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Sample records for anatomic subsites results

  1. Mandibular Ramus Fracture: An Overview of Rare Anatomical Subsite

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Anendd; Mundada, Bhushan; Deshmukh, Rahul; Bhutekar, Umesh; Kala, Atul; Waghwani, Kapil; Mishra, Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The present study aims at exemplifying the incidence, and aetiology and analyses the outcomes of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) over closed treatment of mandibular ramus fractures. Patients and Method. In the present retrospective analysis of mandibular fracture patients, variables analysed were age, sex, cause of injury, pretreatment occlusion, treatment given, period of maxillo-mandibular fixation (MMF), and posttreatment occlusion. Results. Out of 388 mandibular fractures treated, ramus fractures were 12 (3.09%). In the present study, predominant cause of mandibular ramus fracture was road traffic accident (RTA) n = 07 (58.33%) followed by fall n = 04 (33.33%) and assault n = 1 (8.33%). The average age was 35.9 years with a male predilection. Of these, 9 patients were treated with ORIF while remaining 3 with closed treatment. The average MMF after closed treatment was 21 days and 3 to 5 days after ORIF. There was improvement in occlusion in all 12 patients posttreatment with no major complication except for reduced mouth opening in cases treated with ORIF which recovered with physiotherapy and muscle relaxants. Conclusion. Mandibular ramus fractures accounted for 3.09% with RTA as a common aetiology. ORIF of ramus fractures facilitated adequate functional and anatomic reduction with early return of function. PMID:26613050

  2. Meat-Related Compounds and Colorectal Cancer Risk by Anatomical Subsite

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paige E.; Lazarus, Philip; Lesko, Samuel M.; Cross, Amanda J.; Sinha, Rashmi; Laio, Jason; Zhu, Jay; Harper, Gregory; Muscat, Joshua E.; Hartman, Terryl J.

    2012-01-01

    Since meat may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, associations between meat-related compounds were examined to elucidate underlying mechanisms in a population-based case-control study. Participants (989 cases/1,033 healthy controls) completed a food frequency questionnaire with a meat-specific module. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between meat variables and colorectal cancer; polytomous logistic regression was used for subsite-specific analyses. The following significant positive associations were observed for meat-related compounds: 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and colorectal, distal colon, and rectal tumors; 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and colorectal and colon cancer tumors; nitrites/nitrates and proximal colon cancer; 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and rectal cancer; and benzo[a]pyrene and rectal cancer (P-trends < 0.05 ). For analyses by meat type, cooking method, and doneness preference, positive associations between red processed meat and proximal colon cancer and pan-fried red meat and colorectal cancer were found (P-trends < 0.05). Inverse associations were observed between unprocessed poultry and colorectal, colon, proximal colon, and rectal tumors; grilled/barbequed poultry and proximal colon cancer; and well-done/charred poultry and colorectal, colon, and proximal colon tumors (P-trends < 0.05). HCAs, PAHs, nitrites, and nitrates may be involved in colorectal cancer etiology. Further examination into the unexpected inverse associations between poultry and colorectal cancer is warranted. PMID:23441608

  3. Free Tissue Transfer to Head and Neck: Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Results-Experience per Subsite.

    PubMed

    Al Deek, Nidal Farhan; Wei, Fu-Chan; Kao, Huang-Kai

    2016-10-01

    This article provides a lesson-learned approach per site and anatomic structure to head and neck reconstruction. It addresses the most common unfavorable results following successful free flap transfer shedding light on why they happen and how to prevent them. It draws from hundreds of advanced and complicated microsurgical head and neck reconstruction cases, aiming to achieve excellence in the reconstructive endeavor and to enhance the patient's quality of life.

  4. Free Tissue Transfer to Head and Neck: Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Results-Experience per Subsite.

    PubMed

    Al Deek, Nidal Farhan; Wei, Fu-Chan; Kao, Huang-Kai

    2016-10-01

    This article provides a lesson-learned approach per site and anatomic structure to head and neck reconstruction. It addresses the most common unfavorable results following successful free flap transfer shedding light on why they happen and how to prevent them. It draws from hundreds of advanced and complicated microsurgical head and neck reconstruction cases, aiming to achieve excellence in the reconstructive endeavor and to enhance the patient's quality of life. PMID:27601387

  5. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Hachem, Maher Abou; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kramhøft, Birte; Svensson, Birte

    2006-09-18

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as binding barriers. Barley alpha-amylase 1 mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in alpha-amylases.

  6. Computer-aided subsite mapping of α-amylases.

    PubMed

    Mótyán, János A; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Harangi, János; Bagossi, Péter

    2011-02-15

    Subsite mapping is a crucial procedure in the characterization of α-amylases (EC 3.2.1.1), which are extensively used in starch-based industries and in diagnosis of pancreatic and salivary glands disorders. A computer-aided method has been developed for subsite mapping of α-amylases, which substitutes the difficult, expensive, and time-consuming experimental determination of action patterns to crystal structures based energy calculations. Interaction energies between enzymes and carbohydrate substrates were calculated after short energy minimization by a molecular mechanics program. A training set of wild type and mutant amylases with known experimental action patterns of 13 enzymes of wide range of origin was used to set up the procedure. Calculations for training set resulted in good correlation in case of subsite binding energies (r(2)=0.827-0.929) and bond cleavage frequencies (r(2)=0.727-0.835). A set of eight novel barley amylase 1 mutants was used to test our model. Subsite binding energies were predicted with r(2)=0.502 correlation coefficient, while bond cleavage frequency prediction resulted in r(2)=0.538. Our computer-aided procedure may supplement the experimental subsite mapping methods to predict and understand characteristic features of α-amylases.

  7. Rational engineering of mannosyl binding in the distal glycone subsites of Cellulomonas fimi endo-beta-1,4-mannanase: mannosyl binding promoted at subsite -2 and demoted at subsite -3.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Omid; Lo Leggio, Leila; Rosengren, Anna; Kamarauskaite, Jurate; Kolenova, Katarina; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2010-06-15

    To date, rational redesign of glycosidase active-site clefts has been mainly limited to the removal of essential functionalities rather than their introduction. The glycoside hydrolase family 26 endo-beta-1,4-mannanase from the soil bacterium Cellulomonas fimi depolymerizes various abundant plant mannans. On the basis of differences in the structures and hydrolytic action patterns of this wild-type (but recombinantly expressed) enzyme and a homologous mannanase from Cellvibrio japonicus, two nonconserved amino acid residues at two distal glycone-binding subsites of the C. fimi enzyme were substituted, Ala323Arg at subsite -2 and Phe325Ala at subsite -3, to achieve inverted mannosyl affinities in the respective subsites, mimicking the Ce. japonicus enzyme that has an Arg providing mannosyl interactions at subsite -2. The X-ray crystal structure of the C. fimi doubly substituted mannanase was determined to 2.35 A resolution and shows that the introduced Arg323 is in a position suitable for hydrogen bonding to mannosyl at subsite -2. We report steady-state enzyme kinetics and hydrolysis-product analyses using anion-exchange chromatography and a novel rapid mass spectrometric profiling method of (18)O-labeled products obtained using H(2)(18)O as a solvent. The results obtained with oligosaccharide substrates show that although the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) is wild-type-like for the engineered enzyme, it has an altered hydrolytic action pattern that stems from promotion of substrate binding at subsite -2 (due to the introduced Arg323) and demotion of it at subsite -3 (to which removal of Phe325 contributed). However, k(cat)/K(m) decreased approximately 1 order of magnitude with polymeric substrates, possibly caused by spatial repositioning of the substrate at subsite -3 and beyond for the engineered enzyme.

  8. Subsite mapping of enzymes. Depolymerase computer modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J D; Thoma, J A

    1976-01-01

    We have developed a depolymerase computer model that uses a minimization routine. The model is designed so that, given experimental bond-cleavage frequencies for oligomeric substrates and experimental Michaelis parameters as a function of substrate chain length, the optimum subsite map is generated. The minimized sum of the weighted-squared residuals of the experimental and calculated data is used as a criterion of the goodness-of-fit for the optimized subsite map. The application of the minimization procedure to subsite mapping is explored through the use of simulated data. A procedure is developed whereby the minimization model can be used to determine the number of subsites in the enzymic binding region and to locate the position of the catalytic amino acids among these subsites. The degree of propagation of experimental variance into the subsite-binding energies is estimated. The question of whether hydrolytic rate coefficients are constant or a function of the number of filled subsites is examined. PMID:999629

  9. Subsite mapping of the binding region of alpha-amylases with a computer program.

    PubMed

    Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Hovánszki, György; Kandra, Lili

    2002-11-01

    A computer program has been evaluated for subsite map calculations of depolymerases. The program runs in windows and uses the experimentally determined bond cleavage frequencies (BCFs) for determination of the number of subsites, the position of the catalytic site and for calculation of subsite binding energies. The apparent free energy values were optimized by minimization of the differences of the measured and calculated BCF data. The program called suma (SUbsite Mapping of alpha-Amylases) is freely available for research and educational purposes via the Internet (E-mail: gyemant@tigris.klte.hu). The advantages of this program are demonstrated through alpha-amylases of different origin, e.g. porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) studied in our laboratory, in addition to barley and rice alpha-amylases published in the literature. Results confirm the popular 'five subsite model' for PPA with three glycone and two aglycone binding sites. Calculations for barley alpha-amylase justify the '6 + 2 + (1) model' prediction. The binding area of barley alpha-amylase is composed of six glycone, two aglycone binding sites followed by a barrier subsite at the reducing end of the binding site. Calculations for rice alpha-amylase represent an entirely new map with a '(1) + 2 + 5 model', where '(1)' is a barrier subsite at the nonreducing end of the binding site and there are two glycone and five aglycone binding sites. The rice model may be reminiscent of the action of the bacterial maltogenic amylase, that is, suggesting an exo-mechanism for this enzyme.

  10. Anatomic shoulder arthroplasty: an update on indications, technique, results and complication rates

    PubMed Central

    MATTEI, LORENZO; MORTERA, STEFANO; ARRIGONI, CHIARA; CASTOLDI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    A shoulder replacement is indicated in patients affected by glenohumeral arthropathy with severely reduced range of motion, persistent pain, especially at night, and loss of strength. There is much discussion in the scientific community about the prosthetic options for these cases: hemiarthroplasty, anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. We analyzed the indications for, results of, and complications associated with this kind of surgery, focusing on anatomic arthroplasty and on the concept of modularity. PMID:26605254

  11. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  12. [Contributions and results of lipo-structure in repair and rejuvenation of frontal anatomical unit].

    PubMed

    Chichery, A; Mojallal, A; Voulliaume, D; Comparin, J-P; Foyatier, J-L

    2009-04-01

    Forehead is the most large anatomical unit of face. It includes forehead and anterior part of temple. Deteriorations of frontal anatomical units are numerous, ageing forehead has atrophy with eyebrow ptosis. In this work, we want to estimate contribution of lipo-structure in repair and rejuvenation of frontal anatomical unit (FAU). We present seven cases of repair of FAU and three cases of rejuvenation of the forehead. Results are satisfactory, particularly about frontal band. Results are questionable about Lipo-structure of temple. Applications of Lipo-structure in plastic and aesthetic surgery of the forehead are huge. Lipo-structure is the reference technique of volumetric filling. It is preferred to other techniques as flaps (pediculed or free) or materials, because it is a safe, easy and efficient technique, which permits large fillings. In aesthetic surgery, Lipo-structure gives volume to eyebrow region and fills root of the nose. It can be used with injections of botulinum toxin A. Lipo-structure of forehead takes part in rejuvenation of eye and nose. In conclusion, lipo-structure is actually the major technique of filling with a large implication in plastic and aesthetic surgery of FAU.

  13. CD14 and IL18 gene polymorphisms associated with colorectal cancer subsite risks among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiqun; Yoshida, Kengo; Cologne, John B; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide, and chronic inflammation is a risk factor for CRC. In this study, we carried out a cohort study among the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor population to investigate any association between immune- and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms and CRC. We examined the effects of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CD14 and IL18 on relative risks (RRs) of CRC. Results showed that RRs of CRC, overall and by anatomic subsite, significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. The CD14-911A/A genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for all CRC and distal CRC compared with the other two genotypes. In addition, the IL18-137 G/G genotype showed statistically significant higher risks for proximal colon cancer compared with the other two genotypes. In phenotype-genotype analyses, the CD14-911A/A genotype presented significantly higher levels of membrane and soluble CD14 compared with the other two genotypes, and the IL18-137 G/G genotype tended to be lower levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-18 compared with the other two genotypes. These results suggest the potential involvement of a CD14-mediated inflammatory response in the development of distal CRC and an IL18-mediated inflammatory response in the development of proximal colon cancer among A-bomb survivors.

  14. Subsite-specific contributions of different aromatic residues in the active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase family 12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Xiuyun; Liu, Shijia; Li, Dandan; Xu, Hao; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-01-01

    The active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase (GH) is a contiguous subregion of the enzyme constituted by residues clustered in the three-dimensional space, recognizing the monomeric unit of ligand through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Mutations of the key residues in the active site architecture of the GH12 family exerted different impacts on catalytic efficiency. Binding affinities between the aromatic amino acids and carbohydrate rings were quantitatively determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the quantum mechanical (QM) method, showing that the binding capacity order of Tyr>Trp>His (and Phe) was determined by their side-chain properties. The results also revealed that the binding constant of a certain residue remained unchanged when altering its location, while the catalytic efficiency changed dramatically. Increased binding affinity at a relatively distant subsite, such as the mutant of W7Y at the −4 subsite, resulted in a marked increase in the intermediate product of cellotetraose and enhanced the reactivity of endoglucanase by 144%; while tighter binding near the catalytic center, i.e. W22Y at the −2 subsite, enabled the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze smaller oligosaccharides. Clarification of the specific roles of the aromatics at different subsites may pave the way for a more rational design of GHs. PMID:26670009

  15. [Indications, techniques and anatomic results of the tympanoplasty using palisade cartilage].

    PubMed

    Bernal Sprekelsen, M; Tomás Barberán, M

    1997-05-01

    One of the major unsolved problems of the middle ear is Eustachian tube disfunction and abnormalities in gas exchange through the middle ear mucosa, which produces negative pressure and may cause retraction pockets, adhesions, or atelectasis. Postoperatively, ear surgeons face a similar problem when conventional autologous material was used to reconstruct the tympanum. Sooner or later, the new tympanic membrane experience retraction, re-perforation and/or extrusion or displacement of the reconstructed ossicular chain. This paper proposes using cartilage as an alternative method of tympanic membrane reconstruction in a personal modification of Heermann's technique. The indications for the "palisade" reconstruction technique with cartilage, technical aspects, and anatomic results after an average of 20 months after surgery are discussed.

  16. [Use of the anatomical cemented femoral stem SAS I: mid-term results].

    PubMed

    Mikláš, M; Pink, M; Valoušek, T

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In view of increasing interest in a relationship between the surface of an implant and its behaviour and longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA), the aim of this study is to present the clinical and radiographic results, as well as complications, of hip replacement surgery using the cemented femoral stem SAS I. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 298 cemented femoral stems SAS I were implanted in 275 patients at our department between 1996 and 2005. The patient average age was 72.1 years, with the range from 64 to 92 years. The pre-operative diagnoses were as follows: primary osteoarthritis in 179 (30.1%); post-dysplastic osteoarthritis in 41 (13.7%); femoral neck fracture in 44 (14.8%); avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 23 (7.7%); rheumatoid arthritis in nine (3%) and other causes in two (0.7%) patients. Of the 275 patients who had the surgery, 186 (204 THAs) underwent clinical and X-ray examination at an average follow-up of 11.5 years (range, 8 to 17 years). The clinical results were used to calculate the Harris hip score and radiographic evaluation was based on antero-posterior views. RESULTS The group of 186 assessed patients (204 THAs) comprised 106 women and 80 men, who were on average 85.4 years old on evaluation (range, 72 to 92 years). Of the remaining patients, 62 patients (64 THAs) died from causes unrelated to the surgery and 27 patients (30 THAs) were lost to follow-up. The functional outcome of surgery assessed by the Harris hip score was excellent in 61 (32.8%), good in 94 (50.5%), satisfactory in 26 (14%) and poor in five (2.7%) patients. The 93.1% SAS I stem longevity was recorded in relation to aseptic loosening; reimplantation for this indication was performed in 14 THAs. No revision surgery for failure due to valgus/varus deviations of the stem was carried out. Of the 204 hips, 188 had femoral stems aligned in neutral, 12 (5.9%) in valgus and four (2%) in varus positions. DISCUSSION The anatomical femoral stem SAS I

  17. [Use of the anatomical cemented femoral stem SAS I: mid-term results].

    PubMed

    Mikláš, M; Pink, M; Valoušek, T

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In view of increasing interest in a relationship between the surface of an implant and its behaviour and longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA), the aim of this study is to present the clinical and radiographic results, as well as complications, of hip replacement surgery using the cemented femoral stem SAS I. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 298 cemented femoral stems SAS I were implanted in 275 patients at our department between 1996 and 2005. The patient average age was 72.1 years, with the range from 64 to 92 years. The pre-operative diagnoses were as follows: primary osteoarthritis in 179 (30.1%); post-dysplastic osteoarthritis in 41 (13.7%); femoral neck fracture in 44 (14.8%); avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 23 (7.7%); rheumatoid arthritis in nine (3%) and other causes in two (0.7%) patients. Of the 275 patients who had the surgery, 186 (204 THAs) underwent clinical and X-ray examination at an average follow-up of 11.5 years (range, 8 to 17 years). The clinical results were used to calculate the Harris hip score and radiographic evaluation was based on antero-posterior views. RESULTS The group of 186 assessed patients (204 THAs) comprised 106 women and 80 men, who were on average 85.4 years old on evaluation (range, 72 to 92 years). Of the remaining patients, 62 patients (64 THAs) died from causes unrelated to the surgery and 27 patients (30 THAs) were lost to follow-up. The functional outcome of surgery assessed by the Harris hip score was excellent in 61 (32.8%), good in 94 (50.5%), satisfactory in 26 (14%) and poor in five (2.7%) patients. The 93.1% SAS I stem longevity was recorded in relation to aseptic loosening; reimplantation for this indication was performed in 14 THAs. No revision surgery for failure due to valgus/varus deviations of the stem was carried out. Of the 204 hips, 188 had femoral stems aligned in neutral, 12 (5.9%) in valgus and four (2%) in varus positions. DISCUSSION The anatomical femoral stem SAS I

  18. Does learning in clinical context in anatomical sciences improve examination results, learning motivation, or learning orientation?

    PubMed

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical knowledge within the surgical context of the course led to any improvement in learning motivation, learning orientation, and ultimately examination results in the gross anatomy course, as compared with a control group. Within the scope of five teaching sessions, the students learned surgical hand disinfection, suturing techniques, and the identification of commonly used surgical instruments. In addition, the students attended five surgical demonstrations performed by surgical colleagues on cadavers. Successful learning of these basic skills was then assessed based on an Objectively Structured Practical Examination. Learning motivation and learning orientation in both subgroups was determined using the SELLMO-ST motivation test and the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory test. While a significant increase in work avoidance was identified in the control group, this was not the case for FOP participants. Similarly, an increase in the "deep approach" to learning, as well as a decrease in the "surface approach," was able to be documented among the FOP participants following completion of the course. The results suggest that students enrolled in the gross anatomy course, who were simultaneously provided with the opportunity to learn in clinical context, were more likely to be successful at maintaining learning motivation and learning orientation required for the learning process, than students who attended the gross anatomy course alone.

  19. Opposing influences by subsite -1 and subsite +1 residues on relative xylopyranosidase/arabinofuranosidase activities of bifunctional β-D-xylosidase/α-L-arabinofuranosidase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D

    2011-12-01

    Conformational inversion occurs 7-8kcal/mol more readily in furanoses than pyranoses. This difference is exploited here to probe for active-site residues involved in distorting pyranosyl substrate toward reactivity. Spontaneous glycoside hydrolysis rates are ordered 4-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside (4NPA)>4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (4NPX)>xylobiose (X2). The bifunctional β-d-xylosidase/α-l-arabinofuranosidase exhibits the opposite order of reactivity, illustrating that the enzyme is well equipped in using pyranosyl groups of natural substrate X2 in facilitating glycoside hydrolysis. Probing the roles of all 17 active-site residues by single-site mutation to alanine and by changing both moieties of substrate demonstrates that the mutations of subsite -1 residues decrease the ratio k(cat)(4NPX/4NPA), suggesting that the native residues support pyranosyl substrate distortion, whereas the mutations of subsite +1 and the subsite -1/+1 interface residues increase the ratio k(cat)(4NPX/4NPA), suggesting that the native residues support other factors, such as C1 migration and protonation of the leaving group. Alanine mutations of subsite -1 residues raise k(cat)(X2/4NPX) and alanine mutations of subsite +1 and interface residues lower k(cat)(X2/4NPX). We propose that pyranosyl substrate distortion is supported entirely by native residues of subsite -1. Other factors leading to the transition state are supported entirely by native residues of subsite +1 and interface residues.

  20. Encapsulating Subsite Analogues of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases in Micelles Enables Direct Water Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Robby; Brady, Owen; Adair, Elaine; Wright, Joseph A; Pickett, Christopher J; Hunt, Neil T

    2016-07-21

    Encapsulation of subsite analogues of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes in supramolecular structures has been shown to dramatically increase their catalytic ability, but the molecular basis for this enhancement remains unclear. We report the results of experiments employing infrared absorption, ultrafast infrared pump-probe, and 2D-IR spectroscopy to investigate the molecular environment of Fe2(pdt)(CO)6 (pdt: propanedithiolate) [1] encapsulated in the dispersed alkane phase of a heptane-dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide-water microemulsion. It is demonstrated that 1 is partitioned between two molecular environments, one that closely resembles bulk heptane solution and a second that features direct hydrogen-bonding interactions with water molecules that penetrate the surfactant shell. Our results demonstrate that the extent of water access to the normally water-insoluble subsite analogue 1 can be tuned with micelle size, while IR spectroscopy provides a straightforward tool that can be used to measure and fine-tune the chemical environment of catalyst species in self-assembled structures. PMID:27396585

  1. Mapping glycoside hydrolase substrate subsites by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Cogan, Uri; Adir, Noam; Solomon, Vered; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    Relating thermodynamic parameters to structural and biochemical data allows a better understanding of substrate binding and its contribution to catalysis. The analysis of the binding of carbohydrates to proteins or enzymes is a special challenge because of the multiple interactions and forces involved. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a direct measure of binding enthalpy (ΔHa) and allows the determination of the binding constant (free energy), entropy, and stoichiometry. In this study, we used ITC to elucidate the binding thermodynamics of xylosaccharides for two xylanases of family 10 isolated from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6. The change in the heat capacity of binding (ΔCp = ΔH/ΔT) for xylosaccharides differing in one sugar unit was determined by using ITC measurements at different temperatures. Because hydrophobic stacking interactions are associated with negative ΔCp, the data allow us to predict the substrate binding preference in the binding subsites based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. The proposed positional binding preference was consistent with mutants lacking aromatic binding residues at different subsites and was also supported by tryptophan fluorescence analysis. PMID:15277671

  2. The Prognostic Value of Age, Sex, and Subsite in Cutaneous Head and Neck Melanoma: A Clinical Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kadakia, Sameep; Chan, David; Mourad, Moustafa; Ducic, Yadranko

    2016-01-01

    Context Cutaneous head and neck melanoma is a challenging disease owing to its aggressive nature and often times advanced stage at presentation. Age, sex, and subsite are three prognostic indicators which can be determined prior to treatment or testing, and can allow the practitioner to counsel the patient before initiating therapy. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search was conducted utilizing various terms relating to the subject matter. Articles over the past 25 years were analyzed and appropriately selected for review. Results It appears that patients older than 65 have a decreased overall 5 year survival compared to their younger counterparts. Male patients have poorer prognosis compared to female patients as noted by the decreased overall survival, decreased disease specific survival, and shorter time to distant metastasis. Scalp subsite was most uniformly accepted as having the worst prognosis in the head and neck, and may even serve as an independent prognostic indicator. Conclusions Advanced age, male sex, and scalp subsite all portend poor prognosis in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. PMID:27703647

  3. Aminoalcohols as Probes of the Two-subsite Active Site of Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation state of catalytic base (D14, pKa 5.0) and catalytic acid (E186, pKa 7.2) which reside in subsite -1 of the two-subsite active site. Cationic aminoalcohols are shown to bind exclusively to subsite -1 of the ...

  4. Comparative analysis of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation versus non-anatomical hepatic resection for small hepatocellular carcinoma: short-term result

    PubMed Central

    Yune, Yongwoo; Kim, Seokwhan; Song, Insang

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims To compare the clinical outcomes of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and non-anatomical hepatic resection (NAHR) for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From February 2007 to January 2015, clinical outcomes of thirty four patients with HCC receiving RFA or NAHR were compared, retrospectively. Results There was no difference of patient and tumor characteristic between the two groups that received RFA or NAHR. The 1, 2, and 3-year recurrence rates following RFA were 32.2%, 32.2% and 59.3% respectively, and 6.7%, 33.3% and 33.3% following NAHR respectively (p=0.287). The 1, 2 and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates following RFA were 100%, 88.9% and 76.2% respectively, and 100%, 85.6% and 85.6%, respectively, following NAHR (p=0.869). We did not find a definite statistical difference in recurrence rate and OS rate between the two groups. In the multivariate analysis, number of tumor was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and albumin was an independent prognostic factor for OS. Conclusions We recommend non-anatomical hepatic resection rather than intraoperative RFA in small sized HCC, due to a higher recurrence rate in intraoperative RFA. Intraoperative RFA was inferior to non-anatomical hepatic resection in terms of recurrence rate. We need to select the optimal treatment considering liver function and possibility of recurrence. PMID:26693237

  5. Location, number and morphology of parathyroid glands: results from a large anatomical series.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Dimitrios; Noussios, George; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Adamidou, Fotini; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2012-09-01

    Surgical management of parathyroid gland disease may sometimes be difficult, due mainly to the surgeon's failure to successfully detect parathyroids in unusual locations. The records of 942 cadavers (574 men and 368 women) who underwent autopsy in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Athens during the period 1988-2009 were reviewed. In total, 3,796 parathyroid glands were resected and histologically verified. Parathyroid glands varied in number. In 47 cases (5 %), one supernumerary (fifth) parathyroid was found, while in 19 cases (2 %) three parathyroid glands found. Superior glands were larger than inferior ones. However, there was no significant difference between the genders with respect to gland size. In 324 (8.5 %) out of 3,796, the glands were detected in an ectopic location: 7 (0.2 %) in the thyroid parenchyma, 79 (2 %) in different sites in the neck and 238 (6.3 %) in the mediastinum, 152 (4.1 %) of which were found in the upper and 86 (2.2 %) in the lower mediastinum. Significant anatomical variations of normal parathyroid glands may exist regarding number and location-knowledge that is essential for their successful identification and surgical management.

  6. Novel β-N-acetylglucosaminidases from Vibrio harveyi 650: Cloning, expression, enzymatic properties, and subsite identification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Since chitin is a highly abundant natural biopolymer, many attempts have been made to convert this insoluble polysaccharide into commercially valuable products using chitinases and β-N-acetylglucosaminidases (GlcNAcases). We have previously reported the structure and function of chitinase A from Vibrio harveyi 650. This study t reports the identification of two GlcNAcases from the same organism and their detailed functional characterization. Results The genes encoding two new members of family-20 GlcNAcases were isolated from the genome of V. harveyi 650, cloned and expressed at a high level in E. coli. VhNag1 has a molecular mass of 89 kDa and an optimum pH of 7.5, whereas VhNag2 has a molecular mass of 73 kDa and an optimum pH of 7.0. The recombinant GlcNAcases were found to hydrolyze all the natural substrates, VhNag2 being ten-fold more active than VhNag1. Product analysis by TLC and quantitative HPLC suggested that VhNag2 degraded chitooligosaccharides in a sequential manner, its highest activity being with chitotetraose. Kinetic modeling of the enzymic reaction revealed that binding at subsites (-2) and (+4) had unfavorable (positive) binding free energy changes and that the binding pocket of VhNag2 contains four GlcNAc binding subsites, designated (-1),(+1),(+2), and (+3). Conclusions Two novel GlcNAcases were identified as exolytic enzymes that degraded chitin oligosaccharides, releasing GlcNAc as the end product. In living cells, these intracellular enzymes may work after endolytic chitinases to complete chitin degradation. The availability of the two GlcNAcases, together with the previously-reported chitinase A from the same organism, suggests that a systematic development of the chitin-degrading enzymes may provide a valuable tool in commercial chitin bioconversion. PMID:20920218

  7. Crystal Structures of Aspergillus japonicus Fructosyltransferase Complex with Donor/Acceptor Substrates Reveal Complete Subsites in the Active Site for Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Hsieh, Chih-Yu; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Hsieh, Yi-You; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Tien, Yueh-Chu; Chen, Chung-De; Chiang, Chien-Min; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Fructosyltransferases catalyze the transfer of a fructose unit from one sucrose/fructan to another and are engaged in the production of fructooligosaccharide/fructan. The enzymes belong to the glycoside hydrolase family 32 (GH32) with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Here we describe the crystal structures of recombinant fructosyltransferase (AjFT) from Aspergillus japonicus CB05 and its mutant D191A complexes with various donor/acceptor substrates, including sucrose, 1-kestose, nystose, and raffinose. This is the first structure of fructosyltransferase of the GH32 with a high transfructosylation activity. The structure of AjFT comprises two domains with an N-terminal catalytic domain containing a five-blade β-propeller fold linked to a C-terminal β-sandwich domain. Structures of various mutant AjFT-substrate complexes reveal complete four substrate-binding subsites (−1 to +3) in the catalytic pocket with shapes and characters distinct from those of clan GH-J enzymes. Residues Asp-60, Asp-191, and Glu-292 that are proposed for nucleophile, transition-state stabilizer, and general acid/base catalyst, respectively, govern the binding of the terminal fructose at the −1 subsite and the catalytic reaction. Mutants D60A, D191A, and E292A completely lost their activities. Residues Ile-143, Arg-190, Glu-292, Glu-318, and His-332 combine the hydrophobic Phe-118 and Tyr-369 to define the +1 subsite for its preference of fructosyl and glucosyl moieties. Ile-143 and Gln-327 define the +2 subsite for raffinose, whereas Tyr-404 and Glu-405 define the +2 and +3 subsites for inulin-type substrates with higher structural flexibilities. Structural geometries of 1-kestose, nystose and raffinose are different from previous data. All results shed light on the catalytic mechanism and substrate recognition of AjFT and other clan GH-J fructosyltransferases. PMID:20466731

  8. Wide-Field Landers Temporary Keratoprosthesis in Severe Ocular Trauma: Functional and Anatomical Results after One Year

    PubMed Central

    Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Haszcz, Dariusz; Forlini, Cesare; Forlini, Matteo; Moneta-Wielgos, Joanna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Juenemann, Anselm G.; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate longitudinal functional and anatomical results after combined pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) using a wide-field Landers intraoperative temporary keratoprosthesis (TKP) in patients with vitreoretinal pathology and corneal opacity due to severe ocular trauma. Material and Methods. Medical records of 12 patients who had undergone PPV/PKP/KP due to severe eye trauma were analyzed. Functional (best-corrected visual acuity) and anatomic outcomes (clarity of the corneal graft, retinal attachment, and intraocular pressure) were assessed during the follow-up (mean 16 months). Results. Final visual acuities varied from NLP to CF to 2 m. Visual acuity improved in 7 cases, was unchanged in 4 eyes, and worsened in 1 eye. The corneal graft was transparent during the follow-up in 3 cases and graft failure was observed in 9 eyes. Silicone oil was used as a tamponade in all cases and retina was reattached in 92% of cases. Conclusions. Combined PPV and PKP with the use of wide-field Landers TKP allowed for surgical intervention in patients with vitreoretinal pathology coexisting with corneal wound. Although retina was attached in most of the cases, corneal graft survived only in one-fourth of patients and final visual acuities were poor. PMID:26617994

  9. Wide-Field Landers Temporary Keratoprosthesis in Severe Ocular Trauma: Functional and Anatomical Results after One Year.

    PubMed

    Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Haszcz, Dariusz; Forlini, Cesare; Forlini, Matteo; Moneta-Wielgos, Joanna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Juenemann, Anselm G; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate longitudinal functional and anatomical results after combined pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) using a wide-field Landers intraoperative temporary keratoprosthesis (TKP) in patients with vitreoretinal pathology and corneal opacity due to severe ocular trauma. Material and Methods. Medical records of 12 patients who had undergone PPV/PKP/KP due to severe eye trauma were analyzed. Functional (best-corrected visual acuity) and anatomic outcomes (clarity of the corneal graft, retinal attachment, and intraocular pressure) were assessed during the follow-up (mean 16 months). Results. Final visual acuities varied from NLP to CF to 2 m. Visual acuity improved in 7 cases, was unchanged in 4 eyes, and worsened in 1 eye. The corneal graft was transparent during the follow-up in 3 cases and graft failure was observed in 9 eyes. Silicone oil was used as a tamponade in all cases and retina was reattached in 92% of cases. Conclusions. Combined PPV and PKP with the use of wide-field Landers TKP allowed for surgical intervention in patients with vitreoretinal pathology coexisting with corneal wound. Although retina was attached in most of the cases, corneal graft survived only in one-fourth of patients and final visual acuities were poor. PMID:26617994

  10. Eligibility for Renal Denervation: Anatomical Classification and Results in Essential Resistant Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Pellerin, Olivier; Savard, Sébastien; Curis, Emmanuel; Monge, Matthieu; Frank, Michael; Bobrie, Guillaume; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Plouin, Pierre-François; Azizi, Michel; Sapoval, Marc

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo classify the renal artery (RA) anatomy based on specific requirements for endovascular renal artery denervation (RDN) in patients with drug-resistant hypertension (RH).Materials and MethodsThe RA anatomy of 122 consecutive RH patients was evaluated by computed tomography angiography and classified as two types: A (main RA ≥20 mm in length and ≥4.0 mm in diameter) or B (main RA <20 mm in length or main RA <4.0 mm in diameter). The A type included three subtypes: A1 (without accessory RAs), A2 (with accessory RAs <3.0 mm in diameter), and A3 (with accessory RAs ≥3.0 mm in diameter]. A1 and A2 types were eligible for RDN with the Simplicity Flex catheter. Type B included twi subtypes based on the main RA length and diameter. Patients were accordingly classified into three eligibility categories: complete (CE; both RAs were eligible), partial (PE; one eligible RA), and noneligibility (NE; no eligible RA).ResultsBilateral A1 type was the most prevalent and was observed in 48.4 % of the patients followed by the A1/A2 type (18 %). CE, PE, and NE were observed in 69.7, 22.9, and 7.4 % of patients, respectively. The prevalence of accessory RAs was 41 %.ConclusionsOf RH patients, 30.3 % were not eligible for bilateral RDN with the current Simplicity Flex catheter. This classification provides the basis for standardized reporting to allow for pooling of results of larger patient cohorts in the future.

  11. Uterine preservation for advanced pelvic organ prolapse repair: Anatomical results and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Keshet; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate outcomes and patient satisfaction in cases of uterine prolapse treated with vaginal mesh, while preserving the uterus. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study that included all patients operated for prolapse repair with trocar-less vaginal mesh while preserving the uterus between October 2010 and March 2013. Data included: patients pre-and post-operative symptoms, POP-Q and operative complications. Success was defined as prolapse < than stage 2. A telephone survey questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction. Results: Sixty-six patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3, including uterine pro-lapse of at least stage 2 (mean point C at+1.4 (range+8-(-1)) were included. Mean follow-up was 22 months. Success rate of the vaginal mesh procedure aimed to repair uterine prolapse was 92% (61/66), with mean point C at −6.7 (range (-1) - (-9)). No major intra-or post-operative complication occurred. A telephone survey questionnaire was conducted post-operatively 28 months on average. Ninety-eight percent of women were satisfied with the decision to preserve their uterus. Eighteen patients (34%) received prior consultation elsewhere for hysterectomy due to their prolapse, and decided to have the operation at our center in order to preserve the uterus. Conclusions: Uterine preservation with vaginal mesh was found to be a safe and effective treatment, even in cases with advanced uterine prolapse. Most patients prefer to keep their uterus. Uterus preservation options should be discussed with every patient before surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:27564289

  12. The Munich Anatomical Institute under National Socialism. First results and prospective tasks of an ongoing research project.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Mathias; Waschke, Jens; Marckmann, Georg; Steger, Florian

    2013-07-01

    While research into the history of German anatomy under National Socialist rule has increased during the last decade, the story of one of the most important anatomical institutes of the time, the Anatomische Anstalt Munich, has not yet been explored. This study presents the results of an ongoing, cooperative research project at the universities of Halle and Munich and focuses on the history of the institution, its personnel and organization, and its interactions with the National Socialist regime. It reveals continuity and disruption within the institute following Munich anatomists' involvement with the regime's policies and ideology as well as their becoming victims to these policies. Also documented is the manner in which the Munich anatomy benefited from the massive increase in executions, especially during the Second World War, by receiving and using the bodies of prisoners executed at the Stadelheim prison in Munich for scientific purposes. Finally, an outlook is presented regarding planned research aiming to fully understand the history of the Anatomische Anstalt during National Socialism.

  13. Ten-Year Results From the Natrelle 410 Anatomical Form-Stable Silicone Breast Implant Core Study

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, G. Patrick; Van Natta, Bruce W.; Bengtson, Bradley P.; Murphy, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Silicone breast implants have long been used for breast augmentation and reconstruction. During this time, these medical devices have gone through a number of modifications to improve their safety, quality, and clinical outcome performance. Objectives The authors conducted a 10-year study to determine the safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 silicone breast implants. Methods This prospective, multicenter study enrolled 941 subjects who were undergoing either augmentation, augmentation revision, reconstruction, or reconstruction revision. Data on complications, reoperations, explantations, and subject satisfaction were collected at annual clinic visits, and one-third of subjects underwent biennial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for implant rupture. The authors used the Kaplan-Meier estimator to calculate risk rates for local complications, reoperations, and explantations. Results Capsular contracture rates increased approximately 1% per year from the previously reported 6-year rates. The rates were significantly lower than those from the Natrelle round gel core study. The overall rate of confirmed ruptured implants in subjects who underwent MRI was 5.7%. Eleven late seromas were reported. The most common reason for explantation was a subject requesting a size or style change. Satisfaction rates remained high through 10 years, with most subjects saying they were somewhat or definitely satisfied with their implants. Conclusions This 10-year prospective trial demonstrated the long-term safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 anatomical form-stable implants. The complication rates were low and the satisfaction rates were high. Level of Evidence: 1 Therapeutic PMID:25717116

  14. Subsite, T Class, and N Class Cannot be Used to Exclude the Retropharyngeal Nodes From Treatment De-Intensification in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Matthew E.; Chinn, Steven B.; Bellile, Emily; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Kang, Stephen Y.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Carey, Thomas E.; Worden, Francis P.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chepeha, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Understanding the drainage patterns to the retropharyngeal nodes is an important consideration in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) because treatment of these nodes is related to increased morbidity. Prediction of these drainage patterns could not only help minimize treatment morbidity, but could also prevent failures in at-risk patients, as de-escalation trials are underway for this disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of pathologic retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) in OPSCC relative to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Design Retrospective review from 2003–2010 Setting Academic Referral Center Participants 205 previously untreated, advanced stage (III, IV), pathologically confirmed patients with OPSCC Exposure: Concurrent chemoradiation Main Outcome Measures Radiologic evidence of pathologic RPA was tabulated and related to involvement of the oropharyngeal subsite, number of neck nodes, T classification and N classification. Results Pathologic RPA was identified in 18% of patients. There were pathologic retropharyngeal lymph nodes in 12/89 (13%) base of tongue cancers, 24/109 (22%) tonsil cancers, and 1/7 (14%) other oropharyngeal subsite cancers. Increasing prevalence of RPA was positively correlated with closer proximity to the posterior tonsillar pillar. A multivariate predictive regression model using the oropharyngeal subsite, involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar, number of metastatic nodes, T classification, and N classification, showed that the number of metastatic nodes was statistically significant with an odds ratio of 1.436 (p=0.0001, 95% confidence interval: 1.203 – 1.714). Conclusions and Relevance The prevalence of pathologic RPA in this cohort was 18% and patients with multiple nodes had the highest risk for pathologic RPA, followed by involvement of the posterior tonsillar pillar. However, this data suggests that there is no clear

  15. Cartilage graft or fascia in tympanoplasty in patients with low middle ear risk index (anatomical and audological results).

    PubMed

    Callioglu, Elif Ersoy; Ceylan, B Tijen; Kuran, Gokhan; Demirci, Sule; Tulaci, Kamil Gokce; Caylan, Refik

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare anatomic and audiological results of cartilage graft with temporal fascia graft in type 1 tympanoplasty patients with low middle ear risk index (MERI). In this retrospective study, 63 patients that underwent type 1 tympanoplasty with chondroperichondrial island graft between July 2009 and November 2010 were compared with 45 patients in whom temporal muscle fascia was used. Patients in both groups had low MERI values varying between 1 and 3. Five and nine patients underwent masteidectomy in cartilage and fascia group, respectively. Mean duration of follow-up was 11.9 ± 3.7 (5-17) months. Mean value was calculated at pre-operative and post-operative hearing threshold 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz, and air bone gap (ABG) gain was compared in both cartilage and fascia groups. when pre-operative and post-operative ABG gain were compared, significant decrease was seen in ABG levels (p < 0.001). However, no significant difference was seen in ABG gain values (p = 0.608), which was 10.1 ± 7.00 dB in cartilage group and 10.8 ± 5.38 dB in fascia group. In both groups, age, sex, and the addition of mastoidectomy procedure had no significant effect on ABG gain and success. Cartilage is a graft material that may be preferred without concern about the effects on hearing results, especially, in patients with low MERI values. The addition of mastoidectomy had no impact on the outcome of operation and audiological results. However, further studies with larger case series may be carried out to further clarify the issue.

  16. Signal-CF: a subsite-coupled and window-fusing approach for predicting signal peptides.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an automated method for predicting signal peptide sequences and their cleavage sites in eukaryotic and bacterial protein sequences. It is a 2-layer predictor: the 1st-layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as secretory or non-secretory; if it is secretory, the process will be automatically continued with the 2nd-layer prediction engine to further identify the cleavage site of its signal peptide. The new predictor is called Signal-CF, where C stands for "coupling" and F for "fusion", meaning that Signal-CF is formed by incorporating the subsite coupling effects along a protein sequence and by fusing the results derived from many width-different scaled windows through a voting system. Signal-CF is featured by high success prediction rates with short computational time, and hence is particularly useful for the analysis of large-scale datasets. Signal-CF is freely available as a web-server at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/Signal-CF/ or http://202.120.37.186/bioinf/Signal-CF/.

  17. Coulombic effects of remote subsites on the active site of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B M; Schultz, L W; Raines, R T

    1998-12-15

    The active-site cleft of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) is lined with cationic residues that interact with a bound nucleic acid. Those residues interacting with the phosphoryl groups comprise the P0, P1, and P2 subsites, with the scissile P-O5' bond residing in the P1 subsite. Coulombic interactions between the P0 and P2 subsites and phosphoryl groups of the substrate were characterized previously [Fisher, B. M., Ha, J.-H., and Raines, R. T. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12121-12132]. Here, the interactions between these subsites and the active-site residues His12 and His119 are described in detail. A protein variant in which the cationic residues in these subsites (Lys66 in the P0 subsite and Lys7 and Arg10 in the P2 subsite) were replaced with alanine was crystallized, both free and with bound 3'-uridine monophosphate (3'-UMP). Structures of K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A.3'-UMP complex were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis to resolutions of 2.0 and 2.1 A, respectively. There is little observable change between these structures and that of wild-type RNase A, either free or with bound 3'-cytidine monophosphate. K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A was evaluated for its ability to cleave UpA, a dinucleotide substrate that does not span the P0 or the P2 subsites. In comparison to the wild-type enzyme, the value of kcat was decreased by 5-fold and that of kcat/Km was decreased 10-fold, suggesting that these remote subsites interact with the active site. These interactions were characterized by determining the pKa values of His12 and His119 at 0.018 and 0.142 M Na+, both in wild-type RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A variant. The side chains of Lys7, Arg10, and Lys66 depress the pKa values of these histidine residues, and this depression is sensitive to the salt concentration. In addition, the P0 and P2 subsites influence the interaction of His12 and His119 with each other, as demonstrated by changes in the cooperativity that gives rise to microscopic

  18. An anatomical structure which results in puffiness of the upper eyelid and a narrow palpebral fissure in the Mongoloid eye.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, S; Matsuo, K; Kushima, H

    2000-09-01

    The typical Mongoloid eye differs from the Occidental one in puffiness of the upper eyelid and narrowness of the palpebral fissure. We surmised that an anatomical structure might exist in the preaponeurotic fat space, which determines the features of the Mongoloid eye. The upper eyelids of 720 Japanese patients and eight Japanese cadavers were macroscopically investigated, and sagittal slices of the central upper eyelid of one patient and nine cadavers were microscopically analysed. Another, lower-positioned transverse ligament different from the higher-positioned Whitnall's one was identified just above the fusional line between the orbital septum and the levator aponeurosis in almost every upper eyelid. A robust ligamentous structure was observed in 331 patients (46%) with puffier eyelids and a narrower palpebral fissure, a diaphanous retinaculum in 381 patients (53%) and no transverse ligamentous tissue in eight patients (1%). Histological evaluation demonstrated that this ligament was composed of tight bundles of collagen fibres containing few elastic fibres. Examination of the preaponeurotic fat space indicated that the superficial expansion of the levator aponeurosis turned up around this transverse ligament to become the orbital septum. When the levator muscle contracts, the deep expansion of the levator aponeurosis retracts the tarsus, the middle expansion retracts the pretarsal orbicularis oculi muscle and skin, and the superficial expansion retracts the preaponeurotic fat against this ligament. This structure thus determines the low position of the preaponeurotic fat and restricts the vertical width of the palpebral fissure, causing the features of the Mongoloid eye.

  19. Iterative Saturation Mutagenesis of −6 Subsite Residues in Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans To Improve Maltodextrin Specificity for 2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-Ascorbic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruizhi; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), a stable l-ascorbic acid derivative, is usually synthesized by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase), which contains nine substrate-binding subsites (from +2 to −7). In this study, iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) was performed on the −6 subsite residues (Y167, G179, G180, and N193) in the CGTase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve its specificity for maltodextrin, which is a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for AA-2G synthesis. Site saturation mutagenesis of four sites—Y167, G179, G180, and N193—was first performed and revealed that four mutants—Y167S, G179R, N193R, and G180R—produced AA-2G yields higher than those of other mutant and wild-type CGTases. ISM was then conducted with the best positive mutant as a template. Under optimal conditions, mutant Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.12 g/liter, which was 84% higher than that (1.15 g/liter) produced by the wild-type CGTase. Kinetics analysis of AA-2G synthesis using mutant CGTases confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity and showed that compared to the wild-type CGTase, the mutants had no cyclization activity but high hydrolysis and disproportionation activities. A possible mechanism for the enhanced substrate specificity was also analyzed through structure modeling of the mutant and wild-type CGTases. These results indicated that the −6 subsite played crucial roles in the substrate binding and catalytic reactions of CGTase and that the obtained CGTase mutants, especially Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R, are promising starting points for further development through protein engineering. PMID:24077706

  20. Kinetic studies of guanine recognition and a phosphate group subsite on ribonuclease T1 using substitution mutants at Glu46 and Lys41.

    PubMed

    Jo Chitester, Betty; Walz, Frederick G

    2002-10-01

    pH-Dependent kinetic studies were performed with ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1) and its Glu46Ser, Lys41Met, and Lys41Thr mutants with GpC and polyinosinic acid (PolyI) as substrates. Plots of pH versus log(k(cat)/K(M)) for both substrates had ascending slopes that were significantly greater for RNase T1 compared with Glu46Ser-RNase T1, which indicated that the gamma-carboxyl group of conserved Glu46 must be deprotonated (anionic) for maximal interaction with N1H and N2H of the guanine moiety of GpC or the N1H of the hypoxanthine moiety of PolyI. The involvement of the epsilon -ammonium group of nonconserved Lys41 at the 2p subsite (i.e., for an RNA phosphate group two nucleotide positions 5'-upstream from the active site) was supported by comparisons of Lys41Met-RNase T1 and Lys41Thr-RNase T1 with wild-type. These mutants shared identical catalytic properties (i.e., k(cat) and K(M)) with wild-type using GpC as a substrate. However, k(cat)/K(M) for both were identical with each other but lower than those for wild-type when PolyI was the substrate (PolyI has a phosphate group that could interact at a putative 2p site). The pH dependence of this latter difference can be interpreted as reflecting the loss of the 2p subsite interaction with the wild-type enzyme upon deprotonation of the epsilon -ammonium group of Lys41. Subsite interactions for ribonucleases are shown to mainly increase k(cat) and result in an attenuated pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M). PMID:12234492

  1. Iterative saturation mutagenesis of -6 subsite residues in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-12-01

    2-O-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), a stable l-ascorbic acid derivative, is usually synthesized by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase), which contains nine substrate-binding subsites (from +2 to -7). In this study, iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) was performed on the -6 subsite residues (Y167, G179, G180, and N193) in the CGTase from Paenibacillus macerans to improve its specificity for maltodextrin, which is a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for AA-2G synthesis. Site saturation mutagenesis of four sites-Y167, G179, G180, and N193-was first performed and revealed that four mutants-Y167S, G179R, N193R, and G180R-produced AA-2G yields higher than those of other mutant and wild-type CGTases. ISM was then conducted with the best positive mutant as a template. Under optimal conditions, mutant Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.12 g/liter, which was 84% higher than that (1.15 g/liter) produced by the wild-type CGTase. Kinetics analysis of AA-2G synthesis using mutant CGTases confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity and showed that compared to the wild-type CGTase, the mutants had no cyclization activity but high hydrolysis and disproportionation activities. A possible mechanism for the enhanced substrate specificity was also analyzed through structure modeling of the mutant and wild-type CGTases. These results indicated that the -6 subsite played crucial roles in the substrate binding and catalytic reactions of CGTase and that the obtained CGTase mutants, especially Y167S/G179K/N193R/G180R, are promising starting points for further development through protein engineering.

  2. Prediction of Signal Peptide Cleavage Sites with Subsite-Coupled and Template Matching Fusion Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Ting-He; Zhang, Jun-Nan; Huang, Yufei

    2014-03-01

    Fast and effective prediction of signal peptides (SP) and their cleavage sites is of great importance in computational biology. The approaches developed to predict signal peptide can be roughly divided into machine learning based, and sliding windows based. In order to further increase the prediction accuracy and coverage of organism for SP cleavage sites, we propose a novel method for predicting SP cleavage sites called Signal-CTF that utilizes machine learning and sliding windows, and is designed for N-termial secretory proteins in a large variety of organisms including human, animal, plant, virus, bacteria, fungi and archaea. Signal-CTF consists of three distinct elements: (1) a subsite-coupled and regularization function with a scaled window of fixed width that selects a set of candidates of possible secretion-cleavable segment for a query secretory protein; (2) a sum fusion system that integrates the outcomes from aligning the cleavage site template sequence with each of the aforementioned candidates in a scaled window of fixed width to determine the best candidate cleavage sites for the query secretory protein; (3) a voting system that identifies the ultimate signal peptide cleavage site among all possible results derived from using scaled windows of different width. When compared with Signal-3L and SignalP 4.0 predictors, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 4-12 %, 10-25 % higher than that of Signal-3L for human, animal and eukaryote, and SignalP 4.0 for eukaryota, Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Comparing with PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0 predictors on the 32 archaea secretory proteins of used in Bagos's paper, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 12.5 %, 25 % higher than that of PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0, respectively. The predicting results of several long signal peptides show that the Signal-CTF can better predict cleavage sites for long signal peptides than SignalP, Phobius, Philius, SPOCTOPUS, Signal

  3. Key aromatic residues at subsites +2 and +3 of glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidase contribute to recognition of long-chain substrates.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takayoshi; Okuyama, Masayuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kim, Young-Min; Mori, Haruhide; Taguchi, Kazunori; Svensson, Birte; Kimura, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidases (31AGs) show various specificities for maltooligosaccharides according to chain length. Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG) is specific for short-chain substrates with the highest k(cat)/K(m) for maltotriose, while sugar beet α-glucosidase (SBG) prefers long-chain substrates and soluble starch. Multiple sequence alignment of 31AGs indicated a high degree of diversity at the long loop (N-loop), which forms one wall of the active pocket. Mutations of Phe236 in the N-loop of SBG (F236A/S) decreased k(cat)/K(m) values for substrates longer than maltose. Providing a phenylalanine residue at a similar position in ANG (T228F) altered the k(cat)/K(m) values for maltooligosaccharides compared with wild-type ANG, i.e., the mutant enzyme showed the highest k(cat)/K(m) value of maltotetraose. Subsite affinity analysis indicated that modification of subsite affinities at +2 and +3 caused alterations of substrate specificity in the mutant enzymes. These results indicated that the aromatic residue in the N-loop contributes to determining the chain-length specificity of 31AGs. PMID:23457711

  4. Complete subsite mapping of a "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds based on its crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kondo, Kaori; Numata, Tomoyuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2013-08-19

    Crystallographic analysis of a mutated form of "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds a double mutant RSC-c, in which Glu67 and Trp72 are mutated to glutamine and alanine, respectively, (RSC-c-E67Q/W72A) in complex with chitin tetrasaccharide (GlcNAc)₄ revealed that the entire substrate-binding cleft was completely occupied with the sugar residues of two (GlcNAc)₄ molecules. One (GlcNAc)₄ molecule bound to subsites -4 to -1, while the other bound to subsites +1 to +4. Comparisons of the main chain conformation between liganded RSC-c-E67Q/W72A and unliganded wild type RSC-c suggested domain motion essential for catalysis. This is the first report on the complete subsite mapping of GH19 chitinase.

  5. Probing the S2' Subsite of the Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Using Novel N-Alkylated Hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Chiu, Ting-Lan; Solberg, Jonathan; Francis, Subhashree; Maize, Kimberly M; Fernandez, Jenna; Johnson, Rodney L; Hawkinson, Jon E; Walters, Michael A; Finzel, Barry C; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2015-11-12

    The lethal factor (LF) enzyme secreted by Bacillus anthracis is a zinc hydrolase that is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related cell death. Although many studies of the design of small molecule LF inhibitors have been conducted, no LF inhibitor is yet available as a therapeutic agent. Inhibitors with considerable chemical diversity have been developed and investigated; however, the LF S2' subsite has not yet been systematically explored as a potential target for lead optimization. Here we present synthesis, experimental evaluation, modeling, and structural biology for a novel series of sulfonamide hydroxamate LF inhibitor analogues specifically designed to extend into, and probe chemical preferences of, this S2' subsite. We discovered that this region accommodates a wide variety of chemical functionalities and that a broad selection of ligand structural modifications directed to this area can be incorporated without significant deleterious alterations in biological activity. We also identified key residues in this subsite that can potentially be targeted to improve inhibitor binding.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Hastings Ground Water Contamination FAR-MAR-CO subsite, Hastings Irrigation Pipe Company TCA Soils Operable Unit, Hastings, NE. (Second remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The Hastings Ground Water Contamination site (FAR-MAR-CO) is a contaminated aquifer in and near the city of Hastings, Adams County, Nebraska. The site consists of seven source areas, or subsites, contaminated with volatile industrial chemicals. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the Zone 2 portion of the FAR-MAR-CO subsite, which has been divided into two general areas of contamination referred to as Zone 1 and Zone 2. Zone 1, which includes grain elevators and areas to the north of the elevators, contains soil, soil-gas, and ground water contaminated with ethylene dibromide and carbon tetrachloride. Zone 1 contamination was addressed in a 1988 ROD. Zone 2, which is owned and operated by the Hastings Irrigation Pipe Company contains soil contamination primarily due to 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) resulting from the disposal of cleaning solvents in Zone 2. Subsequent testing revealed that the concentration of TCA in Zone 2 had been reduced to a protective level. Response actions for ground water contamination near the FAR MAR CO subsite, however, will be addressed in subsequent remedial activities.

