifies the minimal circuit generating a given frequency. The low-γ peak turns out to be generated in a sub-circuit located in layer 2/3 and 4, while the high-γ peak emerges from the inter-neurons in layer 4. Connections within and onto layer 5 are found to regulate slow rate fluctuations. We further demonstrate how small perturbations of the crucial connections have significant impact on the population spectra, while the impairment of other connections leaves the dynamics on the population level unaltered. The study uncovers connections where mechanisms controlling the spectra of the cortical microcircuit are most effective. PMID:27736873

  13. Optimizing Reconstruction with Periorbital Transplantation: Clinical Indications and Anatomic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael; Mundinger, Gerhard S.; Dorafshar, Amir H.; Iliff, Nicholas T.; Christensen, Joani M.; Christy, Michael R.; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Complex periorbital subunit reconstruction is challenging because the goals of effective reconstruction vary from one individual to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the indications and anatomic feasibility of periorbital transplantation by reviewing our institutional repository of facial injury. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center for a retrospective chart review conducted on patients with periorbital defects. Patient history, facial defects, visual acuity, and periorbital function were critically reviewed to identify indications for periorbital or total face (incorporating the periorbital subunit) vascularized composite allotransplantation. Cadaveric allograft harvest was then designed and performed for specific patient defects to determine anatomic feasibility. Disease conditions not captured by our patient population warranting consideration were reviewed. Results: A total of 7 facial or periorbital transplant candidates representing 6 different etiologies were selected as suitable indications for periorbital transplantation. Etiologies included trauma, burn, animal attack, and tumor, whereas proposed transplants included isolated periorbital and total face transplants. Allograft recovery was successfully completed in 4 periorbital subunits and 1 full face. Dual vascular supply was achieved in 5 of 6 periorbital subunits (superficial temporal and facial vessels). Conclusions: Transplantation of isolated periorbital structures or full face transplantation including periorbital structures is technically feasible. The goal of periorbital transplantation is to re-establish protective mechanisms of the eye, to prevent deterioration of visual acuity, and to optimize aesthetic outcomes. Criteria necessary for candidate selection and allograft design are identified by periorbital defect, periorbital function, ophthalmologic evaluation, and defect etiology. PMID:27014557

  14. Auxiliary anatomical labels for joint segmentation and atlas registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, Tobias; Szekely, Gabor; Goksel, Orcun

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies improving joint segmentation and registration by introducing auxiliary labels for anatomy that has similar appearance to the target anatomy while not being part of that target. Such auxiliary labels help avoid false positive labelling of non-target anatomy by resolving ambiguity. A known registration of a segmented atlas can help identify where a target segmentation should lie. Conversely, segmentations of anatomy in two images can help them be better registered. Joint segmentation and registration is then a method that can leverage information from both registration and segmentation to help one another. It has received increasing attention recently in the literature. Often, merely a single organ of interest is labelled in the atlas. In the presense of other anatomical structures with similar appearance, this leads to ambiguity in intensity based segmentation; for example, when segmenting individual bones in CT images where other bones share the same intensity profile. To alleviate this problem, we introduce automatic generation of additional labels in atlas segmentations, by marking similar-appearance non-target anatomy with an auxiliary label. Information from the auxiliary-labeled atlas segmentation is then incorporated by using a novel coherence potential, which penalizes differences between the deformed atlas segmentation and the target segmentation estimate. We validated this on a joint segmentation-registration approach that iteratively alternates between registering an atlas and segmenting the target image to find a final anatomical segmentation. The results show that automatic auxiliary labelling outperforms the same approach using a single label atlasses, for both mandibular bone segmentation in 3D-CT and corpus callosum segmentation in 2D-MRI.

  15. Mathematical modelling of the growth of human fetus anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Krzysztof; Kędzia, Wojciech; Kędzia, Emilia; Kędzia, Alicja; Derkowski, Wojciech

    2016-07-08

    The goal of this study was to present a procedure that would enable mathematical analysis of the increase of linear sizes of human anatomical structures, estimate mathematical model parameters and evaluate their adequacy. Section material consisted of 67 foetuses-rectus abdominis muscle and 75 foetuses- biceps femoris muscle. The following methods were incorporated to the study: preparation and anthropologic methods, image digital acquisition, Image J computer system measurements and statistical analysis method. We used an anthropologic method based on age determination with the use of crown-rump length-CRL (V-TUB) by Scammon and Calkins. The choice of mathematical function should be based on a real course of the curve presenting growth of anatomical structure linear size Ύ in subsequent weeks t of pregnancy. Size changes can be described with a segmental-linear model or one-function model with accuracy adequate enough for clinical purposes. The interdependence of size-age is described with many functions. However, the following functions are most often considered: linear, polynomial, spline, logarithmic, power, exponential, power-exponential, log-logistic I and II, Gompertz's I and II and von Bertalanffy's function. With the use of the procedures described above, mathematical models parameters were assessed for V-PL (the total length of body) and CRL body length increases, rectus abdominis total length h, its segments hI, hII, hIII, hIV, as well as biceps femoris length and width of long head (LHL and LHW) and of short head (SHL and SHW). The best adjustments to measurement results were observed in the exponential and Gompertz's models.

  16. Anatomical Correlates of Non-Verbal Perception in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with dementia who have dissociations in verbal and non-verbal sound processing may offer insights into the anatomic basis for highly related auditory modes. Methods: To determine the neuronal networks on non-verbal perception, 16 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD), 15 with behavior variant fronto-temporal dementia (bv-FTD), 14 with semantic dementia (SD) were evaluated and compared with 15 age-matched controls. Neuropsychological and auditory perceptive tasks were included to test the ability to compare pitch changes, scale-violated melody and for naming and associating with environmental sound. The brain 3D T1 images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to compare and correlated the volumetric measures with task scores. Results: The SD group scored the lowest among 3 groups in pitch or scale-violated melody tasks. In the environmental sound test, the SD group also showed impairment in naming and also in associating sound with pictures. The AD and bv-FTD groups, compared with the controls, showed no differences in all tests. VBM with task score correlation showed that atrophy in the right supra-marginal and superior temporal gyri was strongly related to deficits in detecting violated scales, while atrophy in the bilateral anterior temporal poles and left medial temporal structures was related to deficits in environmental sound recognition. Conclusions: Auditory perception of pitch, scale-violated melody or environmental sound reflects anatomical degeneration in dementia patients and the processing of non-verbal sounds are mediated by distinct neural circuits. PMID:27630558

  17. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  18. Anatomical and Radiological Aspects of the Supratrochlear Foramen in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Gutfiten-Schlesinger, Gabriel; Leite, Túlio FO; Pires, Lucas AS; Silva, Julio G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The supratrochlear foramen is an anatomic variation of great clinical and anthropologic interest. Although many studies addressed this subject in different ethnic groups, there are no studies regarding Brazilians. Aim To verify the incidence and morphometric measures of the supratrochlear foramen in Brazilian humeri. Materials and Methods A total of 330 dry humeri were analysed and divided in three groups: bones presenting the supratrochlear foramen (Group 1), bones displaying a translucent foramen (Group 2) and humeri without the foramen (Group 3). The aperture was measured with a digital vernier caliper. Radiographic pictures with different incidences were taken. Results Our analysis showed that 22.5% of humeri belonged in Group 1, 41.2% in Group 2, and 36.3% in Group 3. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the supratrochlear foramen on the left side were 2.779±2.050 mm and 2.332±1.23 mm, respectively. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the foramen on the right side were 2.778±2.197 mm, and 2.365±1.396 mm, respectively. The student’s t-test showed that there was no significant difference regarding the size of the foramen between both sides. The best X-ray machine setup was 50 kilo voltage and 0.08 milliamperage per second, associated with a slight increase in the distance of the x-ray tube. Conclusion The aperture seems to be the key point during the pre-operative planning of intramedullary fixation, since it has direct relation to the size of the intramedullary canal, thus, being an entity of clinical, anatomical, anthropological, radiological, and surgical interest. PMID:27790415

  19. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  20. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They

  1. Thoughts on practical core elements of an ethical anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    While questions of ethics in body procurement have become a focus of attention in many medical schools around the world, the recent report by a medical student regarding disturbing incidences in an anatomical dissection course (Terry, ) underlines the importance of a discussion of ethical practices in anatomical education. Here thoughts on core elements of instruction are proposed which are based on the premise that both, ethical body procurement and ethical anatomical education, are the foundation for a humanism-based professional training of students in medicine. As the anatomical dissection course presents an exceptional situation for students, practical guidelines for a curriculum founded on ethical considerations are essential. They include a preparatory phase before the start of the course in which students are asked about their expectations and fears concerning anatomical dissection; an introduction to the history and ethics of anatomy; a time for reflection in the dissection room before the start of dissection; a regular opportunity for reflections on dissection in parallel to the course with students and faculty; and a memorial service for the donors organized by students for faculty, students and donor families. Finally, anatomical faculty should undergo training in ethical educational practices. Many anatomy programs have incorporated various of these ideas, while others have not done so. Guidelines for ethical anatomical practices can strengthen the foundation of a humanistic approach to medicine in future physicians and health care workers.

  2. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56-57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8-9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes.

  3. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56–57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8–9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes. PMID:25384452

  4. A reusable anatomically segmented digital mannequin for public health communication.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Kaori; Okubo, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing development of world wide web technologies has facilitated a change in health communication, which has now become bi-directional and encompasses people with diverse backgrounds. To enable an even greater role for medical illustrations, a data set, BodyParts3D, has been generated and its data set can be used by anyone to create and exchange customised three-dimensional (3D) anatomical images. BP3D comprises more than 3000 3D object files created by segmenting a digital mannequin in accordance with anatomical naming conventions. This paper describes the methodologies and features used to generate an anatomically correct male mannequin.

  5. Anatomic changes due to interspecific grafting in cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Bomfim, N; Ribeiro, D G; Nassar, N M A

    2011-05-31

    Cassava rootstocks of varieties UnB 201 and UnB 122 grafted with scions of Manihot fortalezensis were prepared for anatomic study. The roots were cut, stained with safranin and alcian blue, and examined microscopically, comparing them with sections taken from ungrafted roots. There was a significant decrease in number of pericyclic fibers, vascular vessels and tyloses in rootstocks. They exhibited significant larger vessels. These changes in anatomic structure are a consequence of genetic effects caused by transference of genetic material from scion to rootstock. The same ungrafted species was compared. This is the first report on anatomic changes due to grafting in cassava.

  6. Sex determination of Joseon people skeletons based on anatomical, cultural and molecular biological clues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Suk; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Jun Bum; Kim, Myeung Ju; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2011-12-20

    Sex determination is very integral to examinations conducted by anatomists on human skeletons discovered in the archaeological field. In Korea, as in other countries, cultural or anatomical information has been the tool of first resort in making such determinations. In cases in which anatomical examination has revealed only borderline characteristics, PCR-based analysis of X/Y-chromosome genes has been employed. Even so, there are as yet very few reports on how accurately the respective results correspond with each other. In this study on 34 examined medieval Korean skeletons, 11 (32.3%) showed perfectly matching results for the three methods of sex determination. In the cases in which the cultural and anatomical findings were discordant, the amelogenin assay corroborated either the former or the latter. Although we must admit the relatively limited role of aDNA analysis, when only very small amounts of amplifiable DNA remain, we believe that the amelogenin assay can be very meaningful to Korean anatomists when employed in adjunct to conventional anatomically or culturally based sex determination.

  7. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    PubMed Central

    Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa, Modesto; Wiechers, Carlos; la Roca-Chiapas, Jose Maria De; Moreles, Alejandro Maldonado; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Huerta-Franco, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT) and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright, fowler, and supine positions; 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively). RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions. The ETT means were 5.2 ± 1.1 s, 6.1 ± 1.5 s, and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively. Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects’ anatomical position, and r = -0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject’s BMI. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique, it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT. PMID:18837088

  8. Construction and biomechanical properties of polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate based on the geometry of distal tibia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weiguo; Ye, Weixiong; Ye, Dongping; Zhou, Ziqiang; Chen, Zhiguang; Li, Aiguo; Xie, Zong-Han; Zhang, Lihai; Xu, Jiake

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide scientific and empirical evidence for the clinical application of the polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate, 80 human tibias from healthy adults were scanned by spiral CT and their three-dimensional images were reconstructed using the surface shaded display (SSD) method. Firstly, based on the geometric data of distal tibia, a polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate for distal tibia was designed and constructed. Biomechanical tests were then performed by applying axial loading, 4-point bending, and axial torsion loading on the fracture fixation models of fresh cadaver tibias. Our results showed that variation in twisting angles of lateral tibia surface was found in various segments of the distal tibia. The polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate was constructed based on the geometry of the distal tibia. Compared to the conventional anatomical locking plate, the polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate of the distal tibia provides a better fit to the geometry of the distal tibia of the domestic population, and the insertion angle of locking screws can be regulated up to 30°. Collectively, this study assesses the geometry of the distal tibia and provides variable locking screw trajectory to improve screw-plate stability through the design of a polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate.

  9. Relationship between Peeled Internal Limiting Membrane Area and Anatomic Outcomes following Macular Hole Surgery: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goker, Yasin Sakir; Koc, Mustafa; Yuksel, Kemal; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Gunes, Hasan; Ozpinar, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of peeled internal limiting membrane (ILM) area and anatomic outcomes following macular hole surgery using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty-one eyes in 37 consecutive patients with idiopathic, Gass stage 3-4 macular hole (MH) were enrolled in this retrospective comparative study. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to anatomic success or failure. Basal MH diameter, peeled ILM area, and MH height were calculated using SD-OCT. Other prognostic parameters, including age, stage, preoperative BCVA, and symptom duration were also assessed. Results. Thirty-two cases were classified as anatomic success, and 9 cases were classified as anatomic failure. Peeled ILM area was significantly wider and MH basal diameter was significantly less in the anatomic success group (p = 0.024 and 0.032, resp.). Other parameters did not demonstrate statistical significance. Conclusion. The findings of the present study show that the peeled ILM area can affect the anatomic outcomes of MH surgery. PMID:27413544

  10. Chinese adult anatomical models and the application in evaluation of RF exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tongning; Tan, Liwen; Shao, Qing; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Chen; Li, Ying; Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Wiart, Joe; Lu, Bingsong; Xiao, Li; Wang, Nan; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the work of constructing Chinese adult anatomical models and their application in evaluation of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field exposures. The original dataset was obtained from photos of the sliced frozen cadavers from the Chinese Visible Human Project. Details of preparing the cadaver for slicing procedures which may influence the anatomical structures are discussed. Segmentation and reconstruction were performed mainly manually by experienced anatomists. The reconstructed models represent the average Chinese in their twenties and thirties. The finest resolution for the models is 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 with 90 identified tissues/organs for the female and 87 identified tissues/organs for the male. Tiny anatomical structures such as blood vessels with diameters of 1 mm, various glands and nerves were identified. Whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR) from 20 MHz to 5.8 GHz was calculated with the finite-difference time-domain method for different RF exposure configurations. The WBSAR results are consistent with those from other available models. Finally, some details about the anatomical models are discussed.

  11. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-22

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization.

  12. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  13. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization. PMID:26796339

  14. Characteristics of anatomical landmarks in the mandibular interforaminal region: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Parnia, Fereidoun; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Mahboub, Farhang; Mojaver-Kahnamoui, Haniye

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to assess appearance, visibility, location and course of anatomical landmarks in mandibular interforaminal region using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Study design: A total of 96 CBCT examinations was re-evaluated to exploit anatomical landmarks. The examinations used the Promax 3D CBCT unit. A sole examiner carried out all the measurements. Visibilities of the anatomical landmarks were scored using a four-point rating scale. Results: The mandibular foramen, anterior loop, incisive canal and lingual foramen were observed in 100,84,83,49 % of the images, respectively. The mean size, diameter and width of anterior loop, incisive canal and lingual foramen were obtained 3.54± 1.41, 1.47±0.50 and 0.8 ± 0.09mm, respectively. Conclusion: It is not safe to recommend any definite distance mesially from the mental foramen. The diameter of the canals and foramens should be determined on a case-by-case basis to exploit the appropriate location for each individual. Key words:Anatomical landmarks, cone-beam computed tomography, implant surgery, radiographic evaluation, surgical complications. PMID:22143718

  15. Anatomically Asymmetrical Runners Move More Asymmetrically at the Same Metabolic Cost

    PubMed Central

    Seminati, Elena; Nardello, Francesca; Zamparo, Paola; Ardigò, Luca P.; Faccioli, Niccolò; Minetti, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that, as occurring in cars, body structural asymmetries could generate asymmetry in the kinematics/dynamics of locomotion, ending up in a higher metabolic cost of transport, i.e. more ‘fuel’ needed to travel a given distance. Previous studies found the asymmetries in horses’ body negatively correlated with galloping performance. In this investigation, we analyzed anatomical differences between the left and right lower limbs as a whole by performing 3D cross-correlation of Magnetic Resonance Images of 19 male runners, clustered as Untrained Runners, Occasional Runners and Skilled Runners. Running kinematics of their body centre of mass were obtained from the body segments coordinates measured by a 3D motion capture system at incremental running velocities on a treadmill. A recent mathematical procedure quantified the asymmetry of the body centre of mass trajectory between the left and right steps. During the same sessions, runners’ metabolic consumption was measured and the cost of transport was calculated. No correlations were found between anatomical/kinematic variables and the metabolic cost of transport, regardless of the training experience. However, anatomical symmetry significant correlated to the kinematic symmetry, and the most trained subjects showed the highest level of kinematic symmetry during running. Results suggest that despite the significant effects of anatomical asymmetry on kinematics, either those changes are too small to affect economy or some plastic compensation in the locomotor system mitigates the hypothesized change in energy expenditure of running. PMID:24086316

  16. Precision-grip force changes in the anatomical and prosthetic limb during predictable load increases.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D L; Wallace, S A; Noteboom, J T

    2000-06-01

    This study examined precision-grip force applied to an instrumented test object held aloft while the weight of the object was predictably varied by transporting and placing loads (50, 100, or 200 g) atop the test object. Transport of the loads was performed either by the subject or the experimenter. Grip force was examined in four non-amputee control subjects and in the anatomical and prosthetic hand of a subject with a prosthetic device. As subjects transported the load, anticipatory grip-force changes occurred in the anatomical hands and prosthetic hand, which were scaled in relation to the load. When the experimenter transported the load to the anatomical hands of control subjects or the prosthetic user, anticipatory increases in grip force occurred that also were scaled in relation to load. However, when the experimenter transported the load to the prosthetic hand, anticipatory grip-force adjustments were absent. During the phase in which the load was being assumed by the postural hand, grip forces in the anatomical hands and prosthetic hand were further scaled to load demands. Ability to adapt grip force in the prosthetic hand during this phase suggested that the subject was utilizing sensory information from the residual limb to adjust grip force. Thus, while anticipatory changes precede the process of adaptation to load changes, actual sensory consequences resulting from added weight remain necessary to fully adapt grip force to load demands, even for the prosthetic user.

  17. A biomechanical assessment of isometric handgrip force and fatigue at different anatomical positions.

    PubMed

    Alkurdi, Ziad D; Dweiri, Yazan M

    2010-05-01

    The present work examined the handgrip force at different anatomical positions for both hands. Anthropometrics, handgrip force, and fatigue were obtained from a representative sample of 20 males randomly selected from the German Jordanian University students. The hand dynamometer first was calibrated with respect to the volunteer's maximal grip strength, and he was then asked to squeeze maximally until the grip force decreased to 50% of its maximal due to fatigue; this test was performed for both hands at different anatomical positions with 2 min of rest for recovery of muscle function. The results showed differences in the handgrip force between subjects of the same anatomical positions and for the different anatomical positions, differences in the time for 50% of the force maximal for both right hand and left hand, higher time required to achieve 50% of maximal handgrip force for the nondominant hand, and maximal handgrip force was obtained when arm adduction with 90 degrees forward at the elbow joint. Recommendations for future work are to measure fatigue time at different percentages, 25%, 50%, 60%, and 75% of maximal force and to investigate the factors affecting handgrip force over a larger sample.

  18. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takumi; Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs.

  19. Anatomical brain atlas for NIRS measurements of brain activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffini, Matteo; Zucchelli, Lucia; Contini, Davide; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Boas, David; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Anatomical brain atlases have been introduced in the analysis NIRS data of brain activation and good spatial activation localization has been proved. We applied this method to visualize NIRS data from different protocols.

  20. Anatomical terminology and nomenclature: past, present and highlights.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav; Bozdechova, Ivana; Cech, Pavel; Musil, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    The anatomical terminology is a base for medical communication. It is elaborated into a nomenclature in Latin. Its history goes back to 1895, when the first Latin anatomical nomenclature was published as Basiliensia Nomina Anatomica. It was followed by seven revisions (Jenaiensia Nomina Anatomica 1935, Parisiensia Nomina Anatomica 1955, Nomina Anatomica 2nd to 6th edition 1960-1989). The last revision, Terminologia Anatomica, (TA) created by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology and approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, was published in 1998. Apart from the official Latin anatomical terminology, it includes a list of recommended English equivalents. In this article, major changes and pitfalls of the nomenclature are discussed, as well as the clinical anatomy terms. The last revision (TA) is highly recommended to the attention of not only teachers, students and researchers, but also to clinicians, doctors, translators, editors and publishers to be followed in their activities.

  1. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. PMID:28116086

  2. Probabilistic predictions of penetrating injury to anatomic structures.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, O.; Webber, B.; Clarke, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive 3D graphical system which allows the user to visualize different bullet path hypotheses and stab wound paths and computes the probability that an anatomical structure associated with a given penetration path is injured. Probabilities can help to identify those anatomical structures which have potentially critical damage from penetrating trauma and differentiate these from structures that are not seriously injured. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9357718

  3. The "anatomic" view of the suprarenals in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Sénécail, B; Colin, D; Person, H; Vallée, B; Lefèvre, C

    1994-01-01

    Based on coordinates derived from three series of anatomic sections, the authors propose a view for tomographic investigation, applicable in MRI and ultrasound, which reconstructs the ideal image of the suprarenal gland in its quadrilateral as described by Testut. This "anatomic" view is 45 degrees vertical and oblique, intermediate between the sagittal and frontal views, which it can advantageously replace. A new aspect of suprarenal tomography, recalling the image of a triskele, is described in the context of this view.

  4. Electro-Anatomical Four-Dimensional Mapping of Ventricular Tachycardia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pulmonary vein (PV) region reported ulterior stenosis . Anatomic reconstruction by CT has helped understand the frequency of occurrence and effects of PV... stenosis [1]. Our group presented that the bi-atrial activation sequence became well understood when cardiac activity data and anatomic information...through the Aortic Valve, and of deploying the ICE catheter into the LV transseptally via the IVC, through the Fossa Ovalis and through the Mitral

  5. Toledo School of Translators and their influence on anatomical terminology.

    PubMed

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Bueno-López, José-L; Raio, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Translation facilitates transmission of knowledge between cultures. The fundamental transfer of anatomic terminology from the Ancient Greek and Islamic Golden Age cultures, to medieval Latin Christendom took place in the so-called Toledo School of Translators in the 12th-13th centuries. Translations made in Toledo circulated widely across Europe. They were the foundation of scientific thinking that was born in the boards of first universities. In Toledo, Gerard of Cremona translated Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, the key work of Islamic Golden Age of medicine. Albertus Magnus, Mondino de Luzzi and Guy de Chauliac, the leading authors of anatomical Latin words in the Middle Ages, founded their books on Gerard's translations. The anatomical terms of the Canon retain auctoritas up to the Renaissance. Thus, terms coined by Gerard such as diaphragm, orbit, pupil or sagittal remain relevant in the current official anatomical terminology. The aim of the present paper is to bring new attention to the highly significant influence that the Toledo School of Translators had in anatomical terminology. For this, we shall review here the onomastic origins of a number of anatomical terms (additamentum; coracoid process; coxal; false ribs; femur; panniculus; spondylus; squamous sutures; thorax; xiphoid process, etc.) which are still used today.

