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Sample records for anatomical lymphatic mapping

  1. Mapping superficial lymphatic territories in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Soto-Miranda, Miguel A; Suami, Hiroo; Chang, David W

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the anatomy of the lymphatic system in the rabbit with regard to relationships between the lymphatic vessel and lymph node. According to our previous studies in human cadavers and canines, the superficial lymphatic system could be divided into lymphatic territories. The aim of this study was to completely map the superficial lymphatic system in the rabbit. We used our microinjection technique and histological analysis for dissecting studies and recently developed indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography for demonstrating dynamic lymph flow in living rabbits. Real-time ICG fluorescent lymphography was performed in two living New Zealand White rabbits, and direct dye microinjection of the lymphatic vessels was performed in eight dead rabbits. To assess the relationships between the vascular and lymphatic systems in rabbits, we performed radiocontrast injection into arteries in two dead rabbits prior to the lymphatic injection. The ICG fluorescent lymphography revealed eight lymphatic territories in the preauricular, submandibular, root of the lateral neck, axillary, lumbar, inguinal, root of the tail, and popliteal regions. We injected blue acrylic dye into every lymphatic vessel 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. We then dissected and chased the stained lymphatic vessels proximally until the vessels connected to the first tier lymph node. This procedure was repeated throughout the body until all the relationships between the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes were defined. The lymphatic system of the rabbit could be defined as eight lymphatic territories, each with its own lymphatic vessels and lymph node.

  2. Predictive lymphatic mapping: a method for mapping lymphatic channels in patients with advanced unilateral lymphedema using indocyanine green lymphography.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Makoto; Seki, Yukio; Hara, Hisako; Iida, Takuya; Oka, Aiko; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Haragi, Makiko; Furniss, Dominic; Hin-Lun, Lawrence; Mitsui, Kito; Murai, Noriyuki; Koshima, Isao

    2014-01-01

    In severe lymphedema, indocyanine green lymphography cannot be used to map lymphatic channels before lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) because linear lymphatics cannot be detected in a severely affected leg. Here, we describe a new method, which we refer to as predictive lymphatic mapping, to predict the location of lymphatics for anastomosis in unilateral lymphedema, thereby improving surgical accuracy and efficiency. The approach consists of marking anatomical landmarks and joining selected landmarks with fixed lines. The distance from these fixed lines to lymphatic channels mapped by indocyanine green lymphography in the unaffected leg is then measured, scaled up based on the difference in circumference between the legs, and transposed to the affected leg. To date, we have used this method in 5 cases of unilateral or asymmetric lymphedema of the lower extremities. In no cases have we failed to find a lymphatic channel suitable for LVA within a 2-cm incision. These results suggest that predictive lymphatic mapping is a useful additional tool for surgeons performing LVA under local anesthesia, which will help to improve the accuracy of incisions and the efficiency of surgery.

  3. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, A E; Kirgan, D M; Guenther, J M; Morton, D L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report the feasibility and accuracy of intraoperative lymphatic mapping with sentinel lymphadenectomy in patients with breast cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for breast cancer generally is accepted for its staging and prognostic value, but the extent of dissection remains controversial. Blind lymph node sampling or level I dissection may miss some nodal metastases, but ALND may result in lymphedema. In melanoma, intraoperative lymph node mapping with sentinel lymphadenectomy is an effective and minimally invasive alternative to ALND for identifying nodes containing metastases. METHODS: One hundred seventy-four mapping procedures were performed using a vital dye injected at the primary breast cancer site. Axillary lymphatics were identified and followed to the first ("sentinel") node, which was selectively excised before ALND. RESULTS: Sentinel nodes were identified in 114 of 174 (65.5%) procedures and accurately predicted axillary nodal status in 109 of 114 (95.6%) cases. There was a definite learning curve, and all false-negative sentinel nodes occurred in the first part of the study; sentinel nodes identified in the last 87 procedures were 100% predictive. In 16 of 42 (38.0%) clinically negative/pathologically positive axillae, the sentinel node was the only tumor-involved lymph node identified. The anatomic location of the sentinel node was examined in the 54 most recent procedures; ten cases had only level II nodal metastases that could have been missed by sampling or low (level I) axillary dissection. CONCLUSIONS: This experience indicates that intraoperative lymphatic mapping can accurately identify the sentinel node--i.e., the axillary lymph node most likely to contain breast cancer metastases--in some patients. The technique could enhance staging accuracy and, with further refinements and experience, might alter the role of ALND. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8092905

  4. Aging-related anatomical and biochemical changes in lymphatic collectors impair lymph transport, fluid homeostasis, and pathogen clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zolla, Valerio; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Scharf, Brian; Clement, Cristina C; Maejima, Daisuke; Akl, Tony; Nagai, Takashi; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Halin, Cornelia; Stukes, Sabriya; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Casadevall, Arturo; Jacobs, William R; Entenberg, David; Zawieja, David C; Condeelis, John; Fooksman, David R; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Santambrogio, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The role of lymphatic vessels is to transport fluid, soluble molecules, and immune cells to the draining lymph nodes. Here, we analyze how the aging process affects the functionality of the lymphatic collectors and the dynamics of lymph flow. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and proteomic analysis indicates a loss of matrix proteins, and smooth muscle cells in aged collectors resulting in a decrease in contraction frequency, systolic lymph flow velocity, and pumping activity, as measured in vivo in lymphatic collectors. Functionally, this impairment also translated into a reduced ability for in vivo bacterial transport as determined by time-lapse microscopy. Ultrastructural and proteomic analysis also indicates a decrease in the thickness of the endothelial cell glycocalyx and loss of gap junction proteins in aged lymph collectors. Redox proteomic analysis mapped an aging-related increase in the glycation and carboxylation of lymphatic’s endothelial cell and matrix proteins. Functionally, these modifications translate into apparent hyperpermeability of the lymphatics with pathogen escaping from the collectors into the surrounding tissue and a decreased ability to control tissue fluid homeostasis. Altogether, our data provide a mechanistic analysis of how the anatomical and biochemical changes, occurring in aged lymphatic vessels, compromise lymph flow, tissue fluid homeostasis, and pathogen transport. PMID:25982749

  5. Anatomical Mercury: Changing Understandings of Quicksilver, Blood, and the Lymphatic System, 1650-1800.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Marieke M A

    2015-10-01

    The use of mercury as an injection mass in anatomical experiments and preparations was common throughout Europe in the long eighteenth century, and refined mercury-injected preparations as well as plates of anatomical mercury remain today. The use and meaning of mercury in related disciplines such as medicine and chemistry in the same period have been studied, but our knowledge of anatomical mercury is sparse and tends to focus on technicalities. This article argues that mercury had a distinct meaning in anatomy, which was initially influenced by alchemical and classical understandings of mercury. Moreover, it demonstrates that the choice of mercury as an anatomical injection mass was deliberate and informed by an intricate cultural understanding of its materiality, and that its use in anatomical preparations and its perception as an anatomical material evolved with the understanding of the circulatory and lymphatic systems. By using the material culture of anatomical mercury as a starting point, I seek to provide a new, object-driven interpretation of complex and strongly interrelated historiographical categories such as mechanism, vitalism, chemistry, anatomy, and physiology, which are difficult to understand through a historiography that focuses exclusively on ideas.

  6. Lymphatic Mapping in the Treatment of Chronic Seroma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Aliano, Kristen; Stavrides, Steven; Davenport, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Seromas or lymphoceles are common postoperative complications. This series presents 3 patients with lower extremity seromas refractory to treatment that required lymphatic mapping and lymphatic ligation for closure, and in 1 case, diagnosis. Methods: Lymphatic mapping procedure consisted of intraoperative injection of subcutaneous tissue with methylene blue distal to the seroma with observation of dye effluence from transected or injured lymphatics draining into area of seroma. Results: In 2 patients, methylene blue dye absorption into lymphatic vessels allowed for optimized visual identification of lymphatic leak and contrast against surrounding tissues. In the third patient, where no lymphocele leak was found, the study was diagnostic and helped to find an alternate etiology for the recurrent seroma. Conclusion: Lymphatic mapping with methylene blue dye is an effective tool in the evaluation and diagnosis of chronic seroma. PMID:25848444

  7. A New Technique to Map the Lymphatic Distribution and Alignment of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Long, Liu Yan; Qiang, Pan Fu; Ling, Tao; Wei, Zhang Yan; Long, Zhang Yu; Shan, Meng; Rong, Li Shi; Li, Li Hong

    2015-08-01

    The present study was to examine the distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis of normal adult males, which could provide an anatomical basis for improvement of incisions in penile lengthening surgery, and may also help to prevent postoperative refractory edema. Thirteen normal adult male volunteers were recruited for this study. Contrast agent was injected subcutaneously in the foreskin of the penis, and after two minutes magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL) was performed. The acquired magnetic resonance images were analyzed to determine the changes in the number and diameter of lymphatic vessels in different parts of the penis. Maximum intensity projections (MIP) and materializes interactive medical image control system (MIMICS) were applied to analyze the overall distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the lymphatic vessels were in conspicuous contrast with surrounding tissues and could be clearly identified. Penile lymphatic vessels were clearly visible in the root of the penis. At the junction of the penis and the abdominal wall, all lymphatic vessels were found to be concentrated in the dorsal part of the penis. MIP two-dimensional reconstruction showed that the overall distribution of relatively large lymphatic vessels in the dorsal and ventral parts of the penis could be seen clearly on bilateral 45° position, but not inside the abdominal wall because some of lymphatic vessels were overlapped by other tissues in the abdomen. MIMICS three-dimensional reconstruction was able to reveal the overall spatial distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis from any angle. The reconstruction results showed that there were 1-2 main lymphatic vessels on the root of dorsal penis, which coursed along the cavernous to the first physiological curvature of the penis. Lymphatic vessels merged on both sides of the ventral penis. At the root of the penis, lymphatic vessels gradually coursed to the dorsal surface

  8. Anatomic and Functional Evaluation of Central Lymphatics With Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Lymphangiography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Kim, Hong Kwan; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zo, Jaeil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Accurate assessment of the lymphatic system has been limited due to the lack of optimal diagnostic methods. Recently, we adopted noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography to evaluate the central lymphatic channel. We aimed to investigate the feasibility and the clinical usefulness of noninvasive MR lymphangiography for determining lymphatic disease. Ten patients (age range 42–72 years) with suspected chylothorax (n = 7) or lymphangioma (n = 3) who underwent MR lymphangiography were included in this prospective study. The thoracic duct was evaluated using coronal and axial images of heavily T2-weighted sequences, and reconstructed maximum intensity projection. Two radiologists documented visualization of the thoracic duct from the level of the diaphragm to the thoracic duct outlet, and also an area of dispersion around the chyloma or direct continuity between the thoracic duct and mediastinal cystic mass. The entire thoracic duct was successfully delineated in all patients. Lymphangiographic findings played a critical role in identifying leakage sites in cases of postoperative chylothorax, and contributed to differential diagnosis and confirmation of continuity with the thoracic duct in cases of lymphangioma, and also in diagnosing Gorham disease, which is a rare disorder. In patients who underwent surgery, intraoperative findings were matched with lymphangiographic imaging findings. Nonenhanced MR lymphangiography is a safe and effective method for imaging the central lymphatic system, and can contribute to differential diagnosis and appropriate preoperative evaluation of pathologic lymphatic problems. PMID:27015184

  9. Anatomic and Functional Evaluation of Central Lymphatics With Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Lymphangiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Kim, Hong Kwan; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zo, Jaeil

    2016-03-01

    Accurate assessment of the lymphatic system has been limited due to the lack of optimal diagnostic methods. Recently, we adopted noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography to evaluate the central lymphatic channel. We aimed to investigate the feasibility and the clinical usefulness of noninvasive MR lymphangiography for determining lymphatic disease.Ten patients (age range 42-72 years) with suspected chylothorax (n = 7) or lymphangioma (n = 3) who underwent MR lymphangiography were included in this prospective study. The thoracic duct was evaluated using coronal and axial images of heavily T2-weighted sequences, and reconstructed maximum intensity projection. Two radiologists documented visualization of the thoracic duct from the level of the diaphragm to the thoracic duct outlet, and also an area of dispersion around the chyloma or direct continuity between the thoracic duct and mediastinal cystic mass.The entire thoracic duct was successfully delineated in all patients. Lymphangiographic findings played a critical role in identifying leakage sites in cases of postoperative chylothorax, and contributed to differential diagnosis and confirmation of continuity with the thoracic duct in cases of lymphangioma, and also in diagnosing Gorham disease, which is a rare disorder. In patients who underwent surgery, intraoperative findings were matched with lymphangiographic imaging findings.Nonenhanced MR lymphangiography is a safe and effective method for imaging the central lymphatic system, and can contribute to differential diagnosis and appropriate preoperative evaluation of pathologic lymphatic problems. PMID:27015184

  10. Safety of methylene blue dye for lymphatic mapping in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shah-Khan, Miraj G; Lovely, Jenna; Degnim, Amy C

    2012-11-01

    Methylene blue dye has an important role in lymphatic mapping for sentinel lymph node surgery. A recent safety announcement from the US Food and Drug Administration warned physicians about possible serious central nervous system reactions in patients on serotonergic medications who received intravenous methylene blue for the identification of parathyroid glands. This report summarizes evidence from the Food and Drug Administration's announcement and methylene blue pharmacokinetics. The authors conclude that the use of methylene blue dye at low doses for lymphatic mapping likely carries very little risk for serotonin neurotoxicity, although breast surgeons should be aware of this potential complication in the event of mental status or neuromuscular changes in patients after lymphatic mapping.

  11. Shrinking the Lymphatic Filariasis Map of Ethiopia: Reassessing the Population at Risk through Nationwide Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Ashenafi; Cano, Jorge; Deribe, Kebede; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Shafi, Oumer; Davey, Gail; Brooker, Simon J.; Kebede, Amha; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mapping of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is essential for the delineation of endemic implementation units and determining the population at risk that will be targeted for mass drug administration (MDA). Prior to the current study, only 116 of the 832 woredas (districts) in Ethiopia had been mapped for LF. The aim of this study was to perform a nationwide mapping exercise to determine the number of people that should be targeted for MDA in 2016 when national coverage was anticipated. Methodology/Principal Finding A two-stage cluster purposive sampling was used to conduct a community-based cross-sectional survey for an integrated mapping of LF and podoconiosis, in seven regional states and two city administrations. Two communities in each woreda were purposely selected using the World Health Organization (WHO) mapping strategy for LF based on sampling 100 individuals per community and two purposely selected communities per woreda. Overall, 130 166 people were examined in 1315 communities in 658 woredas. In total, 140 people were found to be positive for circulating LF antigen by immunochromatographic card test (ICT) in 89 communities. Based on WHO guidelines, 75 of the 658 woredas surveyed in the nine regions were found to be endemic for LF with a 2016 projected population of 9 267 410 residing in areas of active disease transmission. Combining these results with other data it is estimated that 11 580 010 people in 112 woredas will be exposed to infection in 2016. Conclusions We have conducted nationwide mapping of LF in Ethiopia and demonstrated that the number of people living in LF endemic areas is 60% lower than current estimates. We also showed that integrated mapping of multiple NTDs is feasible and cost effective and if properly planned, can be quickly achieved at national scale. PMID:26539700

  12. Lymphatic mapping and lymphedema surgery in the breast cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Oscar; Sosin, Michael; Hashmi, Mahjabeen Aftab; Poysophon, Poysophon; Henderson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb lymphedema can be an unfortunate sequela following the oncologic treatment of breast cancer. The surgical treatment of lymphedema has had a recent renewed clinical interest paralleling innovative descriptions of surgical techniques and imaging modalities. In addition, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema has allowed improved translation to the clinical condition. Various surgical options exist to decrease the symptom-burden of upper limb lymphedema, including vascularized lymph node (VLN) transfer, lymphovenous bypass (LVB), liposuction, lymphatic grafting, and excisional procedures. Modern imaging techniques help to improve the consistency and accuracy of these surgical treatment options. A multi-modal treatment plan utilizing non-operative and surgical therapies has the potential to improve various factors related to overall patient quality of life. This review details all of the current operative treatment strategies and modern imaging modalities used in the treatment of lymphedema. PMID:26161309

  13. Added-value of SPECT/CT to lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy in gynaecological cancers

    PubMed Central

    Belhocine, Tarik Z; Prefontaine, Michel; Lanvin, Dominique; Bertrand, Monique; Rachinsky, Irina; Ettler, Helen; Zabel, Pamela; Stitt, Larry W; Sugimoto, Akira; Urbain, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy (LM/SL) have been successfully used in pre-treatment nodal staging of gynaecological cancers. We hypothesised the added-value of LM/SL plus SPECT/CT in patients with early stage of cervical cancer and vulvar cancer. A prospective, single-center, diagnostic, open label, active control, non-randomized clinical trial has been conducted in 7 patients with FIGO IA-IB1 cervical cancer and 7 patients with FIGO stage I-II-IIIcN0 vulvar cancer. All patients underwent LM/SL plus SPECT/low-dose CT and complete lymph node dissection (CLND) according to the standard of care. In case of negative hematoxylin-eosin staining, serial sections of the SLNs were analysed by immunohistochemistry and high molecular weight cytokeratin. Primary outcome measures were the detection rate, the sensitivity (SV), the negative predictive value (NPV), the diagnostic accuracy (DA) for anatomic localisation of SLNs, and the impact on management of SPECT/CT guided LM/SL versus CLND. The secondary outcome measure was the patient tolerability and operating time of LM/SL guided SPECT/CT versus CLND. http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00773071 All 14 patients were enrolled into the 1-day research protocol with dual-tracer LM/SL and SPECT/CT. Additional SLNs were detected on SPECT/CT compared to conventional planar imaging. Hot and cold > 1cm SLNs were detected on SPECT/CT. Detection rate, SV, NPV, DA were 100% in both groups; false negative rate was 0%. Rate of SLN metastases was 28.5% in cervical cancer and 42.9% in vulvar cancer. Impact on treatment was 28.5% and 14.3% in cervical cancer and vulvar cancer patients, respectively. SPECT/CT was well tolerated by all patients and operating time for LM/SL was within 30 min. No adverse events were reported with a time frame of 1-to-3 years. In early stage of gynaecological cancers, SPECT/low-dose CT is technically feasible and of clinical added-value for LM/SL. PMID:23526734

  14. Demonstrating the lymphatic system in rats with microinjection.

    PubMed

    Suami, Hiroo; Chang, David W; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2011-09-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in human health and disease. In addition to a role in the immune response, the lymphatics can serve as a pathway for cancer metastasis. Visualizing the lymphatic system has been a difficult part of anatomic dissection studies. Anatomists have attempted to map the lymphatic system using various methods and materials; vivisection of dogs, injection of mercury into the skin and lymphatic vessel in cadavers, and injection of dye indirectly into the skin of dead and living specimens. In this study, we introduce a method of using a mixture of acrylic blue dye and hydrogen peroxide to visualize the lymphatic system in rats. The lymphatic vessels were cannulated with micropipettes, and radio-opaque orange lead oxide was selectively injected. The lymphatic system became visible from the dorsal side of the hand and foot, and distal region of the tail to their termination at the left and right subclavicular veins via lymph nodes. Cisterna chyli in the abdominal cavity and thoracic duct ran along with the aorta. The advantage of this technique is that lymph nodes as well as lymphatic channels could be recorded not only photographically but also radiographically. This microinjection technique is useful for demonstrating the lymphatic system in rats and may provide further information that will help in cancer metastasis research.