  7. The use of a modular system to convert an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty: Clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Alfke, D; Agneskirchner, J D

    2015-12-01

    If a modular convertible total shoulder system is used as a primary implant for an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty, failure of the prosthesis or the rotator cuff can be addressed by converting it to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), with retention of the humeral stem and glenoid baseplate. This has the potential to reduce morbidity and improve the results. In a retrospective study of 14 patients (15 shoulders) with a mean age of 70 years (47 to 83) we reviewed the clinical and radiological outcome of converting an anatomical shoulder arthroplasty (ASA) to a RSA using a convertible prosthetic system (SMR system, Lima, San Daniele, Italy). The mean operating time was 64 minutes (45 to 75). All humeral stems and glenoid baseplates were found to be well-fixed and could be retained. There were no intra-operative or early post-operative complications and no post-operative infection. The mean follow-up was 43 months (21 to 83), by which time the mean visual analogue scale for pain had decreased from 8 pre-operatively to 1, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score from 12 to 76, the mean Oxford shoulder score from 3 to 39, the mean Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Score from 1618 to 418 and the mean Subjective shoulder value from 15 to 61. On radiological review, one patient had a lucency around the humeral stem, two had stress shielding. There were no fatigue fractures of the acromion but four cases of grade 1 scapular notching. The use of a convertible prosthetic system to revise a failed ASA reduces morbidity and minimises the rate of complications. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this technique are promising.

  8. The complexity of anatomical systems

    PubMed Central

    Grizzi, Fabio; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3) Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture) or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4) Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system) each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5) Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural) to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation. PMID:16029490

  9. Human mesotrypsin exhibits restricted S1' subsite specificity with a strong preference for small polar side chains.

    PubMed

    Szepessy, Edit; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2006-07-01

    Mesotrypsin, an inhibitor-resistant human trypsin isoform, does not activate or degrade pancreatic protease zymogens at a significant rate. These observations led to the proposal that mesotrypsin is a defective digestive protease on protein substrates. Surprisingly, the studies reported here with alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) revealed that, even though mesotrypsin was completely resistant to this serpin-type inhibitor, it selectively cleaved the Lys10-Thr11 peptide bond at the N-terminus. Analyzing a library of alpha1AT mutants in which Thr11 was mutated to various amino acids, we found that mesotrypsin hydrolyzed lysyl peptide bonds containing Thr or Ser at the P1' position with relatively high specificity (kcat/KM approximately 10(5) m(-1) x s(-1)). Compared with Thr or Ser, P1' Gly or Met inhibited cleavage 13- and 25-fold, respectively, whereas P1' Asn, Asp, Ile, Phe or Tyr resulted in 100-200-fold diminished rates of proteolysis, and Pro abolished cleavage completely. Consistent with the Ser/Thr P1' preference, mesotrypsin cleaved the Arg358-Ser359 reactive-site peptide bond of alpha1AT Pittsburgh and was rapidly inactivated by the serpin mechanism (ka approximately 10(6) m(-1) s(-1)). Taken together, the results indicate that mesotrypsin is not a defective protease on polypeptide substrates in general, but exhibits a relatively high specificity for Lys/Arg-Ser/Thr peptide bonds. This restricted, thrombin-like subsite specificity explains why mesotrypsin cannot activate pancreatic zymogens, but might activate certain proteinase-activated receptors. The observations also identify alpha1AT Pittsburgh as an effective mesotrypsin inhibitor and the serpin mechanism as a viable stratagem to overcome the inhibitor-resistance of mesotrypsin. PMID:16759229

  10. A sterically stabilized FeI-FeI semi-rotated conformation of [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model.

    PubMed

    Goy, Roman; Bertini, Luca; Elleouet, Catherine; Görls, Helmar; Zampella, Giuseppe; Talarmin, Jean; De Gioia, Luca; Schollhammer, Philippe; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2015-01-28

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase is a highly sophisticated enzyme for the synthesis of hydrogen via a biological route. The rotated state of the H-cluster in the [Fe(I)Fe(I)] form was found to be an indispensable criteria for an effective catalysis. Mimicking the specific rotated geometry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site is highly challenging as no protein stabilization is present in model compounds. In order to simulate the sterically demanding environment of the nature's active site, the sterically crowded meso-bis(benzylthio)diphenylsilane (2) was utilized as dithiolate linker in an [2Fe2S] model complex. The reaction of the obtained hexacarbonyl complex 3 with 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe) results three different products depending on the amount of dmpe used in this reaction: [{Fe2(CO)5{μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}}2(μ-dmpe)] (4), [Fe2(CO)5(κ(2)-dmpe){μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}] (5) and [Fe2(CO)5(μ-dmpe){μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}] (6). Interestingly, the molecular structure of compound 5 shows a [FeFe] subsite comprising a semi-rotated conformation, which was fully characterized as well as the other isomers 4 and 6 by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and DFT calculations. The herein reported model complex is the first example so far reported for [Fe(I)Fe(I)] hydrogenase model complex showing a semi-rotated geometry without the need of stabilization via agostic interactions (Fe···H-C).

  11. Anatomic Posterolateral Corner Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Serra Cruz, Raphael; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterolateral corner injuries represent a complex injury pattern, with damage to important coronal and rotatory stabilizers of the knee. These lesions commonly occur in association with other ligament injuries, making decisions regarding treatment challenging. Grade III posterolateral corner injuries result in significant instability and have poor outcomes when treated nonoperatively. As a result, reconstruction is advocated. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential for surgical treatment of this pathology. The following technical note provides a diagnostic approach, postoperative management, and details of a technique for anatomic reconstruction of the 3 main static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee. PMID:27656379

  12. Genomic DNA Copy Number Aberrations, Histological Diagnosis, Oral Subsite and Aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Malacarne, Davide; Cirmena, Gabriella; Brown, David; Aiello, Cinzia; Maffei, Massimo; Marino, Roberto; Giaretti, Walter; Pentenero, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) characterized by the presence of dysplasia and DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), may reflect chromosomal instability (CIN) and predispose to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Early detection of OPMDs with such characteristics may play a crucial role in OSCC prevention. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CNAs, histological diagnosis, oral subsite and aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs. Samples from OPMDs and OSCCs were processed by high-resolution DNA flow cytometry (hr DNA-FCM) to determine the relative nuclear DNA content. Additionally, CNAs were obtained for a subset of these samples by genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using DNA extracted from either diploid or aneuploid nuclei suspension sorted by FCM. Our study shows that: i) aneuploidy, global genomic imbalance (measured as the total number of CNAs) and specific focal CNAs occur early in the development of oral cancer and become more frequent at later stages; ii) OPMDs limited to tongue (TNG) mucosa display a higher frequency of aneuploidy compared to OPMDs confined to buccal mucosa (BM) as measured by DNA-FCM; iii) TNG OPMDs/OSCCs show peculiar features of CIN compared to BM OPMDs/OSCCs given the preferential association with total broad and specific focal CNA gains. Follow-up studies are warranted to establish whether the presence of DNA aneuploidy and specific focal or broad CNAs may predict cancer development in non-dysplastic OPMDs. PMID:26540282

  13. Laparoscopic bridging vs. anatomic open reconstruction for midline abdominal hernia mesh repair [LABOR]: single-blinded, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on long-term functional results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Re-approximation of the rectal muscles along the midline is recommended by some groups as a rule for incisional and ventral hernia repairs. The introduction of laparoscopic repair has generated a debate because it is not aimed at restoring abdominal wall integrity but instead aims just to bridge the defect. Whether restoration of the abdominal integrity has a real impact on patient mobility is questionable, and the available literature provides no definitive answer. The present study aims to compare the functional results of laparoscopic bridging with those of re-approximation of the rectal muscle in the midline as a mesh repair for ventral and incisional abdominal defect through an “open” access. We hypothesized that, for the type of defect suitable for a laparoscopic bridging, the effect of an anatomical reconstruction is near negligible, thus not a fixed rule. Methods and design The LABOR trial is a multicenter, prospective, two-arm, single-blinded, randomized trial. Patients of more than 60 years of age with a defect of less than 10 cm at its greatest diameter will be randomly submitted to open Rives or laparoscopic defect repair. All the participating patients will have a preoperative evaluation of their abdominal wall strength and mobility along with volumetry, respiratory function test, intraabdominal pressure and quality of life assessment. The primary outcome will be the difference in abdominal wall strength as measured by a double leg-lowering test performed at 12 months postoperatively. The secondary outcomes will be the rate of recurrence and changes in baseline abdominal mobility, respiratory function tests, intraabdominal pressure, CT volumetry and quality of life at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Discussion The study will help to define the most suitable treatment for small-medium incisional and primary hernias in patients older than 60 years. Given a similar mid-term recurrence rate in both groups, if the trial shows no differences

  14. The degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity varies by primary tumor sub-site

    PubMed Central

    Eterovic, Agda Karina; Wick, Jo; Chen, Ken; Zhao, Hao; Tazi, Loubna; Manna, Pradip; Kerley, Spencer; Joshi, Radhika; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion I.; Garnett, James David; Tsue, Terance Ted; Chien, Jeremy; Mills, Gordon B.; Grandis, Jennifer Rubin; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an era where mutational profiles inform treatment options, it is critical to know the extent to which tumor biopsies represent the molecular profile of the primary and metastatic tumor. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arise primarily in the mucosal lining of oral cavity and oropharynx. Despite aggressive therapy the 5-year survival rate is at 50%. The primary objective of this study is to characterize the degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity in HNSCC. We used multi-region sequencing of paired primary and metastatic tumor DNA of 24 spatially distinct samples from seven patients with HNSCC of larynx, floor of the mouth (FOM) or oral tongue. Full length, in-depth sequencing of 202 genes implicated in cancer was carried out. Larynx and FOM tumors had more than 69.2% unique SNVs between the paired primary and metastatic lesions. In contrast, the oral tongue HNSCC had only 33.3% unique SNVs across multiple sites. In addition, HNSCC of the oral tongue had fewer mutations than larynx and FOM tumors. These findings were validated on the Affymetrix whole genome 6.0 array platform and were consistent with data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This is the first report demonstrating differences in mutational heterogeneity varying by subsite in HNSCC. The heterogeneity within laryngeal tumor specimens may lead to an underestimation of the genetic abnormalities within tumors and may foster resistance to standard treatment protocols. These findings are relevant to investigators and clinicians developing personalized cancer treatments based on identification of specific mutations in tumor biopsies. PMID:27034009

  15. SU-D-17A-04: The Impact of Audiovisual Biofeedback On Image Quality During 4D Functional and Anatomic Imaging: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, P; Pollock, S; Yang, J; Diehn, M; Berger, J; Graves, E; Loo, B; Yamamoto, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ability of audiovisual (AV) biofeedback to improve breathing regularity has not previously been investigated for functional imaging studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT image quality in a prospective clinical trial. We hypothesized that motion blurring in 4D-PET images and the number of artifacts in 4D-CT images are reduced using AV biofeedback. Methods: AV biofeedback is a real-time, interactive and personalized system designed to help a patient self-regulate his/her breathing using a patient-specific representative waveform and musical guides. In an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-PET and 4D-CT images of 10 lung cancer patients were acquired with AV biofeedback (AV) and free breathing (FB). The 4D-PET images in 6 respiratory bins were analyzed for motion blurring by: (1) decrease of GTVPET and (2) increase of SUVmax in 4-DPET compared to 3D-PET. The 4D-CT images were analyzed for artifacts by: (1) comparing normalized cross correlation-based scores (NCCS); and (2) quantifying a visual assessment score (VAS). A two-tailed paired t-test was used to test the hypotheses. Results: The impact of AV biofeedback on 4D-PET and 4D-CT images varied widely between patients, suggesting inconsistent patient comprehension and capability. Overall, the 4D-PET decrease of GTVPET was 2.0±3.0cm3 with AV and 2.3±3.9cm{sup 3} for FB (p=0.61). The 4D-PET increase of SUVmax was 1.6±1.0 with AV and 1.1±0.8 with FB (p=0.002). The 4D-CT NCCS were 0.65±0.27 with AV and 0.60±0.32 for FB (p=0.32). The 4D-CT VAS was 0.0±2.7 (p=ns). Conclusion: A 10-patient study demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of motion blurring of AV over FB for 1/2 functional 4D-PET imaging metrics. No difference between AV and FB was found for 2 anatomic 4D-CT imaging metrics. Future studies will focus on optimizing the human-computer interface and including patient training sessions for improved

  16. [Improving maltodextrin specificity by site-saturation engineering of subsite +1 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiaoyan; Han, Ruizhi; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    By engineering the subsite +1 of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans, we improved its maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) synthesis. Specifically, we conducted site-saturation mutagenesis on Leu194, Ala230, and His233 in subsite +1 separately and gained 3 mutants L194N (leucine --> asparagine), A230D (alanine --> aspartic acid), and H233E (histidine --> glutamic acid) produced higher AA-2G yield than the wild-type and the other mutant CGTases. Therefore, the 3 mutants L194N, A230D, and H233E were further used to construct the double and triple mutations. Among the 7 obtained combinational mutants, the triple mutant L194N/A230D/H233E produced the highest AA-2G titer of 1.95 g/L, which was increased by 62.5% compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. Then, we modeled the reaction kinetics of all the mutants and found a substrate inhibition by high titer of L-AA for the mutants. The optimal temperature, pH, and reaction time of all the mutants were also determined. The structure modeling indicated that the enhanced maltodextrin specificity may be related with the changes of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue at the three positions (194, 230 and 233) and the substrate sugars.

  17. The interaction between the chaperone SecB and its ligands: evidence for multiple subsites for binding.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, L. L.; Hardy, S. J.; Topping, T. B.; Smith, V. F.; Bruce, J. E.; Smith, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The chaperone protein SecB is dedicated to the facilitation of export of proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm and outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It functions to bind and deliver precursors of exported proteins to the membrane-associated translocation apparatus before the precursors fold into their native stable structures. The binding to SecB is characterized by a high selectivity for ligands having nonnative structure but a low specificity for consensus in sequence among the ligands. A model previously presented (Randall LL, Hardy SJS, 1995, Trends Biochem Sci 20:65-69) to rationalize the ability of SecB to distinguish between the native and nonnative states of a polypeptide proposes that the SecB tetramer contains two types of subsites for ligand binding: one kind that would interact with extended flexible stretches of polypeptides and the other with hydrophobic regions. Here we have used titration calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to obtain evidence that such distinguishable subsites exist. PMID:9828004

  18. The anatomical basis of prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that patients with prosopagnosia have right anterior inferior occipital lesions in the region of the occipital temporal junction. Many if not all cases have an additional lesion in the left hemisphere; this is often but apparently not always symmetrical with the right hemisphere lesion. This evidence is discussed in relation to the anatomical connections of these regions and the results of experiments in animals. Images PMID:4209556

  19. Pedro Ara anatomic museum.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, V A; Trefilio, D E; Borghino, V N; Páez, R E; Aranega, C I

    2006-03-01

    Museums where anatomical pieces are exhibited are disappearing. The advance of the computer together with the advance of conventional and three-dimensional radiology makes the organs to be exposed without practicing dissection and the virtual images replace the real ones in the educational process. Some current laws that restrict the use of corpses and fetuses for obituary and exhibition studies have also contributed to the tendency. The anatomical museum, today named Pedro Ara, was founded in December 1920 and it exhibits anatomic works from the embryonic stage to old age, contributing unbeatable teachings to the medical sciences and the general public. The museum is located in the Angel Roque Suarez Anatomic Institute in the Clinical National Hospital which depends on the National University of Cordoba. It is visited daily by hundreds of people from all over the world. The museum owns 1211 pieces that combine ethical, scientific, aesthetical and educational values achieving a realization that received international acknowledgement. The most valuable exhibited work is 'Old man's head' made by Professor Pedro Ara in 1928-1929 (Figure 1), which, owing to its high quality, is in an impeccable and unharmed condition despite being exhibited for 80 years. Other authors, such as Professor Humberto Fracassi, also enriched the museum with their work and we, convinced that it favors and will favor our human formation and professional training, have the privilege of being their heirs and the responsibility of being their followers.

  20. Anatomical curve identification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  1. Anatomic Considerations in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Folbe, Adam J; Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Comprehension of the complex anatomic variants comprising the frontal sinus outflow tract is essential for successful surgical intervention. Deviation from sound technique increases the potential for a variety of deleterious sequelae, including recurrent disease as well as catastrophic intracranial and orbital injury. Furthermore, incomplete removal of elements occluding the frontal recess can result in severe stenosis that can increase the difficulty of further interventions. This review covers anatomic considerations that should be kept in mind when performing frontal sinus surgery. PMID:27329978

  2. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  3. [SUBSTANTIATION OF FORMATION AND RESULTS OF APPLICATION OF A NEW KIND OF PELVIC SMALL INTESTINAL ANATOMIC-FUNCTIONAL THE RESERVOIRE-TYPE CONSTRUCTION AFTER PERFORMANCE OF COLECTOMY, EXTREMELY LOW RECTAL RESECTION AND MUCOSECTOMY. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Poyda, A I; Melnik, V M

    2016-04-01

    For prophylaxis of severe signs of the postcolectomy and diarrheal syndromes, as well as the secondary anal incontinence syndrome, occurring after extended radical operation--colectomy, extremely low anterior rectal resection, mucosectomy, performed for severe diffuse nontumoral colon diseases, a pelvic small-intestinal anatomic-functional reservoir construction of a new type, which includes a small-intestinal reservoir with ileoendoanal anastomosis, was elaborated. In accordance to data on roentgenological control of the contrast small-intestinal transit the laws of its abdominal localization and peculiarities of morphological reconstruction in late terms after the operation were established. Application of a new type construction elaborated in 26 patients have permitted to reduce the occurrence rate for postoperative complications and the disease recurrences essentially, as well as to improve functional results of treatment. PMID:27434944

  4. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  5. 1,2,5-Thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide: a powerful scaffold for probing the S' subsites of (chymo)trypsin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Groutas, W C; Epp, J B; Kuang, R; Ruan, S; Chong, L S; Venkataraman, R; Tu, J; He, S; Yu, H; Fu, Q; Li, Y H; Truong, T M; Vu, N T

    2001-01-01

    The 1,2,5-thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide scaffold (I) embodies a motif that allows it to dock to the active site of (chymo)trypsin-like proteases in a predictable and substrate-like fashion. Consequently, inhibitors derived from this heterocyclic scaffold interact with both the S and S' subsites of an enzyme. Exploitation of binding interactions with both the S and S' subsites of a target enzyme may lead to compounds with greatly enhanced enzyme selectivity and inhibitory potency. This preliminary report describes the use of a series of compounds having the heterocyclic scaffold linked to various amino acids to probe the S' subsites of human leukocyte elastase (HLE), proteinase 3 (PR 3), and cathepsin G (Cat G). For comparative purposes, a series of compounds derived from a related scaffold, isothiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide (II), was also generated. Several of the compounds were found to be highly potent and selective time-dependent inhibitors of HLE, PR 3, and Cat G. PMID:11361013

  6. The death enzyme CP14 is a unique papain-like cysteine proteinase with a pronounced S2 subsite selectivity.

    PubMed

    Paireder, Melanie; Mehofer, Ulrich; Tholen, Stefan; Porodko, Andreas; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Biniossek, Martin L; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lenarcic, Brigita; Novinec, Marko; Schilling, Oliver; Mach, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    The cysteine protease CP14 has been identified as a central component of a molecular module regulating programmed cell death in plant embryos. CP14 belongs to a distinct subfamily of papain-like cysteine proteinases of which no representative has been characterized thoroughly to date. However, it has been proposed that CP14 is a cathepsin H-like protease. We have now produced recombinant Nicotiana benthamiana CP14 (NbCP14) lacking the C-terminal granulin domain. As typical for papain-like cysteine proteinases, NbCP14 undergoes rapid autocatalytic activation when incubated at low pH. The mature protease is capable of hydrolysing several synthetic endopeptidase substrates, but cathepsin H-like aminopeptidase activity could not be detected. NbCP14 displays a strong preference for aliphatic over aromatic amino acids in the specificity-determining P2 position. This subsite selectivity was also observed upon digestion of proteome-derived peptide libraries. Notably, the specificity profile of NbCP14 differs from that of aleurain-like protease, the N. benthamiana orthologue of cathepsin H. We conclude that CP14 is a papain-like cysteine proteinase with unusual enzymatic properties which may prove of central importance for the execution of programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:27246477

  7. Anatomical heterogeneity of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Young; Jeon, Seun; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Geon Ha; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yoon, Cindy W.; Kim, Hee Jin; Chin, Juhee; Park, Kee Hyung; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Because the signs associated with dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) can be heterogeneous, the goal of this study was to use 3-dimensional MRI to examine the various patterns of cortical atrophy that can be associated with dementia of AD type, and to investigate whether AD dementia can be categorized into anatomical subtypes. Methods: High-resolution T1-weighted volumetric MRIs were taken of 152 patients in their earlier stages of AD dementia. The images were processed to measure cortical thickness, and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed using Ward's clustering linkage. The identified clusters of patients were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group using a general linear model. Results: There were several distinct patterns of cortical atrophy and the number of patterns varied according to the level of cluster analyses. At the 3-cluster level, patients were divided into (1) bilateral medial temporal–dominant atrophy subtype (n = 52, ∼34.2%), (2) parietal-dominant subtype (n = 28, ∼18.4%) in which the bilateral parietal lobes, the precuneus, along with bilateral dorsolateral frontal lobes, were atrophic, and (3) diffuse atrophy subtype (n = 72, ∼47.4%) in which nearly all association cortices revealed atrophy. These 3 subtypes also differed in their demographic and clinical features. Conclusions: This cluster analysis of cortical thickness of the entire brain showed that AD dementia in the earlier stages can be categorized into various anatomical subtypes, with distinct clinical features. PMID:25344382

  8. Brain anatomical network and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-05-01

    Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. We constructed binary and weighted brain anatomical networks in each of 79 healthy young adults utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. Based on their IQ test scores, all subjects were divided into general and high intelligence groups and significantly higher global efficiencies were found in the networks of the latter group. Moreover, we showed significant correlations between IQ scores and network properties across all subjects while controlling for age and gender. Specifically, higher intelligence scores corresponded to a shorter characteristic path length and a higher global efficiency of the networks, indicating a more efficient parallel information transfer in the brain. The results were consistently observed not only in the binary but also in the weighted networks, which together provide convergent evidence for our hypothesis. Our findings suggest that the efficiency of brain structural organization may be an important biological basis for intelligence. PMID:19492086

  9. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia.

  10. Ov-APR-1, an aspartic protease from the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini: functional expression, immunolocalization and subsite specificity.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mulvenna, Jason; Huong, Ngo Thi; Pearson, Mark S; Brindley, Paul J; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex

    2009-05-01

    The human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is endemic in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia where long standing infection is associated with cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma. Here we describe a cathepsin D-like aspartic protease from the gut and other tissues in O. viverrini. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Ov-APR-1 is cathepsin D-like, conforming with Clan AA, Family A1 of the MEROPS classification. Ov-APR-1 is expressed in the gut of the mature hermaphroditic parasite, in the reproductive tissues including the testis and immature spermatids, and the developing miracidium within the eggshell. The enzyme was also detected in the excretory/secretory products of cultured adult flukes, indicating a role in host-parasite relationships. A recombinant form of the enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded from denatured inclusion bodies underwent autocatalytic activation and demonstrated hydrolytic activity against the peptide substrate 7-methoxycoumarin-4-acetyl-GKPILFFRLK(DNP)-D-Arg-amide with a k(cat)/K(m)=1.7 x 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) and a pH optimum around pH 2.5-3.0. The recombinant enzyme digested hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin. Forty-six serum albumin peptides were detected after digestion with recombinant Ov-APR-1 and sequenced. Like many other aspartic proteases, Ov-APR-1 displayed promiscuous preferences for residues accommodated at the key subsites of the binding pocket although hydrophobic (Leu, Ala, Ile), positively charged (Lys) and bulky aromatic (Phe) residues, in that order, were preferred at P1. Similar residues were accommodated at P1' although even less selectivity was exerted at this position. PMID:18996218

  11. Anatomic factors in recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Devi Wold, Anne S; Pham, Norma; Arici, Aydin

    2006-02-01

    Anatomic uterine defects are present in 15% of women evaluated for three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions. These anatomic abnormalities can be classified as congenital or acquired. In addition to pregnancy loss, uterine malformations appear to predispose women to other reproductive difficulties including infertility, preterm labor, and abnormal presentation. These poor reproductive outcomes resulting from uterine septum, intrauterine adhesions, polyps, and fibroids are amenable to surgical correction. Therefore, it is essential to make an accurate diagnosis to offer an adequate treatment. In this article, we review the common congenital and acquired uterine anomalies associated with recurrent pregnancy losses, and discuss contemporary diagnosis and treatment options.

  12. An investigation of anatomical competence in junior medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M; Kooloos, Jan G M; Bolhuis, Sanneke M; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an attempt to delineate the nature of anatomical competence. The research question is: what kind of anatomical knowledge do junior medical doctors use during a consultation with a patient presenting with a shoulder complaint? Ten junior medical doctors participated in this stimulated recall study. Each of them was videotaped while performing a consultation with a standardized patient with a complex shoulder complaint. The recording was viewed immediately after. Participants were videotaped again while verbalizing the thoughts they remembered having during the consultation. Verbatim transcriptions were coded by two coders using the qualitative data analysis ATLAS.ti software. Results were that these junior medical doctors used anatomical knowledge in all phases of the consultation, especially during physical examination. The use of anatomical terms was strongly associated with clinical reasoning and it was apparent that every subject visualized relevant anatomical information. Conclusion is that young medical doctors actively use their anatomical knowledge and it seems that the relevant anatomy consists largely of adequate visual representations in memory. Anatomy teachers should focus the students' learning activity on building an adequate visual representation of anatomical structures. This should be supported by assessments that test the quality of the students' visual representations. PMID:25728557

  13. THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUM PEDRO ARA.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Carlos Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    The contribute is aimed to shed light on the history of the Anatomical Museum Pedro Ara since his foundation in 1878. Particularly, it describes the activity of Pedro Ara in preparing the anatomical specimens, which constitute the original collection of the Museum.

  14. Motivation and Organizational Principles for Anatomical Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Cornelius; Mejino, José L.; Modayur, Bharath R.; Jakobovits, Rex; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Conceptualization of the physical objects and spaces that constitute the human body at the macroscopic level of organization, specified as a machine-parseable ontology that, in its human-readable form, is comprehensible to both expert and novice users of anatomical information. Design: Conceived as an anatomical enhancement of the UMLS Semantic Network and Metathesaurus, the anatomical ontology was formulated by specifying defining attributes and differentia for classes and subclasses of physical anatomical entities based on their partitive and spatial relationships. The validity of the classification was assessed by instantiating the ontology for the thorax. Several transitive relationships were used for symbolically modeling aspects of the physical organization of the thorax. Results: By declaring Organ as the macroscopic organizational unit of the body, and defining the entities that constitute organs and higher level entities constituted by organs, all anatomical entities could be assigned to one of three top level classes (Anatomical structure, Anatomical spatial entity and Body substance). The ontology accommodates both the systemic and regional (topographical) views of anatomy, as well as diverse clinical naming conventions of anatomical entities. Conclusions: The ontology formulated for the thorax is extendible to microscopic and cellular levels, as well as to other body parts, in that its classes subsume essentially all anatomical entities that constitute the body. Explicit definitions of these entities and their relationships provide the first requirement for standards in anatomical concept representation. Conceived from an anatomical viewpoint, the ontology can be generalized and mapped to other biomedical domains and problem solving tasks that require anatomical knowledge. PMID:9452983

  15. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  16. [Anatomic pitfalls of vagotomies].

    PubMed

    Dia, A; Ouedraogo, T; Zida, M; Sow, M L

    1994-01-01

    In order to minimise relapses and functional problems after vagotomies, an anatomic study of the vagus nerve at the base of the esophagus and stomach was carried out. Fifty stomachs of adult black African corpses were collected, placed in a formaldehyde solution and then dissected. At the level of the esophageal hiatus, the trunks of the vagus nerve were found in 46% of the cases for the anterior vagus and 24% for the posterior. At the level of the abdominal esophagus there was a single anterior vagus in 68% of cases and single posterior vagus in 64% of cases. At the level of the greater curvature, a recurrent anterior branch was found. At the level of the lesser curvature, the main nerves had a plexiform appearance in 8% of cases for the anterior nerve and 6% of cases for the posterior nerve. The classical arrangement was found in 60% of cases for the main anterior nerve and 64% of the cases for the posterior nerve. At the level of the angulus, the classical crowsfeet was found in 20% of cases for the anterior vagus and in 32% of cases for the posterior vagus. The anterior vagus was plexiform in 54% of cases and 46% of cases for the posterior. This study confirms the extreme variability of the vagus in the stomach. A better knowledge of the variations should lead to more successful vagotomy regardless of its forms.

  17. Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, Joy S

    2007-06-01

    This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores many of the anatomical adaptations exhibited by aquatic mammals that enable life in the water. Anatomical observations on a range of fossil and living marine and freshwater mammals are presented, including sirenians (manatees and dugongs), cetaceans (both baleen whales and toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), the sea otter, and the pygmy hippopotamus. A range of anatomical systems are covered in this issue, including the external form (integument, tail shape), nervous system (eye, ear, brain), musculoskeletal systems (cranium, mandible, hyoid, vertebral column, flipper/forelimb), digestive tract (teeth/tusks/baleen, tongue, stomach), and respiratory tract (larynx). Emphasis is placed on exploring anatomical function in the context of aquatic life. The following topics are addressed: evolution, sound production, sound reception, feeding, locomotion, buoyancy control, thermoregulation, cognition, and behavior. A variety of approaches and techniques are used to examine and characterize these adaptations, ranging from dissection, to histology, to electron microscopy, to two-dimensional (2D) and 3D computerized tomography, to experimental field tests of function. The articles in this issue are a blend of literature review and new, hypothesis-driven anatomical research, which highlight the special nature of anatomical form and function in aquatic mammals that enables their exquisite adaptation for life in such a challenging environment. PMID:17516440

  18. An Investigation of Anatomical Competence in Junior Medical Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an…

  19. Audiologic Patterns of Otic Capsule Preserving Temporal Bone Fracture: Effects of the Affected Subsites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Yoon Joong; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study was aimed to assess the relationship between the type of temporal bone area involved and conductive hearing loss. Methods. We enrolled 97 patients who visited the otolaryngology clinics of Seoul National University Hospital or Boramae Medical Center, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University with temporal bone fracture between January 2004 and January 2014. Audiometric parameters, including initial and improved air-bone (AB) conduction gap values, were reviewed in accordance with the temporal bone computed tomography (external auditory canal [EAC], middle ear [ME], mastoid [M], and ossicle [O]). Results. Patients with ossicular chain involvement exhibited a larger AB gap compared to those with no ossicular chain involvement at 250, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz. Among the groups without ossicular chain involvement, the initial AB gap was largest in patients with EAC+ME+M involvement, followed by the ME+M and M-only involvement groups. The greatest improvement in the AB gap was observed in the EAC+ME+M group followed by the ME+M and M-only groups, irrespective of ossicular chain involvement. Improvements in AB gap values were smallest at 2,000 Hz. Conclusion. Conductive hearing loss pattern differed according to the temporal bone area involved. Therefore, areas such as the hematoma and hemotympanum, as well as the fracture line of the temporal bone area, must be evaluated to predict audiologic patterns with otic capsule preserving temporal bone fracture. PMID:27337953

  20. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location.

    PubMed

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-07-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 x 1 x 1-cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II-III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain.

  1. Modeling the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and the [NiFeu] subsite of the C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases: low-spin iron(II) versus high-spin iron(II).

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Erdem, Özlen F; Bill, Eckhard; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-16

    A series of four [S2Ni(μ-S)2FeCp*Cl] compounds with different tetradentate thiolate/thioether ligands bound to the Ni(II) ion is reported (Cp* = C5Me5). The {S2Ni(μ-S)2Fe} core of these compounds resembles structural features of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Detailed analyses of the electronic structures of these compounds by Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and density functional theory calculations reveal the oxidation states Ni(II) low spin and Fe(II) high spin for the metal ions. The same electronic configurations have been suggested for the Cred1 state of the C-cluster [NiFeu] subsite in carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH). The Ni-Fe distance of ∼3 Å excludes a metal-metal bond between nickel and iron, which is in agreement with the computational results. Electrochemical experiments show that iron is the redox active site in these complexes, performing a reversible one-electron oxidation. The four complexes are discussed with regard to their similarities and differences both to the [NiFe] hydrogenases and the C-cluster of Ni-containing CODH.

  2. [Interhemispheric supraorbital or frontopolar approach: anatomical study].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Roberto Leal; Gusmão, Sebastião; Avelar, Leonardo

    2005-06-01

    A modification of the supraorbital approach is proposed in order to improve the access to the medial portions of the anterior and middle fossas (supraselar region). It consists of a midline extension of the frontal craniotomy along with an interhemispheric approach: interhemispheric supraorbital or frontopolar approach. The anatomical basis of this approach were studied in eight cadaveric heads. Its results demonstratete that this approach adequaly access the medial structures of the anterior and medial fossas with minimal brain retraction and wide exposure.

  3. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  4. Anatomical and functional imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    In endocrine hypertension, hormonal excess results in clinically significant hypertension. The functional imaging (such as radionuclide imaging) complements anatomy-based imaging (such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) to facilitate diagnostic localization of a lesion causing endocrine hypertension. The aim of this review article is to familiarize general radiologists, endocrinologists, and clinicians with various anatomical and functional imaging techniques used in patients with endocrine hypertension. PMID:23087854

  5. Anatomic imaging of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Anil; Verma, Sadhna

    2014-01-01

    The important role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomic evaluation, detection, and staging of prostate cancer is well established. This paper focuses on the pertinent embryologic, anatomic, and imaging facts regarding both the normal prostate and the several examples of prostate cancers as well as staging implications. The discussion primarily includes findings related to T2-weighted imaging as opposed to the other functional sequences, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) or dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging, respectively. PMID:25243174

  6. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  7. Perceptions of science. The anatomical mission to Burma.

    PubMed

    Sappol, Michael

    2003-10-10

    Until the 1830s, most Americans were unfamiliar with the images of anatomy. Then a small vanguard of reformers and missionaries began to preach, at home and around the world, that an identification with the images and concepts of anatomy was a crucial part of the civilizing process. In his essay, Sappol charts the changes in the perception of self that resulted from this anatomical evangelism. Today, as anatomical images abound in the arts and the media, we still believe that anatomical images show us our inner reality.

  8. Two functionally distinct subsites for the binding of internal blockers to the pore of voltage-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Baukrowitz, Thomas; Yellen, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Many blockers of Na+ and K+ channels act by blocking the pore from the intracellular side. For Shaker K+ channels, such intracellular blockers vary in their functional effect on slow (C-type) inactivation: Some blockers interfere with C-type inactivation, whereas others do not. These functional differences can be explained by supposing that there are two overlapping “subsites” for blocker binding, only one of which inhibits C-type inactivation through an allosteric effect. We find that the ability to bind to these subsites depends on specific structural characteristics of the blockers, and correlates with the effect of mutations in two distinct regions of the channel protein. These interactions are important because they affect the ability of blockers to produce use-dependent inhibition. PMID:8917595

  9. Subsite Awareness in Neuropathology Evaluation of National Toxicology Program (NTP) Studies: A Review of Select Neuroanatomical Structures with their Functional Significance in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Little, Peter B.; Sills, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review manuscript is designed to serve as an introductory guide in neuroanatomy for toxicologic pathologists evaluating general toxicity studies. The manuscript provides an overview of approximately 50 neuroanatomical subsites and their functional significance across seven coronal sections of the brain. Also reviewed are three sections of the spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves (trigeminal and sciatic respectively), and intestinal autonomic ganglia. The review is limited to the evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, as light microscopic evaluation of these sections is an integral part of the first-tier toxicity screening of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other agents. Prominent neuroanatomical sites associated with major neurological disorders are noted. This guide, when used in conjunction with detailed neuroanatomic atlases may aid in an understanding of the significance of functional neuroanatomy, thereby improving the characterization of neurotoxicity in general toxicity and safety evaluation studies. PMID:24135464

  10. Probing the specificity of cysteine proteinases at subsites remote from the active site: analysis of P4, P3, P2' and P3' variations in extended substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Portaro, F C; Santos, A B; Cezari, M H; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Carmona, E

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis by papain, cathepsin B and cathepsin L of internally quenched fluorescent peptides derived from the lead peptides Abz-AAFRSAQ-EDDnp [in which Abz and EDDnp stand for o-aminobenzoic acid and N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine respectively], to map the specificity of S(4) and S(3) subsites, and Abz-AFRSAAQ-EDDnp, to identify the specificity of S(2)' and S(3)'. Abz and EDDnp were the fluorescent quencher pair. These two series of peptides were cleaved at the Arg-Ser bond and systematic modifications at P(4), P(3), P(2)' and P(3)' were made. The S(4) to S(2)' subsites had a significant influence on the hydrolytic efficiencies of the three enzymes. Only papain activity was observed to be dependent on S(3)', indicating that its binding site is larger than those of cathepsins B and L. Hydrophobic amino acids were accepted at S(4), S(3), S(2)' and S(3)' of the three enzymes. The best substrates for cathepsins L and B had Trp and Asn at P(2)' respectively; variations at this position were less accepted by these enzymes. The best substrates for papain were peptides containing Trp, Tyr or Asn at P(3)'. Basic residues at P(3) and P(4) were well accepted by cathepsin L and papain. We also explored the susceptibility of substrates Abz-AFRSXAQ-EDDnp, modified at P(2)' (X), to human cathepsin B mutants from which one or two occluding loop contacts had been removed. The modifications at His(111) (H111A) and His(110) (H110A) of cathepsin B led to an increase in k(cat) values of one or two orders of magnitude. The hydrolytic efficiencies of these cathepsin B mutants became closer to those of papain or cathepsin L. PMID:10727410

  11. Anatomical features and clinical relevance of a persistent trigeminal artery

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Tubbs, R S; Niño-Hernández, Lucía M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is uncommonly identified, knowledge of this structure is essential for clinicians who interpret cranial imaging, perform invasive studies of the cerebral vasculature, and operate this region. Methods: A review of the medical literature using standard search engines was performed to locate articles regarding the PTA, with special attention with anatomical descriptions. Results: Although anatomical reports of PTA anatomy are very scarce, those were analyzed to describe in detail the current knowledge about its anatomical relationships and variants. Additionally, the embryology, classification, clinical implications, and imaging modalities of this vessel are extensively discussed. Conclusions: Through a comprehensive review of isolated reports of the PTA, the clinician can better understand and treat patients with such an anatomical derailment. PMID:23087827

  12. Anatomically-aided PET reconstruction using the kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchcroft, Will; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper extends the kernel method that was proposed previously for dynamic PET reconstruction, to incorporate anatomical side information into the PET reconstruction model. In contrast to existing methods that incorporate anatomical information using a penalized likelihood framework, the proposed method incorporates this information in the simpler maximum likelihood (ML) formulation and is amenable to ordered subsets. The new method also does not require any segmentation of the anatomical image to obtain edge information. We compare the kernel method with the Bowsher method for anatomically-aided PET image reconstruction through a simulated data set. Computer simulations demonstrate that the kernel method offers advantages over the Bowsher method in region of interest quantification. Additionally the kernel method is applied to a 3D patient data set. The kernel method results in reduced noise at a matched contrast level compared with the conventional ML expectation maximization algorithm.

  13. Diffusion of innovations: anatomical informatics and iPods.

    PubMed

    Trelease, Robert B

    2006-09-01

    Over the course of many centuries, evolving scientific methods and technologies have advanced the study of anatomy. More recently, such dissemination of innovations has been formally studied in multidisciplinary psychosocial contexts, yielding useful knowledge about underlying principles and processes. We review these precepts and show how diffusion of innovations theory and principles apply to the development and dissemination of anatomical information methods and resources. We consider the factors affecting the late-20th-century dissemination of personal computers and World Wide Web hypermedia into widespread use in anatomical research and instruction. We report on the results of a small experiment in applied diffusion, the development and Internet-based distribution of learning resources for a popular, widely distributed personal media player. With these wearable microcomputer devices already in use by a variety of students, new opportunities exist for widespread dissemination of anatomical information. The continuing evolution of wearable computing devices underscores the need for maintaining anatomical information transportability via standardized data formats.

  14. Anatomic study of infrapopliteal vessels.

    PubMed

    Lappas, D; Stavropoulos, N A; Noussios, G; Sakellariou, V; Skandalakis, P

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to study and analyse the anatomical variations of the infrapopliteal vessels concerning their branching pattern. A reliable sample of one hundred formalin-fixed adult cadavers was dissected by the Anatomical Laboratory of Athens University. The variations can be classified in the following way: the normal branching of the popliteal artery was present in 90%. The remainder revealed variant branching patterns: hypoplastic or aplastic posterior tibial artery and the pedis arteries arising from the peroneal (3%); hypoplastic or aplastic anterior tibial artery (1.5%); and the dorsalis pedis formed by two equal branches, arising from the peroneal and the anterior tibial artery (2%). The variations were more frequent in females and in short-height individuals. Knowledge of these variations is rather important for any invasive technic concerning lower extremities.

  15. Tennis elbow. Anatomical, epidemiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Verhaar, J A

    1994-10-01

    Five studies of tennis elbow are presented. Epidemiological studies showed an incidence of tennis elbow between 1 and 2%. The prevalence of tennis elbow in women between 40 and 50 years of age was 10%. Half of the patients with tennis elbow seek medical attention. Local corticosteroid injections were superior to the physiotherapy regime of Cyriax. Release of the common forearm extensor origin resulted in 70% excellent or good results one year after operation and 89% at five years. Anatomical investigations and nerve conduction studies of the Radial Tunnel Syndrome supported the hypothesis that the Lateral Cubital Force Transmission System is involved in the pathogenesis of tennis elbow.

  16. The anatomical resources on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Paternostro, F; Orlandini, S Z

    2001-01-01

    The main anatomical resources found on the Internet are listed and discussed here, concerning the topics of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, microscopic anatomy and anatomical museums. The search is updated to September 2000, and all the listed Web sites can be used to build a multimedial anatomical lab. PMID:11410999

  17. Departmental audit in surgical anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, G R; Niteckis, V N; Cairns, B J; Hayman, J A

    1997-11-01

    Internal auditing of performance by pathology providers is a necessary component of total quality management. In this study a peer review of 10% of departmental surgical anatomical pathology accessions received over a seven month period was performed. A number of critical performance parameters were analysed including turn-around times, accuracy of reports and technical proficiency. The results demonstrated an approximate 2% significant error rate in macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, technically good quality sections and stains and generally satisfactory turn-around times. The value and costing of such an audit and changes initiated by the audit are discussed.

  18. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  19. Optimization of mammography with respect to anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Svensson, B.; Danielsson, M.; Lazzari, B.; Cederström, B.

    2011-03-01

    Beam quality optimization in mammography traditionally considers detection of a target obscured by quantum noise on a homogenous background. It can be argued that this scheme does not correspond well to the clinical imaging task because real mammographic images contain a complex superposition of anatomical structures, resulting in anatomical noise that may dominate over quantum noise. Using a newly developed spectral mammography system, we measured the correlation and magnitude of the anatomical noise in a set of mammograms. The results from these measurements were used as input to an observer-model optimization that included quantum noise as well as anatomical noise. We found that, within this framework, the detectability of tumors and microcalcifications behaved very differently with respect to beam quality and dose. The results for small microcalcifications were similar to what traditional optimization methods would yield, which is to be expected since quantum noise dominates over anatomical noise at high spatial frequencies. For larger tumors, however, low-frequency anatomical noise was the limiting factor. Because anatomical structure has similar energy dependence as tumor contrast, optimal x-ray energy was significantly higher and the useful energy region wider than traditional methods suggest. Measurements on a tissue phantom confirmed these theoretical results. Furthermore, since quantum noise constitutes only a small fraction of the noise, the dose could be reduced substantially without sacrificing tumor detectability. Exposure settings used clinically are therefore not necessarily optimal for this imaging task. The impact of these findings on the mammographic imaging task as a whole is, however, at this stage unclear.

  20. Experience in Aligning Anatomical Ontologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    An ontology is a formal representation of a domain modeling the entities in the domain and their relations. When a domain is represented by multiple ontologies, there is need for creating mappings among these ontologies in order to facilitate the integration of data annotated with these ontologies and reasoning across ontologies. The objective of this paper is to recapitulate our experience in aligning large anatomical ontologies and to reflect on some of the issues and challenges encountered along the way. The four anatomical ontologies under investigation are the Foundational Model of Anatomy, GALEN, the Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary and the NCI Thesaurus. Their underlying representation formalisms are all different. Our approach to aligning concepts (directly) is automatic, rule-based, and operates at the schema level, generating mostly point-to-point mappings. It uses a combination of domain-specific lexical techniques and structural and semantic techniques (to validate the mappings suggested lexically). It also takes advantage of domain-specific knowledge (lexical knowledge from external resources such as the Unified Medical Language System, as well as knowledge augmentation and inference techniques). In addition to point-to-point mapping of concepts, we present the alignment of relationships and the mapping of concepts group-to-group. We have also successfully tested an indirect alignment through a domain-specific reference ontology. We present an evaluation of our techniques, both against a gold standard established manually and against a generic schema matching system. The advantages and limitations of our approach are analyzed and discussed throughout the paper.

  1. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  2. Anatomical modeling of the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Gerrit; Klinder, Tobias; Blaffert, Thomas; Bülow, Thomas; Wiemker, Rafael; Lorenz, Cristian

    2010-02-01

    The bronchial tree is of direct clinical importance in the context of respective diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It furthermore constitutes a reference structure for object localization in the lungs and it finally provides access to lung tissue in, e.g., bronchoscope based procedures for diagnosis and therapy. This paper presents a comprehensive anatomical model for the bronchial tree, including statistics of position, relative and absolute orientation, length, and radius of 34 bronchial segments, going beyond previously published results. The model has been built from 16 manually annotated CT scans, covering several branching variants. The model is represented as a centerline/tree structure but can also be converted in a surface representation. Possible model applications are either to anatomically label extracted bronchial trees or to improve the tree extraction itself by identifying missing segments or sub-trees, e.g., if located beyond a bronchial stenosis. Bronchial tree labeling is achieved using a naïve Bayesian classifier based on the segment properties contained in the model in combination with tree matching. The tree matching step makes use of branching variations covered by the model. An evaluation of the model has been performed in a leaveone- out manner. In total, 87% of the branches resulting from preceding airway tree segmentation could be correctly labeled. The individualized model enables the detection of missing branches, allowing a targeted search, e.g., a local rerun of the tree-segmentation segmentation.

  3. Anatomic asymmetric prostheses: shaping the breast.

    PubMed

    Mira, Juan A

    2003-01-01

    Over more than 50 years the manufacturers of mammary prostheses have offered implants of two basic shapes, sphere or teardrop, and always unilateral (symmetric). In the year 2001 Poly Implants Prothèse invited us to participate in the development of a device that, in our opinion, was going to change the conceptual design for mammary augmentation and reconstruction: the asymmetric anatomical prosthesis (AAP). On December 10, 2001 we performed, via the transareolaris inferior, the first breast augmentation using a prototype of anatomic, asymmetric, cohesive silicone implants. The result was pleasing in all aspects. The prostheses were capable to reproduce faithfully, in all dimensions, the anatomy of the female breasts, including the differences between each side. Since then, we have used the AAP with two different contents, silicone cohesive gel and Hidrogel, this last model in which we are currently experimenting. We utilized either a transareolar or submammary approach, according to the case (atrophy, ptosis, tuberous breast, etc.). We present in this paper the features of this new prosthesis, the procedures used for their implant, and a comparative analysis of our results. PMID:14629058

  4. Inhibition of the two-subsite beta-d-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium by sugars: competitive, noncompetitive, double binding, and slow binding modes.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D

    2007-09-01

    The active site of the GH43 beta-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium comprises two subsites and a single access route for ligands. Steady-state kinetic experiments that included enzyme (E), inhibitory sugars (I and X) and substrate (S) establish examples of EI, EII, EIX, and EIS complexes. Protonation states of catalytic base (D14, pK(a) 5) and catalytic acid (E186, pK(a) 7) govern formation of inhibitor complexes and strength of binding constants: e.g., EII, EIX, and EIS occur only with the D14(-)E186(H) enzyme and d-xylose binds to D14(-)E186(-) better than to D14(-)E186(H). Binding of two equivalents of l-arabinose to the D14(-)E186(H) enzyme is differentiated by the magnitude of equilibrium K(i) values (first binds tighter) and kinetically (first binds rapidly; second binds slowly). In applications, such as saccharification of herbaceous biomass for subsequent fermentation to biofuels, the highly efficient hydrolase can confront molar concentrations of sugars that diminish catalytic effectiveness by forming certain enzyme-inhibitor complexes.

  5. Anatomic factors associated with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Propst, A M; Hill, J A

    2000-01-01

    Anatomic uterine defects appear to predispose women to reproductive difficulties, including first- and second-trimester pregnancy losses, higher rates of preterm labor and birth, and abnormal fetal presentation. These anatomic abnormalities can be classified as congenital, including müllerian and diethylstilbestrol-related abnormalities, or acquired, such as intrauterine adhesions or leiomyomata. In women with three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions who underwent hysterosalpingography or hysteroscopic examination of their uteri, mullerian anomalies have been found in 8 to 10%. Women with mullerian anomalies may be predisposed to recurrent pregnancy loss because of inadequate vascularity to the developing embryo and placenta, reduced intraluminal volume, or cervical incompetence. The reproductive history of most women with a müllerian anomaly is poor, especially for women with a uterine septum, the most common mullerian anomaly. Recurrent pregnancy losses resulting from a uterine septum, bicornuate uterus, intrauterine adhesions, and fibroids are amenable to surgical correction. Women with müllerian anomaly and a history of second-trimester pregnancy losses may benefit from a prophylactic cervical cerclage.

  6. Retinal vascular tree reconstruction with anatomical realism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Shun; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Chih-Hsiangng; Sofka, Michal; Chen, Shih-Jen; Lin, Wei-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of automatically extracting vessel segments and constructing retinal vascular trees with anatomical realism, this paper presents and analyses an algorithm that combines vessel segmentation and grouping of the extracted vessel segments. The proposed method aims to restore the topology of the vascular trees with anatomical realism for clinical studies and diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases, which manifest abnormalities in either venous and/or arterial vascular systems. Vessel segments are grouped using extended Kalman filter which takes into account continuities in curvature, width, and intensity changes at the bifurcation or crossover point. At a junction, the proposed method applies the minimum-cost matching algorithm to resolve the conflict in grouping due to error in tracing. The system was trained with 20 images from the DRIVE dataset, and tested using the remaining 20 images. The dataset contained a mixture of normal and pathological images. In addition, six pathological fluorescein angiogram sequences were also included in this study. The results were compared against the groundtruth images provided by a physician, achieving average success rates of 88.79% and 90.09%, respectively.

  7. Use of anatomical dolls by Boston-area professionals.

    PubMed

    Kendall-Tackett, K A; Watson, M W

    1992-01-01

    Anatomical dolls are a widely used but controversial tool for interviewing child victims of sexual abuse. The present research examines how a representative sample of professionals who evaluate children actually use the dolls. Contrary to past reports, the results revealed that 96.6% of professionals who use the dolls had received training in anatomical doll use, 77.8% followed some standard protocol for interviewing, and 97.3% had at least 1 year of experience with anatomical dolls. The results also revealed that the majority of professionals did not engage in the "leading" behaviors of presenting unclothed dolls to children or undressing the dolls for the child, again contrary to past reports. The present research indicates that the professionals in this sample are more experienced and better trained than is typically thought. PMID:1617476

  8. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App.

    PubMed

    Hong, Trudy; Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application. PMID:26793410

  9. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App

    PubMed Central

    Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application. PMID:26793410

  10. Improved survival for anatomic total shoulder prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Fevang, Bjørg T S; Nystad, Tone W; Skredderstuen, Arne; Furnes, Ove N; Havelin, Leif I

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Previously, implant survival of total shoulder prostheses was reported to be inferior to that of hemiprostheses. However, the use of total prostheses has increased in Norway due to reported good functional results. On this background, we wanted to study implant survival of 4 major shoulder prosthesis types in Norway between 1994 and 2012. Patients and methods The study population comprised 4,173 patients with shoulder replacements reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, including 2,447 hemiprostheses (HPs), 444 anatomic total prostheses (ATPs), 454 resurfacing prostheses (RPs), and 828 reversed total prostheses (RTPs). Three time periods were compared: 1994–1999, 2000–2005, and 2006–2012. Kaplan-Meier failure curves were used to compare implant failure rates for subgroups of patients, and adjusted risks of revision were calculated using Cox regression analysis. Results For prostheses inserted from 2006 through 2012, the 5-year survival rates were 95% for HPs (as opposed to 94% in 1994–1999), 95% for ATPs (75% in 1994–1999), 87% for RPs (96% in 1994–1999), and 93% for RTPs (91% in 1994–1999). During the study period, the implant survival improved significantly for ATPs (p < 0.001). A tendency of better results with acute fracture and worse results in sequelae after previous fractures was seen in all time periods. Interpretation The 5-year implant survival rates were good with all prosthesis types, and markedly improved for anatomic total prostheses in the last 2 study periods. The better functional results with total shoulder prostheses than with hemiprostheses support the trend towards increased use of total shoulder prostheses. PMID:25386737

  11. [On the sources of the anatomical illustrations appearing in Quanti-xinlun].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideshi; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2009-12-01

    Quanti-xinlun by Hobson is frequently considered to have introduced European scientific anatomy to modern China. It contains numbers of precise anatomical illustrations which surpass by far those found in the Chinese traditional medical books. The impact of Quanti-xinlun derived mainly from the optical effects based on the anatomical illustrations. The present study clarifies for the first time the sources of the anatomical illustrations as being mostly from Wilson's "A System of Human Anatomy" and Carpenter's "Animal Physiology". However in Quanti-xinlun, the editorial sophistication present in the source books was abandoned, with the result that the anatomical contents were extremely minimized. In view of modern Chinese medical history, Quanti-xinlun provided an outline of anatomical knowledge, rather than a textbook encompassing anatomical details. It is concluded that Quanti-xinlun was intended to introduce the European way of thinking at the level of popular science.

  12. Anatomist on the dissecting table? Dutch anatomical professionals' views on body donation.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Sophie; Venbrux, Eric; Eisinga, Rob; Gerrits, Peter O

    2012-03-01

    Anatomical professionals know better than anyone else that donated bodies are a valuable asset to anatomical science and medical education. They highly value voluntary donations, since a dearth of bodies negatively affects their profession. With this in mind, we conducted a survey (n = 54) at the 171st scientific meeting of the Dutch Anatomical Society in 2009 to see to what extent anatomical professionals are willing to donate their own body. The results reveal that none of the survey participants are registered as a whole body donor and that only a quarter of them would consider the possibility of body donation. We argue that the two main constraints preventing Dutch anatomical professionals from donating their own body are their professional and their social environments. In contrast to the absence of registered body donors, half of the anatomical professionals are registered as an organ donor. This figure far exceeds the proportion of registered organ donors among the general Dutch population.