  6. Anatomical and biomechanical investigations of the iliotibial tract.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, K; Siebert, C H; Pandorf, T; Schopphoff, E; Prescher, A; Niethard, F U

    2004-12-01

    Divergent descriptions of the anatomic location and biomechanical function of the iliotibial tract (IT) can be found in the literature. This study attempted to obtain exact data regarding the anatomic course and material characteristics including the biomechanical properties of this structure. The following were its aims: (1) anatomical investigations of the IT; (2) mechanical properties of the IT; (3) femoral head centralizing force of the IT and subligamentous forces in the height of the greater trochanter in different joint positions by using a custom-made measuring prosthesis and a subligamentous positioned sensor; (4) construction of a finite element model of the proximal femur including the IT and measuring the femoral neck angle under variation. The hip joints and IT in a total of 18 unfixed corpses were evaluated. We studied the anatomic relationship to surrounding structures, as well as the material properties with the help of tensile strength testing utilizing an uniaxial apparatus. During the test, a load-displacement curve was registered, documenting the maximum load and deformation of the IT. To measure the subligamentous pressure at the height of the greater trochanter, a custom-made sensor with a power-recording instrument was constructed. Furthermore, an altered hip prosthesis with a pressure gauge at the height of the femoral neck was used to measure the forces which are directed at the acetabulum. The investigations were done in neutral-0 position and ab/adduction of the hip joint of the unfixed corpse. In addition, we varied the femoral neck angle between 115 degrees and 155 degrees in 5 degrees steps. To confirm the subligamentous forces, we did the same measurements intraoperatively at the height of the greater trochanter before and after hip joint replacement in 12 patients. We constructed a finite element model of the proximal femur and considering the IT. The acquisition of the data was done at physiological (128 degrees), varus (115 degrees

  7. Contribution to the anatomical nomenclature concerning general anatomy and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Musil, Vladimir; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-09-01

    Nomenclature of the general and variant anatomy belongs to the most neglected parts of the Latin anatomical nomenclature in Terminologia Anatomica. Although many important small structures are included in Terminologia Anatomica, when describing and teaching particular anatomy of any part of the human body, the general terms are necessary, such as planes, lines and flexion grooves. Moreover, Terminologia Anatomica contains only 149 terms of variant structures, enlisted in the parentheses to differentiate them from constant ones. They are only a rather representative selection and some more should be added, both from the educational and clinical point of view. The authors present some terms, completed with their definitions or explanations concerning the general and variant anatomy to evoke broader discussion on this topic which should issue in incorporation of proposed terms (or their equivalents) into the Terminologia Anatomica.

  8. Fabrication and assessment of 3D printed anatomical models of the lower limb for anatomical teaching and femoral vessel access training in medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Michael K; Reese, Sven; Herlihy, Therese; Geoghegan, Tony; Cantwell, Colin P; Feeney, Robin N M; Jones, James F X

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, cadaveric dissection has been the touchstone of anatomy education. It offers a medical student intimate access to his or her first patient. In contrast to idealized artisan anatomical models, it presents the natural variation of anatomy in fine detail. However, a new teaching construct has appeared recently in which artificial cadavers are manufactured through three-dimensional (3D) printing of patient specific radiological data sets. In this article, a simple powder based printer is made more versatile to manufacture hard bones, silicone muscles and perfusable blood vessels. The approach involves blending modern approaches (3D printing) with more ancient ones (casting and lost-wax techniques). These anatomically accurate models can augment the approach to anatomy teaching from dissection to synthesis of 3D-printed parts held together with embedded rare earth magnets. Vascular simulation is possible through application of pumps and artificial blood. The resulting arteries and veins can be cannulated and imaged with Doppler ultrasound. In some respects, 3D-printed anatomy is superior to older teaching methods because the parts are cheap, scalable, they can cover the entire age span, they can be both dissected and reassembled and the data files can be printed anywhere in the world and mass produced. Anatomical diversity can be collated as a digital repository and reprinted rather than waiting for the rare variant to appear in the dissection room. It is predicted that 3D printing will revolutionize anatomy when poly-material printing is perfected in the early 21st century.

  9. SU-E-J-191: Automated Detection of Anatomic Changes in H'N Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Usynin, A; Ramsey, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel statistics-based method for automated detection of anatomical changes using cone-beam CT data. A method was developed that can provide a reliable and automated early warning system that enables a “just-in-time” adaptation of the treatment plan. Methods: Anatomical changes were evaluated by comparing the original treatment planning CT with daily CBCT images taken prior treatment delivery. The external body contour was computed on a given CT slice and compared against the corresponding contour on the daily CBCT. In contrast to threshold-based techniques, a statistical approach was employed to evaluate the difference between the contours using a given confidence level. The detection tool used the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, which is a non-parametric technique that compares two samples drawn from arbitrary probability distributions. 11 H'N patients were retrospectively selected from a clinical imaging database with a total of 186 CBCT images. Six patients in the database were confirmed to have anatomic changes during the course of radiotherapy. Five of the H'N patients did not have significant changes. The KS test was applied to the contour data using a sliding window analysis. The confidence level of 0.99 was used to moderate false detection. Results: The algorithm was able to correctly detect anatomical changes in 6 out of 6 patients with an excellent spatial accuracy as early as at the 14th elapsed day. The algorithm provided a consistent and accurate delineation of the detected changes. The output of the anatomical change tool is easy interpretable, and can be shown overlaid on a 3D rendering of the patient's anatomy. Conclusion: The detection method provides the basis for one of the key components of Adaptive Radiation Therapy. The method uses tools that are readily available in the clinic, including daily CBCT imaging, and image co-registration facilities.

  10. Interfractional Variations in Patient Setup and Anatomic Change Assessed by Daily Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. Allen . E-mail: ali@radonc.mcw.edu; Qi, X. Sharon; Pitterle, Marissa; Kalakota, Kapila; Mueller, Kevin; Erickson, Beth A.; Wang Dian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Firat, Selim Y.; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the interfractional variations in patient setup and anatomic changes at seven anatomic sites observed in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 152 patients treated at seven anatomic sites using a Hi-Art helical tomotherapy system were analyzed. Daily tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography images acquired before each treatment were fused to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images to determine the daily setup errors and organ motions and deformations. The setup errors were corrected before treatment and were used, along with the organ motions, to determine the clinical target volume/planning target volume margins. The organ motions and deformations for 3 representative patient cases (pancreas, uterus, and soft-tissue sarcoma) and for 14 kidneys of 7 patients are presented. Results: Interfractional setup errors in the skull, brain, and head and neck are significantly smaller than those in the chest, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. These site-specific relationships are statistically significant. The margins required to account for these setup errors range from 3 to 8 mm for the seven sites. The margin to account for both setup errors and organ motions for kidney is 16 mm. Substantial interfractional anatomic changes were observed. For example, the pancreas moved up to {+-}20 mm and volumes of the uterus and sarcoma varied {<=}30% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The interfractional variations in patient setup and in shapes, sizes, and positions of both targets and normal structures are site specific and may be used to determine the site-specific margins. The data presented in this work dealing with seven anatomic sites may be useful in developing adaptive radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Death in Long-Term Survivors of Esophageal Cancer: An Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result Database

    PubMed Central

    Gharzai, Laila; Verma, Vivek; Denniston, Kyle A.; Bhirud, Abhijeet R.; Bennion, Nathan R.; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer often results in unintended radiation doses delivered to the heart owing to anatomic proximity. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we examined late cardiac death in survivors of esophageal cancer that had or had not received RT. Methods 5,630 patients were identified that were diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma (AC) from 1973–2012, who were followed for at least 5 years after therapy. Examined risk factors for cardiac death included age (≤55/56-65/66-75/>75), gender, race (white/non-white), stage (local/regional/distant), histology (SCC/AC), esophageal location (<18cm/18-24cm/25-32cm/33-40cm from incisors), diagnosis year (1973-1992/1993-2002/2003-2012), and receipt of surgery and/or RT. Time to cardiac death was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox model was used to evaluate risk factors for cardiac death in propensity score matched data. Results Patients who received RT were younger, diagnosed more recently, had more advanced disease, SCC histology, and no surgery. The RT group had higher risk of cardiac death than the no-RT group (log-rank p<0.0001). The median time to cardiac death in the RT group was 289 months (95% CI, 255–367) and was not reached in the no-RT group. The probability of cardiac death increased with age and decreased with diagnosis year, and this trend was more pronounced in the RT group. Multivariate analysis found RT to be associated with higher probability of cardiac death (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.47, HR 1.961, 95% CI 1.466–2.624). Lower esophageal subsite (33–40 cm) was also associated with a higher risk of cardiac death. Other variables were not associated with cardiac death. Conclusions Recognizing the limitations of a SEER analysis including lack of comorbidity accountability, these data should prompt more definitive study as to whether a possible associative effect of RT on cardiac death

  12. Anatomical consequences of partial beak amputation (beak trimming) in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Gentle, M J; Thorp, B H; Hughes, B O

    1995-03-01

    A detailed anatomical study was made of the effects of trimming the upper beak of turkeys. The anatomy of the normal beak was compared with that of beaks from birds which had been trimmed by one of three methods, all commonly used in the poultry industry: the Bio-Beaker which passes an electric current through the premaxilla, secateurs, or a heated blade debeaker. All three resulted in the loss of significant amounts of beak tissue. By 42 days after trimming the beak had healed with extensive regrowth, including bone and cartilage formation, and the pattern of regrowth was similar after all three methods. In the normal bird the dermis at the tip of the upper beak contains large numbers of nerve fibres and sensory receptors, but in the beak-trimmed birds the dermal tissue, although well supplied with blood vessels, was devoid of afferent nerve fibres and sensory nerve endings. In contrast with the results of previous studies with older chickens there was no evidence of neuroma formation. Trimming with secateurs was the most precise method. The heated blade damaged additional tissue close to the position of the cut, and the BioBeaker produced the most tissue damage. Behavioural studies suggested that the effectiveness of beak trimming in controlling feather pecking depends on the extent of the tissue damage.

  13. Virtual electrodes around anatomical structures and their roles in defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Vigmond, Edward; Bishop, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Virtual electrodes from structural/conductivity heterogeneities are known to elicit wavefront propagation, upon field-stimulation, and are thought to be important for defibrillation. In this work we investigate how the constitutive and geometrical parameters associated with such anatomical heterogeneities, represented by endo/epicardial surfaces and intramural surfaces in the form of blood-vessels, affect the virtual electrode patterns produced. Methods and results The steady-state bidomain model is used to obtain, using analytical and numerical methods, the virtual electrode patterns created around idealized endocardial trabeculations and blood-vessels. The virtual electrode pattern around blood-vessels is shown to be composed of two dominant effects; current traversing the vessel surface and conductivity heterogeneity from the fibre-architecture. The relative magnitudes of these two effects explain the swapping of the virtual electrode polarity observed, as a function of the vessel radius, and aid in the understanding of the virtual electrode patterns predicted by numerical bidomain modelling. The relatively high conductivity of blood, compared to myocardium, is shown to cause stronger depolarizations in the endocardial trabeculae grooves than the protrusions. Conclusions The results provide additional quantitative understanding of the virtual electrodes produced by small-scale ventricular anatomy, and highlight the importance of faithfully representing the physiology and the physics in the context of computational modelling of field stimulation. PMID:28253365

  14. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric fields due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  15. Quantitative Anatomic Analysis of the Native Ligamentum Teres

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Jacob D.; Slette, Erik L.; Chahla, Jorge; Brady, Alex W.; Locks, Renato; Trindade, Christiano A. C.; Rasmussen, Matthew T.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While recent studies have addressed the biomechanical function of the ligamentum teres and provided descriptions of ligamentum teres reconstruction techniques, its detailed quantitative anatomy remains relatively undocumented. Moreover, there is a lack of consensus in the literature regarding the number and morphology of the acetabular attachments of the ligamentum teres. Purpose: To provide a clinically relevant quantitative anatomic description of the native human ligamentum teres. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Ten human cadaveric hemipelvises, complete with femurs (mean age, 59.6 years; range, 47-65 years), were dissected free of all extra-articular soft tissues to isolate the ligamentum teres and its attachments. A coordinate measuring device was used to quantify the attachment areas and their relationships to pertinent open and arthroscopic landmarks on both the acetabulum and the femur. The clock face reference system was utilized to describe acetabular anatomy, and all anatomic relationships were described using the mean and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There were 6 distinct attachments to the acetabulum and 1 to the femur. The areas of the acetabular and femoral attachment footprints of the ligamentum teres were 434 mm2 (95% CI, 320-549 mm2) and 84 mm2 (95% CI, 65-104 mm2), respectively. The 6 acetabular clock face locations were as follows: anterior attachment, 4:53 o’clock (95% CI, 4:45-5:02); posterior attachment, 6:33 o’clock (95% CI, 6:23-6:43); ischial attachment, 8:07 o’clock (95% CI, 7:47-8:26); iliac attachment, 1:49 o’clock (95% CI, 1:04-2:34); and a smaller pubic attachment that was located at 3:50 o’clock (95% CI, 3:41-4:00). The ischial attachment possessed the largest cross-sectional attachment area (127.3 mm2; 95% CI, 103.0-151.7 mm2) of all the acetabular attachments of the ligamentum teres. Conclusion: The most important finding of this study was that the human ligamentum teres had 6

  16. Korean Type Distal Radius Anatomical Volar Plate System: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jihyeung; Kim, Min Bom; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is the most common fracture of the upper extremity, and approximately 60,000 distal radius fractures occur annually in Korea. Internal fixation with an anatomical volar locking plate is widely used in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. However, most of the currently used distal radius anatomical plate systems were designed based on the anatomical characteristics of Western populations. Recently, the Korean-type distal radius anatomical volar plate (K-DRAVP) system was designed and developed based on the anatomical characteristics of the distal radius of Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of the new K-DRAVP system, and to compare its radiologic and functional results with those of the other systems. Methods From March 2012 to October 2012, 46 patients with acute distal radius fractures who were treated with the K-DRAVP system at three hospitals were enrolled in this study. Standard posteroanterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing, and three radiographic parameters (volar tilt, radial inclination, and radial length) were assessed to evaluate radiographic outcomes. The range of motion and grip strength, the Gartland and Werley scoring system, and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Results All radiologic parameters were restored to normal values, and maintained without any loosening or collapse until the time of final follow-up. Grip strength was restored to 84% of the value for the unaffected side. The mean range of motion of the wrist at final follow-up was restored to 77%-95% of the value for the unaffected side. According to the Gartland and Werley scoring system, there were 16 excellent, 26 good, and 4 fair results. The mean DASH score was 8.4 points. There were no complications after surgery. Conclusions The newly developed K-DRAVP system could be used to

  17. [Anatomical names of foramina and canales in skeleton].

    PubMed

    Shikano, S; Yamashita, Y

    1998-03-01

    Latin anatomical names of Foramina and Canales in skeleton were analyzed and compared with Japanese anatomical names for better understanding of the structures of the human body and for possible revision in the future. The conclusions were as follows: 1. In general, short tunnels were called Foramina (singular: Foramen), and long tunnels Canales (singular: Canalis). 2. One end of Canalis was sometimes called Foramen. In this case, Canalis and Foramen were usually modified by the same words. 3. Each name of Foramina contained the word which means form, state, absolute size, region of existence, one of the contents or function of Foramina. 4. Each name of Canales contained the word which means region of existence, one of the contents or function of Canales. 5. Some names of Foramina and Canales that were supposed to mean the region of existence meant one of the contents of the structures. 6. As for Latin anatomical names, the relation between words were relatively clear by the proper use of noun, adjective, nominative, and genitive. 7. Since different Chinese characters were sometimes pronounced similarly in Japanese anatomical names, different structures might be confused. 8. It seemed that some Japanese anatomical names needed partial correction.

  18. [ANATOMICAL PREPARATIONS IN MUSEUMS A SPECIAL CATEGORY OF CULTURAL HERITAGE].

    PubMed

    Monza, Francesca; Licata, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The international debate on the issue of human remains in museums and on the ethical issues related to their exhibition stimulates reflection on the Italian anatomical collections and on their preparations. A definition of human remains or of anatomical preparation does not exist in the Italian legislation. The anatomical specimens in museums are protected by the laws of Cultural Heritage as part of public collections, but their status is not well defined. By their nature of human material they would in fact be considered as a special category of Cultural Heritage. Because they are part of a cadaver they can be regarded as res nullius, but since treated with special techniques they could also change their meaning and being considered a species nova. Finally, it reflects on the possibility of creating a museum in Italy composed by new anatomical preparations. The article outline the contours of a museological issue that deserves to be investigated in order to better identify the anatomical preparations and their management in museums.

  19. Identification of parathyroid glands: anatomical study and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Melo, Catarina; Pinheiro, Susana; Carvalho, Lina; Bernardes, António

    2015-03-01

    While performing thyroid surgery, the unintentional lesion of parathyroid glands and laryngeal nerves results in a profound alteration in patient's quality of life. To minimize thyroid surgery morbidity, the surgeon must have an in-depth knowledge of the thyroid gland morphology and its anatomical relations in the anterior compartment of the neck. This work intended to simulate total thyroidectomies using cadaver parts and isolate fragments that may correspond to parathyroid glands. The thyroid glands and "eventual" parathyroid glands were then submitted to histological study. Ninety-two cadaver parts were used for macroscopic dissection. A total of 242 fragments were isolated, 154 of which were confirmed through histological study to be parathyroid glands. In 36 cases, all "eventual" parathyroid glands isolated during dissection were confirmed through histological verification. In 40 cases, some glands were confirmed. In 16 cases, none of the "eventual" parathyroid glands was confirmed. The 92 thyroid glands isolated during dissection were also submitted to histological study. In 21 thyroid glands, 16 parathyroid glands were identified in the histological cuts: 8 sub-capsular, 8 extra-capsular, 6 intra-thyroidal. There was no statistical difference between the dimensions of the parathyroid glands. Parathyroid gland identification and preservation are sometimes a challenge during thyroid surgery, difficulty that has been demonstrated during dissection of cadaver parts.

  20. Ectopic parathyroid glands and their anatomical, clinical and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Noussios, G; Anagnostis, P; Natsis, K

    2012-11-01

    Ectopic parathyroid glands result from aberrant migration during early stages of development and lack of successful identification may lead to lack of success in parathyroid surgery. They constitute a common etiology of persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism, when they are missed at initial diagnosis. Their prevalence is about 2-43% in anatomical series and up to 16% and 14% in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, respectively. Ectopic inferior parathyroids are most frequently found in the anterior mediastinum, in association with the thymus or the thyroid gland, while the most common position for ectopic superior parathyroids is the tracheoesophageal groove and retroesophageal region. Neck ultrasound and 99mTc Sestamibi scan are first-line imaging modalities, although with low sensitivity and specificity. However, their combination with modern techniques, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) alone or in combination with CT (SPECT/CT) increases their diagnostic accuracy. Fine needle-aspiration cytology of a lesion suspicious for parathyroid tissue and measurement of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the aspired material further assist to the successful preoperative localization of ectopic glands. Common sites for surgical investigation are the upper thyroid pole and the upper vascular thyroid stalk behind the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus for the superior parathyroids, and the carotid artery bifurcation and the thymic tongue, for the inferior parathyroids. Radioguided minimally invasive parathyroidectomy after successful localization, assisted by rapid PTH measurement postoperatively, significantly improves surgical outcomes in patients with ectopic parathyroid adenomas.

  1. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAMI, Reona; TANIMOTO, Yoshimasa; KISHIMOTO, Miori; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1–3 parietal and 1–3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1–4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2–7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26615866

  2. Anatomical Variations of the Circulus Arteriosus in Cadaveric Human Brains

    PubMed Central

    Gunnal, S. A.; Farooqui, M. S.; Wabale, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Circulus arteriosus/circle of Willis (CW) is a polygonal anastomotic channel at the base of the brain which unites the internal carotid and vertebrobasilar system. It maintains the steady and constant supply to the brain. The variations of CW are seen often. The Aim of the present work is to find out the percentage of normal pattern of CW, and the frequency of variations of the CW and to study the morphological and morphometric aspects of all components of CW. Methods. Circulus arteriosus of 150 formalin preserved brains were dissected. Dimensions of all the components forming circles were measured. Variations of all the segments were noted and well photographed. The variations such as aplasia, hypoplasia, duplication, fenestrations, and difference in dimensions with opposite segments were noted. The data collected in the study was analyzed. Results. Twenty-one different types of CW were found in the present study. Normal and complete CW was found in 60%. CW with gross morphological variations was seen in 40%. Maximum variations were seen in the PCoA followed by the ACoA in 50% and 40%, respectively. Conclusion. As it confirms high percentage of variations, all surgical interventions should be preceded by angiography. Awareness of these anatomical variations is important in neurovascular procedures. PMID:24891951

  3. Fast left ventricle tracking using localized anatomical affine optical flow.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João L; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    In daily clinical cardiology practice, left ventricle (LV) global and regional function assessment is crucial for disease diagnosis, therapy selection and patient follow-up. Currently, this is still a time-consuming task, spending valuable human resources. In this work, a novel fast methodology for automatic LV tracking is proposed based on localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow. This novel method can be combined to previously proposed segmentation frameworks or manually delineated surfaces at an initial frame to obtain fully delineated datasets and, thus, assess both global and regional myocardial function. Its feasibility and accuracy was investigated in three distinct public databases, namely in realistically simulated 3D ultrasound (US), clinical 3D echocardiography and clinical cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. The method showed accurate tracking results in all databases, proving its applicability and accuracy for myocardial function assessment. Moreover, when combined to previous state-of-the-art segmentation frameworks, it outperformed previous tracking strategies in both 3D US and CMR data, automatically computing relevant cardiac indices with smaller biases and narrower limits of agreement compared to reference indices. Simultaneously, the proposed localized tracking method showed to be suitable for online processing, even for 3D motion assessment. Importantly, although here evaluated for LV tracking only, this novel methodology is applicable for tracking of other target structures with minimal adaptations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  5. Anatomical Study of Variations in the Blood Supply of Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Aristotle, Sharmila; Sundarapandian; Felicia, Christilda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery and a single renal vein, which accounts for about 20% of the cardiac output. However, variations in the form of level of origin and arrangement of renal arteries are so frequent. Aim: The present study aimed to note the vascular anatomy of kidneys with respect to the variations in their origin, course and any aberrant vessels which were present. Materials and Methods: The study material comprised of 15 formalin fixed human cadavers. During routine abdominal dissection for undergraduate students, the kidneys were exposed and the blood supply, along with its variations, were noted. Results: The following anatomical findings are observed in this study: (i) Accessory renal arteries (ii) Presegmental arteries (iii) Upper polar arteries (iv) Lower polar arteries (v) Inferior suprarenal artery from accessory renal artery and (vi) Accessory renal vein. Conclusion: Awareness of the normal as well variational anatomy is mandatory for the surgeons, radiologists and urologists, for doing any uroradiological procedures or angiographic studies. Hence, this study will serve a useful guideline for the above mentioned procedures. PMID:24086837

  6. The posterior meniscofemoral ligament: morphologic study and anatomic classification.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Ho; Kim, Deog-Im; Choi, Seung-Gyu; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2012-07-01

    The meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) run from the medial femoral condyle to the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and consist of anterior MFL (aMFL) and/or posterior MFL (pMFL) components according to whether it passes anterior or posterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and morphologic features of the MFLs in Koreans and formulate an anatomic classification system of MFLs to aid the detailed interpretation of medical imaging or biomechanical data. One hundred knees from 52 cadavers were studied. Eighty-seven knees had pMFLs, whereas an aMFL was only found in one knee from a male cadaver. The pMFLs and PCLs were longer in males than in females (P < 0.05). The most common type of MFL was the high crossing of a typical pMFL against the PCL in both genders. Regarding other types, the incidence of absent pMFLs was higher in males than in females and the oblique bundle of the PCL was easily confused with the pMFL in several cases in both genders. These results provide the basis for the classification system of the MFL and will contribute to better outcomes for evaluating the MFL and PCL when using medical imaging such as arthro-CT scan or MRI through a better understanding of the anatomy of the MFL and PCL.

  7. Anatomical study on the innervation of the elbow capsule☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Filho, Mauro Razuk; Rozas, João; Wey, João; de Andrade, Antonio Marcos; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To put forward an anatomical description of the innervation of the elbow capsule, illustrated through morphological analysis on dissections. Methods Thirty elbows from fresh fixed adult cadavers aged 32–74 years, of both sexes, were dissected. Results Among the dissected arms, we observed that the median nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in five arms, two branches in two arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in nine arms and five branches in two arms. The radial nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in two arms, two branches in nine arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in five arms and five branches in two arms. The ulnar nerve did not have any branches in three arms, while it had one branch in six arms, two branches in four arms, three branches in five arms, four branches in seven arms, five branches in four arms and six branches in one arm. Conclusions We observed branches of the radial, ulnar and medial nerves in the elbow joint, and a close relationship between their capsular and motor branches. PMID:27218079

  8. CBCT Assessment of Mental Foramen Position Relative to Anatomical Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study was carried out on an Iranian population aiming to investigate mental foramen position relative to inferior border of mandible and skeletal midline and its gender and age differences on CBCT projections. Materials and Methods. A number of 180 CBCT images of patients were analyzed in different planes (tangential, cross-sectional, and axial). The distances from the superior border of mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible and from the anterior border of mental foramen to the midline were calculated. Results. The mean distance from mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible in the right side was 13.26 mm (SD ± 2.34) and in the left side was 13.37 mm (SD ± 2.19). There was a statistically significant difference between genders in terms of the distance between mental foramen and inferior border of mandible (P value = 0.000). The mean distances from mental foramen to midline were 25.86 mm (SD ± 0.27) and 25.53 mm (SD ± 0.31) in the right and left sides, respectively. Conclusions. The vertical and horizontal positions of mental foramen can be determined from stable anatomical landmarks such as mandibular inferior border and skeletal midline in both dentulous and edentulous patients. The distance from the superior border of mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible exhibited sexual dimorphism. PMID:27999594

  9. Epilepsy-related long-term amnesia: anatomical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Butler, Chris; Kapur, Narinder; Zeman, Adam; Weller, Roy; Connelly, Alan

    2012-11-01

    There are few clues as to the neural basis of selective long-term amnesia. We report group and single-case data to shed light on this issue. In a group study of patients with transient epileptic amnesia, there were no significant correlations between volumetric measures of the hippocampus and indices of accelerated long-term forgetting or longer-term autobiographical memory loss. Post-mortem investigations in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy who showed accelerated long-term forgetting, together with a degree of autobiographical memory loss, yielded evidence of neuronal loss and gliosis in regions of both the right and the left hippocampus. Neuronal loss and gliosis were more evident in anterior than posterior hippocampus. These results indicate that the unusual forms of long-term forgetting seen in some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have no gross anatomical correlate. The findings leave open the possibilities that subtle structural damage or subtle functional disturbance, perhaps in the form of subclinical epileptiform activity, underly epilepsy-related long-term amnesia.