  15. Mapping of lymphatic filariasis: "to be (in English) or not to be".

    PubMed

    Carme, B

    2010-12-01

    Despite lack of supporting evidence from epidemiologic studies and/or confirmed case reports over the last 30 years, maps in non-specialist works on tropical medicine as well as in documents from specialized organizations (e.g. WHO) systematically include Congo and Gabon, two French-speaking countries, within the zone of endemic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti. One certainty is that no cases were found in field studies carried out in these countries in the late 1970s and 1980s but unfortunately published only in French. Studies that we carried out in the Congo between 1982 and 1987 as part of the National Project on Onchocerciasis and Other Filarioses confirmed the presence of four types of human filariasis: onchocerciasis, loaiasis filarioses caused by Mansonella perstans and M. streptocerca. However, there were no confirmed cases of lymphatic filariosis (bancroftosis). Hopefully the WHO program aimed at the elimination of lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem will provide up-to-date data on the distribution and endemicity of filariasis in Central Africa. Achievement of this objective will depend not only on carrying out new field studies but also on taking into account past studies published in languages other than Shakespeare's. PMID:21520639

  16. Lymphatic filariasis transmission risk map of India, based on a geo-environmental risk model.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Shanmugavelu; Raju, Konuganti Hari Kishan; Subramanian, Swaminathan; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Jambulingam, Purushothaman

    2013-09-01

    The strategy adopted by a global program to interrupt transmission of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is mass drug administration (MDA) using chemotherapy. India also followed this strategy by introducing MDA in the historically known endemic areas. All other areas, which remained unsurveyed, were presumed to be nonendemic and left without any intervention. Therefore, identification of LF transmission risk areas in the entire country has become essential so that they can be targeted for intervention. A geo-environmental risk model (GERM) developed earlier was used to create a filariasis transmission risk map for India. In this model, a Standardized Filariasis Transmission Risk Index (SFTRI, based on geo-environmental risk variables) was used as a predictor of transmission risk. The relationship between SFTRI and endemicity (historically known) of an area was quantified by logistic regression analysis. The quantified relationship was validated by assessing the filarial antigenemia status of children living in the unsurveyed areas through a ground truth study. A significant positive relationship was observed between SFTRI and the endemicity of an area. Overall, the model prediction of filarial endemic status of districts was found to be correct in 92.8% of the total observations. Thus, among the 190 districts hitherto unsurveyed, as many as 113 districts were predicted to be at risk, and the remaining at no risk. The GERM developed on geographic information system (GIS) platform is useful for LF spatial delimitation on a macrogeographic/regional scale. Furthermore, the risk map developed will be useful for the national LF elimination program by identifying areas at risk for intervention and for undertaking surveillance in no-risk areas.

  17. Lymphatic mapping improves staging and reduces morbidity in women undergoing total mastectomy for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Langer, Samantha; Guenther, J Michael; Haigh, Philip I; Difronzo, L Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Lymphatic mapping (LM) and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) have become widely accepted in the setting of breast conservation surgery. We hypothesized that LM can be extended to women undergoing total mastectomy, being technically feasible, yielding highly accurate and sensitive results, improving axillary staging, and reducing postoperative morbidity. Between 1995 and 2003, 99 women (mean age 59 years, range 34-87) underwent 100 mastectomies with LM using blue dye alone. Fifty-nine operations (60%) were followed by a completion axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Ninety per cent of patients had invasive carcinoma; 10 per cent had in situ carcinoma. Mean tumor size was 2.5 cm (range 0.3-8 cm). One hundred fifty-nine sentinel nodes (SNs) (mean 1.65, range 1-5) were successfully identified in 96 (96%) axillae. Twenty-five (25%) sentinel nodes revealed nodal metastases. Five of 25 (20%) SNs had micrometasteses. Three patients had a false-negative SN, yielding a sensitivity of 91 per cent. The accuracy of LM was 97 per cent. No patient who underwent SLNB alone developed lymphedema, axillary seroma formation, infection, or restricted arm movement. This was contrasted with patients undergoing ALND, where 10 (16%) developed lymphedema and 2 (3%) developed an infection. Ten (25%) patients developed axillary paresthesias after SNB compared with 47 (78%) patients after ALND (P < 0.0001). LM in the setting of mastectomy is accurate and sensitive. This technique improves axillary staging and decreases morbidity. Patients who are not candidates for breast conservation should be offered LM and SLNB at the time of mastectomy.

  18. CAVEman: Standardized Anatomical Context for Biomedical Data Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turinsky, Andrei L.; Fanea, Elena; Trinh, Quang; Wat, Stephen; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Dong, Xiaoli; Shu, Xueling; Stromer, Julie N.; Hill, Jonathan W.; Edwards, Carol; Grosenick, Brenda; Yajima, Masumi; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have created a software system called the CAVEman, for the visual integration and exploration of heterogeneous anatomical and biomedical data. The CAVEman can be applied for both education and research tasks. The main component of the system is a three-dimensional digital atlas of the adult male human anatomy, structured according to…

  19. Lymphatic mapping and preoperative imaging in the management of post-mastectomy lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Muhammed; Griffiths, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of upper extremity lymphoedema in patients after mastectomy and axillary lymph node clearance is important in order to treat disease before it is too advanced to achieve favourable outcomes. Patients with disease refractory to conservative management can be efficiently assessed for diagnosis and surgical intervention using advanced lymphatic imaging techniques. The current paper highlights the more readily available of these: lymphoscintigraphy, indocyanine green (ICG) lymphangiography and immunofluorescence, magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL) and computed tomographic lymphangiography in combination or individually. With such techniques, both diagnosis and treatment of lymphoedema has become more readily achieved, with lymphatico-venous and lymphatico-lymphatic anastomosis, and lymph node transfer now increasingly common undertakings. PMID:27047786

  20. Lymphatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of Lymph - a fluid that contains ... They are part of the system, too. The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids ...

  1. Lymphatic obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain directions based on the structure of the lymphatic system. This helps the lymph fluid drain through the ... always appropriate or effective. Alternative Names Lymphedema Images Lymphatic system Yellow nail syndrome References Kurklinsky AK, Rooke TW. ...

  2. Systematic review of studies investigating sentinel node navigation surgery and lymphatic mapping for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Can, Mehmet Fatih; Yagci, Gokhan; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2013-08-01

    Evolutions in minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) have had considerable impact on current insights into surgical treatment of gastric cancer. Extensive data on this method of surgical application have accumulated but have been principally derived from single-institute studies. Isosulfan blue and patent blue violet have been the most frequently used dye tracers in the past; however, indocyanine green has now is increasingly popular. The double-tracer method, where dye and radioisotope tracers are used together, seems to be more effective than any single tracer. Among newly emerging adjunct techniques and promising alternative in particular are infrared ray electronic endoscopy, florescence imaging, nanoparticles, and near-infrared technology. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining is still the method of choice for the detection of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastases. Immunohistochemical staining can be used to support H&E findings, but the equipment costs of ultrarapid processing systems are currently slowing down their worldwide spread. We believe minimally invasive function-preserving resection of the stomach, together with lymphatic basin dissection navigated by SLNs, can represent the ideal approach for SNNS to detect clinically node-negative early gastric cancer, although this remains to be elucidated. Patients with cT3 or more advanced disease should still be treated by means of standard D2 dissection.

  3. lyve1 expression reveals novel lymphatic vessels and new mechanisms for lymphatic vessel development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kazuhide S; Astin, Jonathan W; Misa, June P; Flores, Maria V; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2012-07-01

    We have generated novel transgenic lines that brightly mark the lymphatic system of zebrafish using the lyve1 promoter. Facilitated by these new transgenic lines, we generated a map of zebrafish lymphatic development up to 15 days post-fertilisation and discovered three previously uncharacterised lymphatic vessel networks: the facial lymphatics, the lateral lymphatics and the intestinal lymphatics. We show that a facial lymphatic vessel, termed the lateral facial lymphatic, develops through a novel developmental mechanism, which initially involves vessel growth through a single vascular sprout followed by the recruitment of lymphangioblasts to the vascular tip. Unlike the lymphangioblasts that form the thoracic duct, the lymphangioblasts that contribute to the lateral facial lymphatic vessel originate from a number of different blood vessels. Our work highlights the additional complexity of lymphatic vessel development in the zebrafish that may increase its versatility as a model of lymphangiogenesis.

  4. Response Properties of Human Amygdala Subregions: Evidence Based on Functional MRI Combined with Probabilistic Anatomical Maps

    PubMed Central

    Rahm, Benjamin; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Speck, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The human amygdala is thought to play a pivotal role in the processing of emotionally significant sensory information. The major subdivisions of the human amygdala—the laterobasal group (LB), the superficial group (SF), and the centromedial group (CM)—have been anatomically delineated, but the functional response properties of these amygdala subregions in humans are still unclear. We combined functional MRI with cyto-architectonically defined probabilistic maps to analyze the response characteristics of amygdala subregions in subjects presented with auditory stimuli. We found positive auditory stimulation-related signal changes predominantly in probabilistically defined LB, and negative responses predominantly in SF and CM. In the left amygdala, mean response magnitude in the core area of LB with 90–100% assignment probability was significantly larger than in the core areas of SF and CM. These differences were observed for pleasant and unpleasant stimuli. Our findings reveal that the probabilistically defined anatomical subregions of the human amygdala show distinctive fMRI response patterns. The stronger auditory responses in LB as compared with SF and CM may reflect a predominance of auditory inputs to human LB, similar to many animal species in which the majority of sensory, including auditory, afferents project to this subdivision of the amygdala. Our study indicates that the intrinsic functional differentiation of the human amygdala may be probed using fMRI combined with probabilistic anatomical maps. PMID:17375193

  5. Molecular Xenomonitoring Using Mosquitoes to Map Lymphatic Filariasis after Mass Drug Administration in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Schmaedick, Mark A.; Koppel, Amanda L.; Pilotte, Nils; Torres, Melissa; Williams, Steven A.; Dobson, Stephen L.; Lammie, Patrick J.; Won, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA) programs have dramatically reduced lymphatic filariasis (LF) incidence in many areas around the globe, including American Samoa. As infection rates decline and MDA programs end, efficient and sensitive methods for detecting infections are needed to monitor for recrudescence. Molecular methods, collectively termed ‘molecular xenomonitoring,’ can identify parasite DNA or RNA in human blood-feeding mosquitoes. We tested mosquitoes trapped throughout the inhabited islands of American Samoa to identify areas of possible continuing LF transmission after completion of MDA. Methodology/Principle Findings Mosquitoes were collected using BG Sentinel traps from most of the villages on American Samoa's largest island, Tutuila, and all major villages on the smaller islands of Aunu'u, Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u. Real-time PCR was used to detect Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in pools of ≤20 mosquitoes, and PoolScreen software was used to infer territory-wide prevalences of W. bancrofti DNA in the mosquitoes. Wuchereria bancrofti DNA was found in mosquitoes from 16 out of the 27 village areas sampled on Tutuila and Aunu'u islands but none of the five villages on the Manu'a islands of Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u. The overall 95% confidence interval estimate for W. bancrofti DNA prevalence in the LF vector Ae. polynesiensis was 0.20–0.39%, and parasite DNA was also detected in pools of Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes (Finlaya) spp. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest low but widespread prevalence of LF on Tutuila and Aunu'u where 98% of the population resides, but not Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u islands. Molecular xenomonitoring can help identify areas of possible LF transmission, but its use in the LF elimination program in American Samoa is limited by the need for more efficient mosquito collection methods and a better understanding of the relationship between prevalence of W. bancrofti DNA in mosquitoes and infection and

  6. Lymphatic Filariasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Lymphatic Filariasis Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... this? Submit Button Information For: Travelers Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

  7. Lymphatic Territories (Lymphosomes) in a Canine: An Animal Model for Investigation of Postoperative Lymphatic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Suami, Hiroo; Yamashita, Shuji; Soto-Miranda, Miguel A.; Chang, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymph node dissection is often performed as a part of surgical treatment for breast cancer and malignant melanoma to prevent malignant cells from traveling via the lymphatic system. Currently little is known about postoperative lymphatic drainage pattern alterations. This knowledge may be useful for management of recurrent cancer and prevention of breast cancer related lymphedema. We mapped the complete superficial lymphatic system of a dog and used this canine model to perform preliminary studies of lymphatic architectural changes in postoperative condition. Methods Lymphatic territories (lymphosomes) were mapped with 4 female mongrel carcasses using an indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography and a radiographic microinjection technique. Two live dogs were then subjected to unilateral lymph node dissection of lymph basins of the forelimb, and ICG lymphography and lymphangiogram were performed 6 months after the surgery to investigate lymphatic changes. Lymphatic patterns in the carcass were then compared with postoperative lymphatic patterns in the live dogs. Results Ten lymphosomes were identified, corresponding with ten lymphatic basins. Postoperative fluorescent lymphographic images and lymphangiograms in the live dogs revealed small caliber lymphatic network fulfilling gaps in the surgical area and collateral lymphatic vessels arising from the network connecting to lymph nodes in the contralateral and ipsilateral neck in one dog and the ipsilateral subclavicular vein in another dog. Conclusion Our canine lymphosome map allowed us to observe lymphatic collateral formations after lymph node dissection in live dogs. This canine model may help clarify our understanding of postoperative lymphatic changes in humans in future studies. PMID:23894435

  8. A simple way to improve anatomical mapping of functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villain, Nicolas; Landeau, Brigitte; Groussard, Mathilde; Mevel, Katell; Fouquet, Marine; Dayan, Jacques; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Advances in functional neuroimaging studies have led to the need for improved anatomical precision to face with more and more specific challenges. Nevertheless, functional MRI (fMRI) suffers from geometrical distortions which limit the matching between functional and anatomical data necessary to interpret fMRI results. The ‘FieldMap’ method is the most widely used technique to correct for geometrical distortions but in some cases cannot be applied or provides unsatisfactory results. The objective of the present study is thus to provide a very simple alternative method for distortion correction and to demonstrate its efficiency. Methods This correction relies on the non-linear registration of Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) acquisitions onto their corresponding undistorted non-EPI T2Star volume, and was tested on two independent groups of subjects undertaking the same paradigm but scanned with distinct EPI sequences. Results This procedure was found to considerably decrease the mismatch between functional and anatomical data in both groups, as revealed through several quantitative and qualitative measures on both EPI volumes and activation maps. Conclusion The present study describes a simple, rapid, and easily implementable method to significantly improve neuroanatomical accuracy of fMRI results localization, which may be relevant for future neuroimaging studies. PMID:20331499

  9. [Role of sentinel lymph nodes and lymphatic mapping of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K; Kolev, N; Ignatov, V; Temelkov, T; Madzhov, R

    2005-01-01

    The accuracy of staging of colorectal cancer is dependable of number of lymph nodes, colected and investegated from the pathologist. Moreover 50% of newfounded cases with colorectal cancer are diagnosed as I or II stage of the desease. Between 15% and 20% of these patients develop regional or distant metastases around 5 years after the examination, despite of the radical surgery. This may be due to pathological "understaging" (decrease of the stage), becouse of missed micrometastases, which size often is smaller than 5 mm. High accurate and specific pathologoanatomical methods for "ultrastaging" are cost-expensive, therefore their selective application to labeled sentinel lymph nodes has a economical benefit and saves a time. Moreover it is decreasing the understaging effect, assosiated with convectional pathologoanatomical investigaton. In the future, the technical progress will develop the intensive competiton between the sentinel lymph node mapping and the improved imaging diagnostic techniques as flurodeoxyglucose (18FDG), positron emision tomography (PET), or the other molecular imaging techniques. Unfortunately, the limited spatial resolution of these techniques, do not allow to be used for tumor staging as sentinel lymph node techniques. Therefore the sentinel lymphnode mapping become the choice of the lymphnode staging technique. PMID:18693514

  10. Mapping, Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Spatial Prediction of Lymphatic Filariasis Prevalence in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Hannah; Michael, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest to control or eradicate the major neglected tropical diseases. Accurate modelling of the geographic distributions of parasitic infections will be crucial to this endeavour. We used 664 community level infection prevalence data collated from the published literature in conjunction with eight environmental variables, altitude and population density, and a multivariate Bayesian generalized linear spatial model that allows explicit accounting for spatial autocorrelation and incorporation of uncertainty in input data and model parameters, to construct the first spatially-explicit map describing LF prevalence distribution in Africa. We also ran the best-fit model against predictions made by the HADCM3 and CCCMA climate models for 2050 to predict the likely distributions of LF under future climate and population changes. We show that LF prevalence is strongly influenced by spatial autocorrelation between locations but is only weakly associated with environmental covariates. Infection prevalence, however, is found to be related to variations in population density. All associations with key environmental/demographic variables appear to be complex and non-linear. LF prevalence is predicted to be highly heterogenous across Africa, with high prevalences (>20%) estimated to occur primarily along coastal West and East Africa, and lowest prevalences predicted for the central part of the continent. Error maps, however, indicate a need for further surveys to overcome problems with data scarcity in the latter and other regions. Analysis of future changes in prevalence indicates that population growth rather than climate change per se will represent the dominant factor in the predicted increase/decrease and spread of LF on the continent. We indicate that these results could play an important role in aiding the development of strategies that are best able to achieve the goals of parasite elimination locally and globally in a manner that may also account