  13. Visualization of multiple anatomical structures with explicit isosurface manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaonan; Yang, Fei; Yang, Feng; Li, Xiuli; Xu, Min; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In medical image analysis and surgical planning, it is an essential task to visualize and differentiate multiple anatomical structures. The traditional approaches require expensive 3D segmentation steps during pre-processing stage, which defeats the purpose of real-time interaction with the data. In this paper, we propose an interactive method for visualization of multiple anatomical structures. In our results, we show that the new method is a promising technique for visual analysis of medical datasets and a helpful tool for surgical planning. It can be very efficient for a wide range of visualization and analysis tasks. PMID:26737229

  14. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  15. Are the Genitalia of Anatomical Dolls Distorted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bays, Jan

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether the genitalia of anatomical dolls are disproportionately large and may suggest sexual activity to children who have not been abused, the genitalia and breasts of 17 sets of anatomical dolls were measured. When the measurements were extrapolated to adult human proportions, the sizes were not found to be exaggerated. (Author/JDD)

  16. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  17. Specificity of S'1 and S'2 subsites of human tissue kallikrein using the reactive-centre loop of kallistatin: the importance of P'1 and P'2 positions in design of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Daniel C; Fogaça, Sandro E; Melo, Robson L; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A

    2003-05-01

    We have demonstrated that the S'(1) and S'(2) subsites of human tissue kallikrein (hK1) play determinant roles in the recognition and hydrolysis of substrates. The presence of serine at position P'(1) and arginine at P'(2) resulted in the best substrate, Abz-Ala-Ile-Lys-Phe-Phe-Ser-Arg-Gln-EDDnp, which was derived from the kallistatin reactive-centre loop sequence and quencher groups o-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp). Serine and arginine are also the residues at positions P'(1) and P'(2) in human kininogen, from which hK1 releases Lys-bradykinin. Several peptide analogues of Abz-Ala-Ile-Lys-Phe-Phe-Ser-Arg-Gln-EDDnp, in which the Ser and Arg residues were substituted with various other amino acids, were synthesized and tested as substrates. Most of them were hydrolysed slowly, although they showed significant binding to hK1, as demonstrated by their competitive inhibition constants (K(i)). Using this information, six peptides were designed, synthesized and assayed as inhibitors of hK1. Abz-Lys-Phe-Phe-Pro-Arg-Gln-EDDnp, Abz-Lys-Phe-Arg-Pro-Arg-Gln-EDDnp and acetyl-Lys-Phe-Phe-Pro-Leu-Glu-NH(2) inhibited hK1 in the range 20-30 nM (letters in italics denote the D-form of the amino acid). The peptide acetyl-Lys-Phe-Phe-Pro-Leu-Glu-NH(2) was a weak inhibitor for other serine proteases, as indicated by the higher K (i) values compared with hK1, but this peptide was a potent inhibitor of human plasma kallikrein, which has a K (i) value of 8 nM. This result was surprising, since this enzyme is known to be a restricted arginyl-hydrolase. In conclusion, acetyl-Lys-Phe-Phe-Pro-Leu-Glu-NH(2) can be used as a leader compound to design specific inhibitors for hK1, plasma kallikrein, or for both at same time, if the inhibition of kinin release is the main goal. PMID:12578561

  18. Sequencing human ribs into anatomical order by quantitative multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Henneberg, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Little research has focussed on methods to anatomically sequence ribs. Correct anatomical sequencing of ribs assists in determining the location and distribution of regional trauma, age estimation, number of puncture wounds, number of individuals, and personal identification. The aim of the current study is to develop a method for placing fragmented and incomplete rib sets into correct anatomical position. Ribs 2-10 were used from eleven cadavers of an Australian population. Seven variables were measured from anatomical locations on the rib. General descriptive statistics were calculated for each variable along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ANOVA with Bonferroni statistics. Considerable overlap was observed between ribs for univariate methods. Bivariate and multivariate methods were then applied. Results of the ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni statistics show that ratios of various dimensions of a single rib could be used to sequence it within adjacent ribs. Using multiple regression formulae, the most accurate estimation of the anatomical rib number occurs when the entire rib is found in isolation. This however, is not always possible. Even when only the head and neck of the rib are preserved, a modified multivariate regression formula assigned 91.95% of ribs into correct anatomical position or as an adjacent rib. Using multivariate methods it is possible to sequence a single human rib with a high level of accuracy and they are superior to univariate methods. Left and right ribs were found to be highly symmetrical. Some rib dimensions were greater in males than in females, but overall the level of sexual dimorphism was low.

  19. Singapore's anatomical future: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Ang, Eng-Tat; Sugand, Kapil; Hartman, Mikael; Seow, Choon-Sheong; Bay, Boon-Huat; Abrahams, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The disciplines of anatomy and surgery are not dichotomous since one is dependent on the other. Traditionally, surgeons predominantly taught gross and clinical anatomy. In this review, we examine the context of how human anatomy is taught nowadays. In essence, we discovered that there are certain discernable trends consistently observable between the American and British systems. In Singapore, the British Russell Group first influenced its education landscape but now more so by the American Ivy League. Singapore now has three medical schools all offering differing anatomy curricula, which serves as an opportune time for it to consider if there is a best approach given that the practice of surgery is also evolving in parallel. This review discusses the various pedagogies and issues involved, and will serve as a forum and stimulus for discussion. By tweaking the curriculum correctly and the lessons learnt, future doctors and surgeons in training will receive a better anatomical education, not just in Singapore but the world in general. Key recommendations include the use of body painting, clay, plasticine to facilitate the learning of anatomy, and the implementation of a body donation program. Furthermore, strategic mergers with key stakeholders will also ensure the survival of the discipline. PMID:22566391

  20. Effect of anatomical backgrounds on detectability in volumetric cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-03-01

    As anatomical noise is often a dominating factor affecting signal detection in medical imaging, we investigate the effects of anatomical backgrounds on signal detection in volumetric cone beam CT images. Signal detection performances are compared between transverse and longitudinal planes with either uniform or anatomical backgrounds. Sphere objects with diameters of 1mm, 5mm, 8mm, and 11mm are used as the signals. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomical backgrounds are generated using an anatomical noise power spectrum, 1/fβ, with β=3, equivalent to mammographic background [1]. The mean voxel value of the 3D anatomical backgrounds is used as an attenuation coefficient of the uniform background. Noisy projection data are acquired by the forward projection of the uniform and anatomical 3D backgrounds with/without sphere lesions and by the addition of quantum noise. Then, images are reconstructed by an FDK algorithm [2]. For each signal size, signal detection performances in transverse and longitudinal planes are measured by calculating the task SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels. In the uniform background case, transverse planes yield higher task SNR values for all sphere diameters but 1mm. In the anatomical background case, longitudinal planes yield higher task SNR values for all signal diameters. The results indicate that it is beneficial to use longitudinal planes to detect spherical signals in anatomical backgrounds.

  1. The anatomical school of Padua.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Parenti, Anna; De Caro, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    The University of Padua is one of the most ancient in the world, being founded in 1222, and the most important anatomists of the XVI, XVII, and XVIII centuries studied and taught here. Probably, the first professor of anatomy and surgery was Bruno da Longobucco (c. 1200-c. 1286), who had previously studied at the Salerno School of Medicine. While professor in Padua, Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) published De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543), which is considered as the birth of the modern anatomy. Following professors were Realdo Colombo (c. 1516-1559), Gabriel Fallopius (1523-1562), Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente (1533-1619), Iulius Casserius (1552-1616), Johann Wesling (1598-1649), and Johann Georg Wirsung (1589-1643). Many other foreign scholars studied in the University of Padua, such as Thomas Linacre (c. 1460-1524), the founder of the Royal College of Physicians, Werner Rolfinck (1599-1673), and Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702), who created anatomical theatres in Germany and Sweden, respectively, on the basis of the Paduan model. The anatomy of the XVII century characteristically widened the scope of its enquiry to function, as in the Exercitatio Anatomica De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus (1628) by William Harvey (1578-1657). Further evolution was then given by the anatomy in the XVIII century, which tried to correlate alterations of structure with clinical symptoms. The most important anatomist of this century is Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), whose masterpiece De Sedibus et Causis Morborum per Anatomen Indagatis (1761) is a landmark contribution that is viewed as the beginning of modern pathologic anatomy. This year falls the 300th anniversary of Morgagni's inaugural lecture on medical education, Nova Institutionum Medicarum Idea (1712), which is still relevant in its effort to stress the importance of a deep knowledge of all the preclinical and clinical aspects of medical science. PMID:22581496

  2. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow. PMID:27283070

  3. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow.

  4. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  5. Validation and detection of vessel landmarks by using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Bernhardt, Dominik; Biermann, Christina; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    The detection of anatomical landmarks is an important prerequisite to analyze medical images fully automatically. Several machine learning approaches have been proposed to parse 3D CT datasets and to determine the location of landmarks with associated uncertainty. However, it is a challenging task to incorporate high-level anatomical knowledge to improve these classification results. We propose a new approach to validate candidates for vessel bifurcation landmarks which is also applied to systematically search missed and to validate ambiguous landmarks. A knowledge base is trained providing human-readable geometric information of the vascular system, mainly vessel lengths, radii and curvature information, for validation of landmarks and to guide the search process. To analyze the bifurcation area surrounding a vessel landmark of interest, a new approach is proposed which is based on Fast Marching and incorporates anatomical information from the knowledge base. Using the proposed algorithms, an anatomical knowledge base has been generated based on 90 manually annotated CT images containing different parts of the body. To evaluate the landmark validation a set of 50 carotid datasets has been tested in combination with a state of the art landmark detector with excellent results. Beside the carotid bifurcation the algorithm is designed to handle a wide range of vascular landmarks, e.g. celiac, superior mesenteric, renal, aortic, iliac and femoral bifurcation.

  6. Nodule detection in digital chest radiography: effect of anatomical noise.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Håkansson, Markus; Börjesson, Sara; Hoeschen, Christoph; Tischenko, Oleg; Kheddache, Susanne; Vikgren, Jenny; Månsson, Lars Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    The image background resulting from imaged anatomy can be divided into those components that are meaningful to the observers, in the sense that they are recognised as separate structures, and those that are not. These latter components (reffered to as anatomical noise) can be removed using a method developed within the RADIUS group. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the removal of the anatomical noise results in images where lung nodules with lower contrast can be detected. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was therefore conducted using two types of images: clinical chest images and chest images in which the anatomical noise had been removed. Simulated designer nodules with a full-width-at-fifth-maximum of 10 mm but with varying contrast were added to the images. The contrast needed to obtain an area under the ROC curve of 0.80, C0.8, was used as a measure of detectability (a low value of C0.8 represents a high detectability). Five regions of the chest X ray were investigated and it was found that in all regions the removal of anatomical noise led to images with lower C0.8 than the original images. On average, C0.8 was 20% higher in the original images, ranging from 7% (the lateral pulmonary regions) to 41% (the upper mediastinal regions).

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models. PMID:26336695

  8. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  9. Anatomical Variations of Cerebral MR Venography: Is Gender Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rambir; Bansal, Nikhil; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Knowledge of variations in the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy seen on magnetic resonance (MR) venography is essential to avoid over-diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Very limited data is available on gender difference of the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy variations. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted to study the normal anatomy of the intracranial venous system and its normal variation, as depicted by 3D MR venography, in normal adults and any gender-related differences. Results A total of 1654 patients (582 men, 1072 women, age range 19 to 86 years, mean age: 37.98±13.83 years) were included in the study. Most common indication for MR venography was headache (75.4%). Hypoplastic left transverse sinus was the most common anatomical variation in 352 (21.3%) patients. Left transverse sinus was hypoplastic in more commonly in male in comparison to female (24.9% versus 19.3%, p = 0.009). Most common variation of superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was atresia of anterior one third SSS (15, 0.9%). Except hypoplastic left transverse sinus, rest of anatomical variations of the transverse and other sinuses were not significantly differ among both genders. Conclusion Hypoplastic left transverse sinus is the most common anatomical variation and more common in male compared to female in the present study. Other anatomical variations of dural venous sinuses are not significantly differ among both genders. PMID:27621945

  10. Anatomical Variations of Cerebral MR Venography: Is Gender Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rambir; Bansal, Nikhil; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Knowledge of variations in the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy seen on magnetic resonance (MR) venography is essential to avoid over-diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Very limited data is available on gender difference of the cerebral dural venous sinus anatomy variations. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted to study the normal anatomy of the intracranial venous system and its normal variation, as depicted by 3D MR venography, in normal adults and any gender-related differences. Results A total of 1654 patients (582 men, 1072 women, age range 19 to 86 years, mean age: 37.98±13.83 years) were included in the study. Most common indication for MR venography was headache (75.4%). Hypoplastic left transverse sinus was the most common anatomical variation in 352 (21.3%) patients. Left transverse sinus was hypoplastic in more commonly in male in comparison to female (24.9% versus 19.3%, p = 0.009). Most common variation of superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was atresia of anterior one third SSS (15, 0.9%). Except hypoplastic left transverse sinus, rest of anatomical variations of the transverse and other sinuses were not significantly differ among both genders. Conclusion Hypoplastic left transverse sinus is the most common anatomical variation and more common in male compared to female in the present study. Other anatomical variations of dural venous sinuses are not significantly differ among both genders.

  11. Complex anatomic variation in the brachial region.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Th; Michalinos, A; Protogerou, V; Mazarakis, A; Skandalakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Authors describe a case of a complex anatomic variation discovered during dissection of the humeral region. On the right side, brachial artery followed a superficial course. Musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce coracobrachialis muscle but instead passed below the muscle before continuing in the forearm. On the left side, a communication between musculocutaneous and median nerve was dissected. Those variations are analytically presented with a brief review on their anatomic and clinical implications. Considerations on their embryological origin are attempted.

  12. Characterisation of a novel endo-xyloglucanase (XcXGHA) from Xanthomonas that accommodates a xylosyl-substituted glucose at subsite -1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Yan, Kok-Phen; Mikkelsen, Maria D; Meyer, Anne S; Schols, Henk A; Westereng, Bjørge; Mikkelsen, Jørn D

    2014-12-01

    A xyloglucan-specific endo-1,4β-glucanase (XcXGHA) from Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterised. The XcXGHA enzyme belongs to CAZy family GH74 and has catalytic site residues conserved with other xyloglucanases in this family. At its optimal reaction conditions, pH 7.0 and 40 °C, the enzyme has a k cat/K M value of 2.2 × 10(7) min(-1) M(-1) on a tamarind seed xyloglucan substrate. XcXGHA is relatively stable within a broad pH range (pH 4-9) and up to 50 °C (t 1/2, 50 °C of 74 min). XcXGHA is proven to be xyloglucan-specific, and a glycan microarray study verifies that XcXGHA catalyses cleavage of xyloglucan extracted from both monocot and dicot plant species. The enzyme catalyses hydrolysis of tamarind xyloglucan in a unique way by cleaving XXXG into XX and XG (X is xylosyl-substituted glucose; G is unsubstituted glucose), is able to degrade more complex xyloglucans and notably is able to cleave near more substituted xyloglucan motifs such as L [i.e. α-L-Fucp-(1 → 2)-β-D-Galp-(1 → 2)-α-D-Xylp-(1 → 6)-β-D-Glcp]. LC-MS/MS analysis of product profiles of tamarind xyloglucan which had been catalytically degraded by XcXGHA revealed that XcXGHA has specificity for X in subsite -1. The 3D model suggests that XcXGHA consists of two seven-bladed β-propeller domains with the catalytic center formed by the interface of these two domains, which is conserved in xyloglucanases in the GH74 family. However, the XcXGHA has two amino acids (D264 and R472) that differ from the conserved residues of other GH74 xyloglucanases. These two amino acids were predicted to be located on the opposite side of the active site pocket, facing each other and forming a closing surface above the active site pocket. These two amino acids may contribute to the unique substrate specificity of the XcXGHA enzyme. PMID:24898632

  13. Characterizing brain anatomical connections using diffusion weighted MRI and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Y; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Melie-García, L; Valdés-Hernández, P A; Martínez-Montes, E; Alemán-Gómez, Y; Sánchez-Bornot, J M

    2007-07-01

    A new methodology based on Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) and Graph Theory is presented for characterizing the anatomical connections between brain gray matter areas. In a first step, brain voxels are modeled as nodes of a non-directed graph in which the weight of an arc linking two neighbor nodes is assumed to be proportional to the probability of being connected by nervous fibers. This probability is estimated by means of probabilistic tissue segmentation and intravoxel white matter orientational distribution function, obtained from anatomical MRI and DW-MRI, respectively. A new tractography algorithm for finding white matter routes is also introduced. This algorithm solves the most probable path problem between any two nodes, leading to the assessment of probabilistic brain anatomical connection maps. In a second step, for assessing anatomical connectivity between K gray matter structures, the previous graph is redefined as a K+1 partite graph by partitioning the initial nodes set in K non-overlapped gray matter subsets and one subset clustering the remaining nodes. Three different measures are proposed for quantifying anatomical connections between any pair of gray matter subsets: Anatomical Connection Strength (ACS), Anatomical Connection Density (ACD) and Anatomical Connection Probability (ACP). This methodology was applied to both artificial and actual human data. Results show that nervous fiber pathways between some regions of interest were reconstructed correctly. Additionally, mean connectivity maps of ACS, ACD and ACP between 71 gray matter structures for five healthy subjects are presented.

  14. Improving maltodextrin specificity for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid by site-saturation engineering of subsite-3 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Xu, Qiaoyan; Han, Ruizhi; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-20

    In this work, the subsite-3 of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was engineered to improve maltodextrin specificity for 2-O-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) synthesis. Specifically, the site-saturation mutagenesis of tyrosine 89, asparagine 94, aspartic acid 196, and aspartic acid 372 in subsite-3 was separately performed, and three mutants Y89F (tyrosine→phenylalanine), N94P (asparagine→proline), and D196Y (aspartic acid→tyrosine) produced higher AA-2G titer than the wild-type and the other mutants. Previously, we found the mutant K47L (lysine→leucine) also had a higher maltodextrin specificity. Therefore, the four mutants K47L, Y89F, N94P, and D196Y were further used to construct the double, triple, and quadruple mutations. Among the 11 combinational mutants, the quadruple mutant K47L/Y89F/N94P/D196Y produced the highest AA-2G titer of 2.23g/L, which was increased by 85.8% compared to that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics of all the mutants were modeled, and the pH and thermal stabilities of all the mutants were analyzed. The structure modeling indicated that the enhanced maltodextrin specificity may be related with the changes of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue at the four positions (47, 89, 94, and 196) and the substrate sugars.

  15. Anatomic femorotibial changes associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Jennifer A; Allen, David A; Bergman, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    This prospective study evaluated anatomic femorotibial changes utilizing the relationship between the intercondylar notch and the intercondylar eminence following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). We hypothesized that TPLO results in anatomic alteration of the femorotibial joint. Pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) scans of cranial cruciate deficient stifle joints treated with TPLO were performed on 25 client-owned dogs. Computed tomography scans were performed at 3 different stifle angles: extension, 135° walking angle, and 90° of flexion. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy did not result in a significant medial or lateral shift of the intercondylar eminence relative to the intercondylar notch. There was a significant cranial shift of the intercondylar eminence with the stifle in extension following TPLO. In addition, TPLO resulted in a significantly narrowed femorotibial joint space. The biomechanical effects of TPLO and medial meniscal release need to be further defined. PMID:26345618

  16. The anatomical distribution of genetic associations

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Alan; Kopp, Nathan; Xu, Xiaoxiao; O'Brien, David R.; Yang, Wei; Nehorai, Arye; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Kopan, Raphael; Dougherty, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Deeper understanding of the anatomical intermediaries for disease and other complex genetic traits is essential to understanding mechanisms and developing new interventions. Existing ontology tools provide functional, curated annotations for many genes and can be used to develop mechanistic hypotheses; yet information about the spatial expression of genes may be equally useful in interpreting results and forming novel hypotheses for a trait. Therefore, we developed an approach for statistically testing the relationship between gene expression across the body and sets of candidate genes from across the genome. We validated this tool and tested its utility on three applications. First, we show that the expression of genes in associated loci from GWA studies implicates specific tissues for 57 out of 98 traits. Second, we tested the ability of the tool to identify novel relationships between gene expression and phenotypes. Specifically, we experimentally confirmed an underappreciated prediction highlighted by our tool: that white blood cell count – a quantitative trait of the immune system – is genetically modulated by genes expressed in the skin. Finally, using gene lists derived from exome sequencing data, we show that human genes under selective constraint are disproportionately expressed in nervous system tissues. PMID:26586807

  17. Anatomical imbalance between cortical networks in autism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Influential psychological models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have proposed that this prevalent developmental disorder results from impairment of global (integrative) information processing and overload of local (sensory) information. However, little neuroanatomical evidence consistent with this account has been reported. Here, we examined relative grey matter volumes (rGMVs) between three cortical networks, how they changed with age, and their relationship with core symptomatology. Using public neuroimaging data of high-functioning ASD males and age-/sex-/IQ-matched controls, we first identified age-associated atypical increases in rGMVs of the regions of two sensory systems (auditory and visual networks), and an age-related aberrant decrease in rGMV of a task-control system (fronto-parietal network, FPN) in ASD children. While the enlarged rGMV of the auditory network in ASD adults was associated with the severity of autistic socio-communicational core symptom, that of the visual network was instead correlated with the severity of restricted and repetitive behaviours in ASD. Notably, the atypically decreased rGMV of FPN predicted both of the two core symptoms. These findings suggest that disproportionate undergrowth of a task-control system (FPN) may be a common anatomical basis for the two ASD core symptoms, and relative overgrowth of the two different sensory systems selectively compounds the distinct symptoms.

  18. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kleber M.; Costa, Suelen F.; Sampaio, Francisco J.B.; Favorito, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes) with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes) with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV). To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (p <0.05). Results: The fetuses ranged in age from 26 to 35 weeks post-conception (WPC) and the 20 patients with retractile testis ranged in ages from 1 to 12 years (average of 5.8). Of the 50 fetal testes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4%) and epididymal anomalies (EAs) in 1 testis (2%). Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4%) and EA in 4 (14.28%). When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116). Conclusions: Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processus vaginalis and epididymal anomalies. PMID:27564294

  19. Anatomical imbalance between cortical networks in autism

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Influential psychological models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have proposed that this prevalent developmental disorder results from impairment of global (integrative) information processing and overload of local (sensory) information. However, little neuroanatomical evidence consistent with this account has been reported. Here, we examined relative grey matter volumes (rGMVs) between three cortical networks, how they changed with age, and their relationship with core symptomatology. Using public neuroimaging data of high-functioning ASD males and age-/sex-/IQ-matched controls, we first identified age-associated atypical increases in rGMVs of the regions of two sensory systems (auditory and visual networks), and an age-related aberrant decrease in rGMV of a task-control system (fronto-parietal network, FPN) in ASD children. While the enlarged rGMV of the auditory network in ASD adults was associated with the severity of autistic socio-communicational core symptom, that of the visual network was instead correlated with the severity of restricted and repetitive behaviours in ASD. Notably, the atypically decreased rGMV of FPN predicted both of the two core symptoms. These findings suggest that disproportionate undergrowth of a task-control system (FPN) may be a common anatomical basis for the two ASD core symptoms, and relative overgrowth of the two different sensory systems selectively compounds the distinct symptoms. PMID:27484308

  20. Anatomical correlates of foreign speech sound production.

    PubMed

    Golestani, Narly; Pallier, Christophe

    2007-04-01

    Previous work has shown a relationship between brain anatomy and how quickly adults learn to perceive foreign speech sounds. Faster learners have greater asymmetry (left>right) in parietal lobe white matter (WM) volumes and larger WM volumes of left Heschl's gyrus than slower learners. Here, we tested native French speakers who were previously scanned using high-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. We asked them to pronounce a Persian consonant that does not exist in French but which can easily be distinguished from French speech sounds, the voiced uvular stop. Two judges scored the goodness of the utterances. Voxel-based morphometry revealed that individuals who more accurately pronounce the foreign sound have higher WM density in the left insula/prefrontal cortex and in the inferior parietal cortices bilaterally compared with poorer producers. Results suggest that WM anatomy in brain regions previously implicated in articulation and phonological working memory, or the size/shape of these or adjacent regions, is in part predictive of the accuracy of speech sound pronunciation.

  1. Anatomical imbalance between cortical networks in autism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Influential psychological models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have proposed that this prevalent developmental disorder results from impairment of global (integrative) information processing and overload of local (sensory) information. However, little neuroanatomical evidence consistent with this account has been reported. Here, we examined relative grey matter volumes (rGMVs) between three cortical networks, how they changed with age, and their relationship with core symptomatology. Using public neuroimaging data of high-functioning ASD males and age-/sex-/IQ-matched controls, we first identified age-associated atypical increases in rGMVs of the regions of two sensory systems (auditory and visual networks), and an age-related aberrant decrease in rGMV of a task-control system (fronto-parietal network, FPN) in ASD children. While the enlarged rGMV of the auditory network in ASD adults was associated with the severity of autistic socio-communicational core symptom, that of the visual network was instead correlated with the severity of restricted and repetitive behaviours in ASD. Notably, the atypically decreased rGMV of FPN predicted both of the two core symptoms. These findings suggest that disproportionate undergrowth of a task-control system (FPN) may be a common anatomical basis for the two ASD core symptoms, and relative overgrowth of the two different sensory systems selectively compounds the distinct symptoms. PMID:27484308

  2. The Brain Atlas Concordance Problem: Quantitative Comparison of Anatomical Parcellations

    PubMed Central

    Bohland, Jason W.; Bokil, Hemant; Allen, Cara B.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2009-01-01

    Many neuroscientific reports reference discrete macro-anatomical regions of the brain which were delineated according to a brain atlas or parcellation protocol. Currently, however, no widely accepted standards exist for partitioning the cortex and subcortical structures, or for assigning labels to the resulting regions, and many procedures are being actively used. Previous attempts to reconcile neuroanatomical nomenclatures have been largely qualitative, focusing on the development of thesauri or simple semantic mappings between terms. Here we take a fundamentally different approach, discounting the names of regions and instead comparing their definitions as spatial entities in an effort to provide more precise quantitative mappings between anatomical entities as defined by different atlases. We develop an analytical framework for studying this brain atlas concordance problem, and apply these methods in a comparison of eight diverse labeling methods used by the neuroimaging community. These analyses result in conditional probabilities that enable mapping between regions across atlases, which also form the input to graph-based methods for extracting higher-order relationships between sets of regions and to procedures for assessing the global similarity between different parcellations of the same brain. At a global scale, the overall results demonstrate a considerable lack of concordance between available parcellation schemes, falling within chance levels for some atlas pairs. At a finer level, this study reveals spatial relationships between sets of defined regions that are not obviously apparent; these are of high potential interest to researchers faced with the challenge of comparing results that were based on these different anatomical models, particularly when coordinate-based data are not available. The complexity of the spatial overlap patterns revealed points to problems for attempts to reconcile anatomical parcellations and nomenclatures using strictly

  3. Analysis of anatomic variability in children with low mathematical skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaoying; Fuchs, Lynn; Davis, Nikki; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    Mathematical difficulty affects approximately 5-9% of the population. Studies on individuals with dyscalculia, a neurologically based math disorder, provide important insight into the neural correlates of mathematical ability. For example, cognitive theories, neuropsychological studies, and functional neuroimaging studies in individuals with dyscalculia suggest that the bilateral parietal lobes and intraparietal sulcus are central to mathematical performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate morphological differences in a group of third grade children with poor math skills. We compare population averages of children with low math skill (MD) to gender and age matched controls with average math ability. Anatomical data were gathered with high resolution MRI and four different population averaging methods were used to study the effect of the normalization technique on the results. Statistical results based on the deformation fields between the two groups show anatomical differences in the bilateral parietal lobes, right frontal lobe, and left occipital/parietal lobe.

  4. Preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays the best treatment of the primary and secondary hepatic tumor is surgical resection, but only 5–15% of all patient with hepatocellular carcinoma and 20–25% of all patients with liver metastases are indicated for resection. In these cases some kind of ablation and other technique could be used. Aim To present the methodology of preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor. Material and methods The presented method is based on abdomen computed tomography (CT) dynamic examination. Three methods of segmentation are used: rolling vector for liver volume, modified Frangi filter for liver vessels, and fuzzy expert system with initial region-of-interest anisotropic filtration for liver metastases. Segmentation results are the input data for creating 3D anatomical models in the form of B-spline curves and surfaces performing the surface global interpolation algorithm. A graphical user interface for presentation and evaluation of models, presented in color against DICOM images in grayscale, is designed and implemented. Results The proposed approach was tested on 20 abdominal CT obtained from the Department of Clinical Radiology of Silesian Medical University. The lack of a “gold standard” provides for the correction of the results. Conclusions Preparation of the anatomical model is one of the important early stages of the use of image-based navigation systems. This process could not take place in a fully automatic manner and verification of the results obtained is performed by the radiologist. Using the above anatomical model in surgical workflow is presented. PMID:25097694

  5. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    PubMed Central

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  6. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  7. Anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tröbs, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Wilms tumor surgery requires meticulous planning and sophisticated surgical technique. Detailed anatomical knowledge can facilitate the uneventful performance of tumor nephrectomy and cannot be replaced by advanced and sophisticated imaging techniques. We can define two main goals for surgery: (1) exact staging as well as (2) safe and complete resection of tumor without spillage. This review aims to review the anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery. It focuses on the surgical anatomy of retroperitoneal space, aorta, vena cava and their large branches with lymphatics. Types and management of vascular injuries are discussed. PMID:20671845

  8. Anatomical and psychometric relationships of behavioral neglect in daily living.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Allart, Etienne; Bernati, Thérèse; Saj, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    Spatial neglect has been related to both cortical (predominantly at the temporal-parietal junction) and subcortical (predominantly of the superior longitudinal fasciculus) lesions. The objectives of this observational study were to specify the anatomical relationships of behavioral neglect in activities of daily living (N-ADLs), and the anatomical and psychometric relationships of N-ADLs on one hand and components of neglect (peripersonal neglect and personal neglect) and anosognosia on the other. Forty five patients were analyzed for behavioral difficulties in daily living (on the Catherine Bergego scale) and the main components of neglect (using conventional clinical assessments) during the first months post right hemisphere stroke. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify brain areas within which lesions explained the severity of bias in each assessment (non-parametric permutation test; p<0.01, one tailed). N-ADLs was associated with lesions centered on the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and extending to the temporo-parietal junction, temporo-occipital junction and subcortical white matter (including the superior longitudinal fasciculus). Peripersonal neglect resulted from extended cortical lesions centered on the superior temporal gyrus and the inferior parietal gyrus, with subcortical extension. Personal neglect resulted predominantly from lesions centered on the somatosensory cortex and at a lesser degree on the superior temporal sulcus. Anosognosia resulted from lesions of the posterior inferior temporal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. In anatomic terms, N-ADLs was strongly related to peripersonal neglect, and those relationships were also shown by the psychometric analysis. In conclusions, superior temporal gyrus and superior longitudinal fasciculus lesions have a pivotal role in N-ADLs. N-ADLs is principally related (anatomically and psychometrically) to peripersonal neglect, and at a lesser degree to anosognosia and

  9. Following the north star: radial marker lines help preserve anatomic landmarks after local injection of anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Admani, Shehla; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Injection of local anesthetic can result in distortion of local anatomic architecture. "Following the North Star" is a technique that uses radial markings to aid in better preservation of surgical landmarks.

  10. 3D Modeling of Branching Structures for Anatomical Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, William A.; Chariker, Julia H.; Paris, Richard; Chang, Dar-jen; Pani, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Branching tubular structures are prevalent in many different organic and synthetic settings. From trees and vegetation in nature, to vascular structures throughout human and animal biology, these structures are always candidates for new methods of graphical and visual expression. We present a modeling tool for the creation and interactive modification of these structures. Parameters such as thickness and position of branching structures can be modified, while geometric constraints ensure that the resulting mesh will have an accurate anatomical structure by not having inconsistent geometry. We apply this method to the creation of accurate representations of the different types of retinal cells in the human eye. This method allows a user to quickly produce anatomically accurate structures with low polygon counts that are suitable for rendering at interactive rates on commodity computers and mobile devices. PMID:27087764

  11. Preliminary Study on Appearance-Based Detection of Anatomical Point Landmarks in Body Trunk CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Hanaoka, Shohei; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Yoshioka, Naoki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    Anatomical point landmarks as most primitive anatomical knowledge are useful for medical image understanding. In this study, we propose a detection method for anatomical point landmark based on appearance models, which include gray-level statistical variations at point landmarks and their surrounding area. The models are built based on results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of sample data sets. In addition, we employed generative learning method by transforming ROI of sample data. In this study, we evaluated our method with 24 data sets of body trunk CT images and obtained 95.8 ± 7.3 % of the average sensitivity in 28 landmarks.

  12. A Proposed Anatomic Typing of the Right Internal Spermatic Vein: Importance for Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of Varicocele

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Yoel Gat, Yigal; Bacher, Gil N.; Gornish, Michael

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To classify the anatomic types of the right internal spermatic vein (ISV). Methods. We evaluated venograms obtained in 150 consecutive patients with idiopathic varicocele referred for transfemoral sclerotherapy .Results. Six anatomic types of the right internal spermatic vein (ISV) were recognized. These were classified by the location of their orifices and the tributary venous patterns. In roughly half the patients (53%), the ISV appeared as a simple vein with no remarkable retroperitoneal interconnections. In the remainder, complex retroperitoneal anastomoses were encountered. Conclusion. By understanding these anatomic variations, the angiographer can approach treatment of right-sided varicocele with foreknowledge of the nature of these types and the presence of valves and collaterals.

  13. Statistical approach to anatomical landmark extraction in AP radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Rok; Pernus, Franjo

    2001-07-01

    A novel method for the automated extraction of important geometrical parameters of the pelvis and hips from APR images is presented. The shape and intensity variations in APR images are encompassed by the statistical shape and appearance models built from a set of training images for each of the three anatomies, i.e., pelvis, right and left hip, separately. The identification of the pelvis and hips is defined as a flexible object recognition problem, which is solved by generating anatomically plausible object instances and matching them to the APR image. The criterion function minimizes the resulting match error and considers the object topology. The obtained flexible object defines the positions of anatomical landmarks, which are further used to calculate the hip joint contact stress. A leave-one-out test was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method on a set of 26 APR images. The results show the method is able to properly treat image variations and can reliably and accurately identify anatomies in the image and extract the anatomical landmarks needed in the hip joint contact stress calculation.

  14. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Valente, Giordano; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Campen, Anke; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-07-16

    Scaled generic musculoskeletal models are commonly used to drive dynamic simulations of motions. It is however, acknowledged that not accounting for variability in musculoskeletal geometry and musculotendon parameters may confound the simulation results, even when analysing control subjects. This study documents the three-dimensional anatomical variability of musculotendon origins and insertions of 33 lower limb muscles determined based on magnetic resonance imaging in six subjects. This anatomical variability was compared to the musculotendon point location in a generic musculoskeletal model. Furthermore, the sensitivity of muscle forces during gait, calculated using static optimization, to perturbations of the musculotendon point location was analyzed with a generic model. More specific, a probabilistic approach was used: for each analyzed musculotendon point, the three-dimensional location was re-sampled with a uniform Latin hypercube method within the anatomical variability and the static optimization problem was then re-solved for all perturbations. We found that musculotendon point locations in the generic model showed only variable correspondences with the anatomical variability. The anatomical variability of musculotendon point location did affect the calculated muscle forces: muscles most sensitive to perturbations within the anatomical variability are iliacus and psoas. Perturbation of the gluteus medius anterior, iliacus and psoas induces the largest concomitant changes in muscle forces of the unperturbed muscles. Therefore, when creating subject-specific musculoskeletal models, these attachment points should be defined accurately. In addition, the size of the anatomical variability of the musculotendon point location was not related to the sensitivity of the calculated muscle forces.

  15. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Valente, Giordano; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Campen, Anke; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-07-16

    Scaled generic musculoskeletal models are commonly used to drive dynamic simulations of motions. It is however, acknowledged that not accounting for variability in musculoskeletal geometry and musculotendon parameters may confound the simulation results, even when analysing control subjects. This study documents the three-dimensional anatomical variability of musculotendon origins and insertions of 33 lower limb muscles determined based on magnetic resonance imaging in six subjects. This anatomical variability was compared to the musculotendon point location in a generic musculoskeletal model. Furthermore, the sensitivity of muscle forces during gait, calculated using static optimization, to perturbations of the musculotendon point location was analyzed with a generic model. More specific, a probabilistic approach was used: for each analyzed musculotendon point, the three-dimensional location was re-sampled with a uniform Latin hypercube method within the anatomical variability and the static optimization problem was then re-solved for all perturbations. We found that musculotendon point locations in the generic model showed only variable correspondences with the anatomical variability. The anatomical variability of musculotendon point location did affect the calculated muscle forces: muscles most sensitive to perturbations within the anatomical variability are iliacus and psoas. Perturbation of the gluteus medius anterior, iliacus and psoas induces the largest concomitant changes in muscle forces of the unperturbed muscles. Therefore, when creating subject-specific musculoskeletal models, these attachment points should be defined accurately. In addition, the size of the anatomical variability of the musculotendon point location was not related to the sensitivity of the calculated muscle forces. PMID:25979383

  16. Calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the nurses' health study and health professionals follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehong; Keum, NaNa; Wu, Kana; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between calcium intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk remains inconclusive. We conducted this study to evaluate whether the association between calcium intake and CRC risk differs by anatomic subsite and determine the dose-response relationship for this association, as well as assess when in carcinogenesis calcium may play a role. We assessed calcium intake every 4 years and followed 88,509 women (1980-2012) in the Nurses' Health Study and 47,740 men (1986-2012) in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. We documented 3,078 incident CRC cases. Total calcium intake (≥1,400 vs. <600 mg/d) was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of colon cancer (multivariable relative risk: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.65-0.95). Similar results were observed by different sources of calcium (from all foods or dairy products only). The inverse association was linear and suggestively stronger for distal colon cancer (0.65, 0.43-0.99) than for proximal colon cancer (0.94, 0.72-1.22, p-common effects  = 0.14). Additionally, when comparing different latencies, the overall pattern suggested that the inverse association appeared to be stronger with increasing latency and was strongest for intakes 12-16 years before diagnosis. Comparing total calcium intakes of ≥1,400 vs. <600 mg/d for intake 12-16 y before diagnosis, the pooled RR (95% CIs) of CRC was 0.76 (0.64-0.91). Higher calcium intake was associated with a lower risk of developing colon cancer, especially for distal colon cancer. Overall inverse association was linear and did not differ by intake source. Additionally, calcium intake approximately 10 years before diagnosis appeared to be associated with a lower risk of CRC. PMID:27466215

  17. Anatomical variation and its management in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Watson, C J E; Harper, S J F

    2015-06-01

    Variant anatomy may be challenging at retrieval, with failure to identify variance being associated with organ damage, particularly vascular damage. On implantation, some variants demand nonstandard techniques of reconstruction or implantation. This review covers the common and less common anatomical variants of the liver, kidney and pancreas, and gives guidance as to how they may be managed during organ retrieval and implantation.

  18. Giving Ourselves: The Ethics of Anatomical Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical…

  19. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  20. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  1. Anatomical Data for Analyzing Human Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plagenhoef, Stanley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Anatomical data obtained from cadavers and from water displacement studies with living subjects were used to determine the weight, center of gravity, and radius of gyration for 16 body segments. A lead model was used to study movement patterns of the trunk section of the body. (Authors/PP)

  2. The maxillary second molar - anatomical variations (case report).

    PubMed

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-01-01

    To be acquainted with dental anatomical specificity is of great importance for dental endodontic treatment algorithm. The subject of present publication is 2 clinical cases of upper second molars, detailed characterization of, which is considered very important for enrichment of anatomical knowledge about dental anatomical variations. In one case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 38-year-old woman was complains as of esthetic character as well as functional misbalance (disturbance of chewing function due to the damage of orthopedic construction). The patient indicated to the existence of coronary defects of large size aesthetic discomforts, damage and discolouration of old orthopedic construction (denture) in maxillary right molar area. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified as a result of incomplete endodontic treatment. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified, tooth 17 with 2 roots and 2 canals. In the second clinical case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 39-year-old woman was severe pain in the upper right molar area. The patient indicated to the caries on the tooth 17. After completion of proper survey clinical and visiographical examinations, acute pulpitis (K04.00) - with three roots and 4 canals was diagnosed. In both cases after the proper examinations and agreement with the patients a treatment plan envisaging: 17 teeth endodontic treatment, filling of caries defects and their preparation on one hand for orthopedic construction (denture) and on the other hand for restoration of anatomical integrity by light-cured composite, was scheduled. The present study is designed to prevent complications of endodontic treatment of the second molar, to optimize diagnosis and treatment algorithm, once again proving reliable information indicating to the

  3. Anatomical evaluation of CT-MRI combined femoral model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon S; Seon, Jong K; Shin, Vladimir I; Kim, Gyu-Ha; Jeon, Moongu

    2008-01-01

    Background Both CT and MRI are complementary to each other in that CT can produce a distinct contour of bones, and MRI can show the shape of both ligaments and bones. It will be ideal to build a CT-MRI combined model to take advantage of complementary information of each modality. This study evaluated the accuracy of the combined femoral model in terms of anatomical inspection. Methods Six normal porcine femora (180 ± 10 days, 3 lefts and 3 rights) with ball markers were scanned by CT and MRI. The 3D/3D registration was performed by two methods, i.e. the landmark-based 3 points-to-3 points and the surface matching using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The matching accuracy of the combined model was evaluated with statistical global deviation and locally measure anatomical contour-based deviation. Statistical analysis to assess any significant difference between accuracies of those two methods was performed using univariate repeated measures ANOVA with the Turkey post hoc test. Results This study revealed that the local 2D contour-based measurement of matching deviation was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in the femoral condyle, and in the middle femoral shaft. The global 3D contour matching deviation of the landmark-based matching was 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, but local 2D contour deviation through anatomical inspection was much larger as much as 3.0 ± 1.8 mm. Conclusion Even with human-factor derived errors accumulated from segmentation of MRI images, and limited image quality, the matching accuracy of CT-&-MRI combined 3D models was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in terms of local anatomical inspection. PMID:18234068

  4. Etiologic analysis of 100 anatomically failed dacryocystorhinostomies

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Tarjani Vivek; Mohammed, Faraz Ali; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the etiological factors contributing to the failure of a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Patients and methods Retrospective review was performed in 100 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with anatomically failed DCR at presentation to a tertiary care hospital over a 5-year period from 2010 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed for demographic data, type of past surgery, preoperative endoscopic findings, previous use of adjuvants such as intubation and mitomycin C, and intraoperative notes during the re-revision. The potential etiological factors for failure were noted. Results Of the 100 patients with failed DCRs, the primary surgery was an external DCR in 73 and endoscopic DCR in 27 patients. Six patients in each group had multiple revisions. The mean ages at presentation in the external and endoscopic groups were 39.41 years and 37.19 years, respectively. All patients presented with epiphora. The most common causes of failure were inadequate osteotomy (69.8% in the external group and 85.1% in the endoscopic group, P=0.19) followed by inadequate or inappropriate sac marsupialization (60.2% in the external group and 77.7% in the endoscopic group, P=0.16) and cicatricial closure of the ostium (50.6% in the external group and 55.5% in the endoscopic group, P=0.83). The least common causes such as ostium granulomas and paradoxical middle turbinate (1.37%, n=1) were noted in the external group only. Conclusion Inadequate osteotomy, incomplete sac marsupialization, and cicatricial closure of the ostium were the most common causes of failure and did not significantly differ in the external and endoscopic groups. Meticulous evaluation to identify causative factors for failure and addressing them are crucial for subsequent successful outcomes. PMID:27555748

  5. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Long-range population dynamics of anatomically defined neocortical networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry L; Voigt, Fabian F; Javadzadeh, Mitra; Krueppel, Roland; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of activity across neocortical areas is essential for mammalian brain function. Understanding this process requires simultaneous functional measurements across the cortex. In order to dissociate direct cortico-cortical interactions from other sources of neuronal correlations, it is furthermore desirable to target cross-areal recordings to neuronal subpopulations that anatomically project between areas. Here, we combined anatomical tracers with a novel multi-area two-photon microscope to perform simultaneous calcium imaging across mouse primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory whisker cortex during texture discrimination behavior, specifically identifying feedforward and feedback neurons. We find that coordination of S1-S2 activity increases during motor behaviors such as goal-directed whisking and licking. This effect was not specific to identified feedforward and feedback neurons. However, these mutually projecting neurons especially participated in inter-areal coordination when motor behavior was paired with whisker-texture touches, suggesting that direct S1-S2 interactions are sensory-dependent. Our results demonstrate specific functional coordination of anatomically-identified projection neurons across sensory cortices. PMID:27218452

  7. Long-range population dynamics of anatomically defined neocortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry L; Voigt, Fabian F; Javadzadeh, Mitra; Krueppel, Roland; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of activity across neocortical areas is essential for mammalian brain function. Understanding this process requires simultaneous functional measurements across the cortex. In order to dissociate direct cortico-cortical interactions from other sources of neuronal correlations, it is furthermore desirable to target cross-areal recordings to neuronal subpopulations that anatomically project between areas. Here, we combined anatomical tracers with a novel multi-area two-photon microscope to perform simultaneous calcium imaging across mouse primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory whisker cortex during texture discrimination behavior, specifically identifying feedforward and feedback neurons. We find that coordination of S1-S2 activity increases during motor behaviors such as goal-directed whisking and licking. This effect was not specific to identified feedforward and feedback neurons. However, these mutually projecting neurons especially participated in inter-areal coordination when motor behavior was paired with whisker-texture touches, suggesting that direct S1-S2 interactions are sensory-dependent. Our results demonstrate specific functional coordination of anatomically-identified projection neurons across sensory cortices. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14679.001 PMID:27218452

  8. Brain Anatomical Structure Segmentation by Hybrid Discriminative/Generative Models

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhuowen; Narr, Katherine L.; Dollár, Piotr; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid discriminative/generative model for brain anatomical structure segmentation is proposed. The learning aspect of the approach is emphasized. In the discriminative appearance models, various cues such as intensity and curvatures are combined to locally capture the complex appearances of different anatomical structures. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) framework is adopted to learn multi-class discriminative models that combine hundreds of features across different scales. On the generative model side, both global and local shape models are used to capture the shape information about each anatomical structure. The parameters to combine the discriminative appearance and generative shape models are also automatically learned. Thus low-level and high-level information is learned and integrated in a hybrid model. Segmentations are obtained by minimizing an energy function associated with the proposed hybrid model. Finally, a grid-face structure is designed to explicitly represent the 3D region topology. This representation handles an arbitrary number of regions and facilitates fast surface evolution. Our system was trained and tested on a set of 3D MRI volumes and the results obtained are encouraging. PMID:18390346

  9. Anatomical Study of the Clavicles in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xu-sheng; Wang, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Yan-Cheng; Guo, Xia; Chen, Yi-xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. A reemergence of interest in clavicle anatomy was prompted because of the advocacy for operative treatment of midshaft clavicle fractures. Several anatomical studies of the clavicle have been performed in western population. However, there was no anatomical study of clavicle in Chinese population. Patients and Methods. 52 patients were included in the present study. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the clavicles were generated. The length of the clavicle, the widths and thicknesses of the clavicle, curvatures of the clavicle, the areas of the intramedullary canal, and sectional areas of the clavicle were measured. All the measurements were compared between genders and two sides. Results. The mean length of the clavicles was 144.2 ± 12.0 mm. Clavicles in males were longer, wider, and thicker than in females; also males have different curvatures in both planes compared with females. The men's intramedullary canals and sectional areas of the clavicle were larger than those of women. No significant difference between the sides was found for all the measurements. Conclusion. This study provided an anatomical data of the clavicle in a Chinese population. These clavicle dimensions can be applied to the modifications of the contemporary clavicle plate or a new development for the Chinese population. PMID:27088088

  10. Synthesizing average 3D anatomical shapes using deformable templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Johnson, Hans J.; Haller, John W.; Melloy, Jenny; Vannier, Michael W.; Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    1999-05-01

    A major task in diagnostic medicine is to determine whether or not an individual has a normal or abnormal anatomy by examining medical images such as MRI, CT, etc. Unfortunately, there are few quantitative measures that a physician can use to discriminate between normal and abnormal besides a couple of length, width, height, and volume measurements. In fact, there is no definition/picture of what normal anatomical structures--such as the brain-- look like let alone normal anatomical variation. The goal of this work is to synthesize average 3D anatomical shapes using deformable templates. We present a method for empirically estimating the average shape and variation of a set of 3D medical image data sets collected from a homogeneous population of topologically similar anatomies. Results are shown for synthesizing the average brain image volume from a set of six normal adults and synthesizing the average skull/head image volume from a set of five 3 - 4 month old infants with sagittal synostosis.

  11. Anatomically correct deformable colon phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Barton, Michael D.; Davis, Brynmor J.; Bieszczad, Jerry; Meunier, Norm L.; Brown, Nathan W.; Kynor, David B.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a technique to build a soft-walled colon phantom that provides realistic lumen anatomy in computed tomography (CT) images. The technique begins with the geometry of a human colon measured during CT colonography (CTC). The three-dimensional air-filled colonic lumen is segmented and then replicated using stereolithography (SLA). The rigid SLA model includes large-scale features (e.g., haustral folds and tenia coli bands) down to small-scale features (e.g., a small pedunculated polyp). Since the rigid model represents the internal air-filled volume, a highly-pliable silicone polymer is painted onto the rigid model. This thin layer of silicone, when removed, becomes the colon wall. Small 3 mm diameter glass beads are affixed to the outer wall. These glass beads show up with high intensity in CT scans and provide a ground truth for evaluating performance of algorithms designed to register prone and supine CTC data sets. After curing, the silicone colon wall is peeled off the rigid model. The resulting colon phantom is filled with air and submerged in a water bath. CT images and intraluminal fly-through reconstructions from CTC scans of the colon phantom are compared against patient data to demonstrate the ability of the phantom to simulate a human colon.

  12. Anatomical calibration for wearable motion capture systems: Video calibrated anatomical system technique.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita; Caroselli, Alessio; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Inertial sensors are becoming widely used for the assessment of human movement in both clinical and research applications, thanks to their usability out of the laboratory. This work aims to propose a method for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame with an ease to use, portable and low cost device. An off-the-shelf camera, a stick and a pattern, attached to the inertial sensor, compose the device. The proposed technique is referred to as video Calibrated Anatomical System Technique (vCAST). The absolute orientation of a synthetic femur was tracked both using the vCAST together with an inertial sensor and using stereo-photogrammetry as reference. Anatomical landmark calibration showed mean absolute error of 0.6±0.5 mm: these errors are smaller than those affecting the in-vivo identification of anatomical landmarks. The roll, pitch and yaw anatomical frame orientations showed root mean square errors close to the accuracy limit of the wearable sensor used (1°), highlighting the reliability of the proposed technique. In conclusion, the present paper proposes and preliminarily verifies the performance of a method (vCAST) for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame: the technique is low time consuming, highly portable, easy to implement and usable outside laboratory. PMID:26077101

  13. Reduction of variance in measurements of average metabolite concentration in anatomically-defined brain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Ryan J.; Newman, Michael; Nikolaidis, Aki

    2016-11-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed for using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) to measure representative metabolite concentrations of anatomically-defined brain regions. Generally these methods require spectral analysis, quantitation of the signal, and reconciliation with anatomical brain regions. However, to simplify processing pipelines, it is practical to only include those corrections that significantly improve data quality. Of particular importance for cross-sectional studies is knowledge about how much each correction lowers the inter-subject variance of the measurement, thereby increasing statistical power. Here we use a data set of 72 subjects to calculate the reduction in inter-subject variance produced by several corrections that are commonly used to process MRSI data. Our results demonstrate that significant reductions of variance can be achieved by performing water scaling, accounting for tissue type, and integrating MRSI data over anatomical regions rather than simply assigning MRSI voxels with anatomical region labels.

  14. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  15. Procedure Planning: Anatomical Determinants of Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hanratty, Colm; Walsh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary practice there are three main methods that can be employed when attempting to open a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of a coronary artery; antegrade or retrograde wire escalation, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde dissection re-entry. This editorial will attempt to clarify the anatomical features that can be identified to help when deciding which of these strategies to employ initially and help understand the reasons for this decision. PMID:24694102

  16. [Supratentorial-infraoccipital (or occipitopolar) approach: clinical and anatomical study].

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Sebastião; Silveira, Roberto Leal; Oliveira, Marcelo Magaldi

    2005-06-01

    Twenty-two patients harboring tumors or vascular lesions (AVMs and aneurysms) located at the posterior aspect of the parahipocampal gyrus and the pulvinar of thalamus operated by supratentorial-infraoccipital approach were analysed. Total resection was achieved in all five AVM patients as well as in six out of fifteen tumor patients. This approach was performed in five anatomical specimens (ten approaches); It results, along with the surgical results, allow this approach to be considered a good option for lesions of the pulvinar of thalamus and postero-medial temporal lobe which are evident at the transverse fissure.

  17. Increased cortical-limbic anatomical network connectivity in major depression revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Wang, Lubin; Li, Baojuan; Liu, Li; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported significant functional and structural differences between depressed patients and controls. Little attention has been given, however, to the abnormalities in anatomical connectivity in depressed patients. In the present study, we aim to investigate the alterations in connectivity of whole-brain anatomical networks in those suffering from major depression by using machine learning approaches. Brain anatomical networks were extracted from diffusion magnetic resonance images obtained from both 22 first-episode, treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder and 26 matched healthy controls. Using machine learning approaches, we differentiated depressed patients from healthy controls based on their whole-brain anatomical connectivity patterns and identified the most discriminating features that represent between-group differences. Classification results showed that 91.7% (patients=86.4%, controls=96.2%; permutation test, p<0.0001) of subjects were correctly classified via leave-one-out cross-validation. Moreover, the strengths of all the most discriminating connections were increased in depressed patients relative to the controls, and these connections were primarily located within the cortical-limbic network, especially the frontal-limbic network. These results not only provide initial steps toward the development of neurobiological diagnostic markers for major depressive disorder, but also suggest that abnormal cortical-limbic anatomical networks may contribute to the anatomical basis of emotional dysregulation and cognitive impairments associated with this disease. PMID:23049910

  18. Shape analysis of simulated breast anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contijoch, Francisco; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution 3D breast imaging, namely, digital breast tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT, have enabled detailed analysis of the shape and distribution of anatomical structures in the breast. Such analysis is critically important, since the projections of breast anatomical structures make up the parenchymal pattern in clinical images which can mask the existing abnormalities or introduce false alarms; the parenchymal pattern is also correlated with the risk of cancer. As a first step towards the shape analysis of anatomical structures in the breast, we have analyzed an anthropomorphic software breast phantom. The phantom generation is based upon the recursive splitting of the phantom volume using octrees, which produces irregularly shaped tissue compartments, qualitatively mimicking the breast anatomy. The shape analysis was performed by fitting ellipsoids to the simulated tissue compartments. The ellipsoidal semi-axes were calculated by matching the moments of inertia of each individual compartment and of an ellipsoid. The distribution of Dice coefficients, measuring volumetric overlap between the compartment and the corresponding ellipsoid, as well as the distribution of aspect ratios, measuring relative orientations of the ellipsoids, were used to characterize various classes of phantoms with qualitatively distinctive appearance. A comparison between input parameters for phantom generation and the properties of fitted ellipsoids indicated the high level of user control in the design of software breast phantoms. The proposed shape analysis could be extended to clinical breast images, and used to inform the selection of simulation parameters for improved realism.