  10. Anatomical causes of female infertility and their management.

    PubMed

    Abrao, Mauricio S; Muzii, Ludovico; Marana, Riccardo

    2013-12-01

    The main female anatomical causes of infertility include post-infectious tubal damage, endometriosis, and congenital/acquired uterine anomalies. Congenital (septate uterus) and acquired (myomas and synechiae) diseases of the uterus may lead to infertility, pregnancy loss, and other obstetric complications. Pelvic inflammatory disease represents the most common cause of tubal damage. Surgery still remains an important option for tubal factor infertility, with results in terms of reproductive outcome that compare favorably with those of in vitro fertilization. Endometriosis is a common gynecologic condition affecting women of reproductive age, which can cause pain and infertility. The cause of infertility associated with endometriosis remains elusive, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism involving immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors. Despite the high prevalence of endometriosis, the exact mechanisms of its pathogenesis are unknown. Specific combinations of medical, surgical, and psychological treatments can ameliorate the quality of life of women with endometriosis. In the majority of cases, surgical treatment of endometriosis has promoted significant increases in fertilization rates. There are obvious associations between endometriosis and the immune system, and future strategies to treat endometriosis might be based on immunologic concepts.

  11. Anatomical Region-Specific In Vivo Wireless Communication Channel Characterization.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ali Fatih; Abbasi, Qammer; Ankarali, Zekeriyya Esat; Alomainy, Akram; Qaraqe, Khalid; Serpedin, Erchin; Arslan, Huseyin

    2016-10-19

    In vivo wireless body area networks (WBANs) and their associated technologies are shaping the future of healthcare by providing continuous health monitoring and noninvasive surgical capabilities, in addition to remote diagnostic and treatment of diseases. To fully exploit the potential of such devices, it is necessary to characterize the communication channel which will help to build reliable and high-performance communication systems. This paper presents an in vivo wireless communication channel characterization for male torso both numerically and experimentally (on a human cadaver) considering various organs at 915 MHz and 2.4 GHz. A statistical path loss (PL) model is introduced, and the anatomical region-specific parameters are provided. It is found that the mean PL in dB scale exhibits a linear decaying characteristic rather than an exponential decaying profile inside the body, and the power decay rate is approximately twice at 2.4 GHz as compared to 915 MHz. Moreover, the variance of shadowing increases significantly as the in vivo antenna is placed deeper inside the body since the main scatterers are present in the vicinity of the antenna. Multipath propagation characteristics are also investigated to facilitate proper waveform designs in the future wireless healthcare systems, and a rootmean- square (RMS) delay spread of 2.76 ns is observed at 5 cm depth. Results show that the in vivo channel exhibit different characteristics than the classical communication channels, and location dependency is very critical for accurate, reliable, and energy-efficient link budget calculations.

  12. Lymphosome concept: Anatomical study of the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Suami, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    The gross anatomical study of the lymphatic system in humans and animals has been suspended for almost 100 years. This article introduces the author's technique for investigating the lymphatic system using the concept of the lymphosome. In revisiting the anatomical study of the lymphatic system, our updated knowledge can potentially be utilized either to reassure surgeons about their current procedures in the surgical management of cancers and lymphedema or assist them to refine them. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:13-17. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Robust Morphological Averages in Three Dimensions for Anatomical Atlas Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Jorge; Bloch, Isabelle; Schmitt, Francis

    2004-09-01

    We present original methods for obtaining robust, anatomical shape-based averages of features of the human head anatomy from a normal population. Our goals are computerized atlas construction with representative anatomical features and morphopometry for specific populations. A method for true-morphological averaging is proposed, consisting of a suitable blend of shape-related information for N objects to obtain a progressive average. It is made robust by penalizing, in a morphological sense, the contributions of features less similar to the current average. Morphological error and similarity, as well as penalization, are based on the same paradigm as the morphological averaging.

  14. Anatomical eponyms, Part 2: The other side of the coin.

    PubMed

    Olry, Regis

    2014-11-01

    Over a century after they were removed, at least officially, from anatomical terminology, eponyms remain an obviously controversial topic. In the first part of this paper we acted as their defense counsel, aiming to demonstrate that the 1895 first edition of the Nomina Anatomica and subsequently the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) probably put the cart before the horse. However, their authors advanced arguments supporting their decision, and it is now time to develop these arguments. Let us now become the public prosecutor of eponyms.

  15. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  16. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest-abdomen-pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore, serve

  17. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  18. The Prevalence of Persistent Petrosquamosal Sinus and Other Temporal Bone Anatomical Variations on High-Resolution Temporal Bone Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bożek, Paweł; Kluczewska, Ewa; Misiołek, Maciej; Ścierski, Wojciech; Lisowska, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of petrosquamosal sinus (PSS) and other temporal bone (TB) anatomical variations in various patients using high-resolution computed tomography (CT). Material/Methods We reviewed clinical and consecutively obtained CT data for 276 TBs of 138 patients. The incidence of TB anatomical variations was compared among patients with radiological markers of chronic otitis media (RCOM) and non-RCOM. Results The PSS incidence in our sample was 6.9%, and it was significantly higher in TBs with RCOM (14.6%). Selected anatomical variations of RCOM TBs were observed: lateral sigmoid sinus (14.5%), prominent sigmoid sinus (23.6%), PSS (14.6%), and high jugular bulb (17.3%). Lateral sigmoid sinus and prominent sigmoid sinus (p<0.01), high jugular bulb (p<0.05), and PSS (p<0.01) were observed more often in RCOM than in non-RCOM TBs. Conclusions The TB vascular and anatomical variations, including PSS, a high jugular bulb, and a laterally and prominent placed sigmoid sinus, were more often observed in TBs with RCOM. Presurgical imaging and CT-based navigation techniques for TB surgery can offer remarkable value for understanding the altered anatomy of this complex structure and can localize rare anatomical variations. PMID:27811834

  19. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoya Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2015-08-07

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner. - Highlights: • Visceral adipose tissue express higher pref-1 mRNA than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length in visceral adipose tissue is longer than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length of adipose tissue is not associated with adipocyte size. • Pref-1 mRNA is negatively correlated with intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size.

  20. Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Cronin, Thomas W; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-06-01

    The presence of a specialised dorsal rim area with an ability to detect the e-vector orientation of polarised light is shown for the first time in a nocturnal hymenopteran. The dorsal rim area of the halictid bee Megalopta genalis features a number of characteristic anatomical specialisations including an increased rhabdom diameter and a lack of primary screening pigments. Optically, these specialisations result in wide spatial receptive fields (Deltarho = 14 degrees ), a common adaptation found in the dorsal rim areas of insects used to filter out interfering effects (i.e. clouds) from the sky. In this specialised eye region all nine photoreceptors contribute their microvilli to the entire length of the ommatidia. These orthogonally directed microvilli are anatomically arranged in an almost linear, anterior-posterior orientation. Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  1. Anatomical reference point for harvesting a flexor graft during arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Lopes, Clécio; Arantes, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Victor Lapenda; Pinto, Dilamar Moreira; Gonçalves, Marcelo Carvalho Krause; Gonçalves, Romeu Carvalho Krause

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of a vascular network adjacent to the insertion of the pes anserinus, so that it could be used as an anatomical reference point to facilitate harvesting flexor grafts for arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty patients with ACL tears who were going to undergo ACL reconstruction using the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles as grafts were selected randomly. During the harvesting of these tendons, the presence or absence of this anatomical reference point was noted. Results All the patients presented a vascular network of greater or lesser diameter. Conclusion The vascular network seems to be a good reference point during harvesting of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, for facilitating graft harvesting. PMID:26229911

  2. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies.

  3. ANATOMIC STUDY OF THE NERVOUS COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE MEDIAN AND MUSCULOUCUTANEOUS NERVE

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Razuk, Mauro; Almargo, Marco Antonio Pires; Caetano, Mauricio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of nerve communication between the musculocutaneous and median nerve. Methods: Anatomical dissection of 40 limbs from 20 fetal cadavers was performed at the Laboratory of Anatomy, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas e da Saúde da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo. Results: A communicating branch was found in 10 upper limbs. In nine limbs there was a musculocutaneous-median anastomosis (type I); and in one limb there was a median-musculocutaneous anastomosis (type II). Conclusion: It is very important to know these anatomical variations, especially when considering clinical examination, diagnostic, prognostic and surgical treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:28243174

  4. System for the Analysis and Visualization of Large 3D Anatomical Trees

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kun-Chang; Ritman, Erik L.; Higgins, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Modern micro-CT and multi-detector helical CT scanners can produce high-resolution 3D digital images of various anatomical trees. The large size and complexity of these trees make it essentially impossible to define them interactively. Automatic approaches have been proposed for a few specific problems, but none of these approaches guarantee extracting geometrically accurate multi-generational tree structures. This paper proposes an interactive system for defining and visualizing large anatomical trees and for subsequent quantitative data mining. The system consists of a large number of tools for automatic image analysis, semi-automatic and interactive tree editing, and an assortment of visualization tools. Results are presented for a variety of 3D high-resolution images. PMID:17669390

  5. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  6. Anatomic VisualizeR: realizing the vision of a VR-based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, H; Murray, M

    1999-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego's Anatomic VisualizeR project has reached another milestone. As the period of DARPA-funded research and development comes to a close, UCSD's VR-based learning environment has matured to the point where curricular implementation is now underway. In this presentation, we will reflect on the process by which lessons in this virtual environment are realized, highlight the results of ongoing 3-D perception studies, and describe examples of how Anatomic VisualizeR is being used in medical school anatomy and high school biology classes. To conclude, we will outline the future of this project which will include full scale curricular implementation, learning outcomes assessment, and dissemination through industrial and academic partnerships.

  7. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  8. Anatomically ordered tapping interferes more with one-digit addition than two-digit addition: a dual-task fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Firat; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    Fingers are used as canonical representations for numbers across cultures. In previous imaging studies, it was shown that arithmetic processing activates neural resources that are known to participate in finger movements. Additionally, in one dual-task study, it was shown that anatomically ordered finger tapping disrupts addition and subtraction more than multiplication, possibly due to a long-lasting effect of early finger counting experiences on the neural correlates and organization of addition and subtraction processes. How arithmetic task difficulty and tapping complexity affect the concurrent performance is still unclear. If early finger counting experiences have bearing on the neural correlates of arithmetic in adults, then one would expect anatomically and non-anatomically ordered tapping to have different interference effects, given that finger counting is usually anatomically ordered. To unravel these issues, we studied how (1) arithmetic task difficulty and (2) the complexity of the finger tapping sequence (anatomical vs. non-anatomical ordering) affect concurrent performance and use of key neural circuits using a mixed block/event-related dual-task fMRI design with adult participants. The results suggest that complexity of the tapping sequence modulates interference on addition, and that one-digit addition (fact retrieval), compared to two-digit addition (calculation), is more affected from anatomically ordered tapping. The region-of-interest analysis showed higher left angular gyrus BOLD response for one-digit compared to two-digit addition, and in no-tapping conditions than dual tapping conditions. The results support a specific association between addition fact retrieval and anatomically ordered finger movements in adults, possibly due to finger counting strategies that deploy anatomically ordered finger movements early in the development.

  9. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy adults. The model components included the levator veli palatini (LVP), the velum, and the posterior pharyngeal wall, and the simulations were based on material parameters from the literature. The outcome metrics were the VP closure force and LVP muscle activation required to achieve VP closure. Results Our average model compared favorably with experimental data from the literature. Simulations of 1,000 random anatomies reflected the large variability in closure forces observed experimentally. VP distance had the greatest effect on both outcome metrics when considering the observed anatomic variability. Other anatomical parameters were ranked by their predicted influences on the outcome metrics. Conclusions Our results support the implication that interventions for VP dysfunction that decrease anterior to posterior VP portal distance, increase velar length, and/or increase LVP cross-sectional area may be very effective. Future modeling studies will help to further our understanding of speech mechanics and optimize treatment of speech disorders. PMID:26049120

  10. A machine learning approach for classification of anatomical coverage in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Lo, Pechin; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Goldin, Johnathan; Brown, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Automatic classification of anatomical coverage of medical images is critical for big data mining and as a pre-processing step to automatically trigger specific computer aided diagnosis systems. The traditional way to identify scans through DICOM headers has various limitations due to manual entry of series descriptions and non-standardized naming conventions. In this study, we present a machine learning approach where multiple binary classifiers were used to classify different anatomical coverages of CT scans. A one-vs-rest strategy was applied. For a given training set, a template scan was selected from the positive samples and all other scans were registered to it. Each registered scan was then evenly split into k × k × k non-overlapping blocks and for each block the mean intensity was computed. This resulted in a 1 × k3 feature vector for each scan. The feature vectors were then used to train a SVM based classifier. In this feasibility study, four classifiers were built to identify anatomic coverages of brain, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis CT scans. Each classifier was trained and tested using a set of 300 scans from different subjects, composed of 150 positive samples and 150 negative samples. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the testing set was measured to evaluate the performance in a two-fold cross validation setting. Our results showed good classification performance with an average AUC of 0.96.

  11. Computational analysis of polyethylene wear in anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; Monteiro, J

    2015-02-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, components has been associated with the failure of joint prostheses in the hip, knee, and shoulder. Considering that in vitro experiments are generally too expensive and time-consuming, computational models are an attractive alternative to study the wear behavior of UHMWPE components. The objective of the present study was to develop a computational wear model to evaluate the wear resistance of anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses. The effects of the wear law and the updating of the UHMWPE surface on the prediction of wear were also considered. Apart from Archard's law, a new wear law, so-called second generation law, which includes the concept of cross-shear and a pressure-independent wear factor, was considered. The wear analyses were performed considering three shoulder joint motions. The muscle and joint reaction forces applied were estimated by an inverse biomechanical model of the upper limb. The results show that abrasive wear is as important for the reverse components as it is for the anatomical. Nevertheless, the volumetric wears estimated over 1 year are within the range considered clinically desirable to reduce the risk of osteolysis. For the anatomical components, the predictions from Archard's law compare better, than those of the second generation law, to the experimental and clinical data available in the literature. Yet, the opposite result is obtained for the reverse components. From the numerical point of view, an updating procedure for the UHMWPE surface is mandatory to improve the numerical predictions.

  12. Totally laparoscopic anatomical hepatectomy exposing the major hepatic veins from the root side: a case of the right anterior sectorectomy (with video).

    PubMed

    Honda, Goro; Kurata, Masanao; Okuda, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Shin; Sakamoto, Katsunori; Takahashi, Keiichi

    2014-07-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy has rapidly evolved recently; however, laparoscopic anatomical hepatectomy has yet to become widely used, although anatomical hepatectomy is ideal, especially for curative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, and is widely accepted via open approach. This is because good-experienced skills, for example, exposing Glissonean pedicles and hepatic veins on the cutting plane, are required in order to perform anatomical hepatectomy via a pure laparoscopic approach. We obtained good results for various totally laparoscopic anatomical hepatectomies using the standardized techniques. We exposed the major hepatic veins from the root side by utilizing the unique view from the caudal side in the laparoscopic approach, and moved CUSA from the root side toward the peripheral side to avoid splitting the bifurcation of the hepatic vein. We performed totally laparoscopic anatomical hepatectomy for 47 patients from August, 2008, to December, 2012 (Table 1). In most types of anatomical hepatectomy, the mean blood loss was <500 ml. Conversion to open surgery was required in two patients. Postoperative complications were prolonged ascites in two, peroneal palsy in two, and biloma in one. Mortality was zero. The embedded video demonstrates totally laparoscopic right anterior sectorectomy. In conclusion, our standardized techniques make laparoscopic anatomical hepatectomy more feasible.

  13. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar.

  14. Understanding ontogenetic trajectories of indirect defence: ecological and anatomical constraints in the production of extrafloral nectaries

    PubMed Central

    Villamil, Nora; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Boege, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Early ontogenetic stages of myrmecophytic plants are infrequently associated with ants, probably due to constraints on the production of rewards. This study reports for the first time the anatomical and histological limitations constraining the production of extrafloral nectar in young plants, and the implications that the absence of protective ants imposes for plants early during their ontogeny are discussed. Methods Juvenile, pre-reproductive and reproductive plants of Turnera velutina were selected in a natural population and their extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) per leaf were quantified. The anatomical and morphological changes in EFNs during plant ontogeny were studied using scanning electron and light microscopy. Extrafloral nectar volume and sugar concentration were determined as well as the number of patrolling ants. Key Results Juvenile plants were unable to secrete or contain nectar. Pre-reproductive plants secreted and contained nectar drops, but the highest production was achieved at the reproductive stage when the gland is fully cup-shaped and the secretory epidermis duplicates. No ants were observed in juvenile plants, and reproductive individuals received greater ant patrolling than pre-reproductive individuals. The issue of the mechanism of extrafloral nectar release in T. velutina was solved given that we found an anatomical, transcuticular pore that forms a channel-like structure and allows nectar to flow outward from the gland. Conclusions Juvenile stages had no ant protection against herbivores probably due to resource limitation but also due to anatomical constraints. The results are consistent with the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis. As plants age, they increase in size and have larger nutrient-acquiring, photosynthetic and storage capacity, so they are able to invest in defence via specialized organs, such as EFNs. Hence, the more vulnerable juvenile stage should rely on other defensive strategies to reduce the

  15. Temporal lobe arteriovenous malformations: anatomical subtypes, surgical strategy, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Young, William L.; Lawton, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Object Descriptions of temporal lobe arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are inconsistent. To standardize reporting, the authors blended existing descriptions in the literature into an intuitive classification with 5 anatomical subtypes: lateral, medial, basal, sylvian, and ventricular. The authors’ surgical experience with temporal lobe AVMs was reviewed according to these subtypes. Methods Eighty-eight patients with temporal lobe AVMs were treated surgically. Results Lateral temporal lobe AVMs were the most common (58 AVMs, 66%). Thirteen AVMs (15%) were medial, 9 (10%) were basal, and 5 (6%) were sylvian. Ventricular AVMs were least common (3 AVMs, 3%). A temporal craniotomy based over the ear was used in 64%. Complete AVM resection was achieved in 82 patients (93%). Four patients (5%) died in the perioperative period (6 in all were lost to follow-up); 71 (87%) of the remaining 82 patients had good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale scores 0–2); and 68 (83%) were unchanged or improved after surgery. Conclusions Categorization of temporal AVMs into subtypes can assist with surgical planning and also standardize reporting. Lateral AVMs are the easiest to expose surgically, with circumferential access to feeding arteries and draining veins at the AVM margins. Basal AVMs require a subtemporal approach, often with some transcortical dissection through the inferior temporal gyrus. Medial AVMs are exposed tangentially with an orbitozygomatic craniotomy and transsylvian dissection of anterior choroidal artery and posterior cerebral artery feeders in the medial cisterns. Medial AVMs posterior to the cerebral peduncle require transcortical approaches through the temporooccipi tal gyrus. Sylvian AVMs require a wide sylvian fissure split and differentiation of normal arteries, terminal feeding arteries, and transit arteries. Ventricular AVMs require a transcortical approach through the inferior temporal gyrus that avoids the Meyer loop. Surgical results with temporal lobe

  16. Redo sternotomy for extra-anatomical correction of aortic coarctation and mitral repair in an adult after failed endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozker, E; Saritas, B; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Kocyigit, O I; Turkoz, R

    2011-07-01

    Recently, extra-anatomical bypass surgery has been widely used in complicated adult aortic coarctation cases with concomitant intracardiac repair. Stent implantation has been widely used for primary aortic coarctation as well. The procedure has been shown to be effective with long term follow ups. However, failed stent implantations like stent fracture and dislodgement may complicate the clinical status and subsequent surgical procedure. Extra-anatomic bypass can provide effective results and lower morbidity in cases with concomitant intracardiac problems and stent failure. Here we present an adult aortic coarctation patient who had undergone a Bentall operation and two unsuccessful stent implantations for recurrent aortic coarctation. The patient then got an extra-anatomic bypass for aortic coarctation and concomitant mitral valve commissurotomy through median sternotomy.

  17. Recent advances in medical imaging: anatomical and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Bruno; Mainard, Laurence; Delion, Matthieu; Hodez, Claude; Oldrini, Guillaume

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to present an overview of the most important recent advances in medical imaging and their potential clinical and anatomical applications. Dramatic changes have been particularly observed in the field of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography (CT) has been completely overturned by the successive development of helical acquisition, multidetector and large area-detector acquisition. Visualising brain function has become a new challenge for MRI, which is called functional MRI, currently based principally on blood oxygenation level-dependent sequences, which could be completed or replaced by other techniques such as diffusion MRI (DWI). Based on molecular diffusion due to the thermal energy of free water, DWI offers a spectrum of anatomical and clinical applications, ranging from brain ischemia to visualisation of large fibrous structures of the human body such as the anatomical bundles of white matter with diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. In the field of X-ray projection imaging, a new low-dose device called EOS has been developed through new highly sensitive detectors of X-rays, allowing for acquiring frontal and lateral images simultaneously. Other improvements have been briefly mentioned. Technical principles have been considered in order to understand what is most useful in clinical practice as well as in the field of anatomical applications. Nuclear medicine has not been included.

  18. CAVEman: Standardized Anatomical Context for Biomedical Data Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turinsky, Andrei L.; Fanea, Elena; Trinh, Quang; Wat, Stephen; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Dong, Xiaoli; Shu, Xueling; Stromer, Julie N.; Hill, Jonathan W.; Edwards, Carol; Grosenick, Brenda; Yajima, Masumi; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have created a software system called the CAVEman, for the visual integration and exploration of heterogeneous anatomical and biomedical data. The CAVEman can be applied for both education and research tasks. The main component of the system is a three-dimensional digital atlas of the adult male human anatomy, structured according to…

  19. Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills: An Innovative Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explains the organization, structure, and assessment of the undergraduate course entitled Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills. The course aims to refocus, vertically integrate, and revise the subject using problem-solving methods plus testing of various clinically relevant skills recorded in a logbook. This report re-emphasizes the importance…

  20. Outcomes of Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy: Role of Anatomic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Pairawan, Seyed S; Cody, Derek; Kim, Hahns; Hughes, M Katherine; Solomon, Naveenraj; Senthil, Maheswari; Garberoglio, Carlos; Lum, Sharon

    2016-10-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) offers improved cosmesis for women undergoing mastectomy; however, there is increased risk for complications with this technique. We sought to determine if standard anatomic measurements could be used to predict complications of NSM. We performed a retrospective review of NSM for which anthropometric measurements of sternal notch to nipple distance, base width, and inframammary fold to nipple distance were available, and compared outcomes by anatomic measurements. We identified 102 cases of NSM with measurements available for study performed in 55 patients. Areola necrosis was associated with base width of greater than 15 cm (42.9% vs 10.9%, P = 0.02), infections were more likely with inframammary fold to nipple distance of more than 10 cm (29.2% vs 10.3%, P = 0.02), hematomas were more likely with sternal notch to nipple distance more than 30 cm (22.2% vs 4.3%, P = 0.03), and delayed wound healing was more likely with sternal notch to nipple distance of more than 25 cm (10.3% vs 1.6%, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in nipple necrosis, skin flap necrosis, wound care requirements, or operative intervention based on anatomic measurement. Standard anatomic measurements are inconsistent predictors of outcome from NSM and should not be used alone to exclude attempts at NSM.

  1. Constructivist Learning of Anatomy: Gaining Knowledge by Creating Anatomical Casts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermiz, David J.; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Educators are encouraged to provide inquiry-based, collaborative, and problem solving activities that enhance learning and promote curiosity, skepticism, objectivity, and the use of scientific reasoning. Making anatomical casts or models by injecting solidifying substances into organs is an example of a constructivist activity for achieving these…

  2. Proceedings of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    The Winter Meeting of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland was held at the Royal Holloway College, Egham, Surrey from 5th to 7th January 2000. It included a symposium on ‘Phenotypic changes in epithelial development’ and the Annual General Meeting of the Society. The following are abstracts of communications and posters presented at the meeting. PMID:17103662

  3. Semantic Dementia and Persisting Wernicke's Aphasia: Linguistic and Anatomical Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogar, J. M.; Baldo, J. V.; Wilson, S. M.; Brambati, S. M.; Miller, B. L.; Dronkers, N. F.; Gorno-Tempini, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared the clinical and anatomical characteristics of patients with progressive aphasia to those of patients with aphasia caused by stroke. In the current study we examined fluent forms of aphasia in these two groups, specifically semantic dementia (SD) and persisting Wernicke's aphasia (WA) due to stroke. We compared…

  4. Children's use of anatomically detailed dolls to recount an event.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G S; Aman, C

    1990-12-01

    The use of anatomically detailed dolls in child sexual abuse investigations has raised several controversial issues related to important theoretical questions in developmental psychology. The present study was designed to examine some of these issues in a methodologically sound experiment. 80 3- and 5-year-old children experienced a social interaction with a male confederate and were later tested under 1 of 4 recall conditions: reenactment with anatomically detailed dolls, reenactment with regular dolls, free recall with visual cues, or free recall without visual cues. The children were also asked a variety of specific and misleading questions, some of them dealing with acts associated with abuse ("He took your clothes off, didn't he?"). Both anatomically detailed and regular dolls along with other props aided 5-year-olds more than 3-year-olds in recounting the event. To use increased rather than decreased age differences. Anatomically detailed dolls did not foster false reports of abuse. Overall, 3-year-olds were more suggestible than 5-year-olds. The findings have implications for children's testimony in child abuse cases and for psychological theories concerning the effects of stimulus support on children's memory.