  11. Secondary mapping of lymphatic filariasis in Haiti-definition of transmission foci in low-prevalence settings.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Naomi; Washington, Charles H; Lovegrove, Maribeth; Grady, Caroline; Milord, Marie Denise; Streit, Thomas; Lammie, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    To eliminate Lymphatic filariasis (LF) as a public health problem, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that any area with infection prevalence greater than or equal to 1% (denoted by presence of microfilaremia or antigenemia) should receive mass drug administration (MDA) of antifilarial drugs for at least five consecutive rounds. Areas of low-antigen prevalence (< 1%) are thought to pose little risk for continued transmission of LF. Five low-antigen prevalence communes in Haiti, characterized as part of a national survey, were further assessed for transmission in this study. An initial evaluation of schoolchildren was performed in each commune to identify antigen-positive children who served as index cases for subsequent community surveys conducted among households neighboring the index cases. Global positioning system (GPS) coordinates and immunochromatographic tests (ICT) for filarial antigenemia were collected on approximately 1,600 persons of all ages in the five communes. The relationship between antigen-positive cases in the community and distance from index cases was evaluated using multivariate regression techniques and analyses of spatial clustering. Community surveys demonstrated higher antigen prevalence in three of the five communes than was observed in the original mapping survey; autochthonous cases were found in the same three communes. Regression techniques identified a significantly increased likelihood of being antigen-positive when living within 20 meters of index cases when controlling for age, gender, and commune. Spatial clustering of antigen-positive cases was observed in some, but not all communes. Our results suggest that localized transmission was present even in low-prevalence settings and suggest that better surveillance methods may be needed to detect microfoci of LF transmission. PMID:23071849

  12. An anatomical basis for visual calibration of the auditory space map in the barn owl's midbrain.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D E; Knudsen, E I

    1997-09-01

    The map of auditory space in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) of the barn owl is calibrated by visual experience during development. ICX neurons are tuned for interaural time difference (ITD), the owl's primary cue for sound source azimuth, and are arranged into a map of ITD. When vision is altered by rearing owls with prismatic spectacles that shift the visual field in azimuth, ITD tuning in the ICX shifts adaptively. In contrast, ITD tuning remains unchanged in the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICCls), which provides the principal auditory input to the ICX, suggesting that the projection from the ICCls to the ICX is altered by prism-rearing. In this study, the topography of the ICCls-ICX projection was assessed in normal and prism-reared owls by retrograde labeling using biotinylated dextran amine. In juvenile owls at the age before prism attachment, and in normal adults, labeling patterns were consistent with a topographic projection, with each ICX site receiving input from a restricted region of the ICCls with similar ITD tuning. In prism-reared owls, labeling patterns were systematically altered: each ICX site received additional, abnormal input from a region of the ICCls where ITD tuning matched the shifted ITD tuning of the ICX neurons. These results indicate that anatomical reorganization of the ICCls-ICX projection contributes to the visual calibration of the ICX auditory space map. PMID:9254692

  13. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  14. Preclinical lymphatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Gang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-08-01

    Noninvasive in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymphatic nodes is expected to fulfill the purpose of analyzing lymphatic vessels and their function, understanding molecular mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic spread of tumors, and utilizing lymphatic molecular markers as a prognostic or diagnostic indicator. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of in vivo imaging modalities for detecting lymphatic vessels, lymphatic drainage, and lymphatic nodes, which include conventional lymphatic imaging techniques such as dyes and radionuclide scintigraphy as well as novel techniques for lymphatic imaging such as optical imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, positron emission tomography using lymphatic biomarkers, photoacoustic imaging, and combinations of multiple modalities. The field of lymphatic imaging is ever evolving, and technological advances, combined with the development of new contrast agents, continue to improve the research of lymphatic vascular system in health and disease states as well as to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in the relevant diseases.

  15. Preclinical Lymphatic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Gang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymphatic nodes is expected to fulfill the purpose of analyzing lymphatic vessels and their function, understanding molecular mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic spread of tumors, and utilizing lymphatic molecular markers as a prognostic or diagnostic indicator. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of in vivo imaging modalities for detecting lymphatic vessels, lymphatic drainage, lymphatic nodes, which include conventional lymphatic imaging techniques such as dyes and radionuclide scintigraphy as well as novel techniques for lymphatic imaging such as optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) using lymphatic biomarkers, photoacoustic imaging and combinations of multiple modalities. The field of lymphatic imaging is ever evolving, and technological advances, combined with the development of new contrast agents, continue to improve the research of lymphatic vascular system in health and disease states as well as to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in the relevant diseases. PMID:20862613

  16. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  17. BodyMap-Xs: anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal ESTs for cross-species comparison of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Osamu; Otsuji, Makiko; Watanabe, Kouji; Iizuka, Takayasu; Tamura, Takuro; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Kawamoto, Shoko; Okubo, Kousaku

    2006-01-01

    BodyMap-Xs (http://bodymap.jp) is a database for cross-species gene expression comparison. It was created by the anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal expressed sequence tag (EST) records in DDBJ using a sorting program tailored for this purpose. In BodyMap-Xs, users are allowed to compare the expression patterns of orthologous and paralogous genes in a coherent manner. This will provide valuable insights for the evolutionary study of gene expression and identification of a responsive motif for a particular expression pattern. In addition, starting from a concise overview of the taxonomical and anatomical breakdown of all animal ESTs, users can navigate to obtain gene expression ranking of a particular tissue in a particular animal. This method may lead to the understanding of the similarities and differences between the homologous tissues across animal species. BodyMap-Xs will be automatically updated in synchronization with the major update in DDBJ, which occurs periodically.

  18. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27341526

  19. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anatomy of the lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, John E; Skandalakis, Lee J; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatic system is perhaps the most complicated system of Homo sapiens. An introduction to the anatomy, embryology, and anomalies of the lymphatics is presented. The overall anatomy and drainage of the lymphatic vessels in outlined. The topographic anatomy, relations, and variations of the principle vessels of the lymphatic system (the right lymphatic duct, the thoracic duct, and the cisterna chyli) are presented in detail.

  1. Improving anatomical mapping of complexly deformed anatomy for external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy dose accumulation in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M. Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Schuring-Pereira, Monica; Zolnay, András; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In the treatment of cervical cancer, large anatomical deformations, caused by, e.g., tumor shrinkage, bladder and rectum filling changes, organ sliding, and the presence of the brachytherapy (BT) applicator, prohibit the accumulation of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT dose distributions. This work proposes a structure-wise registration with vector field integration (SW+VF) to map the largely deformed anatomies between EBRT and BT, paving the way for 3D dose accumulation between EBRT and BT. Methods: T2w-MRIs acquired before EBRT and as a part of the MRI-guided BT procedure for 12 cervical cancer patients, along with the manual delineations of the bladder, cervix-uterus, and rectum-sigmoid, were used for this study. A rigid transformation was used to align the bony anatomy in the MRIs. The proposed SW+VF method starts by automatically segmenting features in the area surrounding the delineated organs. Then, each organ and feature pair is registered independently using a feature-based nonrigid registration algorithm developed in-house. Additionally, a background transformation is calculated to account for areas far from all organs and features. In order to obtain one transformation that can be used for dose accumulation, the organ-based, feature-based, and the background transformations are combined into one vector field using a weighted sum, where the contribution of each transformation can be directly controlled by its extent of influence (scope size). The optimal scope sizes for organ-based and feature-based transformations were found by an exhaustive analysis. The anatomical correctness of the mapping was independently validated by measuring the residual distances after transformation for delineated structures inside the cervix-uterus (inner anatomical correctness), and for anatomical landmarks outside the organs in the surrounding region (outer anatomical correctness). The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the

  2. MRI-based anatomical model of the human head for specific absorption rate mapping

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Nikos; Angelone, Leonardo; Tulloch, Seann; Sorg, Scott; Kaiser, Jonathan; Kennedy, David

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based, high-resolution, numerical model of the head of a healthy human subject. In order to formulate the model, we performed quantitative volumetric segmentation on the human head, using T1-weighted MRI. The high spatial resolution used (1 × 1 × 1 mm3), allowed for the precise computation and visualization of a higher number of anatomical structures than provided by previous models. Furthermore, the high spatial resolution allowed us to study individual thin anatomical structures of clinical relevance not visible by the standard model currently adopted in computational bioelectromagnetics. When we computed the electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) at 7 Tesla MRI using this high-resolution model, we were able to obtain a detailed visualization of such fine anatomical structures as the epidermis/dermis, bone structures, bone-marrow, white matter and nasal and eye structures. PMID:18985401

  3. Imaging the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P

    2014-11-01

    Visualization of the lymphatic system is clinically necessary during diagnosis or treatment of many conditions and diseases; it is used for identifying and monitoring lymphedema, for detecting metastatic lesions during cancer staging and for locating lymphatic structures so they can be spared during surgical procedures. Imaging lymphatic anatomy and function also plays an important role in experimental studies of lymphatic development and function, where spatial resolution and accessibility are better. Here, we review technologies for visualizing and imaging the lymphatic system for clinical applications. We then describe the use of lymphatic imaging in experimental systems as well as some of the emerging technologies for improving these methodologies.

  4. Imaging the lymphatic system

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the lymphatic system is clinically necessary during diagnosis or treatment of many conditions and diseases; it is used for identifying and monitoring lymphedema, for detecting metastatic lesions during cancer staging and for locating lymphatic structures so they can be spared during surgical procedures. Imaging lymphatic anatomy and function also plays an important role in experimental studies of lymphatic development and function, where spatial resolution and accessibility are better. Here, we review technologies for visualizing and imaging the lymphatic system for clinical applications. We then describe the use of lymphatic imaging in experimental systems as well as some of the emerging technologies for improving these methodologies. PMID:24956510

  5. Lymphedema: A General Outline of Its Anatomical Base.

    PubMed

    Amore, M; Tapia, L; Mercado, D; Pattarone, G; Ciucci, J

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic research of the lymphatic system has been a very controversial subject throughout due to the complexity of the methods for its visualization. More than 30 years ago, together with Prof. Caplan, we began the vascular anatomy research, focusing on the lymphatic anatomy, developing and adapting different techniques of injection. On the third Normal Anatomy Chair of Buenos Aires University, we summarized the lymphatic drainage of the breast and the limbs to interpret the anatomic bases of lymphedema.

  6. Geographic information system (GIS) mapping of lymphatic filariasis endemic areas of Gampaha District, Sri Lanka based on epidemiological and entomological screening.

    PubMed

    Wijegunawardana, N D A D; Gunawardene, Y I N Silva; Manamperi, Aresha; Senarathne, H; Abeyewickreme, W

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a site directed geographic information system (GIS) map of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka as a guide for targeted control activities. Epidemiological and entomological screening of LF was carried out in nine pre-identified endemic areas in Gampaha District, using night blood screening and pool-screening PCR-ELISA. In total, 1,073 subjects (286 children, 787 adults) from 9 sites were examined. Positive cases were detected at 2 sites, with prevalence rates of 0.5% (Hekiththa) and 3.4% (Peliyagoda); the prevalence of microfilaria (mf) among adult Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes surveyed was 30%. The overall prevalence of mosquitoes with L1-L2 larvae of W. bancrofti ranged from 0% to 8.31% using dissection and point estimates of infection prevalence, and ranged from 0 to 32.4% using PCR-ELISA. The largest number of human cases was found at altitudes of 2.5-3.5 min highly populated areas, where transmission appears to have taken place. Questionnaires indicated that limited community awareness of LF may be a reason for the fairly static infection prevalent among the local population. The GIS mapping of LF cases shows a considerable prevalence of LF and marked variability by geographic site in Gampaha.

  7. Geographic information system (GIS) mapping of lymphatic filariasis endemic areas of Gampaha District, Sri Lanka based on epidemiological and entomological screening.

    PubMed

    Wijegunawardana, N D A D; Gunawardene, Y I N Silva; Manamperi, Aresha; Senarathne, H; Abeyewickreme, W

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a site directed geographic information system (GIS) map of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka as a guide for targeted control activities. Epidemiological and entomological screening of LF was carried out in nine pre-identified endemic areas in Gampaha District, using night blood screening and pool-screening PCR-ELISA. In total, 1,073 subjects (286 children, 787 adults) from 9 sites were examined. Positive cases were detected at 2 sites, with prevalence rates of 0.5% (Hekiththa) and 3.4% (Peliyagoda); the prevalence of microfilaria (mf) among adult Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes surveyed was 30%. The overall prevalence of mosquitoes with L1-L2 larvae of W. bancrofti ranged from 0% to 8.31% using dissection and point estimates of infection prevalence, and ranged from 0 to 32.4% using PCR-ELISA. The largest number of human cases was found at altitudes of 2.5-3.5 min highly populated areas, where transmission appears to have taken place. Questionnaires indicated that limited community awareness of LF may be a reason for the fairly static infection prevalent among the local population. The GIS mapping of LF cases shows a considerable prevalence of LF and marked variability by geographic site in Gampaha. PMID:23077834

  8. Clinical feasibility study of combined optoacoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Herzog, Don; Clingman, Bryan; Miller, Tom; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. Carol; McCorvey, B. Michelle; Otto, Pamela; Ermilov, Sergey; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Conjusteau, Andre; Su, Richard; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Two-dimensional optoacoustic imaging with a hand-held probe operated in backward mode is being developed for diagnostic imaging of breast cancer to evaluate the feasibility of a dual-modality optoacoustic plus ultrasonic system that maps functional information of anatomical tissue structures with ultrasonic resolution. Tissue is illuminated at 757nm and 1064nm for optical contrast between hypoxic blood of breast carcinomas and normally oxygenated blood in benign masses. The system is optimized and calibrated in phantoms for a pilot clinical study of patients with breast masses suspected for malignancy. Capability of the non-invasive system to improve detection and diagnosis of breast tumors is discussed.

  9. Lymphatic anatomy and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Daniela; Moriondo, Andrea

    2011-06-15

    Lymph formation is driven by hydraulic pressure gradients developing between the interstitial tissue and the lumen of initial lymphatics. While in vessels equipped with lymphatic smooth muscle cells these gradients are determined by well-synchronized spontaneous contractions of vessel segments, initial lymphatics devoid of smooth muscles rely on tissue motion to form lymph and propel it along the network. Lymphatics supplying highly moving tissues, such as skeletal muscle, diaphragm or thoracic tissues, undergo cyclic compression and expansion of their lumen imposed by local stresses arising in the tissue as a consequence of cardiac and respiratory activities. Active muscle contraction and not passive tissue displacement is required to support an efficient lymphatic drainage, as suggested by the fact that the respiratory activity promotes lymph formation during spontaneous, but not mechanical ventilation. The mechanical properties of the lymphatic wall and of the surrounding tissue also play an important role in lymphatic function. Modelling of stress distribution in the lymphatic wall suggests that compliant vessels behave as reservoirs accommodating absorbed interstitial fluid, while lymphatics with stiffer walls, taking advantage of a more efficient transmission of tissue stresses to the lymphatic lumen, propel fluid through the lumen of the lymphatic circuit.

  10. Lymphatics, Cancer and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Many solid tumors are known to metastasize through the lymphatic vasculature. This process is facilitated by the generation of new lymphatic vessels (tumor lymphangiogenesis) and also by the remodelling of existing lymphatics. Together these processes enable the spread of tumor cells to distant sites. Currently our understanding of tumor lymphangiogenesis has been informed from mouse tumor models and from studies of developmental lymphangiogenesis. Since the discovery of bona fide lymphatic vessels in zebrafish in 2006, zebrafish have become a well-established model of developmental lymphangiogenesis. The attributes that make zebrafish such an important model of blood vessel development-the ability to live image developing vessels, genetic tractability and the conserved nature of development-also make fish an attractive model of lymphatic vessel development. In particular, zebrafish have made important contributions to our understanding of the processes of lymphatic vessel sprouting from veins and the mechanisms by which lymphatic precursors remodel into mature vessels. To date, zebrafish have not been used to directly model tumor lymphangiogenesis. In this chapter we will summarise the contributions zebrafish have made to our understanding of lymphangiogenesis and investigate the possibilities of combining zebrafish transgenic cancer lines or tumor transplantation models with existing lymphatic reporter lines, which could provide valuable insights into the process of tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. In addition the utility of using the zebrafish lymphatic model as a platform to screen and develop novel anti-lymphatic therapeutics will also be discussed.

  11. Lymphatics, Cancer and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Many solid tumors are known to metastasize through the lymphatic vasculature. This process is facilitated by the generation of new lymphatic vessels (tumor lymphangiogenesis) and also by the remodelling of existing lymphatics. Together these processes enable the spread of tumor cells to distant sites. Currently our understanding of tumor lymphangiogenesis has been informed from mouse tumor models and from studies of developmental lymphangiogenesis. Since the discovery of bona fide lymphatic vessels in zebrafish in 2006, zebrafish have become a well-established model of developmental lymphangiogenesis. The attributes that make zebrafish such an important model of blood vessel development-the ability to live image developing vessels, genetic tractability and the conserved nature of development-also make fish an attractive model of lymphatic vessel development. In particular, zebrafish have made important contributions to our understanding of the processes of lymphatic vessel sprouting from veins and the mechanisms by which lymphatic precursors remodel into mature vessels. To date, zebrafish have not been used to directly model tumor lymphangiogenesis. In this chapter we will summarise the contributions zebrafish have made to our understanding of lymphangiogenesis and investigate the possibilities of combining zebrafish transgenic cancer lines or tumor transplantation models with existing lymphatic reporter lines, which could provide valuable insights into the process of tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. In addition the utility of using the zebrafish lymphatic model as a platform to screen and develop novel anti-lymphatic therapeutics will also be discussed. PMID:27165355

  12. Local shape similarity and mean-shift curvature for deformable surface mapping of anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, Pietro; Manzotti, Alfonso; Vanzulli, Angelo; Baroni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a novel method for deformable registration of digital anatomical surfaces. The method capitalizes upon the iterative local affine iterative closest point (ICP) approach that applies an affine transformation per surface vertex along with a regularization constraint to force neighboring surface vertices to undergo similar transformations. More robust vertex correspondence with respect to simple closest point was obtained by exploiting local shape similarity metrics, which includes vertex distance, surface normal, and local curvature. The local curvature was mean shifted at run-time, during the iterative optimization, to make the point correspondence process less dependent upon the surface noise and resolution. The experimental validation was performed on three surface datasets (femur, hemi-pelvic bone, and liver). The registration results showed that the proposed method outperforms, across all the three surface datasets (rmse: 0.19 mm, 0.30 mm, 0.61 mm), global affine ICP (rmse: 2.89 mm, 3.95 mm, and 8.30 mm), local affine ICP (rmse: 0.31 mm, 1.61 mm, and 1.63 mm) and coherent point drift (rmse: 1.99 mm, 2.39 mm, and 4.78 mm) methods. As a whole, the mean-shifted curvature increased the registration accuracy by about 20%. PMID:23912461

  13. Adaptive algorithms to map how brain trauma affects anatomical connectivity in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Emily L.; Prasad, Gautam; Babikian, Talin; Kernan, Claudia; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-12-01

    Deficits in white matter (WM) integrity occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI), and often persist long after the visible scars have healed. Heterogeneity in injury types and locations can complicate analyses, making it harder to discover common biomarkers for tracking recovery. Here we apply a newly developed adaptive connectivity method, EPIC (evolving partitions to improve connectomics) to identify differences in structural connectivity that persist longitudinally. This data comes from a longitudinal study, in which we scanned participants (aged 8-19 years) with anatomical and diffusion MRI in both the post-acute and chronic phases (1-6 months and 13-19 months post-injury). To identify patterns of abnormal connectivity, we trained a model on data from 32 TBI patients in the post-acute phase and 45 well-matched healthy controls, reducing an initial 68x68 connectivity matrix to a 14x14 matrix. We then applied this reduced parcellation to the chronic data in participants who had returned for their chronic assessment (21 TBI and 26 healthy controls) and tested for group differences. We found significant differences in two connections, comprising callosal fibers and long anterior-posterior fibers, with the TBI group showing increased fiber density relative to controls. Longitudinal analysis revealed that these were connections that were decreasing over time in the healthy controls, as is a common developmental phenomenon, but they were increasing in the TBI group. While we cannot definitively tell why this may occur with our current data, this study provides targets for longitudinal tracking, and poses questions for future investigation.