  19. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of a cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to a magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1 mm×1.4 mm in about 6 min of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discussed. We discuss several measures to increase the sensitivity to reach a resolution 1 mm×1 mm.

  20. Early life body fatness and risk of colorectal cancer in US women and men – results from two large cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Colditz, Graham A.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Nimptsch, Katharina; Ogino, Shuji; Wei, Esther K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between body fatness before adulthood and later risk of colorectal cancer remains unclear. We hypothesized that, independent of adult body fatness, early life body fatness would be associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods We assessed body fatness during childhood and adolescence using a validated 9-level somatotype and inquired body weight in young adulthood in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used Cox proportional hazard regression modeling to estimate relative risks (RRs, 95% CIs) adjusting for adult body mass index (BMI) and other known colorectal cancer risk factors. Results We identified 2,100 incident colorectal cancer cases (1,292 in women and 808 in men) during 22 years of follow-up. Among women, the RR(95% CI) for childhood body fatness of level 5 or higher versus level 1 was 1.28(1.04-1.58, p-trend=0.08) and for adolescent body fatness, it was 1.27(1.01-1.60, p-trend = 0.23). The corresponding RRs for men were 1.04(0.82-1.31, p-trend=0.48) and 0.98(0.75-1.27, p-trend=0.20), respectively. Results were generally similar across anatomic subsites within the colorectum. Additionally, the RRs comparing BMI categories ≥ 27.5 to < 19 kg/m2 were 1.44(1.06-1.95, at age 18, p-trend=0.009) for women and 1.18(0.84-1.65, at age 21, p-trend=0.57) for men. Conclusion Increased body fatness in early life, independent of adult obesity, might be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in women, but we observed a weaker association in men. Impact Our findings support the growing evidence that early life body fatness affects the risk of colorectal cancer many decades later. PMID:25777804

  1. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  2. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-02-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  3. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed Central

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-01-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  5. Anatomical variations of the human suprarenal arteries.

    PubMed

    Manso, J C; DiDio, L J

    2000-09-01

    This is on anatomical study of the suprarenal arteries and their variations in 30 cadavers aimed at providing in a subsequent article the anatomical basis of arterial segments of the gland. The suprarenal glands were supplied by 3 main groups of suprarenal arteries: superior, middle and inferior. Only the superior and the inferior groups were present in all cases, since the middle vessels appeared in only 93.3% +/- 4.6 of the cases. The superior group included on each side 4 arteries in males and 5 in females; the middle group presented only 1 artery on each side in both males and females, and the inferior group exhibited on each side 2 arteries in males and 1 artery in females. The most variable group was the middle one, the aortic origin being the most frequent but with a relatively low incidence (53.3% +/- 9.1 on the right and 46.7% +/- 9.1 on the left). The superior group originated from the posterior branch of the ipsilateral inferior phrenic artery in 83.3% +/- 6.8 on the right and 80% +/- 7.3 on the left. The arteries of the inferior group were branches of the ipsilateral renal artery in 70% +/- 8.4 on the right and 50% +/- 9.1 on the left. The origin of the middle suprarenal arteries from the trunk of the inferior phrenic artery on both sides (26.7% +/- 8.1 on the right and 36.7% +/- 8.8 on the left) should be considered relevant. The anatomical findings warrant a further investigation for the identification, illustration and nomenclature of arterial anatomicosurgical segments.

  6. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  7. Anatomical Factors Influencing Pneumatization of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Lee, Seunghun; Choi, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aim of the present study was to define the relationship between petrous apex pneumatization and the nearby major anatomical landmarks using temporal bone computed tomography (CT) images. Methods This retrospective, Institutional Review Board-approved study analyzed CT images of 84 patients that showed normal findings bilaterally. Pneumatization of the petrous apex was classified using two methods. Eight parameters were as follows: angle between the posterior cranial fossa and internal auditory canal, Morimitsu classification of anterior epitympanic space, distance between the carotid canal and jugular bulb, distance between the cochlear modiolus and carotid canal, distance between the tympanic segment and jugular bulb, high jugular bulb, distance between the vertical segment and jugular bulb, and distance between the lateral semicircular canals and middle cranial fossa. Results There was a significant difference in Morimitsu classification of the anterior epitympanic space between the two classification methods. Poorly pneumatic upper petrous apices were distributed uniformly in three types of Morimitsu classification, but more pneumatic upper petrous apices were found more often in anterior type. Lower petrous apex was well pneumatized regardless of the types of anterior epitympanic space, but the largest amount of pneumatization was found more frequently in the anterior type of anterior epitympanic space. Conclusion This study showed that there was no reliable anatomic marker to estimate petrous apex pneumatization and suggests that the pneumatization of the petrous apex may be an independent process from other part of the temporal bone, and may not be influenced by the nearby major anatomical structures in the temporal bone. In this study, the anterior type of anterior epitympanic space was found to be closely related to more well-pneumatized petrous apices, which implies that the anterior saccule of the saccus medius may be the main factor

  8. Anatomical bases of percutaneous surgery for calculi in horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Cussenot, O; Desgrandchamps, F; Ollier, P; Teillac, P; Le Duc, A

    1992-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a renal fusion which combines three anatomic abnormalities: ectopia, malrotation and vascular changes. These anomalies can be recognised separately to varying degrees in unfused kidneys. Necessary modifications of the standard technique for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) are directly deducible from analysis of the anatomic data of the imaging of horseshoe kidneys. We report our experience with 5 patients (7 kidneys) who underwent PNL for calculi in horseshoe kidneys. The percutaneous approach was performed under ultrasound and fluoroscopic monitoring. In situ disintegration by ultrasonic lithotripsy and nephrostomy drainage were necessary in all cases. Modifications of the standard PNL procedure are related to the anatomic changes. The lower abdominal position of a horseshoe kidney necessitates upper or middle calyceal puncture, while the malrotation necessitates a more posterior puncture. Monitoring of the puncture needle by fluoroscopy as it is advanced postero-anteriorly is more difficult and the risk of the surgeon's hand entering the radiation path is increased. The renal pelvis is deep and a long endoscope may be required. Aberrant segmental vessels may create potential hazards. The majority of problems in location can be avoided by use of an ultrasonically guided needle. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is the treatment of choice for calculi in horseshoe kidneys for the following reasons: the high incidence of recurrent lithiasis in horseshoe kidney and the complexity of repeated surgical approaches diminish the acceptable results of open surgery; difficulties in focussing on the calculi and drainage problems militate against the success of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL); PNL has a good success rate and the least morbidity.

  9. The Anatomical and Functional Organization of the Human Visual Pulvinar

    PubMed Central

    Pinsk, Mark A.; Kastner, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The pulvinar is the largest nucleus in the primate thalamus and contains extensive, reciprocal connections with visual cortex. Although the anatomical and functional organization of the pulvinar has been extensively studied in old and new world monkeys, little is known about the organization of the human pulvinar. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, we identified two visual field maps within the ventral pulvinar, referred to as vPul1 and vPul2. Both maps contain an inversion of contralateral visual space with the upper visual field represented ventrally and the lower visual field represented dorsally. vPul1 and vPul2 border each other at the vertical meridian and share a representation of foveal space with iso-eccentricity lines extending across areal borders. Additional, coarse representations of contralateral visual space were identified within ventral medial and dorsal lateral portions of the pulvinar. Connectivity analyses on functional and diffusion imaging data revealed a strong distinction in thalamocortical connectivity between the dorsal and ventral pulvinar. The two maps in the ventral pulvinar were most strongly connected with early and extrastriate visual areas. Given the shared eccentricity representation and similarity in cortical connectivity, we propose that these two maps form a distinct visual field map cluster and perform related functions. The dorsal pulvinar was most strongly connected with parietal and frontal areas. The functional and anatomical organization observed within the human pulvinar was similar to the organization of the pulvinar in other primate species. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The anatomical organization and basic response properties of the visual pulvinar have been extensively studied in nonhuman primates. Yet, relatively little is known about the functional and anatomical organization of the human pulvinar. Using neuroimaging, we found multiple representations of visual space within the ventral

  10. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  11. Anatomical and molecular imaging of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer types. It is generally divided into two categories: melanoma (∼ 5%) and nonmelanoma (∼ 95%), which can be further categorized into basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and some rare skin cancer types. Biopsy is still the gold standard for skin cancer evaluation in the clinic. Various anatomical imaging techniques have been used to evaluate different types of skin cancer lesions, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, high-frequency ultrasound, terahertz pulsed imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and some other recently developed techniques such as photoacoustic microscopy. However, anatomical imaging alone may not be sufficient in guiding skin cancer diagnosis and therapy. Over the last decade, various molecular imaging techniques (in particular single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography) have been investigated for skin cancer imaging. The pathways or molecular targets that have been studied include glucose metabolism, integrin αvβ3, melanocortin-1 receptor, high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen, and several other molecular markers. Preclinical molecular imaging is thriving all over the world, while clinical molecular imaging has not lived up to the expectations because of slow bench-to-bedside translation. It is likely that this situation will change in the near future and molecular imaging will truly play an important role in personalized medicine of melanoma patients. PMID:21437135

  12. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  13. Isolated Male Epispadias: Anatomic Functional Restoration Is the Primary Goal

    PubMed Central

    Bruneel, Elke; Ploumidis, Achilles; Van Laecke, Erik; Hoebeke, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Isolated male epispadias (IME) is a rare congenital penile malformation, as often part of bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC). In its isolated presentation, it consists in a defect of the dorsal aspect of the penis, leaving the urethral plate open. Occurrence of urinary incontinence is related to the degree of dorsal displacement of the meatus and the underlying underdevelopment of the urethral sphincter. The technique for primary IME reconstruction, based on anatomic restoration of the urethra and bladder neck, is here illustrated. Patients and Methods. A retrospective database was created with patients who underwent primary IME repair between June 1998 and February 2014. Intraoperative variables, postoperative complications, and outcomes were assessed. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results and Limitations. Eight patients underwent primary repair, with penopubic epispadias (PPE) in 3, penile epispadias (PE) in 2, and glandular epispadias (GE) in 3. Median age at surgery was 13.0 months [7–47]; median follow-up was 52 months [9–120]. Complications requiring further surgery were reported in two patients, while further esthetic surgeries were required in 4 patients. Conclusion. Anatomical restoration in primary IME is safe and effective, with acceptable results given the initial pathology. PMID:27722172

  14. [Experimental value of formaldehyde exposure to preserve anatomical findings].

    PubMed

    Albertini, P; Mainardi, P; Mazzeo, N; Triassi, M

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde, already classified as potentially carcinogen and recently as "human carcinogen" by IARC, is generally used for fixing and preserving anatomical findings. This reason causes a problem of professional exposure for the operators who use the formaldehyde for this purpose. In this work we present the results of the periodical monitoring which is done for the determination of the exposure at formaldehyde in operating theatres and surgeries, where the operator fill the special container with the anatomical findings andformaldehyde for following tests. The measurements have been done using an instrument that continuously measure the concentration of formaldehyde, based on the infrared spectrometry, in 54 rooms which are operating theatres or surgeries in 9 public hospitals in Campania (Italy). The results show that the long-term exposure limits are not exceeded and that the average of the highest values of concentration obtained during its use was 0.15 +/- 0.04 ppm, that is below the limits. It is important to point out that such a limit was never exceeded during every single measurement. Finally, analyzing statistically the data, we can infer that the probability of exceeding the short-term limit is less than 0.1%, when formaldehyde is used for the purposes mentioned above.

  15. Role of the omega loop in specificity determination in subsite 2 of the D-alanine:D-alanine (D-lactate) ligase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides: a molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Francis C

    2011-09-01

    The synthesis of D-ala-D-lactate in Leuconostoc mesenteroides is catalyzed by D-alanine:D-alanine (D-lactate) ligase (ADP). The ability to assemble this depsipeptide as well as D-ala-D-ala provides a mechanism for the organism's intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. Mutation of Phe261 to Tyr261 in the Ω-loop of this ligase showed a complete loss of the ability to make D-ala-D-lactate (Park and Walsh, J. Biol. Chem. 272 (1997) 9210-9214). Phe261 is a key specificity determinant in the α-helical cap of the Ω-loop when folded into the closed conformation. A molecular docking study of the closed ligase using AutoDock 4.2 defines additional specificity constraints promoted by the Ω-loop capping the catalytic center. Attaining productive orientations of D-lactate with favorable ligation chemistry requires the flexibilities of Phe261 and Arg301 in the docking protocol. These are in addition to the optimization of van der Waals contacts with Lys260, Met326, and Ser327. The location of Phe261 and Lys260 in the α-helical cap of the Ω-loop over subsite 2 is an essential part of the folding process ensuring depsipeptide formation in the hydrophobic environment of the catalytic center. The importance of the F261Y mutation suggests that the hydroxyl of Tyr261 plays an instrumental role in determining non-productive docking orientations of D-lactate. Two of these are presented: (A) D-lactate-OH as an H-bond donor to the Tyr261-OH; (B) D-lactate as an H-bond donor to the phosphoryl of the intermediate D-alanyl phosphate, and the D-lactate-COO- as an H-bond acceptor for the Tyr261-OH. Neither orientation, A or B, show the bifurcated H-bonding with Arg301 recently proposed for the activation of the nucleophilic D-lactate for D-ala-D-lactate formation. Insights into the role of the Ω-loop and its K(F/Y) signature provide additional background for inhibitor design targeted to subsite 2 of the D-alanine:D-alanine (D-X) ligases.

  16. Using 3D modeling techniques to enhance teaching of difficult anatomical concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Baldwin, Michael; Nassiri, Joshua; Kikinis, Ron; Shaffer, Kitt

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Anatomy is an essential component of medical education as it is critical for the accurate diagnosis in organs and human systems. The mental representation of the shape and organization of different anatomical structures is a crucial step in the learning process. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of developing innovative teaching modules for anatomy education of first-year medical students based on 3D reconstructions from actual patient data. Materials and Methods A total of 196 models of anatomical structures from 16 anonymized CT datasets were generated using the 3D Slicer open-source software platform. The models focused on three anatomical areas: the mediastinum, the upper abdomen and the pelvis. Online optional quizzes were offered to first-year medical students to assess their comprehension in the areas of interest. Specific tasks were designed for students to complete using the 3D models. Results Scores of the quizzes confirmed a lack of understanding of 3D spatial relationships of anatomical structures despite standard instruction including dissection. Written task material and qualitative review by students suggested that interaction with 3D models led to a better understanding of the shape and spatial relationships among structures, and helped illustrate anatomical variations from one body to another. Conclusion The study demonstrates the feasibility of one possible approach to the generation of 3D models of the anatomy from actual patient data. The educational materials developed have the potential to supplement the teaching of complex anatomical regions and help demonstrate the anatomic variation among patients. PMID:26897601

  17. A procedure to average 3D anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Subramanya, K; Dean, D

    2000-12-01

    Creating a feature-preserving average of three dimensional anatomical surfaces extracted from volume image data is a complex task. Unlike individual images, averages present right-left symmetry and smooth surfaces which give insight into typical proportions. Averaging multiple biological surface images requires careful superimposition and sampling of homologous regions. Our approach to biological surface image averaging grows out of a wireframe surface tessellation approach by Cutting et al. (1993). The surface delineating wires represent high curvature crestlines. By adding tile boundaries in flatter areas the 3D image surface is parametrized into anatomically labeled (homology mapped) grids. We extend the Cutting et al. wireframe approach by encoding the entire surface as a series of B-spline space curves. The crestline averaging algorithm developed by Cutting et al. may then be used for the entire surface. Shape preserving averaging of multiple surfaces requires careful positioning of homologous surface regions such as these B-spline space curves. We test the precision of this new procedure and its ability to appropriately position groups of surfaces in order to produce a shape-preserving average. Our result provides an average that well represents the source images and may be useful clinically as a deformable model or for animation.

  18. Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

  19. Anatomic patterning in the expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.; McAllen, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes (VSR) is related to a nerve's anatomic location rather than its target organ, we compared VSR recorded from the same type of postganglionic fiber [muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC)] located at three different rostrocaudal levels: hindlimb, forelimb, and face. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats, and vestibular afferents were stimulated electrically. Single MVC unit activity was extracted by spike shape analysis of few-fiber recordings, and unit discrimination was confirmed by autocorrelation. Poststimulus time histogram analysis revealed that about half of the neurons were initially inhibited by vestibular stimulation (type 1 response), whereas the other MVC fibers were initially strongly excited (type 2 response). MVC units with types 1 and 2 responses were present in the same nerve fascicle. Barosensitivity was equivalent in the two groups, but fibers showing type 1 responses fired significantly faster than those giving type 2 responses (0.29 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 Hz). Nerve fibers with type 1 responses were most common in the hindlimb (21 of 29 units) and least common in the face (2 of 11 units), the difference in relative proportion being significant (P < 0.05, chi(2) test). These results support the hypothesis that VSR are anatomically patterned.

  20. Anatomic variations should be considered in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, R; Miura, H; Bravo, C V; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Miyanishi, K; Hirata, G; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anatomic variations on the operative techniques used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was assessed. In 133 Japanese patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA), six parameters were measured on anteroposterior radiographs of the lower extremities taken with the patients in the supine position. The results showed that the characteristics of the knees were bowing of the femoral shaft and proximal tibia vara, with lateral offset of the tibial shaft with respect to the center of the tibial plateau. The angle between a perpendicular to the mechanical axis and the tangent to the distal femoral condyles can be used in determining the external rotation of the femoral component. This angle was more than 3 degrees in 20% of the patients. The femoral component should therefore be externally rotated more than 3 degrees relative to the posterior condylar line in such patients. Because the center of the tibial plateau is located medial to the central line of the tibial shaft in knees with medial OA, the central point of the tibial articular surface should not be used for alignment of the tibial component. The medial offset stem of the tibial component may impinge against the medial wall. Anatomic variations should be evaluated before TKA is attempted. PMID:10982663

  1. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Anatomical Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Freehand Transtibial Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Han, Jae-Hwi; Kwon, Jae-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Woon; Park, Hyung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In anatomical single-bundle (SB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the traditional transtibial approach can limit anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel. Surgical Technique We present a novel three-point freehand technique that allows for anatomic SB ACL reconstruction with the transtibial technique. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and December 2012, 55 ACL reconstructions were performed using the three-point freehand technique. All the patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months post-operatively. Clinical evaluation was done using the Lysholm score and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) grade. All patients were analyzed by 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) at 1 week after surgery. Results The mean Lysholm score improved from 68.2±12.7 points preoperatively to 89.2±8.2 points at final follow-up. At final follow-up, the IKDC grade was normal in 42 patients and nearly normal in 13 patients. None of the patients had a positive pivot shift test, anterior drawer test and Lachman test at final follow-up. The anatomical position of the femoral tunnel was confirmed on 3D CT scans. Conclusions The three-point freehand technique for SB transtibial ACL reconstruction is a simple, anatomic technique showing good clinical results. PMID:26060611

  3. Fleck, anatomical drawings and early modern history.

    PubMed

    Lowy, Ilana

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, the historian of medicine Michael Stolberg, contested the argument--developed by Thomas Laqueur and Londa Schiebinger--that in the XVIII century, anatomists shifted from a one-sex to a two-sexes model. Laqueur and Schiebinger linked the new focus on anatomical differences between the sexes to the rise of egalitarian aspirations during the Enlightenment, and a consecutive need to ground male domination in invariable "laws of nature". Stolberg claimed that the shift to the two sexes model occurred in the early modern period, and was mainly motivated by developments within medicine. This article examines the 2003 debate on the origin of "two sexes" model in the light of a 1939 controversy that opposed the historian of medicine Tadeusz Bilikiewicz, who advocated a focus on a "spirit" of an earlier epoch, and the pioneer of sociology of science Ludwik Fleck, who promoted the study of the "thought styles" of specific scientific communities.

  4. [Antique anatomical collections for contemporary museums].

    PubMed

    Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy and Pathology Museum collections display a great biological value and offer unique samples for research purposes. Pathological specimens may be investigated by means of modern radiological and molecular biology techniques in order to provide the etiological background of disease, with relevance to present-day knowledge. Meanwhile, historical resources provide epidemiologic data regarding the socio-economic conditions of the resident populations, the more frequently encountered illnesses and dietary habits. These multidisciplinary approaches lead to more accurate diagnoses also allowing new strategies in cataloguing and musealization of anatomical specimens. Further, once these data are gathered, they may constitute the basis of riedited Museum catalogues feasible to be digitalized and displayed via the Web.

  5. Anatomic autoandrophilia in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne A

    2009-12-01

    Some men are sexually aroused by impersonating the individuals to whom they are sexually attracted, or by permanently changing their bodies to become facsimiles of such individuals. Blanchard (J Sex Marital Ther 17:235-251, 1991) suggested that these paraphilic sexual interests, along with fetishism, represented erotic target location errors, i.e., developmental errors in locating erotic targets in the environment. Because the desire to impersonate or become a facsimile of the kind of person to whom one is attracted can have significant implications for identity, Freund and Blanchard (Br J Psychiatry 162:558-563, 1993) coined the term erotic target identity inversion to describe this type of erotic target location error. The best-known examples of erotic target identity inversions occur in men who are sexually attracted to women and who are also sexually aroused by the idea of impersonating or becoming women; these paraphilic interests manifest as transvestic fetishism and as one type of male-to-female transsexualism. Analogous erotic target identity inversions have been described in men who are sexually attracted to children and to female amputees. In theory, erotic target identity inversions should also occur in men who are sexually attracted to men. There have been no unambiguous descriptions, however, of men who are sexually attracted to men and also sexually aroused by the idea of changing their bodies to become more sexually attractive men. This report describes such a man, whose paraphilic interest would appropriately be called anatomic autoandrophilia. The demonstration that anatomic autoandrophilia exists in men is consistent with the theory that erotic target location errors constitute an independent paraphilic dimension. PMID:19093196

  6. Anatomical investigation of the esophageal and aortic hiatuses: physiologic, clinical and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Milton Melciades Barbosa; Pires-Neto, Mario Ary

    2004-03-01

    Precise knowledge about the anatomical constitution of the diaphragmatic pillars is essential to understand the physiologic, clinical and surgical roles of the esophageal and aortic hiatuses. Because anatomical descriptions found in the literature are dubious, we have decided to investigate this subject. Anatomical dissections and histologic sections of the right and left diaphragmatic pillars (diaphragma crura) from 43 human bodies were analyzed, comprising both non-fixed and fixed specimens. We have described a classification of the diaphragmatic pillars and their muscular branches, forming two basic arrangements (patterns I and II) around the esophageal and aortic hiatuses. Such anatomical and functional relationships between the esophagus and its diaphragmatic hiatus help explain why, during normal inspiration, a hiatal enlargement is observed first but is followed, thereafter, during deep inspiration, by a hiatal narrowing exerted by the contraction of the diaphragmatic pillars. Our results also show that the aortic hiatus does not seem to constitute a rigid ventral tendinous arc around the aorta that could impose any considerable degree of vascular compression, as suggested by other investigators. The present study provides anatomical data useful for a better understanding of gastroesophageal reflux physiology, antireflux surgery and abdominal angina.

  7. How spatial abilities and dynamic visualizations interplay when learning functional anatomy with 3D anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material presentation formats, spatial abilities, and anatomical tasks. First, to understand the cognitive challenges a novice learner would be faced with when first exposed to 3D anatomical content, a six-step cognitive task analysis was developed. Following this, an experimental study was conducted to explore how presentation formats (dynamic vs. static visualizations) support learning of functional anatomy, and affect subsequent anatomical tasks derived from the cognitive task analysis. A second aim was to investigate the interplay between spatial abilities (spatial visualization and spatial relation) and presentation formats when the functional anatomy of a 3D scapula and the associated shoulder flexion movement are learned. Findings showed no main effect of the presentation formats on performances, but revealed the predictive influence of spatial visualization and spatial relation abilities on performance. However, an interesting interaction between presentation formats and spatial relation ability for a specific anatomical task was found. This result highlighted the influence of presentation formats when spatial abilities are involved as well as the differentiated influence of spatial abilities on anatomical tasks.

  8. Extra-anatomical bypass: a surgical option for recurrent aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Malaj, Alban; Martinelli, Ombretta; Irace, Francesco Giosue'; Jabbour, Jihad; Gossetti, Bruno; Mazzesi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Background. Balloon aortoplasty with or without stenting is a less invasive alternative to open surgery for the management of recurrent isthmic coarctation. However, in patients with previous small size tube graft, an open surgical correction is mandatory and, in most cases, an anatomical aortic reconstruction is carried out. Methods. We present the case of a 48-year-old woman with recurrent aortic coarctation and systemic hypertension with systolic value around 190-200 mmHg and preoperative systolic pressure gradient 70 mmHg, submitted to an extra-anatomical bypass. Through a median sternotomy, an extra-anatomical bypass from ascending to descending aorta was performed. Results. No intra- or postoperative complications were observed. The postoperative pressure gradient was 10 mmHg and the systolic pressure ranged from 130 to 140 mmHg. Conclusion. The extra-anatomical bypass can be considered an effective and safe alternative to the anatomical aortic reconstruction in the cases with recurrent aortic coarctation unfit for endovascular treatment.

  9. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    PubMed Central

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort. PMID:25309338

  10. Anatomical Connections of the Functionally Defined "Face Patches" in the Macaque Monkey.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Piercesare; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Tsao, Doris

    2016-06-15

    The neural circuits underlying face recognition provide a model for understanding visual object representation, social cognition, and hierarchical information processing. A fundamental piece of information lacking to date is the detailed anatomical connections of the face patches. Here, we injected retrograde tracers into four different face patches (PL, ML, AL, AM) to characterize their anatomical connectivity. We found that the patches are strongly and specifically connected to each other, and individual patches receive inputs from extrastriate cortex, the medial temporal lobe, and three subcortical structures (the pulvinar, claustrum, and amygdala). Inputs from prefrontal cortex were surprisingly weak. Patches were densely interconnected to one another in both feedforward and feedback directions, inconsistent with a serial hierarchy. These results provide the first direct anatomical evidence that the face patches constitute a highly specialized system and suggest that subcortical regions may play a vital role in routing face-related information to subsequent processing stages. PMID:27263973

  11. Use of Lateral Calcaneal Flap for Coverage of Hindfoot Defects: An Anatomical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Zygouris, Panagiotis; Michalinos, Adamantios; Protogerou, Vassilis; Kotsiomitis, Evangelos; Mazarakis, Antonios; Dimovelis, Ioannis; Troupis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Lateral calcaneal flap is an established surgical option for coverage of lateral calcaneum and posterior heel defects. Lateral calcaneal flap vascularization and innervations are based on lateral calcaneal artery neurovascular bundle, that is, lateral calcaneal artery, small saphenous vein, and sural nerve. Anatomical research has allowed exploration of its many advantages but can also lead to its various modifications, permitting a wide variety of clinical applications. In this paper the authors report an anatomical and clinical study on lateral calcaneal artery course and lateral calcaneal flap clinical applications. Anatomic part of our study focused on lateral calcaneal artery course and optimization of surgical technique for flap harvesting. Data were used for design of lateral calcaneal flap in 5 patients. Our results were satisfactory in terms of coverage adequacy, perioperative morbidity, and functional and aesthetical outcome. PMID:26640707

  12. [Mycotic aneurysm of the subrenal abdominal aorta: extra anatomical reconstruction in five patients].

    PubMed

    Denguir, R; Gharsallah, N; Khanfir, I; Ghedira, F; Kharroubi, M; Kalfat, T; Khayati, A; Abid, A

    2003-02-01

    Between 1988 and 2001, five patients with mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta underwent surgery. Extra-anatomical reconstruction with axillo-bifemoral bypass grafting was performed in all patients. The hospital mortality rate was 20%. During the follow-up period two patients presented thrombosis of the axillo-bifemoral bypass, descending aorto-bifemoral bypass was performed in one. Extra-anatomic revascularization is a satisfactory procedure in the treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. The results are acceptable and the prognosis is mainly related to the underlying pathology and the severity of the infection. PMID:12616221

  13. [Developing a finite element model of human head with true anatomic structure mandible].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Haizhong; Du, Huiliang; Huang, Shilin; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2005-02-01

    A finite element model of human mandible is developed from CT scan images by the technologies of three-dimensional reconstruction, image processing and meshing. The mandible model is connected to one modified head model of Hybrid III dummy with joint according to the anatomic structure and mechanical characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Then a finite element model of the human head with the true anatomic structure mandible is developed. This model has been validated with the cadaver test results. It can be used in researches on the mechanism of craniofacial blunt-impact injury and on the assessment of injury severity. PMID:15762115

  14. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-11-01

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  20. The Use of Anatomical Dolls as Assessment and Evidentiary Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, Gwat-Yong; Inman, Anjanette

    1991-01-01

    Notes that several recent court decisions have questioned reliability and validity of anatomical dolls as assessment and evidentiary tool. Reviews literature on the use of anatomical dolls and highlights issues concerning their diagnostic and forensic efficacy. Identifies and discusses implications of the use of these dolls for social work…

  1. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TUMORS OF THE LEFT PANCREATIC ANATOMICAL SEGMENT].

    PubMed

    Kopchak, V M; Tkachuk, O S; Kopchak, K V; Duvalko, O V; Khomyak, I V; Pererva, L O; Kvasivka, O O; Andronik, S V; Shevkolenko, G G; Khanenko, V V; Romaniv, Ya V; Grebihn, R M

    2015-04-01

    The results of treatment of 231 patients, suffering tumoral affection of pancreatic left anatomical segment in period of 2009-2013 yrs were analyzed. Individualized approach, using modern technologies, was applied. Radical operations were performed in 129 patients, ageing 14-81 yrs old, including pancreatic distal resections in various modifications, central resection and tumoral enucleation. Possibilities of the extended pancreatic resection performance were studied in conditions of tumoral invasion of adjacent organs, regional vessels, as well as impact of such interventions on postoperative complications and lethality rate. While performing pancreatic subtotal distal resection with simultant resection of affected main venous vessels and adjacent organs the operative intervention risk is enhanced, but possibilities of a radical operations performance in previously considered inoperable patients are expanding.

  2. Anatomical study of a posterior cerebral lesion producing dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Van Buren, J M

    1979-07-01

    After an "occipital lobectomy" that resulted in a severe dyslexia and a moderate dysgraphia-dyscalculia, anatomical study showed damage to the posterior extremity of the angular gyrus and degeneration in the posteroinferior pulvinar. This is in contrast to an earlier case that had degeneration in the anterosuperior pulvinor associated with a small anterior temporoparietal infarct and a well-documented receptive-expressive aphasia. However, the role of the pulvinar in speech function remains uncertain. The surgeon should be aware of the short distance between the angular gyrus and both the midline and the occipital pole because a lesion here during an "occipital lobectomy" produces a distressing and durable speech impairment. PMID:471199

  3. Automatic detection of anatomical landmarks in uterine cervix images.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Hayit; Gordon, Shiri; Zimmerman, Gali; Lotenberg, Shelly; Jeronimo, Jose; Antani, Sameer; Long, Rodney

    2009-03-01

    The work focuses on a unique medical repository of digital cervicographic images ("Cervigrams") collected by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in longitudinal multiyear studies. NCI, together with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is developing a unique web-accessible database of the digitized cervix images to study the evolution of lesions related to cervical cancer. Tools are needed for automated analysis of the cervigram content to support cancer research. We present a multistage scheme for segmenting and labeling regions of anatomical interest within the cervigrams. In particular, we focus on the extraction of the cervix region and fine detection of the cervix boundary; specular reflection is eliminated as an important preprocessing step; in addition, the entrance to the endocervical canal (the "os"), is detected. Segmentation results are evaluated on three image sets of cervigrams that were manually labeled by NCI experts.

  4. Foundations of Intonational Meaning: Anatomical and Physiological Factors.

    PubMed

    Gussenhoven, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Like non-verbal communication, paralinguistic communication is rooted in anatomical and physiological factors. Paralinguistic form-meaning relations arise from the way these affect speech production, with some fine-tuning by the cultural and linguistic context. The effects have been classified as "biological codes," following the terminological lead of John Ohala's Frequency Code. Intonational morphemes, though arguably non-arbitrary in principle, are in fact heavily biased toward these paralinguistic meanings. Paralinguistic and linguistic meanings for four biological codes are illustrated. In addition to the Frequency Code, the Effort Code, and the Respiratory Code, the Sirenic Code is introduced here, which is based on the use of whispery phonation, widely seen as being responsible for the signaling and perception of feminine attractiveness and sometimes used to express interrogativity in language. In the context of the evolution of language, the relations between physiological conditions and the resulting paralinguistic and linguistic meanings will need to be clarified. PMID:27016315

  5. [Aging of the respiratory system: anatomical changes and physiological consequences].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2012-10-01

    The respiratory system undergoes progressive involution with age, resulting in anatomical and functional changes that are exerted on all levels. The rib cage stiffens and respiratory muscles weaken. Distal bronchioles have reduced diameter and tend to be collapsed. Mobilized lung volumes decrease with age while residual volume increases. Gas exchanges are modified with a linear decrease of PaO(2) up to the age of 70 years and a decreased diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. Ventilatory responses to hypercapnia, hypoxia and exercise decrease in the elderly. Knowledge of changes in the respiratory system related to advancing age is a medical issue of great importance in order to distinguish the effects of aging from those of diseases.

  6. Anatomical landmark detection using nearest neighbor matching and submodular optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-stage method for effective and efficient detection of one or multiple anatomical landmarks in an arbitrary 3D volume. The first stage of nearest neighbor matching is to roughly estimate the landmark locations. It searches out of 100,000 volumes for the closest to an input volume and then transfers landmark annotations to the input. The second stage of submodular optimization is to refine the landmark locations by running discriminative landmark detectors within the search ranges constrained by the first stage results. Further it coordinates multiple detectors with a search strategy optimized on the fly to reduce the overall computation cost arising in a submodular formulation. We validate the accuracy, speed and robustness of our approach by detecting body regions and landmarks in a dataset of 2500 CT scans. PMID:23286155

  7. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  8. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  9. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  10. Swept-source anatomic optical coherence elastography of porcine trachea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Mitran, Sorin; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative endoscopic imaging is at the vanguard of novel techniques in the assessment upper airway obstruction. Anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) has the potential to provide the geometry of the airway lumen with high-resolution and in 4 dimensions. By coupling aOCT with measurements of pressure, optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be performed to characterize airway wall stiffness. This can aid in identifying regions of dynamic collapse as well as informing computational fluid dynamics modeling to aid in surgical decision-making. Toward this end, here we report on an anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system powered by a wavelength-swept laser source. The system employs a fiber-optic catheter with outer diameter of 0.82 mm deployed via the bore of a commercial, flexible bronchoscope. Helical scans are performed to measure the airway geometry and to quantify the cross-sectional-area (CSA) of the airway. We report on a preliminary validation of aOCT for elastography, in which aOCT-derived CSA was obtained as a function of pressure to estimate airway wall compliance. Experiments performed on a Latex rubber tube resulted in a compliance measurement of 0.68+/-0.02 mm2/cmH2O, with R2=0.98 over the pressure range from 10 to 40 cmH2O. Next, ex vivo porcine trachea was studied, resulting in a measured compliance from 1.06+/-0.12 to 3.34+/-0.44 mm2/cmH2O, (R2>0.81). The linearity of the data confirms the elastic nature of the airway. The compliance values are within the same order-of-magnitude as previous measurements of human upper airways, suggesting that this system is capable of assessing airway wall compliance in future human studies.

  11. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  12. An interactive three-dimensional virtual body structures system for anatomical training over the internet.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Bharti; Acosta, Eric; Malvankar, Ameya; Vaidyanath, Sreeram

    2006-04-01

    The Visible Human digital datasets make it possible to develop computer-based anatomical training systems that use virtual anatomical models (virtual body structures-VBS). Medical schools are combining these virtual training systems and classical anatomy teaching methods that use labeled images and cadaver dissection. In this paper we present a customizable web-based three-dimensional anatomy training system, W3D-VBS. W3D-VBS uses National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Visible Human Male datasets to interactively locate, explore, select, extract, highlight, label, and visualize, realistic 2D (using axial, coronal, and sagittal views) and 3D virtual structures. A real-time self-guided virtual tour of the entire body is designed to provide detailed anatomical information about structures, substructures, and proximal structures. The system thus facilitates learning of visuospatial relationships at a level of detail that may not be possible by any other means. The use of volumetric structures allows for repeated real-time virtual dissections, from any angle, at the convenience of the user. Volumetric (3D) virtual dissections are performed by adding, removing, highlighting, and labeling individual structures (and/or entire anatomical systems). The resultant virtual explorations (consisting of anatomical 2D/3D illustrations and animations), with user selected highlighting colors and label positions, can be saved and used for generating lesson plans and evaluation systems. Tracking users' progress using the evaluation system helps customize the curriculum, making W3D-VBS a powerful learning tool. Our plan is to incorporate other Visible Human segmented datasets, especially datasets with higher resolutions, that make it possible to include finer anatomical structures such as nerves and small vessels.

  13. Central Venous Cannulation of the Internal Jugular Vein Using Ultrasound-Guided and Anatomical Landmark Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mehdi; Izanloo, Azra; Jahanbakhsh, Saeed; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar; Majidzadeh, Ali; Sabri Benhangi, Azam; Paravi, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Background Central venous cannulation is a current and important procedure used in the operating room and intensive care unit. Some studies have shown that the application of ultrasound-guided cannulation can improve the success rate of surgery, save time, reduce the number of required needlesticks, and mitigate many complications compared to anatomical landmark-guided cannulation. Objectives The aim of the present study was to draw a comparison between central venous cannulation of the internal jugular vein using ultrasound-guided and anatomical landmark-guided techniques. Patients and Methods A total of 321 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery in the surgical ward of a general hospital were randomly treated with central venous cannulation using either anatomical landmarks (150 patients) or ultrasound guidance (170 patients). The demographic data of patients, the success rate of cannulation, the execution time, and the number of attempts for successful cannulation as well as the complications were recorded and subjected to statistical analysis. Results The success rate of cannulation was 98.7% in the anatomical landmark-guided group and 99.4% in the ultrasound-guided group. The average operation times were 46.05 and 45.46 seconds in the anatomical landmark and ultrasound-guided groups, respectively. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the success rates of treatment, the number of attempts, the time required for successful cannulation, or the prevalence of complications (P > 0.05) other than carotid artery puncture (P = 0.04) Conclusions In our conditions, the use of an anatomical landmark-guided procedure was the preferred treatment method due to limited resources and a lack of adequate training. PMID:27642580

  14. An interactive three-dimensional virtual body structures system for anatomical training over the internet.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Bharti; Acosta, Eric; Malvankar, Ameya; Vaidyanath, Sreeram

    2006-04-01

    The Visible Human digital datasets make it possible to develop computer-based anatomical training systems that use virtual anatomical models (virtual body structures-VBS). Medical schools are combining these virtual training systems and classical anatomy teaching methods that use labeled images and cadaver dissection. In this paper we present a customizable web-based three-dimensional anatomy training system, W3D-VBS. W3D-VBS uses National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Visible Human Male datasets to interactively locate, explore, select, extract, highlight, label, and visualize, realistic 2D (using axial, coronal, and sagittal views) and 3D virtual structures. A real-time self-guided virtual tour of the entire body is designed to provide detailed anatomical information about structures, substructures, and proximal structures. The system thus facilitates learning of visuospatial relationships at a level of detail that may not be possible by any other means. The use of volumetric structures allows for repeated real-time virtual dissections, from any angle, at the convenience of the user. Volumetric (3D) virtual dissections are performed by adding, removing, highlighting, and labeling individual structures (and/or entire anatomical systems). The resultant virtual explorations (consisting of anatomical 2D/3D illustrations and animations), with user selected highlighting colors and label positions, can be saved and used for generating lesson plans and evaluation systems. Tracking users' progress using the evaluation system helps customize the curriculum, making W3D-VBS a powerful learning tool. Our plan is to incorporate other Visible Human segmented datasets, especially datasets with higher resolutions, that make it possible to include finer anatomical structures such as nerves and small vessels. PMID:16506202

  15. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Pei, Qiu-Yan; Li, Yun-Tao; Yang, Zhen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births. Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). FECG is not widely used, and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably. Thus, mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology. The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program. Methods: We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital. Each original database contained 400–700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels. We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company, Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software. The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations. The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training. Results: The database was rebuilt using the 3D software. The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically, continuously, and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles. The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG. The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs. We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG. Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education. Conclusions: The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of

  16. [The meninges, an anatomical point of view].

    PubMed

    Sakka, L; Chazal, J

    2005-03-01

    The meninges correspond to an anatomical concept. For the morphologist, the microscopic organization, the hypothetical presence of a subdural space, the nature of the interface between the deep meningeal layer and the nervous parenchyma in the perivascular spaces are the central issues. For the clinician, dynamic aspects of cerebrospinal fluid flow, secretion, and resorption are essential factors with practical consequences in terms of disease and patient management. Comparative anatomy, embryology, and organogenesis provide an interesting perspective for the descriptive and functional anatomy of the meninges. Usually considered as protective membranes, the meninges play a prominent role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system. The meninges are in constant evolution, from their formation to senescence. The meninges present three layers in children and adults: the dura mater, the arachnoid and the pia mater. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted by the choroid plexuses, flows through the ventricles and the subarachnoid space, and is absorbed by arachnoid granulations. Other sites of secretion and resorption are suggested by comparative anatomy and human embryology and organogenesis.

  17. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  18. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Proximal Tibiofibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Warner, Brent T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) instability can be easily missed or confused for other, more common lateral knee pathologies such as meniscal tears, fibular collateral ligament injury, biceps femoris pathology, or iliotibial band syndrome. Because of this confusion, some authors believe that PTFJ instability is more common than initially appreciated. Patients with PTFJ subluxation may have no history of inciting trauma or injury, and it is not uncommon for these patients to have bilateral symptoms and generalized ligamentous laxity. Currently, the optimal surgical treatment for patients with chronic PTFJ instability is unknown. Historically, a variety of surgical treatments have been reported. Initially, joint arthrodesis and fibular head resection were recommended. More recently, temporary screw fixation, nonanatomic reconstruction with strips of the biceps femoris tendon or iliotibial band, and reconstruction with free hamstring autograft have been described. The purpose of this report is to present our surgical technique for treatment of chronic PTFJ instability using an anatomic reconstruction of the posterior ligamentous structures of the PTFJ with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:27274455

  19. Is the cervical fascia an anatomical proteus?

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Condino, Sara; Stecco, Antonio; Soldani, Paola; Belmonte, Monica Mattioli; Gesi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The cervical fasciae have always represented a matter of debate. Indeed, in the literature, it is quite impossible to find two authors reporting the same description of the neck fascia. In the present review, a historical background was outlined, confirming that the Malgaigne's definition of the cervical fascia as an anatomical Proteus is widely justified. In an attempt to provide an essential and a more comprehensive classification, a fixed pattern of description of cervical fasciae is proposed. Based on the morphogenetic criteria, two fascial groups have been recognized: (1) fasciae which derive from primitive fibro-muscular laminae (muscular fasciae or myofasciae); (2) fasciae which derive from connective thickening (visceral fasciae). Topographic and comparative approaches allowed to distinguish three different types of fasciae in the neck: the superficial, the deep and the visceral fasciae. The first is most connected to the skin, the second to the muscles and the third to the viscera. The muscular fascia could be further divided into three layers according to the relationship with the different muscles.

  20. Truncus arteriosus. An anatomical-angiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, R; Soto, B; Kirklin, J W; Bargeron, L M

    1983-01-01

    A series of 25 cases of truncus arteriosus communis examined post mortem was studied retrospectively. Fifteen of them had had angiographic studies, enabling anatomo-radiographic correlative analysis to be made. All cases had situs solitus of the atria and concordant connections between atria and ventricles. The three main components of the malformation, present in all 25 cases, were: (a) ventricular septal defect, (b) single semilunar valve, (c) anomalies of the aortopulmonary septum. The ventricular septal defect was always subarterial but its size and its relation to mitral and tricuspid valves were extremely variable. The truncal valve varied greatly also in the number of its cusps and its relation to right and left ventricles. Above valvular level the presence or absence of residual aortopulmonary septum was reflected by the presence or absence of a main pulmonary artery. Additional supratruncal malformations produced variations of the anatomy of the aorta and pulmonary arteries. The angiographic demonstration of all these components was obtained best by selective angiography using special projections. From this study it appears that there is a wide degree of variability in all of the three main components of truncus arteriosus. Such anatomical variations should be identified angiographically in each patient in order to provide enough information before corrective surgery, but they do not alter the basically homogeneous anatomy of the category of truncus arteriosus and therefore do not justify complex classifications. Images PMID:6849718

  1. Optimizing Reconstruction with Periorbital Transplantation: Clinical Indications and Anatomic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael; Mundinger, Gerhard S.; Dorafshar, Amir H.; Iliff, Nicholas T.; Christensen, Joani M.; Christy, Michael R.; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Complex periorbital subunit reconstruction is challenging because the goals of effective reconstruction vary from one individual to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the indications and anatomic feasibility of periorbital transplantation by reviewing our institutional repository of facial injury. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center for a retrospective chart review conducted on patients with periorbital defects. Patient history, facial defects, visual acuity, and periorbital function were critically reviewed to identify indications for periorbital or total face (incorporating the periorbital subunit) vascularized composite allotransplantation. Cadaveric allograft harvest was then designed and performed for specific patient defects to determine anatomic feasibility. Disease conditions not captured by our patient population warranting consideration were reviewed. Results: A total of 7 facial or periorbital transplant candidates representing 6 different etiologies were selected as suitable indications for periorbital transplantation. Etiologies included trauma, burn, animal attack, and tumor, whereas proposed transplants included isolated periorbital and total face transplants. Allograft recovery was successfully completed in 4 periorbital subunits and 1 full face. Dual vascular supply was achieved in 5 of 6 periorbital subunits (superficial temporal and facial vessels). Conclusions: Transplantation of isolated periorbital structures or full face transplantation including periorbital structures is technically feasible. The goal of periorbital transplantation is to re-establish protective mechanisms of the eye, to prevent deterioration of visual acuity, and to optimize aesthetic outcomes. Criteria necessary for candidate selection and allograft design are identified by periorbital defect, periorbital function, ophthalmologic evaluation, and defect etiology. PMID:27014557

  2. Effect of thinning on anatomical adaptations of Norway spruce needles.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Roman; Volarík, Daniel; Urban, Josef; Børja, Isabella; Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Eldhuset, Toril Drabløs; Krokene, Paal

    2011-10-01

    Conifers and other trees are constantly adapting to changes in light conditions, water/nutrient supply and temperatures by physiological and morphological modifications of their foliage. However, the relationship between physiological processes and anatomical characteristics of foliage has been little explored in trees. In this study we evaluated needle structure and function in Norway spruce families exposed to different light conditions and transpiration regimes. We compared needle characteristics of sun-exposed and shaded current-year needles in a control plot and a thinned plot with 50% reduction in stand density. Whole-tree transpiration rates remained similar across plots, but increased transpiration of lower branches after thinning implies that sun-exposed needles in the thinned plot were subjected to higher water stress than sun-exposed needles in the control plot. In general, morphological and anatomical needle parameters increased with increasing tree height and light intensity. Needle width, needle cross-section area, needle stele area and needle flatness (the ratio of needle thickness to needle width) differed most between the upper and lower canopy. The parameters that were most sensitive to the altered needle water status of the upper canopy after thinning were needle thickness, needle flatness and percentage of stele area in needle area. These results show that studies comparing needle structure or function between tree species should consider not only tree height and light gradients, but also needle water status. Unaccounted for differences in needle water status may have contributed to the variable relationship between needle structure and irradiance that has been observed among conifers. PMID:21891783

  3. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  4. Anatomical and Radiological Aspects of the Supratrochlear Foramen in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Gutfiten-Schlesinger, Gabriel; Leite, Túlio FO; Pires, Lucas AS; Silva, Julio G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The supratrochlear foramen is an anatomic variation of great clinical and anthropologic interest. Although many studies addressed this subject in different ethnic groups, there are no studies regarding Brazilians. Aim To verify the incidence and morphometric measures of the supratrochlear foramen in Brazilian humeri. Materials and Methods A total of 330 dry humeri were analysed and divided in three groups: bones presenting the supratrochlear foramen (Group 1), bones displaying a translucent foramen (Group 2) and humeri without the foramen (Group 3). The aperture was measured with a digital vernier caliper. Radiographic pictures with different incidences were taken. Results Our analysis showed that 22.5% of humeri belonged in Group 1, 41.2% in Group 2, and 36.3% in Group 3. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the supratrochlear foramen on the left side were 2.779±2.050 mm and 2.332±1.23 mm, respectively. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the foramen on the right side were 2.778±2.197 mm, and 2.365±1.396 mm, respectively. The student’s t-test showed that there was no significant difference regarding the size of the foramen between both sides. The best X-ray machine setup was 50 kilo voltage and 0.08 milliamperage per second, associated with a slight increase in the distance of the x-ray tube. Conclusion The aperture seems to be the key point during the pre-operative planning of intramedullary fixation, since it has direct relation to the size of the intramedullary canal, thus, being an entity of clinical, anatomical, anthropological, radiological, and surgical interest. PMID:27790415

  5. Anatomical Correlates of Non-Verbal Perception in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with dementia who have dissociations in verbal and non-verbal sound processing may offer insights into the anatomic basis for highly related auditory modes. Methods: To determine the neuronal networks on non-verbal perception, 16 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD), 15 with behavior variant fronto-temporal dementia (bv-FTD), 14 with semantic dementia (SD) were evaluated and compared with 15 age-matched controls. Neuropsychological and auditory perceptive tasks were included to test the ability to compare pitch changes, scale-violated melody and for naming and associating with environmental sound. The brain 3D T1 images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to compare and correlated the volumetric measures with task scores. Results: The SD group scored the lowest among 3 groups in pitch or scale-violated melody tasks. In the environmental sound test, the SD group also showed impairment in naming and also in associating sound with pictures. The AD and bv-FTD groups, compared with the controls, showed no differences in all tests. VBM with task score correlation showed that atrophy in the right supra-marginal and superior temporal gyri was strongly related to deficits in detecting violated scales, while atrophy in the bilateral anterior temporal poles and left medial temporal structures was related to deficits in environmental sound recognition. Conclusions: Auditory perception of pitch, scale-violated melody or environmental sound reflects anatomical degeneration in dementia patients and the processing of non-verbal sounds are mediated by distinct neural circuits.

  6. TissueCypher™: A systems biology approach to anatomic pathology

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Jeffrey W.; Davison, Jon M.; Campbell, Bruce B.; Repa, Kathleen A.; Reese, Lia M.; Nguyen, Xuan M.; Li, Jinhong; Foxwell, Tyler; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current histologic methods for diagnosis are limited by intra- and inter-observer variability. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods are frequently used to assess biomarkers to aid diagnoses, however, IHC staining is variable and nonlinear and the manual interpretation is subjective. Furthermore, the biomarkers assessed clinically are typically biomarkers of epithelial cell processes. Tumors and premalignant tissues are not composed only of epithelial cells but are interacting systems of multiple cell types, including various stromal cell types that are involved in cancer development. The complex network of the tissue system highlights the need for a systems biology approach to anatomic pathology, in which quantification of system processes is combined with informatics tools to produce actionable scores to aid clinical decision-making. Aims: Here, we describe a quantitative, multiplexed biomarker imaging approach termed TissueCypher™ that applies systems biology to anatomic pathology. Applications of TissueCypher™ in understanding the tissue system of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the potential use as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis of BE are described. Patients and Methods: The TissueCypher™ Image Analysis Platform was used to assess 14 epithelial and stromal biomarkers with known diagnostic significance in BE in a set of BE biopsies with nondysplastic BE with reactive atypia (RA, n = 22) and Barrett's with high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n = 17). Biomarker and morphology features were extracted and evaluated in the confirmed BE HGD cases versus the nondysplastic BE cases with RA. Results: Multiple image analysis features derived from epithelial and stromal biomarkers, including immune biomarkers and morphology, showed significant differences between HGD and RA. Conclusions: The assessment of epithelial cell abnormalities combined with an assessment of cellular changes in the lamina propria may serve as an adjunct to conventional pathology in the

  7. Auxiliary anatomical labels for joint segmentation and atlas registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, Tobias; Szekely, Gabor; Goksel, Orcun

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies improving joint segmentation and registration by introducing auxiliary labels for anatomy that has similar appearance to the target anatomy while not being part of that target. Such auxiliary labels help avoid false positive labelling of non-target anatomy by resolving ambiguity. A known registration of a segmented atlas can help identify where a target segmentation should lie. Conversely, segmentations of anatomy in two images can help them be better registered. Joint segmentation and registration is then a method that can leverage information from both registration and segmentation to help one another. It has received increasing attention recently in the literature. Often, merely a single organ of interest is labelled in the atlas. In the presense of other anatomical structures with similar appearance, this leads to ambiguity in intensity based segmentation; for example, when segmenting individual bones in CT images where other bones share the same intensity profile. To alleviate this problem, we introduce automatic generation of additional labels in atlas segmentations, by marking similar-appearance non-target anatomy with an auxiliary label. Information from the auxiliary-labeled atlas segmentation is then incorporated by using a novel coherence potential, which penalizes differences between the deformed atlas segmentation and the target segmentation estimate. We validated this on a joint segmentation-registration approach that iteratively alternates between registering an atlas and segmenting the target image to find a final anatomical segmentation. The results show that automatic auxiliary labelling outperforms the same approach using a single label atlasses, for both mandibular bone segmentation in 3D-CT and corpus callosum segmentation in 2D-MRI.