  5. Designing Learning Spaces for Interprofessional Education in the Anatomical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Benjamin; Kvan, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores connections between interprofessional education (IPE) models and the design of learning spaces for undergraduate and graduate education in the anatomical sciences and other professional preparation. The authors argue that for IPE models to be successful and sustained they must be embodied in the environment in which…

  6. Creating tight, anatomically correct interproximal contacts.

    PubMed

    Keogh, T P; Bertolotti, R L

    2001-01-01

    Achievement of an excellent contact, one that provides a natural look and feel, reproducing the natural tooth contact or sometimes improving it, can be achieved in many ways. Understanding the separate issues of tightness and anatomy is crucial to achieving the desired result. In most cases, use of a contoured sectional matrix and McKean-style ring is the surest way to achieve the desired result. Unusual circumstances, such as wide preparations and malpositioned teeth, call for innovative techniques, some of which are illustrated in this article.

  7. Anatomical and Physiological Responses of Citrus Trees to Varying Boron Availability Are Dependent on Rootstock.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Geisa L; Zambrosi, Fernando C B; Tanaka, Francisco A O; Boaretto, Rodrigo M; Quaggio, José A; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mattos, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    In Citrus, water, nutrient transport and thereby fruit production, are influenced among other factors, by the interaction between rootstock and boron (B) nutrition. This study aimed to investigate how B affects the anatomical structure of roots and leaves as well as leaf gas exchange in sweet orange trees grafted on two contrasting rootstocks in response to B supply. Plants grafted on Swingle citrumelo or Sunki mandarin were grown in a nutrient solution of varying B concentration (deficient, adequate, and excessive). Those grafted on Swingle were more tolerant to both B deficiency and toxicity than those on Sunki, as revealed by higher shoot and root growth. In addition, plants grafted on Sunki exhibited more severe anatomical and physiological damages under B deficiency, showing thickening of xylem cell walls and impairments in whole-plant leaf-specific hydraulic conductance and leaf CO2 assimilation. Our data revealed that trees grafted on Swingle sustain better growth under low B availablitlity in the root medium and still respond positively to increased B levels by combining higher B absorption and root growth as well as better organization of xylem vessels. Taken together, those traits improved water and B transport to the plant canopy. Under B toxicity, Swingle rootstock would also favor plant growth by reducing anatomical and ultrastructural damage to leaf tissue and improving water transport compared with plants grafted on Sunki. From a practical point of view, our results highlight that B management in citrus orchards shall take into account rootstock varieties, of which the Swingle rootstock was characterized by its performance on regulating anatomical and ultrastructural damages, improving water transport and limiting negative impacts of B stress conditions on plant growth.

  8. Anatomical and functional outcomes of scleral buckling versus primary vitrectomy in pseudophakic retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Cankurtaran, Veysel; Citirik, Mehmet; Simsek, Mert; Tekin, Kemal; Teke, Mehmet Yasin

    2017-01-01

    Retinal detachment is the separation of the sensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium by subretinal fluid. There are several types of retinal re-attachment surgery, including scleral buckling (SB), pneumatic retinopexy, and vitrectomy (with or without SB). The objective of this study was to compare anatomical and visual outcomes between patients with pseudophakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil (SO) or perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas tamponade and pseudophakic RRD patients who underwent SB surgery. We evaluated retrospectively 101 pseudophakic RRD patients from a single center. The patients were classified into three groups according to the surgical procedure performed: PPV + Silicone - patients who underwent PPV with SO tamponade; PPV + Gas - patients who underwent PPV with perfluoropropane gas tamponade; and SB group - patients who underwent SB surgery. The groups were compared with regard to primary and final anatomical and visual outcomes. The number of patients in PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, and SB group was 39 (38.6%), 32 (31.7%), and 30 (29.7%), respectively. The mean follow-up period in PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, and SB group was 33.95 ± 23.58, 32.62 ± 10.95, and 33.76 ± 16.62 months, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the groups neither with regard to primary and final anatomical and visual success rates nor in relation to the recurrence rate of retinal detachment. According to our anatomical and visual outcome results, either of the three methods (i.e. PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, or SB) can be used in the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment. PMID:28135566

  9. Anatomical and functional outcomes of scleral buckling versus primary vitrectomy in pseudophakic retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Cankurtaran, Veysel; Citirik, Mehmet; Simsek, Mert; Tekin, Kemal; Teke, Mehmet Yasin

    2017-02-21

    Retinal detachment is the separation of the sensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium by subretinal fluid. There are several types of retinal re-attachment surgery, including scleral buckling (SB), pneumatic retinopexy, and vitrectomy (with or without SB). The objective of this study was to compare anatomical and visual outcomes between patients with pseudophakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil (SO) or perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas tamponade and pseudophakic RRD patients who underwent SB surgery. We evaluated retrospectively 101 pseudophakic RRD patients from a single center. The patients were classified into three groups according to the surgical procedure performed: PPV + Silicone - patients who underwent PPV with SO tamponade; PPV + Gas - patients who underwent PPV with perfluoropropane gas tamponade; and SB group - patients who underwent SB surgery. The groups were compared with regard to primary and final anatomical and visual outcomes. The number of patients in PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, and SB group was 39 (38.6%), 32 (31.7%), and 30 (29.7%), respectively. The mean follow-up period in PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, and SB group was 33.95 ± 23.58, 32.62 ± 10.95, and 33.76 ± 16.62 months, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the groups neither with regard to primary and final anatomical and visual success rates nor in relation to the recurrence rate of retinal detachment. According to our anatomical and visual outcome results, either of the three methods (i.e., PPV + Silicone, PPV + Gas, or SB) can be used in the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment.

  10. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    DOE PAGES

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; ...

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stovermore » was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.« less

  11. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; Westover, Tyler L.

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stover was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.

  12. Wood anatomical analysis of Alnus incana and Betula pendula injured by a debris-flow event.

    PubMed

    Arbellay, Estelle; Stoffel, Markus; Bollschweiler, Michelle

    2010-10-01

    Vessel chronologies in ring-porous species have been successfully employed in the past to extract the climate signal from tree rings. Environmental signals recorded in vessels of ring-porous species have also been used in previous studies to reconstruct discrete events of drought, flooding and insect defoliation. However, very little is known about the ability of diffuse-porous species to record environmental signals in their xylem cells. Moreover, time series of wood anatomical features have only rarely been used to reconstruct former geomorphic events. This study was therefore undertaken to characterize the wood anatomical response of diffuse-porous Alnus incana (L.) Moench and Betula pendula Roth to debris-flow-induced wounding. Tree microscopic response to wounding was assessed through the analysis of wood anatomical differences between injured rings formed in the debris-flow event year and uninjured rings formed in the previous year. The two ring types were examined close and opposite to the injury in order to determine whether wound effects on xylem cells decrease with increasing tangential distance from the injury. Image analysis was used to measure vessel parameters as well as fiber and parenchyma cell (FPC) parameters. The results of this study indicate that injured rings are characterized by smaller vessels as compared with uninjured rings. By contrast, FPC parameters were not found to significantly differ between injured and uninjured rings. Vessel and FPC parameters mainly remained constant with increasing tangential distance from the injury, except for a higher proportion of vessel lumen area opposite to the injury within A. incana. This study highlights the existence of anatomical tree-ring signatures-in the form of smaller vessels-related to past debris-flow activity and addresses a new methodological approach to date injuries inflicted on trees by geomorphic processes.

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of the anatomical growth response of European conifers to mechanical disturbance.

    PubMed

    Schneuwly, Dominique M; Stoffel, Markus; Dorren, Luuk K A; Berger, Frédéric

    2009-10-01

    Studies on tree reaction after wounding were so far based on artificial wounding or chemical treatment. For the first time, type, spread and intensity of anatomical responses were analyzed and quantified in naturally disturbed Larix decidua Mill., Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Abies alba Mill. trees. The consequences of rockfall impacts on increment growth were assessed at the height of the wounds, as well as above and below the injuries. A total of 16 trees were selected on rockfall slopes, and growth responses following 54 wounding events were analyzed on 820 cross-sections. Anatomical analysis focused on the occurrence of tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRD) and on the formation of reaction wood. Following mechanical disturbance, TRD production was observed in 100% of L. decidua and P. abies wounds. The radial extension of TRD was largest at wound height, and they occurred more commonly above, rather than below, the wounds. For all species, an intra-annual radial shift of TRD was observed with increasing axial distance from wounds. Reaction wood was formed in 87.5% of A. alba following wounding, but such cases occurred only in 7.7% of L. decidua. The results demonstrate that anatomical growth responses following natural mechanical disturbance differ significantly from the reactions induced by artificial stimuli or by decapitation. While the types of reactions remain comparable between the species, their intensity, spread and persistence disagree considerably. We also illustrate that the external appearance of wounds does not reflect an internal response intensity. This study reveals that disturbance induced under natural conditions triggers more intense and more widespread anatomical responses than that induced under artificial stimuli, and that experimental laboratory tests considerably underestimate tree response.

  14. ElePhant--an anatomical electronic phantom as simulation-system for otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Grunert, R; Strauss, G; Moeckel, H; Hofer, M; Poessneck, A; Fickweiler, U; Thalheim, M; Schmiedel, R; Jannin, P; Schulz, T; Oeken, J; Dietz, A; Korb, W

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the ElePhant (Electronic Phantom)-an anatomical correct simulation system based on 3D rapid prototyping models for the otologic intervention "Mastoidectomy". The anatomical structures of the head are created with plaster as base material using 3D-printing as rapid prototyping technology (RPT). Structures at risk, represented by electrically conductible material and fiber optics, are realized as an electric circuit and can be detected during the simulation of the surgical procedure. An accuracy study of 15 identical RPT-models compared to the 3D reconstructed CT-dataset of the patient showed that the mean accuracy is lower than the reconstructed CT layer thickness of 0.5 mm. An evaluation study of the ElePhant-system for "Mastoidectomy" was performed by 7 ENT-surgeons. The mean value of the study questionnaire (evaluation range from -2 (not at all) to +2 (very good)) was +1.2. The results showed that the ElePhant can simulate "Mastoidectomy" realistically. It is especially suitable for the simulation of the correct representation and position of the anatomical structures, realistic operation setting, and realistic milling properties of the bone structure. Furthermore it is applicable for training of surgeons.

  15. The influence of slope on Spartium junceum root system: morphological, anatomical and biomechanical adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Fabio; Scippa, G S; Lasserre, B; Montagnoli, A; Tognetti, R; Marchetti, M; Chiatante, D

    2017-03-15

    Root systems have a pivotal role in plant anchorage and their mechanical interactions with the soil may contribute to soil reinforcement and stabilization of slide-prone slopes. In order to understand the responses of root system to mechanical stress induced by slope, samples of Spartium junceum L., growing in slope and in plane natural conditions, were compared in their morphology, biomechanical properties and anatomical features. Soils sampled in slope and plane revealed similar characteristics, with the exception of organic matter content and penetrometer resistance, both higher in slope. Slope significantly influenced root morphology and in particular the distribution of lateral roots along the soil depth. Indeed, first-order lateral roots of plants growing on slope condition showed an asymmetric distribution between up- and down-slope. Contrarily, this asymmetric distribution was not observed in plants growing in plane. The tensile strength was higher in lateral roots growing up-slope and in plane conditions than in those growing down-slope. Anatomical investigations revealed that, while roots grown up-slope had higher area covered by xylem fibers, the ratio of xylem and phloem fibers to root diameter did not differ among the three conditions, as also, no differences were found for xylem fiber cell wall thickness. Roots growing up-slope were the main contributors to anchorage properties, which included higher strength and higher number of fibers in the xylematic tissues. Results suggested that a combination of root-specific morphological, anatomical and biomechanical traits, determines anchorage functions in slope conditions.

  16. Anatomical Position of Four Different Transobturator Mesh Implants for Female Anterior Prolapse Repair.

    PubMed

    Lenz, F; Doll, S; Sohn, C; Brocker, K A

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Polypropylene mesh implants are frequently used for pelvic floor reconstruction in women. Yet they vary in size and fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare four mesh products with regard to their anatomical positioning and functionality within the pelvic floor, to determine whether each mesh fits equally well in a female cadaver. Methods: One female pelvis was dissected, opening the retropubic space exposing the endopelvic fascia and demonstrating the arcus tendineus fasciae pelvis (ATFP). Anatomical parameters were measured before and after implanting four meshes via the transobturator approach. Results: The anterior fixation of the ATFP was found to be 5 mm lateral to the symphysis in this cadaver. The endopelvic fascia covered 54.6 cm(2). The obturator nerve was located 35 mm from the white line. The distance of the proximal and lateral points of mesh fixation from the ischial spine or ATFP varied from 0 to 25 mm. The meshes varied in size and anatomical positioning. Conclusion: These observations demonstrate the necessity of developing optimally sized meshes and appropriate introducer techniques that can provide sufficient vaginal support. Surgeons, furthermore, need profound knowledge of anatomy, the patient's pelvic floor defect and the meshes available on the market.

  17. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  18. New concept of scapholunate dissociation treatment and novel modification of Brunelli procedure - anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds This paper describes a novel method in treatment of scapholunate dissociation accompanied with rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid. The idea of this method is to create a kind of axial lever that can fully reconstruct anatomical relationship between the scaphoid and the lunate, with no involvement of extrinsic ligaments, and with simultaneous restriction of pathological alignment of the scaphoid. Based on this technique, we have also proposed a new modification of Brunelli procedure in scapholunate dissociation with rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid and dorsal intercalated segmental instability. Methods At the initial stage of the study, 20 human wrists fixed in Ethanol were used, followed by 12 fresh human wrists used in part two. The first stage included functional, biomechanical and strength tests carried out by means of a 5 kg load and intended to find the most anatomical and durable treatment method. The second stage involved testing the proposed methods on fresh cadaver wrists. Results We have discovered that the new method is able to recreate anatomical forces and properties of scapholunate ligament; what’s more, it can also prevent rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid. The performed strength tests have proven that it is possible to treat scapholunate instability also in case of dorsal intercalated segmental instability. Conclusions We highly recommend using both the new technique and the new modification of Brunelli procedure for treatment of scapholunate dissociation in both dynamic and static instabilities. PMID:24886132

  19. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  20. Anatomical and subjective success rates of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy over a seven-year period.

    PubMed

    Beshay, N; Ghabrial, R

    2016-11-01

    PurposeEndonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (END-DCR) is a relatively novel approach that has recently been shown in some studies to provide similar success rates to the more traditional external approach for the treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). However, a range of success rates using this approach are reported within the literature and the majority of oculoplastic surgeons are still favouring the external approach. The purpose of this study was to review the anatomical and subjective success rates of END-DCRs performed over a 7-year period.Patients and methodsWe provide a review of the success rates of 288 END-DCRs for the treatment of acquired NLDO performed over a 7-year period by a single oculoplastic surgeon in Sydney, Australia. We describe the operative technique used and define anatomical success as demonstrated patency of the nasolacrimal drainage system at 10 weeks postoperatively while subjective success is defined as complete resolution or significant improvement of symptoms as reported by patients at the same time point.ResultsIn our study, we were able to demonstrate that out of 288 END-DCRs, an average anatomical success rate of 89.6% and an average subjective success rate of 81.3% were achievable.ConclusionsWe conclude that the success rates using our endonasal approach remain similar to those obtained using the external approach, as reported within the literature, and may be considered as a primary treatment option for acquired NLDO.

  1. Congenital blindness is associated with large-scale reorganization of anatomical networks

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Uri; Andric, Michael; Atilgan, Hicret; Collignon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Blindness is a unique model for understanding the role of experience in the development of the brain's functional and anatomical architecture. Documenting changes in the structure of anatomical networks for this population would substantiate the notion that the brain's core network-level organization may undergo neuroplasticity as a result of life-long experience. To examine this issue, we compared whole-brain networks of regional cortical-thickness covariance in early blind and matched sighted individuals. This covariance is thought to reflect signatures of integration between systems involved in similar perceptual/cognitive functions. Using graph-theoretic metrics, we identified a unique mode of anatomical reorganization in the blind that differed from that found for sighted. This was seen in that network partition structures derived from subgroups of blind were more similar to each other than they were to partitions derived from sighted. Notably, after deriving network partitions, we found that language and visual regions tended to reside within separate modules in sighted but showed a pattern of merging into shared modules in the blind. Our study demonstrates that early visual deprivation triggers a systematic large-scale reorganization of whole-brain cortical-thickness networks, suggesting changes in how occipital regions interface with other functional networks in the congenitally blind. PMID:26767944

  2. Multispectral imaging: a review of its technical aspects and applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J R

    2014-01-01

    The field of anatomic pathology has changed significantly over the last decades and, as a result of the technological developments in molecular pathology and genetics, has had increasing pressures put on it to become quantitative and to provide more information about protein expression on a cellular level in tissue sections. Multispectral imaging (MSI) has a long history as an advanced imaging modality and has been used for over a decade now in pathology to improve quantitative accuracy, enable the analysis of multicolor immunohistochemistry, and drastically reduce the impact of contrast-robbing tissue autofluorescence common in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. When combined with advanced software for the automated segmentation of different tissue morphologies (eg, tumor vs stroma) and cellular and subcellular segmentation, MSI can enable the per-cell quantitation of many markers simultaneously. This article covers the role that MSI has played in anatomic pathology in the analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections, discusses the technological aspects of why MSI has been adopted, and provides a review of the literature of the application of MSI in anatomic pathology.

  3. ConvNet-Based Localization of Anatomical Structures in 3D Medical Images.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Bob; Wolterink, Jelmer; de Jong, Pim; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max; Isgum, Ivana

    2017-02-23

    Localization of anatomical structures is a prerequisite for many tasks in medical image analysis. We propose a method for automatic localization of one or more anatomical structures in 3D medical images through detection of their presence in 2D image slices using a convolutional neural network (ConvNet). A single ConvNet is trained to detect presence of the anatomical structure of interest in axial, coronal, and sagittal slices extracted from a 3D image. To allow the ConvNet to analyze slices of different sizes, spatial pyramid pooling is applied. After detection, 3D bounding boxes are created by combining the output of the ConvNet in all slices. In the experiments 200 chest CT, 100 cardiac CT angiography (CTA), and 100 abdomen CT scans were used. The heart, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta were localized in chest CT scans, the left cardiac ventricle in cardiac CTA scans, and the liver in abdomen CT scans. Localization was evaluated using the distances between automatically and manually defined reference bounding box centroids and walls. The best results were achieved in localization of structures with clearly defined boundaries (e.g. aortic arch) and the worst when the structure boundary was not clearly visible (e.g. liver). The method was more robust and accurate in localization multiple structures.

  4. The Parametric Model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process Created by Method of Anatomical Features.

    PubMed

    Vitković, Nikola; Mitić, Jelena; Manić, Miodrag; Trajanović, Miroslav; Husain, Karim; Petrović, Slađana; Arsić, Stojanka

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically accurate and anatomically correct 3D models of the human bones are of great importance for medical research and practice in orthopedics and surgery. These geometrical models can be created by the use of techniques which can be based on input geometrical data acquired from volumetric methods of scanning (e.g., Computed Tomography (CT)) or on the 2D images (e.g., X-ray). Geometrical models of human bones created in such way can be applied for education of medical practitioners, preoperative planning, etc. In cases when geometrical data about the human bone is incomplete (e.g., fractures), it may be necessary to create its complete geometrical model. The possible solution for this problem is the application of parametric models. The geometry of these models can be changed and adapted to the specific patient based on the values of parameters acquired from medical images (e.g., X-ray). In this paper, Method of Anatomical Features (MAF) which enables creation of geometrically precise and anatomically accurate geometrical models of the human bones is implemented for the creation of the parametric model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process (HMCP). The obtained results about geometrical accuracy of the model are quite satisfactory, as it is stated by the medical practitioners and confirmed in the literature.

  5. Body shape transformation along a shared axis of anatomical evolution in labyrinth fishes (Anabantoidei).

    PubMed

    Collar, David C; Quintero, Michelle; Buttler, Bernardo; Ward, Andrea B; Mehta, Rita S

    2016-03-01

    Major morphological transformations, such as the evolution of elongate body shape in vertebrates, punctuate evolutionary history. A fundamental step in understanding the processes that give rise to such transformations is identification of the underlying anatomical changes. But as we demonstrate in this study, important insights can also be gained by comparing these changes to those that occur in ancestral and closely related lineages. In labyrinth fishes (Anabantoidei), rapid evolution of a highly derived torpedo-shaped body in the common ancestor of the pikehead (Luciocephalus aura and L. pulcher) occurred primarily through exceptional elongation of the head, with secondary contributions involving reduction in body depth and lengthening of the precaudal vertebral region. This combination of changes aligns closely with the primary axis of anatomical diversification in other anabantoids, revealing that pikehead evolution involved extraordinarily rapid change in structures that were ancestrally labile. Finer-scale examination of the anatomical components that determine head elongation also shows alignment between the pikehead evolutionary trajectory and the primary axis of cranial diversification in anabantoids, with much higher evolutionary rates leading to the pikehead. Altogether, our results show major morphological transformation stemming from extreme change along a shared morphological axis in labyrinth fishes.

  6. Anatomical diversity and regressive evolution in trichomanoid filmy ferns (Hymenophyllaceae): a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, Jean-Yves; Hennequin, Sabine; Bary, Sophie; Ebihara, Atsushi; Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie

    2011-12-01

    To infer the anatomical evolution of the Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) and to test previously suggested scenarios of regressive evolution, we performed an exhaustive investigation of stem anatomy in the most variable lineage of the family, the trichomanoids, using a representative sampling of 50 species. The evolution of qualitative and quantitative anatomical characters and possibly related growth-forms was analyzed using a maximum likelihood approach. Potential correlations between selected characters were then statistically tested using a phylogenetic comparative method. Our investigations support the anatomical homogeneity of this family at the generic and sub-generic levels. Reduced and sub-collateral/collateral steles likely derived from an ancestral massive protostele, and sub-collateral/collateral types appear to be related to stem thickness reduction and root apparatus regression. These results corroborate the hypothesis of regressive evolution in the lineage, in terms of morphology as well as anatomy. In addition, a heterogeneous cortex, which is derived in the lineage, appears to be related to a colonial strategy and likely to a climbing phenotype. The evolutionary hypotheses proposed in this study lay the ground for further evolutionary analyses that take into account trichomanoid habitats and accurate ecological preferences.

  7. Duration and extension of anatomical changes in wood structure after cambial injury.

    PubMed

    Arbellay, Estelle; Fonti, Patrick; Stoffel, Markus

    2012-05-01

    Cambial injury has been reported to alter wood structure in broad-leaved trees. However, the duration and extension of associated anatomical changes have rarely been analysed thoroughly. A total of 18 young European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) trees injured on the stem by a spring flood were sampled with the aim of comparing earlywood vessels and rays formed prior to and after the scarring event. Anatomical and hydraulic parameters were measured in five successive rings over one-quarter of the stem circumference. The results demonstrate that mechanical damage induces a decrease in vessel lumen size (up to 77%) and an increase in vessel number (up to 475%) and ray number (up to 115%). The presence of more earlywood vessels and rays was observed over at least three years after stem scarring. By contrast, abnormally narrow earlywood vessels mainly developed in the first ring formed after the event, increasing the thickness-to-span ratio of vessels by 94% and reducing both xylem relative conductivity and the index for xylem vulnerability to cavitation by 54% and 32%, respectively. These vessels accumulated in radial groups in a 30° sector immediately adjacent to the wound, raising the vessel grouping index by 28%. The wound-induced anatomical changes in wood structure express the functional need of trees to improve xylem hydraulic safety and mechanical strength at the expense of water transport. Xylem hydraulic efficiency was restored in one year, while xylem mechanical reinforcement and resistance to cavitation and decay lasted over several years.

  8. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    PubMed Central

    de Notaris, Matteo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam; San Molina, Joan; Berenguer, Joan; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1) simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions); (2) dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries). Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered. PMID:24575410

  9. Cell-level anatomical characteristics explain high mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic capacity in sclerophyllous Mediterranean oaks.