  14. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Aaron A.; Clark, Benjamin J.; Demecha, Alexis J.; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas. PMID:25601828

  15. Anatomically-adapted graph wavelets for improved group-level fMRI activation mapping.

    PubMed

    Behjat, Hamid; Leonardi, Nora; Sörnmo, Leif; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    A graph based framework for fMRI brain activation mapping is presented. The approach exploits the spectral graph wavelet transform (SGWT) for the purpose of defining an advanced multi-resolutional spatial transformation for fMRI data. The framework extends wavelet based SPM (WSPM), which is an alternative to the conventional approach of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), and is developed specifically for group-level analysis. We present a novel procedure for constructing brain graphs, with subgraphs that separately encode the structural connectivity of the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter (GM), and address the inter-subject GM variability by the use of template GM representations. Graph wavelets tailored to the convoluted boundaries of GM are then constructed as a means to implement a GM-based spatial transformation on fMRI data. The proposed approach is evaluated using real as well as semi-synthetic multi-subject data. Compared to SPM and WSPM using classical wavelets, the proposed approach shows superior type-I error control. The results on real data suggest a higher detection sensitivity as well as the capability to capture subtle, connected patterns of brain activity.

  16. Mechanobiology of lymphatic contractions.

    PubMed

    Munn, Lance L

    2015-02-01

    The lymphatic system is responsible for controlling tissue fluid pressure by facilitating flow of lymph (i.e. the plasma and cells that enter the lymphatic system). Because lymph contains cells of the immune system, its transport is not only important for fluid homeostasis, but also immune function. Lymph drainage can occur via passive flow or active pumping, and much research has identified the key biochemical and mechanical factors that affect output. Although many studies and reviews have addressed how tissue properties and fluid mechanics (i.e. pressure gradients) affect lymph transport [1-3] there is less known about lymphatic mechanobiology. As opposed to passive mechanical properties, mechanobiology describes the active coupling of mechanical signals and biochemical pathways. Lymphatic vasomotion is the result of a fascinating system affected by mechanical forces exerted by the flowing lymph, including pressure-induced vessel stretch and flow-induced shear stresses. These forces can trigger or modulate biochemical pathways important for controlling the lymphatic contractions. Here, I review the current understanding of lymphatic vessel function, focusing on vessel mechanobiology, and summarize the prospects for a comprehensive understanding that integrates the mechanical and biomechanical control mechanisms in the lymphatic system.

  17. Autoradiographic quantitation and anatomical mapping of 125I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Melander, T; Köhler, C; Nilsson, S; Hökfelt, T; Brodin, E; Theodorsson, E; Bartfai, T

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of 125I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system was studied by the use of autoradiography, and the amount of peptide bound was determined by the use of microdensitometry. The amount of 125I-galanin bound in various CNS regions ranged from non detectable to 0.40 pmol per gramme tissue at a concentration of 1.5 nM 125I-galanin. The anatomical mapping revealed high density of binding sites in the telencephalon, where labelling was seen in the entorhinal, perirhinal and piriform cortices, in most septal nuclei, in the amygdala and in the hippocampal formation. In the diencephalon binding sites were densely accumulated in the hypothalamus, including the median eminence and periventricular nucleus as well as in the dorsal and medial thalamic nuclei. In the mesencephalon binding sites were seen in many nuclei including the dorsal raphe nucleus, the periaqueductal central grey and pars compacta of the substantia nigra. The pons/medulla revealed high density of binding sites in the locus coeruleus, parabrachial nuclei and in the dorsal vagal complex, while binding in the spinal cord was seen in laminae I, II and X as well as in the intermediolateral horn. The distribution of 125I-galanin binding sites corresponded well to the localization of the peptide as revealed in several earlier immunohistochemical and radioimmunoassay studies, as well as to several previously reported effects of galanin on central autonomic functions.

  18. Lymphatics and the breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... is often referred to as the body's "secondary circulatory system." The lymphatic system collects excess fluid in ... the exchange of fluid and molecules between the blood circulation and body tissues, blood capillaries may not reabsorb ...

  19. Edge Density Imaging: Mapping the Anatomic Embedding of the Structural Connectome Within the White Matter of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Julia P.; Chang, Yi-Shin; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    The structural connectome has emerged as a powerful tool to characterize the network architecture of the human brain and shows great potential for generating important new biomarkers for neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The edges of the cerebral graph traverse white matter to interconnect cortical and subcortical nodes, although the anatomic embedding of these edges is generally overlooked in the literature. Mapping the paths of the connectome edges could elucidate the relative importance of individual white matter tracts to the overall network topology of the brain and also lead to a better understanding of the effect of regionally-specific white matter pathology on cognition and behavior. In this work, we introduce edge density imaging (EDI), which maps the number of network edges that pass through every white matter voxel. Test-retest analysis shows good to excellent reliability for edge density (ED) measurements, with consistent results using different cortical and subcortical parcellation schemes and different diffusion MR imaging acquisition parameters. We also demonstrate that ED yields complementary information to both traditional and emerging voxel-wise metrics of white matter microstructure and connectivity, including fractional anisotropy, track density, fiber orientation dispersion and neurite density. Our results demonstrate spatially ordered variations of ED throughout the white matter, notably including greater ED in posterior than anterior cerebral white matter. The EDI framework is employed to map the white matter regions that are enriched with pathways connecting rich club nodes and also those with high densities of intra-modular and inter-modular edges. We show that periventricular white matter has particularly high ED and high densities of rich club edges, which is significant for diseases in which these areas are selectively affected, ranging from white matter injury of prematurity in infants to leukoaraiosis in the elderly. Using edge

  20. PAVA: physiological and anatomical visual analytics for mapping of tissue-specific concentration and time-course data.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; Transue, Thomas R; Chang, Daniel T; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Breen, Michael S; Dary, Curtis C

    2010-06-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics tool (PAVA), a web browser-based application, used to visualize experimental/simulated chemical time-course data (dosimetry), epidemiological data and Physiologically-Annotated Data (PAD). Using continuous color mapping scheme both spatial (organ shape and location) and temporal (time-course/kinetics) data was cast onto an abstract, layered, 2D visual representation of the human anatomy and physiology. This approach is aligned with the compartment-level of detail afforded by Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of chemical disposition. In this tutorial we provide several illustrative examples of how PAVA may be applied: (1) visualization of multiple organ/tissue simulated dosimetry of a previously published oral exposure route ethanol PBPK model, (2) visualization of PAD such as organ-specific disease time-lines or (3) tissue-specific mRNA expression-level profiles (e.g. phase I/II metabolic enzymes and nuclear receptors) to draw much needed molecular biological conclusions at organ-level resolution conducive to model development. Furthermore, discussion is raised on how graphical representations of PBPK models, and the use of PAVA more generally to visualize PAD, can be of benefit. We believe this novel platform-independent tool for visualizing PAD on physiologically-relevant representations of human anatomy will become a valuable visual analytic addition to the tool-kits of modern exposure scientists, computational biologists, toxicologists, biochemists, molecular biologists, epidemiologists and pathologists alike in visually translating, representing and mining complex PAD relationships required to understand systems biology or manage chemical risk.

  1. PAVA: Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics for Mapping of Tissue-Specific Concentration and Time-Course Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe the development and implementation of a Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics tool (PAVA), a web browser-based application, used to visualize experimental/simulated chemical time-course data (dosimetry), epidemiological data and Physiologically-Annotated Data ...

  2. Mechanical forces and lymphatic transport.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-11-01

    This review examines the current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect the pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. An improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema. PMID:25107458

  3. Mechanical Forces and Lymphatic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including: evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema. PMID:25107458

  4. Mechanical forces and lymphatic transport.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-11-01

    This review examines the current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect the pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. An improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema.

  5. [Medical treatment of lymphatic filariasis].

    PubMed

    Hovette, P; Laroche, R; Verrot, D; Molinier, S; Touze, J E

    1991-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis remains in 1991 a major health problem. Ivermectine revolutionizes their treatment and, by suppressing microfilaremia, provides a new method of helping to control the vector-borne transmission of lymphatic filariasis. PMID:2072855

  6. First report of image integration of cine-angiography with 3D electro-anatomical mapping of the right ventricle in postoperative tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Russo, Mario Salvatore; Righi, Daniela; Di Mambro, Corrado; Ruoppolo, Valentina; Silvetti, Massimo Stefano; Drago, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia and, more rarely, sudden cardiac death are potential complications affecting the long-term outcome after Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) repair. Intraventricular septal scar, fibro-fatty substitution around infundibular resection and patchy myocardial fibrosis may provide anatomical substrates of abnormal depolarization and repolarization causing reentrant ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping (3D EAM) has allowed to investigate the electro-anatomical status of the right ventricle. Radiation exposure during cardiac electrophysiological procedures is still a major concern. We report the first case of 3D mapping of the right ventricle in a postoperative ToF patient performed with a new module of the CARTO® 3 System-the CARTOUnivu™ Module-that combines, simultaneously, fluoroscopic images or cine-angiographic sequences with 3D cardiac mapping to allow real-time visualization of the electrocatheter during the 3D EAM reconstruction. The same volume, previously evaluated with cardiac MRI, was mapped. A perfect match of the diastolic edges of the RV obtained either by cine-loop acquisition during contrast fluoroscopy and by the 3D EAM, was observed. The fluoroscopy time for 3D EAM was 10 s. In conclusion, CARTOUnivu™ Module can integrate, in real time, fluoroscopic images/cine-angiography in virtual biplane view and the 3D EAM allowing a contextual visualization of position and movement of all electrocatheters. This can further increase the accuracy of the 3D EAM in very complex-operated congenital heart diseases, even decreasing radiation exposure.

  7. The surgical anatomy of the lymphatic system of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Malefant, Jason; Patel, Swetal D; Du Plessis, Maira; Renna, Sarah; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-05-01

    The lymphatic system of the pancreas is a complex, intricate network of lymphatic vessels and nodes responsible for the drainage of the head, neck, body, and tail of the pancreas. Its anatomical divisions and embryological development have been well described in the literature with emphasis on its clinical relevance in regards to pancreatic pathologies. A thorough knowledge and understanding of the lymphatic system surrounding the pancreas is critical for physicians in providing diagnostic and treatment strategies for patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a surgeon may try to predict the routes for metastasis for pancreatic cancer, the complexity of this system presents difficulty due to variable drainage patterns. Pancreatitis also presents as another severe disease which has been shown to have an association with the lymphatics. The aim of this article is to review the literature on the lymphatics of the pancreas, pancreatic pathologies, and the available imaging methodologies used to study the pancreatic lymphatics.

  8. West Nile Virus Spreads Transsynaptically within the Pathways of Motor Control: Anatomical and Ultrastructural Mapping of Neuronal Virus Infection in the Primate Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Maximova, Olga A.; Bernbaum, John G.; Pletnev, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background During recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in the US, half of the reported cases were classified as neuroinvasive disease. WNV neuroinvasion is proposed to follow two major routes: hematogenous and/or axonal transport along the peripheral nerves. How virus spreads once within the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of viral antigens in the CNS of rhesus monkeys that were intrathalamically inoculated with a wild-type WNV. The localization of WNV within the CNS was mapped to specific neuronal groups and anatomical structures. The neurological functions related to structures containing WNV-labeled neurons were reviewed and summarized. Intraneuronal localization of WNV was investigated by electron microscopy. The known anatomical connectivity of WNV-labeled neurons was used to reconstruct the directionality of WNV spread within the CNS using a connectogram design. Anatomical mapping revealed that all structures identified as containing WNV-labeled neurons belonged to the pathways of motor control. Ultrastructurally, virions were found predominantly within vesicular structures (including autophagosomes) in close vicinity to the axodendritic synapses, either at pre- or post-synaptic positions (axonal terminals and dendritic spines, respectively), strongly indicating transsynaptic spread of the virus between connected neurons. Neuronal connectivity-based reconstruction of the directionality of transsynaptic virus spread suggests that, within the CNS, WNV can utilize both anterograde and retrograde axonal transport to infect connected neurons. Conclusions/Significance This study offers a new insight into the neuropathogenesis of WNV infection in a primate model that closely mimics WNV encephalomyelitis in humans. We show that within the primate CNS, WNV primarily infects the anatomical structures and pathways responsible for the control of movement. Our findings

  9. Shared and distinct anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency revealed by lesion-symptom mapping in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Biessels, Geert Jan; Postma, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Semantic and phonemic fluency tasks are frequently used to test executive functioning, speed and attention, and access to the mental lexicon. In semantic fluency tasks, subjects are required to generate words belonging to a category (e.g., animals) within a limited time window, whereas in phonemic fluency tasks subjects have to generate words starting with a given letter. Anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency are currently assumed to overlap in left frontal structures, reflecting shared executive processes, and to be distinct in left temporal and right frontal structures, reflecting involvement of distinct memory processes and search strategies. Definite evidence for this assumption is lacking. To further establish the anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency, we applied assumption-free voxel-based and region-of-interest-based lesion-symptom mapping in 93 patients with ischemic stroke. Fluency was assessed by asking patients to name animals (semantic), and words starting with the letter N and A (phonemic). Our findings indicate that anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency overlap in the left inferior frontal gyrus and insula, reflecting shared underlying cognitive processes. Phonemic fluency additionally draws on the left rolandic operculum, which might reflect a search through phonological memory, and the middle frontal gyrus. Semantic fluency additionally draws on left medial temporal regions, probably reflecting a search through semantic memory, and the right inferior frontal gyrus, which might reflect the application of a visuospatial mental imagery strategy in semantic fluency. These findings establish shared and distinct anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency.

  10. The lymphatic vasculature in disease.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Kari

    2011-11-07

    Blood vessels form a closed circulatory system, whereas lymphatic vessels form a one-way conduit for tissue fluid and leukocytes. In most vertebrates, the main function of lymphatic vessels is to collect excess protein-rich fluid that has extravasated from blood vessels and transport it back into the blood circulation. Lymphatic vessels have an important immune surveillance function, as they import various antigens and activated antigen-presenting cells into the lymph nodes and export immune effector cells and humoral response factors into the blood circulation. Defects in lymphatic function can lead to lymph accumulation in tissues, dampened immune responses, connective tissue and fat accumulation, and tissue swelling known as lymphedema. This review highlights the most recent developments in lymphatic biology and how the lymphatic system contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases involving immune and inflammatory responses and its role in disseminating tumor cells.

  11. Nonmalignant Adult Thoracic Lymphatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Maxim; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    The thoracic lymphatic disorders are a heterogeneous group of uncommon conditions that are associated with thoracic masses, interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and chylous complications. Accurate diagnosis of the thoracic lymphatic disorders has important implications for the newest approaches to management, including embolization and treatment with antilymphangiogenic drugs. New imaging techniques to characterize lymphatic flow, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiogram, are redefining approaches to disease classification and therapy. PMID:27514588

  12. Atrial fibrillation driven by micro-anatomic intramural re-entry revealed by simultaneous sub-epicardial and sub-endocardial optical mapping in explanted human hearts

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Brian J.; Zhao, Jichao; Csepe, Thomas A.; Moore, Brandon T.; Li, Ning; Jayne, Laura A.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lim, Praise; Bratasz, Anna; Powell, Kimerly A.; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Higgins, Robert S.D.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Weiss, Raul; Hummel, John D.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The complex architecture of the human atria may create physical substrates for sustained re-entry to drive atrial fibrillation (AF). The existence of sustained, anatomically defined AF drivers in humans has been challenged partly due to the lack of simultaneous endocardial–epicardial (Endo–Epi) mapping coupled with high-resolution 3D structural imaging. Methods and results Coronary-perfused human right atria from explanted diseased hearts (n = 8, 43–72 years old) were optically mapped simultaneously by three high-resolution CMOS cameras (two aligned Endo–Epi views (330 µm2 resolution) and one panoramic view). 3D gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GE-MRI, 80 µm3 resolution) revealed the atrial wall structure varied in thickness (1.0 ± 0.7–6.8 ± 2.4 mm), transmural fiber angle differences, and interstitial fibrosis causing transmural activation delay from 23 ± 11 to 43 ± 22 ms at increased pacing rates. Sustained AF (>90 min) was induced by burst pacing during pinacidil (30–100 µM) perfusion. Dual-sided sub-Endo–sub-Epi optical mapping revealed that AF was driven by spatially and temporally stable intramural re-entry with 107 ± 50 ms cycle length and transmural activation delay of 67 ± 31 ms. Intramural re-entrant drivers were captured primarily by sub-Endo mapping, while sub-Epi mapping visualized re-entry or ‘breakthrough’ patterns. Re-entrant drivers were anchored on 3D micro-anatomic tracks (15.4 ± 2.2 × 6.0 ± 2.3 mm2, 2.9 ± 0.9 mm depth) formed by atrial musculature characterized by increased transmural fiber angle differences and interstitial fibrosis. Targeted radiofrequency ablation of the tracks verified these re-entries as drivers of AF. Conclusions Integrated 3D structural–functional mapping of diseased human right atria ex vivo revealed that the complex atrial microstructure caused significant differences between Endo vs. Epi activation during pacing and sustained AF driven by intramural re-entry anchored

  13. Cutaneous lymphatic sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; Kurien, T; Jacob, M; Koshi, G

    1994-01-01

    The first case of cutaneous lymphatic sporotrichosis from Nagaland and a case of cutaneous sporotrichosis from Kerala who had acquired infection from Assam are reported. The diagnosis in both cases were established by isolating Sporothrix schenckii from multiple cutaneous lesions. The dimorphic nature of fungus was established in vitro by demonstrating the mycelial phase at 25-30 degrees C and yeast phase at 37 degrees C and pathogenicity to white mice. Both the patients were successfully treated with oral administration of potassium iodide for 3 months. PMID:8088907

  14. Lymphatic System in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Robciuc, Marius R; Karaman, Sinem; Makinen, Taija; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian circulatory system comprises both the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system. In contrast to the blood vascular circulation, the lymphatic system forms a unidirectional transit pathway from the extracellular space to the venous system. It actively regulates tissue fluid homeostasis, absorption of gastrointestinal lipids, and trafficking of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes to lymphoid organs and on to the systemic circulation. The cardinal manifestation of lymphatic malfunction is lymphedema. Recent research has implicated the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including obesity and metabolic disease, dyslipidemia, inflammation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and myocardial infarction. Here, we review the most recent advances in the field of lymphatic vascular biology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease.