  8. OSTEOTOMIES OF THE CORACOID PROCESS: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; de Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Marczyk, Carlos Stanislaw Fleury; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Relate the main tendinous and ligamentous structures attached in the coracoid process, correlating it to several levels of osteotomy and describing the involved structures. Methods: Thirty shoulders were dissected. The coracoid process with mainly inserted anatomic structures was dissected, and five levels of osteotomy (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5; 3.0 cm) were made from the apex of the process and the mainly involved structures were recorded. Results: In osteotomies of 1.0 cm, in 100% of the cases only the conjoint tendon (CT). In osteotomies of 1.5 cm there were 63.33% of cases involved with the CT and the Pectoralis minor (PMi), in 20% of cases only the CT, and in 16.66% the CT, PMi, and the coracohumeral ligament (CUL). In osteotomies of 2.0 cm, in 80% of the shoulders, the osteotomies embraced the CT, PMi and the CUL, and in 20% only the CT and the PMi were involved. In the osteotomies of 2.5cm there was involvement of the CT, PMi and CUL in 100% of cases. In the osteotomies of 3.0cm, six cases (20%) have presented an injury on the trapezoid ligament, and in 100% of these osteotomies, the osteotomized distal fragment had embraced the CT, PMi, CUL. Conclusion: The knowledge of anatomic structures inserted and involved in the osteotomies cuts of the coracoid process is very importan to lead with osteotomies performed in the treatment techniques of the coracoid process. Osteotomies of 3.0 cm can injure the trapezoid ligament. PMID:27042643

  9. Anatomical Correlates of Non-Verbal Perception in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with dementia who have dissociations in verbal and non-verbal sound processing may offer insights into the anatomic basis for highly related auditory modes. Methods: To determine the neuronal networks on non-verbal perception, 16 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD), 15 with behavior variant fronto-temporal dementia (bv-FTD), 14 with semantic dementia (SD) were evaluated and compared with 15 age-matched controls. Neuropsychological and auditory perceptive tasks were included to test the ability to compare pitch changes, scale-violated melody and for naming and associating with environmental sound. The brain 3D T1 images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to compare and correlated the volumetric measures with task scores. Results: The SD group scored the lowest among 3 groups in pitch or scale-violated melody tasks. In the environmental sound test, the SD group also showed impairment in naming and also in associating sound with pictures. The AD and bv-FTD groups, compared with the controls, showed no differences in all tests. VBM with task score correlation showed that atrophy in the right supra-marginal and superior temporal gyri was strongly related to deficits in detecting violated scales, while atrophy in the bilateral anterior temporal poles and left medial temporal structures was related to deficits in environmental sound recognition. Conclusions: Auditory perception of pitch, scale-violated melody or environmental sound reflects anatomical degeneration in dementia patients and the processing of non-verbal sounds are mediated by distinct neural circuits. PMID:27630558

  10. Clinical repercussions of Martin-Gruber anastomosis: anatomical study☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Filho, Mauro Razuk; Pedro, Gabriel; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Vieira, Luiz Angelo; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2016-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to describe Martin-Gruber anastomosis anatomically and to recognize its clinical repercussions. Method 100 forearms of 50 adult cadavers were dissected in an anatomy laboratory. The dissection was performed by means of a midline incision along the entire forearm and the lower third of the upper arm. Two flaps including skin and subcutaneous tissue were folded back on the radial and ulnar sides, respectively. Results Nerve communication between the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm (Martin-Gruber anastomosis) was found in 27 forearms. The anastomosis was classified into six types: type I: anastomosis between the anterior interosseous nerve and the ulnar nerve (n = 9); type II: anastomosis between the anterior interosseous nerve and the ulnar nerve at two points (double anastomosis) (n = 2); type III: anastomosis between the median nerve and the ulnar nerve (n = 4); type IV: anastomosis between branches of the median nerve and ulnar nerve heading toward the flexor digitorum profundus muscle of the fingers; these fascicles form a loop with distal convexity (n = 5); type V: intramuscular anastomosis (n = 5); and type VI: anastomosis between a branch of the median nerve to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle and the ulnar nerve (n = 2). Conclusion Knowledge of the anatomical variations relating to the innervation of the hand has great importance, especially with regard to physical examination, diagnosis, prognosis and surgical treatment. If these variations are not given due regard, errors and other consequences will be inevitable. PMID:27069892

  11. The molecular mechanism of flop-selectivity and subsite recognition for an AMPA receptor allosteric modulator: Structures of GluA2 and GluA3 complexed with PEPA

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Ptak, Christopher P.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are important potential drug targets for cognitive enhancement and the treatment of schizophrenia in part because they are the most prevalent excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the vertebrate central nervous system. One approach to the application of therapeutic agents to the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors is the use of allosteric modulators, which promote dimerization by binding to a dimer interface thereby reducing desensitization and deactivation. AMPA receptors exist in two alternatively spliced variants (flip and flop) that differ in desensitization and receptor activation profiles. Most of the structural information on modulators of the AMPA receptor target the flip subtype. We report here the crystal structure of the flop-selective allosteric modulator, PEPA, bound to the binding domains of the GluA2 and GluA3 flop isoforms of AMPA receptors. Specific hydrogen bonding patterns can explain the preference for the flop isoform. This includes a bidentate hydrogen bonding pattern between PEPA and N754 of the flop isoforms of GluA2 and GluA3 (the corresponding position in the flip isoform is S754). Comparison with other allosteric modulators provides a framework for the development of new allosteric modulators with preferences for either the flip or flop isoforms. In addition to interactions with N/S754, specific interactions of the sulfonamide with conserved residues in the binding site are characteristics of a number of allosteric modulators. These, in combination, with variable interactions with five subsites on the binding surface lead to different stoichiometries, orientations within the binding pockets, and functional outcomes. PMID:20199107

  12. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  13. Embryologic and anatomic basis of duodenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Androulakis, J; Colborn, G L; Skandalakis, P N; Skandalakis, L J; Skandalakis, J E

    2000-02-01

    The following points should be remembered by surgeons (Table 1). In writing about the head of the pancreas, the common bile duct, and the duodenum in 1979, the authors stated that Embryologically, anatomically and surgically these three entities form an inseparable unit. Their relations and blood supply make it impossible for the surgeon to remove completely the head of the pancreas without removing the duodenum and the distal part of the common bile duct. Here embryology and anatomy conspire to produce some of the most difficult surgery of the abdominal cavity. The only alternative procedure, the so-called 95% pancreatectomy, leaves a rim of pancreas along the medial border of the duodenum to preserve the duodenal blood supply. The authors had several conversations with Child, one of the pioneers of this procedure, whose constant message was to always be careful with the blood supply of the duodenum (personal communication, 1970). Beger et al popularized duodenum-preserving resection of the pancreatic head, emphasizing preservation of endocrine pancreatic function. They reported that ampullectomy (removal of the papilla and ampulla of Vater) carries a mortality rate of less than 0.4% and a morbidity rate of less than 10.0%. Surgeons should not ligate the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries because such ligation may cause necrosis of the head of the pancreas and of much of the duodenum. The accessory pancreatic duct of Santorini passes under the gastrointestinal artery. For safety, surgeons should ligate the artery away from the anterior medial duodenal wall, where the papilla is located, thereby avoiding injury to or ligation of the duct. "Water under the bridge" applies not only to the relationship of the uterine artery and ureter but also to the gastroduodenal artery and the accessory pancreatic duct. In 10% of cases, the duct of Santorini is the only duct draining the pancreas, so ligation of the gastroduodenal artery with accidental inclusion of

  14. An anatomically oriented breast model for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutra, Dominik; Bergtholdt, Martin; Sabczynski, Jörg; Dössel, Olaf; Buelow, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the western world. In the breast cancer care-cycle, MRIis e.g. employed in lesion characterization and therapy assessment. Reading of a single three dimensional image or comparing a multitude of such images in a time series is a time consuming task. Radiological reporting is done manually by translating the spatial position of a finding in an image to a generic representation in the form of a breast diagram, outlining quadrants or clock positions. Currently, registration algorithms are employed to aid with the reading and interpretation of longitudinal studies by providing positional correspondence. To aid with the reporting of findings, knowledge about the breast anatomy has to be introduced to translate from patient specific positions to a generic representation. In our approach we fit a geometric primitive, the semi-super-ellipsoid to patient data. Anatomical knowledge is incorporated by fixing the tip of the super-ellipsoid to the mammilla position and constraining its center-point to a reference plane defined by landmarks on the sternum. A coordinate system is then constructed by linearly scaling the fitted super-ellipsoid, defining a unique set of parameters to each point in the image volume. By fitting such a coordinate system to a different image of the same patient, positional correspondence can be generated. We have validated our method on eight pairs of baseline and follow-up scans (16 breasts) that were acquired for the assessment of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. On average, the location predicted and the actual location of manually set landmarks are within a distance of 5.6 mm. Our proposed method allows for automatic reporting simply by uniformly dividing the super-ellipsoid around its main axis.

  15. Radial force distribution changes associated with tangential force production in cylindrical grasping, and the importance of anatomical registration

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Slota, Gregory P.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    Radial force (Fr) distributions describe grip force coordination about a cylindrical object. Recent studies have employed only explicit Fr tasks, and have not normalized for anatomical variance when considering Fr distributions. The goals of the present study were (i) to explore Fr during tangential force production tasks, and (ii) to examine the extent to which anatomical registration (i.e. spatial normalization of anatomically analogous structures) could improve signal detectability in Fr data. Twelve subjects grasped a vertically-oriented cylindrical handle (diameter = 6 cm) and matched target upward tangential forces of 10, 20, and 30 N. Fr data were measured using a flexible pressure mat with an angular resolution 4.8 deg, and were registered using piecewise-linear interpolation between five manually identified points-of-interest. Results indicate that Fr was primarily limited to three contact regions: the distal thumb, the distal fingers, and the fingers’ metatacarpal heads, and that, while increases in tangential force caused significant increases in Fr for these regions, they did not significantly affect the Fr distribution across the hand. Registration was found to substantially reduce between-subject variability, as indicated by both accentuated Fr trends, and amplification of the test statistic. These results imply that, while subjects focus Fr primarily on three anatomical regions during cylindrical grasp, inter-subject anatomical differences introduce a variability that, if not corrected for via registration, may compromise one’s ability to draw anatomically relevant conclusions from grasping force data. PMID:22134182

  16. A reusable anatomically segmented digital mannequin for public health communication.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Kaori; Okubo, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing development of world wide web technologies has facilitated a change in health communication, which has now become bi-directional and encompasses people with diverse backgrounds. To enable an even greater role for medical illustrations, a data set, BodyParts3D, has been generated and its data set can be used by anyone to create and exchange customised three-dimensional (3D) anatomical images. BP3D comprises more than 3000 3D object files created by segmenting a digital mannequin in accordance with anatomical naming conventions. This paper describes the methodologies and features used to generate an anatomically correct male mannequin.

  17. Anatomic changes due to interspecific grafting in cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Bomfim, N; Ribeiro, D G; Nassar, N M A

    2011-05-31

    Cassava rootstocks of varieties UnB 201 and UnB 122 grafted with scions of Manihot fortalezensis were prepared for anatomic study. The roots were cut, stained with safranin and alcian blue, and examined microscopically, comparing them with sections taken from ungrafted roots. There was a significant decrease in number of pericyclic fibers, vascular vessels and tyloses in rootstocks. They exhibited significant larger vessels. These changes in anatomic structure are a consequence of genetic effects caused by transference of genetic material from scion to rootstock. The same ungrafted species was compared. This is the first report on anatomic changes due to grafting in cassava.

  18. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  19. A reusable anatomically segmented digital mannequin for public health communication.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Kaori; Okubo, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing development of world wide web technologies has facilitated a change in health communication, which has now become bi-directional and encompasses people with diverse backgrounds. To enable an even greater role for medical illustrations, a data set, BodyParts3D, has been generated and its data set can be used by anyone to create and exchange customised three-dimensional (3D) anatomical images. BP3D comprises more than 3000 3D object files created by segmenting a digital mannequin in accordance with anatomical naming conventions. This paper describes the methodologies and features used to generate an anatomically correct male mannequin. PMID:27311009

  20. The use of anatomical dolls as assessment and evidentiary tools.

    PubMed

    Lie, G Y; Inman, A

    1991-09-01

    Anatomical dolls commonly are used to assess allegations of child sexual abuse. Such assessments are based largely on interviews with children and observations of how they play with and handle the dolls. Several recent court decisions have questioned the reliability and validity of anatomical dolls as an assessment and evidentiary tool. This article reviews the literature on the use of anatomical dolls and highlights issues concerning their diagnostic and forensic efficacy. The authors identify and discuss implications of the use of these dolls for social work practice and research. PMID:1925700

  1. The Role of Extra-Anatomic Bypass in the Surgical Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Gokhan; Bozok, Şahin; Ergene, Şaban; Karakisi, Sedat Ozan; Tufekci, Nebiye; Kazdal, Hızır; Ogullar, Sabri; Kucuker, Seref Alp

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic occlusion is rare catastophic pathology with high rates of mortality and severe morbidity. In this study, we aimed to share our experience in the management of aortic occlusion and to assess the outcomes of extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Methods Eighteen patients who had undergone extra-anatomic bypass interventions in the cardiovascular surgery department of our tertiary care center between July 2009 and May 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients were preoperatively assessed with angiograms (conventional, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance angiography) and Doppler ultrasonography. Operations consisted of bilateral femoral thromboembolectomy, axillobifemoral extra-anatomic bypass and femoropopliteal bypass and were performed on an emergency basis. Results In all patients during early postoperative period successful revascularization outcomes were obtained; however, one of these operated patients died on the 10th postoperative due to multiorgan failure. The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 21.2±9.4 months (range, 6 to 36 months). Amputation was not warranted for any patient during postoperative follow-up. Conclusion To conclude, acute aortic occlusion is a rare but devastating event and is linked with substantial morbidity and mortality in spite of the recent advances in critical care and vascular surgery. Our results have shown that these hazardous outcomes may be minimized and better rates of graft patency may be achieved with extra-anatomic bypass techniques tailored according to the patient. PMID:26078925

  2. Simultaneous anatomical sketching as learning by doing method of teaching human anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Hoseini, Leila; Amini, Mitra; Dehghani, Mohammad-Reza; Kojuri, Javad; Bazrafkan, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Learning by lecture is a passive experience. Many innovative techniques have been presented to stimulate students to assume a more active attitude toward learning. In this study, simultaneous sketch drawing, as an interactive learning technique was applied to teach anatomy to the medical students. Materials and Methods: We reconstructed a fun interactive model of teaching anatomy as simultaneous anatomic sketching. To test the model's instruction effectiveness, we conducted a quasi- experimental study and then the students were asked to write their learning experiences in their portfolio, also their view was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results: The results of portfolio evaluation revealed that students believed that this method leads to deep learning and understanding anatomical subjects better. Evaluation of the students’ views on this teaching approach was showed that, more than 80% of the students were agreed or completely agreed with this statement that leaning anatomy concepts are easier and the class is less boring with this method. More than 60% of the students were agreed or completely agreed to sketch anatomical figures with professor simultaneously. They also found the sketching make anatomy more attractive and it reduced the time for learning anatomy. These number of students were agree or completely agree that the method help them learning anatomical concept in anatomy laboratory. More than 80% of the students found the simultaneous sketching is a good method for learning anatomy overall. Conclusion: Sketch drawing, as an interactive learning technique, is an attractive for students to learn anatomy. PMID:25013843

  3. Construction and Biomechanical Properties of PolyAxial Self-Locking Anatomical Plate Based on the Geometry of Distal Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Weiguo; Ye, Weixiong; Ye, Dongping; Zhou, Ziqiang; Chen, Zhiguang; Li, Aiguo; Xie, Zong-Han; Zhang, Lihai; Xu, Jiake

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide scientific and empirical evidence for the clinical application of the polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate, 80 human tibias from healthy adults were scanned by spiral CT and their three-dimensional images were reconstructed using the surface shaded display (SSD) method. Firstly, based on the geometric data of distal tibia, a polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate for distal tibia was designed and constructed. Biomechanical tests were then performed by applying axial loading, 4-point bending, and axial torsion loading on the fracture fixation models of fresh cadaver tibias. Our results showed that variation in twisting angles of lateral tibia surface was found in various segments of the distal tibia. The polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate was constructed based on the geometry of the distal tibia. Compared to the conventional anatomical locking plate, the polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate of the distal tibia provides a better fit to the geometry of the distal tibia of the domestic population, and the insertion angle of locking screws can be regulated up to 30°. Collectively, this study assesses the geometry of the distal tibia and provides variable locking screw trajectory to improve screw-plate stability through the design of a polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate. PMID:25025051

  4. Relationship between Peeled Internal Limiting Membrane Area and Anatomic Outcomes following Macular Hole Surgery: A Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Goker, Yasin Sakir; Koc, Mustafa; Yuksel, Kemal; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Demir, Abdulvahit; Gunes, Hasan; Ozpinar, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of peeled internal limiting membrane (ILM) area and anatomic outcomes following macular hole surgery using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty-one eyes in 37 consecutive patients with idiopathic, Gass stage 3-4 macular hole (MH) were enrolled in this retrospective comparative study. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to anatomic success or failure. Basal MH diameter, peeled ILM area, and MH height were calculated using SD-OCT. Other prognostic parameters, including age, stage, preoperative BCVA, and symptom duration were also assessed. Results. Thirty-two cases were classified as anatomic success, and 9 cases were classified as anatomic failure. Peeled ILM area was significantly wider and MH basal diameter was significantly less in the anatomic success group (p = 0.024 and 0.032, resp.). Other parameters did not demonstrate statistical significance. Conclusion. The findings of the present study show that the peeled ILM area can affect the anatomic outcomes of MH surgery. PMID:27413544

  5. Relationship between Peeled Internal Limiting Membrane Area and Anatomic Outcomes following Macular Hole Surgery: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goker, Yasin Sakir; Koc, Mustafa; Yuksel, Kemal; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Gunes, Hasan; Ozpinar, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of peeled internal limiting membrane (ILM) area and anatomic outcomes following macular hole surgery using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty-one eyes in 37 consecutive patients with idiopathic, Gass stage 3-4 macular hole (MH) were enrolled in this retrospective comparative study. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to anatomic success or failure. Basal MH diameter, peeled ILM area, and MH height were calculated using SD-OCT. Other prognostic parameters, including age, stage, preoperative BCVA, and symptom duration were also assessed. Results. Thirty-two cases were classified as anatomic success, and 9 cases were classified as anatomic failure. Peeled ILM area was significantly wider and MH basal diameter was significantly less in the anatomic success group (p = 0.024 and 0.032, resp.). Other parameters did not demonstrate statistical significance. Conclusion. The findings of the present study show that the peeled ILM area can affect the anatomic outcomes of MH surgery. PMID:27413544

  6. Editorial Commentary: Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Does It Really Matter?

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-01-01

    An anatomic anteromedial portal and outside-in technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel may improve rotational stability but shows no published differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:26743417

  7. Inversion of the anatomical lateralization of chick thalamofugal visual pathway by light experience.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Mamiko; Kikuchi, Tateki; Yohda, Masafumi; Nakamura, Shun

    2002-02-01

    It has been reported that light exposure to one eye induces functional lateralization, which can be inverted by exposing the opposite eye to the light. However, the anatomical basis of the functional inversion by the light has not been shown. To address this issue, we labeled cells in the dorsolateral anterior thalamus (DLA) using retrograde fluorescent tracers injected into visual Wulst, counted the labeled cell number, and compared the anatomical asymmetry of DLA between the left eye occluded and the right eye occluded chickens. We found that a rostral part of DLA (DLAda) and a lateral/ventral part of DLA differentially projected to the visual cortex ipsilaterally and contralaterally, respectively. These regions showed anatomical asymmetry that was inverted by the light. An antibody against a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit more intensively and widely stained the side of DLA receiving the light stimulation and the cell labeled by the tracers co-localized with the immunoreactive neuropil. These results indicated that the light experience induced the anatomical lateralization of thalamofugal visual pathway. PMID:11803112

  8. Chinese adult anatomical models and the application in evaluation of RF exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tongning; Tan, Liwen; Shao, Qing; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Chen; Li, Ying; Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Wiart, Joe; Lu, Bingsong; Xiao, Li; Wang, Nan; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the work of constructing Chinese adult anatomical models and their application in evaluation of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field exposures. The original dataset was obtained from photos of the sliced frozen cadavers from the Chinese Visible Human Project. Details of preparing the cadaver for slicing procedures which may influence the anatomical structures are discussed. Segmentation and reconstruction were performed mainly manually by experienced anatomists. The reconstructed models represent the average Chinese in their twenties and thirties. The finest resolution for the models is 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 with 90 identified tissues/organs for the female and 87 identified tissues/organs for the male. Tiny anatomical structures such as blood vessels with diameters of 1 mm, various glands and nerves were identified. Whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR) from 20 MHz to 5.8 GHz was calculated with the finite-difference time-domain method for different RF exposure configurations. The WBSAR results are consistent with those from other available models. Finally, some details about the anatomical models are discussed.

  9. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization. PMID:26796339

  10. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-22

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization.

  11. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  12. Clinical Correlates of the Anatomical Relationships of the Foramen Ovale: A Radioanatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ahmed; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Tantawy, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ahmed Ali; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Otto, Bradley A.; Solares, Arturo C.; Filho, Leo F. S. Ditzel; Rompaey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endonasal endoscopic transpterygoid approaches are commonly used techniques to access the infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal space. Important endoscopic endonasal landmarks for the poststyloid parapharyngeal space, hence the internal carotid artery, include the mandibular nerve at the level of foramen ovale and the lateral pterygoid plate. This study aims to define the anatomical relationships of the foramen ovale, establishing its distance to other important anatomical landmarks such as the pterygoid process and columella. Methods Distances between the foramen ovale, foramen rotundum, and fixed anatomical landmarks like the columella and pterygoid process were measured using computed tomography (CT) scans and cadaveric dissections of the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae. Results The mean distances from the foramen ovale to columella and from the foramen rotundum to columella were found to be 9.15 cm and 7.09 cm, respectively. Analysis of radiologic measurements detected no statistically significant differences between sides or gender. Conclusions The pterygoid plates and V3 are prominent landmarks of the endonasal endoscopic approach to the infratemporal fossa and poststyloid parapharyngeal space. A better understanding of the endoscopic anatomy of the infratemporal fossa and awareness of the approximate distances and geometry among anatomical landmarks facilitates a safe and complete resection of lesions arising or extending to these regions. PMID:25452902

  13. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. PMID:25653931

  14. Methods for reasoning from geometry about anatomic structures injured by penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, Omolola

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used for three-dimensional (3D) reasoning about anatomic structures affected by penetrating trauma in TraumaSCAN-Web, a platform-independent decision support system for evaluating the effects of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. In assessing outcomes for an injured patient, TraumaSCAN-Web utilizes 3D models of anatomic structures and 3D models of the regions of damage associated with stab and gunshot wounds to determine the probability of injury to anatomic structures. Probabilities estimated from 3D reasoning about affected anatomic structures serve as input to a Bayesian network which calculates posterior probabilities of injury based on these initial probabilities together with available information about patient signs, symptoms and test results. In addition to displaying textual descriptions of conditions arising from penetrating trauma to a patient, TraumaSCAN-Web allows users to visualize the anatomy suspected of being injured in 3D, in this way providing a guide to its reasoning process. PMID:16321576

  15. Frequency of radial artery anatomic variations in patients undergoing transradial heart catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Zvonimir; Bulum, Joško; Ernst, Aleksander; Strozzi, Maja; Marić-Bešić, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Over the last ten years, transradial cardiac catheterization has been increasingly applied, primarily because of its lower incidence of complications compared to the femoral approach. However, one of the greatest flaws of the transradial approach is a relatively high incidence of catheterization failure (1%-5%). Anatomic variations of radial artery are ranked second among the reasons for this. Previous studies have not provided unambiguous data on the frequency of these anomalies. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine the frequency of anatomic variations using routine angiographies of radial artery during left heart catheterization. This was a retrospective study involving examination of 602 images of routine angiographies of radial artery performed during cardiac catheterization. The frequency of anatomic variations of radial artery was 8.8%, exclusive of tortuosities with a frequency of 12.7%. The most frequent anatomic variation was the high origin of radial artery, found in 31 (5.1%) subjects. Radioulnar loops, being one of the potential contraindications for the procedure, were reported in 2% of cases. Regression analysis revealed that age (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.015) and high origin (p = 0.034) considerably contributed to the development of tortuosity. The results indicated the incidence of tortuosity to increase linearly with age. Although it is not a contraindication for continuing with the procedure, we recommend that elderly patients have angiography of radial artery performed at the beginning of the procedure due to the higher frequency of tortuosity. PMID:26058245

  16. Anatomically asymmetrical runners move more asymmetrically at the same metabolic cost.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Nardello, Francesca; Zamparo, Paola; Ardigò, Luca P; Faccioli, Niccolò; Minetti, Alberto E

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that, as occurring in cars, body structural asymmetries could generate asymmetry in the kinematics/dynamics of locomotion, ending up in a higher metabolic cost of transport, i.e. more 'fuel' needed to travel a given distance. Previous studies found the asymmetries in horses' body negatively correlated with galloping performance. In this investigation, we analyzed anatomical differences between the left and right lower limbs as a whole by performing 3D cross-correlation of Magnetic Resonance Images of 19 male runners, clustered as Untrained Runners, Occasional Runners and Skilled Runners. Running kinematics of their body centre of mass were obtained from the body segments coordinates measured by a 3D motion capture system at incremental running velocities on a treadmill. A recent mathematical procedure quantified the asymmetry of the body centre of mass trajectory between the left and right steps. During the same sessions, runners' metabolic consumption was measured and the cost of transport was calculated. No correlations were found between anatomical/kinematic variables and the metabolic cost of transport, regardless of the training experience. However, anatomical symmetry significant correlated to the kinematic symmetry, and the most trained subjects showed the highest level of kinematic symmetry during running. Results suggest that despite the significant effects of anatomical asymmetry on kinematics, either those changes are too small to affect economy or some plastic compensation in the locomotor system mitigates the hypothesized change in energy expenditure of running. PMID:24086316

  17. Targeting the S1 and S3 subsite of trypsin with unnatural cationic amino acids generates antimicrobial peptides with potential for oral administration.

    PubMed

    Karstad, Rasmus; Isaksen, Geir; Wynendaele, Evelien; Guttormsen, Yngve; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Brandsdal, Bjørn-Olav; Svendsen, John Sigurd; Svenson, Johan

    2012-07-26

    This study investigates how the S1 and S3 site of trypsin can be challenged with cationic amino acid analogues to yield active antimicrobial peptides with stability toward tryptic degradation. It is shown that unnatural analogues can be incorporated to generate stable peptides with maintained bioactivity to allow for a potential oral uptake. Selected peptides were studied using isothermal calorimetry and computational methods. Both stable and unstable peptides were found to bind stoichiometrically to trypsin with dissociation constants ranging 2-60 μM, suggesting several different binding modes. The stability of selected peptides was analyzed in whole organ extracts and the incorporation of homoarginine and 2-amino-(3-guanidino)propanoic acid resulted in a 14- and 50-fold increase in duodenal stability. In addition, a 40- and 70-fold increase in stomach stability is also reported. Overall, these results illustrate how the incorporation of cationic side chains can be employed to generate bioactive peptides with significant systemic stability.

  18. Lymphedema: A General Outline of Its Anatomical Base.

    PubMed

    Amore, M; Tapia, L; Mercado, D; Pattarone, G; Ciucci, J

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic research of the lymphatic system has been a very controversial subject throughout due to the complexity of the methods for its visualization. More than 30 years ago, together with Prof. Caplan, we began the vascular anatomy research, focusing on the lymphatic anatomy, developing and adapting different techniques of injection. On the third Normal Anatomy Chair of Buenos Aires University, we summarized the lymphatic drainage of the breast and the limbs to interpret the anatomic bases of lymphedema.

  19. Probabilistic predictions of penetrating injury to anatomic structures.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, O.; Webber, B.; Clarke, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive 3D graphical system which allows the user to visualize different bullet path hypotheses and stab wound paths and computes the probability that an anatomical structure associated with a given penetration path is injured. Probabilities can help to identify those anatomical structures which have potentially critical damage from penetrating trauma and differentiate these from structures that are not seriously injured. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9357718

  20. Exploring the anatomical encoding of voice with a mathematical model of the vocal system.

    PubMed

    Assaneo, M Florencia; Sitt, Jacobo; Varoquaux, Gael; Sigman, Mariano; Cohen, Laurent; Trevisan, Marcos A

    2016-11-01

    The faculty of language depends on the interplay between the production and perception of speech sounds. A relevant open question is whether the dimensions that organize voice perception in the brain are acoustical or depend on properties of the vocal system that produced it. One of the main empirical difficulties in answering this question is to generate sounds that vary along a continuum according to the anatomical properties the vocal apparatus that produced them. Here we use a mathematical model that offers the unique possibility of synthesizing vocal sounds by controlling a small set of anatomically based parameters. In a first stage the quality of the synthetic voice was evaluated. Using specific time traces for sub-glottal pressure and tension of the vocal folds, the synthetic voices generated perceptual responses, which are indistinguishable from those of real speech. The synthesizer was then used to investigate how the auditory cortex responds to the perception of voice depending on the anatomy of the vocal apparatus. Our fMRI results show that sounds are perceived as human vocalizations when produced by a vocal system that follows a simple relationship between the size of the vocal folds and the vocal tract. We found that these anatomical parameters encode the perceptual vocal identity (male, female, child) and show that the brain areas that respond to human speech also encode vocal identity. On the basis of these results, we propose that this low-dimensional model of the vocal system is capable of generating realistic voices and represents a novel tool to explore the voice perception with a precise control of the anatomical variables that generate speech. Furthermore, the model provides an explanation of how auditory cortices encode voices in terms of the anatomical parameters of the vocal system. PMID:27436593

  1. The linguistic roots of Modern English anatomical terminology.

    PubMed

    Turmezei, Tom D

    2012-11-01

    Previous research focusing on Classical Latin and Greek roots has shown that understanding the etymology of English anatomical terms may be beneficial for students of human anatomy. However, not all anatomical terms are derived from Classical origins. This study aims to explore the linguistic roots of the Modern English terminology used in human gross anatomy. By reference to the Oxford English Dictionary, etymologies were determined for a lexicon of 798 Modern English gross anatomical terms from the 40(th) edition of Gray's Anatomy. Earliest traceable language of origin was determined for all 798 terms; language of acquisition was determined for 747 terms. Earliest traceable languages of origin were: Classical Latin (62%), Classical Greek (24%), Old English (7%), Post-Classical Latin (3%), and other (4%). Languages of acquisition were: Classical Latin (42%), Post-Classical Latin (29%), Old English (8%), Modern French (6%), Classical Greek (5%), Middle English (3%), and other (7%). While the roots of Modern English anatomical terminology mostly lie in Classical languages (accounting for the origin of 86% of terms), the anatomical lexicon of Modern English is actually much more diverse. Interesting and perhaps less familiar examples from these languages and the methods by which such terms have been created and absorbed are discussed. The author suggests that awareness of anatomical etymologies may enhance the enjoyment and understanding of human anatomy for students and teachers alike. PMID:22461143

  2. Toledo School of Translators and their influence on anatomical terminology.

    PubMed

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Bueno-López, José-L; Raio, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Translation facilitates transmission of knowledge between cultures. The fundamental transfer of anatomic terminology from the Ancient Greek and Islamic Golden Age cultures, to medieval Latin Christendom took place in the so-called Toledo School of Translators in the 12th-13th centuries. Translations made in Toledo circulated widely across Europe. They were the foundation of scientific thinking that was born in the boards of first universities. In Toledo, Gerard of Cremona translated Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, the key work of Islamic Golden Age of medicine. Albertus Magnus, Mondino de Luzzi and Guy de Chauliac, the leading authors of anatomical Latin words in the Middle Ages, founded their books on Gerard's translations. The anatomical terms of the Canon retain auctoritas up to the Renaissance. Thus, terms coined by Gerard such as diaphragm, orbit, pupil or sagittal remain relevant in the current official anatomical terminology. The aim of the present paper is to bring new attention to the highly significant influence that the Toledo School of Translators had in anatomical terminology. For this, we shall review here the onomastic origins of a number of anatomical terms (additamentum; coracoid process; coxal; false ribs; femur; panniculus; spondylus; squamous sutures; thorax; xiphoid process, etc.) which are still used today. PMID:25667112

  3. The linguistic roots of Modern English anatomical terminology.

    PubMed

    Turmezei, Tom D

    2012-11-01

    Previous research focusing on Classical Latin and Greek roots has shown that understanding the etymology of English anatomical terms may be beneficial for students of human anatomy. However, not all anatomical terms are derived from Classical origins. This study aims to explore the linguistic roots of the Modern English terminology used in human gross anatomy. By reference to the Oxford English Dictionary, etymologies were determined for a lexicon of 798 Modern English gross anatomical terms from the 40(th) edition of Gray's Anatomy. Earliest traceable language of origin was determined for all 798 terms; language of acquisition was determined for 747 terms. Earliest traceable languages of origin were: Classical Latin (62%), Classical Greek (24%), Old English (7%), Post-Classical Latin (3%), and other (4%). Languages of acquisition were: Classical Latin (42%), Post-Classical Latin (29%), Old English (8%), Modern French (6%), Classical Greek (5%), Middle English (3%), and other (7%). While the roots of Modern English anatomical terminology mostly lie in Classical languages (accounting for the origin of 86% of terms), the anatomical lexicon of Modern English is actually much more diverse. Interesting and perhaps less familiar examples from these languages and the methods by which such terms have been created and absorbed are discussed. The author suggests that awareness of anatomical etymologies may enhance the enjoyment and understanding of human anatomy for students and teachers alike.

  4. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They

  5. Nucleotides sequestered at different subsite loci within DNA-binding pockets of two OB-fold single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are unstacked to different extents.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu N; Zhao, Liang; Gray, Carla W; Gray, Donald M; Xia, Tianbing

    2013-07-01

    The gene 5 protein (g5p) encoded by the Ff strains of Escherichia coli bacteriophages is a dimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) that consists of two identical OB-fold (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding) motifs. Ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence measurements were carried out to investigate the effect of g5p binding on the conformation of 2-aminopurine (2AP) labels positioned between adenines or cytosines in the 16-nucleotide antiparallel tails of DNA hairpins. The measurements revealed significant changes in the conformational heterogeneity of the 2AP labels caused by g5p binding. The extent of the changes was dependent on sub-binding-site location, but generally resulted in base unstacking. When bound by g5p, the unstacked 2AP population increased from ∼ 22% to 59-67% in C-2AP-C segments and from 39% to 77% in an A-2AP-A segment. The OB-fold RPA70A domain of the human replication protein A also caused a significant amount of base unstacking at various locations within the DNA binding site as evidenced by steady-state fluorescence titration measurements using 2AP-labeled 5-mer DNAs. These solution studies support the concept that base unstacking at most of a protein's multiple sub-binding-site loci may be a feature that allows non-sequence specific OB-fold proteins to bind to single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with minimal preference for particular sequences.

  6. Fabrication and assessment of 3D printed anatomical models of the lower limb for anatomical teaching and femoral vessel access training in medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Michael K; Reese, Sven; Herlihy, Therese; Geoghegan, Tony; Cantwell, Colin P; Feeney, Robin N M; Jones, James F X

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, cadaveric dissection has been the touchstone of anatomy education. It offers a medical student intimate access to his or her first patient. In contrast to idealized artisan anatomical models, it presents the natural variation of anatomy in fine detail. However, a new teaching construct has appeared recently in which artificial cadavers are manufactured through three-dimensional (3D) printing of patient specific radiological data sets. In this article, a simple powder based printer is made more versatile to manufacture hard bones, silicone muscles and perfusable blood vessels. The approach involves blending modern approaches (3D printing) with more ancient ones (casting and lost-wax techniques). These anatomically accurate models can augment the approach to anatomy teaching from dissection to synthesis of 3D-printed parts held together with embedded rare earth magnets. Vascular simulation is possible through application of pumps and artificial blood. The resulting arteries and veins can be cannulated and imaged with Doppler ultrasound. In some respects, 3D-printed anatomy is superior to older teaching methods because the parts are cheap, scalable, they can cover the entire age span, they can be both dissected and reassembled and the data files can be printed anywhere in the world and mass produced. Anatomical diversity can be collated as a digital repository and reprinted rather than waiting for the rare variant to appear in the dissection room. It is predicted that 3D printing will revolutionize anatomy when poly-material printing is perfected in the early 21st century.

  7. SU-E-J-191: Automated Detection of Anatomic Changes in H'N Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Usynin, A; Ramsey, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel statistics-based method for automated detection of anatomical changes using cone-beam CT data. A method was developed that can provide a reliable and automated early warning system that enables a “just-in-time” adaptation of the treatment plan. Methods: Anatomical changes were evaluated by comparing the original treatment planning CT with daily CBCT images taken prior treatment delivery. The external body contour was computed on a given CT slice and compared against the corresponding contour on the daily CBCT. In contrast to threshold-based techniques, a statistical approach was employed to evaluate the difference between the contours using a given confidence level. The detection tool used the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, which is a non-parametric technique that compares two samples drawn from arbitrary probability distributions. 11 H'N patients were retrospectively selected from a clinical imaging database with a total of 186 CBCT images. Six patients in the database were confirmed to have anatomic changes during the course of radiotherapy. Five of the H'N patients did not have significant changes. The KS test was applied to the contour data using a sliding window analysis. The confidence level of 0.99 was used to moderate false detection. Results: The algorithm was able to correctly detect anatomical changes in 6 out of 6 patients with an excellent spatial accuracy as early as at the 14th elapsed day. The algorithm provided a consistent and accurate delineation of the detected changes. The output of the anatomical change tool is easy interpretable, and can be shown overlaid on a 3D rendering of the patient's anatomy. Conclusion: The detection method provides the basis for one of the key components of Adaptive Radiation Therapy. The method uses tools that are readily available in the clinic, including daily CBCT imaging, and image co-registration facilities.

  8. Quantitative CT Imaging of Ventral Hernias: Preliminary Validation of an Anatomical Labeling Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described and validated a quantitative anatomical labeling protocol for extracting clinically relevant quantitative parameters for ventral hernias (VH) from routine computed tomography (CT) scans. This information was then used to predict the need for mesh bridge closure during ventral hernia repair (VHR). Methods A detailed anatomical labeling protocol was proposed to enable quantitative description of VH including shape, location, and surrounding environment (61 scans). Intra- and inter-rater reproducibilities were calculated for labeling on 18 and 10 clinically acquired CT scans, respectively. Preliminary clinical validation was performed by correlating 20 quantitative parameters derived from anatomical labeling with the requirement for mesh bridge closure at surgery (26 scans). Prediction of this clinical endpoint was compared with similar models fit on metrics from the semi-quantitative European Hernia Society Classification for Ventral Hernia (EHSCVH). Results High labeling reproducibilities were achieved for abdominal walls (±2 mm in mean surface distance), key anatomical landmarks (±5 mm in point distance), and hernia volumes (0.8 in Cohen’s kappa). 9 out of 20 individual quantitative parameters of hernia properties were significantly different between patients who required mesh bridge closure versus those in whom fascial closure was achieved at the time of VHR (p<0.05). Regression models constructed by two to five metrics presented a prediction with 84.6% accuracy for bridge requirement with cross-validation; similar models constructed by EHSCVH variables yielded 76.9% accuracy. Significance Reproducibility was acceptable for this first formal presentation of a quantitative image labeling protocol for VH on abdominal CT. Labeling-derived metrics presented better prediction of the need for mesh bridge closure than the EHSCVH metrics. This effort is intended as the foundation for future outcomes studies attempting to optimize choice of

  9. Interfractional Variations in Patient Setup and Anatomic Change Assessed by Daily Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. Allen . E-mail: ali@radonc.mcw.edu; Qi, X. Sharon; Pitterle, Marissa; Kalakota, Kapila; Mueller, Kevin; Erickson, Beth A.; Wang Dian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Firat, Selim Y.; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the interfractional variations in patient setup and anatomic changes at seven anatomic sites observed in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 152 patients treated at seven anatomic sites using a Hi-Art helical tomotherapy system were analyzed. Daily tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography images acquired before each treatment were fused to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images to determine the daily setup errors and organ motions and deformations. The setup errors were corrected before treatment and were used, along with the organ motions, to determine the clinical target volume/planning target volume margins. The organ motions and deformations for 3 representative patient cases (pancreas, uterus, and soft-tissue sarcoma) and for 14 kidneys of 7 patients are presented. Results: Interfractional setup errors in the skull, brain, and head and neck are significantly smaller than those in the chest, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. These site-specific relationships are statistically significant. The margins required to account for these setup errors range from 3 to 8 mm for the seven sites. The margin to account for both setup errors and organ motions for kidney is 16 mm. Substantial interfractional anatomic changes were observed. For example, the pancreas moved up to {+-}20 mm and volumes of the uterus and sarcoma varied {<=}30% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The interfractional variations in patient setup and in shapes, sizes, and positions of both targets and normal structures are site specific and may be used to determine the site-specific margins. The data presented in this work dealing with seven anatomic sites may be useful in developing adaptive radiotherapy.

  10. Evaluation of the global effect of anatomical background on microcalcifications detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, Federica; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Jacobs, Jurgen; Pöyry, Paula; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: 1/ To validate a method for simulating microcalcifications in mammography 2/ To evaluate the effect of anatomical background on visibility of (simulated) microcalcifications Materials and methods: Microcalcifications were extracted from the raw data of specimen from a stereotactic vacuum needle biopsy. The sizes of the templates varied from 200 μm to 1350μm and the peak contrast from 1.3% to 24%. Experienced breast imaging radiologists were asked to blindly evaluate images containing real and simulated lesions. Analysis was done using ROC methodology. The simulated lesions have been used for the creation of composite image datasets: 408 microcalcifications were simulated into 161 ROI's of 59 digital mammograms, having different anatomical backgrounds. Nine radiologists were asked to detect and rate them under conditions of free-search. A modified receiver operating characteristic study (FROC) was applied to find correlations between detectability and anatomical background. Results: 1/ The calculated area under the ROC curve, Az, was 0.52+/- 0.04. Simulated microcalcifications could not be distinguished from real ones. 2/ In the anatomical background classified as Category 1 (fatty), the detection fraction is the lowest (0.48), while for type 2,3,4 there is a gradually decrease (from 0.61 to 0.54) as the glandularity increases. The number of false positives is the highest for the background Category 1 (24%), compared to the other three types (16%). A 80% detectability is found for microcalcifications with a diameter > 400μm and a peak contrast >10%. Anatomic noise seems to limit detectability of large low contrast lesions, having a diameter >700μm.

  11. Coordination Chemistry of [HFe(CN)2(CO)3− and Its Derivatives: Toward a Model for the Iron Subsite of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, C. Matthew; Wilson, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    The photoreaction of Fe(CO)5 and cyanide salts in MeCN solution affords the dianion [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2−, conveniently isolated as [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3]. Solutions of [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− oxidize irreversibly at −600 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) to give primarily [Fe(CN)3(CO)3]−. Protonation of the dianion affords the hydride [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)2(CO)3] with a pKa ≈ 17 (MeCN). The ferrous hydride exhibits enhanced electrophilicity vs. its dianionic precursor, which resists substitution. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)2(CO)3] with tertiary phosphines and phosphites gives isomeric mixtures of [HFe(CN)2(CO)2L]− (L = P(OPh)3 and PPh3). Carbonyl substitution on [1H(CO)2]− by P(OPh)3 is first-order in both the phosphite and iron (k = 0.18 M−1 s−1 at 22 °C) with ΔH‡ = 51.6 kJ mol−1 and ΔS‡ = −83.0 J K−1 mol−1. These ligands are displaced under an atmosphere of CO. With cis-Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 (dppv), we obtained the monocarbonyl, [HFe(CN)2(CO)(dppv)]−, a highly basic hydride (pKa > 23.3) that rearranges in solution to a single isomer. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)2(CO)3] with Et4NCN resulted in rapid proton transfer to give [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− and HCN. The tricyano hydride [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]2− is prepared by the reaction of [HFe(CN)2(CO)2(PPh3)]− and [K(18-crown-6)]CN. Similar to the phosphine and phosphite derivatives, [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]2− exists as a mixture of all three possible isomers. Protonation of the hydrides [HFe(CN)2(CO)(dppv)]− and [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]− in acetonitrile solutions releases H2 and gives the corresponding acetonitrile complexes [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)3(NCMe)(CO)2] and Fe(CN)2(NCMe)(CO)(dppv). Alkylation of [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3] with MeOTf gives the thermally-unstable [MeFe(CN)2(CO)3]−, which was characterized spectroscopically at −40 °C. Reaction of dppv with [MeFe(CN)2(CO)3]− gives the acetyl complex, [Fe(CN)2(COMe)(CO)(dppv)]−. Whereas [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− undergoes protonation and methylation at Fe

  12. Robust algorithms for anatomic plane primitive detection in MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang; Peng, Zhigang; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2009-02-01

    One of primary challenges in the medical image data analysis is the ability to handle abnormal, irregular and/or partial cases. In this paper, we present two different robust algorithms towards the goal of automatic planar primitive detection in 3D volumes. The overall algorithm is a bottoms-up approach starting with the anatomic point primitives (or landmarks) detection. The robustness in computing the planar primitives is built in through both a novel consensus-based voting approach, and a random sampling-based weighted least squares regression method. Both these approaches remove inconsistent landmarks and outliers detected in the landmark detection step. Unlike earlier approaches focused towards a particular plane, the presented approach is generic and can be easily adapted to computing more complex primitives such as ROIs or surfaces. To demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of our approach, we present extensive results for automatic plane detection (Mig-Sagittal and Optical Triangle planes) in brain MR-images. In comparison to ground truth, our approach has marginal errors on about 90 patients. The algorithm also works really well under adverse conditions of arbitrary rotation and cropping of the 3D volume. In order to exhibit generalization of the approach, we also present preliminary results on intervertebrae-plane detection for 3D spine MR application.

  13. Determinants of Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: an international pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M C; Murphy, G; Koriyama, C; Pfeiffer, R M; Kim, W H; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Corvalan, A H; Carrascal, E; Abdirad, A; Anwar, M; Hao, Z; Kattoor, J; Yoshiwara-Wakabayashi, E; Eizuru, Y; Rabkin, C S; Akiba, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Meta-analyses of the published literature indicate that about 9% of gastric cancers contain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), with consistent and significant differences by sex and anatomic subsite. This study aimed to identify additional determinants of EBV positivity and their joint effects. Methods: From 15 international populations with consistent laboratory testing for EBV, we pooled individual-level data for 5081 gastric cancer cases including information on age, sex, subsite, histologic type, diagnostic stage, geographic region, and period of diagnosis. First, we combined population-specific EBV prevalence estimates using random effects meta-analysis. We then aggregated individual-level data to estimate odds ratios of EBV positivity in relation to all variables, accounting for within-population clustering. Results: In unadjusted analyses, EBV positivity was significantly higher in males, young subjects, non-antral subsites, diffuse-type histology, and in studies from the Americas. Multivariable analyses confirmed significant associations with histology and region. Sex interacted with age (P=0.003) and subsite (P=0.002) such that male predominance decreased with age for both subsites. The positivity of EBV was not significantly associated with either stage or time period. Conclusion: Aggregating individual-level data provides additional information over meta-analyses. Distinguishing histologic and geographic features as well as interactions among age, sex, and subsite further support classification of EBV-associated gastric cancer as a distinct aetiologic entity. PMID:21654677

  14. Clinically feasible reconstruction of 3D whole-body PET/CT data using blurred anatomical labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtat, Claude; Kinahan, Paul E.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Beyer, Thomas; Townsend, David W.; Defrise, Michel; Michel, Christian

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of utilizing aligned anatomical information from CT images to locally adjust image smoothness during the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) data. The ability of whole-body PET imaging to detect malignant neoplasms is becoming widely recognized. Potentially useful, however, is the role of whole-body PET in quantitative estimation of tracer uptake. The utility of PET in oncology is often limited by the high level of statistical noise in the images. Reduction in noise can be obtained by incorporating a priori image smoothness information from correlated anatomical information during the reconstruction of PET data. A combined PET/CT scanner allows the acquisition of accurately aligned PET and x-ray CT whole-body data. We use the Fourier rebinning algorithm (FORE) to accurately convert the 3D PET data to two-dimensional (2D) data to accelerate the image reconstruction process. The 2D datasets are reconstructed with successive over-relaxation of a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) objective function to model the statistics of the acquisition, data corrections, and rebinning. A 3D voxel label model is presented that incorporates the anatomical information via the penalty weights of the PWLS objective function. This combination of FORE + PWLS + labels was developed as it allows for both reconstruction of 3D whole-body data sets in clinically feasible times and also the inclusion of anatomical information in such a way that convergence can be guaranteed. Since mismatches between anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) data are unavoidable in practice, the labels are 'blurred' to reflect the uncertainty associated with the anatomical information. Simulated and experimental results show the potential advantage of incorporating anatomical information by using blurred labels to calculate the penalty weights. We conclude that while the effect of this method on detection tasks is complicated and unclear

  15. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric fields due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  16. Diagnostic 'errors' in anatomical pathology: relevance to Australian laboratories.

    PubMed

    Leong, Anthony S Y; Braye, Stephen; Bhagwandeen, Brahm

    2006-12-01

    Failure to recognise that anatomical pathology diagnosis is a process of cognitive interpretation of the morphological features present in a small tissue sample has led to the public misperception that the process is infallible. The absence of a universally accepted definition of diagnostic error makes comparison of error rates impossible and one large study of laboratories in the United States shows a significant error rate of about 5%, most of which have no major impact on patient management. A recent review of the work of one pathologist in New South Wales confirms a lack of appreciation in medical administration that variable diagnostic thresholds result in an inherent fallibility of anatomical pathology diagnoses. The outcome of the review emphasises the need to educate both public and non-pathology colleagues of the nature of our work and brings into consideration the requirement to establish baseline error rates for Australian laboratories and the role of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) in developing fair and unbiased protocols for review of diagnostic errors. The responsibility of ensuring that diagnostic error rates are kept to the minimum is a shared one. Area health services must play their part by seeking to ensure that pathologists in any laboratory are not overworked and have adequate support and back-up from pathologists with expertise in specialised areas. It has been clearly enunciated by the Royal College of Pathologists in the United Kingdom that it is not safe for any histopathology service to be operated single-handedly by one histopathologist. Service managers and clinicians have to understand that country pathologists cannot provide the full range and depth of pathology expertise in the many clinical subspecialty areas that are often practised in non-metropolitan areas. Attending clinicians share the responsibility of accepting proffered pathology diagnoses only if it conforms to the clinical context. Pathology

  17. Physiological and anatomical adaptations induced by flooding in Cotula coronopifolia.

    PubMed

    Smaoui, A; Jouini, Jihène; Rabhi, M; Bouzaien, G; Albouchi, A; Abdelly, C

    2011-06-01

    Cotula coronopifolia is a wild annual Asteraceae that grows in periodically-flooded prone environments and seems highly tolerant to periodic flooding. Seedlings of about 15 cm were collected directly from the edge of Soliman sabkha (N-E Tunisia, semi-arid stage) and grown under greenhouse conditions. Two treatments were considered: drainage and flooding. After 56 days of treatment, flooded plants showed a pronounced growth increase. This performance was essentially associated with significant increment in biomass production of both shoots and roots (about 220% of the control). The appropriate response to flooding was also characterized by the ability of the species to maintain its water status under such conditions. Neither water content nor water potential showed a significant variation as compared to those of non-flooded plants. However, transpiration rate decreased slightly but significantly in flooded plants (from 0.86 to 0.64 mmol H2O m-2 s-1). Na+ and K+ concentrations were practically maintained under waterlogging conditions, except a significant increase of Na+ content in roots of flooded plants (157% of the control). These responses were concomitant with maintenance of photosynthetic rate. However, the contents of chlorophylls a and b increased to 167% and 295%, respectively. It seems that the enhancement in these photosynthetic pigments together with a significant improvement in water use efficiency (from 4.66 to 6.07 mmol CO2 mol-1 H2O) allowed to the species to compensate the decrease in photosynthetic rate. At the anatomical level, this species responded to flooding by a significant development of its root aerenchyma (+63%) and an increase in the lignification of its stem xylem tissues (+37%). Based on the presented data, the plant fitness under flooding conditions was a result of dynamic readjustment of several morphological, physiological, and anatomical adaptive traits. Flood requirement together with salt tolerance are responsible for the

  18. Predictive factors for complications of anatomical pulmonary segmentectomies

    PubMed Central

    Traibi, Akram; Grigoroiu, Madalina; Boulitrop, Celia; Urena, Anna; Masuet-Aumatell, Cristina; Brian, Emmanuel; Stern, Jean-Baptiste; Zaimi, Rym; Gossot, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The role of anatomical pulmonary segmentectomy is increasing, but there are few data about its complication rate. We have analysed the postoperative morbidity, mortality and risk factors in a consecutive series of 228 segmentectomies performed in our department. METHODS Between January 2007 and December 2011, 221 patients underwent 228 segmentectomies. There were 99 women (45%) and 122 men (55%). The mean age was 61 years (range 18–86 years). The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 87%, and 30 patients had an FEV1 of ≤60%. Fifty-seven patients had a previous history of pulmonary resection. Indications for segmentectomy were: primary lung cancer (111 cases), metastases (71 cases), benign non-infectious (25 cases) and benign infectious diseases (21 cases). The approach was a posterolateral thoracotomy (Group PLT) in 146 patients (64%) and a thoracoscopy (Group TS) in 82 (36%). The two groups were homogenous in terms of age, gender, indications of surgery and type of segmentectomy. RESULTS The mortality rate at 3 months was 1.3% (3 patients). The overall complication rate was 34%. Ten patients were reoperated for the following reasons: haemothorax (4 cases), ischaemia of the remaining segment (3 cases), active bleeding (1 case), prolonged air leak (1 case) and dehiscence of thoracotomy (1 case). The average duration of drainage was 5 days (range 1–34 days) and the average length of stay was 9 days (range 3–126 days). On univariate analysis, FEV1, male gender and thoracotomy were statistically significant risk factors for complications. On multivariate analysis, the same three predictive factors of complications independently of age were found statistically significant: preoperative FEV1 < 60% [odds ratio (OR) = 5.9, 95% CI (2.5–13.7), P < 0.001] male gender [OR = 2.04, 95% CI (1.2–3.6), P < 0.013] and thoracotomy [OR = 2.14, 95% CI (1.33–3.46), P = 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary anatomical segmentectomies have an acceptable

  19. Capturing the multiscale anatomical shape variability with polyaffine transformation trees.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christof; Pennec, Xavier; Reyes, Mauricio

    2012-10-01

    Mandible fractures are classified depending on their location. In clinical practice, locations are grouped into regions at different scales according to anatomical, functional and esthetic considerations. Implant design aims at defining the optimal implant for each patient. Emerging population-based techniques analyze the anatomical variability across a population and perform statistical analysis to identify an optimal set of implants. Current efforts are focused on finding clusters of patients with similar characteristics and designing one implant for each cluster. Ideally, the description of anatomical variability is directly connected to the clinical regions. This connection is what we present here, by introducing a new registration method that builds upon a tree of locally affine transformations that describes variability at different scales. We assess the accuracy of our method on 146 CT images of femurs. Two medical experts provide the ground truth by manually measuring six landmarks. We illustrate the clinical importance of our method by clustering 43 CT images of mandibles for implant design. The presented method does not require any application-specific input, which makes it attractive for the analysis of other multiscale anatomical structures. At the core of our new method lays the introduction of a new basis for stationary velocity fields. This basis has very close links to anatomical substructures. In the future, this method has the potential to discover the hidden and possibly sparse structure of the anatomy.

  20. [ANATOMICAL PREPARATIONS IN MUSEUMS A SPECIAL CATEGORY OF CULTURAL HERITAGE].

    PubMed

    Monza, Francesca; Licata, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The international debate on the issue of human remains in museums and on the ethical issues related to their exhibition stimulates reflection on the Italian anatomical collections and on their preparations. A definition of human remains or of anatomical preparation does not exist in the Italian legislation. The anatomical specimens in museums are protected by the laws of Cultural Heritage as part of public collections, but their status is not well defined. By their nature of human material they would in fact be considered as a special category of Cultural Heritage. Because they are part of a cadaver they can be regarded as res nullius, but since treated with special techniques they could also change their meaning and being considered a species nova. Finally, it reflects on the possibility of creating a museum in Italy composed by new anatomical preparations. The article outline the contours of a museological issue that deserves to be investigated in order to better identify the anatomical preparations and their management in museums.

  1. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments.