    PubMed

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; García-Nogales, Ana; Niinemets, Ülo; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Saz, Miguel Ángel; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2017-04-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) has been suggested to negatively affect the mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm ), which is the most limiting factor for area-based photosynthesis (AN ) in many Mediterranean sclerophyll species. However, despite their high LMA, these species have similar AN to plants from other biomes. Variations in other leaf anatomical traits, such as mesophyll and chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular air space (Sm /S and Sc /S), may offset the restrictions imposed by high LMA in gm and AN in these species. Seven sclerophyllous Mediterranean oaks from Europe/North Africa and North America with contrasting LMA were compared in terms of morphological, anatomical and photosynthetic traits. Mediterranean oaks showed specific differences in AN that go beyond the common morphological leaf traits reported for these species (reduced leaf area and thick leaves). These variations resulted mainly from the differences in gm , the most limiting factor for carbon assimilation in these species. Species with higher AN showed increased Sc /S, which implies increased gm without changes in stomatal conductance. The occurrence of this anatomical adaptation at the cell level allowed evergreen oaks to reach AN values comparable to congeneric deciduous species despite their higher LMA.

  10. Congenital blindness is associated with large-scale reorganization of anatomical networks.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Uri; Andric, Michael; Atilgan, Hicret; Collignon, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Blindness is a unique model for understanding the role of experience in the development of the brain's functional and anatomical architecture. Documenting changes in the structure of anatomical networks for this population would substantiate the notion that the brain's core network-level organization may undergo neuroplasticity as a result of life-long experience. To examine this issue, we compared whole-brain networks of regional cortical-thickness covariance in early blind and matched sighted individuals. This covariance is thought to reflect signatures of integration between systems involved in similar perceptual/cognitive functions. Using graph-theoretic metrics, we identified a unique mode of anatomical reorganization in the blind that differed from that found for sighted. This was seen in that network partition structures derived from subgroups of blind were more similar to each other than they were to partitions derived from sighted. Notably, after deriving network partitions, we found that language and visual regions tended to reside within separate modules in sighted but showed a pattern of merging into shared modules in the blind. Our study demonstrates that early visual deprivation triggers a systematic large-scale reorganization of whole-brain cortical-thickness networks, suggesting changes in how occipital regions interface with other functional networks in the congenitally blind.

  11. Validation of the conceptual anatomical model of the lung airway.

    PubMed

    Fleming, John S; Sauret, Veronique; Conway, Joy H; Martonen, Ted B

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual anatomical model of the lung airway considers each lung volume divided into ten concentric shells. It specifies the volume of each airway generation in each shell, using Weibel morphometry. This study updates and validates the model and evaluates the errors obtained when using it to estimate inhaled aerosol deposition per generation from spatial imaging data. A comparison of different airway models describing the volume per generation, including data from CT images of a lung cast and a human subject, was performed. A revised version of the conceptual model was created, using the average volume per generation from these data. The new model was applied to derive the aerosol deposition per generation from 24 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. Analysis errors were assessed by applying the same calculations but using airway models based on the minimum and maximum volumes per generation. The mean shell position of each generation in the average model was not significantly different from either CT model. However there were differences between the volumes per generation of the different models. The root mean square differences between bronchial airways deposition fraction (generations 2-8) obtained from the maximum and minimum models compared to the new average model was 0.66 percentage points (14%). For the conducting airways deposition fraction (generations 2-15) this was 1.66 percentage points (12%). The conceptual model is consistent with CT measurements of airway geometry. The errors resulting from using a generic airway model to interpret 3D radionuclide image data have been defined.

  12. GBM heterogeneity characterization by radiomic analysis of phenotype anatomical planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system, characterized among other traits by rapid metastatis. Three tissue phenotypes closely associated with GBMs, namely, necrosis (N), contrast enhancement (CE), and edema/invasion (E), exhibit characteristic patterns of texture heterogeneity in magnetic resonance images (MRI). In this study, we propose a novel model to characterize GBM tissue phenotypes using gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) in three anatomical planes. The GLCM encodes local image patches in terms of informative, orientation-invariant texture descriptors, which are used here to sub-classify GBM tissue phenotypes. Experiments demonstrate the model on MRI data of 41 GBM patients, obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Intensity-based automatic image registration is applied to align corresponding pairs of fixed T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) post-contrast and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. GBM tissue regions are then segmented using the 3D Slicer tool. Texture features are computed from 12 quantifier functions operating on GLCM descriptors, that are generated from MRI intensities within segmented GBM tissue regions. Various classifier models are used to evaluate the effectiveness of texture features for discriminating between GBM phenotypes. Results based on T1-WI scans showed a phenotype classification accuracy of over 88.14%, a sensitivity of 85.37% and a specificity of 96.1%, using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. This model has the potential to provide important characteristics of tumors, which can be used for the sub-classification of GBM phenotypes.

  13. Anatomical characterization of central, apical and minimal corneal thickness

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Bermúdez-Vallecilla, Martha Cecilia; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Jañez, Luis; Martinez-de-la-Casa, José María; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Sanchez, Julián; Garcia-Feijoo, Julián

    2014-01-01

    AIM To anatomically locate the points of minimum corneal thickness and central corneal thickness (pupil center) in relation to the corneal apex. METHODS Observational, cross-sectional study, 299 healthy volunteers. Thickness at the corneal apex (AT), minimum corneal thickness (MT) and corneal thickness at the pupil center (PT) were determined using the pentacam. Distances from the corneal apex to MT (MD) and PT (PD) were calculated and their quadrant position (taking the corneal apex as the reference) determined: point of minimum thickness (MC) and point of central thickness (PC) depending on the quadrant position. Two multivariate linear regression models were constructed to examine the influence of age, gender, power of the flattest and steepest corneal axes, position of the flattest axis, corneal volume (determined using the Pentacam) and PT on MD and PD. The effects of these variables on MC and PC were also determined in two multinomial regression models. RESULTS MT was located at a mean distance of 0.909 mm from the apex (79.4% in the inferior-temporal quadrant). PT was located at a mean distance of 0.156 mm from the apex. The linear regression model for MD indicated it was significantly influenced by corneal volume (B=-0.024; 95%CI: -0.043 to -0.004). No significant relations were identified in the linear regression model for PD or the multinomial logistic regressions for MC and PC. CONCLUSION MT was typically located at the inferior-temporal quadrant of the cornea and its distance to the corneal apex tended to decrease with the increment of corneal volume. PMID:25161940

  14. Foramen of Civinini: A New Anatomical Guide for Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Saran, R Sharmila; Ananthi, K Suba; Subramaniam, Aruna; Balaji, MS Thotakura; Vinaitha, D; Vaithianathan, G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Study on Morphometric and radiological aspect on existence of foramen of civinini. Sphenoid bone comprises of some rare ossified ligaments, may encounter difficulty in surgical procedures. Incidence of Pterygospinous bars various with different racial groups and they are genetically controlled. Complete ossification of pterygospinous ligament form foramen of civinini. Entrapments of vessels or nerves may occur due to existence of pterygospinous bar. The bar may locate medially or inferiorly to formen ovale as seen in Hawaiian and lemurs. Co – existence of bar with the wide lateral pterygoid plate exhibits development of the bar from herbivore, carnivore and old world monkeys. Comparatively absence or small spine of civinini noted in new world monkeys, rodents and platyrrhines. Pterygospinousbar represents the phylogenetic remnant of Human beings. Material and Methods: By using digital vernier caliper, the measurements of length, width of the pterygospinous bar and area of foramen of civinini including the length and breadth of lateral pterygoid plate were measured. Using X rays the radiological view was determined. Results: In this study from 160 cases of skull and sphenoid bones revealed that complete and incomplete foramen of civinini in 1.25% and 7.5% of cases respectively. Peculiarly accessory foramen of civinini noticed in 1.25% of cases. Maximum area of foramen of civinini was 94.2mm2. The maximum width of lateral pterygoid was noted as 19.6mm respectively. Mentocoronal view of skiagram clearly shows the bar. Conclusion: During Anaesthesia for trigeminal neuralgia may encounter difficult to pass the needle. The bar compress the mandibular nerve branches can cause lingual numbness, pain and speech impairment. Conductive anaesthesia on the mandibular nerve through the lateral subzygomatic route may be difficult to approach. Exploring the anatomical and clinical updates of pterygospinous bar may guide the surgeons and radiologists to overcome any

  15. Investigations of Anatomical Variations of the Thorax and Heart, and Anatomical Knowledge for First Year Medical Dental and Podiatry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenna, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The universal presence of anatomy in healthcare professions is undeniable. It is a cornerstone to each of the clinical and basic sciences. Therefore, further expansion of current anatomical knowledge and effective methods to teach anatomy is essential. In this work, the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery with the trunks of the brachial…

  16. Ipsilesional Neglect: Behavioral and Anatomical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Daniela L.; Goedert, Kelly M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The sparse existing research on ipsilesional neglect supports an association of this disorder with damage to the right frontal and subcortical brain networks. It is believed that dysfunction in these networks may result in primarily “aiming”, motor-intentional spatial errors. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether frontal-subcortical circuits are indeed commonly affected in ipsilesional neglect and to determine the relative presence of “aiming”, motor-intentional versus “where”, perceptual-attentional spatial errors in these individuals. Methods We identified 12 participants with ipsilesional neglect based on a computerized line bisection task and used the line bisection data to quantify participants' perceptual-attentional and motor-intentional errors. We were able to discriminate between these two biases using the algebraic solutions for two separate equations, one for “aiming” and one for “where” biases. Lesion mapping was conducted for all participants using MRICroN® software; lesion checklist and overlap analysis were created from these images. Results A greater percentage of participants with ipsilesional neglect had frontal/subcortical damage (83%) compared to the expected percentage (27%) observed in published patient samples with contralesional neglect. We observed the greatest area of lesion overlap in frontal lobe white matter pathways. Nevertheless, participants with ipsilesional neglect made primarily “where” rather than “aiming” spatial errors. Conclusion Our data confirms previous research suggesting that ipsilesional neglect may result from lesions to the right frontal-subcortical networks. Furthermore, in our group, ipsilesional neglect was also strongly associated with primarily “where”, perceptual-attentional bias, and less so with “aiming” motor-intentional spatial bias. PMID:25180980

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome - anatomical and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Iskra, Tomasz; Mizia, Ewa; Musial, Agata; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common and widely known of the entrapment neuropathies in which the body's peripheral nerves are compressed. Common symptoms of CTS involve the hand and result from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In general, CTS develops when the tissues around the median nerve irritate or compress on the nerve along its course through the carpal tunnel, however often it is very difficult to determine cause of CTS. Proper treatment (conservative or surgical) usually can relieve the symptoms and restore normal use of the wrist and hand.

  18. Connecting Imaging Mass Spectrometry and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based Anatomical Atlases for Automated Anatomical Interpretation and Differential Analysis.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Murphy, Monika J M; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Caprioli, Richard M; de Plas, Raf Van

    2017-02-27

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model, which are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities.

  19. Anatomical background and generalized detectability in tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gang, G. J.; Tward, D. J.; Lee, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Anatomical background presents a major impediment to detectability in 2D radiography as well as 3D tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). This article incorporates theoretical and experimental analysis of anatomical background ''noise'' in cascaded systems analysis of 2D and 3D imaging performance to yield ''generalized'' metrics of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detectability index as a function of the orbital extent of the (circular arc) source-detector orbit. Methods: A physical phantom was designed based on principles of fractal self-similarity to exhibit power-law spectral density ({kappa}/f{sup {beta}}) comparable to various anatomical sites (e.g., breast and lung). Background power spectra [S{sub B}(f)] were computed as a function of source-detector orbital extent, including tomosynthesis ({approx}10 deg. - 180 deg.) and CBCT (180 deg. +fan to 360 deg.) under two acquisition schemes: (1) Constant angular separation between projections (variable dose) and (2) constant total number of projections (constant dose). The resulting S{sub B} was incorporated in the generalized NEQ, and detectability index was computed from 3D cascaded systems analysis for a variety of imaging tasks. Results: The phantom yielded power-law spectra within the expected spatial frequency range, quantifying the dependence of clutter magnitude ({kappa}) and correlation ({beta}) with increasing tomosynthesis angle. Incorporation of S{sub B} in the 3D NEQ provided a useful framework for analyzing the tradeoffs among anatomical, quantum, and electronic noise with dose and orbital extent. Distinct implications are posed for breast and chest tomosynthesis imaging system design--applications varying significantly in {kappa} and {beta}, and imaging task and, therefore, in optimal selection of orbital extent, number of projections, and dose. For example, low-frequency tasks (e.g., soft-tissue masses or nodules) tend to benefit from larger orbital extent and more fully 3D tomographic

  20. [Anatomic and functional features of venous valves].

    PubMed

    Griton, P; Vanet, P; Cloarec, M

    1997-05-01

    The comparison of the venous system in the human organism, and in particular the venous valves of the lower limbs, with studies conducted in animal models helped us to understand better the mechanisms involved in adapting to the upright position and walking. We examined work conducted in several species from the horse to the dog, especially in animals who often take on an upright position such as the chimpanzee and the kangouroo, in search for structures comparable to those in man. Different types of valves can be described in man: flotting valves (bicuspid, pigeon nest valves); reinforced valves (mid-thigh); reinforcing valves (periarticular zone in the knee); finally, "flat" valves which are highly resistant formations but with little anti-back flow action. We also describe valvular structures with muscle cells found in the plantar aspect of the foot and the veins of the quadriceps muscle, these valves may have an active hematopropulsive action (Bassi). These results allowed us to identify certain common points between the structures observed in the posterior legs of certain animals and to propose models for investigating venous diseases.

  1. The primo vascular system as a new anatomical system.

    PubMed

    Stefanov, Miroslav; Potroz, Michael; Kim, Jungdae; Lim, Jake; Cha, Richard; Nam, Min-Ho

    2013-12-01

    Traditional Eastern medicine has had a successful existence for a long time and has provided functional paths for curing disease. However, some scientists do not accept acupuncture, primarily because the meridian system lacks a physical anatomical basis. To date, scientific theories have not been able to explain the functional paths used by traditional Eastern medicine to cure disease. According to Western medicine, no known anatomical foundation exists for the meridians and unknown nervous, circulatory, endocrine, and immune mechanisms mediate the effects of acupuncture. In the early 1960s, only one hypothesis was proposed to explain the anatomical basis of the meridians. By using different experimental approaches during the past 10 years, the number of scientific papers that report the discovery of different anatomical and physiological evidence confirming the existence of an anatomical basis for the meridian system has increased. Morphological science is greatly challenged to offer a new biomedical theory that explains the possible existence of new bodily systems such as the primo vascular system (PVS). The PVS is a previously unknown system that integrates the features of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and hormonal systems. It also provides a physical substrate for the acupuncture points and meridians. Announcements of the morphological architectonics and the function of the PVS fundamentally changed the basic understanding of biology and medicine because the PVS is involved in the development and the functions of living organisms. We propose a new vision of the anatomical basis for the PVS and the vital energy-called "Qi"-as an electromagnetic wave that is involved very closely with the DNA in the PVS. DNA provides genetic information and it functions as a store of information that can be obtained from the electromagnetic fields of the environment. The PVS is the communication system between living organisms and the environment, and it lies at the lowest

  2. Anatomical aspects of angiosperm root evolution

    PubMed Central

    Seago, James L.; Fernando, Danilo D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Anatomy had been one of the foundations in our understanding of plant evolutionary trends and, although recent evo-devo concepts are mostly based on molecular genetics, classical structural information remains useful as ever. Of the various plant organs, the roots have been the least studied, primarily because of the difficulty in obtaining materials, particularly from large woody species. Therefore, this review aims to provide an overview of the information that has accumulated on the anatomy of angiosperm roots and to present possible evolutionary trends between representatives of the major angiosperm clades. Scope This review covers an overview of the various aspects of the evolutionary origin of the root. The results and discussion focus on angiosperm root anatomy and evolution covering representatives from basal angiosperms, magnoliids, monocots and eudicots. We use information from the literature as well as new data from our own research. Key Findings The organization of the root apical meristem (RAM) of Nymphaeales allows for the ground meristem and protoderm to be derived from the same group of initials, similar to those of the monocots, whereas in Amborellales, magnoliids and eudicots, it is their protoderm and lateral rootcap which are derived from the same group of initials. Most members of Nymphaeales are similar to monocots in having ephemeral primary roots and so adventitious roots predominate, whereas Amborellales, Austrobaileyales, magnoliids and eudicots are generally characterized by having primary roots that give rise to a taproot system. Nymphaeales and monocots often have polyarch (heptarch or more) steles, whereas the rest of the basal angiosperms, magnoliids and eudicots usually have diarch to hexarch steles. Conclusions Angiosperms exhibit highly varied structural patterns in RAM organization; cortex, epidermis and rootcap origins; and stele patterns. Generally, however, Amborellales, magnoliids and, possibly

  3. Types of case series--the anatomically based approach: commentary on M. F. Schwartz & G. S. Dell: case series investigations in cognitive neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Shallice, Tim; Buiatti, Tania

    2011-10-01

    The paper addresses a weakness in the Schwartz and Dell paper (2010)-namely, its discussion of the inclusion criteria for case series. The paper distinguishes the different types that exist and how they constrain the theoretical conclusions that one can draw about the organization of the normal cognitive system. Four different types of inclusion criteria are considered. Two are those treated by Schwartz and Dell-namely, theoretically derived clinical criteria, such as the example of semantic dementia, and broad clinical criteria such as the presence of aphasia. In addition, in the present paper two different types of anatomically based criteria are assessed-those using anatomical regions selected a priori and also regions selected as a result of an anatomical group study analysis. Putative functional syndromes are argued to be the empirical building blocks for cognitive neuropsychology. Anatomically based case series can aid in their construction or in their fractionation.

  4. Volume rendering of visible human data for an anatomical virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Kerr, J; Ratiu, P; Sellberg, M

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we utilize the axial anatomical human male sections from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project to generate three-dimensional (3-D) volume representations of the human male subject. The two-dimensional (2-D) projection images were produced by combining ray tracing techniques with automated image segmentation routines. The resultant images provide accurate and realistic volumetric representations of the Visible Human data set which is ultimately needed in medical virtual environment simulation. Ray tracing techniques provide methods by which 2-D volume views of a 3-D voxel array can be produced. The cross-sectional images can be scanned at different angles to produce rotated views of the voxel array. By combining volume views at incremental angles over 360 degrees a full volumetric representation of the voxel array, in this case the human male data set, can be computer generated and displayed without the speed and memory limitations of trying to display the entire data array. Additional texture and feature information can be obtained from the data by applying optical property equations to the ray scans. The imaging effects that can be added to volume renderings using these equations include shading, shadowing, and transparency. The automated segmentation routines provide a means to distinguish between various anatomical structures of the body. These routines can be used to differentiate between skin, fat, muscle, cartilage, blood vessels, and bone. By combining automated segmentation routines with the ray-tracing techniques, 2-D volume views of various anatomical structures and features can be isolated from the full data set. Examples of these segmentation abilities are demonstrated for the human male data set which include volume views of the skeletal systems, the musculoskeletal system, and part of the vascular system. The methods described above allow us to generate lifelike images, NURBS surface models, and realistic texture maps

  5. Characterization of Capsicum species using anatomical and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Dias, G B; Gomes, V M; Moraes, T M S; Zottich, U P; Rabelo, G R; Carvalho, A O; Moulin, M; Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Da Cunha, M

    2013-02-28

    Capsicum species are frequently described in terms of genetic divergence, considering morphological, agronomic, and molecular databases. However, descriptions of genetic differences based on anatomical characters are rare. We examined the anatomy and the micromorphology of vegetative and reproductive organs of several Capsicum species. Four Capsicum accessions representing the species C. annuum var. annuum, C. baccatum var. pendulum, C. chinense, and C. frutescens were cultivated in a greenhouse; leaves, fruits and seeds were sampled and their organ structure analyzed by light and scanning electronic microscopy. Molecular accession characterization was made using ISSR markers. Polymorphism was observed among tector trichomes and also in fruit color and shape. High variability among accessions was detected by ISSR markers. Despite the species studied present a wide morphological and molecular variability that was not reflected by anatomical features.

  6. [For an interdisciplinary museology. The particular case of anatomical waxes].

    PubMed

    Pirson, Chloé

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the anatomical models in three dimensions are often showed in Museums devoted to the History of Medicine. Due to their historical importance and the major role they played as scientific education tool, they are essentials to understand the heritage of the anatomical knowledge. Historically, within all materials used to cast the body, wax has been the most frequently used, so that the ceroplastical collection has become a part of the medical education before leading to a general public pedagogy. This paper has a double purpose. In one hand, it aims to survey the formal evolution and the uses of this production, from his creation on, in the other, to study this cultural heritage within the museology issue.

  7. An anatomical evaluation of the serratus anterior plane block.

    PubMed

    Mayes, J; Davison, E; Panahi, P; Patten, D; Eljelani, F; Womack, J; Varma, M

    2016-09-01

    The serratus anterior plane block has been described for analgesia of the hemithorax. This study was conducted to determine the spread of injectate and investigate the anatomical basis of the block. Ultrasound-guided serratus anterior plane block was performed on six soft-fix embalmed cadavers. All cadavers received bilateral injections, on one side performed with 20 ml latex and on the other with 20 ml methylene blue. Subsequent dissection explored the extent of spread and nerve involvement. Photographs were taken throughout dissection. The intercostal nerves were involved on three occasions with dye, but not with latex. The lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerve contained dye and latex on all occasions. The serratus plane block appears to be mediated through blockade of the lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerves. Anatomically, serratus plane block does not appear to be equivalent to paravertebral block for rib fracture analgesia.

  8. Value of anatomic landmarks in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, O Y; Uras, I; Tasbas, B; Kaya, M; Ozay, R; Komurcu, M

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated which anatomic landmarks were most useful for correct and safe incision placement in carpal tunnel surgery. Kirschner wires were attached to the hands to mark previously defined landmarks. The bony attachments of the transverse carpal ligament, which were identified previously, were drawn on an anteroposterior digital x-ray of the hand, with the thumb in full abduction. The relationship between anatomic landmarks and these bony attachments were examined. In all hands, either the line along the third web space or the crease between the thenar and the hypothenar regions, or both, were on the ulnar half of the transverse carpal ligament. During incision placement, we recommend selecting the most ulnar choice between the line drawn along the third web space and the crease between the thenar and hypothenar regions in order to be at safe distance from the recurrent motor branch of the median nerve.

  9. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  10. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees.

    PubMed

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan; Lo, Pechin; Thomsen, Laura H; Wille, Mathilde M W; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for labeling anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given tree are evaluated based on distances to a training set of labeled trees. In tree-space, the tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway centerline tree, which are relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Performance is statistically similar to the inter- and intra-expert agreement, and we found no significant correlation between COPD stage and labeling accuracy.

  11. A three dimensional heart model based on anatomically aligned trusses.

    PubMed

    Witman, S; Gefen, A; Barnea, O

    2007-01-01

    A new approach for modeling and simulating the contraction of the heart is presented. The model is based on anatomical images and accounts for cardiac muscle fibers and their orientation. The heart is modeled as a structure built of trusses, each representing a group of myofibers with calculated deformations using matrix structural analysis. Three elements are represented; these are the contractile cardiac muscle, the elastic passive collagen, and intracardiac blood interacting with the heart's preload and afterload. Incompressibility of each element is preserved. The conduction system is simulated in the model by transferring the activating signal from one element to another or by Purkinje fibers activation. The method was demonstrated using a three-dimensional one-layer geometrical ventricle with orthogonal fibers and with anatomically oriented fibers.

  12. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  13. Constructivist learning of anatomy: gaining knowledge by creating anatomical casts.

    PubMed

    Hermiz, David J; O'Sullivan, Daniel J; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    Educators are encouraged to provide inquiry-based, collaborative, and problem solving activities that enhance learning and promote curiosity, skepticism, objectivity, and the use of scientific reasoning. Making anatomical casts or models by injecting solidifying substances into organs is an example of a constructivist activity for achieving these goals. This report describes a student-implemented protocol for making postmortem anatomical casts of the bronchial tree and coronary arteries of rats using Silastic® sealant. The teacher facilitated this process by asking leading questions to guide the students toward the development of their own conclusions. This relatively simple and inexpensive procedure has important applications for the constructivist approach to study cardiovascular and respiratory morphology.

  14. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  15. Anatomical models for space radiation applications: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, W.

    1994-10-01

    Extremely detailed computerized anatomical male (CAM) and female (CAF) models that have been developed for use in space radiation analyses are discussed and reviewed. Recognizing that the level of detail may currently be inadequate for certain radiological applications, one of the purposes of this paper is to elicit specific model improvements or requirements from the scientific user-community. Methods and rationale are presented which describe the approach used in the Space Shuttle program to extrapolate dosimetry measurements (skin doses) to realistic astronaut body organ doses. Several mission scenarios are presented which demonstrate the utility of the anatomical models for obtaining specific body organ exposure estimates and can be used for establishing cancer morbidity and mortality risk assessments. These exposure estimates are based on the trapped Van Allen belt and galactic cosmic radiation environment models and data from the major historical solar particle events.