  15. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Babu, S; Nutman, T B

    2014-08-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen-specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4(+) T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4(+) T-cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general.

  16. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4+ T cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T cell hypo-responsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general. PMID:24134686

  17. In vivo albumin labeling and lymphatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Lang, Lixin; Huang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Ali, Iqbal U; Teng, Gaojun; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately and easily locate sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) with noninvasive imaging methods would assist in tumor staging and patient management. For this purpose, we developed a lymphatic imaging agent by mixing fluorine-18 aluminum fluoride-labeled NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid)-conjugated truncated Evans blue ((18)F-AlF-NEB) and Evans blue (EB) dye. After local injection, both (18)F-AlF-NEB and EB form complexes with endogenous albumin in the interstitial fluid and allow for visualizing the lymphatic system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and/or optical imaging of LNs was performed in three different animal models including a hind limb inflammation model, an orthotropic breast cancer model, and a metastatic breast cancer model. In all three models, the LNs can be distinguished clearly by the apparent blue color and strong fluorescence signal from EB as well as a high-intensity PET signal from (18)F-AlF-NEB. The lymphatic vessels between the LNs can also be optically visualized. The easy preparation, excellent PET and optical imaging quality, and biosafety suggest that this combination of (18)F-AlF-NEB and EB has great potential for clinical application to map sentinel LNs and provide intraoperative guidance. PMID:25535368

  18. In vivo albumin labeling and lymphatic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Lang, Lixin; Huang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ali, Iqbal U.; Teng, Gaojun; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately and easily locate sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) with noninvasive imaging methods would assist in tumor staging and patient management. For this purpose, we developed a lymphatic imaging agent by mixing fluorine-18 aluminum fluoride-labeled NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid)-conjugated truncated Evans blue (18F-AlF-NEB) and Evans blue (EB) dye. After local injection, both 18F-AlF-NEB and EB form complexes with endogenous albumin in the interstitial fluid and allow for visualizing the lymphatic system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and/or optical imaging of LNs was performed in three different animal models including a hind limb inflammation model, an orthotropic breast cancer model, and a metastatic breast cancer model. In all three models, the LNs can be distinguished clearly by the apparent blue color and strong fluorescence signal from EB as well as a high-intensity PET signal from 18F-AlF-NEB. The lymphatic vessels between the LNs can also be optically visualized. The easy preparation, excellent PET and optical imaging quality, and biosafety suggest that this combination of 18F-AlF-NEB and EB has great potential for clinical application to map sentinel LNs and provide intraoperative guidance. PMID:25535368

  19. Anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tröbs, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Wilms tumor surgery requires meticulous planning and sophisticated surgical technique. Detailed anatomical knowledge can facilitate the uneventful performance of tumor nephrectomy and cannot be replaced by advanced and sophisticated imaging techniques. We can define two main goals for surgery: (1) exact staging as well as (2) safe and complete resection of tumor without spillage. This review aims to review the anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery. It focuses on the surgical anatomy of retroperitoneal space, aorta, vena cava and their large branches with lymphatics. Types and management of vascular injuries are discussed. PMID:20671845

  20. Newborn intraabdominal cystic lymphatic malformations.

    PubMed

    Lin, J I; Fisher, J; Caty, M G

    2000-08-01

    Cystic lymphatic malformations are rare causes of abdominal masses in the newborn. Also known as mesenteric, omental, or retroperitoneal cysts, they can present in a variety of ways including, intestinal obstruction, volvulus, nonspecific abdominal pain, intracystic hemorrhage, or as an asymptomatic abdominal mass. Abdominal ultrasound scan provides a definitive diagnosis in most suspected cases. Complete resection is possible in most patients except those with extensive retroperitoneal involvement. Recurrence is unusual when complete resection is accomplished. Because most case series with complete data suggest that these entities are lymphatic malformations, the authors suggest the more specific term, cystic lymphatic malformations, be used to describe these lesions.

  1. Successful migration of three tracers without identification of sentinel nodes during intraoperative lymphatic mapping for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Antoine; Cheng, Cai; Antonescu, Christian; Pezzetta, Edgardo; Bischof-Delaloye, Angelika; Ris, Hans-Beat

    2007-04-01

    Prospective comparative evaluation of patent V blue, fluorescein and (99m)TC-nanocolloids for intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping during surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ten patients with peripherally localised clinical stage I NSCLC underwent thoracotomy and peritumoral subpleural injection of 2 ml of patent V blue dye, 1 ml of 10% fluorescein and 1ml of (99m)Tc-nanocolloids (0.4 mCi). The migration and spatial distribution pattern of the tracers was assessed by direct visualisation (patent V blue), visualisation of fluorescence signalling by a lamp of Wood (fluorescein) and radioactivity counting with a hand held gamma-probe ((99m)Tc-nanocolloids). Lymph nodes at interlobar (ATS 11), hilar (ATS 10) and mediastinal (right ATS 2,4,7; left ATS 5,6,7) levels were systematically assessed every 10 min up to 60 min after injection, followed by lobectomy and formal lymph node dissection. Successful migration from the peritumoral area to the mediastinum was observed for all three tracers up to 60 min after injection. The interlobar lympho-fatty tissue (station ATS 11) revealed an early and preferential accumulation of all three tracers for all tumours assessed and irrespective of the tumour localisation. However, no preferential accumulation in one or two distinct lymph nodes was observed up to 60 min after injection for all three tracers assessed. Intraoperative SLN mapping revealed successful migration of the tracers from the site of peritumoral injection to the mediastinum, but in a diffuse pattern without preferential accumulation in sentinel lymph nodes.

  2. Successful migration of three tracers without identification of sentinel nodes during intraoperative lymphatic mapping for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Antoine; Cheng, Cai; Antonescu, Christian; Pezzetta, Edgardo; Bischof-Delaloye, Angelika; Ris, Hans-Beat

    2007-04-01

    Prospective comparative evaluation of patent V blue, fluorescein and (99m)TC-nanocolloids for intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping during surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ten patients with peripherally localised clinical stage I NSCLC underwent thoracotomy and peritumoral subpleural injection of 2 ml of patent V blue dye, 1 ml of 10% fluorescein and 1ml of (99m)Tc-nanocolloids (0.4 mCi). The migration and spatial distribution pattern of the tracers was assessed by direct visualisation (patent V blue), visualisation of fluorescence signalling by a lamp of Wood (fluorescein) and radioactivity counting with a hand held gamma-probe ((99m)Tc-nanocolloids). Lymph nodes at interlobar (ATS 11), hilar (ATS 10) and mediastinal (right ATS 2,4,7; left ATS 5,6,7) levels were systematically assessed every 10 min up to 60 min after injection, followed by lobectomy and formal lymph node dissection. Successful migration from the peritumoral area to the mediastinum was observed for all three tracers up to 60 min after injection. The interlobar lympho-fatty tissue (station ATS 11) revealed an early and preferential accumulation of all three tracers for all tumours assessed and irrespective of the tumour localisation. However, no preferential accumulation in one or two distinct lymph nodes was observed up to 60 min after injection for all three tracers assessed. Intraoperative SLN mapping revealed successful migration of the tracers from the site of peritumoral injection to the mediastinum, but in a diffuse pattern without preferential accumulation in sentinel lymph nodes. PMID:17669814

  3. Lymphatic Regulation of Cellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play vital roles in immune surveillance and immune regulation by conveying antigen loaded dendritic cells, memory T cells, macrophages and neutrophils from the peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes where they initiate as well as modify immune responses. Until relatively recently however, there was little understanding of how entry and migration through lymphatic vessels is organized or the specific molecular mechanisms that might be involved. Within the last decade, the situation has been transformed by an explosion of knowledge generated largely through the application of microscopic imaging, transgenic animals, specific markers and function blocking mAbs that is beginning to provide a rational conceptual framework. This article provides a critical review of the recent literature, highlighting seminal discoveries that have revealed the fascinating ultrastructure of leucocyte entry sites in lymphatic vessels, as well as generating controversies over the involvement of integrin adhesion, chemotactic and haptotactic mechanisms in DC entry under normal and inflamed conditions. It also discusses the major changes in lymphatic architecture that occur during inflammation and the different modes of leucocyte entry and trafficking within inflamed lymphatic vessels, as well as presenting a timely update on the likely role of hyaluronan and the major lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor LYVE-1 in leucocyte transit.

  4. Not one extrastriate body area: Using anatomical landmarks, hMT+, and visual field maps to parcellate limb-selective activations in human lateral occipitotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing view of human lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) organization suggests a single area selective for images of the human body (extrastriate body area, EBA) that highly overlaps with the human motion-selective complex (hMT+). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging with higher resolution (1.5mm voxels) than past studies (3–4mm voxels), we examined the fine-scale spatial organization of these activations relative to each other, as well as to visual field maps in LOTC. Rather than one contiguous EBA highly overlapping hMT+, results indicate three limb-selective activations organized in a crescent surrounding hMT+: (1) an activation posterior to hMT+ on the lateral occipital sulcus/middle occipital gyrus (LOS/MOG) overlapping the lower vertical meridian shared between visual field maps LO-2 and TO-1, (2) an activation anterior to hMT+ on the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) consistently overlapping the lower vertical meridian of TO-2 and extending outside presently defined visual field maps, and (3) an activation inferior to hMT+ on the inferotemporal gyrus (ITG) overlapping the parafoveal representation of the TO cluster. This crescent organization of limb-selective activations surrounding hMT+ is reproducible over a span of three years and is consistent across different image types used for localization. Further, these regions exhibit differential position properties: preference for contralateral image presentation decreases and preference for foveal presentation increases from the limb-selective LOS to the MTG. Finally, the relationship between limb-selective activations and visual field maps extends to the dorsal stream where a posterior IPS activation overlaps V7. Overall, our measurements demonstrate a series of LOTC limb-selective activations that 1) have separate anatomical and functional boundaries, 2) overlap distinct visual field maps, and 3) illustrate differential position properties. These findings indicate that category selectivity

  5. Lymphatic regulation in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    All vertebrate animals share in common the production of lymph through net capillary filtration from their closed circulatory system into their tissues. The balance of forces responsible for net capillary filtration and lymph formation is described by the Starling equation, but additional factors such as vascular and interstitial compliance, which vary markedly among vertebrates, also have a significant impact on rates of lymph formation. Why vertebrates show extreme variability in rates of lymph formation and how nonmammalian vertebrates maintain plasma volume homeostasis is unclear. This gap hampers our understanding of the evolution of the lymphatic system and its interaction with the cardiovascular system. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate lymphatic system is not clear, but recent advances suggest common developmental factors for lymphangiogenesis in teleost fishes, amphibians, and mammals with some significant changes in the water-land transition. The lymphatic system of anuran amphibians is characterized by large lymphatic sacs and two pairs of lymph hearts that return lymph into the venous circulation but no lymph vessels per se. The lymphatic systems of reptiles and some birds have lymph hearts, and both groups have extensive lymph vessels, but their functional role in both lymph movement and plasma volume homeostasis is almost completely unknown. The purpose of this review is to present an evolutionary perspective in how different vertebrates have solved the common problem of the inevitable formation of lymph from their closed circulatory systems and to point out the many gaps in our knowledge of this evolutionary progression.

  6. Lymphatic regulation in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    All vertebrate animals share in common the production of lymph through net capillary filtration from their closed circulatory system into their tissues. The balance of forces responsible for net capillary filtration and lymph formation is described by the Starling equation, but additional factors such as vascular and interstitial compliance, which vary markedly among vertebrates, also have a significant impact on rates of lymph formation. Why vertebrates show extreme variability in rates of lymph formation and how nonmammalian vertebrates maintain plasma volume homeostasis is unclear. This gap hampers our understanding of the evolution of the lymphatic system and its interaction with the cardiovascular system. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate lymphatic system is not clear, but recent advances suggest common developmental factors for lymphangiogenesis in teleost fishes, amphibians, and mammals with some significant changes in the water-land transition. The lymphatic system of anuran amphibians is characterized by large lymphatic sacs and two pairs of lymph hearts that return lymph into the venous circulation but no lymph vessels per se. The lymphatic systems of reptiles and some birds have lymph hearts, and both groups have extensive lymph vessels, but their functional role in both lymph movement and plasma volume homeostasis is almost completely unknown. The purpose of this review is to present an evolutionary perspective in how different vertebrates have solved the common problem of the inevitable formation of lymph from their closed circulatory systems and to point out the many gaps in our knowledge of this evolutionary progression. PMID:23640588

  7. Cross-Reactivity of Filariais ICT Cards in Areas of Contrasting Endemicity of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in Cameroon: Implications for Shrinking of the Lymphatic Filariasis Map in the Central African Region

    PubMed Central

    Wanji, Samuel; Koudou, Benjamin; Chounna Ndongmo, Patrick W.; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Datchoua-Poutcheu, Fabrice R.; Fovennso, Bridget Adzemye; Tayong, Dizzle Bita; Fombad, Fanny Fri; Fischer, Peter U.; Enyong, Peter I.; Bockarie, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunochromatographic card test (ICT) is a tool to map the distribution of Wuchereria bancrofti. In areas highly endemic for loaisis in DRC and Cameroon, a relationship has been envisaged between high L. loa microfilaria (Mf) loads and ICT positivity. However, similar associations have not been demonstrated from other areas with contrasting levels of L. loa endemicity. This study investigated the cross-reactivity of ICT when mapping lymphatic filariasis (LF) in areas with contrasting endemicity levels of loiasis and mansonellosis in Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence and intensity of W. bancrofti, L. loa and M. perstans was carried out in 42 villages across three regions (East, North-west and South-west) of the Cameroon rainforest domain. Diurnal blood was collected from participants for the detection of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) by ICT and assessment of Mf using a thick blood smear. Clinical manifestations of LF were also assessed. ICT positives and patients clinically diagnosed with lymphoedema were further subjected to night blood collection for the detection of W. bancrofti Mf. Overall, 2190 individuals took part in the study. Overall, 24 individuals residing in 14 communities were tested positive by ICT, with prevalence rates ranging from 0% in the South-west to 2.1% in the North-west. Lymphoedema were diagnosed in 20 individuals with the majority of cases found in the North-west (11/20), and none of them were tested positive by ICT. No Mf of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with a positive ICT result or clinical lymphoedema. Positive ICT results were strongly associated with high L. loa Mf intensity with 21 subjects having more than 8,000 L. loa Mf ml/blood (Odds ratio = 15.4; 95%CI: 6.1–39.0; p < 0.001). Similarly, a strong positive association (Spearman’s rho = 0.900; p = 0.037) was observed between the prevalence of L. loa and ICT positivity by area

  8. Fluid-solid modeling of lymphatic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulk, Alexander; Ballard, Matthew; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Dixon, Brandon; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system performs important physiological functions such as the return of interstitial fluid to the bloodstream to maintain tissue fluid balance, as well as the transport of immune cells in the body. It utilizes contractile lymphatic vessels, which contain valves that open and close to allow flow in only one direction, to directionally pump lymph against a pressure gradient. We develop a fluid-solid model of geometrically representative lymphatic valves. Our model uses a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann lattice spring method to capture fluid-solid interactions with two-way coupling between a viscous fluid and lymphatic valves in a lymphatic vessel. We use this model to investigate the opening and closing of lymphatic valves, and its effect on lymphatic pumping. This helps to broaden our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the lymphatic system.

  9. Pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwen; Huang, Yuhong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Yuanyi; Mahoud, Salma; Bakheet, Ahmed Musa Hago; Wang, Li; Zhou, Shuting; Tang, Jianwu

    2016-10-01

    Precondition for tumor lymphatic metastasis is that tumor cells induce formation of original and newborn lymphatic vessels and invade surrounding lymphatic vessels in tumor stroma, while some pathway-related molecules play an important role in mechanisms associated with proliferation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and tumor cells. In lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, the pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, such as Furin-like enzyme, CNTN1, Prox1, LYVE-1, Podoplanin, SOX18, SDF1 and CXCR4, are direct constitutors as a portion of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, and their biological activities rely on this ligand-receptor system. These axis-related signal molecules could gradually produce waterfall-like cascading effects, mediate differentiation and maturation of LECs, remodel original and neonatal lymphatic vessels, as well as ultimately promote tumor cell chemotaxis, migration, invasion and metastasis to lymphoid tracts. This review summarizes the structure and function features of pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, the expression changes of these molecules in different anatomic organs or histopathologic types or development stages of various tumors, the characteristics of transduction, implementation, integration of signal networks, the interactive effects on biological behaviors between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells, and their molecular mechanisms and significances in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis.