  2. Anatomical Study of Variations in the Blood Supply of Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Aristotle, Sharmila; Sundarapandian; Felicia, Christilda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery and a single renal vein, which accounts for about 20% of the cardiac output. However, variations in the form of level of origin and arrangement of renal arteries are so frequent. Aim: The present study aimed to note the vascular anatomy of kidneys with respect to the variations in their origin, course and any aberrant vessels which were present. Materials and Methods: The study material comprised of 15 formalin fixed human cadavers. During routine abdominal dissection for undergraduate students, the kidneys were exposed and the blood supply, along with its variations, were noted. Results: The following anatomical findings are observed in this study: (i) Accessory renal arteries (ii) Presegmental arteries (iii) Upper polar arteries (iv) Lower polar arteries (v) Inferior suprarenal artery from accessory renal artery and (vi) Accessory renal vein. Conclusion: Awareness of the normal as well variational anatomy is mandatory for the surgeons, radiologists and urologists, for doing any uroradiological procedures or angiographic studies. Hence, this study will serve a useful guideline for the above mentioned procedures. PMID:24086837

  3. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments. PMID:26363844

  4. The knee in full flexion: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Pinskerova, V; Samuelson, K M; Stammers, J; Maruthainar, K; Sosna, A; Freeman, M A R

    2009-06-01

    There has been only one limited report dating from 1941 using dissection which has described the tibiofemoral joint between 120 degrees and 160 degrees of flexion despite the relevance of this arc to total knee replacement. We now provide a full description having examined one living and eight cadaver knees using MRI, dissection and previously published cryosections in one knee. In the range of flexion from 120 degrees to 160 degrees the flexion facet centre of the medial femoral condyle moves back 5 mm and rises up on to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. At 160 degrees the posterior horn is compressed in a synovial recess between the femoral cortex and the tibia. This limits flexion. The lateral femoral condyle also rolls back with the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus moving with the condyle. Both move down over the posterior tibia at 160 degrees of flexion. Neither the events between 120 degrees and 160 degrees nor the anatomy at 160 degrees could result from a continuation of the kinematics up to 120 degrees . Therefore hyperflexion is a separate arc. The anatomical and functional features of this arc suggest that it would be difficult to design an implant for total knee replacement giving physiological movement from 0 degrees to 160 degrees .

  5. Epilepsy-related long-term amnesia: anatomical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Butler, Chris; Kapur, Narinder; Zeman, Adam; Weller, Roy; Connelly, Alan

    2012-11-01

    There are few clues as to the neural basis of selective long-term amnesia. We report group and single-case data to shed light on this issue. In a group study of patients with transient epileptic amnesia, there were no significant correlations between volumetric measures of the hippocampus and indices of accelerated long-term forgetting or longer-term autobiographical memory loss. Post-mortem investigations in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy who showed accelerated long-term forgetting, together with a degree of autobiographical memory loss, yielded evidence of neuronal loss and gliosis in regions of both the right and the left hippocampus. Neuronal loss and gliosis were more evident in anterior than posterior hippocampus. These results indicate that the unusual forms of long-term forgetting seen in some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have no gross anatomical correlate. The findings leave open the possibilities that subtle structural damage or subtle functional disturbance, perhaps in the form of subclinical epileptiform activity, underly epilepsy-related long-term amnesia.

  6. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAMI, Reona; TANIMOTO, Yoshimasa; KISHIMOTO, Miori; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1–3 parietal and 1–3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1–4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2–7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26615866

  7. Kanamycin and bumetanide ototoxicity: anatomical, physiological and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Santi, P A; Ruggero, M A; Nelson, D A; Turner, C W

    1982-08-01

    Severe hair-cell degeneration and cochlear dysfunction was observed in chinchillas examined at 60 days (or longer) after administration of a single injection of 150 mg/kg kanamycin, followed 2 h later by a single injection of 20 mg/kg bumetanide. Outer hair cells in the cochlear base were most severely affected. While inner and outer hair-cell loss was common, some animals showed large regions along the basilar membrane where almost all inner hair cells were present and almost all outer hair cells were absent. Wherever areas of complete degeneration of the organ of Corti occurred, a small, diffuse population of nerve fibers within the spiral lamina was always present. Single-unit tuning curves correlated best with anatomical observations, compared with the other functional measures of auditory sensitivity that were obtained (behavioral audiogram and compound action potential thresholds). Results indicated that behavioral detection of auditory stimuli is relatively independent of innervation density as long as a few inner hair cells are present. Thus, the cross-fiber threshold envelope of the single-unit tuning curves appeared very similar to the behavioral audiogram. PMID:7118731

  8. Trapezius muscle transfer for external shoulder rotation: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Sakane, Daniel Takashi; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the viability of transferring the lower and transverse trapezius to the greater tuberosity using three different techniques. METHODS: Twelve shoulders from six cadavers were used. The primary outcome was to assess the suture viability of the trapezius muscle transfer to the greater tuberosity in the insertion topography of the infraspinatus, with the arm adducted during internal rotation (hand on the abdomen) and maximum scapular retraction. Three transfers were applied to each shoulder: the lower and transverse trapezius distal insertion (Group 1); lower trapezius alone (Group 2); and lower trapezius insertion and origin (Group 3). Accessory nerve integrity was assessed before and after transfers. RESULTS: Sutures were viable in 42% (5/12) and 58% (7/12) on Groups 1 and 3, respectively, with no statistically significant difference (Fisher's test, p=0.558); Group 3 exhibited frequent neurologic injury (11/12). Group 2 was the least successful; the tendon did not reach the greater tuberosity, and no sutures were viable. CONCLUSION: Groups 1 and 3 exhibited the best nongrafting suture viability to the greater tuberosity; however, Group 3 was associated to frequent spinal accessory nerve injury. Level of Evidence IV, Anatomical Study PMID:25538475

  9. Anatomic Variations of Cervical and High Thoracic Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural blocks are widely used for the management of acute and chronic pain. The technique of loss of resistance is frequently adopted to determine the epidural space. A discontinuity of the ligamentum flavum may increase the risk of failure to identify the epidural space. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomic variations of the cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum in embalmed cadavers. Methods Vertebral column specimens of 15 human cadavers were obtained. After vertebral arches were detached from pedicles, the dural sac and epidural connective tissue were removed. The ligamentum flavum from C3 to T6 was directly examined anteriorly. Results The incidence of midline gaps in the ligamentum flavum was 87%-100% between C3 and T2. The incidence decreased below this level and was the lowest at T4-T5 (8%). Among the levels with a gap, the location of a gap in the caudal third of the ligamentum flavum was more frequent than in the middle or cephalic portion of the ligamentum flavum. Conclusions The cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum frequently has midline intervals with various features, especially in the caudal portion of the intervertebral space. Therefore, the ligamentum flavum is not always reliable as a perceptible barrier to identify the epidural space at these vertebral levels. Additionally, it may be more useful to insert the needle into the cephalic portion of the intervertebral space than in the caudal portion. PMID:25317280

  10. Anatomical study on the innervation of the elbow capsule☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Filho, Mauro Razuk; Rozas, João; Wey, João; de Andrade, Antonio Marcos; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To put forward an anatomical description of the innervation of the elbow capsule, illustrated through morphological analysis on dissections. Methods Thirty elbows from fresh fixed adult cadavers aged 32–74 years, of both sexes, were dissected. Results Among the dissected arms, we observed that the median nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in five arms, two branches in two arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in nine arms and five branches in two arms. The radial nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in two arms, two branches in nine arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in five arms and five branches in two arms. The ulnar nerve did not have any branches in three arms, while it had one branch in six arms, two branches in four arms, three branches in five arms, four branches in seven arms, five branches in four arms and six branches in one arm. Conclusions We observed branches of the radial, ulnar and medial nerves in the elbow joint, and a close relationship between their capsular and motor branches. PMID:27218079

  11. Cartilaginous and ligamentous degeneration of the wrist. Anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; de Smet, L; Fabry, G

    1994-01-01

    The growing precision of diagnostic techniques (MRI, arthrography, arthroscopy) and the consequent increase of the diagnosis of cartilaginous and ligamentous lesions of the wrist led us to undertake a detailed anatomical study of the carpus and to extend this study to the search for correlations between these lesions and the radio-ulnar index. Fifty one cadaveric wrists were dissected from an elderly population (mean age of 76 years). Cartilaginous lesions were found in two-thirds of radioulnar joints of the wrist with a marked predominance for the lunate bone (43%). The triangular cartilage of the fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC) was perforated in 23 wrists (46%). We established a correlation between the radio-ulnar index and perforations of the TFCC (p < 0.05), as well as the thickness of this structure (p < 0.05). The relationship between age and rupture of intrinsic ligaments (p < 0.05), and the radio-ulnar index (p < 0.05) and age was also established. We present our figures, discuss the clinical implications, and draw the following conclusions from this study. 1) The carpus is a complex joint which is subject to age-related degeneration. 2) The large number of cartilaginous lesions observed in this study must be taken into account in the interpretation of MRI and the "over" precise results of arthroscopy. PMID:7531478

  12. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  13. Bilateral anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty versus reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Latif, Vaqar; Denard, Patrick J; Young, Allan A; Liotard, Jean-Pierre; Walch, Gllies

    2012-04-01

    The results of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty have previously been reported separately. Although the indications differ, scenarios exist in which a patient may have a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 shoulder and a reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral shoulder.Between 1992 and 2009, twelve patients underwent bilateral sequential primary shoulder arthroplasty with a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 side and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral side. Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, subjective shoulder value, and patient satisfaction were obtained a minimum 1 year postoperatively. Mean postoperative Constant score was 77 after total shoulder arthroplasty and 73 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P<.2488). Mean postoperative active forward flexion was similar after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.8910). Greater external rotation at the side (43° vs 12°; P<.0001) and internal rotation (T8 vs L1; P<.0001) were observed after total shoulder arthroplasty. Mean ASES score was 89.6 after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with 82.4 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.0125). Patient satisfaction was 92% for both prostheses, and mean subjective shoulder value was similar (85.4% vs 82.5%; P=.6333).Bilateral shoulder arthroplasty performed with a total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on opposite shoulders can provide good functional outcome and high patient satisfaction. Although range of motion is better following total shoulder arthroplasty, no difference was observed in final Constant score or subjective patient assessment. PMID:22495846

  14. Zebrafish Expression Ontology of Gene Sets (ZEOGS): a tool to analyze enrichment of zebrafish anatomical terms in large gene sets.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Marsico, Annalisa; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2013-09-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for developmental and biomedical research. It is frequently used for high-throughput functional genomics experiments, such as genome-wide gene expression measurements, to systematically analyze molecular mechanisms. However, the use of whole embryos or larvae in such experiments leads to a loss of the spatial information. To address this problem, we have developed a tool called Zebrafish Expression Ontology of Gene Sets (ZEOGS) to assess the enrichment of anatomical terms in large gene sets. ZEOGS uses gene expression pattern data from several sources: first, in situ hybridization experiments from the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN); second, it uses the Zebrafish Anatomical Ontology, a controlled vocabulary that describes connected anatomical structures; and third, the available connections between expression patterns and anatomical terms contained in ZFIN. Upon input of a gene set, ZEOGS determines which anatomical structures are overrepresented in the input gene set. ZEOGS allows one for the first time to look at groups of genes and to describe them in terms of shared anatomical structures. To establish ZEOGS, we first tested it on random gene selections and on two public microarray datasets with known tissue-specific gene expression changes. These tests showed that ZEOGS could reliably identify the tissues affected, whereas only very few enriched terms to none were found in the random gene sets. Next we applied ZEOGS to microarray datasets of 24 and 72 h postfertilization zebrafish embryos treated with beclomethasone, a potent glucocorticoid. This analysis resulted in the identification of several anatomical terms related to glucocorticoid-responsive tissues, some of which were stage-specific. Our studies highlight the ability of ZEOGS to extract spatial information from datasets derived from whole embryos, indicating that ZEOGS could be a useful tool to automatically analyze gene expression

  15. Functional, Clinical and Biomechanical Comparison of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Anatomical Placement of Transtibial Tunnel Placement

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Eray; Kara, Adnan; Öç, Yunus; Çelik, Haluk; Çamur, Savaş; Eren, Osman Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Functional, clinical and biomechanical comparison of Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of transtibial tunnel placement. Methods: 55 patients who can be adequately followed-up being divided into transtibial and anatomic groups. Lachman and Pivot-shift tests were performed to all patients. Laxity was measured by performing KT-1000 arthrometer test with 15,20 and 30 pounds power. Muscle strength were evaluated with Cybex II at 60 ° / sec, 240 ° / sec frequencies with flexion and extension peak torque. The maximum force values of untouched knee and the knee with surgery have been compared. Groups were evaluated by using IKDC knee ligament healing standard form, IKDC activity scale, modified Lysholm and Cincinnati evaluation forms. Return to work and return to fitness times of patients were compared. NCSS 2007 & PASS 2008 Statistical Software was used for statistical analysis. Results: Statistically, there was not any observed significant difference between Lachman and Pivot-shift levels. Positive value of Pivot-shift test and incidence of anterior translation in Lachman test were higher in the cases which were subjected to transtibial technique . There was not any statistically significant difference between Lysholm activity levels of cases. Lysholm activity levels of patients who underwent anatomic techniques significantly higher than transtibial technique. There was not any statistically significant difference between Modified Cincinnati activity levels. Modified Cincinnati activity levels of patients who were subjected anatomical techniques, are significantly higher than transtibial technique. There was not any statistically significant difference between post treatment IKDC activity levels. Intense activity after treatment rate of patient who were subjected to anatomic techniques was significantly higher than transtibial technique. There was a statistically significant differences between Cybex extension-flexion 60

  16. A simple way to improve anatomical mapping of functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villain, Nicolas; Landeau, Brigitte; Groussard, Mathilde; Mevel, Katell; Fouquet, Marine; Dayan, Jacques; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Advances in functional neuroimaging studies have led to the need for improved anatomical precision to face with more and more specific challenges. Nevertheless, functional MRI (fMRI) suffers from geometrical distortions which limit the matching between functional and anatomical data necessary to interpret fMRI results. The ‘FieldMap’ method is the most widely used technique to correct for geometrical distortions but in some cases cannot be applied or provides unsatisfactory results. The objective of the present study is thus to provide a very simple alternative method for distortion correction and to demonstrate its efficiency. Methods This correction relies on the non-linear registration of Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) acquisitions onto their corresponding undistorted non-EPI T2Star volume, and was tested on two independent groups of subjects undertaking the same paradigm but scanned with distinct EPI sequences. Results This procedure was found to considerably decrease the mismatch between functional and anatomical data in both groups, as revealed through several quantitative and qualitative measures on both EPI volumes and activation maps. Conclusion The present study describes a simple, rapid, and easily implementable method to significantly improve neuroanatomical accuracy of fMRI results localization, which may be relevant for future neuroimaging studies. PMID:20331499

  17. Subdivision of the occipital lobes: an anatomical and functional MRI connectivity study.

    PubMed

    Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Urbanski, Marika; Valabregue, Romain; Bayle, Dimitri J; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2014-07-01

    Exploring brain connectivity is fundamental to understanding the functional architecture of the cortex. In our study we employed tractography-based parcellation, combined with the principal component analysis statistical framework, to divide the occipital lobes into seven areas in a group of eighteen healthy participants. Tractography-based parcellation is a method based on diffusion imaging tractography, which segregates the living human brain into distinctive areas showing sharp differences in their anatomical connectivity. The results were compared to covarying functional networks involving distinct areas within the occipital lobes, that we obtained using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), as well as to other existing subdivisions of the occipital lobes. Our results showed similarities with functional imaging data in healthy controls and cognitive profiles in brain-damaged patients, although several differences with cytoarchitectonic, myelogenetic, myeloarchitectonic and functional maps were reported. While the similarities are encouraging, the potential validity and limitations of the differences observed are discussed. Taken together these results suggest that tractography-based parcellation may provide a new promising anatomical subdivision of the living human brain based on its anatomical connectivity, which may benefit the understanding of clinical-neuroanatomical dissociations and functional neuroimaging results.

  18. Distal Triceps Knotless Anatomic Footprint Repair: A New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Paci, James M.; Clark, Jonathan; Rizzi, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Distal triceps rupture is a rare injury causing significant disability. Several techniques for treating distal triceps ruptures have been described using bone tunnels or suture anchors. More recent techniques have focused on re-creating the anatomic footprint of the distal triceps tendon. However, the increasing numbers of anchors used increase the risk to the articular surface, and all earlier techniques require knot tying and bulky knots beneath the thin posterior elbow soft-tissue envelope. We describe a technique combining the use of bone tunnels and a single suture anchor to create a knotless anatomic footprint repair of the distal triceps. By using this technique, we are able to create a tension-band construct that self-reinforces the anatomic repair and is very low profile while significantly decreasing risk to the articular surface. PMID:25473618

  19. Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Technique: An Anatomic-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Restoration of anteroposterior laxity after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been predictable with traditional open and endoscopic techniques. However, anterolateral rotational stability has been difficult to achieve in a subset of patients, even with appropriate anatomic techniques. Therefore, differing techniques have attempted to address this rotational laxity by augmenting or reconstructing lateral-sided structures about the knee. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the anterolateral ligament as a potential contributor to residual anterolateral rotatory instability in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients. Numerous anatomic and biomechanical studies have been performed to further define the functional importance of the anterolateral ligament, highlighting the need for surgical techniques to address these injuries in the unstable knee. This article details our technique for an anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon allograft. PMID:27656361

  20. Anatomical and Physiological Considerations in Vestibular Dysfunction and Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.; Mills, Kristal N.; Gaines, G. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Sensory information from the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory/proprioceptive systems are integrated in the brain in complex ways to produce a final motor output to muscle groups for maintaining gaze, head and body posture, and controlling static and dynamic balance. The balance system is complex, which can make differential diagnosis of dizziness quite challenging. On the other hand, this complex system is organized anatomically in a variety of pathways and some of these pathways have been well studied. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is one such pathway. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the VOR facilitates our understanding of normal and abnormal eye movements and research is advancing our understanding of the plasticity of the vestibular system. This review highlights anatomical and physiological features of the normal vestibular system, applies these concepts to explain some clinical findings in some common peripheral vestibular disorders, and discusses some of the research investigating the anatomical and physiological basis for vestibular compensation. PMID:21072129

  1. A joint model for boundaries of multiple anatomical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Grégoire; Kurtek, Sebastian; Srivastava, Anuj

    2011-03-01

    The use of joint shape analysis of multiple anatomical parts is a promising area of research with applications in medical diagnostics, growth evaluations, and disease characterizations. In this paper, we consider several features (shapes, orientations, scales, and locations) associated with anatomical parts and develop probability models that capture interactions between these features and across objects. The shape component is based on elastic shape analysis of continuous boundary curves. The proposed model is a second order model that considers principal coefficients in tangent spaces of joint manifolds as multivariate normal random variables. Additionally, it models interactions across objects using area-interaction processes. Using given observations of four anatomical parts: caudate, hippocampus, putamen and thalamus, on one side of the brain, we first estimate the model parameters and then generate random samples from them using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The plausibility of these random samples validates the proposed models.

  2. Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Death in Long-Term Survivors of Esophageal Cancer: An Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result Database

    PubMed Central

    Gharzai, Laila; Verma, Vivek; Denniston, Kyle A.; Bhirud, Abhijeet R.; Bennion, Nathan R.; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer often results in unintended radiation doses delivered to the heart owing to anatomic proximity. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we examined late cardiac death in survivors of esophageal cancer that had or had not received RT. Methods 5,630 patients were identified that were diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma (AC) from 1973–2012, who were followed for at least 5 years after therapy. Examined risk factors for cardiac death included age (≤55/56-65/66-75/>75), gender, race (white/non-white), stage (local/regional/distant), histology (SCC/AC), esophageal location (<18cm/18-24cm/25-32cm/33-40cm from incisors), diagnosis year (1973-1992/1993-2002/2003-2012), and receipt of surgery and/or RT. Time to cardiac death was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox model was used to evaluate risk factors for cardiac death in propensity score matched data. Results Patients who received RT were younger, diagnosed more recently, had more advanced disease, SCC histology, and no surgery. The RT group had higher risk of cardiac death than the no-RT group (log-rank p<0.0001). The median time to cardiac death in the RT group was 289 months (95% CI, 255–367) and was not reached in the no-RT group. The probability of cardiac death increased with age and decreased with diagnosis year, and this trend was more pronounced in the RT group. Multivariate analysis found RT to be associated with higher probability of cardiac death (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.47, HR 1.961, 95% CI 1.466–2.624). Lower esophageal subsite (33–40 cm) was also associated with a higher risk of cardiac death. Other variables were not associated with cardiac death. Conclusions Recognizing the limitations of a SEER analysis including lack of comorbidity accountability, these data should prompt more definitive study as to whether a possible associative effect of RT on cardiac death

  3. Benign anatomical mistakes: the correct anatomical term for the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, John E

    2002-01-01

    The term recurrent laryngeal nerve has been adopted by Nomina Anatomica (1989) and Terminologia Anatomica (1998) to describe this vagus branch from its origin, its turn dorsally around the subclavian artery and the aortic arch, and its cranial pathway until it reaches its terminal organs in the neck. However, there is still much confusion, and either the terms inferior and recurrent laryngeal nerve are used interchangeably or inferior laryngeal nerve is considered the terminal branch of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. We hereby feel that it is necessary to reassess the term and we propose the term inferior laryngeal nerve for the entire nerve under consideration, from its origin from the vagus nerve to its destinations, including tracheal, esophageal, and pharyngeal branches. If the term superior laryngeal nerve is a given, standard and accepted term in the anatomical terminology, then logically the term inferior laryngeal nerve should also be accepted, as opposed to it. Of course the upward travel of the inferior laryngeal nerve is "recurrent". When nonrecurrence is encountered together with an arteria lusoria, a retroesophageal right subclavian artery or a right aortic arch, we consider that the term nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerve should be used to describe the deviation from the normal.

  4. Anatomic shoulder replacement for primary osteoarthritis in patients over 80 years

    PubMed Central

    Iriberri, Iker; Candrian, Christian; Freehill, Michael T; Raiss, Patric; Boileau, Pascal; Walch, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) gives good outcome in the treatment of primary osteoarthritis, but it is not known whether this also applies to patients over 80 years old. Patients and methods We retrospectively assessed outcome in patients over the age of 80 after anatomic TSA, performed for primary osteoarthritis with a preoperative intact rotator cuff (group O, n = 32). We compared it with outcome in a group of patients under the age of 70 (group Y, n = 32). Subjective outcome, Constant score, and radiological findings were analyzed. Results At a mean follow-up time of 7 years, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. In group O, 24 patients were very satisfied and in group Y, 23 patients were very satisfied; the subjective shoulder value was 81% in both groups. Mean Constant score was 65 in group O and 67 in group Y. Moderate or severe radiological upper migration of the humeral head was detected in 1 patient in group O and in 3 patients in group Y. One patient in group Y was revised for glenoid loosening. Interpretation Good to excellent results can be expected after anatomic TSA in patients over the age of 80. Our findings suggest that they have similar results to those in patients around 70 years of age. PMID:25586167

  5. Bilateral lingual-facial trunk: anatomic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Troupis, T; Michalinos, A; Kakisis, J; Natsis, K; Sofidis, G; Skandalakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Common origin of lingual and facial artery is a relatively frequent anatomic varia-tion. Instead, bilateral lingual-facial trunk has been described only sparsely in the literature. In this report authors describe and analyse a case of bilateral common lingual-facial trunk in the context of its anatomical, clinical and embryological implications. We also describe possible consequences in performance of elective and emergent surgical operations and modification in surgical techniques that should be considered. We believe that surgeons should be suspicious for this variation's existence and keep alternative solutions in their armentarium.

  6. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  7. Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue–Derived Stem Cell Utility Is Independent of Anatomical Harvest Site

    PubMed Central

    Choudhery, Mahmood S.; Badowski, Michael; Muise, Angela; Pierce, John; Harris, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the challenges for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is to obtain suitably large cell numbers for therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can easily be expanded in vitro to obtain large numbers of cells, but this approach may induce cellular senescence. The characteristics of cells are dependent on variables like age, body mass index (BMI), and disease conditions, however, and in the case of adipose tissue–derived stem cells (ASCs), anatomical harvest site is also an important variable that can affect the regenerative potential of isolated cells. We therefore had kept the parameters (age, BMI, disease conditions) constant in this study to specifically assess influence of anatomical sites of individual donors on utility of ASCs. Adipose tissue was obtained from multiple anatomical sites in individual donors, and viability and nucleated cell yield were determined. MSC frequency was enumerated using colony forming unit assay and cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Growth characteristics were determined by long-term population doubling analysis of each sample. Finally, MSCs were induced to undergo adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. To validate the findings, these results were compared with similar single harvest sites from multiple individual patients. The results of the current study indicated that MSCs obtained from multiple harvest sites in a single donor have similar morphology and phenotype. All adipose depots in a single donor exhibited similar MSC yield, viability, frequency, and growth characteristics. Equivalent differentiation capacity into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes was also observed. On the basis of results, we conclude that it is acceptable to combine MSCs obtained from various anatomical locations in a single donor to obtain suitably large cell numbers required for therapy, avoiding in vitro senescence and lengthy and expensive in vitro culturing and expansion steps. PMID:26309790

  8. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest-abdomen-pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore, serve

  9. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  10. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  11. Segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures from volumetric medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jonghyun; Park, Soonyoung; Cho, Wanhyun; Kim, Sunworl; Kim, Gisoo; Ahn, Gukdong; Lee, Myungeun; Lim, Junsik

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method that can extract and visualize anatomical structures from volumetric medical images by using a 3D level set segmentation method and a hybrid volume rendering technique. First, the segmentation using the level set method was conducted through a surface evolution framework based on the geometric variation principle. This approach addresses the topological changes in the deformable surface by using the geometric integral measures and level set theory. These integral measures contain a robust alignment term, an active region term, and a mean curvature term. By using the level set method with a new hybrid speed function derived from the geometric integral measures, the accurate deformable surface can be extracted from a volumetric medical data set. Second, we employed a hybrid volume rendering approach to visualize the extracted deformable structures. Our method combines indirect and direct volume rendering techniques. Segmented objects within the data set are rendered locally by surface rendering on an object-by-object basis. Globally, all the results of subsequent object rendering are obtained by direct volume rendering (DVR). Then the two rendered results are finally combined in a merging step. This is especially useful when inner structures should be visualized together with semi-transparent outer parts. This merging step is similar to the focus-plus-context approach known from information visualization. Finally, we verified the accuracy and robustness of the proposed segmentation method for various medical volume images. The volume rendering results of segmented 3D objects show that our proposed method can accurately extract and visualize human organs from various multimodality medical volume images.

  12. Methods of Evidence-Based Anatomy: a guide to conducting systematic reviews and meta-analysis of anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-Based Anatomy (EBA) is the concept of applying evidence-based principles and research methods to the anatomical sciences. While narrative reviews are common in the anatomical sciences, true systematic reviews (SR) and meta-analysis (MA) are only beginning to grow in popularity. In order to enhance the quality of future EBA studies, and ensure the clinical reliability of their results, a uniform methodology is needed. In this paper, we present a step-by-step methodological guide for performing SRs and MAs of anatomical studies. We address the EBA-specific challenges in each step of the SR and MA process, and discuss methods and strategies to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, we discuss in detail the statistical methods used in MA of anatomical data, including multi-categorical and single-categorical pooled prevalence estimates, as well as pooled means of one group. Lastly, we discuss the major limitations of EBA, including the lack of a proper quality assessment tool for anatomical studies. The methods described in this paper present a uniform road map for future EBA studies. PMID:26844627

  13. Evidence for a genetic discontinuity between Neandertals and 24,000-year-old anatomically modern Europeans.

    PubMed

    Caramelli, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Vernesi, Cristiano; Lari, Martina; Casoli, Antonella; Mallegni, Francesco; Chiarelli, Brunetto; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2003-05-27

    During the late Pleistocene, early anatomically modern humans coexisted in Europe with the anatomically archaic Neandertals for some thousand years. Under the recent variants of the multiregional model of human evolution, modern and archaic forms were different but related populations within a single evolving species, and both have contributed to the gene pool of current humans. Conversely, the Out-of-Africa model considers the transition between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans as the result of a demographic replacement, and hence it predicts a genetic discontinuity between them. Following the most stringent current standards for validation of ancient DNA sequences, we typed the mtDNA hypervariable region I of two anatomically modern Homo sapiens sapiens individuals of the Cro-Magnon type dated at about 23 and 25 thousand years ago. Here we show that the mtDNAs of these individuals fall well within the range of variation of today's humans, but differ sharply from the available sequences of the chronologically closer Neandertals. This discontinuity is difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that both Neandertals and early anatomically modern humans contributed to the current European gene pool.

  14. Evidence for a genetic discontinuity between Neandertals and 24,000-year-old anatomically modern Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Caramelli, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Vernesi, Cristiano; Lari, Martina; Casoli, Antonella; Mallegni, Francesco; Chiarelli, Brunetto; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    During the late Pleistocene, early anatomically modern humans coexisted in Europe with the anatomically archaic Neandertals for some thousand years. Under the recent variants of the multiregional model of human evolution, modern and archaic forms were different but related populations within a single evolving species, and both have contributed to the gene pool of current humans. Conversely, the Out-of-Africa model considers the transition between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans as the result of a demographic replacement, and hence it predicts a genetic discontinuity between them. Following the most stringent current standards for validation of ancient DNA sequences, we typed the mtDNA hypervariable region I of two anatomically modern Homo sapiens sapiens individuals of the Cro-Magnon type dated at about 23 and 25 thousand years ago. Here we show that the mtDNAs of these individuals fall well within the range of variation of today's humans, but differ sharply from the available sequences of the chronologically closer Neandertals. This discontinuity is difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that both Neandertals and early anatomically modern humans contributed to the current European gene pool. PMID:12743370

  15. Evidence for a genetic discontinuity between Neandertals and 24,000-year-old anatomically modern Europeans.

    PubMed

    Caramelli, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Vernesi, Cristiano; Lari, Martina; Casoli, Antonella; Mallegni, Francesco; Chiarelli, Brunetto; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2003-05-27

    During the late Pleistocene, early anatomically modern humans coexisted in Europe with the anatomically archaic Neandertals for some thousand years. Under the recent variants of the multiregional model of human evolution, modern and archaic forms were different but related populations within a single evolving species, and both have contributed to the gene pool of current humans. Conversely, the Out-of-Africa model considers the transition between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans as the result of a demographic replacement, and hence it predicts a genetic discontinuity between them. Following the most stringent current standards for validation of ancient DNA sequences, we typed the mtDNA hypervariable region I of two anatomically modern Homo sapiens sapiens individuals of the Cro-Magnon type dated at about 23 and 25 thousand years ago. Here we show that the mtDNAs of these individuals fall well within the range of variation of today's humans, but differ sharply from the available sequences of the chronologically closer Neandertals. This discontinuity is difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that both Neandertals and early anatomically modern humans contributed to the current European gene pool. PMID:12743370

  16. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoya Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2015-08-07

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner. - Highlights: • Visceral adipose tissue express higher pref-1 mRNA than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length in visceral adipose tissue is longer than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length of adipose tissue is not associated with adipocyte size. • Pref-1 mRNA is negatively correlated with intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size.

  17. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  18. Anatomic considerations in infections of the face and neck: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Granite, E L

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to summarize the literature concerning the potential spaces between fascial layers in the face and neck and to correlate the variations in terminology used by different authors. It soon became evident in a search of the literature that far too many names are given to the same anatomical space and that there is a wealth of written material for study. As a result, the descriptions given here deal with the terminology that was most frequently encountered (Table). As anatomical relations form the basis of diagnosis and therapy, a thorough knowledge of the nature of infective processes in the facial and cervical regions is essential. The various fascial spaces are described and some general aspects of diagnosis are considered.

  19. Anatomic VisualizeR: realizing the vision of a VR-based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, H; Murray, M

    1999-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego's Anatomic VisualizeR project has reached another milestone. As the period of DARPA-funded research and development comes to a close, UCSD's VR-based learning environment has matured to the point where curricular implementation is now underway. In this presentation, we will reflect on the process by which lessons in this virtual environment are realized, highlight the results of ongoing 3-D perception studies, and describe examples of how Anatomic VisualizeR is being used in medical school anatomy and high school biology classes. To conclude, we will outline the future of this project which will include full scale curricular implementation, learning outcomes assessment, and dissemination through industrial and academic partnerships.

  20. Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Cronin, Thomas W; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-06-01

    The presence of a specialised dorsal rim area with an ability to detect the e-vector orientation of polarised light is shown for the first time in a nocturnal hymenopteran. The dorsal rim area of the halictid bee Megalopta genalis features a number of characteristic anatomical specialisations including an increased rhabdom diameter and a lack of primary screening pigments. Optically, these specialisations result in wide spatial receptive fields (Deltarho = 14 degrees ), a common adaptation found in the dorsal rim areas of insects used to filter out interfering effects (i.e. clouds) from the sky. In this specialised eye region all nine photoreceptors contribute their microvilli to the entire length of the ommatidia. These orthogonally directed microvilli are anatomically arranged in an almost linear, anterior-posterior orientation. Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  1. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2016-08-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  2. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias.

  3. A 3.5-cm Single-Incision VATS Anatomical Segmentectomy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Igai, Hitoshi; Ibe, Takashi; Kawatani, Natsuko; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    The results of several pulmonary resections using a uniportal approach have been published. However, there are no reports of uniportal thoracoscopic anatomic segmentectomy in Japan. We have a fundamental belief in “reduced-port surgery” and therefore routinely perform uniportal thoracoscopic surgery for patients with pneumothorax. This report describes a successful case of uniportal thoracoscopic anatomic segmentectomy through a 3.5-cm incision in a 76-year-old woman with primary lung cancer. The patient was pathologically diagnosed with multiple primary adenocarcinomas stage IA (T1aN0M0). Postoperatively, no analgesics were needed. The operative procedure is described in detail and includes technical tips such as the pulley method, extra-vessel exposure, the shaft-on-shaft technique, one-hand encircling, and one-hand exposure. The selection criteria for uniportal thoracoscopic segmentectomy limit its use. PMID:25224514

  4. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies. PMID:27622139

  5. Successful Parenchyma-Sparing Anatomical Surgery by 3-Dimensional Reconstruction of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma Combined with Anatomic Variation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qihong; Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yunhe; Chen, Wei; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The combination of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and anatomic variation constitutes a rare and complicated condition. Precise understanding of 3-dimensional position of tumor in the intrahepatic structure in such cases is important for operation planning and navigation. We report a case of a 61-year woman presenting with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Anatomic variation and tumor location were well depicted on preoperative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) combined with 3-dimensional reconstruction as the right posterior segmental duct drained to left hepatic duct. The common hepatic duct, biliary confluence, right anterior segmental duct, and right anterior branch of portal vein were involved by the tumor (Bismuth IIIa). After carefully operation planning, we successfully performed a radical parenchyma-sparing anatomical surgery of hilar cholangiocarcinoma: Liver segmentectomy (segments 5 and 8) and caudate lobectomy. MDCTcombined with 3-dimensional reconstruction is a reliable non-invasive modality for preoperative evaluation of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27376205

  6. Anatomically-constrained effective connectivity among layers in a cortical column modeled and estimated from local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Sotero, Roberto C; Bortel, Aleksandra; Martínez-Cancino, Ramón; Neupane, Sujaya; O'Connor, Peter; Carbonell, Felix; Shmuel, Amir

    2010-12-01

    We propose a neural mass model for anatomically-constrained effective connectivity among neuronal populations residing in four layers (L2/3, L4, L5 and L6) within a cortical column. Eight neuronal populations in a given column--an excitatory population and an inhibitory population per layer--are assumed to be coupled via effective connections of unknown strengths that need to be estimated. The effective connections are constrained to anatomical connections that have been shown to exist in previous anatomical studies. The neural input to a cortical column is directed into the two populations in L4. The anatomically-constrained effective connectivity is captured by a system of 16 stochastic differential equations. Solving these equations yields the average postsynaptic potentials and transmembrane currents generated in each population. The current source density (CSD) responses in each layer, which serve as the model observations, are equated in the model to the sum of all currents generated within that layer. The model is implemented in a continuous-discrete state-space framework, and the innovation method is used for estimating the model parameters from CSD data. To this end, local field potential (LFP) responses to forepaw stimulation were recorded in rat area S1 using multi-channel linear probes. LFPs were converted to CSD signals, which were averaged within each layer, yielding one CSD response per layer. To estimate the effective strengths of connections between all cortical layers, the model was fitted to these CSD signals. The results show that the pattern of effective interactions is strongly influenced by the pattern of strengths of the anatomical connections; however, these two patterns are not identical. The estimated anatomically-constrained effective connectivity matrix and the anatomical connectivity matrix shared five of their six strongest connections, although rankings according to connection strength differed. The strongest effective connections

  7. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  8. A machine learning approach for classification of anatomical coverage in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Lo, Pechin; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Goldin, Johnathan; Brown, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Automatic classification of anatomical coverage of medical images is critical for big data mining and as a pre-processing step to automatically trigger specific computer aided diagnosis systems. The traditional way to identify scans through DICOM headers has various limitations due to manual entry of series descriptions and non-standardized naming conventions. In this study, we present a machine learning approach where multiple binary classifiers were used to classify different anatomical coverages of CT scans. A one-vs-rest strategy was applied. For a given training set, a template scan was selected from the positive samples and all other scans were registered to it. Each registered scan was then evenly split into k × k × k non-overlapping blocks and for each block the mean intensity was computed. This resulted in a 1 × k3 feature vector for each scan. The feature vectors were then used to train a SVM based classifier. In this feasibility study, four classifiers were built to identify anatomic coverages of brain, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis CT scans. Each classifier was trained and tested using a set of 300 scans from different subjects, composed of 150 positive samples and 150 negative samples. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the testing set was measured to evaluate the performance in a two-fold cross validation setting. Our results showed good classification performance with an average AUC of 0.96.

  9. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks.

  10. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy adults. The model components included the levator veli palatini (LVP), the velum, and the posterior pharyngeal wall, and the simulations were based on material parameters from the literature. The outcome metrics were the VP closure force and LVP muscle activation required to achieve VP closure. Results Our average model compared favorably with experimental data from the literature. Simulations of 1,000 random anatomies reflected the large variability in closure forces observed experimentally. VP distance had the greatest effect on both outcome metrics when considering the observed anatomic variability. Other anatomical parameters were ranked by their predicted influences on the outcome metrics. Conclusions Our results support the implication that interventions for VP dysfunction that decrease anterior to posterior VP portal distance, increase velar length, and/or increase LVP cross-sectional area may be very effective. Future modeling studies will help to further our understanding of speech mechanics and optimize treatment of speech disorders. PMID:26049120

  11. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks. PMID:26334050

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Meniscal Anatomical 3D Scaffolds: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, L; Lambers, F.M; Wilson, W; van Donkelaar, C.C; de Wijn, JR; Huiskesb, R; van Blitterswijk, C.A

    2007-01-01

    Solid Free-Form Fabrication (SFF) technologies allow the fabrication of anatomical 3D scaffolds from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients’ dataset. These structures can be designed and fabricated with a variable, interconnected and accessible porous network, resulting in modulable mechanical properties, permeability, and architecture that can be tailored to mimic a specific tissue to replace or regenerate. In this study, we evaluated whether anatomical meniscal 3D scaffolds with matching mechanical properties and architecture are beneficial for meniscus replacement as compared to meniscectomy. After acquiring CT and MRI of porcine menisci, 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated with different architectures by varying the deposition pattern of the fibers comprising the final structure. The mechanical behaviour of 3DF scaffolds with different architectures and of porcine menisci was measured by static and dynamic mechanical analysis and the effect of these tissue engineering templates on articular cartilage was assessed by finite element analysis (FEA) and compared to healthy conditions or to meniscectomy. Results show that 3DF anatomical menisci scaffolds can be fabricated with pore different architectures and with mechanical properties matching those of natural menisci. FEA predicted a beneficial effect of meniscus replacement with 3D scaffolds in different mechanical loading conditions as compared to meniscectomy. No influence of the internal scaffold architecture was found on articular cartilage damage. Although FEA predictions should be further confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments, this study highlights meniscus replacement by SFF anatomical scaffolds as a potential alternative to meniscectomy. PMID:19662124

  13. Understanding ontogenetic trajectories of indirect defence: ecological and anatomical constraints in the production of extrafloral nectaries

    PubMed Central

    Villamil, Nora; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Boege, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Early ontogenetic stages of myrmecophytic plants are infrequently associated with ants, probably due to constraints on the production of rewards. This study reports for the first time the anatomical and histological limitations constraining the production of extrafloral nectar in young plants, and the implications that the absence of protective ants imposes for plants early during their ontogeny are discussed. Methods Juvenile, pre-reproductive and reproductive plants of Turnera velutina were selected in a natural population and their extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) per leaf were quantified. The anatomical and morphological changes in EFNs during plant ontogeny were studied using scanning electron and light microscopy. Extrafloral nectar volume and sugar concentration were determined as well as the number of patrolling ants. Key Results Juvenile plants were unable to secrete or contain nectar. Pre-reproductive plants secreted and contained nectar drops, but the highest production was achieved at the reproductive stage when the gland is fully cup-shaped and the secretory epidermis duplicates. No ants were observed in juvenile plants, and reproductive individuals received greater ant patrolling than pre-reproductive individuals. The issue of the mechanism of extrafloral nectar release in T. velutina was solved given that we found an anatomical, transcuticular pore that forms a channel-like structure and allows nectar to flow outward from the gland. Conclusions Juvenile stages had no ant protection against herbivores probably due to resource limitation but also due to anatomical constraints. The results are consistent with the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis. As plants age, they increase in size and have larger nutrient-acquiring, photosynthetic and storage capacity, so they are able to invest in defence via specialized organs, such as EFNs. Hence, the more vulnerable juvenile stage should rely on other defensive strategies to reduce the

  14. Anatomic Characteristics of Pronator Quadratus Muscle: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the anatomic characteristics of the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle and the entry zone (EZ) of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) to this muscle by means of cadaver dissection. Methods We examined the PQ muscle and AIN in 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers. After identifying the PQ muscle and the EZ of the AIN, we measured the distances from the midpoint (MidP) of the PQ muscle and EZ to the vertical line passing the tip of the ulnar styloid process (MidP_X and EZ_X, respectively) and to the medial border of the ulna (MidP_Y and EZ_Y, respectively). Forearm length (FL) and wrist width (WW) were also measured, and the ratios of MidP and EZ to FL and of MidP and EZ to WW were calculated. Results The MidP was found to be 3.0 cm proximal to the ulnar styloid process or distal 13% of the FL and 2.0 cm lateral to the medial border of the ulna or ulnar 40% side of the WW, which was similar to the location of EZ. The results reveal a more distal site than was reported in previous studies. Conclusion We suggest that the proper site for needle insertion and motor point block of the PQ muscle is 3 cm proximal to the ulnar styloid process or distal 13% of the FL and 2 cm lateral to the medial border of the ulna or ulnar 40% side of the WW. PMID:27446787

  15. Evolving anatomic and electrophysiologic considerations associated with Fontan conversion.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl Lewis; Deal, Barbara J; Stewart, Robert D; Franklin, Wayne H; Tsao, Sabrina; Ward, Kendra

    2007-01-01

    The principles of Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery are to restore the cardiac anatomy by converting the original atriopulmonary connection to a total cavopulmonary artery extracardiac connection and treat the underlying atrial arrhythmias. Successful outcomes of this procedure are dependent on a thorough understanding of several factors: the patient's fundamental diagnosis of single-ventricle anatomy, the resultant cardiac configuration from the original atriopulmonary Fontan connection, right atrial dilatation that leads to atrial flutter or fibrillation, and associated congenital cardiac anomalies. The purpose of this article is to present some of the more challenging anatomic and electrophysiologic problems we have encountered with Fontan conversion and arrhythmia surgery and the innovative solutions we have used to treat them. The cases reviewed herein include: takedown of a Bjork-Fontan modification, right ventricular hypertension and tricuspid regurgitation after atriopulmonary Fontan for pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum, takedown of atrioventricular valve isolation patch for right-sided maze procedure, resultant hemodynamic considerations leading to intraoperative pulmonary vein stenosis after Fontan conversion, unwanted inferior vena cava retraction during the extracardiac connection, right atrial cannulation in the presence of a right atrial clot, distended left superior vena cava causing left pulmonary vein stenosis, dropped atrial septum, and the modified right-sided maze procedure for various single-ventricle pathology. Since 1994 we have performed Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery on 109 patients with a 0.9% mortality rate. We attribute our program's success in no small measure to the strong collaborative efforts of the cardiothoracic surgery and cardiology teams.

  16. S1 subsite specificity of a recombinant cysteine proteinase, CPB, of Leishmania mexicana compared with cruzain, human cathepsin L and papain using substrates containing non-natural basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Alves, L C; Melo, R L; Sanderson, S J; Mottram, J C; Coombs, G H; Caliendo, G; Santagada, V; Juliano, L; Juliano, M A

    2001-03-01

    inhibited cruzain with a K(i) of 40 nM. Human cathepsin L presented an activity on these peptides very similar to that of CPB2.8 Delta CTE and papain hydrolyzed all the peptides with high efficiency. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that CPB2.8 Delta CTE has more restricted specificity at the S1 subsite and it seems possible to design efficient inhibitors with amino acids such as Ama or Aca at the P(1) position.

  17. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar. PMID:27041013

  18. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar.

  19. Anatomic and examination considerations of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Madani, Mansoor; Berardi, Thomas; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-11-01

    Patients often present to their physician with complaints of dental and/or oral pain. It is important for physicians to understand the complexities of oral anatomy and how to perform a basic clinical examination of this area to evaluate and potentially manage patients with these complaints. This article discusses anatomic structures of the oral cavity and systematic clinical examination of this area.

  20. Constructivist Learning of Anatomy: Gaining Knowledge by Creating Anatomical Casts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermiz, David J.; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Educators are encouraged to provide inquiry-based, collaborative, and problem solving activities that enhance learning and promote curiosity, skepticism, objectivity, and the use of scientific reasoning. Making anatomical casts or models by injecting solidifying substances into organs is an example of a constructivist activity for achieving these…

  1. CAVEman: Standardized Anatomical Context for Biomedical Data Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turinsky, Andrei L.; Fanea, Elena; Trinh, Quang; Wat, Stephen; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Dong, Xiaoli; Shu, Xueling; Stromer, Julie N.; Hill, Jonathan W.; Edwards, Carol; Grosenick, Brenda; Yajima, Masumi; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have created a software system called the CAVEman, for the visual integration and exploration of heterogeneous anatomical and biomedical data. The CAVEman can be applied for both education and research tasks. The main component of the system is a three-dimensional digital atlas of the adult male human anatomy, structured according to…

  2. Designing Learning Spaces for Interprofessional Education in the Anatomical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Benjamin; Kvan, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores connections between interprofessional education (IPE) models and the design of learning spaces for undergraduate and graduate education in the anatomical sciences and other professional preparation. The authors argue that for IPE models to be successful and sustained they must be embodied in the environment in which…

  3. Semantic Dementia and Persisting Wernicke's Aphasia: Linguistic and Anatomical Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogar, J. M.; Baldo, J. V.; Wilson, S. M.; Brambati, S. M.; Miller, B. L.; Dronkers, N. F.; Gorno-Tempini, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared the clinical and anatomical characteristics of patients with progressive aphasia to those of patients with aphasia caused by stroke. In the current study we examined fluent forms of aphasia in these two groups, specifically semantic dementia (SD) and persisting Wernicke's aphasia (WA) due to stroke. We compared…

  4. Anatomical networks reveal the musculoskeletal modularity of the human head.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Diogo, Rui; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-02-06

    Mosaic evolution is a key mechanism that promotes robustness and evolvability in living beings. For the human head, to have a modular organization would imply that each phenotypic module could grow and function semi-independently. Delimiting the boundaries of head modules, and even assessing their existence, is essential to understand human evolution. Here we provide the first study of the human head using anatomical network analysis (AnNA), offering the most complete overview of the modularity of the head to date. Our analysis integrates the many biological dependences that tie hard and soft tissues together, arising as a consequence of development, growth, stresses and loads, and motion. We created an anatomical network model of the human head, where nodes represent anatomical units and links represent their physical articulations. The analysis of the human head network uncovers the presence of 10 musculoskeletal modules, deep-rooted in these biological dependences, of developmental and evolutionary significance. In sum, this study uncovers new anatomical and functional modules of the human head using a novel quantitative method that enables a more comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary anatomy of our lineage, including the evolution of facial expression and facial asymmetry.

  5. Surface anatomy and anatomical planes in the adult turkish population.

    PubMed

    Uzun, C; Atman, E D; Ustuner, E; Mirjalili, S A; Oztuna, D; Esmer, T S

    2016-03-01

    Surface anatomy and anatomical planes are widely used in education and clinical practice. The planes are largely derived from cadaveric studies and their projections on the skin show discrepancies between and within anatomical reference textbooks. In this study, we reassessed the accuracy of common thoracic and abdominopelvic anatomical planes using computed tomography (CT) imaging in the live adult Turkish population. After patients with distorting pathologies had been excluded, CT images of 150 supine patients at the end tidal inspiration were analyzed. Sternal angle, transpyloric, subcostal, supracristal and pubic crest planes and their relationships to anatomical structures were established by dual consensus. The tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein/superior vena cava (SVC) junction and pulmonary bifurcation were usually below the sternal angle while the concavity of the aortic arch was generally within the plane. The tip of the tenth rib, the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein were usually within the transpyloric plane while the renal hila and the fundus of the gallbladder were below it. The inferior mesenteric artery was below the subcostal plane and the aortic bifurcation was below the supracristal plane in most adults. Projectional surface anatomy is fundamental to medical education and clinical practice. Modern cross-sectional imaging techniques allow large groups of live patients to be examined. Classic textbook information regarding anatomy needs to be reviewed and updated using the data gathered from these recent studies, taking ethnic differences into consideration.

  6. Anatomic variations of feline internal and external jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Olive, Julien; Auriemma, Edoardo; Blond, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated 50 feline head and neck computed tomography examinations to determine the prevalence of vascular variation in the internal and external jugular veins. We identified three distinct anatomic conformations of the internal jugular vein. No variation of external jugular vein morphology was detected. Feline patients can have different internal jugular vein morphology that should be recognized for surgical planning. PMID:22548331

  7. Adaptation of Museum Specimens for Use in Anatomical Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, P. F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Color transparencies are prepared of a re-colored anatomical specimen after placing labels temporarily in position to indicate specific structures. The specimen is also radiographed to show skeletal and soft tissue structures. Cross-reference among the specimen, photographs, and radiographs is supplemented by examination and self-assessment…

  8. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809 PMID:21777478

  9. Anatomic standardization: Linear scaling and nonlinear warping of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    An automated method was proposed for anatomic standardization of PET scans in three dimensions, which enabled objective intersubject and cross-group comparisons of functional brain images. The method involved linear scaling to correct for individual brain size and nonlinear warping to minimize regional anatomic variations among subjects. In the linear-scaling step, the anteroposterior length and width of the brain were measured on the PET images, and the brain height was estimated by a contour-matching procedure using the midsagittal plane. In the nonlinear warping step, individual gray matter locations were matched with those of a standard brain by maximizing correlation coefficients of regional profile curves determined between predefined stretching centers (predominantly in white matter) and the gray matter landmarks. The accuracy of the brain height estimation was compared with skull x-ray estimations, showing comparable accuracy and better reproducibility. Linear-scaling and nonlinear warping methods were validated using ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose and ({sup 15}O)water images. Regional anatomic variability on the glucose images was reduced markedly. The statistical significance of activation foci in paired water images was improved in both vibratory and visual activation paradigms. A group versus group comparison following the proposed anatomic standardization revealed highly significant glucose metabolic alterations in the brains of patients with Alzheimer`s disease compared with those of a normal control group. These results suggested that the method is well suited to both research and clinical settings and can facilitate pixel-by-pixel comparisons of PET images. 26 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Anatomical and Physiological Responses of Citrus Trees to Varying Boron Availability Are Dependent on Rootstock

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Geisa L.; Zambrosi, Fernando C. B.; Tanaka, Francisco A. O.; Boaretto, Rodrigo M.; Quaggio, José A.; Ribeiro, Rafael V.; Mattos, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    In Citrus, water, nutrient transport and thereby fruit production, are influenced among other factors, by the interaction between rootstock and boron (B) nutrition. This study aimed to investigate how B affects the anatomical structure of roots and leaves as well as leaf gas exchange in sweet orange trees grafted on two contrasting rootstocks in response to B supply. Plants grafted on Swingle citrumelo or Sunki mandarin were grown in a nutrient solution of varying B concentration (deficient, adequate, and excessive). Those grafted on Swingle were more tolerant to both B deficiency and toxicity than those on Sunki, as revealed by higher shoot and root growth. In addition, plants grafted on Sunki exhibited more severe anatomical and physiological damages under B deficiency, showing thickening of xylem cell walls and impairments in whole-plant leaf-specific hydraulic conductance and leaf CO2 assimilation. Our data revealed that trees grafted on Swingle sustain better growth under low B availablitlity in the root medium and still respond positively to increased B levels by combining higher B absorption and root growth as well as better organization of xylem vessels. Taken together, those traits improved water and B transport to the plant canopy. Under B toxicity, Swingle rootstock would also favor plant growth by reducing anatomical and ultrastructural damage to leaf tissue and improving water transport compared with plants grafted on Sunki. From a practical point of view, our results highlight that B management in citrus orchards shall take into account rootstock varieties, of which the Swingle rootstock was characterized by its performance on regulating anatomical and ultrastructural damages, improving water transport and limiting negative impacts of B stress conditions on plant growth. PMID:26973670

  11. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    DOE PAGES

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; Westover, Tyler L.