  16. [Histologic and anatomic correlation of the infraorbital region].

    PubMed

    Copin, H; Bremond-Gignac, D; Cirilie, K; Braun, M; Kohler, Ch

    2003-12-01

    The infra-orbital area has not been well studied although it represents an interesting area in plastic surgery because of its implication in malarplasty reduction or transplantation for facial tissue repair. This work comprises an anatomic dissection layer by layer and a histologic study describing the various structures of this area. It was performed on 10 heads taken from cadavers (mean age 70 years old). The anatomic and histologic study found four layers: a subcutaneous fat layer, a muscular layer, a deep fat layer and a deep muscular layer. The superficial fat layer constitutes the convexity of the cheek and can be removed in plastic surgery reduction or reconstituted after atrophy following nasolabial musculo cutaneous flaps.

  17. Physical therapy management of female chronic pelvic pain: Anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    George, Susan E; Clinton, Susan C; Borello-France, Diane F

    2013-01-01

    The multisystem nature of female chronic pelvic pain (CPP) makes this condition a challenge for physical therapists and other health care providers to manage. This article uses a case scenario to illustrate commonly reported somatic, visceral, and neurologic symptoms and their associated health and participation impact in a female with CPP. Differential diagnosis of pain generators requires an in-depth understanding of possible anatomic and physiologic contributors to this disorder. This article provides a detailed discussion of the relevant clinical anatomy with specific attention to complex interrelationships between anatomic structures potentially leading to the patient's pain. In addition, it describes the physical therapy management specific to this case, including examination, differential diagnosis, and progression of interventions.

  18. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  19. Anatomic variation of the common palmar digital nerves and arteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong; Fu, Maoyong

    2015-03-01

    Variations in the course and distribution of common palmar digital nerves and arteries are rare. A classic common palmar digital nerves and arteries are defined as concomitant. During routine dissection classes to undergraduate medical students we observed formation of each common palmar digital nerve divided into 2 or 3 branches and formed a ring enclosing the corresponding common palmar digital artery. Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the common palmar digital nerves and arteries is crucial for safe and successful hand surgery.

  20. Frequency in Usage of FCAT-Approved Anatomical Terms by North American Anatomists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Bradford D.; Thorpe, Donna; Barnes, Richard; DeLeon, Michael; Hill, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) published Terminologia Anatomica (TA), the current authority on anatomical nomenclature. There exists a perceived lack of unity among anatomists to adopt many FCAT recommended anatomical terms in TA. An e-mail survey was sent to members of the American Association…

  1. The Importance of Exposure to Human Material in Anatomical Education: A Philosophical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Despite reductions in the importance, time committed to, and status of anatomical education in modern medical curricula, anatomical knowledge remains a cornerstone of medicine and related professions. Anatomists are therefore presented with the challenge of delivering required levels of core anatomical knowledge in a reduced time-frame and with…

  2. The Intermingled History of Occupational Therapy and Anatomical Education: A Retrospective Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Melissa A.; Lawson, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Few research articles have addressed the anatomical needs of entry-level occupational therapy students. Given this paucity of empirical evidence, there is a lack of knowledge regarding anatomical education in occupational therapy. This article will primarily serve as a retrospective look at the inclusion of anatomical education in the occupational…

  3. Anatomic Anomalies Encountered in 467 Open Carpal Tunnel Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ahmadreza; Nasiri, Behnam; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Hesarikia, Hamid; Navaeifar, Nasrin; Taleb, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy and carpal tunnel surgery is the most frequently performed hand surgery. Anatomic anomalies may predispose the median nerve to compression. The aim of the current study was to search for anatomic anomalies in open carpal tunnel surgeries through a cross-sectional study. During a cross-sectional study in a one-year period, 436 consecutive patients (307 females and 129 males) with the average age of 50.3 ± 2.4 years underwent 467 classic open carpal tunnel surgeries. Thirty-one patients had bilateral surgeries. A thorough inspection of the incisions was conducted to search for vascular, neural, tendon and muscular anomalies. Forty-two (8.9%) hands (14 males and 28 females) had anomalies. The average age of the patients with discovered anomalies was 48.6 ± 7.6 years. Ten anomalies were seen on the left hands and 32 anomalies were seen on the right hands. Among the 42 anomalies, there were 16 persistent median arteries, 14 anomalies of the median nerve, 7 intratunnel intrusion of the flexor and lumbrical muscle bellies and 5 anomalies of the origin of the thenar muscles. There was no correlation between the discovered anomalies and the age, gender or hand sides. Anatomical anomalies are not uncommon in carpal tunnel surgeries. However, the frequencies of the reported anomalies vary among different studies. Familiarity with these anomalies increases the safety of the operation.

  4. A totally thoracoscopic approach for pulmonary anatomic segmentectomies.

    PubMed

    Gossot, Dominique; Ramos, Ricard; Brian, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Christine; Girard, Philippe; Strauss, Christiane

    2011-04-01

    Reported experience with video-assisted anatomic pulmonary segmentectomy is still limited. Over a 28-month period, totally thoracoscopic (TT) anatomic segmentectomies, i.e. using only endoscopic instrumentation and video-display without utility incision, were attempted on 50 patients (25 males and 25 females), aged 18-81 years (mean: 57 years). The indication was a clinical N0 non-small cell lung carcinoma in 25 cases, a solitary metastasis in nine cases and a benign lesion in 16 cases. The following segmentectomies were performed: right apicosuperior (9) right superior (6), right basilar (7), lingula sparing left upper lobectomy (7), left apicosuperior (4), lingula (4), left superior (6) and left basilar (7). It was associated with a radical lymphadenectomy in 20 cases. There was one conversion to thoracotomy. The mean operative time was 188±54 min, the mean intraoperative blood loss was 91±82 ml (range: 0-450 ml). There were four minor postoperative complications (11.7%). The median postoperative stay was 5.6±2.4 days. Out of the 25 patients operated on for a cN0 lung carcinoma, two were finally upstaged to N2. TT anatomic pulmonary segmentectomies are feasible and safe.

  5. Biofabrication of multi-material anatomically shaped tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Peters, Benjamin; Burger, Thijs J; Boomstra, Jelle; Dhert, Wouter J A; Melchels, Ferry P W; Malda, Jos

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing in the field of regenerative medicine aims to fabricate organized tissue-equivalents. However, the control over shape and composition of biofabricated constructs is still a challenge and needs to be improved. The current research aims to improve shape, by converging a number of biocompatible, quality construction materials into a single three-dimensional fiber deposition process. To demonstrate this, several models of complex anatomically shaped constructs were fabricated by combined deposition of poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(ε-caprolactone), gelatin methacrylamide/gellan gum and alginate hydrogel. Sacrificial components were co-deposited as temporary support for overhang geometries and were removed after fabrication by immersion in aqueous solutions. Embedding of chondrocytes in the gelatin methacrylamide/gellan component demonstrated that the fabrication and the sacrificing procedure did not affect cell viability. Further, it was shown that anatomically shaped constructs can be successfully fabricated, yielding advanced porous thermoplastic polymer scaffolds, layered porous hydrogel constructs, as well as reinforced cell-laden hydrogel structures. In conclusion, anatomically shaped tissue constructs of clinically relevant sizes can be generated when employing multiple building and sacrificial materials in a single biofabrication session. The current techniques offer improved control over both internal and external construct architecture underscoring its potential to generate customized implants for human tissue regeneration.

  6. Periprosthetic bone loss after insertion of an uncemented, customized femoral stem and an uncemented anatomical stem

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Customized femoral stems are designed to have a perfect fit and fill in the femur in order to achieve physiological load transfer and minimize stress shielding. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is regarded as an accurate method for detection of small alterations in bone mineral density (BMD) around hip prostheses. We present medium-term DXA results from a randomized study comparing a customized and an anatomical femoral stem. Methods 100 hips were randomized to receive either the anatomical ABG-I stem or the Unique customized femoral stem, both uncemented. DXA measurements were conducted postoperatively and after 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 60 months, and BMD was computed for each of the 7 Gruen zones in the proximal femur. Results Results from 87 patients were available for analysis. 78 completed the 5-year follow-up: 35 patients in the ABG group and 43 patients in the Unique group. In both groups, we found the greatest degree of bone loss in the proximal Gruen zones. In zone 1, there was 15% reduction in BMD in the ABG-I group and 14% reduction in the Unique group. In zone 7, the reduction was 28% in the ABG-I group and 27% in the Unique group. The only statistically significant difference between the groups was found in Gruen zone 4, which is distal to the tip of the stem, with 1.6% reduction in BMD in the ABG-I group and 9.7% reduction in the Unique group (p = 0.003). Interpretation 5-year DXA results showed that because of stress-shielding, proximal bone loss could not be avoided—either for the anatomical ABG-I stem or for the customized Unique stem. PMID:21668387

  7. Improving spatial localization in MEG inverse imaging by leveraging intersubject anatomical differences

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K.; Lee, Adrian K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques enable non-invasive observation of ongoing neural processing, with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in particular providing direct measurement of neural activity with millisecond time resolution. However, accurately mapping measured MEG sensor readings onto the underlying source neural structures remains an active area of research. This so-called “inverse problem” is ill posed, and poses a challenge for source estimation that is often cited as a drawback limiting MEG data interpretation. However, anatomically constrained MEG localization estimates may be more accurate than commonly believed. Here we hypothesize that, by combining anatomically constrained inverse estimates across subjects, the spatial uncertainty of MEG source localization can be mitigated. Specifically, we argue that differences in subject brain geometry yield differences in point-spread functions, resulting in improved spatial localization across subjects. To test this, we use standard methods to combine subject anatomical MRI scans with coregistration information to obtain an accurate forward (physical) solution, modeling the MEG sensor data resulting from brain activity originating from different cortical locations. Using a linear minimum-norm inverse to localize this brain activity, we demonstrate that a substantial increase in the spatial accuracy of MEG source localization can result from combining data from subjects with differing brain geometry. This improvement may be enabled by an increase in the amount of available spatial information in MEG data as measurements from different subjects are combined. This approach becomes more important in the face of practical issues of coregistration errors and potential noise sources, where we observe even larger improvements in localization when combining data across subjects. Finally, we use a simple auditory N100(m) localization task to show how this effect can influence localization using a recorded neural dataset

  8. Does Learning in Clinical Context in Anatomical Sciences Improve Examination Results, Learning Motivation, or Learning Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical…

  9. The Role of Long-Range Connectivity for the Characterization of the Functional–Anatomical Organization of the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knösche, Thomas R.; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of long-range connectivity as one element of brain structure that is of key importance for the functional–anatomical organization of the cortex. In this context, we discuss the putative guiding principles for mapping brain function and structure onto the cortical surface. Such mappings reveal a high degree of functional–anatomical segregation. Given that brain regions frequently maintain characteristic connectivity profiles and the functional repertoire of a cortical area is closely related to its anatomical connections, long-range connectivity may be used to define segregated cortical areas. This methodology is called connectivity-based parcellation. Within this framework, we investigate different techniques to estimate connectivity profiles with emphasis given to non-invasive methods based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and diffusion tractography. Cortical parcellation is then defined based on similarity between diffusion tractograms, and different clustering approaches are discussed. We conclude that the use of non-invasively acquired connectivity estimates to characterize the functional–anatomical organization of the brain is a valid, relevant, and necessary endeavor. Current and future developments in dMRI technology, tractography algorithms, and models of the similarity structure hold great potential for a substantial improvement and enrichment of the results of the technique. PMID:21779237

  10. Anatomical location differences between mutated and wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Zhifeng; Ji, Chunhong; Lian, Yuxi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-01-06

    Anatomical location of gliomas has been considered as a factor implicating the contributions of a specific precursor cells during the tumor growth. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is a pathognomonic biomarker with a significant impact on the development of gliomas and remarkable prognostic effect. The correlation between anatomical location of tumor and IDH1 states for low-grade gliomas was analyzed quantitatively in this study. Ninety-two patients diagnosed of low-grade glioma pathologically were recruited in this study, including 65 patients with IDH1-mutated glioma and 27 patients with wide-type IDH1. A convolutional neural network was designed to segment the tumor from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging images. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was then employed to study the tumor location distribution differences between gliomas with mutated and wild-type IDH1. In order to characterize the location differences quantitatively, the Automated Anatomical Labeling Atlas was used to partition the standard brain atlas into 116 anatomical volumes of interests (AVOIs). The percentages of tumors with different IDH1 states in 116 AVOIs were calculated and compared. Support vector machine and AdaBoost algorithms were used to estimate the IDH1 status based on the 116 location features of each patient. Experimental results proved that the quantitative tumor location measurement could be a very important group of imaging features in biomarker estimation based on radiomics analysis of glioma.

  11. Leaf hydraulic conductance is coordinated with leaf morpho-anatomical traits and nitrogen status in the genus Oryza.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dongliang; Yu, Tingting; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-02-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf) is a major determinant of photosynthetic rate in plants. Previous work has assessed the relationships between leaf morpho-anatomical traits and K leaf with woody species, but there has been very little focus on cereal crops. The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa) and wild species (such as O. rufipogon cv. Griff), is ideal material for identifying leaf features associated with K leaf and gas exchange. Leaf morpho-anatomical traits, K leaf, leaf N content per leaf area, and CO2 diffusion efficiency were investigated in 11 Oryza cultivars. K leaf was positively correlated with leaf thickness and related traits, and therefore positively correlated with leaf mass per area and leaf N content per leaf area, and negatively with inter-veinal distance. K leaf was also positively correlated with leaf area and its related traits, and therefore negatively correlated with the proportion of minor vein length per area. In addition, coordination between K leaf and CO2 diffusion conductance in leaves was observed. We conclude that leaf morpho-anatomical traits and N content per leaf area strongly influence K leaf. Our results suggest that more detailed anatomical and structural studies are needed to elucidate the impacts of leaf feature traits on K leaf and gas exchange in grasses.

  12. Anatomical coupling among distributed cortical regions in youth varies as a function of individual differences in vocabulary abilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Raznahan, Armin; Wallace, Gregory L; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Clasen, Liv S; Lerch, Jason P; Giedd, Jay N

    2014-05-01

    Patient lesion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have provided convincing evidence that a distributed brain network subserves word knowledge. However, little is known about the structural correlates of this network within the context of typical development and whether anatomical coupling in linguistically relevant regions of cortex varies as a function of vocabulary skill. Here we investigate the association between vocabulary and anatomical coupling in 235 typically developing youth (ages 6-19 years) using structural MRI. The study's primary aim was to evaluate whether higher vocabulary performance was associated with greater vertex-level cortical thickness covariation in distributed regions of cortex known to be associated with word knowledge. Results indicate that better vocabulary skills are associated with greater anatomical coupling in several linguistically relevant regions of cortex, including the left inferior parietal (temporal-parietal junction), inferior temporal, middle frontal, and superior frontal gyri and the right inferior frontal and precentral gyri. Furthermore, in high vocabulary scorers, stronger coupling is found among these regions. Thus, complementing patient and fMRI studies, this is the first investigation to highlight the relevance of anatomical covariance within the cortex to vocabulary skills in typically developing youth, further elucidating the distributed nature of neural systems subserving word knowledge.

  13. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  14. Computed tomography of the larynx: correlation with anatomic and pathologic studies in cases of laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Schild, J.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Capek, V.

    1983-04-01

    Seven patients with known carcinoma of the larynx underwent computed tomography (CT) of the larynx prior to surgery. Whole-mount sections of the extirpated larynx cut in the horizontal plane were compared with the corresponding level of the preoperaive CT sections to demonstrate the validity of CT scanning in the evaluation of tumors of the larynx. The results indicate that CT scanning accurately demonstrates the anatomic location and gross size of laryngeal tumor, although early invasion of the laryngeal cartilages may be difficult to diagnose with CT. It is concluded that preoperative CT scanning of the larynx is the radiologic procedure of choice for evaluating carcinoma of the larynx.

  15. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  16. Self-adaptive asymmetric on-line boosting for detecting anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Tajbakhsh, Nima; Xue, Wenzhe; Liang, Jianming

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a self-adaptive, asymmetric on-line boosting (SAAOB) method for detecting anatomical structures in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). SAAOB is novel in that it exploits a new asymmetric loss criterion with self-adaptability according to the ratio of exposed positive and negative samples and in that it has an advanced rule to update sample's importance weight taking account of both classification result and sample's label. Our presented method is evaluated by detecting three distinct thoracic structures, the carina, the pulmonary trunk and the aortic arch, in both balanced and imbalanced conditions.

  17. Segmenting the prostate and rectum in CT imagery using anatomical constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siqi; Lovelock, D Michael; Radke, Richard J

    2011-02-01

    The automatic segmentation of the prostate and rectum from 3D computed tomography (CT) images is still a challenging problem, and is critical for image-guided therapy applications. We present a new, automatic segmentation algorithm based on deformable organ models built from previously segmented training data. The major contributions of this work are a new segmentation cost function based on a Bayesian framework that incorporates anatomical constraints from surrounding bones and a new appearance model that learns a nonparametric distribution of the intensity histograms inside and outside organ contours. We report segmentation results on 185 datasets of the prostate site, demonstrating improved performance over previous models.

  18. [Anatomic approach to the sphenooccipital synchondrosis in newborns and infants with craniocerebral injury].

    PubMed

    Parilov, S L; Chikun, V I; Klevno, V A

    2008-01-01

    An anatomic approach is developed to sphenooccipital synchondrosis in newborn infants and nurslings. After removal of the squamous portion of the occipital bone by the method of Medvedev, opening of the cerebrospinal canal, removal of the spinal cord and hypophysis, two parallel cuts converging at an angle of approximately 90 degrees were made with a dissecting blade saw along both sides of sella turcica towards the anterior edge of the great occipital foramen to transect the sphenoid bone and main part of the occipital bone. The resulting osteochondrous fragment showed up defects in synchondrosis including consolidated ones.

  19. [Anatomic study of the arteries and nervous plexus of the prostate and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Chen, X Q

    1989-06-01

    The arteries and nervous plexus of prostates were observed on 32 sides of male adult cadavers. 74.3% of prostatic arteries were derived from the inferior vesical arteries. The latters divided into branches at a site of 24 +/- 10 mm above 4(8) o'clock point of intervesico-prostatic sulcus. According to the anatomical results, the authors have put and used a new hemostatic method ligating the inferior vesical arteries prior to the section of the hyperplastic gland tissue in 18 cases. Bleeding volume in the operations was 80 ml average. The various color varied from red to clean was 90 minutes average after the operations.

  20. Specification and estimation of sources of bias affecting neurological studies in PET/MR with an anatomical brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuho, J.; Johansson, J.; Linden, J.; Saunavaara, V.; Tolvanen, T.; Teräs, M.

    2014-01-01

    Selection of reconstruction parameters has an effect on the image quantification in PET, with an additional contribution from a scanner-specific attenuation correction method. For achieving comparable results in inter- and intra-center comparisons, any existing quantitative differences should be identified and compensated for. In this study, a comparison between PET, PET/CT and PET/MR is performed by using an anatomical brain phantom, to identify and measure the amount of bias caused due to differences in reconstruction and attenuation correction methods especially in PET/MR. Differences were estimated by using visual, qualitative and quantitative analysis. The qualitative analysis consisted of a line profile analysis for measuring the reproduction of anatomical structures and the contribution of the amount of iterations to image contrast. The quantitative analysis consisted of measurement and comparison of 10 anatomical VOIs, where the HRRT was considered as the reference. All scanners reproduced the main anatomical structures of the phantom adequately, although the image contrast on the PET/MR was inferior when using a default clinical brain protocol. Image contrast was improved by increasing the amount of iterations from 2 to 5 while using 33 subsets. Furthermore, a PET/MR-specific bias was detected, which resulted in underestimation of the activity values in anatomical structures closest to the skull, due to the MR-derived attenuation map that ignores the bone. Thus, further improvements for the PET/MR reconstruction and attenuation correction could be achieved by optimization of RAMLA-specific reconstruction parameters and implementation of bone to the attenuation template.

  1. Differentiation of persistent anatomical defensive structures is costly and determined by nutrient availability and genetic growth-defence constraints.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Zas, Rafael; Solla, Alejandro; Sampedro, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Conifers exhibit a number of chemical and anatomical mechanisms to defend against pests and pathogens. Theory predicts an increased investment in plant defences under limited nutrient availability, but while this has been demonstrated for chemical defences, it has rarely been shown for anatomical defensive structures. In a long-lived woody plant, we tested the hypothesis that limited nutrient availability may promote an improved differentiation of persistent anatomical defences. We also hypothesized that the costs of differentiation of those long-term anatomical structures may be determined by genetic constraints on early growth potential. Using Pinus pinaster Ait. juveniles, we performed a greenhouse study with 15 half-sib families subjected to experimental manipulation of phosphorus (P) availability and herbivory-related induced responses. When plants were ∼30 cm high, half of the plant material was treated with methyl jasmonate to induce defences, and 2 weeks later plants were harvested and the abundance of resin canals in the cortex and xylem was assessed. Density of constitutive resin canals in the cortex and the total canal system was ∼1.5-fold higher in plants under limited P availability than in fully fertilized plants. Availability of P did not significantly influence the inducibility of resin canal traits. We found negative genetic correlations between plant growth and the density of constitutive canals in the xylem and total canal system, but only under conditions of limited nutrition. These results demonstrate for the first time that differentiation of constitutive anatomical-based defences is affected by P limitation. Moreover, results also evidence the existence of genetic constraints between plant growth and constitutive defensive investment, where lineages with the highest growth potential showed the lowest investment in constitutive resin canals.