  10. Pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwen; Huang, Yuhong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Yuanyi; Mahoud, Salma; Bakheet, Ahmed Musa Hago; Wang, Li; Zhou, Shuting; Tang, Jianwu

    2016-10-01

    Precondition for tumor lymphatic metastasis is that tumor cells induce formation of original and newborn lymphatic vessels and invade surrounding lymphatic vessels in tumor stroma, while some pathway-related molecules play an important role in mechanisms associated with proliferation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and tumor cells. In lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, the pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, such as Furin-like enzyme, CNTN1, Prox1, LYVE-1, Podoplanin, SOX18, SDF1 and CXCR4, are direct constitutors as a portion of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, and their biological activities rely on this ligand-receptor system. These axis-related signal molecules could gradually produce waterfall-like cascading effects, mediate differentiation and maturation of LECs, remodel original and neonatal lymphatic vessels, as well as ultimately promote tumor cell chemotaxis, migration, invasion and metastasis to lymphoid tracts. This review summarizes the structure and function features of pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, the expression changes of these molecules in different anatomic organs or histopathologic types or development stages of various tumors, the characteristics of transduction, implementation, integration of signal networks, the interactive effects on biological behaviors between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells, and their molecular mechanisms and significances in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. PMID:27527412

  11. Impaired lymphatic contraction associated with immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; Cheng, Gang; Conner, David A; Huang, Yuhui; Kucherlapati, Raju S; Munn, Lance L; Ruddle, Nancy H; Jain, Rakesh K; Fukumura, Dai; Padera, Timothy P

    2011-11-15

    To trigger an effective immune response, antigen and antigen-presenting cells travel to the lymph nodes via collecting lymphatic vessels. However, our understanding of the regulation of collecting lymphatic vessel function and lymph transport is limited. To dissect the molecular control of lymphatic function, we developed a unique mouse model that allows intravital imaging of autonomous lymphatic vessel contraction. Using this method, we demonstrated that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in lymphatic endothelial cells is required for robust lymphatic contractions under physiological conditions. By contrast, under inflammatory conditions, inducible NOS (iNOS)-expressing CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells attenuate lymphatic contraction. This inhibition of lymphatic contraction was associated with a reduction in the response to antigen in a model of immune-induced multiple sclerosis. These results suggest the suppression of lymphatic function by the CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells as a potential mechanism of self-protection from autoreactive responses during on-going inflammation. The central role for nitric oxide also suggests that other diseases such as cancer and infection may also mediate lymphatic contraction and thus immune response. Our unique method allows the study of lymphatic function and its molecular regulation during inflammation, lymphedema, and lymphatic metastasis.

  12. Isolated epiglottic lymphatic malformation in a 2-year-old: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tate; Sheyn, Anthony; Lenes-Voit, Felicity; Berg, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Airway obstruction in children has a wide differential diagnosis that includes laryngomalacia, infectious processes, paralysis, extrinsic compression, and other rare anatomic anomalies. Isolated laryngeal lymphatic malformations are rare developments that can manifest with clinically significant airway obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, there have been fewer than 20 reported cases. These laryngeal mucosal lesions are best managed with radiofrequency ablation or laser ablation. We present a case of a 2-year-old child who presented with airway obstruction, initially diagnosed with laryngomalacia, who was subsequently diagnosed and treated for an isolated epiglottic lymphatic malformation. PMID:27657323

  13. Blood and lymphatic vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Bautch, Victoria L; Caron, Kathleen M

    2015-03-02

    Blood and lymphatic vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients, remove waste and CO2, and regulate interstitial pressure in tissues and organs. These vessels begin life early in embryogenesis using transcription factors and signaling pathways that regulate differentiation, morphogenesis, and proliferation. Here we describe how these vessels develop in the mouse embryo, and the signals that are important to their development.

  14. Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease.

    PubMed

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B

    2012-11-01

    Although two thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ~40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process-the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host's adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections). PMID:23053393

  15. Functional imaging in tumor-associated lymphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in cancer cell dissemination; however whether lymphatic drainage pathways and function change during tumor progression and metastasis remains to be elucidated. In this report, we employed a non-invasive, dynamic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique for functional lymphatic imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into tumor-free mice and mice bearing C6/LacZ rat glioma tumors in the tail or hindlimb. Our imaging data showed abnormal lymphatic drainage pathways and reduction/loss of lymphatic contractile function in mice with lymph node (LN) metastasis, indicating that cancer metastasis to the draining LNs is accompanied by transient changes of the lymphatic architectural network and its function. Therefore, functional lymphatic imaging may provide a role in the clinical staging of cancer.

  16. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  17. Multivalent Vaccine for Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Samykutty, Abhilash; Dakshinamoorthy, Gajalakshmi; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito borne parasitic infection that cause severe economic burden in several parts of the world. Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent this infection in human. Multidrug therapy is effective, however, requires annual treatment and there is significant concern of drug resistance. In this manuscript we describe development of a multivalent DNA based vaccine comprising BmALT-2 and BmHSP antigens of lymphatic filariasis. Challenge experiments using third stage infective larvae of Brugia malayi in a mouse model suggested that nearly 90% protection can be achieved using the multivalent formulation in a DNA prime protein boost approach. The vaccination regimen induced significant IgG antibody responses and ELISPOT analysis for secreted cytokines from the spleen cells of vaccinated animals showed that these cells produce significant amount of IL-4. Results from this study thus show that a multivalent vaccine formulation of BmALT-2 and BmHSP is an excellent vaccine for lymphatic filariasis and significant protection can be achieved against a challenge infection with B. malayi in a mouse model. PMID:21709765

  18. Multivalent Vaccine for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Samykutty, Abhilash; Dakshinamoorthy, Gajalakshmi; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito borne parasitic infection that cause severe economic burden in several parts of the world. Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent this infection in human. Multidrug therapy is effective, however, requires annual treatment and there is significant concern of drug resistance. In this manuscript we describe development of a multivalent DNA based vaccine comprising BmALT-2 and BmHSP antigens of lymphatic filariasis. Challenge experiments using third stage infective larvae of Brugia malayi in a mouse model suggested that nearly 90% protection can be achieved using the multivalent formulation in a DNA prime protein boost approach. The vaccination regimen induced significant IgG antibody responses and ELISPOT analysis for secreted cytokines from the spleen cells of vaccinated animals showed that these cells produce significant amount of IL-4. Results from this study thus show that a multivalent vaccine formulation of BmALT-2 and BmHSP is an excellent vaccine for lymphatic filariasis and significant protection can be achieved against a challenge infection with B. malayi in a mouse model.

  19. Phosphorylation of ERK/MAP Kinase Is Required for Long-Term Potentiation in Anatomically Restricted Regions of the Lateral Amygdala in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafe, Glenn E.; Swank, Michael W.; Rodriguez, Sarina M.; Debiec, Jacek; Doyere, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/ MAPK) is transiently activated in anatomically restricted regions of the lateral amygdala (LA) following Pavlovian fear conditioning and that blockade of ERK/MAPK activation in the LA impairs both fear memory consolidation and long-term…

  20. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  1. Acute neonatal presentation of a lymphatic malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chee Yan; Wijnen, M; Sambeeck van, S J; Halbertsma, F J J

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal lymphatic malformations usually present with a mass either at birth or in the first 2 years of life. Rarely, lymphatic malformations present with extremely progressive respiratory problems shortly after birth, and usually occur in cases which have remained undetected in the absence of antenatal ultrasound. We report the case of a newborn that required tracheostomy and gastrostomy due to a rapidly expansive lymphatic malformation. MRI showed multilocular microcystic lymphatic malformation. Intralesional bleomycin injections proved to be successful in this patient. A short review of epidemiology, clinical manifestation and treatment is given. PMID:23907961

  2. Organization and developmental aspects of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Osamu; Ohtani, Yuko

    2008-05-01

    The lymphatic system plays important roles in maintaining tissue fluid homeostasis, immune surveillance of the body, and the taking up dietary fat and fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. The lymphatic system is involved in many pathological conditions, including lymphedema, inflammatory diseases, and tumor dissemination. A clear understanding of the organization of the lymphatic vessels in normal conditions would be critically important to develop new treatments for diseases involving the lymphatic vascular system. Therefore, the present paper reviews the organization of the lymphatic vascular system of a variety of organs, including the thyroid gland, lung and pleura, small intestine, cecum and colon in the rat, the diaphragm in the rat, monkey, and human, Peyer's patches and the appendix in the rabbit, and human tonsils. Methods employed include scanning electron microscopy of lymphatic corrosion casts and tissues with or without treatment of alkali maceration technique, transmission electron microscopy of intact tissues, confocal microscopy in conjunction with immunohistochemistry to some lymphatic-specific markers (i.e., LYVE-1 and VEGFR-3), and light microscopy in conjunction with enzyme-histochemistry to 5'-nucleotidase. Some developmental aspects of the lymphatic vessels and lymphedema are also discussed.

  3. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  4. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alicia L; Kelley, Philip M; Tempero, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage-tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato-positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture-induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT(+) LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT(+) lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  5. [Morphogenesis, structure and properties of lymphatic vessels].

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Anna; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Flaht, Aleksandra; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota

    2012-11-19

    In this paper, we present literature results related to structure and various manners of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological events, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and other diseases. The functions of the lymphatic system include the collection of fluids that enter tissues from the circulation, absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the intestine and their subsequent transport, participation in antigen, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte migration. The lymphatic system is also a route for tumor cell and inflammatory cell transport. Native lymphatic capillaries differ from blood capillaries by having an irregular lumen, a discontinuous basement membrane, absence of pericytes, and a strong anchorage of their endothelial cells to the extracellular matrix via microfibrils built of emilin and fibrillin. Lymphatic endothelial cells express surface antigens such as Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR3 (Flk4) and transcription factor Prox-1, as well as molecules which are common for blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (CD31, CD34, Flk-1, Tie-1, Tie-2, neuropilin 2). Lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development starts with the occurrence of lymphatic sacs sprouting from systemic jugular veins and/or by co-option of lymphangioblasts or hematopoietic-derived cells. It can also proceed by dedifferentiation of venous endothelial cells after their detachment from the venous system, migration to the target places within the body and assembly in the lymphatic lumen. Mechanisms of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological conditions, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and metastasis, is regulated by a plethora of growth factors and molecules, among which the most important are VEGF-C, VEGF-D, HGF, FGF, retinoic acid, IL-3, and IL-7. Macrophages and cells bearing CD45 phenotype seem to take part in the formation of lymphatics. Macrophages might act as a source of growth

  6. Lymphovenous hemostasis and the role of platelets in regulating lymphatic flow and lymphatic vessel maturation.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John D; Kahn, Mark L; Sweet, Daniel T

    2016-09-01

    Aside from the established role for platelets in regulating hemostasis and thrombosis, recent research has revealed a discrete role for platelets in the separation of the blood and lymphatic vascular systems. Platelets are activated by interaction with lymphatic endothelial cells at the lymphovenous junction, the site in the body where the lymphatic system drains into the blood vascular system, resulting in a platelet plug that, with the lymphovenous valve, prevents blood from entering the lymphatic circulation. This process, known as "lymphovenous hemostasis," is mediated by activation of platelet CLEC-2 receptors by the transmembrane ligand podoplanin expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells. Lymphovenous hemostasis is required for normal lymph flow, and mice deficient in lymphovenous hemostasis exhibit lymphedema and sometimes chylothorax phenotypes indicative of lymphatic insufficiency. Unexpectedly, the loss of lymph flow in these mice causes defects in maturation of collecting lymphatic vessels and lymphatic valve formation, uncovering an important role for fluid flow in driving endothelial cell signaling during development of collecting lymphatics. This article summarizes the current understanding of lymphovenous hemostasis and its effect on lymphatic vessel maturation and synthesizes the outstanding questions in the field, with relationship to human disease. PMID:27385789

  7. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  8. Use of a PEG-conjugated bright near-infrared dye for functional imaging of rerouting of tumor lymphatic drainage after sentinel lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Steven T.; Luciani, Paola; Christiansen, Ailsa; Karaman, Sinem; Blum, Katrin S.; Rinderknecht, Matthias; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis promotes metastatic cancer spread to lymph nodes and beyond. However, the potential remodeling and functionality of tumor-draining lymphatic vessels has remained unclear. Thus, we aimed to develop non-invasive imaging methods for repeated quantitative imaging of lymphatic drainage and of contractile collecting lymphatic vessel function in mice, with colloidal near-infrared (NIR) tracers and a custom fluorescence stereomicroscope specially adapted for NIR sensitive imaging. Using these tools, we quantitatively determined pulse rates and valvular function of collecting lymphatic vessels with high resolution. Unexpectedly, we found that tumor-draining lymphatic vessels in a melanoma footpad model initially were dilated but remained functional, despite lower pulse rates. In two independent tumor models, impaired lymphatic function was detected once metastases were present in draining lymph nodes. Importantly, we found that lymphatic dysfunction, induced by metastatic tumor spread to sentinel lymph nodes, can lead to a rerouting of lymphatic flow away from the metastatic lymph node, via collateral lymphatic vessels, to alternate lymph nodes. These findings might have important clinical implications for the procedure of sentinel lymph node mapping that represents the standard of care for determining prognosis and treatment of melanoma and breast cancer patients. PMID:23566803

  9. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, Nicola N; Banerji, Suneale; Johnson, Louise A; Holder, Kayla A; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A C; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology.

  10. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Holder, Kayla A.; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A. C.; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology. PMID:26352587

  11. Experience in Aligning Anatomical Ontologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    An ontology is a formal representation of a domain modeling the entities in the domain and their relations. When a domain is represented by multiple ontologies, there is need for creating mappings among these ontologies in order to facilitate the integration of data annotated with these ontologies and reasoning across ontologies. The objective of this paper is to recapitulate our experience in aligning large anatomical ontologies and to reflect on some of the issues and challenges encountered along the way. The four anatomical ontologies under investigation are the Foundational Model of Anatomy, GALEN, the Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary and the NCI Thesaurus. Their underlying representation formalisms are all different. Our approach to aligning concepts (directly) is automatic, rule-based, and operates at the schema level, generating mostly point-to-point mappings. It uses a combination of domain-specific lexical techniques and structural and semantic techniques (to validate the mappings suggested lexically). It also takes advantage of domain-specific knowledge (lexical knowledge from external resources such as the Unified Medical Language System, as well as knowledge augmentation and inference techniques). In addition to point-to-point mapping of concepts, we present the alignment of relationships and the mapping of concepts group-to-group. We have also successfully tested an indirect alignment through a domain-specific reference ontology. We present an evaluation of our techniques, both against a gold standard established manually and against a generic schema matching system. The advantages and limitations of our approach are analyzed and discussed throughout the paper.

  12. Nitric oxide permits hypoxia-induced lymphatic perfusion by controlling arterial-lymphatic conduits in zebrafish and glass catfish

    PubMed Central

    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse; Cao, Renhai; Hedlund, Eva-Maria; Söll, Iris; Lundberg, Jon O.; Hauptmann, Giselbert; Steffensen, John Fleng; Cao, Yihai

    2009-01-01

    The blood and lymphatic vasculatures are structurally and functionally coupled in controlling tissue perfusion, extracellular interstitial fluids, and immune surveillance. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the regulation of bloodlymphatic vessel connections and lymphatic perfusion. Here we show in the adult zebrafish and glass catfish (Kryptopterus bicirrhis) that blood-lymphatic conduits directly connect arterial vessels to the lymphatic system. Under hypoxic conditions, arterial-lymphatic conduits (ALCs) became highly dilated and linearized by NO-induced vascular relaxation, which led to blood perfusion into the lymphatic system. NO blockage almost completely abrogated hypoxia-induced ALC relaxation and lymphatic perfusion. These findings uncover mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced oxygen compensation by perfusion of existing lymphatics in fish. Our results might also imply that the hypoxia-induced NO pathway contributes to development of progression of pathologies, including promotion of lymphatic metastasis by modulating arterial-lymphatic conduits, in the mammalian system. PMID:19822749

  13. Lymphatic Filariasis: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a parasitic disease caused by microscopic, thread-like worms. The adult worms only live in the human lymph system. The ... South America. You cannot get infected with the worms in the United States. How is lymphatic filariasis ...

  14. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lymphatics in head and neck lymphedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Maus, Erik A.; Rasmussen, John C.; Marshall, Milton V.; Fife, Caroline E.; Smith, Latisha A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of lymphatic disease is complicated and controversial, due in part to the limited understanding of the lymphatic system. Lymphedema (LE) is a frequent complication after surgical resection and radiation treatment in cancer survivors, and is especially debilitating in regions where treatment options are limited. Although some extremity LE can be effectively treated with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) therapy or compression devices to direct proximal lymph transport, head and neck LE is more challenging, due to complicated geometry and complex lymphatic structure in head and neck region. Herein, we describe the compassionate use of an investigatory technique of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging to understand the lymphatic anatomy and function, and to help direct MLD in a patient with head and neck LE. Immediately after 9 intradermal injections of 25 μg indocyanine green each around the face and neck region, NIR fluorescence images were collected using a custom-built imaging system with diffused excitation light illumination. These images were then used to direct MLD therapy. In addition, 3-dimensional (3D) surface profilometry was used to monitor response to therapy. NIR fluorescence images of functioning lymphatic vessels and abnormal structures were obtained. Precise geometries of facial structures were obtained using 3D profilometry, and detection of small changes in edema between therapy sessions was achieved. NIR fluorescence imaging provides a mapping of lymphatic architecture to direct MLD therapy and thus improve treatment efficacy in the head and neck LE, while 3D profilometry allowed longitudinal assessment of edema to evaluate the efficacy of therapy.

  15. CT demonstration of perirenal lymphatic cysts.

    PubMed

    De Maeyer, P; Baert, A L; Usewils, R; Wynants, P; De Pauw, A

    1982-01-01

    A case of perirenal lymphatic cysts demonstrated by computed tomography is reported. These lymphatic cysts, a histological subtype of lymphangiomata, are clearly visible as collections with clear fluid-type density surrounding both kidneys. The retroperitoneal localization of this rarity has been reported in the radiological literature, whereas, to our knowledge, the radiological demonstration of the perirenal localization has not. CT provides a unique method for direct radiological visualization of the cyst.

  16. TGF-β1-induced EMT promotes targeted migration of breast cancer cells through the lymphatic system by the activation of CCR7/CCL21-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Pang, M-F; Georgoudaki, A-M; Lambut, L; Johansson, J; Tabor, V; Hagikura, K; Jin, Y; Jansson, M; Alexander, J S; Nelson, C M; Jakobsson, L; Betsholtz, C; Sund, M; Karlsson, M C I; Fuxe, J

    2016-02-11

    Tumor cells frequently disseminate through the lymphatic system during metastatic spread of breast cancer and many other types of cancer. Yet it is not clear how tumor cells make their way into the lymphatic system and how they choose between lymphatic and blood vessels for migration. Here we report that mammary tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) become activated for targeted migration through the lymphatic system, similar to dendritic cells (DCs) during inflammation. EMT cells preferentially migrated toward lymphatic vessels compared with blood vessels, both in vivo and in 3D cultures. A mechanism of this targeted migration was traced to the capacity of TGF-β1 to promote CCR7/CCL21-mediated crosstalk between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. On one hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCR7 expression in EMT cells through p38 MAP kinase-mediated activation of the JunB transcription factor. Blockade of CCR7, or treatment with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, reduced lymphatic dissemination of EMT cells in syngeneic mice. On the other hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCL21 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. CCL21 acted in a paracrine fashion to mediate chemotactic migration of EMT cells toward lymphatic endothelial cells. The results identify TGF-β1-induced EMT as a mechanism, which activates tumor cells for targeted, DC-like migration through the lymphatic system. Furthermore, it suggests that p38 MAP kinase inhibition may be a useful strategy to inhibit EMT and lymphogenic spread of tumor cells.