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stovermore » was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.« less

  12. Multimodal 3-D reconstruction of human anatomical structures using SurLens Visualization System.

    PubMed

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R; Khalid, N E A; Abidin, S Z Z

    2013-03-01

    In the medical diagnosis and treatment planning, radiologists and surgeons rely heavily on the slices produced by medical imaging devices. Unfortunately, these image scanners could only present the 3-D human anatomical structure in 2-D. Traditionally, this requires medical professional concerned to study and analyze the 2-D images based on their expert experience. This is tedious, time consuming and prone to error; expecially when certain features are occluding the desired region of interest. Reconstruction procedures was earlier proposed to handle such situation. However, 3-D reconstruction system requires high performance computation and longer processing time. Integrating efficient reconstruction system into clinical procedures involves high resulting cost. Previously, brain's blood vessels reconstruction with MRA was achieved using SurLens Visualization System. However, adapting such system to other image modalities, applicable to the entire human anatomical structures, would be a meaningful contribution towards achieving a resourceful system for medical diagnosis and disease therapy. This paper attempts to adapt SurLens to possible visualisation of abnormalities in human anatomical structures using CT and MR images. The study was evaluated with brain MR images from the department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, United States and CT abdominal pelvic, from the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing. The MR images contain around 109 datasets each of T1-FLASH, T2-Weighted, DTI and T1-MPRAGE. Significantly, visualization of human anatomical structure was achieved without prior segmentation. SurLens was adapted to visualize and display abnormalities, such as an indication of walderstrom's macroglobulinemia, stroke and penetrating brain injury in the human brain using Magentic Resonance (MR) images. Moreover, possible abnormalities in abdominal pelvic was also visualized using Computed Tomography (CT) slices. The study shows SurLens' functionality as

  13. Accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation in anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dallalana, Richard James; McMahon, Ryan A.; East, Ben; Geraghty, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Glenoid component malposition is associated with poor function and early failure of both anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Glenoid positioning is challenging particularly in the setting of bone loss or deformity. Recently, the use of computer assistance has been shown to reduce implantation error. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation in cases of anatomic and reverse shoulder replacement in vivo. Methods: Twenty patients underwent total shoulder arthroplasty using a computed tomography (CT)-based patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) system, ten anatomic and ten reverse. Preoperative three-dimensional digital templating of glenoid component position was undertaken and surgery then performed using a custom-made guide. Postoperative CT scans were used to compare final implanted component position to the preoperatively planned position in the same patient. Results: Final component position and orientation closely reflected the preoperatively templated position. Mean deviation in the glenoid version from planned was 1.8° ±1.9° (range, 0.1°–7.3°). Mean deviation in inclination was 1.3° ±1.0° (range, 0.2°–4.5°). Mean deviation in position on the glenoid face was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm (range, 0.0–1.3 mm) in the anteroposterior plane and 0.8 ± 0.5 mm (range, 0.0–1.9 mm) in the superoinferior plane. Actual achieved version was within 7° of neutral in all cases except for one where it was deliberately planned to be outside of this range. Conclusion: PSI in both anatomic and reverse shoulder arthroplasty is highly accurate in guiding glenoid component implantation in vivo. The system can reliably correct bony deformity. PMID:27186057

  14. Radial force distribution changes associated with tangential force production in cylindrical grasping, and the importance of anatomical registration.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C; Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-01-10

    Radial force (F(r)) distributions describe grip force coordination about a cylindrical object. Recent studies have employed only explicit F(r) tasks, and have not normalized for anatomical variance when considering F(r) distributions. The goals of the present study were (i) to explore F(r) during tangential force production tasks, and (ii) to examine the extent to which anatomical registration (i.e. spatial normalization of anatomically analogous structures) could improve signal detectability in F(r) data. Twelve subjects grasped a vertically oriented cylindrical handle (diameter=6 cm) and matched target upward tangential forces of 10, 20, and 30 N. F(r) data were measured using a flexible pressure mat with an angular resolution of 4.8°, and were registered using piecewise-linear interpolation between five manually identified points-of-interest. Results indicate that F(r) was primarily limited to three contact regions: the distal thumb, the distal fingers, and the fingers' metatacarpal heads, and that, while increases in tangential force caused significant increases in F(r) for these regions, they did not significantly affect the F(r) distribution across the hand. Registration was found to substantially reduce between-subject variability, as indicated by both accentuated F(r) trends, and amplification of the test statistic. These results imply that, while subjects focus F(r) primarily on three anatomical regions during cylindrical grasp, inter-subject anatomical differences introduce a variability that, if not corrected for via registration, may compromise one's ability to draw anatomically relevant conclusions from grasping force data. PMID:22134182

  15. Foramen of Civinini: A New Anatomical Guide for Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Saran, R Sharmila; Ananthi, K Suba; Subramaniam, Aruna; Balaji, MS Thotakura; Vinaitha, D; Vaithianathan, G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Study on Morphometric and radiological aspect on existence of foramen of civinini. Sphenoid bone comprises of some rare ossified ligaments, may encounter difficulty in surgical procedures. Incidence of Pterygospinous bars various with different racial groups and they are genetically controlled. Complete ossification of pterygospinous ligament form foramen of civinini. Entrapments of vessels or nerves may occur due to existence of pterygospinous bar. The bar may locate medially or inferiorly to formen ovale as seen in Hawaiian and lemurs. Co – existence of bar with the wide lateral pterygoid plate exhibits development of the bar from herbivore, carnivore and old world monkeys. Comparatively absence or small spine of civinini noted in new world monkeys, rodents and platyrrhines. Pterygospinousbar represents the phylogenetic remnant of Human beings. Material and Methods: By using digital vernier caliper, the measurements of length, width of the pterygospinous bar and area of foramen of civinini including the length and breadth of lateral pterygoid plate were measured. Using X rays the radiological view was determined. Results: In this study from 160 cases of skull and sphenoid bones revealed that complete and incomplete foramen of civinini in 1.25% and 7.5% of cases respectively. Peculiarly accessory foramen of civinini noticed in 1.25% of cases. Maximum area of foramen of civinini was 94.2mm2. The maximum width of lateral pterygoid was noted as 19.6mm respectively. Mentocoronal view of skiagram clearly shows the bar. Conclusion: During Anaesthesia for trigeminal neuralgia may encounter difficult to pass the needle. The bar compress the mandibular nerve branches can cause lingual numbness, pain and speech impairment. Conductive anaesthesia on the mandibular nerve through the lateral subzygomatic route may be difficult to approach. Exploring the anatomical and clinical updates of pterygospinous bar may guide the surgeons and radiologists to overcome any

  16. GBM heterogeneity characterization by radiomic analysis of phenotype anatomical planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system, characterized among other traits by rapid metastatis. Three tissue phenotypes closely associated with GBMs, namely, necrosis (N), contrast enhancement (CE), and edema/invasion (E), exhibit characteristic patterns of texture heterogeneity in magnetic resonance images (MRI). In this study, we propose a novel model to characterize GBM tissue phenotypes using gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) in three anatomical planes. The GLCM encodes local image patches in terms of informative, orientation-invariant texture descriptors, which are used here to sub-classify GBM tissue phenotypes. Experiments demonstrate the model on MRI data of 41 GBM patients, obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Intensity-based automatic image registration is applied to align corresponding pairs of fixed T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) post-contrast and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. GBM tissue regions are then segmented using the 3D Slicer tool. Texture features are computed from 12 quantifier functions operating on GLCM descriptors, that are generated from MRI intensities within segmented GBM tissue regions. Various classifier models are used to evaluate the effectiveness of texture features for discriminating between GBM phenotypes. Results based on T1-WI scans showed a phenotype classification accuracy of over 88.14%, a sensitivity of 85.37% and a specificity of 96.1%, using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. This model has the potential to provide important characteristics of tumors, which can be used for the sub-classification of GBM phenotypes.

  17. Anatomical Characteristics and Surgical Treatments of Pincer Nail Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong Ju; Kim, Jae Hee; Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Dong Chul; Lee, Se Il

    2015-01-01

    Background Pincer nail deformity is a transverse overcurvature of the nail. This study aimed to define the anatomical characteristics of pincer nail deformity and to evaluate the surgical outcomes. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 20 cases of pincer nail deformity of the great toe. Thirty subjects without pincer nail deformity or history of trauma of the feet were selected as the control group. Width and height indices were calculated, and interphalangeal angles and base widths of the distal phalanx were measured with radiography. We chose the surgical treatment methods considering perfusion-related factors such as age, diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, and peripheral vascular disease. The zigzag nail bed flap method (n=9) and the inverted T incision method (n=11) were used to repair deformities. The outcomes were evaluated 6 months after surgery. Results The interphalangeal angle was significantly greater in the preoperative patient group (14.0°±3.6°) than in the control group (7.9°±3.0°) (P<0.05). The postoperative width and height indices were very close to the measurements in the control group, and most patients were satisfied with the outcomes. Conclusions We believe that the width and height indices are useful for evaluating the deformity and outcomes of surgical treatments. We used two different surgical methods for the two patient groups with respect to the perfusion-related factors and found that the outcomes were all satisfactory. Consequently, we recommend taking into consideration the circulatory condition of the foot when deciding upon the surgical method for pincer nail deformity. PMID:25798393

  18. Anatomical characterization of central, apical and minimal corneal thickness

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Bermúdez-Vallecilla, Martha Cecilia; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Jañez, Luis; Martinez-de-la-Casa, José María; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Sanchez, Julián; Garcia-Feijoo, Julián

    2014-01-01

    AIM To anatomically locate the points of minimum corneal thickness and central corneal thickness (pupil center) in relation to the corneal apex. METHODS Observational, cross-sectional study, 299 healthy volunteers. Thickness at the corneal apex (AT), minimum corneal thickness (MT) and corneal thickness at the pupil center (PT) were determined using the pentacam. Distances from the corneal apex to MT (MD) and PT (PD) were calculated and their quadrant position (taking the corneal apex as the reference) determined: point of minimum thickness (MC) and point of central thickness (PC) depending on the quadrant position. Two multivariate linear regression models were constructed to examine the influence of age, gender, power of the flattest and steepest corneal axes, position of the flattest axis, corneal volume (determined using the Pentacam) and PT on MD and PD. The effects of these variables on MC and PC were also determined in two multinomial regression models. RESULTS MT was located at a mean distance of 0.909 mm from the apex (79.4% in the inferior-temporal quadrant). PT was located at a mean distance of 0.156 mm from the apex. The linear regression model for MD indicated it was significantly influenced by corneal volume (B=-0.024; 95%CI: -0.043 to -0.004). No significant relations were identified in the linear regression model for PD or the multinomial logistic regressions for MC and PC. CONCLUSION MT was typically located at the inferior-temporal quadrant of the cornea and its distance to the corneal apex tended to decrease with the increment of corneal volume. PMID:25161940

  19. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  20. Alveolar Antral Artery: Review of Surgical Techniques Involving this Anatomic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The horizontal bony canal in the lateral maxillary wall is the site of anastomosis between the arterial branches from the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAa) and the infraorbital artery. This anatomic structure is known as the ‘alveolar antral artery’. Materials and Methods: We performed a literature review. The anatomic location of the alveolar antral artery in the lateral maxillary sinus wall was researched and its importance in surgical procedures routinely performed on this bony wall discussed. Results: This artery can be accidentally involved during surgical procedures on the lateral maxillary sinus wall, such as open sinus lift surgery, horizontal osteotomy of the maxilla, Le Fort I fracture treatment, and Caldwell-Luc surgeries. Conclusion: The alveolar antral artery is an important anatomic structure in the lateral maxillary sinus wall. A preoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan can be used as a good diagnostic procedure to reduce surgical complications in suspected cases as well as conditions that may involve this artery. PMID:24744995

  1. PHIV-RootCell: a supervised image analysis tool for rice root anatomical parameter quantification

    PubMed Central

    Lartaud, Marc; Perin, Christophe; Courtois, Brigitte; Thomas, Emilie; Henry, Sophia; Bettembourg, Mathilde; Divol, Fanchon; Lanau, Nadege; Artus, Florence; Bureau, Charlotte; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Sarah, Gautier; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Dievart, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We developed the PHIV-RootCell software to quantify anatomical traits of rice roots transverse section images. Combined with an efficient root sample processing method for image acquisition, this program permits supervised measurements of areas (those of whole root section, stele, cortex, and central metaxylem vessels), number of cell layers and number of cells per cell layer. The PHIV-RootCell toolset runs under ImageJ, an independent operating system that has a license-free status. To demonstrate the usefulness of PHIV-RootCell, we conducted a genetic diversity study and an analysis of salt stress responses of root anatomical parameters in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Using 16 cultivars, we showed that we could discriminate between some of the varieties even at the 6 day-olds stage, and that tropical japonica varieties had larger root sections due to an increase in cell number. We observed, as described previously, that root sections become enlarged under salt stress. However, our results show an increase in cell number in ground tissues (endodermis and cortex) but a decrease in external (peripheral) tissues (sclerenchyma, exodermis, and epidermis). Thus, the PHIV-RootCell program is a user-friendly tool that will be helpful for future genetic and physiological studies that investigate root anatomical trait variations. PMID:25646121

  2. The Parametric Model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process Created by Method of Anatomical Features

    PubMed Central

    Vitković, Nikola; Mitić, Jelena; Manić, Miodrag; Trajanović, Miroslav; Husain, Karim; Petrović, Slađana; Arsić, Stojanka

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically accurate and anatomically correct 3D models of the human bones are of great importance for medical research and practice in orthopedics and surgery. These geometrical models can be created by the use of techniques which can be based on input geometrical data acquired from volumetric methods of scanning (e.g., Computed Tomography (CT)) or on the 2D images (e.g., X-ray). Geometrical models of human bones created in such way can be applied for education of medical practitioners, preoperative planning, etc. In cases when geometrical data about the human bone is incomplete (e.g., fractures), it may be necessary to create its complete geometrical model. The possible solution for this problem is the application of parametric models. The geometry of these models can be changed and adapted to the specific patient based on the values of parameters acquired from medical images (e.g., X-ray). In this paper, Method of Anatomical Features (MAF) which enables creation of geometrically precise and anatomically accurate geometrical models of the human bones is implemented for the creation of the parametric model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process (HMCP). The obtained results about geometrical accuracy of the model are quite satisfactory, as it is stated by the medical practitioners and confirmed in the literature. PMID:26064183

  3. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  4. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  5. Congenital blindness is associated with large-scale reorganization of anatomical networks

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Uri; Andric, Michael; Atilgan, Hicret; Collignon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Blindness is a unique model for understanding the role of experience in the development of the brain's functional and anatomical architecture. Documenting changes in the structure of anatomical networks for this population would substantiate the notion that the brain's core network-level organization may undergo neuroplasticity as a result of life-long experience. To examine this issue, we compared whole-brain networks of regional cortical-thickness covariance in early blind and matched sighted individuals. This covariance is thought to reflect signatures of integration between systems involved in similar perceptual/cognitive functions. Using graph-theoretic metrics, we identified a unique mode of anatomical reorganization in the blind that differed from that found for sighted. This was seen in that network partition structures derived from subgroups of blind were more similar to each other than they were to partitions derived from sighted. Notably, after deriving network partitions, we found that language and visual regions tended to reside within separate modules in sighted but showed a pattern of merging into shared modules in the blind. Our study demonstrates that early visual deprivation triggers a systematic large-scale reorganization of whole-brain cortical-thickness networks, suggesting changes in how occipital regions interface with other functional networks in the congenitally blind. PMID:26767944

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pulmonary blood vessels by using anatomical knowledge base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaoka, Noriko; Suzuki, Hideo; Mori, Masaki; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Suzuki, Akira

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents a knowledge-based method for automatic reconstruction and recognition of pulmonary blood vessels from chest x-ray CT images with 10-mm thickness. The system has four main stages: (1) automatic extraction and segmentation of blood vessel components from each 2-D image, (2) analysis of these components, (3) a search for points connecting blood vessel segments in different CT slices, using a knowledge base for 3-D reconstruction, and (4) object manipulation and display. The authors also describe a method of representing 3-D anatomical knowledge of the pulmonary blood vessel structure. The edges of blood vessels in chest x-ray images are unclear, in contrast to those in angiograms. Each CT slice has thickness, and blood vessels are slender, so a simple graphical display, which can be used for bone tissues from CT images, is not sufficient for pulmonary blood vessels. It is therefore necessary to use anatomical knowledge to track the blood vessel lines in 3-D spaces. Experimental results using actual images of a normal adult male has shown that utilizing anatomical information enables one to improve processing efficiency and precision, such as blood vessel extraction and searching for connecting points.

  7. Body shape transformation along a shared axis of anatomical evolution in labyrinth fishes (Anabantoidei).

    PubMed

    Collar, David C; Quintero, Michelle; Buttler, Bernardo; Ward, Andrea B; Mehta, Rita S

    2016-03-01

    Major morphological transformations, such as the evolution of elongate body shape in vertebrates, punctuate evolutionary history. A fundamental step in understanding the processes that give rise to such transformations is identification of the underlying anatomical changes. But as we demonstrate in this study, important insights can also be gained by comparing these changes to those that occur in ancestral and closely related lineages. In labyrinth fishes (Anabantoidei), rapid evolution of a highly derived torpedo-shaped body in the common ancestor of the pikehead (Luciocephalus aura and L. pulcher) occurred primarily through exceptional elongation of the head, with secondary contributions involving reduction in body depth and lengthening of the precaudal vertebral region. This combination of changes aligns closely with the primary axis of anatomical diversification in other anabantoids, revealing that pikehead evolution involved extraordinarily rapid change in structures that were ancestrally labile. Finer-scale examination of the anatomical components that determine head elongation also shows alignment between the pikehead evolutionary trajectory and the primary axis of cranial diversification in anabantoids, with much higher evolutionary rates leading to the pikehead. Altogether, our results show major morphological transformation stemming from extreme change along a shared morphological axis in labyrinth fishes. PMID:26899988

  8. ANATOMIC STUDY OF THE PROXIMAL THIRD OF THE FEMUR: FEMOROACETABULAR IMPACT AND THE CAM EFFECT

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; Alves, Sergio Delmonte; da Silva, Anselmo Fernandes; Giuberti, Gilberto Ribeiro; de Azevedo Neto, Justino Nóbrega; Mezzalira Penedo, Jorge Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To analyze anatomical variations of the proximal end of femur that could cause a femoroacetabular impact. Methods: 199 skeletically mature anatomical specimens of femurs were used. The femurs were measured in order to determine the anteversion angle of the femoral neck, neckshaft angle, sphericity of the femoral head at anteroposterior and superoinferior, angle between epiphysis and the anterior femoral neck, angle between epiphysis and the neck at lateral plane, anteroposterior distance at 5mm of the head and neck junction and anteroposterior distance of the neck base. Results: we found that the impact subgroup presented a significantly larger junction diameter of 5mm (p = 0.0001) and cam-head (%) (p= 0.0001), while base-cam (%) (p = 0.0001) showed a significantly smaller diameter than the subgroup without impact. It was identified that cam-head (%) ≤ 80 e base-cam (%) ≤ 73 were identified as the optimal impact points. Conclusion: our study showed that the effect cam, caused by anatomical variations of the proximal femoral end focused the head-neck junction and base of the neck-junction head-neck. These rates can be predictive factors of the impact. PMID:26998462

  9. [Ultrasonic dissection and coagulation by attachment ("Harmonic Focus" in anatomic resection of the lung].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Karlson, A

    2014-01-01

    The authors aimed to evaluate the efficacy of application of ultrasound dissection technology and coagulation by using "Harmonic Focus" (HF) instrument, while performing anatomical resection of the lung in open thoracic surgery. The method was carried out in serial 20 patients with lung cancer, whom the lung anatomical resection was performed. A long attachment (17 cm) with curved branches was applied. There were 11 lobectomies and 9 pneumoectomies. The application of HF allowed the dissection of pleural adhesions, pulmonary ligament, a separation of roots of the lung elements, lymphatic nodes of roots of the lung and mediastinum, in spite of being very close to vessels. A fatty tissue of the mediastinum was removed quickly and practically without blood. The HF considerably accelerated the process of vessel treatment, especially, while performing the lobectomy. At the same time, the attempts of application of HF instrument for separation of interlobal fissure resulted in not quite satisfactory aerostasis and hemostasis. The duration of the lobectomy was 127 +/- 35 minutes at the average and in the case of pneumoectomy, it consisted of 120 +/- 45 minutes. An intraoperative hemorrhage was 300 +/- 145 ml. A quantity of exudates was 440 +/- 280 ml by drainage on the first day. The pleural cavity drainage was used during 3 +/- 1 days. The HF instrument, which was applied for ultrasonic dissection and coagulation, was characterized by multifunctionality and simplicity of usage. It was recommended for a wide application in the thoracic surgery for performing the anatomical lung resections by thoracotomy method. PMID:25055517

  10. Response of anatomical structures in tree roots to an erosion event on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liping; Wang, Xiaodan; Hong, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    Exposed roots have been used in dendrogeomorphology to determine erosion rates. However, few studies have focused on the changes in ring width and in the anatomical properties of hardwood roots exposed by soil erosion at a macroscopic and microscopic level. In this study, we identified the ring width and the anatomical response of hardwood root to a denudation event and applied these anatomical findings to the reconstruction and quantification of soil erosion rates. A total of 136 cross sections (54 from buried roots and 79 from exposed roots of 25 trees) were sampled in the study area. Measurements of the widths of the growth rings, the average vessel area in earlywood, the average vessel area per ring, and the vessel number per ring were performed with WinDENDRO and ImageJ. Our results show that the analysis of vessel features is a useful tool to identify soil erosion events recorded during the life of a tree. A sharp decrease of nearly 50% in the vessel area of earlywood was an important signature indicating the exposure of tree roots caused by denudation. Soil erosion rates derived from exposed roots varied between 1.04 and 3.61 mm y- 1 in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  11. Anatomical Position of Four Different Transobturator Mesh Implants for Female Anterior Prolapse Repair.

    PubMed

    Lenz, F; Doll, S; Sohn, C; Brocker, K A

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Polypropylene mesh implants are frequently used for pelvic floor reconstruction in women. Yet they vary in size and fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare four mesh products with regard to their anatomical positioning and functionality within the pelvic floor, to determine whether each mesh fits equally well in a female cadaver. Methods: One female pelvis was dissected, opening the retropubic space exposing the endopelvic fascia and demonstrating the arcus tendineus fasciae pelvis (ATFP). Anatomical parameters were measured before and after implanting four meshes via the transobturator approach. Results: The anterior fixation of the ATFP was found to be 5 mm lateral to the symphysis in this cadaver. The endopelvic fascia covered 54.6 cm(2). The obturator nerve was located 35 mm from the white line. The distance of the proximal and lateral points of mesh fixation from the ischial spine or ATFP varied from 0 to 25 mm. The meshes varied in size and anatomical positioning. Conclusion: These observations demonstrate the necessity of developing optimally sized meshes and appropriate introducer techniques that can provide sufficient vaginal support. Surgeons, furthermore, need profound knowledge of anatomy, the patient's pelvic floor defect and the meshes available on the market. PMID:24771893

  12. [Characteristics of pneumoconiosis on multi-detector row CT and its' anatomic-pathologic basis].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanchun; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Yuan; Chen, Tianwu; Wang, Qiling; Deng, Wen

    2011-04-01

    In order to investigate the fine distinction of the tomographic images and the dominant anatomic distributions, we carefully reviewed and analyzed the features and predominant anatomic distribution of forty-nine pneumoconiosis patients with confirmed diagnosis on multi-detector row CT (MDCT). It was found that the round and small opacity p and irregular small opacity were mostly shown in the MDCT features of pneumoconiosis, while the large opacity and progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) were less frequently depicted in the MDCT. Distributions of round and small opacity and irregular small opacity in the six lung lobes were significantly different (P < 0.01). The most common p opacity was significantly seen in the upper and lower left lungs as well as in the upper right lung's opacity was in the upper left lung as well as lower left and right lungs. The large opacity commonly distributed in upper left and right lungs, while the PMF was often shown in both of two lungs. The results demonstrated that the MDCT could be an effective modality for detecting tiny lesions and anatomic distribution of pneumoconiosis, and it would be helpful for early diagnosis and accurate staging of the pneumoconiosis disease.

  13. [Anatomic orthotopic heart transplantation: the surgical characteristics and the advantages of the method].

    PubMed

    Dzemeshkevich, S L; Ivanov, A S; Rykunov, I E; Kuznetsova, L M; Trekova, N A; Poplavskiĭ, I V; Belous, A E; Zhidkov, I L; Koseros, Kh; Eremenko, A A; Chaus, N I

    1998-01-01

    Standard technique of establishment of interatrial anastomoses allows to carry out orthotopic transplantation of the heart quickly and reliably. However the accumulation of collective experience evidences about a number of unavoidable shortcomings of such operation: rhythm disturbances, worsening of hemodynamics in discordant atrial contractions of recipient and donor, atrio-ventricular valve insufficiency, thromboembolism, coronary fistulas. Since 1990 in RRCS 25 operations were carried out with the use of standard technique and we also met with the risk of developing the above complications. In experiment on 30 mongrel dogs the technique of anatomical, truly orthotopic transplantation of the heart with six anastomoses was developed: left pulmonary veins with a common cuff, separate anastomoses of the superior and inferior caval veins, anastomoses of aorta and pulmonary artery. Particular attention was paid to developing of original surgical modes for prophylaxis of stenoses in the area of anastomoses of pulmonary and caval veins. In 1997 the anatomical technique of heart transplantation was successfully introduced by us into clinical practice. Clinical electrophysiological, echocardiographic and functional examinations have confirmed the results of the experiments and have evidenced for substantial advantages of the anatomical technique of orthotopic transplantation of the heart. By reliability the new operation is not inferior to standard method of N. Shumway.

  14. Motion representation of the long fingers: a proposal for the definitions of new anatomical frames.

    PubMed

    Coupier, Jérôme; Moiseev, Fédor; Feipel, Véronique; Rooze, Marcel; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2014-04-11

    Despite the availability of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) recommendations for the orientation of anatomical frames, no consensus exists about motion representations related to finger kinematics. This paper proposes novel anatomical frames for motion representation of the phalangeal segments of the long fingers. A three-dimensional model of a human forefinger was acquired from a non-pathological fresh-frozen hand. Medical imaging was used to collect phalangeal discrete positions. Data processing was performed using a customized software interface ("lhpFusionBox") to create a specimen-specific model and to reconstruct the discrete motion path. Five examiners virtually palpated two sets of landmarks. These markers were then used to build anatomical frames following two methods: a reference method following ISB recommendations and a newly-developed method based on the mean helical axis (HA). Motion representations were obtained and compared between examiners. Virtual palpation precision was around 1mm, which is comparable to results from the literature. The comparison of the two methods showed that the helical axis method seemed more reproducible between examiners especially for secondary, or accessory, motions. Computed Root Mean Square distances comparing methods showed that the ISB method displayed a variability 10 times higher than the HA method. The HA method seems to be suitable for finger motion representation using discrete positions from medical imaging. Further investigations are required before being able to use the methodology with continuous tracking of markers set on the subject's hand.

  15. Spatial sap flow and xylem anatomical characteristics in olive trees under different irrigation regimes.

    PubMed

    López-Bernal, Álvaro; Alcántara, Esteban; Testi, Luca; Villalobos, Francisco J

    2010-12-01

    The compensation heat pulse (CHP) method is widely used to estimate sap flow and transpiration in conducting organs of woody plants. Previous studies have reported a natural azimuthal variability in sap flow, which could have practical implications in locating the CHP probes and integrating their output. Sap flow of several olive trees (Olea europaea L. cv. 'Arbequina') previously grown under different irrigation treatments were monitored by the CHP method, and their xylem anatomical characteristics were analyzed from wood samples taken at the same location in which the probes were installed. A significant azimuthal variability in the sap flow was found in a well-irrigated olive tree monitored by eight CHP probes. The azimuthal variability was well related to crown architecture, but poorly to azimuthal differences in the xylem anatomical characteristics. Well-irrigated and deficit-irrigated olive trees showed similar xylem anatomical characteristics, but they differed in xylem growth and in the ratio of nocturnal-to-diurnal sap flow (N/D index). The results of this work indicate that transpiration cannot be accurately estimated by the CHP method in olive trees if a small number of sensors are employed and that the N/D index could be used as a sensitive water status indicator.

  16. The Parametric Model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process Created by Method of Anatomical Features.

    PubMed

    Vitković, Nikola; Mitić, Jelena; Manić, Miodrag; Trajanović, Miroslav; Husain, Karim; Petrović, Slađana; Arsić, Stojanka

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically accurate and anatomically correct 3D models of the human bones are of great importance for medical research and practice in orthopedics and surgery. These geometrical models can be created by the use of techniques which can be based on input geometrical data acquired from volumetric methods of scanning (e.g., Computed Tomography (CT)) or on the 2D images (e.g., X-ray). Geometrical models of human bones created in such way can be applied for education of medical practitioners, preoperative planning, etc. In cases when geometrical data about the human bone is incomplete (e.g., fractures), it may be necessary to create its complete geometrical model. The possible solution for this problem is the application of parametric models. The geometry of these models can be changed and adapted to the specific patient based on the values of parameters acquired from medical images (e.g., X-ray). In this paper, Method of Anatomical Features (MAF) which enables creation of geometrically precise and anatomically accurate geometrical models of the human bones is implemented for the creation of the parametric model of the Human Mandible Coronoid Process (HMCP). The obtained results about geometrical accuracy of the model are quite satisfactory, as it is stated by the medical practitioners and confirmed in the literature. PMID:26064183

  17. Spatial anatomic knowledge for 2-D interactive medical image segmentation and matching.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, J F

    1991-01-01

    A representation is described for two-dimensional anatomic shapes which can be described by single-valued distortions of a circle. The representation, called a radial contour model, is both generic, in that it captures the expected shape as well as the range of variation for an anatomic shape class, and flexible, in that the model can deform to fit an individual instance of the shape class. The model is implemented in a program called SCANNER (version 0.61) for 2-D interactive image segmentation and matching. An initial evaluation was performed using 7 shape models learned from a training set of 93 contours, and a control model containing no shape knowledge. Evaluation using 60 additional contours showed that in general the shape knowledge should reduce interactive segmentation time by a factor of two over the control, and that for specific shapes such as the eye, the improvement is much greater. A matching function was also devised which showed that the radial contour model should allow diagnosis of subtle shape changes. These results suggest that the use of spatial anatomic knowledge, when combined with good interactive tools, can help to alleviate the segmentation bottleneck in medical imaging. The models, when extended to more complex shapes, will form the spatial component of a knowledge base of anatomy that could have many uses in addition to image segmentation.

  18. Anatomical diversity and regressive evolution in trichomanoid filmy ferns (Hymenophyllaceae): a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, Jean-Yves; Hennequin, Sabine; Bary, Sophie; Ebihara, Atsushi; Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie

    2011-12-01

    To infer the anatomical evolution of the Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) and to test previously suggested scenarios of regressive evolution, we performed an exhaustive investigation of stem anatomy in the most variable lineage of the family, the trichomanoids, using a representative sampling of 50 species. The evolution of qualitative and quantitative anatomical characters and possibly related growth-forms was analyzed using a maximum likelihood approach. Potential correlations between selected characters were then statistically tested using a phylogenetic comparative method. Our investigations support the anatomical homogeneity of this family at the generic and sub-generic levels. Reduced and sub-collateral/collateral steles likely derived from an ancestral massive protostele, and sub-collateral/collateral types appear to be related to stem thickness reduction and root apparatus regression. These results corroborate the hypothesis of regressive evolution in the lineage, in terms of morphology as well as anatomy. In addition, a heterogeneous cortex, which is derived in the lineage, appears to be related to a colonial strategy and likely to a climbing phenotype. The evolutionary hypotheses proposed in this study lay the ground for further evolutionary analyses that take into account trichomanoid habitats and accurate ecological preferences.

  19. Ipsilesional Neglect: Behavioral and Anatomical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Daniela L.; Goedert, Kelly M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The sparse existing research on ipsilesional neglect supports an association of this disorder with damage to the right frontal and subcortical brain networks. It is believed that dysfunction in these networks may result in primarily “aiming”, motor-intentional spatial errors. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether frontal-subcortical circuits are indeed commonly affected in ipsilesional neglect and to determine the relative presence of “aiming”, motor-intentional versus “where”, perceptual-attentional spatial errors in these individuals. Methods We identified 12 participants with ipsilesional neglect based on a computerized line bisection task and used the line bisection data to quantify participants' perceptual-attentional and motor-intentional errors. We were able to discriminate between these two biases using the algebraic solutions for two separate equations, one for “aiming” and one for “where” biases. Lesion mapping was conducted for all participants using MRICroN® software; lesion checklist and overlap analysis were created from these images. Results A greater percentage of participants with ipsilesional neglect had frontal/subcortical damage (83%) compared to the expected percentage (27%) observed in published patient samples with contralesional neglect. We observed the greatest area of lesion overlap in frontal lobe white matter pathways. Nevertheless, participants with ipsilesional neglect made primarily “where” rather than “aiming” spatial errors. Conclusion Our data confirms previous research suggesting that ipsilesional neglect may result from lesions to the right frontal-subcortical networks. Furthermore, in our group, ipsilesional neglect was also strongly associated with primarily “where”, perceptual-attentional bias, and less so with “aiming” motor-intentional spatial bias. PMID:25180980

  20. Anatomical applications of a new direct Ceromer.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, D

    1997-01-01

    Composite resin materials have become the basic restorative materials of the modern aesthetics-oriented practice. However, the application of composite resin in posterior teeth remains a challenge as a result of its handling characteristics and chairside stratification. New ceramic optimized polymers (ceromers), such as Tetric Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY), now offer versatility and improved handling properties in response to increasing clinical demand for producing high-quality natural restorations. With a well-designed instrumentation, the work of the clinician may be greatly facilitated. This article evaluates the selection and utilization of a direct ceromer material for posterior restorations and presents a predictable method to achieve aesthetic restorations.

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome - anatomical and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Iskra, Tomasz; Mizia, Ewa; Musial, Agata; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common and widely known of the entrapment neuropathies in which the body's peripheral nerves are compressed. Common symptoms of CTS involve the hand and result from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In general, CTS develops when the tissues around the median nerve irritate or compress on the nerve along its course through the carpal tunnel, however often it is very difficult to determine cause of CTS. Proper treatment (conservative or surgical) usually can relieve the symptoms and restore normal use of the wrist and hand.

  2. Investigations of Anatomical Variations of the Thorax and Heart, and Anatomical Knowledge for First Year Medical Dental and Podiatry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenna, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The universal presence of anatomy in healthcare professions is undeniable. It is a cornerstone to each of the clinical and basic sciences. Therefore, further expansion of current anatomical knowledge and effective methods to teach anatomy is essential. In this work, the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery with the trunks of the brachial…

  3. Reconstruction Of Anatomical Shapes From Moire Contourographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Carl G.

    1983-07-01

    A Moire system which rotates an object in front of a slit camera has been used to obtain continuous photographic maps around amputee socket and shoe last shapes. Previous analysis methods required the use of IBM 370 hardware and extensive software overhead. Using a systematic manual digitizing technique and user-interactive FORTRAN software, the shape reconstruction has been easily performed on a PDP-11 minicomputer system. Both the digitizing technique and the software are oriented towards the shape reproduction process. Numerically controlled machining parameters are used to identify a "skewed" grid of required points along the cutter path. Linear interpolation and anti-interference techniques resulted in reproduction of shoe lasts to within 0.05 inches (1.2 millimeters) from the sensing axis. Difficulties were experienced in obtaining information to resolve the ends of the shapes. Current efforts focus on circumferential shape sensing of live subjects and automatic digitization of sensed data.

  4. [Meningiomas: anatomical pathology and molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bekiashev, A Kh; Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5-10 years, there has been a considerable progress the understanding of the biology of meningioma. The most important advances have been made by comprehensive studies of the pathogenesis of meningioma in molecular genetics. Several target genes could be identified for mutation or inactivation. Additional chromosomal regions that are usually subject to deletion or amplification and point to the presence of tumor suppressor genes or proto-oncogenes were found. The revised and updated 2000 WHO Classification is a major innovation in the histopathology of meningiomas. The new classification system more precisely and objectively determines the grade of meningioma, which allows one to more logically make a prognosis of the recurrence and aggressive behavior of the tumor. The present overview places particular emphasis on recent advances in its molecular biology. It summarizes the most important aspects of the classification of meningiomas, which makes it possible to include the results of biological observations into the respective context, and also considers the mechanisms of angiogenesis and edema development and the role of hormonal receptors in meningiomas.

  5. Anatomical background and generalized detectability in tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Gang, G. J.; Tward, D. J.; Lee, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomical background presents a major impediment to detectability in 2D radiography as well as 3D tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). This article incorporates theoretical and experimental analysis of anatomical background “noise” in cascaded systems analysis of 2D and 3D imaging performance to yield “generalized” metrics of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detectability index as a function of the orbital extent of the (circular arc) source-detector orbit. Methods: A physical phantom was designed based on principles of fractal self-similarity to exhibit power-law spectral density (κ∕fβ) comparable to various anatomical sites (e.g., breast and lung). Background power spectra [SB(f)] were computed as a function of source-detector orbital extent, including tomosynthesis (∼10°–180°) and CBCT (180°+fan to 360°) under two acquisition schemes: (1) Constant angular separation between projections (variable dose) and (2) constant total number of projections (constant dose). The resulting SB was incorporated in the generalized NEQ, and detectability index was computed from 3D cascaded systems analysis for a variety of imaging tasks. Results: The phantom yielded power-law spectra within the expected spatial frequency range, quantifying the dependence of clutter magnitude (κ) and correlation (β) with increasing tomosynthesis angle. Incorporation of SB in the 3D NEQ provided a useful framework for analyzing the tradeoffs among anatomical, quantum, and electronic noise with dose and orbital extent. Distinct implications are posed for breast and chest tomosynthesis imaging system design—applications varying significantly in κ and β, and imaging task and, therefore, in optimal selection of orbital extent, number of projections, and dose. For example, low-frequency tasks (e.g., soft-tissue masses or nodules) tend to benefit from larger orbital extent and more fully 3D tomographic imaging, whereas high-frequency tasks (e.g., microcalcifications

  6. Anatomical background and generalized detectability in tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gang, G. J.; Tward, D. J.; Lee, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Anatomical background presents a major impediment to detectability in 2D radiography as well as 3D tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). This article incorporates theoretical and experimental analysis of anatomical background ''noise'' in cascaded systems analysis of 2D and 3D imaging performance to yield ''generalized'' metrics of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detectability index as a function of the orbital extent of the (circular arc) source-detector orbit. Methods: A physical phantom was designed based on principles of fractal self-similarity to exhibit power-law spectral density ({kappa}/f{sup {beta}}) comparable to various anatomical sites (e.g., breast and lung). Background power spectra [S{sub B}(f)] were computed as a function of source-detector orbital extent, including tomosynthesis ({approx}10 deg. - 180 deg.) and CBCT (180 deg. +fan to 360 deg.) under two acquisition schemes: (1) Constant angular separation between projections (variable dose) and (2) constant total number of projections (constant dose). The resulting S{sub B} was incorporated in the generalized NEQ, and detectability index was computed from 3D cascaded systems analysis for a variety of imaging tasks. Results: The phantom yielded power-law spectra within the expected spatial frequency range, quantifying the dependence of clutter magnitude ({kappa}) and correlation ({beta}) with increasing tomosynthesis angle. Incorporation of S{sub B} in the 3D NEQ provided a useful framework for analyzing the tradeoffs among anatomical, quantum, and electronic noise with dose and orbital extent. Distinct implications are posed for breast and chest tomosynthesis imaging system design--applications varying significantly in {kappa} and {beta}, and imaging task and, therefore, in optimal selection of orbital extent, number of projections, and dose. For example, low-frequency tasks (e.g., soft-tissue masses or nodules) tend to benefit from larger orbital extent and more fully 3D tomographic

  7. Anatomical aspects of angiosperm root evolution

    PubMed Central

    Seago, James L.; Fernando, Danilo D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Anatomy had been one of the foundations in our understanding of plant evolutionary trends and, although recent evo-devo concepts are mostly based on molecular genetics, classical structural information remains useful as ever. Of the various plant organs, the roots have been the least studied, primarily because of the difficulty in obtaining materials, particularly from large woody species. Therefore, this review aims to provide an overview of the information that has accumulated on the anatomy of angiosperm roots and to present possible evolutionary trends between representatives of the major angiosperm clades. Scope This review covers an overview of the various aspects of the evolutionary origin of the root. The results and discussion focus on angiosperm root anatomy and evolution covering representatives from basal angiosperms, magnoliids, monocots and eudicots. We use information from the literature as well as new data from our own research. Key Findings The organization of the root apical meristem (RAM) of Nymphaeales allows for the ground meristem and protoderm to be derived from the same group of initials, similar to those of the monocots, whereas in Amborellales, magnoliids and eudicots, it is their protoderm and lateral rootcap which are derived from the same group of initials. Most members of Nymphaeales are similar to monocots in having ephemeral primary roots and so adventitious roots predominate, whereas Amborellales, Austrobaileyales, magnoliids and eudicots are generally characterized by having primary roots that give rise to a taproot system. Nymphaeales and monocots often have polyarch (heptarch or more) steles, whereas the rest of the basal angiosperms, magnoliids and eudicots usually have diarch to hexarch steles. Conclusions Angiosperms exhibit highly varied structural patterns in RAM organization; cortex, epidermis and rootcap origins; and stele patterns. Generally, however, Amborellales, magnoliids and, possibly

  8. The primo vascular system as a new anatomical system.

    PubMed

    Stefanov, Miroslav; Potroz, Michael; Kim, Jungdae; Lim, Jake; Cha, Richard; Nam, Min-Ho

    2013-12-01

    Traditional Eastern medicine has had a successful existence for a long time and has provided functional paths for curing disease. However, some scientists do not accept acupuncture, primarily because the meridian system lacks a physical anatomical basis. To date, scientific theories have not been able to explain the functional paths used by traditional Eastern medicine to cure disease. According to Western medicine, no known anatomical foundation exists for the meridians and unknown nervous, circulatory, endocrine, and immune mechanisms mediate the effects of acupuncture. In the early 1960s, only one hypothesis was proposed to explain the anatomical basis of the meridians. By using different experimental approaches during the past 10 years, the number of scientific papers that report the discovery of different anatomical and physiological evidence confirming the existence of an anatomical basis for the meridian system has increased. Morphological science is greatly challenged to offer a new biomedical theory that explains the possible existence of new bodily systems such as the primo vascular system (PVS). The PVS is a previously unknown system that integrates the features of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and hormonal systems. It also provides a physical substrate for the acupuncture points and meridians. Announcements of the morphological architectonics and the function of the PVS fundamentally changed the basic understanding of biology and medicine because the PVS is involved in the development and the functions of living organisms. We propose a new vision of the anatomical basis for the PVS and the vital energy-called "Qi"-as an electromagnetic wave that is involved very closely with the DNA in the PVS. DNA provides genetic information and it functions as a store of information that can be obtained from the electromagnetic fields of the environment. The PVS is the communication system between living organisms and the environment, and it lies at the lowest

  9. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part I. Single-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Muller, Serge; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The use of an intravenously injected iodinated contrast agent could help increase the sensitivity of digital mammography by adding information on tumor angiogenesis. Two approaches have been made for clinical implementation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM), namely, single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) imaging. In each technique, pairs of mammograms are acquired, which are then subtracted with the intent to cancel the appearance of healthy breast tissue to permit sensitive detection and specific characterization of lesions. Patterns of contrast agent uptake in the healthy parenchyma, and uncanceled signal from background tissue create a 'clutter' that can mask or mimic an enhancing lesion. This type of 'anatomical noise' is often the limiting factor in lesion detection tasks, and thus, noise quantification may be useful for cascaded systems analysis of CEDM and for phantom development. In this work, the authors characterize the anatomical noise in CEDM clinical images and the authors evaluate the influence of the x-ray energy used for acquisition, the presence of iodine in the breast, and the timing of imaging postcontrast administration on anatomical noise. The results are presented in a two-part report, with SE CEDM described here, and DE CEDM in Part II. Methods: A power law is used to model anatomical noise in CEDM images. The exponent, {beta}, which describes the anatomical structure, and the constant {alpha}, which represents the magnitude of the noise, are determined from Wiener spectra (WS) measurements on images. A total of 42 SE CEDM cases from two previous clinical pilot studies are assessed. The parameters {alpha} and {beta} are measured both from unprocessed images and from subtracted images. Results: Consistent results were found between the two SE CEDM pilot studies, where a significant decrease in {beta} from a value of approximately 3.1 in the unprocessed images to between about 1.1 and 1.8 in the subtracted images was

  10. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Răzvan; Muller, Serge; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters α and β. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, α and β, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers β to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing β by about 0.07 compared to DM, with α unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases α by about 2

  11. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  12. [Anatomical rationale for lingual nerve injury prevention during mandibular block].

    PubMed

    Semkin, V A; Dydikin, S S; Kuzin, A V; Sogacheva, V V

    2015-01-01

    The topographic and anatomical study of lingual nerve structural features was done. It was revealed that during mandibular anesthesia possible lingual nerve injury can occur if puncture needle is lower than 1 cm. of molars occlusal surface level. The position of the lingual nerve varies withmandible movements. At the maximum open mouth lingual nerve is not mobile and is pressed against the inner surface of the mandibular ramus by the medial pterygoid muscle and the temporal muscle tendon. When closing the mouth to 1.25±0.2 cmfrom the physiological maximum, lingual nerve is displaced posteriorly from the internal oblique line of the mandible and gets mobile. On the basis of topographic and anatomic features of the lingual nervestructure the authors recommend the re-do of inferior alveolar nerve block, a semi-closed mouth position or the use the "high block techniques" (Torus anesthesia, Gow-Gates, Vazirani-Akinozi). PMID:26271698

  13. Characterization of Capsicum species using anatomical and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Dias, G B; Gomes, V M; Moraes, T M S; Zottich, U P; Rabelo, G R; Carvalho, A O; Moulin, M; Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Da Cunha, M

    2013-02-28

    Capsicum species are frequently described in terms of genetic divergence, considering morphological, agronomic, and molecular databases. However, descriptions of genetic differences based on anatomical characters are rare. We examined the anatomy and the micromorphology of vegetative and reproductive organs of several Capsicum species. Four Capsicum accessions representing the species C. annuum var. annuum, C. baccatum var. pendulum, C. chinense, and C. frutescens were cultivated in a greenhouse; leaves, fruits and seeds were sampled and their organ structure analyzed by light and scanning electronic microscopy. Molecular accession characterization was made using ISSR markers. Polymorphism was observed among tector trichomes and also in fruit color and shape. High variability among accessions was detected by ISSR markers. Despite the species studied present a wide morphological and molecular variability that was not reflected by anatomical features.

  14. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  15. Anatomical models for space radiation applications: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, W.

    1994-10-01

    Extremely detailed computerized anatomical male (CAM) and female (CAF) models that have been developed for use in space radiation analyses are discussed and reviewed. Recognizing that the level of detail may currently be inadequate for certain radiological applications, one of the purposes of this paper is to elicit specific model improvements or requirements from the scientific user-community. Methods and rationale are presented which describe the approach used in the Space Shuttle program to extrapolate dosimetry measurements (skin doses) to realistic astronaut body organ doses. Several mission scenarios are presented which demonstrate the utility of the anatomical models for obtaining specific body organ exposure estimates and can be used for establishing cancer morbidity and mortality risk assessments. These exposure estimates are based on the trapped Van Allen belt and galactic cosmic radiation environment models and data from the major historical solar particle events.

  16. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27469407

  17. Value of anatomic landmarks in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, O Y; Uras, I; Tasbas, B; Kaya, M; Ozay, R; Komurcu, M

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated which anatomic landmarks were most useful for correct and safe incision placement in carpal tunnel surgery. Kirschner wires were attached to the hands to mark previously defined landmarks. The bony attachments of the transverse carpal ligament, which were identified previously, were drawn on an anteroposterior digital x-ray of the hand, with the thumb in full abduction. The relationship between anatomic landmarks and these bony attachments were examined. In all hands, either the line along the third web space or the crease between the thenar and the hypothenar regions, or both, were on the ulnar half of the transverse carpal ligament. During incision placement, we recommend selecting the most ulnar choice between the line drawn along the third web space and the crease between the thenar and hypothenar regions in order to be at safe distance from the recurrent motor branch of the median nerve.

  18. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  19. An anatomical commentary on the concept of infantile oral sadism.

    PubMed

    Freeman, R; Freeman, T

    1992-01-01

    Although this paper is entitled 'An anatomical commentary on the concept of infantile oral sadism' it is also an attempt to examine hypotheses regarding the sources of oral sadism. Freud did not explicitly refer to an oral sadistic phase of development in early infancy, believing as he did that sadism was a component instinct. Abraham postulated that oral sadism arises when the teeth erupt and the jaw muscles function. Melanie Klein, however, came to claim that oral sadistic impulses operate from birth and arise from the infant's innate potential for fantasy. This hypothesis is akin to Freud's theory of primal fantasies. The anatomical record supports Abraham's theory of the source of oral sadism. PMID:1512124

  20. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  1. Evaluation of anatomical consistency in craniofacial superimposition images.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Imaizumi, K; Miyasaka, S; Seta, S

    1995-06-30

    Using 52 skulls in forensic cases, the anatomical consistency of cranio-facial superimposition images was investigated for evaluating the validity in personal identification by the superimposition method. In 35 out of 52 cases the unknown skull was positively identified as the missing person by matching of the outline and anatomical relation in skull and face images taken from frontal, oblique and lateral directions. The unknown skull in two cases was exclusive of the presumed person since the outline of the skull was not anatomically consistent with that of the face. In the remaining 15 cases, the skull in question was examined using only a frontal face photograph of the missing person and matched with it because of the lack of other photographs taken from different angles, giving a probable identification. From our practical examination, it is stated that the outline from the trichion to the gnathion in the lateral or oblique view is the preferable portion for personal identification, and the cranio-facial super-imposition method is reliable for individualization when two or more facial photographs taken from different angles are used in the examination.

  2. Designing learning spaces for interprofessional education in the anatomical sciences.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Benjamin; Kvan, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores connections between interprofessional education (IPE) models and the design of learning spaces for undergraduate and graduate education in the anatomical sciences and other professional preparation. The authors argue that for IPE models to be successful and sustained they must be embodied in the environment in which interprofessional learning occurs. To elaborate these arguments, two exemplar tertiary education facilities are discussed: the Charles Perkins Centre at the University of Sydney for science education and research, and Victoria University's Interprofessional Clinic in Wyndham for undergraduate IPE in health care. Backed by well-conceived curriculum and pedagogical models, the architectures of these facilities embody the educational visions, methods, and practices they were designed to support. Subsequently, the article discusses the spatial implications of curriculum and pedagogical change in the teaching of the anatomical sciences and explores how architecture might further the development of IPE models in the field. In conclusion, it is argued that learning spaces should be designed and developed (socially) with the expressed intention of supporting collaborative IPE models in health education settings, including those in the anatomical sciences.

  3. The Essential Anatomical Subunit Approximation Unilateral Cleft Lip Repair.

    PubMed

    Chong, David K; Swanson, Jordan W

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical subunit approximation cleft lip repair advantageously achieves a balanced lip contour, with the line of repair hidden along seams of aesthetic subunits. Dr. David Fisher's original description of the repair reflects the considerable thought that went into the evolution of his design. As his technique has gained acceptance in the intervening 10 years, the authors note several key principles embodied in it that represent a shift in the cleft lip repair paradigm. The authors believe understanding these principles is important to mastery of the anatomical subunit technique, and facilitate its teaching. First, design a plan that adheres to anatomical subunits and perform measurements precisely. Second, identify and adequately release each cleft tissue layer from the lip and nose to enable restoration of balance. Third, drive surgical approximation through inset of the lateral muscle into the superiorly backcut medial orbicularis muscle, followed by skin closure with inferior triangle interposition above the white roll. In this article, the authors present essential components of the technique, and identify several principles that enable its successful execution. PMID:27348690

  4. The Importance of Exposure to Human Material in Anatomical Education: A Philosophical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Despite reductions in the importance, time committed to, and status of anatomical education in modern medical curricula, anatomical knowledge remains a cornerstone of medicine and related professions. Anatomists are therefore presented with the challenge of delivering required levels of core anatomical knowledge in a reduced time-frame and with…

  5. The Intermingled History of Occupational Therapy and Anatomical Education: A Retrospective Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Melissa A.; Lawson, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Few research articles have addressed the anatomical needs of entry-level occupational therapy students. Given this paucity of empirical evidence, there is a lack of knowledge regarding anatomical education in occupational therapy. This article will primarily serve as a retrospective look at the inclusion of anatomical education in the occupational…

  6. Frequency in Usage of FCAT-Approved Anatomical Terms by North American Anatomists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Bradford D.; Thorpe, Donna; Barnes, Richard; DeLeon, Michael; Hill, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) published Terminologia Anatomica (TA), the current authority on anatomical nomenclature. There exists a perceived lack of unity among anatomists to adopt many FCAT recommended anatomical terms in TA. An e-mail survey was sent to members of the American Association…

  7. A flexible, generic model for anatomic shape: application to interactive two-dimensional medical image segmentation and matching.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, J F

    1993-04-01

    A representation called a radial contour model (RCM) is described for two-dimensional anatomic shapes. The model, which is a type of a geometric constraint network (GCN), is both flexible, in that it can deform to fit a particular instance of an anatomic shape, and generic, in that it captures all examples of a particular anatomic shape class. The model is implemented in a program, called SCANNER (version 0.7), for interactive model-based two-dimensional image segmentation and matching. Use of the model allows the segmenter to direct the search for edges in the image, and to fill in edges where none are present. Evaluations were done using models of 15 cross-sectional shapes appearing on CT images from 16 patients. Results from 480 trials show that the model-based approach reduces segmentation time by nearly a factor of 3 over manual methods, and correctly classifies 72.9% of the contours. The results not only suggest that the RCM will be useful for several current medical image segmentation tasks, but also support the hypothesis that geometric constraint networks are a viable approach to anatomic shape representation.

  8. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  9. A portable system for collecting anatomical joint angles during stair ascent: a comparison with an optical tracking device

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Jeroen HM; Mayagoitia, Ruth E; Smith, Ian CH

    2009-01-01

    Background Assessments of stair climbing in real-life situations using an optical tracking system are lacking, as it is difficult to adapt the system for use in and around full flights of stairs. Alternatively, a portable system that consists of inertial measurement units (IMUs) can be used to collect anatomical joint angles during stair ascent. The purpose of this study was to compare the anatomical joint angles obtained by IMUs to those calculated from position data of an optical tracking device. Methods Anatomical joint angles of the thigh, knee and ankle, obtained using IMUs and an optical tracking device, were compared for fourteen healthy subjects. Joint kinematics obtained with the two measurement devices were evaluated by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and by calculating a two-tailed Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) between the two signals. Results Strong mean correlations (range 0.93 to 0.99) were found for the angles between the two measurement devices, as well as an average root mean square error (RMSE) of 4 degrees over all the joint angles, showing that the IMUs are a satisfactory system for measuring anatomical joint angles. Conclusion These highly portable body-worn inertial sensors can be used by clinicians and researchers alike, to accurately collect data during stair climbing in complex real-life situations. PMID:19389238

  10. Anatomical coupling among distributed cortical regions in youth varies as a function of individual differences in vocabulary abilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Raznahan, Armin; Wallace, Gregory L; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Clasen, Liv S; Lerch, Jason P; Giedd, Jay N

    2014-05-01

    Patient lesion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have provided convincing evidence that a distributed brain network subserves word knowledge. However, little is known about the structural correlates of this network within the context of typical development and whether anatomical coupling in linguistically relevant regions of cortex varies as a function of vocabulary skill. Here we investigate the association between vocabulary and anatomical coupling in 235 typically developing youth (ages 6-19 years) using structural MRI. The study's primary aim was to evaluate whether higher vocabulary performance was associated with greater vertex-level cortical thickness covariation in distributed regions of cortex known to be associated with word knowledge. Results indicate that better vocabulary skills are associated with greater anatomical coupling in several linguistically relevant regions of cortex, including the left inferior parietal (temporal-parietal junction), inferior temporal, middle frontal, and superior frontal gyri and the right inferior frontal and precentral gyri. Furthermore, in high vocabulary scorers, stronger coupling is found among these regions. Thus, complementing patient and fMRI studies, this is the first investigation to highlight the relevance of anatomical covariance within the cortex to vocabulary skills in typically developing youth, further elucidating the distributed nature of neural systems subserving word knowledge.

  11. Anatomical coupling among distributed cortical regions in youth varies as a function of individual differences in vocabulary abilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Raznahan, Armin; Wallace, Gregory L; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Clasen, Liv S; Lerch, Jason P; Giedd, Jay N

    2014-05-01

    Patient lesion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have provided convincing evidence that a distributed brain network subserves word knowledge. However, little is known about the structural correlates of this network within the context of typical development and whether anatomical coupling in linguistically relevant regions of cortex varies as a function of vocabulary skill. Here we investigate the association between vocabulary and anatomical coupling in 235 typically developing youth (ages 6-19 years) using structural MRI. The study's primary aim was to evaluate whether higher vocabulary performance was associated with greater vertex-level cortical thickness covariation in distributed regions of cortex known to be associated with word knowledge. Results indicate that better vocabulary skills are associated with greater anatomical coupling in several linguistically relevant regions of cortex, including the left inferior parietal (temporal-parietal junction), inferior temporal, middle frontal, and superior frontal gyri and the right inferior frontal and precentral gyri. Furthermore, in high vocabulary scorers, stronger coupling is found among these regions. Thus, complementing patient and fMRI studies, this is the first investigation to highlight the relevance of anatomical covariance within the cortex to vocabulary skills in typically developing youth, further elucidating the distributed nature of neural systems subserving word knowledge. PMID:23728856

  12. Dead bodies for the anatomical institute in the Third Reich: An investigation at the University of Jena.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Fröber, Rosemarie; Viebig, Michael; Zimmermann, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    During the period of 2004-2005, a group of anatomists and historians investigated the origin of dead bodies received by the anatomical institute of the University of Jena in the Third Reich. Between 1933 and 1945, the institute received the bodies of 203 executed persons, most of whom had been sentenced to death for relatively minor offenses or opposition to National Socialist (NS) regulations. Moreover, the institute received about 200 bodies of possible "euthanasia" victims from nearby nursing homes and mental institutions, and several dozen dead bodies of forced laborers from Eastern Europe. Many of these persons must be considered victims of NS injustice. One of the central questions of the investigation was whether any remains of NS victims were still present in the anatomical collections of the institute. At their own initiative, members of the anatomical institute initiated the investigation after a change of leadership at the institute. The investigation was characterized by (1) a scholarly approach thanks to the participation of expert historians, (2) transparency, including early and full information of the press, (3) documentation and publication of the results at the national and international level, (4) appropriate consequences for the anatomical collections, and (5) commemoration of the victims. This and other recent investigations demonstrate that a new generation of German anatomists has begun to uncover the role of their institutes during the Third Reich, finally overcoming the phase of silence in postwar German anatomy.