  2. Hemodialysis catheter implantation in the axillary vein by ultrasound guidance versus palpation or anatomical reference

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Cesar A Restrepo; Villa, Carlos A Buitrago; Cardona, Jose A Chacon

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared the results of four different methods of hemodialysis catheter insertion in the medial segment of the axillary vein: ultrasound guidance, palpation, anatomical reference, and prior transient catheter. Methods All patients that required acute or chronic hemodialysis and for whom it was determined impossible or not recommended either to place a catheter in the internal jugular vein (for instance, those patients with a tracheostomy), or to practice arteriovenous fistula or graft; it was then essential to obtain an alternative vascular access. When the procedure of axillary vein catheter insertion was performed in the Renal Care Facility (RCF), ultrasound guidance was used, but in the intensive care unit (ICU), this resource was unavailable, so the palpation or anatomical reference technique was used. Results Two nephrologists with experience in the technique performed 83 procedures during a period lasting 15 years and 8 months (from January 1997–August 2012): 41 by ultrasound guidance; 19 by anatomical references; 15 by palpation of the contiguous axillary artery; and 8 through a temporary axillary catheter previously placed. The ultrasound-guided patients had fewer punctures than other groups, but the value was not statistically significant. Arterial punctures were infrequent in all techniques. Analyzing all the procedure-related complications, such as hematoma, pneumothorax, brachial-plexus injury, as well as the reasons for catheter removal, no differences were observed among the groups. The functioning time was longer in the ultrasound-guided and previous catheter groups. In 15 years and 8 months of surveillance, no clinical or image evidence for axillary vein stenosis was found. Conclusion The ultrasound guide makes the procedure of inserting catheters in the axillary veins easier, but knowledge of the anatomy of the midaxillary region and the ability to feel the axillary artery pulse (for the palpation method) also allow relatively easy

  3. Understanding the Anatomic Basis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Bagchi, Sheila; Keenan, Brendan T.; Comyn, François-Louis; Wang, Stephen; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Huang, Shirley; Traylor, Joel; Torigian, Drew A.; Bradford, Ruth M.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Structural risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in adolescents have not been well characterized. Because many adolescents with OSAS are obese, we hypothesized that the anatomic OSAS risk factors would be more similar to those in adults than those in children. Objectives: To investigate the anatomic risk factors in adolescents with OSAS compared with obese and lean control subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Three groups of adolescents (age range: 12–16 yr) underwent MRI: obese individuals with OSAS (n = 49), obese control subjects (n = 38), and lean control subjects (n = 50). Measurements and Main Results: We studied 137 subjects and found that (1) obese adolescents with OSAS had increased adenotonsillar tissue compared with obese and lean control subjects; (2) obese OSAS adolescents had a smaller nasopharyngeal airway than control subjects; (3) the size of other upper airway soft tissue structures (volume of the tongue, parapharyngeal fat pads, lateral walls, and soft palate) was similar between subjects with OSAS and obese control subjects; (4) although there were no major craniofacial abnormalities in most of the adolescents with OSAS, the ratio of soft tissue to craniofacial space surrounding the airway was increased; and (5) there were sex differences in the pattern of lymphoid proliferation. Conclusions: Increased size of the pharyngeal lymphoid tissue, rather than enlargement of the upper airway soft tissue structures, is the primary anatomic risk factor for OSAS in obese adolescents. These results are important for clinical decision making and suggest that adenotonsillectomy should be considered as the initial treatment for OSAS in obese adolescents, a group that has poor continuous positive airway pressure adherence and difficulty in achieving weight loss. PMID:25835282

  4. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject’s complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). Results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modeling is able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that results remain significant even if the number of

  5. Comparison of grafts for anatomical reconstruction of the ACL: patellar versus semitendinosus/gracilis☆

    PubMed Central

    Bitun, Patrícia Barros; Miranda, Carlos Roberto; Escudero, Ricardo Boso; Araf, Marcelo; de Souza, Daphnis Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the functional results from surgical treatment for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a single band, using two types of autologous grafts. Methods Twenty-seven patients who underwent anatomical reconstruction of the ACL by means of the Chambat technique were evaluated prospectively. They were divided into two groups: A, with 14 patients, using grafts from flexor tendons; and B, with 13 patients, using grafts from the patellar tendon. In both groups, fixation was performed using an absorbable interference screw. Results Based on the Lysholm score, group A presented a mean score of 71.6 in the first month, while B presented 75. At the end of the sixth month, both groups presented 96.6. Evaluation of the total IKDC showed that in the first month, the majority of the patients, both in group A (85.7%) and in group B (76.9%), presented a knee assessment that was close to normal. In the sixth month, 92.9% of group A had normal presentations, and 100% of group B. Conclusion According to the Lysholm functional evaluation and the IKDC subjective assessment, there was no statistically significant difference in the results between the groups, and the results were better in the sixth month. PMID:26229896

  6. Radiological analysis on femoral tunnel positioning between isometric and anatomical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; de Pinho Tavares, Leonardo Augusto; Pace Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos; da Cunha, Fernando Amaral; de Melo Lisboa, Lucas Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to radiologically evaluate the femoral tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions using the isometric and anatomical techniques. Methods a prospective analytical study was conducted on patients undergoing ACL reconstruction by means of the isometric and anatomical techniques, using grafts from the knee flexor tendons or patellar tendon. Twenty-eight patients were recruited during the immediate postoperative period, at the knee surgery outpatient clinic of FCMMG-HUSJ. Radiographs of the operated knee were produced in anteroposterior (AP) view with the patient standing on both feet and in lateral view with 30° of flexion. The lines were traced out and the distances and angles were measured on the lateral radiograph to evaluate the sagittal plane. The distance from the center of the screw to the posterior cortical bone of the lateral condyle was measured and divided by the Blumensaat line. In relation to the height of the screw, the distance from the center of the screw to the joint surface of the lateral condyle of the knee was measured. On the AP radiograph, evaluating the coronal plane, the angle between the anatomical axis of the femur and a line traced at the center of the screw was measured. Results with regard to the p measurement (posteriorization of the interference screw), the tests showed that the p-value (0.4213) was greater than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was not rejected and it could be stated that there was no statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. With regard to the H measurement (height of the screw in relation to the lower cortical bone of the knee), the p-value observed (0.0006) was less than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was rejected and it could be stated that there was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. It can be concluded that the

  7. Thomas Willis, a pioneer in translational research in anatomy (on the 350th anniversary of Cerebri anatome).

    PubMed

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Navia-Álvarez, Pedro; Fuentes-Redondo, Talia; Bueno-López, José-L

    2015-03-01

    The year 2014 marked the 350th anniversary of the publication in London of Cerebri anatome, a ground-breaking work of neuroscience heavily influenced by the political and cultural context of Baroque Europe and mid-17th century England. This article aims to review the work of the English physician and anatomist Thomas Willis, specifically with regard to the contents of his Cerebri anatome. Willis's academic and professional career was influenced by the turbulent period of the English Civil War during which he studied medicine. Willis went from chemistry to dissection arguably because of his need to justify the body-brain-soul relationship. As a result, he became a fellow of a select club of eminent experimentalists, and afterward was a Fellow of the Royal Society. Later on, he went to London, leaving the academic life to dedicate himself fully to the profession of medicine. As a physician, Willis did not base his practice on aphorisms but on a 'bench to bedside' approach to medicine, while studying neuroanatomy--covering embryology, comparative anatomy and pathological anatomy--as a basis for the comprehension of neurological pathology. He developed innovative anatomical methods for the preservation and dissection of the brain, injection of coloured substances and illustration of his findings. In Cerebri anatome, Willis recognized the cerebral cortex as the substrate of cognition. He also claimed that the painful stimuli came from the meninges, but not from the brain itself. He explained for the first time the pathological and functional meaning of the brain's circular arterial anastomosis, which is named after him. He also specified some features of the cranial origin of the sympathetic nerves and coined the term 'neurologie'. Cerebri anatome marked the transition between the mediaeval and modern notions of brain function, and thus it is considered a cornerstone of clinical and comparative anatomy of the nervous system. The new contributions and methods employed by

  8. Representation and visualization of variability in a 3D anatomical atlas using the kidney as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Silke; Handels, Heinz

    2006-03-01

    Computer-based 3D atlases allow an interactive exploration of the human body. However, in most cases such 3D atlases are derived from one single individual, and therefore do not regard the variability of anatomical structures concerning their shape and size. Since the geometric variability across humans plays an important role in many medical applications, our goal is to develop a framework of an anatomical atlas for representation and visualization of the variability of selected anatomical structures. The basis of the project presented is the VOXEL-MAN atlas of inner organs that was created from the Visible Human data set. For modeling anatomical shapes and their variability we utilize "m-reps" which allow a compact representation of anatomical objects on the basis of their skeletons. As an example we used a statistical model of the kidney that is based on 48 different variants. With the integration of a shape description into the VOXEL-MAN atlas it is now possible to query and visualize different shape variations of an organ, e.g. by specifying a person's age or gender. In addition to the representation of individual shape variants, the average shape of a population can be displayed. Besides a surface representation, a volume-based representation of the kidney's shape variants is also possible. It results from the deformation of the reference kidney of the volume-based model using the m-rep shape description. In this way a realistic visualization of the shape variants becomes possible, as well as the visualization of the organ's internal structures.

  9. Ultrasonographic Validation of Anatomical Landmarks for Localization of the Tendon of the Long Head of Biceps Brachii

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Saiyun; Harrell, John

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To establish anatomical landmarks for biceps tendon groove localization based on intrinsic anatomical relations and to validate the localization with ultrasonographic measurement. Design. Perspective, observational, single-blinded pilot study. Participants. 25 healthy male and female volunteers ages 24–50 years. Methods. We used two anatomical landmarks, the medial epicondyle vertical line related landmark and the coracoid process landmark. The distance from the groove skin mark to the medial epicondyle vertical line and the coracoid process was measured horizontally and was measured at 0° and 45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Results. Medial epicondyle vertical lines were 9.3 mm/21.5 mm medial to the groove at 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0.04/0.10, 0.32/0.42, and 0.26/0.37 for weight, height, and BMI in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. The distance between the coracoid process and the groove was 44.0 mm/62.2 mm in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0.36/0.41, 0.36/0.54, and 0.18/0.12 for weight, height, and BMI in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Conclusions. The medial epicondyle vertical line and the coracoid process landmark are both useful anatomical landmarks to localize the biceps groove. The anatomical landmark based localization is essentially not correlated with subject's weight, height, or BMI. PMID:28299316

  10. TH-C-BRD-11: Robustness of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Pelvic Cancer Under Anatomical Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinges, E; Bhatia, S; Gross, B; McGuire, S; Wang, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy provides excellent dosimetric benefits in pelvic cancer treatment, yet day-to-day anatomical variations in pelvic region tend to cause range uncertainties. This study evaluates the dosimetric robustness under anatomical changes for three PBS intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), IMPT using worstcase robust optimization (thereafter ‘Robust IMPT’), and single-field uniform dose (SFUD), in cervical cancer treatment. Methods: IMPT, Robust IMPT, and SFUD plans using the same beam directions and the same prescription (Rx) were generated on computed tomography (CT) images acquired on the simulation day. The dose from each plan was then recomputed on CT images acquired in subsequent two to five weeks using the same protocol. The weekly CTs were registered to the planning CT based on bony anatomy. Target coverage was considered adequate on each weekly CT if dose to 99% of the internal target volume (D-ITV99%) reached at least 95% of the Rx dose. Statistical analysis was then performed on the 21 weekly CT images available for the 7 enrolled patients. Results: Statistically, IMPT was unable to maintain target coverage (mean D-ITV99% = 90.5% Rx, p = 0.004), and SFUD was able to maintain target coverage (mean D-ITV99% = 98.0% Rx, p = 0.0064), in the weeks following simulation. Robust IMPT was able to improve the robustness of IMPT significantly (p < 0.0001), though its maintenance of target coverage was not statistically significant by the 95% Rx criteria (mean D-ITV99% = 96.0%, p = 0.1677). Conclusion: During the multi-week treatment course with anatomical variations, SFUD is robust in terms of maintaining target coverage while IMPT is not. The worst-case optimized Robust IMPT, assuming ±3.5% range uncertainties, improves the robustness of IMPT under anatomical changes significantly, even though it was not designed to account for anatomical changes by mechanism.

  11. A surgical view of the superior nasal turbinate: anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Mustafa; Govsa, Figen; Saylam, Canan

    2010-06-01

    Differences of the superior nasal turbinate (SNT), presence of the supreme nasal turbinate (SpNT) and measurements of opening sphenoid sinus (OSS) are consistent anatomical landmarks that allow for safe entrances, such as posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoid sinusotomy. The purpose of study was to investigate the anatomical details of the SNT for approaching the OSS on 20 specimens of adult cadavers under an operating microscope. The SNT and SpNT were localized more perpendicular than parallel to their axes. The SpNT structure was observed in 12 specimens (60%) and it was classified into three types. Type A SpNT was shortest of all turbinates (58.3%). In types B and C, SpNT was equal or larger than the SNT. These types were seen in 41.7% of specimens. In 11 specimens, posterior ethmoidal cells opened to supreme nasal meatus. In 7 specimens, there was one opening to supreme nasal meatus, while 2 openings were detected in 12 specimens, and 3 openings were seen in 1 specimen. All these openings belonged to posterior ethmoidal cells. To determine the position of the OSS, distances between some anatomical points were measured. In cases where the SpNT is present or the SpNT is bigger than the SNT, it is certain that a different method will be applied during the procedure in the nasal cavity. The SNT and the SpNT may easily be injured by unrecognized dissection in types B and C, leading to the disruption of its olfactory neuroepithelium and possibly to postoperative hyposmia.

  12. An arthroscopic evaluation of the anatomical "critical zone".

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nerissa; Lazarus, Lelika; Osman, Shameem Ahmed; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2016-09-26

    The "critical zone", a region of speculated vascularity, is situated approximately 10mm proximal to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon. Despite its obvious role as an anatomical landmark demarcator, its patho-anatomic nature has been identified as the source of rotator cuff pathology. Although many studies have attempted to evaluate the vascularity of this region, the architecture regarding the exact length, width and shape of the critical zone, remains unreported. This study aimed to determine the shape and morphometry of the "critical zone" arthroscopically. The sample series, which comprised of 38 cases (n = 38) specific to pathological types, employed an anatomical investigation of the critical zone during routine real-time arthroscopy. Demographic representation: i) Sex: 19 Males, 19 Females; ii) Age range: 18 - 76 years old; iii) Race: White (29), Indian (7) and Coloured (2). The incidence of shape and the mean lengths and widths of the critical zone were determined in accordance with the relevant demographic factors and patient history. Although the cresenteric shape was predominant, hemispheric and sail-shaped critical zones were also identified. The lengths and widths of the critical zone appeared markedly increased in male individuals. While the increase in age may account for the increased incidence of rotator cuff degeneration due to poor end vascular supply, the additional factors of height and weight presented as major determinants of the increase in size of the critical zone. In addition, the comparisons of length and width with each other and shape yielded levels of significant difference, therefore indicating a directly proportional relationship between the length and width of the critical zone. This detailed understanding of the critical zone may prove beneficial for the success of post-operative rotator cuff healing.

  13. A propositional representation model of anatomical and functional brain data.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Pablo; Batrancourt, Bénédicte

    2011-01-01

    Networks can represent a large number of systems. Recent advances in the domain of networks have been transferred to the field of neuroscience. For example, the graph model has been used in neuroscience research as a methodological tool to examine brain networks organization, topology and complex dynamics, as well as a framework to test the structure-function hypothesis using neuroimaging data. In the current work we propose a graph-theoretical framework to represent anatomical, functional and neuropsychological assessment instruments information. On the one hand, interrelationships between anatomic elements constitute an anatomical graph. On the other hand, a functional graph contains several cognitive functions and their more elementary cognitive processes. Finally, the neuropsychological assessment instruments graph includes several neuropsychological tests and scales linked with their different sub-tests and variables. The two last graphs are connected by relations of type "explore" linking a particular instrument with the cognitive function it explores. We applied this framework to a sample of patients with focal brain damage. Each patient was related to: (i) the cerebral entities injured (assessed with structural neuroimaging data) and (ii) the neusopsychological assessment tests carried out (weight by performance). Our model offers a suitable platform to visualize patients' relevant information, facilitating the representation, standardization and sharing of clinical data. At the same time, the integration of a large number of patients in this framework will make possible to explore relations between anatomy (injured entities) and function (performance in different tests assessing different cognitive functions) and the use of neurocomputational tools for graph analysis may help diagnostic and contribute to the comprehension of neural bases of cognitive functions.

  14. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  15. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  16. Characterization and Management of Interfractional Anatomic Changes for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Erickson, Beth; Peng Cheng; Li, X. Allen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize interfractional anatomic variations in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy (RT) and to study dosimetric advantages for using an online adaptive replanning scheme to account for these variations. Methods and Materials: Targets and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated by autosegmentation based on daily computed tomography (CT) images acquired using a respiration-gated in-room CT during daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for 10 pancreatic cancer patients. Various parameters, including the maximum overlap ratio (MOR) between the volumes based on planning and daily CTs for a structure, while the overlapping volumes were maximized, were used to quantify the interfractional organ deformation with the intrafractional variations largely excluded. An online adaptive RT (ART) was applied to these daily CTs. To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of ART, the dose distributions from the online ART were compared to those from the repositioning in the current standard IGRT practice. Results: The interfractional anatomic variations, particularly the organ deformation, are significant during pancreas irradiation. For the patients studied, the average MORs of all daily CTs were 80.2%, 61.7%, and 72.2% for pancreatic head, duodenum, and stomach, respectively. The online ART leads to improved dosimetric plan with better target coverage and/or OAR sparing than IGRT repositioning. For the patients studied, the mean V{sub 50.4Gy} (volume covered by 50.4 Gy) for the duodenum was reduced from 43.4% for IGRT to 15.6% for the online ART scheme. Conclusions: The online adaptive RT scheme can effectively account for the significant interfractional anatomic variations observed in pancreas irradiation. The dosimetric advantages with the online ART may enable safe dose escalation in radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  18. Anatomic approach for ganglionic plexi ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Sougiannis, Demetrios; Goumas, Nicolaos; Paxinos, George; Camm, A John

    2008-08-01

    There is evidence that parasympathetic denervation may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrences. This study aimed at applying an anatomic approach for ablation of atrial ganglionic plexi (GPs) in patients with paroxysmal AF. Nineteen patients with symptomatic, paroxysmal AF underwent anatomically guided radiofrequency ablation at the location of the 4 main left atrial GPs and were prospectively assessed for recurrence of AF or other atrial arrhythmia. This group was compared with 19 age- and gender-matched patients who previously underwent conventional circumferential pulmonary vein ablation. All ablation procedures were uneventful. Circumferential and GP ablations were accomplished with a radiofrequency delivery time of 28 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 3 min (p <0.001) and a fluoroscopy time of 31 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 5 min (p <0.001), respectively. Parasympathetic reflexes during radiofrequency ablation were elicited in 4 patients (21%). Arrhythmia recurred in 7 patients (37%) with circumferential ablation and 14 patients (74%) with GP ablation, during 1-year follow-up (p for log-rank test = 0.017). In 2 patients with GP ablation, left atrial flutters were documented in addition to AF during follow-up. Patients who underwent GP ablation had an almost 2.5 times higher risk of AF recurrence compared with those who underwent circumferential ablation (hazard ratio 2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 6.6, p = 0.038). In conclusion, anatomically guided GP ablation is feasible and safe in the electrophysiology laboratory, but this approach yields inferior clinical results compared with circumferential ablation.

  19. Safe Corridor to Access Clivus for Endoscopic Trans-Sphenoidal Surgery: A Radiological and Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Zhang, Siwen; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penetration of the clivus is required for surgical access of the brain stem. The endoscopic transclivus approach is a difficult procedure with high risk of injury to important neurovascular structures. We undertook a novel anatomical and radiological investigation to understand the structure of the clivus and neurovascular structures relevant to the extended trans-nasal trans-sphenoid procedure and determine a safe corridor for the penetration of the clivus. Method We examined the clivus region in the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images of 220 adults, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 50 adults, and dry skull specimens of 10 adults. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) of the CT images was performed, and the anatomical features of the clivus were studied in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. The data from the images were used to determine the anatomical parameters of the clivus and neurovascular structures, such as the internal carotid artery and inferior petrosal sinus. Results The examination of the CTA and MR images of the enrolled subjects revealed that the thickness of the clivus helped determine the depth of the penetration, while the distance from the sagittal midline to the important neurovascular structures determined the width of the penetration. Further, data from the CTA and MR images were consistent with those retrieved from the examination of the cadaveric specimens. Conclusion Our findings provided certain pointers that may be useful in guiding the surgery such that inadvertent injury to vital structures is avoided and also provided supportive information for the choice of the appropriate endoscopic equipment. PMID:26368821

  20. Distribution of Prostate Sentinel Nodes: A SPECT-Derived Anatomic Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Ganswindt, Ute; Schilling, David; Mueller, Arndt-Christian; Bares, Roland; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The randomized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-13 trial revealed that coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in high-risk prostate cancer confers an advantage (progression-free survival and biochemical failure) in patients with {>=}15% risk of lymph node involvement. To facilitate an improved definition of the adjuvant target volume, precise knowledge regarding the location of the relevant lymph nodes is necessary. Therefore, we generated a three-dimensional sentinel lymph node atlas. Methods and Materials: In 61 patients with high-risk prostate cancer, a three-dimensional visualization of sentinel lymph nodes was performed using a single photon emission computed tomography system after transrectal intraprostatic injection of 150 to 362 (median 295) mega becquerel (MBq) {sup 99m}Technetium-nanocolloid (1.5-3h after injection) followed by an anatomic functional image fusion. Results: In all, 324 sentinel nodes in 59 of 61 patients (96.7%) were detected, with 0 to 13 nodes per patient (median 5, mean 5.3). The anatomic distribution of the sentinel nodes was as follows: external iliac 34.3%, internal iliac 17.9%, common iliac 12.7%, sacral 8.6%, perirectal 6.2%, left paraaortic 5.3%, right paraaortic 5.3%, seminal vesicle lymphatic plexus 3.1%, deep inguinal 1.5%, superior rectal 1.2%, internal pudendal 1.2%, perivesical 0.9%, inferior rectal 0.9%, retroaortic 0.3%, superficial inguinal 0.3%, and periprostatic 0.3%. Conclusions: The distribution of sentinel nodes as detected by single photon emission computed tomography imaging correlates well with the distribution determined by intraoperative gamma probe detection. A lower detection rate of sentinels in close proximity to the bladder and seminal vesicles is probably caused by the radionuclide accumulation in the bladder. In regard to intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques, the presented anatomic atlas may allow optimized target volume definitions.

  1. Anatomical failure following laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS); does it really matter?

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, N; Stratford, J; Jones, L; Sohampal, J; Robertson, R; Booth, MI; Dehn, TCB

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Failure rates of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) vary from 2–30%. A degree of anatomical failure is common, and the most common failure is intrathoracic wrap herniation. We have assessed anatomical integrity of the crural repair and wrap using marking Liga clips placed at the time of surgery and compared this with symptomatic outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS A prospective study was undertaken on 50 patients who underwent LARS in a single centre over a 3-year period. Each had an X-ray on the first postoperative day and a barium swallow at 6 months at which the distance was measured between the marking Liga clips. An increase in interclip distance of > 25–49% was deemed ‘mild separation’, and an increase of > 50% ‘moderate separation’. Patients completed a standardised symptom questionnaire at 6 months. RESULTS At 6 months' postoperatively, 22% had mild separation of the crural repair with a mean Visick score of 1.18, and 54% had moderate separation with a mean Visick score of 1.26. Mild separation of the wrap occurred in 28% with a mean Visick score of 1.21 and 22% moderate separation with a mean Visick score of 1.18. Three percent had mild separation of both the crural repair and wrap with a mean Visick score of 1.0, and 16% moderate separation with a mean Visick score of 1.13. Of patients, 14% had evidence of some degree of failure on barium swallow but only one of these was significant intrathoracic migration of the wrap which was symptomatic and required re-do surgery. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of some form of anatomical failure, as determined by an increase in the interclip distance, is high at 6 months' postoperatively following LARS. However, this does not seem to correlate with a subjective recurrence of symptoms. PMID:19995487

  2. Determining Functional Connectivity using fMRI Data with Diffusion-Based Anatomical Weighting

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, F. DuBois; Zhang, Lijun; Derado, Gordana; Chen, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    There is strong interest in investigating both functional connectivity (FC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural connectivity (SC) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). There is also emerging evidence of correspondence between functional and structural pathways within many networks (Skudlarski et al., 2008; van den Heuvel et al., 2009; Greicius, et al., 2009), although some regions without SC exhibit strong FC (Honey et al., 2009). These findings suggest that FC may be mediated by (direct or indirect) anatomical connections, offering an opportunity to supplement fMRI data with DTI data when determining FC. We develop a novel statistical method for determining FC, called anatomically-weighted FC (awFC), which combines fMRI and DTI data. Our awFC approach implements a hierarchical clustering algorithm that establishes neural processing networks using a new distance measure consisting of two components, a primary functional component that captures correlations between fMRI signals from different regions and a secondary anatomical weight reflecting probabilities of SC. The awFC approach defaults to conventional unweighted clustering for specific parameter settings. We optimize awFC parameters using a strictly functional criterion, therefore our approach will generally perform at least as well as an unweighted analysis, with respect to intracluster coherence or autocorrelation. AwFC also yields more informative results since it provides structural properties associated with identified functional networks. We apply awFC to two fMRI data sets: resting-state data from 6 healthy subjects and data from 17 subjects performing an auditory task. In these examples, awFC leads to more highly autocorrelated networks than a conventional analysis. We also conduct a simulation study, which demonstrates accurate performance of awFC and confirms that awFC generally yields comparable, if not superior, accuracy relative to a standard approach. PMID:22634220

  3. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chetvertkov, M; Kim, J; Siddiqui, F; Kumarasiri, A; Chetty, I; Gordon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial.

  4. Anatomic findings in revision endoscopic sinus surgery: Case series and review of contributory factors

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Jessica; Egro, Francesco M.; Masterson, Liam; Javer, Amin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is recognized that patients who undergo endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) do not always achieve control of their disease. The causes are multifactorial; variations in surgical practice have been identified as possible factors in refractory disease. Objective: To reflect on the frequent anatomic findings of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who require revision ESS. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who required revision ESS at a tertiary institution over a 3-year period. Patients for whom maximal medical therapy failed for CRS underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and image-guided surgery. Surgical records of anatomic findings were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Over 3 years, a total of 75 patients underwent revision procedures, 28% of all ESS performed in the unit. The most frequent finding was a residual uncinate process in 64% of the patients (n = 48); other findings included a maxillary antrostomy not based on the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus in 47% (n = 35), an oversized antrostomy in 29% (n = 22), resected middle turbinates in 35% (n = 26), middle meatal stenosis in 15% (n = 11), synechiae in 29% (n = 22), and osteitic bone that required drilling in 13% (n = 10). Conclusion: Surgical technique can give rise to anatomic variations that may prevent adequate mucociliary clearance and medication delivery, which leads to failure in ESS in patients with CRS. This study demonstrated the surgical findings encountered in revision ESS that should be highlighted in the training of Ear, Nose and Throat surgeons to help prevent primary failure and reduce health care costs. PMID:28107148

  5. Functional topography of the right inferior parietal lobule structured by anatomical connectivity profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaojian; Zhang, Jinfeng; Rong, Menglin; Wei, Xuehu; Zheng, Dingchen; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-12-01

    The nature of the relationship between structure and function is a fundamental question in neuroscience, especially at the macroscopic neuroimaging level. Although mounting studies have revealed that functional connectivity reflects structural connectivity, whether similar structural and functional connectivity patterns can reveal corresponding similarities in the structural and functional topography remains an open problem. In our current study, we used the right inferior parietal lobule (RIPL), which has been demonstrated to have similar anatomical and functional connectivity patterns at the subregional level, to directly test the hypothesis that similar structural and functional connectivity patterns can inform the corresponding topography of this area. In addition, since the association between the RIPL regions and particular functions and networks is still largely unknown, post-hoc functional characterizations and connectivity analyses were performed to identify the main functions and cortical networks in which each subregion participated. Anatomical and functional connectivity-based parcellations of the RIPL have consistently identified five subregions. Our functional characterization using meta-analysis-based behavioral and connectivity analyses revealed that the two anterior subregions (Cl1 and Cl2) primarily participate in interoception and execution, respectively; whereas the posterior subregion (Cl3) in the SMG primarily participates in attention and action inhibition. The two posterior subregions (Cl4, Cl5) in the AG were primarily involved in social cognition and spatial cognition, respectively. These results indicated that similar anatomical and functional connectivity patterns of the RIPL are reflected in corresponding structural and functional topographies. The identified cortical connectivity and functional characterization of each subregion may facilitate RIPL-related clinical research. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4316-4332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  6. Developing patient-specific anatomic models for validation of cardiac ablation guidance procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David, III; Rettmann, Maryam; Cameron, Bruce; Camp, Jon; Robb, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Image-guided cardiac ablation has the potential to decrease procedure times and improve clinical outcome for patients with cardiac arrhythmias. There are several proposed methods for integrating patient-specific anatomy into the cardiac ablation procedure; however, these methods require thorough validation. One of the primary challenges in validation is determining ground truth as a standard for comparison. Some validation protocols have been developed for animals models and even in patients; however, these methods can be costly to implement and may increase the risk to patients. We have developed an approach to building realistic patient-specific anatomic models at a low-cost in order to validate the guidance procedure without introducing additional risk to the patients. Using a pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography scan, the blood pool of the left and right atria of a patient are segmented semi-manually. In addition, several anatomical landmarks are identified in the image data. The segmented atria and landmarks are converted into a polygonalized model which is used to build a thin-walled patient-specific blood pool model in a stereo-lithography system. Thumbscrews are inserted into the model at the landmarks. The entire model is embedded in a platinum silicone material which has been shown to have tissue-mimicking properties relative to ultrasound. Once the pliable mold has set, the blood pool model is extracted by dissolving the rigid material. The resulting physical model correctly mimics a specific patient anatomy with embedded fiducals which can be used for validation experiments. The patient-specific anatomic model approach may also be used for pre-surgical practice and training of new interventionalists.