  17. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  18. Platelets: Covert Regulators of Lymphatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Cara C.; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymphatic vessels during embryonic development. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Podoplanin, a transmembrane protein expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells, engages the platelet CLEC-2 receptor when exposed to blood, leading to SYK-SLP-76-dependent platelet activation. When components of this pathway are disrupted, aberrant vascular connections form, resulting in blood-lymphatic mixing. Furthermore, platelet-null embryos manifest identical blood-lymphatic mixing. The identification of platelets as the critical cell type mediating blood-lymphatic vascular separation raises new questions in our understanding of lymphatic development and platelet biology. PMID:21071706

  19. Connexins in lymphatic vessel physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Meens, Merlijn J; Sabine, Amélie; Petrova, Tatiana V; Kwak, Brenda R

    2014-04-17

    Connexins are transmembrane proteins that form gap junction- and hemi-channels. Once inserted into the membrane, hemi-channels (connexons) allow for diffusion of ions and small molecules (<1 kDa) between the extracellular space and the cytosol. Gap junction channels allow diffusion of similar molecules between the cytoplasms of adjacent cells. The expression and function of connexins in blood vessels has been intensely studied in the last few decades. In contrast, only a few studies paid attention to lymphatic vessels; convincing in vivo data with respect to expression patterns of lymphatic connexins and their functional roles have only recently begun to emerge. Interestingly, mutations in connexin genes have been linked to diseases of lymphatic vasculature, most notably primary and secondary lymphedema. This review summarizes the available data regarding lymphatic connexins. More specifically it addresses (i) early studies aimed at presence of gap junction-like structures in lymphatic vessels, (ii) more recent studies focusing on lymphatic connexins using genetically engineered mice, and (iii) results of clinical studies that have reported lymphedema-linked mutations in connexin genes.

  20. Label-free 3D imaging of microstructure, blood, and lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Jung, Yeongri; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-03-01

    This Letter reports the use of an ultrahigh resolution optical microangiography (OMAG) system for simultaneous 3D imaging of microstructure and lymphatic and blood vessels without the use of an exogenous contrast agent. An automatic algorithm is developed to segment the lymphatic vessels from the microstructural images based on the fact that the lymph fluid is optically transparent. An OMAG system is developed that utilizes a broadband supercontinuum light source, providing an axial resolution of 2.3 μm and lateral resolution of 5.8 μm, capable of resolving the capillary vasculature and lymphatic vessels innervating microcirculatory tissue beds. Experimental demonstration is performed by showing detailed 3D lymphatic and blood vessel maps, coupled with morphology, within mouse ears in vivo.

  1. Label-free 3D imaging of microstructure, blood and lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Jung, Yeongri; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports the use of an ultrahigh resolution optical microangiography (OMAG) system for simultaneous 3D imaging of microstructure, lymphatic and blood vessels without the use of exogenous contrast agent. An automatic algorithm is developed to segment the lymphatic vessels from the microstructural images, based on the fact that the lymph fluid is optically transparent. The OMAG system is developed that utilizes a broadband supercontinuum light source, providing an axial resolution of 2.3 μm and lateral resolution of 5.8 μm, capable of resolving the capillary vasculature and lymphatic vessels innervating microcirculatory tissue beds. Experimental demonstration is performed by showing detailed 3D lymphatic and blood vessel maps, coupled with morphology, within mouse ears in vivo. PMID:22378402

  2. Role of lymphatic vasculature in regional and distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Podgrabinska, Simona; Skobe, Mihaela

    2014-09-01

    In cancer, lymphatic vasculature has been traditionally viewed only as a transportation system for metastatic cells. It has now become clear that lymphatics perform many additional functions which could influence cancer progression. Lymphangiogenesis, induced at the primary tumor site and at distant sites, potently augments metastasis. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control tumor cell entry and exit from the lymphatic vessels. LECs also control immune cell traffic and directly modulate adaptive immune responses. This review highlights advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels, and in particular lymphatic endothelium, impact metastasis.

  3. The Lymphatic System in Disease Processes and Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Padera, Timothy P; Meijer, Eelco F J; Munn, Lance L

    2016-07-11

    Advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the lymphatic system have made it possible to identify its role in a variety of disease processes. Because it is involved not only in fluid homeostasis but also in immune cell trafficking, the lymphatic system can mediate and ultimately alter immune responses. Our rapidly increasing knowledge of the molecular control of the lymphatic system will inevitably lead to new and effective therapies for patients with lymphatic dysfunction. In this review, we discuss the molecular and physiological control of lymphatic vessel function and explore how the lymphatic system contributes to many disease processes, including cancer and lymphedema.

  4. A study of the three-dimensional organization of the human diaphragmatic lymphatic lacunae and lymphatic drainage units.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Zhao, Z; Zhou, J; Yu, S

    1996-12-01

    The peritoneal stomata, lymphatic drainage units and subperitoneal terminal lymphatics, called lymphatic lacunae, form a specialized drainage system in the diaphragm, by which absorption of fluid in bulk, particles and cells is carried out in the peritoneal cavity. The aim of this study is to elucidate the three-dimensional organization and function of the subperitoneal lymphatic lacunae and lymphatic drainage units by using lymphatic casts in the scanning electron microscope (SEM), ODO (OsO4-DMSO-OsO4) freeze fracture, conventional SEM and the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The subperitoneal lymphatic lacuna is unique for its large size and its multiple morphology and can be recognized by its broad, flattened enlargement and the blind-ends of lymphatic vessels, from which extend numerous main lymphatic vessels and side branches. These lymphatic vessels communicate with each other and form a rich lymphatic plexus under the diaphragmatic peritoneum. Two layers of lymphatic networks, i.e. the subperitoneal plexus and the deeper plexus are found in the muscular portion. Only one layer is present in the tendinous portion of the human diaphragm. The lymphatic plexus is denser in the tendinous portion than that in the muscular portion. The lymphatic lacunae occur exclusively in the muscular portion of the human diaphragm. The lumina of lymphatic lacunae are separated from the peritoneal cavity by a barrier consisting of cuboidal mesothelial cells, endothelial cells of the lymphatic lacunae and intervening connective tissue forming a lymphatic drainage unit. All these three components of the lymphatic drainage unit abut upon each other, but are not linked by specialized junctions. The cuboidal mesothelial cells frequently extend valve-like cytoplasmic processes that bridge the subperitoneal channel and make give it a tortuous course. The fibrous layer of the connective tissue is arranged in fiber bundles and gives a three-dimensional network forming the floor of

  5. High-Resolution Mapping of Anatomical Connections in Marmoset Extrastriate Cortex Reveals a Complete Representation of the Visual Field Bordering Dorsal V2

    PubMed Central

    Jeffs, Janelle; Federer, Frederick; Ichida, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The primate visual cortex consists of many areas. The posterior areas (V1, V2, V3, and middle temporal) are thought to be common to all primate species. However, the organization of cortex immediately anterior to area V2 (the “third tier” cortex) remains controversial, particularly in New World primates. The main point of contention has been whether the third tier cortex consists of a single area V3, representing lower and upper visual quadrants in dorsal and ventral cortex, respectively, or of 2 distinct areas (the dorsomedial [DM] area and a V3-like area). Resolving this controversy is crucial to understand the function and evolution of the third tier cortex. We have addressed this issue in marmosets, by performing high-precision mapping of corticocortical connections in cortex bordering dorsal V2. Multiple closely spaced neuroanatomical tracer injections were placed across the full width of dorsal V2 or adjacent anterior cortex, and the location of resulting labeled cells mapped throughout whole flattened visual cortex. The resulting topographic patterns of labeled connections allowed us to define areas and their boundaries. We found that a complete representation of the visual field borders dorsal V2 and that the third tier cortex consists of 2 distinct areas. These results unequivocally support the DM model. PMID:22523183

  6. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  7. Development of the lymphatic system: new questions and paradigms.

    PubMed

    Semo, Jonathan; Nicenboim, Julian; Yaniv, Karina

    2016-03-15

    The lymphatic system is a blind-ended network of vessels that plays important roles in mediating tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal lipid absorption and the immune response. A profound understanding of the development of lymphatic vessels, as well as of the molecular cues governing their formation and morphogenesis, might prove essential for our ability to treat lymphatic-related diseases. The embryonic origins of lymphatic vessels have been debated for over a century, with a model claiming a venous origin for the lymphatic endothelium being predominant. However, recent studies have provided new insights into the origins of lymphatic vessels. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling lymphatic specification and sprouting, and we discuss exciting findings that shed new light on previously uncharacterized sources of lymphatic endothelial cells.

  8. Clinical feasibility study of combined opto-acoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Smith, Remie J.; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Ermilov, Sergey; Conjusteau, André; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. C.; Otto, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    We report on findings from the clinical feasibility study of the ImagioTM. Breast Imaging System, which acquires two-dimensional opto-acoustic (OA) images co-registered with conventional ultrasound using a specialized duplex hand-held probe. Dual-wavelength opto-acoustic technology is used to generate parametric maps based upon total hemoglobin and its oxygen saturation in breast tissues. This may provide functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism and microvasculature, which is complementary to morphological information obtained with conventional gray-scale ultrasound. We present co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical feasibility study. The clinical results illustrate that the technology may have the capability to improve the efficacy of breast tumor diagnosis. In doing so, it may have the potential to reduce biopsies and to characterize cancers that were not seen well with conventional gray-scale ultrasound alone.

  9. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  10. Lymphangiogenesis, Lymphatic Endothelial Cells and Lymphatic Metastasis in Head and Neck Cancer — A Review of Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuang; Helman, Joseph I; Li, Long-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is a continuous and complicated process. The detailed mechanisms of lymphatic metastasis are still not very clear, despite considerable research efforts in recent years. Previously, it was commonly accepted that there were no lymphatic vessels in the primary tumor. However, recent studies have demonstrated that lymphatic vessels are detectable in certain types of cancer, and more and more evidence has shown that cancer cells invade into local lymph nodes mainly via peritumoral lymphatic vessels. Moreover, activated endothelial cells may also be important, having an influence on lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells. This article, based on recent research findings, provides an in-depth discussion of the relationship between lymphangiogenesis, tumor-derived lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphatic metastasis in head and neck cancer. PMID:20690413

  11. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  12. [Chylous reflux and chylous ascites in lymphatic dysplasia, with the lymphographic demonstration of mediastinal and retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts].

    PubMed

    Hermanutz, K D; Boldt, I; Frotscher, U

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with congenital dysplasia of the lymphatic system and with chylous ascites are described. In one 24-year old woman with this rare condition, it was possible to demonstrate for the first time numerous mediastinal lymphatic cysts during lymphangiography. Both patients showed an abnormality of the retroperitoneal lymphatics, consisting of lymphatic dilatation and cysts. In the investigation of chylous ascites, direct lymphangiography must be regarded as a valuable and necessary investigation.

  13. Lymphatic Muscle Cells in Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessels of Various Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5–15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. Methods and Results In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. Conclusions The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels. PMID:23531183

  14. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow.

  15. The embryonic origins of lymphatic vessels: an historical review.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    Work on the lymphatic system began in the 17th century, and by the beginning of the 19th century the anatomy of most of the lymphatic system had been described. One of the most important questions in this field has been the determination of the embryological origin of the lymphatic endothelium. Two theories were proposed. The first suggested that lymphatic endothelium derived by sprouting from venous endothelium, the so-called centrifugal theory. The second, the so-called centripetal theory, suggested that lymphatic endothelium differentiates in situ from primitive mesenchyme, and secondarily acquires connection with the vascular system. More recent evidence has provided support for both hypotheses.

  16. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  17. Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease1

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Although two-thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ~ 40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process - the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host’s adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections). PMID:23053393

  18. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  19. Interleukin-7 is produced by afferent lymphatic vessels and supports lymphatic drainage

    PubMed Central

    Iolyeva, Maria; Aebischer, David; Proulx, Steven T.; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Häner, Simone; Bouchaud, Grégory; Krieg, Carsten; Onder, Lucas; Ludewig, Burkhard; Santambrogio, Laura; Boyman, Onur; Chen, Lu; Finke, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-7 exerts essential roles in lymph node (LN) organogenesis and lymphocyte development and homeostasis. Recent studies have identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) as a major source of IL-7 in LNs. Here, we report that LECs not only produce IL-7, but also express the IL-7 receptor chains IL-7Rα and CD132. Stimulation with recombinant IL-7 enhanced LEC in vitro activity and induced lymphangiogenesis in the cornea of wild-type (WT) mice. Whereas in IL-7Rα−/− mice, dermal lymphatic vessels (LVs) were abnormally organized and lymphatic drainage was compromised, transgenic overexpression of IL-7 in mice resulted in an expanded dermal LV network with increased drainage function. Moreover, systemic treatment with recombinant IL-7 enhanced lymphatic drainage in the skin of WT mice and of mice devoid of lymphocytes. Experiments in IL-7Rα−/− bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that the drainage-enhancing activity of IL-7 was exclusively dependent on IL-7Rα expression in stromal but not in hematopoietic cells. Finally, near-infrared in vivo imaging performed in IL-7Rα−/− mice revealed that the pumping activity of collecting vessels was normal but fluid uptake into lymphatic capillaries was defective. Overall, our data point toward an unexpected new role for IL-7 as a potential autocrine mediator of lymphatic drainage. PMID:23963040

  20. Pkd1 regulates lymphatic vascular morphogenesis during development.

    PubMed

    Coxam, Baptiste; Sabine, Amélie; Bower, Neil I; Smith, Kelly A; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Skoczylas, Renae; Astin, Jonathan W; Frampton, Emmanuelle; Jaquet, Muriel; Crosier, Philip S; Parton, Robert G; Harvey, Natasha L; Petrova, Tatiana V; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Francois, Mathias; Hogan, Benjamin M

    2014-05-01

    Lymphatic vessels arise during development through sprouting of precursor cells from veins, which is regulated by known signaling and transcriptional mechanisms. The ongoing elaboration of vessels to form a network is less well understood. This involves cell polarization, coordinated migration, adhesion, mixing, regression, and shape rearrangements. We identified a zebrafish mutant, lymphatic and cardiac defects 1 (lyc1), with reduced lymphatic vessel development. A mutation in polycystic kidney disease 1a was responsible for the phenotype. PKD1 is the most frequently mutated gene in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Initial lymphatic precursor sprouting is normal in lyc1 mutants, but ongoing migration fails. Loss of Pkd1 in mice has no effect on precursor sprouting but leads to failed morphogenesis of the subcutaneous lymphatic network. Individual lymphatic endothelial cells display defective polarity, elongation, and adherens junctions. This work identifies a highly selective and unexpected role for Pkd1 in lymphatic vessel morphogenesis during development.

  1. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  2. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27469407

  3. Short time effects of radiotherapy on lymphatic vessels and restorative lymphatic pathways: experimental approaches ina mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pastouret, F; Lievens, P; Leduc, O; Bourgeois, P; Tournel, K; Lamote, J; Zirak, C; Leduc, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important component in the therapeutic approach to oncologic conditions. This study presents the investigative results on the impact of RT on lymphatic vessels and on the regenerative response of the lymphatic system in a mouse model. We first irradiated 3 groups of ten mice using brachytherapy in a single treatment of 20 Gy. We then performed morphological examination of the irradiated lymphatic vessels using an in vivo microscopic transillumination technique at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Next we evaluated lymphatic flow using lymphoscintigraphy and in vivo microscopy at 6 to 11 weeks in: 10 additional mice following irradiation as above (IR), in 10 mice following incision of a lymphatic vessel (I), and in a non-treated control group of 10 mice (N). Intact lymphatic vessels were observed in all mice at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the single dose of radiotherapy in the first group of mice and normal lymphatic flow was fully restored in the irradiated (IR) and incised (I) mice indicating that the reparative substitution lymphatic pathways are functioning normally. We found that following irradiation with one dose of 20 Gy, lymphatic vessels were not visibly damaged and also that lymphatic flow was consistently restored and substitutive lymphatic pathways formed.

  4. Higher blood vessel density in comparison to the lymphatic vessels in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Espinoza, Iris; Reyes, Montserrat; Aitken, Juan Pablo; Aguayo, Francisco; Hartel, Steffen; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is characterized by local invasion and the development of cervical metastasis. In the tongue, an association between the invasion of the lymphatic vessels and the development of metastasis in the regional lymph nodes has been demonstrated. Moreover, invasion of the blood vessels is associated with greater recurrence and poorer prognoses. Therefore, the presence and density of lymphatic and blood vessels in intra- and peritumoral tissues should play an important role in the progression, dissemination and metastasis of carcinomas. However, the evidence regarding OSCC is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the comparison and association between the lymphatic (D2-40) and blood vessel (CD34) densities in intratumoral OSCC tissue. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven cases diagnosed as OSCC between the years 2000 and 2008 were obtained from the Anatomic Pathology Service of the School of Dentistry, University of Chile. The immunohistochemical markers D2-40 and CD34 were used, and the densities (mm2) of lymphatic vessels (LVD) and blood vessels (BVD) in the intratumoral region were determined. The relationship between LVD and BVD values was evaluated. Results: There were significant association between the CD34 and D2-40 expression (rho=0.4, P<0.05) and between the LVD and the location in the tongue (P=0.019). The BVD was greater (128.0 vessels/mm2) than the LVD (42.9 vessels/mm2), and there was a positive correlation between the LVD and BVD. Conclusions: In OSCC, the BVD is greater than the LVD, and there is a moderate correlation between the two quantities. PMID:26722595

  5. Mesenchymal status of lymphatic endothelial cell: enlightening treatment of lymphatic malformation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Gang; Li, Rui-Fang; Sun, Yan-Fang; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to blood capillaries, lymphatic capillaries in peripheral tissues are composed of a single-cell layer of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) without a covering of mural cells. However, in lymphatic malformations, the enlarged lymphatic vessels were covered with mural cells. This study aimed to understand the molecular mechanism of differences between human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to determine the changes of LECs in the pathological condition of lymphatic malformation. Results showed that HDLECs exhibited lower expression of endothelial proteins, including VE-cadherin and CD31, than HUVECs; HDLECs also showed higher expression of mesenchymal proteins, including α-SMA, SM22α, calponin, and epithelial mesenchymal transition-related transcription factor Slug, than HUVECs. Likewise, HDLECs displayed higher permeability and weaker recruitment of SMCs than HUVECs; HDLECs also exhibited low PDGF-BB expression. TGF-β2 treatment and FGF2 depletion enhanced mesenchymal marker expression with increased permeability and reduced SMC recruitment. By contrast, Slug depletion in HDLECs enhanced VE-cadherin expression, inhibited α-SMA expression, decreased permeability, and enhanced PDGF-BB expression. These results suggested that HDLECs were in a mesenchymal status, which contributed to their functions and might determine their identities. Our data also revealed that miR143/145 was implicated in the mesenchymal status of HDLECs. In lymphatic malformations (LMs) treated with OK-432 sclerotherapy, immunohistochemistry results showed that Prox1 expression was reduced and mural cell investment was increased; these results indicated that LECs lost their mesenchymal status after OK-432 treatment was administered. The decreased mesenchymal status of LECs in LMs may induce dilated vessel constriction, which could be the mechanism of OK-432 sclerotherapy. PMID:26550134

  6. The lymphatic vasculature: development and role in shaping immunity.

    PubMed

    Betterman, Kelly L; Harvey, Natasha L

    2016-05-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is an integral component of the immune system. Lymphatic vessels are a key highway via which immune cells are trafficked, serving not simply as a passive route of transport, but to actively shape and coordinate immune responses. Reciprocally, immune cells provide signals that impact the growth, development, and activity of the lymphatic vasculature. In addition to immune cell trafficking, lymphatic vessels are crucial for fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. The field of lymphatic vascular research is rapidly expanding, fuelled by rapidly advancing technology that has enabled the manipulation and imaging of lymphatic vessels, together with an increasing recognition of the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a myriad of human pathologies. In this review we provide an overview of the genetic pathways and cellular processes important for development and maturation of the lymphatic vasculature, discuss recent work revealing important roles for the lymphatic vasculature in directing immune cell traffic and coordinating immune responses and highlight the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a range of pathological settings.