  13. Anatomical investigations on root, stem, and leaf of Gentiana olivieri Griseb

    PubMed Central

    Tüzün, Canan Yağci; Toker, Mehmet Cihat; Toker, Gülnur

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gentiana olivieri Griseb. (Afat) (Gentianaceae), which has many bioactive compounds is used as antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, digestive aid, antidepressant, and antianemic in traditional medicine. Materials and Methods: Root, stem, and leaf sections of G. olivieri were taken free hand or by sliding microtome and examined on light microscope. Results: Anatomical characters of the species were observed to be similar to the usual features of Gentianaceae anatomy. Conclusion: Intraxylary phloem, which was primarily the distinguishing feature between Gentianoideae and Menyanthoideae sub-families was observed in G. olivieri roots. PMID:21472072

  14. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  15. Computed tomography of the larynx: correlation with anatomic and pathologic studies in cases of laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Schild, J.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Capek, V.

    1983-04-01

    Seven patients with known carcinoma of the larynx underwent computed tomography (CT) of the larynx prior to surgery. Whole-mount sections of the extirpated larynx cut in the horizontal plane were compared with the corresponding level of the preoperaive CT sections to demonstrate the validity of CT scanning in the evaluation of tumors of the larynx. The results indicate that CT scanning accurately demonstrates the anatomic location and gross size of laryngeal tumor, although early invasion of the laryngeal cartilages may be difficult to diagnose with CT. It is concluded that preoperative CT scanning of the larynx is the radiologic procedure of choice for evaluating carcinoma of the larynx.

  16. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  17. Specification and estimation of sources of bias affecting neurological studies in PET/MR with an anatomical brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuho, J.; Johansson, J.; Linden, J.; Saunavaara, V.; Tolvanen, T.; Teräs, M.

    2014-01-01

    Selection of reconstruction parameters has an effect on the image quantification in PET, with an additional contribution from a scanner-specific attenuation correction method. For achieving comparable results in inter- and intra-center comparisons, any existing quantitative differences should be identified and compensated for. In this study, a comparison between PET, PET/CT and PET/MR is performed by using an anatomical brain phantom, to identify and measure the amount of bias caused due to differences in reconstruction and attenuation correction methods especially in PET/MR. Differences were estimated by using visual, qualitative and quantitative analysis. The qualitative analysis consisted of a line profile analysis for measuring the reproduction of anatomical structures and the contribution of the amount of iterations to image contrast. The quantitative analysis consisted of measurement and comparison of 10 anatomical VOIs, where the HRRT was considered as the reference. All scanners reproduced the main anatomical structures of the phantom adequately, although the image contrast on the PET/MR was inferior when using a default clinical brain protocol. Image contrast was improved by increasing the amount of iterations from 2 to 5 while using 33 subsets. Furthermore, a PET/MR-specific bias was detected, which resulted in underestimation of the activity values in anatomical structures closest to the skull, due to the MR-derived attenuation map that ignores the bone. Thus, further improvements for the PET/MR reconstruction and attenuation correction could be achieved by optimization of RAMLA-specific reconstruction parameters and implementation of bone to the attenuation template.

  18. Computational analysis of polyethylene wear in anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; Monteiro, J

    2015-02-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, components has been associated with the failure of joint prostheses in the hip, knee, and shoulder. Considering that in vitro experiments are generally too expensive and time-consuming, computational models are an attractive alternative to study the wear behavior of UHMWPE components. The objective of the present study was to develop a computational wear model to evaluate the wear resistance of anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses. The effects of the wear law and the updating of the UHMWPE surface on the prediction of wear were also considered. Apart from Archard's law, a new wear law, so-called second generation law, which includes the concept of cross-shear and a pressure-independent wear factor, was considered. The wear analyses were performed considering three shoulder joint motions. The muscle and joint reaction forces applied were estimated by an inverse biomechanical model of the upper limb. The results show that abrasive wear is as important for the reverse components as it is for the anatomical. Nevertheless, the volumetric wears estimated over 1 year are within the range considered clinically desirable to reduce the risk of osteolysis. For the anatomical components, the predictions from Archard's law compare better, than those of the second generation law, to the experimental and clinical data available in the literature. Yet, the opposite result is obtained for the reverse components. From the numerical point of view, an updating procedure for the UHMWPE surface is mandatory to improve the numerical predictions. PMID:25362522

  19. Foliar anatomical and morphological variation in Nothofagus pumilio seedlings under controlled irradiance and soil moisture levels.

    PubMed

    Ivancich, Horacio S; Lencinas, María V; Pastur, Guillermo J Martínez; Esteban, Rosina M Soler; Hernández, Luis; Lindstrom, Ivone

    2012-05-01

    Foliar anatomy and morphology are strongly related to physiological performance; therefore, phenotypic plasticity in leaves to variations in environmental conditions, such as irradiance and soil moisture availability, can be related to growth rate and survivorship, mainly during critical growth phases, such as establishment. The aim of this work was to analyze changes in the foliar internal anatomy (tissue proportions and cell dimensions) and external morphology (leaf length, width and area) of Nothofagus pumilio (Poepp. et Endl.) Krasser seedlings growing in a greenhouse under controlled irradiance (three levels) and soil moisture (two levels) during one growing season (measured three times), and to relate them to physiological traits. Three irradiance levels (4, 26 and 64% of the natural incident light) and two soil moisture levels (40 and 80% soil capacity) were evaluated during November, January and March. Internal foliar anatomy of seedlings was analyzed using digital photographs of histological cuttings, while leaf gross morphology was measured using digital calipers and image analysis software. Most internal anatomical variables presented significant differences under different irradiance levels during the growing season, but differences were not detected between soil moisture levels. Palisade parenchyma was the tissue most sensitive to irradiance levels, and high irradiance levels (64% natural incident light) produced greater values in most of the internal anatomical variables than lower irradiance levels (4-24% natural incident light). Complementarily, larger leaves were observed in medium and low irradiance levels, as well as under low soil moisture levels (40% soil capacity). The relationship of main results with some eco-physiological traits was discussed. Foliar internal anatomical and external morphological plasticity allows quick acclimation of seedlings to environmental changes (e.g., during harvesting). These results can be used to propose new

  20. Hemodialysis catheter implantation in the axillary vein by ultrasound guidance versus palpation or anatomical reference

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Cesar A Restrepo; Villa, Carlos A Buitrago; Cardona, Jose A Chacon

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared the results of four different methods of hemodialysis catheter insertion in the medial segment of the axillary vein: ultrasound guidance, palpation, anatomical reference, and prior transient catheter. Methods All patients that required acute or chronic hemodialysis and for whom it was determined impossible or not recommended either to place a catheter in the internal jugular vein (for instance, those patients with a tracheostomy), or to practice arteriovenous fistula or graft; it was then essential to obtain an alternative vascular access. When the procedure of axillary vein catheter insertion was performed in the Renal Care Facility (RCF), ultrasound guidance was used, but in the intensive care unit (ICU), this resource was unavailable, so the palpation or anatomical reference technique was used. Results Two nephrologists with experience in the technique performed 83 procedures during a period lasting 15 years and 8 months (from January 1997–August 2012): 41 by ultrasound guidance; 19 by anatomical references; 15 by palpation of the contiguous axillary artery; and 8 through a temporary axillary catheter previously placed. The ultrasound-guided patients had fewer punctures than other groups, but the value was not statistically significant. Arterial punctures were infrequent in all techniques. Analyzing all the procedure-related complications, such as hematoma, pneumothorax, brachial-plexus injury, as well as the reasons for catheter removal, no differences were observed among the groups. The functioning time was longer in the ultrasound-guided and previous catheter groups. In 15 years and 8 months of surveillance, no clinical or image evidence for axillary vein stenosis was found. Conclusion The ultrasound guide makes the procedure of inserting catheters in the axillary veins easier, but knowledge of the anatomy of the midaxillary region and the ability to feel the axillary artery pulse (for the palpation method) also allow relatively easy

  1. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  2. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  3. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject’s complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). Results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modeling is able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that results remain significant even if the number of

  4. [Internal fixation of radial shaft fractures: Anatomical and biomechanical principles].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    Radius is a critical bone for functioning of the forearm and therefore its reconstruction following fracture of its shaft must be anatomical in all planes and along all axes. The method of choice is plate fixation. However, it is still associated with a number of unnecessary complications that were not resolved even by introduction of locking plates, but rather the opposite. All the more it is surprising that discussions about anatomical and biomechanical principles of plate fixation have been reduced to minimum or even neglected in the current literature. This applies primarily to the choice of the surgical approach, type of plate, site of its placement and contouring, its working length, number of screws and their distribution in the plate. At the same time it has to be taken into account that a plate used to fix radius is exposed to both bending and torsion stress. Based on our 30-year experience and analysis of literature we present our opinions on plate fixation of radial shaft fractures:We always prefer the volar Henry approach as it allows expose almost the whole of radius, with a minimal risk of injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve.The available studies have not so far found any substantial advantage of LCP plates as compared to 3.5mm DCP or 3.5mm LC DCP plates, quite the contrary. The reason is high rigidity of the locking plates, a determined trajectory of locking screws which is often unsuitable, mainly in plates placed on the anterior surface of the shaft, and failure to respect the physiological curvature of the radius. Therefore based on our experience we prefer "classical" 3.5mm DCP plates.Volar placement of the plate, LCP in particular, is associated with a number of problems. The volar surface covered almost entirely by muscles, must be fully exposed which negatively affects blood supply to the bone. A straight plate, if longer, either lies with its central part partially off the bone and overlaps the interosseous border, or its ends

  5. Does Learning in Clinical Context in Anatomical Sciences Improve Examination Results, Learning Motivation, or Learning Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical…

  6. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  7. MRI of the glenoid labrum with gross anatomic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, C.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the magnetic resonance image (MRI) appearance of the glenoid labrum and the perilabral structures with and without instillation of intraarticular contrast material. Ten cadaveric shoulder specimens underwent axial MRI using various MR pulse sequences. The shoulders then were transversely sectioned, and tile gross morphology of the labrum and perilabral structures was evaluated and correlated with the MR images. The contrast-enhanced sequences allowed for improved anatomic visualization of the structures evaluated. 23 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Device for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device is disclosed for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs such as the ear canal or throat. It has a housing shaped like a flashlight, an electrical power source such as a battery or AC power from a wall socket, and a tip extending from the housing. The tip has at least one wire loop made from a shape-memory-effect alloy, such as Nitinol, switchably connected to the electrical power source such that when electric current flows through the wire loop the wire loop heats up and returns to a previously programmed shape such as a curet or tweezers so as to facilitate removal of the foreign object.

  9. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery.

  10. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery. PMID:27140865

  11. An Anatomic Pathology System Using the File Manager

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, R. E.; Tatarczuk, J. R.; Roy, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    An Anatomic Pathology System incorporating patient data from surgical pathology, cytopathology and autopsy pathology is presented. The System includes four interconnected files created with the aid of the File Manager. One file, containing patient demographic data, can be used as a connecting node to other patient databases. Five MUMPS routines, using File Manager functions, allow System users unfamiliar with computers and computer programming to easily enter, edit and retrieve patient information. Retrieved information is in a format to reconstruct, when possible, a patient's medical history from the pathology database and to correlate surgical pathology, cytopathology and autopsy pathology data.

  12. [Anatomical specimens and surgical instruments in old Dresden].

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Passionate collectors of anatomical specimens, curiosities and surgical instruments the electors of Saxony between 1560 and 1748 founded great collections of this matter. They struggled for knowledge of nature, of the human body and of diseases. The exhibits were used by members of the court, by citizens and by the students of the first surgical school of Dresden, the Collegium medico-chirurgicum, and its successor. A selection of human and animal bones, fetuses, specimens in alcohol, abnormalities and medical instruments are described by original papers. The whole collection of preparations and old instruments was lost by being given away, fire and wars.

  13. A rare anatomic variant of the superior glenohumeral ligament.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, R L; Itoi, E; Watanabe, W; Yamada, S; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu, T; Wakabayashi, I; Sato, K

    2001-01-01

    The attachment of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL) to the upper pole of the glenoid is variable and 3 types have been described. We report an anatomic variant of SGHL attachment to the upper pole of the glenoid that has not heretofore been reported in the literature. In this case, the SGHL overrode the biceps origin, continued to the superior labrum posteriorly, and had no attachment to the middle glenohumeral ligament or the anterior labrum. This variant was detected during routine arthroscopic examination undertaken before surgery on a rotator cuff tear.

  14. Anatomic and biomechanical fundamentals of the thrower shoulder.

    PubMed

    Eckenrode, Brian J; Kelley, Martin J; Kelly, John D

    2012-03-01

    The act of throwing requires proper functioning and timing of the entire kinetic chain musculature to generate a coordinated movement pattern for ball delivery. The role of the shoulder complex is vital in the transmission of force from the lower extremities and trunk to the arm and hand. A review of the anatomic and biomechanical factors of the shoulder girdle will be discussed as it pertains to the thrower. An understanding of the relationship of the muscles, ligaments, and osseous structures is essential to the successful diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pathology and dysfunction.

  15. Pneumomediastinum: Elucidation of the anatomic pathway by liquid ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Jamadar, D.A.; Kazerooni, E.A.; Hirschl, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    Partial liquid ventilation is a new technique to improve oxygenation in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. In a patient with status asthmaticus and tension pneumothorax treated with subsequent liquid ventilation, radiopaque perfluorocarbon was identified along bronchovascular structures, in the mediastinum, and in the retroperitoneum. Perfluorocarbon outlined on CT and chest radiography the anatomic pathway by which spontaneous pneumomediastinum develops following alveolar rupture, as described earlier by histopathologic study in animals. This represents the radiopaque equivalent of radiolucent pneumomediastinum. Perfluorocarbon remained in the pulmonary interstitium on radiography 30 days after beginning liquid ventilation, without sequelae. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Correlative CT and anatomic study of the sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Pech, P.; Haughton, V.

    1985-05-01

    Sciatica can be caused by numerous processes affecting the sciatic nerve or its components within the pelvis including tumors, infectious diseases, aneurysms, fractures, and endometriosis. The CT diagnosis of these causes of sciatica has not been emphasized. This study identified the course and appearance of the normal sciatic nerve in the pelvis by correlating CT and anatomic slices in cadavers. For purposes of discussion, the sciatic nerve complex is conveniently divided into three parts: presacral, muscular, and ischial. Each part is illustrated here by two cryosections with corresponding CT images.

  17. TH-C-BRD-11: Robustness of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Pelvic Cancer Under Anatomical Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinges, E; Bhatia, S; Gross, B; McGuire, S; Wang, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy provides excellent dosimetric benefits in pelvic cancer treatment, yet day-to-day anatomical variations in pelvic region tend to cause range uncertainties. This study evaluates the dosimetric robustness under anatomical changes for three PBS intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), IMPT using worstcase robust optimization (thereafter ‘Robust IMPT’), and single-field uniform dose (SFUD), in cervical cancer treatment. Methods: IMPT, Robust IMPT, and SFUD plans using the same beam directions and the same prescription (Rx) were generated on computed tomography (CT) images acquired on the simulation day. The dose from each plan was then recomputed on CT images acquired in subsequent two to five weeks using the same protocol. The weekly CTs were registered to the planning CT based on bony anatomy. Target coverage was considered adequate on each weekly CT if dose to 99% of the internal target volume (D-ITV99%) reached at least 95% of the Rx dose. Statistical analysis was then performed on the 21 weekly CT images available for the 7 enrolled patients. Results: Statistically, IMPT was unable to maintain target coverage (mean D-ITV99% = 90.5% Rx, p = 0.004), and SFUD was able to maintain target coverage (mean D-ITV99% = 98.0% Rx, p = 0.0064), in the weeks following simulation. Robust IMPT was able to improve the robustness of IMPT significantly (p < 0.0001), though its maintenance of target coverage was not statistically significant by the 95% Rx criteria (mean D-ITV99% = 96.0%, p = 0.1677). Conclusion: During the multi-week treatment course with anatomical variations, SFUD is robust in terms of maintaining target coverage while IMPT is not. The worst-case optimized Robust IMPT, assuming ±3.5% range uncertainties, improves the robustness of IMPT under anatomical changes significantly, even though it was not designed to account for anatomical changes by mechanism.

  18. Thomas Willis, a pioneer in translational research in anatomy (on the 350th anniversary of Cerebri anatome).

    PubMed

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Navia-Álvarez, Pedro; Fuentes-Redondo, Talia; Bueno-López, José-L

    2015-03-01

    The year 2014 marked the 350th anniversary of the publication in London of Cerebri anatome, a ground-breaking work of neuroscience heavily influenced by the political and cultural context of Baroque Europe and mid-17th century England. This article aims to review the work of the English physician and anatomist Thomas Willis, specifically with regard to the contents of his Cerebri anatome. Willis's academic and professional career was influenced by the turbulent period of the English Civil War during which he studied medicine. Willis went from chemistry to dissection arguably because of his need to justify the body-brain-soul relationship. As a result, he became a fellow of a select club of eminent experimentalists, and afterward was a Fellow of the Royal Society. Later on, he went to London, leaving the academic life to dedicate himself fully to the profession of medicine. As a physician, Willis did not base his practice on aphorisms but on a 'bench to bedside' approach to medicine, while studying neuroanatomy--covering embryology, comparative anatomy and pathological anatomy--as a basis for the comprehension of neurological pathology. He developed innovative anatomical methods for the preservation and dissection of the brain, injection of coloured substances and illustration of his findings. In Cerebri anatome, Willis recognized the cerebral cortex as the substrate of cognition. He also claimed that the painful stimuli came from the meninges, but not from the brain itself. He explained for the first time the pathological and functional meaning of the brain's circular arterial anastomosis, which is named after him. He also specified some features of the cranial origin of the sympathetic nerves and coined the term 'neurologie'. Cerebri anatome marked the transition between the mediaeval and modern notions of brain function, and thus it is considered a cornerstone of clinical and comparative anatomy of the nervous system. The new contributions and methods employed by

  19. Application of a rules-based natural language parser to critical value reporting in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Owens, Scott R; Balis, Ulysses G J; Lucas, David R; Myers, Jeffrey L

    2012-03-01

    Critical values in anatomic pathology are rare occurrences and difficult to define with precision. Nevertheless, accrediting institutions require effective and timely communication of all critical values generated by clinical and anatomic laboratories. Provisional gating criteria for potentially critical anatomic diagnoses have been proposed, with some success in their implementation reported in the literature. Ensuring effective communication is challenging, however, making the case for programmatic implementation of a turnkey-style integrated information technology solution. To address this need, we developed a generically deployable laboratory information system-based tool, using a tiered natural language processing predicate calculus inference engine to identify qualifying cases that meet criteria for critical diagnoses but lack an indication in the electronic medical record for an appropriate clinical discussion with the ordering physician of record. Using this tool, we identified an initial cohort of 13,790 cases over a 49-month period, which were further explored by reviewing the available electronic medical record for each patient. Of these cases, 35 (0.3%) were judged to require intervention in the form of direct communication between the attending pathologist and the clinical physician of record. In 8 of the 35 cases, this intervention resulted in the conveyance of new information to the requesting physician and/or a change in the patient's clinical plan. The very low percentage of such cases (0.058%) illustrates their rarity in daily practice, making it unlikely that manual identification/notification approaches alone can reliably manage them. The automated turnkey system was useful in avoiding missed handoffs of significant, clinically actionable diagnoses.

  20. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  1. Distribution of Prostate Sentinel Nodes: A SPECT-Derived Anatomic Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Ganswindt, Ute; Schilling, David; Mueller, Arndt-Christian; Bares, Roland; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The randomized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-13 trial revealed that coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in high-risk prostate cancer confers an advantage (progression-free survival and biochemical failure) in patients with {>=}15% risk of lymph node involvement. To facilitate an improved definition of the adjuvant target volume, precise knowledge regarding the location of the relevant lymph nodes is necessary. Therefore, we generated a three-dimensional sentinel lymph node atlas. Methods and Materials: In 61 patients with high-risk prostate cancer, a three-dimensional visualization of sentinel lymph nodes was performed using a single photon emission computed tomography system after transrectal intraprostatic injection of 150 to 362 (median 295) mega becquerel (MBq) {sup 99m}Technetium-nanocolloid (1.5-3h after injection) followed by an anatomic functional image fusion. Results: In all, 324 sentinel nodes in 59 of 61 patients (96.7%) were detected, with 0 to 13 nodes per patient (median 5, mean 5.3). The anatomic distribution of the sentinel nodes was as follows: external iliac 34.3%, internal iliac 17.9%, common iliac 12.7%, sacral 8.6%, perirectal 6.2%, left paraaortic 5.3%, right paraaortic 5.3%, seminal vesicle lymphatic plexus 3.1%, deep inguinal 1.5%, superior rectal 1.2%, internal pudendal 1.2%, perivesical 0.9%, inferior rectal 0.9%, retroaortic 0.3%, superficial inguinal 0.3%, and periprostatic 0.3%. Conclusions: The distribution of sentinel nodes as detected by single photon emission computed tomography imaging correlates well with the distribution determined by intraoperative gamma probe detection. A lower detection rate of sentinels in close proximity to the bladder and seminal vesicles is probably caused by the radionuclide accumulation in the bladder. In regard to intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques, the presented anatomic atlas may allow optimized target volume definitions.

  2. Characterization and Management of Interfractional Anatomic Changes for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Erickson, Beth; Peng Cheng; Li, X. Allen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize interfractional anatomic variations in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy (RT) and to study dosimetric advantages for using an online adaptive replanning scheme to account for these variations. Methods and Materials: Targets and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated by autosegmentation based on daily computed tomography (CT) images acquired using a respiration-gated in-room CT during daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for 10 pancreatic cancer patients. Various parameters, including the maximum overlap ratio (MOR) between the volumes based on planning and daily CTs for a structure, while the overlapping volumes were maximized, were used to quantify the interfractional organ deformation with the intrafractional variations largely excluded. An online adaptive RT (ART) was applied to these daily CTs. To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of ART, the dose distributions from the online ART were compared to those from the repositioning in the current standard IGRT practice. Results: The interfractional anatomic variations, particularly the organ deformation, are significant during pancreas irradiation. For the patients studied, the average MORs of all daily CTs were 80.2%, 61.7%, and 72.2% for pancreatic head, duodenum, and stomach, respectively. The online ART leads to improved dosimetric plan with better target coverage and/or OAR sparing than IGRT repositioning. For the patients studied, the mean V{sub 50.4Gy} (volume covered by 50.4 Gy) for the duodenum was reduced from 43.4% for IGRT to 15.6% for the online ART scheme. Conclusions: The online adaptive RT scheme can effectively account for the significant interfractional anatomic variations observed in pancreas irradiation. The dosimetric advantages with the online ART may enable safe dose escalation in radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  3. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chetvertkov, M; Kim, J; Siddiqui, F; Kumarasiri, A; Chetty, I; Gordon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial.

  4. Post-mortem 1.5T MR quantification of regular anatomical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Hottinger, Anna-Lena; Schwendener, Nicole; Schuster, Frederick; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J; Jackowski, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Recently, post-mortem MR quantification has been introduced to the field of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. By usage of a particular MR quantification sequence, T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissues and organs can be quantified simultaneously. The aim of the present basic research study was to assess the quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of regular anatomical brain structures for a 1.5T application and to correlate the assessed values with corpse temperatures. In a prospective study, 30 forensic cases were MR-scanned with a quantification sequence prior to autopsy. Body temperature was assessed during MR scans. In synthetically calculated T1, T2, and PD-weighted images, quantitative T1, T2 (both in ms) and PD (in %) values of anatomical structures of cerebrum (Group 1: frontal gray matter, frontal white matter, thalamus, internal capsule, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) and brainstem/cerebellum (Group 2: cerebral crus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, pons, cerebellar hemisphere, and superior cerebellar peduncle) were assessed. The investigated brain structures of cerebrum and brainstem/cerebellum could be characterized and differentiated based on a combination of their quantitative T1, T2, and PD values. MANOVA testing verified significant differences between the investigated anatomical brain structures among each other in Group 1 and Group 2 based on their quantitative values. Temperature dependence was observed mainly for T1 values, which were slightly increasing with rising temperature in the investigated brain structures in both groups. The results provide a base for future computer-aided diagnosis of brain pathologies and lesions in post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26872469

  5. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  6. DR-TAMAS: Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate Alignment of Anatomical Structures.

    PubMed

    Irfanoglu, M Okan; Nayak, Amritha; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Sadeghi, Neda; Thomas, Cibu P; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we propose DR-TAMAS (Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate alignMent of Anatomical Structures), a novel framework for intersubject registration of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data sets. This framework is optimized for brain data and its main goal is to achieve an accurate alignment of all brain structures, including white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and spaces containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Currently most DTI-based spatial normalization algorithms emphasize alignment of anisotropic structures. While some diffusion-derived metrics, such as diffusion anisotropy and tensor eigenvector orientation, are highly informative for proper alignment of WM, other tensor metrics such as the trace or mean diffusivity (MD) are fundamental for a proper alignment of GM and CSF boundaries. Moreover, it is desirable to include information from structural MRI data, e.g., T1-weighted or T2-weighted images, which are usually available together with the diffusion data. The fundamental property of DR-TAMAS is to achieve global anatomical accuracy by incorporating in its cost function the most informative metrics locally. Another important feature of DR-TAMAS is a symmetric time-varying velocity-based transformation model, which enables it to account for potentially large anatomical variability in healthy subjects and patients. The performance of DR-TAMAS is evaluated with several data sets and compared with other widely-used diffeomorphic image registration techniques employing both full tensor information and/or DTI-derived scalar maps. Our results show that the proposed method has excellent overall performance in the entire brain, while being equivalent to the best existing methods in WM.

  7. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee Leads to Overconstraint at any Fixation Angle

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Jason; Brady, Alex; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cruz, Raphael; Chahla, Jorge; Dornan, Grant; Turnbull, Travis L.; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    internal rotation during a simulated pivot shift (combined 5 N-m internal rotation and 10 N-m valgus torques) were recorded between 0° and 60°. Kinematic changes were measured and compared to the native state for all reconstructed and sectioned states. Results: Anterolateral ligament reconstruction at all graft fixation angles significantly reduced internal rotation of the knee with respect to the ACLR with sectioned ALL state at all knee flexion angles beyond 30° (Figure 1). However, ALLR overconstrained the knee joint at each tested ALL graft fixation angle and through all tested knee flexion angles beyond 15° during simulated internal rotation torque and pivot shift tests (Figure 1). Furthermore, no significant difference was observed between the different graft fixation angles on the kinematics of the knee with respect to anterior drawer, pivot shift and internal rotation. Conclusion: Anatomic ALLR in conjunction with an ACLR overconstrained internal rotation of the knee joint at flexion angles beyond 15° regardless of graft fixation angle. The surgical technique and indications for this procedure should be investigated further and it is recommended that ALLR be used with caution.

  8. Anatomical Variations in the Sinoatrial Nodal Artery: A Meta-Analysis and Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Hsieh, Wan Chin; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The sinoatrial nodal artery (SANa) is a highly variable vessel which supplies blood to the sinoatrial node (SAN). Due to its variability and susceptibility to iatrogenic injury, our study aimed to assess the anatomy of the SANa and determine the prevalence of its anatomical variations. Study Design An extensive search of major electronic databases was performed to identify all articles reporting anatomical data on the SANa. No lower date limit or language restrictions were applied. Anatomical data regarding the artery were extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis. Results Sixty-six studies (n = 21455 hearts) were included in the meta-analysis. The SANa usually arose as a single vessel with a pooled prevalence of 95.5% (95%CI:93.6–96.9). Duplication and triplication of the artery were also observed with pooled prevalence of 4.3% (95%CI:2.8–6.0) and 0.3% (95%CI:0–0.7), respectively. The most common origin of the SANa was from the right coronary artery (RCA), found in 68.0% (95%CI:55.6–68.9) of cases, followed by origin from the left circumflex artery, and origin from the left coronary artery with pooled prevalence of 22.1% (95%CI:15.0–26.2) and 2.7 (95%CI:0.7–5.2), respectively. A retrocaval course of the SANa was the most common course of the artery with a pooled prevalence of 47.1% (95%CI:36.0–55.5). The pooled prevalence of an S-shaped SANa was 7.6% (95%CI:2.9–14.1). Conclusions The SANa is most commonly reported as a single vessel, originating from the RCA, and taking a retrocaval course to reach the SAN. Knowledge of high risk anatomical variants of the SANa, such as an S-shaped artery, must be taken into account by surgeons to prevent iatrogenic injuries. Specifically, interventional or cardiosurgical procedures, such as the Cox maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, open heart surgeries through the right atrium or intraoperative cross-clamping or dissection procedures during mitral valve surgery using the septal

  9. Cone beam CT--anatomic assessment and legal issues: the new standards of care.

    PubMed

    Curley, Arthur; Hatcher, David C

    2010-01-01

    Until the recent introduction of cone beam computed tomography scanners, standard 2-D imaging provided a moderate contribution to overall treatment planning when considering the diagnostic potential, costs of study and risks to the patient. Cone beam computed tomography-dedicated maxillofacial imaging scanners provide broader imaging tools for anatomic assessment and have become widely available. This article discusses the uses and benefits of 3-D imaging, as well as the impact on the standard of care. Many phases of patient care involve imaging to assist with diagnosis, treatment planning, risk assessment and treatment. Techniques employing X-rays, visible light, ultrasound, lasers and magnetic fields have been used in medicine and dentistry to create images. All forms of imaging require a coupled system of emitters and sensors. For example, a cephalometric image is produced using an X-ray emitter and film sensor. Imaging systems can be categorized in many different ways based upon emitter or output type (examples; film-based, digital, 2-D and 3-D images). The resultant images can be used to evaluate the anatomy of interest, including surface and subsurface. The ultimate quest of all forms of imaging is to reveal the anatomic truth; that is, to portray the anatomy as it exists in nature. Thoughtful clinical application of image acquisition requires matching the uses and limitations of the available imaging choices to achieve the desired diagnostic information (imaging goal) while keeping the risks and costs to the patient as low as possible. Imaging data must provide a benefit at an acceptable cost and risk. Two-dimensional representation of 3-D anatomies creates images that have poor spatial accuracy, are static in space and time, and contain information voids. These 2-D measurements have propagated legacy databases of inaccurate morphometric measurements. Current development in imaging technology for dentistry includes digital imaging and improved sensor

  10. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Chatzimarkos, Markos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Safioleas, Michail

    2016-01-01

    Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones. PMID:27047690

  11. Anatomically shaped tooth and periodontal regeneration by cell homing.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Lee, C H; Kim, B K; Mao, J J

    2010-08-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-epsilon-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-microm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications.

  12. Anatomically Shaped Tooth and Periodontal Regeneration by Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, B.K.; Mao, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-ε-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-µm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications. PMID:20448245

  13. [Osteochondrodysplasias. Prenatal diagnosis and pathological-anatomic findings].

    PubMed

    Tennstedt, C; Bartho, S; Bollmann, R; Schwenke, A; Nitz, I; Rothe, K

    1993-03-01

    Prenatal sonographic investigations were applied for malformations to 7,194 foetuses, between October 1985 and April 1992, with 28 cases of osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) and one case of dysostosis being dissected. Included were 20 cases of lethal osteochondrodysplasia, among them two cases of lethal hypophosphatasia, five cases of thanatophoric dysplasia, one case each of Type II shortrib (polydactyly) syndrome (VERMA-NAUMOFF) and metatropic dysplasia, three cases of campomelic dysplasia and eight cases of Type II A imperfect osteogenesis. Also observed were eight cases of nonlethal OCD, among them three cases of diastrophic dysplasia and five of achondroplasia. Dysostosis was recorded from one case and was diagnosed as Type V acrocephalosyndactyly (Pfeiffer). Identification of a specific OCD proved to be difficult in the second or third trimenon. Hence, the form of OCD was prenatally diagnosed only in ten of all cases investigated. Tentative diagnosis was first established from the postmortem radiograph. Additional malformations and other abnormalities then were detected by complementary pathologico-anatomic processing of findings. The final diagnosis was derived from radiological, pathologico-anatomic and histological findings. Diagnosis of this constitutional osteopathy is quite difficult and calls for interdisciplinary cooperation between gynaecologists, neonatologists, paediatric surgeons, radiologists, geneticists and pathologists. More effective counselling of affected families is the major purpose of all the efforts involved. PMID:8499423

  14. Semantic dementia and persisting Wernicke's aphasia: linguistic and anatomical profiles.

    PubMed

    Ogar, J M; Baldo, J V; Wilson, S M; Brambati, S M; Miller, B L; Dronkers, N F; Gorno-Tempini, M L

    2011-04-01

    Few studies have directly compared the clinical and anatomical characteristics of patients with progressive aphasia to those of patients with aphasia caused by stroke. In the current study we examined fluent forms of aphasia in these two groups, specifically semantic dementia (SD) and persisting Wernicke's aphasia (WA) due to stroke. We compared 10 patients with SD to 10 age- and education-matched patients with WA in three language domains: language comprehension (single words and sentences), spontaneous speech and visual semantics. Neuroanatomical involvement was analyzed using disease-specific image analysis techniques: voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for patients with SD and overlays of lesion digitized lesion reconstructions in patients with WA. Patients with SD and WA were both impaired on tasks that involved visual semantics, but patients with SD were less impaired in spontaneous speech and sentence comprehension. The anatomical findings showed that different regions were most affected in the two disorders: the left anterior temporal lobe in SD and the left posterior middle temporal gyrus in chronic WA. This study highlights that the two syndromes classically associated with language comprehension deficits in aphasia due to stroke and neurodegenerative disease are clinically distinct, most likely due to distinct distributions of damage in the temporal lobe.

  15. An anatomical and functional model of the human tracheobronchial tree.

    PubMed

    Florens, M; Sapoval, B; Filoche, M

    2011-03-01

    The human tracheobronchial tree is a complex branched distribution system in charge of renewing the air inside the acini, which are the gas exchange units. We present here a systematic geometrical model of this system described as a self-similar assembly of rigid pipes. It includes the specific geometry of the upper bronchial tree and a self-similar intermediary tree with a systematic branching asymmetry. It ends by the terminal bronchioles whose generations range from 8 to 22. Unlike classical models, it does not rely on a simple scaling law. With a limited number of parameters, this model reproduces the morphometric data from various sources (Horsfield K, Dart G, Olson DE, Filley GF, Cumming G. J Appl Physiol 31: 207-217, 1971; Weibel ER. Morphometry of the Human Lung. New York: Academic Press, 1963) and the main characteristics of the ventilation. Studying various types of random variations of the airway sizes, we show that strong correlations are needed to reproduce the measured distributions. Moreover, the ventilation performances are observed to be robust against anatomical variability. The same methodology applied to the rat also permits building a geometrical model that reproduces the anatomical and ventilation characteristics of this animal. This simple model can be directly used as a common description of the entire tree in analytical or numerical studies such as the computation of air flow distribution or aerosol transport. PMID:21183626

  16. Morphological-anatomical characterization and identification of Tomentella ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Eros-Honti, Zsolt

    2008-09-01

    Over the last two decades, much information has been gathered on the ectomycorrhizal fungus community composition of plant associations of boreal, temperate, and tropical regions. Worldwide, Tomentella ectomycorrhizas (ECM) are often common and dominant in the mycorrhizosphere of coniferous and deciduous forests. They are present under different environmental conditions and associate with diverse plant hosts. Tomentella sporocarps, however, are rarely found aboveground, so Tomentella species are often missing from fungus community studies based on fruit-body presence. Tomentella is a resupinate genus of Thelephoraceae (Basidiomycota) forming black-brown, brown, yellow, or ochre ECM on the roots of gymnosperm and angiosperm trees, distinguished by typical morphological-anatomical characteristics (clamped hyphae, angular mantle, surface network, special rhizomorphs and cystidia). In this paper, we review the taxonomic position and morphological-anatomical characteristics of Tomentella ECM. A short summary of the microscopic features used for distinguishing tomentelloids during morphotyping and identification is presented in order to support molecular and ecological studies of ectomycorrhizal fungus communities.

  17. Anatomically guided implant site preparation technique at molar sites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tizcareño, Mario H; Bravo-Flores, Claudia

    2009-10-01

    Immediate postextraction implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth is a difficult procedure in view of having to place the implant in an ideal position without jeopardizing its initial stability. The surgeon often faces the problem of directing the initial osteotomy in the medial portion of the alveolus with the difficulty of engaging the inter-radicular septum of the extraction socket. The drill may slip continually leading to an inaccurate site preparation, and consequently to a deficient implant insertion. The fixture is often placed directly into either one of the extraction sockets of the tooth to be replaced. The anatomically guided site preparation technique is a very useful tool to perform implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth. This approach of implant insertion consists of a progressive preparation of the implant site using the anatomy and geometry of the root of the multiradicular teeth to be extracted as a reference and as an aid to engage the inter-radicular septum. This places the implants in a favorable and proper position from a biomechanical and occlusal standpoint. The objective of this article is to describe the anatomically guided implant site preparation technique as an aid to favorably place dental implants in multiradicular teeth postextraction.

  18. Preserving and sharing examples of anatomical variation and developmental anomalies via photorealistic virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Gary L; Nagy, Frank; Wagner, Lynn A

    2004-01-01

    Computer graphics technology has made it possible to create photographic-quality virtual specimens from real anatomical material. One technique for doing this, QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR), results in virtual specimens that are easily shared on the Internet and displayed as standalone entities or incorporated into complex programs or Web sites. A compelling use of this technology is the sharing of rare specimens such as unusual variations, developmental anomalies or gross pathology. These types of specimens have traditionally been confined to anatomical museums, but could serve a much more useful existence as freely shared virtual specimens. An example presented here is a relatively rare developmental defect in the embryonic aortic arches that results in a right-sided aortic arch coursing posterior to the trachea and esophagus. In a time of ever increasing restraints on the practical side of anatomy education, an Internet-based library of human variation and other rare specimens would be a useful supplement to students' limited exposure to the human body. Since the discovery and preparation of specimens would be the rate-limiting step in producing such a collection, we propose the establishment of a center for virtual specimen creation and preservation through a cooperative effort by gross anatomists and pathologists in contributing the source material. This collection, a work in progress, is available at www.anatomy.wright.edu/qtvr.

  19. Taxonomic implications from morphological and anatomical studies in the section Stenodiptera from the genus Grammosciadium (Apiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Barış; Ulusoy, Fatma; Karakaya, Muhammet Ali; Koch, Marcus A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. bilgilii and Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. sivasicum from Turkey are herein described as two new subspecies, and the species Grammosciadium schischkinii is synonymied under Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. pterocarpum. Quantitative variation of morphological and anatomical characters have been analysed to provide discriminative characters between the taxa of section Stenodiptera and to provide a key to the species. The taxonomic status of the taxa has been discussed in light of these morphological and fruit anatomical data using multivariate statistics such as MANOVA and Principal Component Analysis. The results are also used to present a critical discussion of characters used to distinguish and determine different taxa within Grammosciadium. MANOVA showed that ten characters, except stylopodium and style length, differed significantly among the taxa, and the results were confirmed by Tukey tests and PCA analysis (except the character of fruit number). However, only ranges of the characters of sepal length, fruit length, fruit width, fruit width/wing width ratio, and width of fruit wing are not overlapped. Qualitative characters of petiolate stipular segments of lower leaves and presence of funicular oil ducts in transvers section of mericarps were found as diagnostic characters. PMID:27698576

  20. Laser technique for anatomical-functional study of the medial prefrontal cortex of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Huerta, Laura; Hernandez, Adan; Ayala, Griselda; Marroquin, Javier; Silva, Adriana B.; Khotiaintsev, Konstantin S.; Svirid, Vladimir A.; Flores, Gonzalo; Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.

    1999-05-01

    The brain represents one of the most complex systems that we know yet. In its study, non-destructive methods -- in particular, behavioral studies play an important role. By alteration of brain functioning (e.g. by pharmacological means) and observation of consequent behavior changes an important information on brain organization and functioning is obtained. For inducing local alterations, permanent brain lesions are employed. However, for correct results this technique has to be quasi-non-destructive, i.e. not to affect the normal brain function. Hence, the lesions should be very small, accurate and applied precisely over the structure (e.g. the brain nucleus) of interest. These specifications are difficult to meet with the existing techniques for brain lesions -- specifically, neurotoxical, mechanical and electrical means because they result in too extensive damage. In this paper, we present new laser technique for quasi-non- destructive anatomical-functional mapping in vivo of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) of the rat. The technique is based on producing of small-size, well-controlled laser- induced lesions over some areas of the MPFC. The anesthetized animals are subjected to stereotactic surgery and certain points of the MPFC are exposed the confined radiation of the 10 W cw CO2 laser. Subsequent behavioral changes observed in neonatal and adult animals as well as histological data prove effectiveness of this technology for anatomical- functional studies of the brain by areas, and as a treatment method for some pathologies.

  1. Microstereolithography-Based Fabrication of Anatomically Shaped Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Shinohara, Makoto; Kageyama, Tomonori; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Porous ceramic scaffolds with shapes matching the bone defects may result in more efficient grafting and healing than the ones with simple geometries. Using computer-assisted microstereolithography (MSTL), we have developed a novel gelcasting indirect MSTL technology and successfully fabricated two scaffolds according to CT images of rabbit femur. Negative resin molds with outer 3D dimensions conforming to the femur and an internal structure consisting of stacked meshes with uniform interconnecting struts, 0.5 mm in diameter, were fabricated by MSTL. The second mold type was designed for cortical bone formation. A ceramic slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone as binder was cast into the molds. After the RTV silicone was completely cured, the composite was sintered at 1500°C for 5 h. Both gross anatomical shape and the interpenetrating internal network were preserved after sintering. Even cortical structure could be introduced into the customized scaffolds, which resulted in enhanced strength. Biocompatibility was confirmed by vital staining of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the customized scaffolds for 5 days. This fabrication method could be useful for constructing bone substitutes specifically designed according to local anatomical defects. PMID:26504839

  2. Anatomical equivalence class based complete morphological descriptor for robust image analysis and abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Sajjad; Davatzikos, Christos

    2008-03-01

    Groupwise registration and statistical analysis of medical images are of fundamental importance in computational anatomy, where healthy and pathologic anatomies are compared relative to their differences with a common template. Accuracy of such approaches is primarily determined by the ability of finding perfectly conforming shape transformations, which is rarely achieved in practice due to algorithmic limitations arising from biological variability. Amount of the residual information not reflected by the transformation is, in fact, dictated by template selection and is lost permanently from subsequent analysis. In general, an attempt to aggressively minimize residual results in biologically incorrect correspondences, necessitating a certain level of regularity in the transformation at the cost of accuracy. In this paper, we introduce a framework for groupwise registration and statistical analysis of biomedical images that optimally fuses the information contained in a diffeomorphism and the residual to achieve completeness of representation. Since the degree of information retained in the residual depends on transformation parameters such as the level of regularization, and template selection, our approach consists of forming an equivalence class for each individual, thereby representing them via nonlinear manifolds embedded in high dimensional space. By employing a minimum variance criterion and constraining the optimization to respective anatomical manifolds, we proceed to determine their optimal morphological representation. A practical ancillary benefit of this approach is that it yields optimal choice of transformation parameters, and eliminates respective confounding variation in the data. Resultantly, the optimal signatures depend solely on anatomical variations across subjects, and may ultimately lead to more accurate diagnosis through pattern classification.

  3. Taxonomic implications from morphological and anatomical studies in the section Stenodiptera from the genus Grammosciadium (Apiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Barış; Ulusoy, Fatma; Karakaya, Muhammet Ali; Koch, Marcus A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. bilgilii and Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. sivasicum from Turkey are herein described as two new subspecies, and the species Grammosciadium schischkinii is synonymied under Grammosciadium pterocarpum subsp. pterocarpum. Quantitative variation of morphological and anatomical characters have been analysed to provide discriminative characters between the taxa of section Stenodiptera and to provide a key to the species. The taxonomic status of the taxa has been discussed in light of these morphological and fruit anatomical data using multivariate statistics such as MANOVA and Principal Component Analysis. The results are also used to present a critical discussion of characters used to distinguish and determine different taxa within Grammosciadium. MANOVA showed that ten characters, except stylopodium and style length, differed significantly among the taxa, and the results were confirmed by Tukey tests and PCA analysis (except the character of fruit number). However, only ranges of the characters of sepal length, fruit length, fruit width, fruit width/wing width ratio, and width of fruit wing are not overlapped. Qualitative characters of petiolate stipular segments of lower leaves and presence of funicular oil ducts in transvers section of mericarps were found as diagnostic characters.

  4. Microstereolithography-Based Fabrication of Anatomically Shaped Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Shinohara, Makoto; Kageyama, Tomonori; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Porous ceramic scaffolds with shapes matching the bone defects may result in more efficient grafting and healing than the ones with simple geometries. Using computer-assisted microstereolithography (MSTL), we have developed a novel gelcasting indirect MSTL technology and successfully fabricated two scaffolds according to CT images of rabbit femur. Negative resin molds with outer 3D dimensions conforming to the femur and an internal structure consisting of stacked meshes with uniform interconnecting struts, 0.5 mm in diameter, were fabricated by MSTL. The second mold type was designed for cortical bone formation. A ceramic slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone as binder was cast into the molds. After the RTV silicone was completely cured, the composite was sintered at 1500°C for 5 h. Both gross anatomical shape and the interpenetrating internal network were preserved after sintering. Even cortical structure could be introduced into the customized scaffolds, which resulted in enhanced strength. Biocompatibility was confirmed by vital staining of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the customized scaffolds for 5 days. This fabrication method could be useful for constructing bone substitutes specifically designed according to local anatomical defects. PMID:26504839

  5. The effect of anatomical factors on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Derih, Ay; Burak, Erdolu; Gunduz, Yumun; Yumun, Aydin; Ahmet, Demir; Hakan, Ozkan; Osman, Tiryakioglu; Kamuran, Erkoc

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of anatomical characteristics on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods We investigated 56 EVAR procedures for infrarenal aortic aneurysms performed between January 2010 and December 2013, and the data were supplemented with a prospective review. The patients were divided into two groups according to the diameter of the aneurysm. Group I (n = 30): patients with aneurysm diameters less than 6 cm, group II (n = 26): patients with aneurysm diameters larger than 6 cm. The pre-operative anatomical data of the aneurysms were noted and the groups were compared with regard to postoperative results. Results There were no correlations between diameter of aneurysm (p > 0.05), aneurysm neck angle (p > 0.05) and mortality rate. The long-term mortality rate was found to be high in patients in whom an endoleak occurred. Conclusion We found that aneurysm diameter did not have an effect on postoperative mortality rates. An increased EuroSCORE value and the development of endoleaks had an effect on long-term mortality rates. PMID:26207946

  6. Experimental Characterization of the Anatomical Structures of the Lumbar Spine Under Dynamic Sagittal Bending.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, C A; Demetropoulos, C K; Luongo, M E; Pyles, C O; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events transmit high-rate vertical loads through the seated occupant’s lumbar spine and have a high probability of inducing severe injury. While previous studies have characterized the lumbar spine under quasi-static loading, additional work should focus on the complex kinetic and kinematic response under high loading rates. To discern the biomechanical influence of the lumbar spine’s anatomical structures during dynamic loading, the axial force, flexion-extension moments and range of motion for lumbar motion segments (n=18) were measured during different states of progressive dissection. Pre-compression was applied using a static mass while dynamic bending was applied using an offset drop mass. Dynamic loading resulted in peak axial loads of 4,224±133 N, while maximum peak extension and flexion moments were 19.6±12.5 and -44.8±8.6 Nm in the pre-dissected state, respectively. Upon dissection, transection of the interspinous ligament, ligamentum flavum and facet capsules resulted in significantly larger flexion angles, while the removal of the posterior elements increased the total peak angular displacement in extension from 3.3±1.5 to 5.0±1.7 degrees (p=0.002). This study provides insight on the contribution of individual anatomical components on overall lumbar response under high-rate loading, as well as validation data for numerical models. PMID:25996712

  7. Microstereolithography-Based Fabrication of Anatomically Shaped Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Shinohara, Makoto; Kageyama, Tomonori; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Porous ceramic scaffolds with shapes matching the bone defects may result in more efficient grafting and healing than the ones with simple geometries. Using computer-assisted microstereolithography (MSTL), we have developed a novel gelcasting indirect MSTL technology and successfully fabricated two scaffolds according to CT images of rabbit femur. Negative resin molds with outer 3D dimensions conforming to the femur and an internal structure consisting of stacked meshes with uniform interconnecting struts, 0.5 mm in diameter, were fabricated by MSTL. The second mold type was designed for cortical bone formation. A ceramic slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone as binder was cast into the molds. After the RTV silicone was completely cured, the composite was sintered at 1500°C for 5 h. Both gross anatomical shape and the interpenetrating internal network were preserved after sintering. Even cortical structure could be introduced into the customized scaffolds, which resulted in enhanced strength. Biocompatibility was confirmed by vital staining of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the customized scaffolds for 5 days. This fabrication method could be useful for constructing bone substitutes specifically designed according to local anatomical defects.

  8. Dosimetric comparison of the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomical head models using a novel definition for the mobile phone positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Christ, Andreas; Kellom, Tocher; Seidman, Seth; Nikoloski, Neviana; Beard, Brian; Kuster, Niels

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents new definitions for obtaining reproducible results in numerical phone dosimetry. Numerous numerical dosimetric studies have been published about the exposure of mobile phone users which concluded with conflicting results. However, many of these studies lack reproducibility due to shortcomings in the description of the phone positioning. The new approach was tested by two groups applying two different numerical program packages to compare the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomically correct head models. A novel definition for the positioning of mobile phones next to anatomically correct head models is given along with other essential parameters to be reported. The definition is solely based on anatomical characteristics of the head. A simple up-to-date phone model was used to determine the peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) of mobile phones in SAM and in the anatomically correct head models. The results were validated by measurements. The study clearly shows that SAM gives a conservative estimate of the exposure in anatomically correct head models for head only tissue. Depending on frequency, phone position and head size the numerically calculated 10 g averaged SAR in the pinna can be up to 2.1 times greater than the peak spatial SAR in SAM. Measurements in small structures, such as the pinna, will significantly increase the uncertainty; therefore SAM was designed for SAR assessment in the head only. Whether SAM will provide a conservative value for the pinna depends on the pinna SAR limit of the safety standard considered.

  9. Validation of computational fluid dynamics methods with anatomically exact, 3D printed MRI phantoms and 4D pcMRI.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeff R; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Britz, Gavin W; Grossman, Robert G; Lv, Nan; Huang, Qinghai; Karmonik, Christof

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of rapid 3D prototyping was implemented using cost-effective 3D printing for creating anatomically correct replica of cerebral aneurysms. With a dedicated flow loop set-up in a full body human MRI scanner, flow measurements were performed using 4D phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to visualize and quantify intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. Ultrashort TE sequences were employed to obtain high-resolution 3D image data to visualize the lumen inside the plastic replica. In-vitro results were compared with retrospectively obtained in-vivo data and results from computational fluid dynamics simulations (CFD). Rapid prototyping of anatomically realistic 3D models may have future impact in treatment planning, design of image acquisition methods for MRI and angiographic systems and for the design and testing of advanced image post-processing technologies.

  10. Using photoshop filters to create anatomic line-art medical images.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Jacobo; Geller, Brian S

    2006-08-01

    There are multiple ways to obtain anatomic drawings suitable for publication or presentations. This article demonstrates how to use Photoshop to alter digital radiologic images to create line-art illustrations in a quick and easy way. We present two simple to use methods; however, not every image can adequately be transformed and personal preferences and specific changes need to be applied to each image to obtain the desired result. There are multiple ways to obtain anatomic drawings suitable for publication or to prepare presentations. Medical illustrators have always played a major role in the radiology and medical education process. Whether used to teach a complex surgical or radiologic procedure, to define typical or atypical patterns of the spread of disease, or to illustrate normal or aberrant anatomy, medical illustration significantly affects learning (). However, if you are not an accomplished illustrator, the alternatives can be expensive (contacting a professional medical illustrator or buying an already existing stock of digital images) or simply not necessarily applicable to what you are trying to communicate. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how using Photoshop (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA) to alter digital radiologic images we can create line-art illustrations in a quick, inexpensive, and easy way in preparation for electronic presentations and publication.

  11. Association between injury to the retinacula of Weitbrecht and femoral neck fractures: anatomical and clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jiong; Ni, Ming; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Guangyao; Liu, Shiwei; Cui, Xueliang; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Dai, Yahui; Quan, Kun; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no objective indicator for surgical procedures in elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of damage to the retinacula of Weitbrecht based on the type of femoral neck fracture, anatomical and clinical observations. Data from 44 patients treated with artificial femoral head replacement were analyzed for the association between Garden type fracture and severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula. Additionally, 18 cases (Pauwels type III fracture) after Watson-Jones surgical approach and internal fixations were used to investigate the bone healing and femoral head necrosis. Among 44 patients (Garden type was III-IV, 79.6%), significant associations were found between Garden type fracture and lateral (P < 0.001), anterior (P = 0.045), and medial (P = 0.004) retinacular injury. Significant positive Spearman correlation coefficients between Garden type and the severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula were Ρ = 0.561 with P < 0.001 for lateral, Ρ = 0.338 with P = 0.025 for anterior, and Ρ = 0.469 with P = 0.001 for medial retinacula. Additionally, 4 out of 18 Pauwels type III fracture cases were observed severe damages on Weitbrecht’s retinacula and resulting bone necrosis. In conclusion, this study provided the anatomical and histological correlations between fracture displacement and degree of retinacula injury. PMID:26770357

  12. Comparison of subjective comfort ratings between anatomically shaped and cylindrical handles.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Dolšak, Bojan

    2014-07-01

    Most authors have provided diameter recommendations for cylindrical handle design in order to increase performance, avoid discomfort, and reduce the risk of cumulative trauma disorders. None of the studies has investigated the importance of determining the correct handle shape on the subjective comfort ratings, which could further improve the handles' ergonomics. Therefore, new methods based on a virtual hand model in its optimal power grasp posture have been developed in order to obtain customised handles with best fits for targeted subjects. Cylindrical and anatomically shaped handles were evaluated covering ten subjects by means of an extensive subjective comfort questionnaire. The results suggest large impact of the handle shape on the perceived subjective comfort ratings. Anatomically shaped handles were rated as being considerably more comfortable than cylindrical handles for almost all the subjective comfort predictors. They showed that handle shapes based on optimal power grasp postures can improve subjective comfort ratings, thus maximising performance. Future research should consider real conditions, since the comfort ratings can vary based on the specific task and by the tool selected for the task.

  13. Radiographic and Anatomic Basis for Prostate Contouring Errors and Methods to Improve Prostate Contouring Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Evans, Cheryl M.S.; Feng, Mary; Narayana, Vrinda