  7. [The anatomical concept of Ma Wang Dui archeological artifacts].

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Tso

    2010-01-01

    Amongst the archeological findings of Ma Wang Dui that concern the human anatomy, the first noted was a well-preserved female corpse, which demonstrated superb antiseptic techniques of the ancient Chinese. Also, 14 medical books were excavated and revealed a prototype of human visceral anatomy. The differentiation between small and large intestines was absent, and only the term of "intestine" was mentioned. The term of "triple energizers" was absent, too. However, contexts of surface anatomy were already abundant. Analyzing the terms of relative position, the anatomical position portrayed by the Ma Wang Dui medical texts is very similar to that of modern medicine.

  8. [The "pneumoneck" in videocervicoscopy: operative technique and anatomic limits].

    PubMed

    Cougard, P; Cheynel, N; Peschaud, F; Bilosi, M; Goudet, P

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a technic in order to create a gas space "pneumoneck" during videoendoscopic surgery of the neck and to determine the anatomical limits of this space. Data were based on a surgical experience and on the dissection of two corpses. This space was located between the two layers of the pre-tracheal lamina of the cervical fascia. This space was enclosed and favourable to detachment with insufflated gas without subcutaneous emphysema. This approach can be used for parathyroid and thyroid surgery.

  9. Bronchopleural Fistula and Empyema After Anatomic Lung Resection.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Giorgio; Mitchell, John D

    2015-11-01

    Empyema after anatomic lung resection is rare but causes serious morbidity, particularly if associated with a bronchopleural fistula. Careful assessment of preoperative risk factors and proper surgical technique can minimize risks. Empyema after segmentectomy or lobectomy may respond to simple drainage and antibiotics, or may require decortication with or without muscle transposition. After pneumonectomy, treatment principles include initial drainage of the intrathoracic space, closure of the fistula if present, and creation of an open thoracostomy, which is packed and later closed. Success rates can exceed 80%.

  10. Body symmetry and asymmetry in early Greek anatomical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2008-05-01

    This historical note focuses on some of the earliest reports of human anatomy found in Greek medical literature. These passages testify the initial steps taken by Greek scientists in building a theoretical model of the human body. In these excerpts, one finds erroneous anatomical descriptions, which shed light on the epistemological approach used by these intellectual pioneers. Because of the lack of systematic dissection, it appears that early Greek anatomists developed a somewhat stylized idea of the human body that used a certain degree of symmetry. Overcoming the concept of a strict left-right bilateral parallelism in human body architecture was a challenging intellectual task that required prolonged observation of dissected corpses.

  11. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach.

    PubMed

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  12. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  13. Risky Cerebrovascular Anatomic Orientation: Implications for Brain Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-12-01

    This study documents a risky vascular anatomic orientation that might play an important role in the postoperative hemodynamics following anterior cerebral artery (ACA) revascularization. A 71-year-old woman presented with uncontrollable frequent right lower limb transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) attributed to a left cerebral ischemic lesion due to severe left ACA stenosis. She underwent successful left-sided superficial temporal artery-ACA bypass using interposed vascular graft. The patient awoke satisfactory from anesthesia; however, on postoperative day 1, she developed right-sided hemiparesis. Extensive postoperative investigations disclosed that watershed shift infarction was considered the etiology for this neurologic deterioration.

  14. Palatopharyngeus the missing palatal muscles: Anatomical and physiological review

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Abdelrahman E. M.; El-Shenawy, Hanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The first true anatomical descriptions of the normal anatomy of the palate and pharynx were published by Von Luschka in 1868, and then in 1935 anatomist James Whillis described pharyngeal sphincter. Later, in 1941 Michael Oldfield noted that the muscular elements of the soft palate have a sling-like function. Although there have been conflicting descriptions of the role of the palatopharyngeus, multiple function such as speech, swallowing, and respiration, it could role in all this function. Although, the palatopharyngeus muscle has many important functions, but it remains the missing muscle that we need to know more about it. PMID:26981475

  15. Automatic semantic interpretation of anatomic spatial relationships in clinical text.

    PubMed

    Bean, C A; Rindflesch, T C; Sneiderman, C A

    1998-01-01

    A set of semantic interpretation rules to link the syntax and semantics of locative relationships among anatomic entities was developed and implemented in a natural language processing system. Two experiments assessed the ability of the system to identify and characterize physico-spatial relationships in coronary angiography reports. Branching relationships were by far the most common observed (75%), followed by PATH (20%) and PART/WHOLE relationships. Recall and precision scores were 0.78 and 0.67 overall, suggesting the viability of this approach in semantic processing of clinical text.

  16. Device for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device is disclosed for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs such as the ear canal or throat. It has a housing shaped like a flashlight, an electrical power source such as a battery or AC power from a wall socket, and a tip extending from the housing. The tip has at least one wire loop made from a shape-memory-effect alloy, such as Nitinol, switchably connected to the electrical power source such that when electric current flows through the wire loop the wire loop heats up and returns to a previously programmed shape such as a curet or tweezers so as to facilitate removal of the foreign object.

  17. Atlas-based Anatomical Modeling and Analysis of Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Young, Alistair A

    2014-01-01

    Heart shape and function are major determinants of disease severity and predictors of future morbidity and mortality. Many studies now rely on non-invasive cardiac imaging techniques to quantify structural and functional changes. Statistical anatomical modeling of heart shape and motion provides a new tool for the quantification and evaluation of heart disease. This review surveys recent progress in the evaluation of statistical shape measures across populations and sub-cohorts, and highlights collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing and atlas-based shape analysis. PMID:26688687

  18. Correlative CT and anatomic study of the sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Pech, P.; Haughton, V.

    1985-05-01

    Sciatica can be caused by numerous processes affecting the sciatic nerve or its components within the pelvis including tumors, infectious diseases, aneurysms, fractures, and endometriosis. The CT diagnosis of these causes of sciatica has not been emphasized. This study identified the course and appearance of the normal sciatic nerve in the pelvis by correlating CT and anatomic slices in cadavers. For purposes of discussion, the sciatic nerve complex is conveniently divided into three parts: presacral, muscular, and ischial. Each part is illustrated here by two cryosections with corresponding CT images.

  19. Anterior ethmoidal artery emerging anterior to bulla ethmoidalis: An abnormal anatomical variation in Waardenburg's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Danny K. C.; Shao, Angus; Campbell, Raewyn

    2014-01-01

    In endoscopic sinus surgery, the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is usually identified as it traverses obliquely across the fovea ethmoidalis, posterior to the bulla ethmoidalis and anterior to or within the ground lamella's attachment to the skull base. Injury to the AEA may result in hemorrhage, retraction of the AEA into the orbit, and a retrobulbar hematoma. The resulting increase in intraorbital pressure may threaten vision. Waardenburg's syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder, distinguished by characteristic facial features, pigmentation abnormalities, and profound, congenital, sensorineural hearing loss. We present a case of AEAs located anterior to the bulla ethmoidalis in a 36-year-old male with WS and chronic rhinosinusitis. The anatomic abnormality was not obvious on a preoperative computed tomography scan and was discovered intraoperatively when the left AEA was injured, resulting in a retrobulbar hematoma. The hematoma was immediately identified and decompressed endoscopically without lasting complications. The AEA on the right was identified intraoperatively and preserved. The characteristic craniofacial features in WS were probably associated with the abnormal vascular anatomy. Endoscopic sinus surgeons should be aware of these potential anatomic anomalies in patients with abnormal craniofacial development. PMID:25565054

  20. Anatomical Variations in the Sinoatrial Nodal Artery: A Meta-Analysis and Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Hsieh, Wan Chin; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The sinoatrial nodal artery (SANa) is a highly variable vessel which supplies blood to the sinoatrial node (SAN). Due to its variability and susceptibility to iatrogenic injury, our study aimed to assess the anatomy of the SANa and determine the prevalence of its anatomical variations. Study Design An extensive search of major electronic databases was performed to identify all articles reporting anatomical data on the SANa. No lower date limit or language restrictions were applied. Anatomical data regarding the artery were extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis. Results Sixty-six studies (n = 21455 hearts) were included in the meta-analysis. The SANa usually arose as a single vessel with a pooled prevalence of 95.5% (95%CI:93.6–96.9). Duplication and triplication of the artery were also observed with pooled prevalence of 4.3% (95%CI:2.8–6.0) and 0.3% (95%CI:0–0.7), respectively. The most common origin of the SANa was from the right coronary artery (RCA), found in 68.0% (95%CI:55.6–68.9) of cases, followed by origin from the left circumflex artery, and origin from the left coronary artery with pooled prevalence of 22.1% (95%CI:15.0–26.2) and 2.7 (95%CI:0.7–5.2), respectively. A retrocaval course of the SANa was the most common course of the artery with a pooled prevalence of 47.1% (95%CI:36.0–55.5). The pooled prevalence of an S-shaped SANa was 7.6% (95%CI:2.9–14.1). Conclusions The SANa is most commonly reported as a single vessel, originating from the RCA, and taking a retrocaval course to reach the SAN. Knowledge of high risk anatomical variants of the SANa, such as an S-shaped artery, must be taken into account by surgeons to prevent iatrogenic injuries. Specifically, interventional or cardiosurgical procedures, such as the Cox maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, open heart surgeries through the right atrium or intraoperative cross-clamping or dissection procedures during mitral valve surgery using the septal

  1. Anatomical nuances of the internal carotid artery in relation to the quadrangular space.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Ricardo L L; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Goulart, Carlos R; Upadhyay, Smita; Buohliqah, Lamia; Lazarini, Paulo R; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in relation to the quadrangular space (QS) and to propose a classification system based on the results. METHODS A total of 44 human cadaveric specimens were dissected endonasally under direct endoscopic visualization. During the dissection, the anatomical variations of the ICA and their relationship with the QS were noted. RESULTS The space between the paraclival ICAs (i.e., intercarotid space) can be classified as 1 of 3 different shapes (i.e., trapezoid, square, or hourglass) based on the trajectory of the ICAs. The ICA trajectories also directly influence the volumetric area of the QS. Based on its geometry, the QS was classified as one of the following: 1) Type A has the smallest QS area and is associated with a trapezoid intercarotid space, 2) Type B corresponds to the expected QS area (not minimized or enlarged) and is associated with a square intercarotid space, and 3) Type C has the largest QS area and is associated with an hourglass intercarotid space. CONCLUSIONS The different trajectories of the ICAs can modify the area of the QS and may be an essential parameter to consider for preoperative planning and defining the most appropriate corridor to reach Meckel's cave. In addition, ICA trajectories should be considered prior to surgery to avoid injuring the vessels.

  2. Anatomical and electrophysiological comparison of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Harris, Kristen; Chitwood, Raymond A

    2009-10-01

    The study of learning and memory at the single-neuron level has relied on the use of many animal models, most notably rodents. Although many physiological and anatomical studies have been carried out in rats, the advent of genetically engineered mice has necessitated the comparison of new results in mice to established results from rats. Here we compare fundamental physiological and morphological properties and create three-dimensional compartmental models of identified hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of one strain of rat, Sprague-Dawley, and two strains of mice, C57BL/6 and 129/SvEv. We report several differences in neuronal physiology and anatomy among the three animal groups, the most notable being that neurons of the 129/SvEv mice, but not the C57BL/6 mice, have higher input resistance, lower dendritic surface area, and smaller spines than those of rats. A surprising species-specific difference in membrane resonance indicates that both mouse strains have lower levels of the hyperpolarization-activated nonspecific cation current I(h). Simulations suggest that differences in I(h) kinetics rather than maximal conductance account for the lower resonance. Our findings indicate that comparisons of data obtained across strains or species will need to account for these and potentially other physiological and anatomical differences.

  3. Microstereolithography-Based Fabrication of Anatomically Shaped Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Shinohara, Makoto; Kageyama, Tomonori; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Porous ceramic scaffolds with shapes matching the bone defects may result in more efficient grafting and healing than the ones with simple geometries. Using computer-assisted microstereolithography (MSTL), we have developed a novel gelcasting indirect MSTL technology and successfully fabricated two scaffolds according to CT images of rabbit femur. Negative resin molds with outer 3D dimensions conforming to the femur and an internal structure consisting of stacked meshes with uniform interconnecting struts, 0.5 mm in diameter, were fabricated by MSTL. The second mold type was designed for cortical bone formation. A ceramic slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone as binder was cast into the molds. After the RTV silicone was completely cured, the composite was sintered at 1500°C for 5 h. Both gross anatomical shape and the interpenetrating internal network were preserved after sintering. Even cortical structure could be introduced into the customized scaffolds, which resulted in enhanced strength. Biocompatibility was confirmed by vital staining of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the customized scaffolds for 5 days. This fabrication method could be useful for constructing bone substitutes specifically designed according to local anatomical defects. PMID:26504839

  4. Effect of anatomical landmark perturbation on mean helical axis parameters of in vivo upper costovertebral joints.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Benoît; Sholukha, Victor; Salvia, Patrick; Rooze, Marcel; Feipel, Véronique; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2015-02-05

    The literature concerning quantification of costovertebral joint (CVJ) motion under in vivo conditions is scarce. Most papers concerning this topic are related to ex vivo loading conditions. In vivo protocols are available from the literature to determine rib and vertebra kinematics but new developments are needed to improve data processing concerning CVJ behaviour obtained from discrete breathing positions showing limiting ranges-of-motion and sensitive to noise. Data from previous work were used to implement a method analyzing mean helical axis (MHA) and pivot point parameters of the CVJ complexes. Several levels of noises were estimated within Monte-Carlo simulations to optimize MHA results. MHA parameters were then used to transform and define a CVJ-specific local coordinate system. This study proposes an improvement for CVJ kinematics processing and description from in vivo data obtained from computed tomography. This methodology emphasizes the possibility to work with variability of MHA parameters using Monte-Carlo procedures on anatomical landmark coordinates and to define a local coordinate system from this particular joint behaviour. Results from the CVJ joint model are closer to a hinge joint (secondary motions inferior to 3°) when anatomical frames are expressed from MHA orientation. MHA orientation and position data obtained from the proposed method are relevant according to angular dispersion obtained (from 7.5° to 13.9°) and therefore relevant to define behaviour of CVJ.

  5. ANATOMICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE TO THE CORACOID PROCESS, ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT AND ACROMION

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Gaspar, Eric Figueiredo; Siqueira, Karina Levy; Filho, Nivaldo Souza Cardozo; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish the anatomical relationship of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) located in the suprascapular notch, to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral border of the acromion. Methods: We dissected 16 shoulders of 16 cadavers (9 males and 7 females). The distances from the suprascapular nerve (at its passage beneath the transverse ligament) to certain fixed points on the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint, and the anterolateral border of the acromion were measured with the aid of calipers and correlated with age and sex. Cadavers with previous surgical interventions were excluded. Results: The mean measurements from the notch of the suprascapular nerve were: 3.9 cm to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process (ranging from 3.1 cm to 5.2 cm); 4.7 cm to the acromioclavicular joint (ranging from 3.9 cm to 5.2 cm); and 6.1 cm to the anterolateral border of the acromion (ranging from 5.7 cm to 6.8 cm). Conclusion: Accurate anatomical knowledge of the nerves of the anterior region of the shoulder is essential in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries and to achieve satisfactory results in surgical treatment for shoulder diseases, whether performed as open or arthroscopic procedures. PMID:27022551

  6. Anatomical and Electrophysiological Comparison of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of the Rat and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Brandy N.; Johnston, Daniel; Harris, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    The study of learning and memory at the single-neuron level has relied on the use of many animal models, most notably rodents. Although many physiological and anatomical studies have been carried out in rats, the advent of genetically engineered mice has necessitated the comparison of new results in mice to established results from rats. Here we compare fundamental physiological and morphological properties and create three-dimensional compartmental models of identified hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of one strain of rat, Sprague–Dawley, and two strains of mice, C57BL/6 and 129/SvEv. We report several differences in neuronal physiology and anatomy among the three animal groups, the most notable being that neurons of the 129/SvEv mice, but not the C57BL/6 mice, have higher input resistance, lower dendritic surface area, and smaller spines than those of rats. A surprising species-specific difference in membrane resonance indicates that both mouse strains have lower levels of the hyperpolarization-activated nonspecific cation current Ih. Simulations suggest that differences in Ih kinetics rather than maximal conductance account for the lower resonance. Our findings indicate that comparisons of data obtained across strains or species will need to account for these and potentially other physiological and anatomical differences. PMID:19675296

  7. Laser technique for anatomical-functional study of the medial prefrontal cortex of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Huerta, Laura; Hernandez, Adan; Ayala, Griselda; Marroquin, Javier; Silva, Adriana B.; Khotiaintsev, Konstantin S.; Svirid, Vladimir A.; Flores, Gonzalo; Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.

    1999-05-01

    The brain represents one of the most complex systems that we know yet. In its study, non-destructive methods -- in particular, behavioral studies play an important role. By alteration of brain functioning (e.g. by pharmacological means) and observation of consequent behavior changes an important information on brain organization and functioning is obtained. For inducing local alterations, permanent brain lesions are employed. However, for correct results this technique has to be quasi-non-destructive, i.e. not to affect the normal brain function. Hence, the lesions should be very small, accurate and applied precisely over the structure (e.g. the brain nucleus) of interest. These specifications are difficult to meet with the existing techniques for brain lesions -- specifically, neurotoxical, mechanical and electrical means because they result in too extensive damage. In this paper, we present new laser technique for quasi-non- destructive anatomical-functional mapping in vivo of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) of the rat. The technique is based on producing of small-size, well-controlled laser- induced lesions over some areas of the MPFC. The anesthetized animals are subjected to stereotactic surgery and certain points of the MPFC are exposed the confined radiation of the 10 W cw CO2 laser. Subsequent behavioral changes observed in neonatal and adult animals as well as histological data prove effectiveness of this technology for anatomical- functional studies of the brain by areas, and as a treatment method for some pathologies.

  8. Anatomic variations of the coracoacromial ligament in neonatal cadavers: a neonatal cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Kopuz, Cem; Baris, Sancar; Yildirim, Mehmet; Gülman, Birol

    2002-10-01

    One of the most common causes of pain and disability in the upper limb is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons. When no significant bony abnormality exists in the surrounding structures, the coracoacromial ligament has been implicated as a possible cause of impingement on the cuff tendons and various morphological variants of the ligament have so far been claimed to be either the cause or the result of impingement. In this study, 110 shoulders from 60 neonatal cadavers that were preserved in a preparation of formaldehyde were dissected. Anatomic variations of coracoacromial ligaments were investigated with metric and histologic analysis. Three main ligament types were identified: quadrangular, broad band and U-shaped. The multiple banded ligament was not found. Histologic analysis showed that in U-shaped ligaments a thin tissue existed in the central part of the ligament close to the coracoid. Comparing our data with the adult measurements of a previous study we suggest that the primordial ligament is broad shaped, but assumes a quadrangular shape due to the different growth rates of the coracoid and acromial ends. We also suggest that broad and U-shaped ligaments account for the primordial and quadrangular and Y-shaped ligaments account for the adult types of the single or double banded anatomic variants respectively. Our results show that various types of the coracoacromial ligament are present at the neonatal period and that the final shape of the ligament should be defined by developmental factors, rather than degenerative changes.

  9. Taxonomic implications from morphological and anatomical studies in the section Stenodiptera from the genus Grammosciadium (Apiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Barış; Ulusoy, Fatma; Karakaya, Muhammet Ali; Koch, Marcus A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. bilgilii and Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. sivasicum from Turkey are herein described as two new subspecies, and the species Grammosciadium schischkinii is synonymied under Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. pterocarpum. Quantitative variation of morphological and anatomical characters have been analysed to provide discriminative characters between the taxa of section Stenodiptera and to provide a key to the species. The taxonomic status of the taxa has been discussed in light of these morphological and fruit anatomical data using multivariate statistics such as MANOVA and Principal Component Analysis. The results are also used to present a critical discussion of characters used to distinguish and determine different taxa within Grammosciadium. MANOVA showed that ten characters, except stylopodium and style length, differed significantly among the taxa, and the results were confirmed by Tukey tests and PCA analysis (except the character of fruit number). However, only ranges of the characters of sepal length, fruit length, fruit width, fruit width/wing width ratio, and width of fruit wing are not overlapped. Qualitative characters of petiolate stipular segments of lower leaves and presence of funicular oil ducts in transvers section of mericarps were found as diagnostic characters. PMID:27698576

  10. Assessment of anatomical knowledge: Approaches taken by higher education institutions.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Bipasha; Freemont, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    Assessment serves the primary function of determining a student's competence in a subject. Several different assessment formats are available for assessing anatomical skills, knowledge and understanding and, as assessment can drive learning, a careful selection of assessments can help to engender the correct deep learning facility required of the safe clinical practitioner. The aim of this review was to survey the published literature to see whether higher education institutions are taking an andragogical approach to assessment. Five databases (EMBASE, ERIC, Medline, PubMed, and Web of Knowledge) were searched using standardized search terms with two limits applied (English language, and 2000 to the present). Among the 2,094 papers found, 32 were deemed suitable for this review. Current literature on assessment can be categorized into the following themes: assessment driven learning, types of assessments, frequency of assessments, and use of images in assessments. The consensus is to use a variety of methods, written and practical, to assess anatomical knowledge and skill in different domains. Institutions aim for different levels of Bloom's taxonomy for students at similar stages of their medical degree. Formative assessments are used widely, in differing formats, with mostly good effects on the final examination grade. In conclusion, a wide variety of assessments, each aimed at a different level of Bloom's taxonomy, are used by different institutions. Clin. Anat. 30:290-299, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Anatomically guided implant site preparation technique at molar sites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tizcareño, Mario H; Bravo-Flores, Claudia

    2009-10-01

    Immediate postextraction implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth is a difficult procedure in view of having to place the implant in an ideal position without jeopardizing its initial stability. The surgeon often faces the problem of directing the initial osteotomy in the medial portion of the alveolus with the difficulty of engaging the inter-radicular septum of the extraction socket. The drill may slip continually leading to an inaccurate site preparation, and consequently to a deficient implant insertion. The fixture is often placed directly into either one of the extraction sockets of the tooth to be replaced. The anatomically guided site preparation technique is a very useful tool to perform implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth. This approach of implant insertion consists of a progressive preparation of the implant site using the anatomy and geometry of the root of the multiradicular teeth to be extracted as a reference and as an aid to engage the inter-radicular septum. This places the implants in a favorable and proper position from a biomechanical and occlusal standpoint. The objective of this article is to describe the anatomically guided implant site preparation technique as an aid to favorably place dental implants in multiradicular teeth postextraction.

  12. Rare anatomical variation of the musculocutaneous nerve - case report.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina; Pereira, Eduardo; Andrades, Lilian; de Souza, Cristiano Cirqueira

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and surgical importance of anatomical knowledge of the musculocutaneous nerve and its variations is due to the fact that one of the complications in many upper-limb surgical procedures involves injury to this nerve. During routine dissection of the right upper limb of a male cadaver, we observed an anatomical variation of this nerve. The musculocutaneous nerve originated in the lateral cord and continued laterally, passing under the coracobrachialis muscle and then continuing until its first branch to the biceps brachialis muscle. Just after this, it supplied another two branches, i.e. the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm and a branch to the brachialis muscle, and then it joined the median nerve. The median nerve followed the arm medially to the region of the cubital fossa and then gave rise to the anterior intermediate nerve of the forearm. The union between the musculocutaneous nerve and the median nerve occurred approximately at the midpoint of the arm and the median nerve. Given that either our example is not covered by the classifications found in the literature or that it fits into more than one variation proposed, without us finding something truly similar, we consider this variation to be rare.