  7. Comparison of approaches for microscopic imaging of skin lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Yu, Zheyuan; Liu, Ningfei

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of skin lymphatic vessels is of great significance in understanding their roles in many pathological conditions. Our aim was to identify the optimal approach for investigation of cutaneous lymphatic system. We performed comparative studies on skin lymphatic vessels using immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, computer graphic reconstruction method together with immunohistochemically stained serial sections and whole mount fluorescence in human lower limb. Lymphatic vessels were identified with podoplanin antibody. The relative merits and drawbacks of each method in evaluation of structure, spatial organization, and distribution of cutaneous lymphatic vessels were described. Immunohistology of tissue sections enabled the investigation of the structure and distribution of the whole cutaneous lymphatic system in two-dimensional slices, whereas three-dimensional morphology of only the most superficial lymph capillary network immediately under the epidermis could be evaluated with the whole mount technique. Meanwhile, only little segmentation of skin lymphatic vessel from five immunohistochemically stained serial sections was reconstructed and evaluated due to expense and special skills required using computer graphic three-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, a great number of artifacts and special skills required in its processes leaded to less accurate structure of skin lymphatic vessels. Our findings demonstrated that the use of either of the proposed techniques alone could not allow a comprehensive analysis of the skin lymphatic system due to their relative drawbacks. Combination of immunohistology of tissue sections and three-dimensional whole-mount preparations appears to be the best candidate for comprehensive evaluation of skin lymphatic system.

  8. Lymphatic system: an active pathway for immune protection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, P Y

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which may include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases.

  9. The lymphatic vasculature: development and role in shaping immunity.

    PubMed

    Betterman, Kelly L; Harvey, Natasha L

    2016-05-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is an integral component of the immune system. Lymphatic vessels are a key highway via which immune cells are trafficked, serving not simply as a passive route of transport, but to actively shape and coordinate immune responses. Reciprocally, immune cells provide signals that impact the growth, development, and activity of the lymphatic vasculature. In addition to immune cell trafficking, lymphatic vessels are crucial for fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. The field of lymphatic vascular research is rapidly expanding, fuelled by rapidly advancing technology that has enabled the manipulation and imaging of lymphatic vessels, together with an increasing recognition of the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a myriad of human pathologies. In this review we provide an overview of the genetic pathways and cellular processes important for development and maturation of the lymphatic vasculature, discuss recent work revealing important roles for the lymphatic vasculature in directing immune cell traffic and coordinating immune responses and highlight the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a range of pathological settings. PMID:27088921

  10. Lymph flow regulates collecting lymphatic vessel maturation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Daniel T; Jiménez, Juan M; Chang, Jeremy; Hess, Paul R; Mericko-Ishizuka, Patricia; Fu, Jianxin; Xia, Lijun; Davies, Peter F; Kahn, Mark L

    2015-08-01

    Fluid shear forces have established roles in blood vascular development and function, but whether such forces similarly influence the low-flow lymphatic system is unknown. It has been difficult to test the contribution of fluid forces in vivo because mechanical or genetic perturbations that alter flow often have direct effects on vessel growth. Here, we investigated the functional role of flow in lymphatic vessel development using mice deficient for the platelet-specific receptor C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC2) as blood backfills the lymphatic network and blocks lymph flow in these animals. CLEC2-deficient animals exhibited normal growth of the primary mesenteric lymphatic plexus but failed to form valves in these vessels or remodel them into a structured, hierarchical network. Smooth muscle cell coverage (SMC coverage) of CLEC2-deficient lymphatic vessels was both premature and excessive, a phenotype identical to that observed with loss of the lymphatic endothelial transcription factor FOXC2. In vitro evaluation of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) revealed that low, reversing shear stress is sufficient to induce expression of genes required for lymphatic valve development and identified GATA2 as an upstream transcriptional regulator of FOXC2 and the lymphatic valve genetic program. These studies reveal that lymph flow initiates and regulates many of the key steps in collecting lymphatic vessel maturation and development.

  11. An overview of lymphatic vessels and their emerging role in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dennis; Min, Wang

    2011-07-01

    Over the past decade, molecular details of lymphatic vessels (lymphatics) have been rapidly acquired due to the identification of lymphatic endothelial-specific markers. Separate from the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system is also an elaborate network of vessels that are important in normal physiology. Lymphatic vessels have the unique task to regulate fluid homeostasis, assist in immune surveillance, and transport dietary lipids. However, dysfunctional lymphatic vessels can cause pathology, while normal lymphatics can exacerbate pathology. This review summarizes the development and growth of lymphatic vessels in addition to highlighting their critical roles in physiology and pathology. Also, we discuss recent work that suggests a connection between lymphatic dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Interactions of immune cells and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Lee, Yulia G; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    In addition to fluid and lipid absorption, immune cell trafficking has now become recognized as one of the major functions of the lymphatic system. Recently, several critical roles of the lymphatic vessels (LVs) in modulating immune reactions during both physiological and pathological conditions have been emerging. As LVs serve as conduits for immune cells, they come to closely interact with macrophages/monocytes, dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Accumulating evidences indicate that reciprocal interactions between the LVs and immune cells exist which cause considerable influence over the process of immune cell migration, LV growth, and ultimately certain immune reactions. This chapter discusses on the interactions of macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells with peripheral LVs and on those of sinusoidal macrophages and T and B lymphocytes with lymph node LVs.

  13. Lymphatic spreading and lymphadenectomy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiang; Cai, Jie; Chen, Yao; Chen, Long-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a highly lethal malignancy with a poor prognosis. One of the most important prognostic factors in EC is lymph node status. Therefore, lymphadenectomy has been recognized as a key that influences the outcome of surgical treatment for EC. However, the lymphatic drainage system of the esophagus, including an abundant lymph-capillary network in the lamina propria and muscularis mucosa, is very complex with cervical, mediastinal and celiac node spreading. The extent of lymphadenectomy for EC has always been controversial because of the very complex pattern of lymph node spreading. In this article, published literature regarding lymphatic spreading was reviewed and the current lymphadenectomy trends for EC are discussed. PMID:26843917

  14. Aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Nagy, Nadine; Lago, Gabriela D'Amico; Kirmse, Santina; Klose, Ralph; Schrödter, Katrin; Zimmermann, Annika; Helfrich, Iris; Rundqvist, Helene; Theegarten, Dirk; Anhenn, Olaf; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique; Johnson, Randall S; Alitalo, Kari; Fischer, Jens W; Fandrey, Joachim; Stockmann, Christian

    2012-06-14

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease with unknown etiology that is characterized by extensive remodeling of the lung parenchyma, ultimately resulting in respiratory failure. Lymphatic vessels have been implicated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but the role of the lymphatic vasculature in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis remains enigmatic. Here we show in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis that lymphatic vessels exhibit ectopic mural coverage and that this occurs early during the disease. The abnormal lymphatic vascular patterning in fibrotic lungs was driven by expression of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) in lymphatic endothelial cells and signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β in associated mural cells. Because of impaired lymphatic drainage, aberrant mural cell coverage fostered the accumulation of fibrogenic molecules and the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Pharmacologic inhibition of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-β signaling axis disrupted the association of mural cells and lymphatic vessels, improved lymphatic drainage of the lung, and prevented the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Our results implicate aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and that the drainage capacity of pulmonary lymphatics is a critical mediator of fibroproliferative changes.

  15. Pedro Ara anatomic museum.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, V A; Trefilio, D E; Borghino, V N; Páez, R E; Aranega, C I

    2006-03-01

    Museums where anatomical pieces are exhibited are disappearing. The advance of the computer together with the advance of conventional and three-dimensional radiology makes the organs to be exposed without practicing dissection and the virtual images replace the real ones in the educational process. Some current laws that restrict the use of corpses and fetuses for obituary and exhibition studies have also contributed to the tendency. The anatomical museum, today named Pedro Ara, was founded in December 1920 and it exhibits anatomic works from the embryonic stage to old age, contributing unbeatable teachings to the medical sciences and the general public. The museum is located in the Angel Roque Suarez Anatomic Institute in the Clinical National Hospital which depends on the National University of Cordoba. It is visited daily by hundreds of people from all over the world. The museum owns 1211 pieces that combine ethical, scientific, aesthetical and educational values achieving a realization that received international acknowledgement. The most valuable exhibited work is 'Old man's head' made by Professor Pedro Ara in 1928-1929 (Figure 1), which, owing to its high quality, is in an impeccable and unharmed condition despite being exhibited for 80 years. Other authors, such as Professor Humberto Fracassi, also enriched the museum with their work and we, convinced that it favors and will favor our human formation and professional training, have the privilege of being their heirs and the responsibility of being their followers.

  16. Lymphatic vessels arise from specialized angioblasts within a venous niche.

    PubMed

    Nicenboim, J; Malkinson, G; Lupo, T; Asaf, L; Sela, Y; Mayseless, O; Gibbs-Bar, L; Senderovich, N; Hashimshony, T; Shin, M; Jerafi-Vider, A; Avraham-Davidi, I; Krupalnik, V; Hofi, R; Almog, G; Astin, J W; Golani, O; Ben-Dor, S; Crosier, P S; Herzog, W; Lawson, N D; Hanna, J H; Yanai, I; Yaniv, K

    2015-06-01

    How cells acquire their fate is a fundamental question in developmental and regenerative biology. Multipotent progenitors undergo cell-fate restriction in response to cues from the microenvironment, the nature of which is poorly understood. In the case of the lymphatic system, venous cells from the cardinal vein are thought to generate lymphatic vessels through trans-differentiation. Here we show that in zebrafish, lymphatic progenitors arise from a previously uncharacterized niche of specialized angioblasts within the cardinal vein, which also generates arterial and venous fates. We further identify Wnt5b as a novel lymphatic inductive signal and show that it also promotes the ‘angioblast-to-lymphatic’ transition in human embryonic stem cells, suggesting that this process is evolutionarily conserved. Our results uncover a novel mechanism of lymphatic specification, and provide the first characterization of the lymphatic inductive niche. More broadly, our findings highlight the cardinal vein as a heterogeneous structure, analogous to the haematopoietic niche in the aortic floor.

  17. Emerging trends in the pathophysiology of lymphatic contractile function.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Davis, Michael J; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic contractile dysfunction is central to a number of pathologies that affect millions of people worldwide. Due to its critical role in the process of inflammation, a dysfunctional lymphatic system also compromises the immune response, further exacerbating a number of inflammation related diseases. Despite the critical physiological functions accomplished by the transport of lymph, a complete understanding of the contractile machinery of the lymphatic system lags far behind that of the blood vasculature. However, there has been a surge of recent research focusing on different mechanisms that underlie both physiological and pathophysiological aspects of lymphatic contractile function. This review summarizes those emerging paradigms that shed some novel insights into the contractile physiology of the lymphatics in normal as well as different disease states. In addition, this review emphasizes the recent progress made in our understanding of various contractile parameters and regulatory elements that contribute to the normal functioning of the lymphatics.

  18. Anatomical curve identification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  19. Successful mapping of lymphorrhea using patent blue dye after lymph node dissection for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Shimada, H; Kanzaki, T

    2000-06-01

    Patent blue is a dye that has been used for intraoperative lymphatic mapping. We used this mapping method on a patient with lymphorrhea after groin dissection. We easily detected the lymphatic channel causing lymphorrhea and successfully ligated it. This technique may have great merit for treating of lymphorrhea.

  20. Visualization of lymphatic vessel development, growth, and function.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Cathrin; Hägerling, René; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Despite their important physiological and pathophysiological functions, lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphatic vessels remain less well studied compared to the blood vascular system. Lymphatic endothelium differentiates from venous blood vascular endothelium after initial arteriovenous differentiation. Only recently by the use of light sheet microscopy, the precise mechanism of separation of the first lymphatic endothelial progenitors from the cardinal vein has been described as delamination followed by mesenchymal cell migration of lymphatic endothelial cells. Dorsolaterally of the embryonic cardinal vein, lymphatic endothelial cells reaggregate to form the first lumenized lymphatic vessels, the dorsal peripheral longitudinal vessel and the more ventrally positioned primordial thoracic duct. Despite this progress in our understanding of the first lymph vessel formation, intravital observation of lymphatic vessel behavior in the intact organism, during development and in the adult, is prerequisite to a precise understanding of this tissue. Transgenic models and two-photon microscopy, in combination with optical windows, have made live intravital imaging possible: however, new imaging modalities and novel approaches promise gentler, more physiological, and longer intravital imaging of lymphatic vessels.

  1. Lymphatic imaging: Lymphography, computed tomography and scintigraphy, 2nd ed

    SciTech Connect

    Close, M.E.; Wallace, S.

    1985-01-01

    The latest addition to the Golden's Diagnostic Radiology series deals not only with imaging of the lymphatic system but also with lymphatic anatomy, its pathophysiology, and treatment of disorders. The first two chapters deal with the history of the discovery of the lymphatic system and its normal anatomy. The section on technique contains practical information and discussion of lymphatic physiology and the pathology of lymphomas. Half of the book's 16 chapters are devoted to problems encountered in clinical imaging. The approach is both by anatomy (thorax, neck, abdomen) and pathology (benign disease, lymphoma, solid tumors).

  2. Lymphatic communication: Connexin junction, what’s your function?

    PubMed Central

    Kanady, John D.; Simon, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This article reviews recent findings on expression and function of connexin proteins - the structural subunits of gap junction intercellular channels in the lymphatic vasculature - both during development and in the mature lymphatic vessel. Highlighted in particular are recent mouse connexin knockout studies which show that connexins are crucial for normal lymphatic development. We discuss, in general terms, both channel-dependent as well as channel-independent functions of connexins and raise some of the many unanswered questions about the mechanism(s) of action and physiological roles of connexins in the lymphatic vasculature. PMID:22165579

  3. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Lymphatic Imaging to Reconsider Occlusion Pressure of Superficial Lymphatic Collectors in Upper Extremities of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Vandermeeren, Liesbeth; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Valsamis, Jean-Baptiste; Malloizel-Delaunay, Julie; Moraine, Jean-Jacques; Liebens, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: There are very little scientific data on occlusion pressure for superficial lymphatic collectors. Given its importance in determining the transport capacity of lymphatic vessels, it is crucial to know its value. The novel method of near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging (NIRFLI) can be used to visualize lymphatic flow in real time. The goal of this study was to see if this method could be used to measure the lymphatic occlusion pressure. Methods: We observed and recorded lymph flow in the upper limb of healthy volunteers through a transparent cuff using near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging. After obtaining a baseline of the lymph flow without pressure inside the cuff, the cuff was inflated by increments of 10 mm Hg starting at 30 mm Hg. A NIRFLI guided manual lymphatic drainage technique named “Fill & Flush Drainage Method” was performed during the measurement to promote lymph flow. Lymphatic occlusion pressure was determined by observing when lymph flow stopped under the cuff. Results: We measured the lymphatic occlusion pressure on 30 healthy volunteers (11 men and 19 women). Mean lymphatic occlusion pressure in the upper limb was 86 mm Hg (CI ±3.7 mm Hg, α = 0.5%). No significant differences were found between age groups (p = 0.18), gender (p = 0.12), or limb side (p = 0.85). Conclusions: NIRFLI, a transparent sphygmomanometer cuff and the “Fill and Flush” manual lymphatic drainage method were used to measure the lymphatic occlusion pressure in 30 healthy humans. That combination of these techniques allows the visualization of the lymph flow in real time, while ensuring the continuous filling of the lymph collectors during the measurement session, reducing false negative observations. The measured occlusion pressures are much higher than previously described in the medical literature. PMID:27167187

  4. Motivation and Organizational Principles for Anatomical Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Cornelius; Mejino, José L.; Modayur, Bharath R.; Jakobovits, Rex; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Conceptualization of the physical objects and spaces that constitute the human body at the macroscopic level of organization, specified as a machine-parseable ontology that, in its human-readable form, is comprehensible to both expert and novice users of anatomical information. Design: Conceived as an anatomical enhancement of the UMLS Semantic Network and Metathesaurus, the anatomical ontology was formulated by specifying defining attributes and differentia for classes and subclasses of physical anatomical entities based on their partitive and spatial relationships. The validity of the classification was assessed by instantiating the ontology for the thorax. Several transitive relationships were used for symbolically modeling aspects of the physical organization of the thorax. Results: By declaring Organ as the macroscopic organizational unit of the body, and defining the entities that constitute organs and higher level entities constituted by organs, all anatomical entities could be assigned to one of three top level classes (Anatomical structure, Anatomical spatial entity and Body substance). The ontology accommodates both the systemic and regional (topographical) views of anatomy, as well as diverse clinical naming conventions of anatomical entities. Conclusions: The ontology formulated for the thorax is extendible to microscopic and cellular levels, as well as to other body parts, in that its classes subsume essentially all anatomical entities that constitute the body. Explicit definitions of these entities and their relationships provide the first requirement for standards in anatomical concept representation. Conceived from an anatomical viewpoint, the ontology can be generalized and mapped to other biomedical domains and problem solving tasks that require anatomical knowledge. PMID:9452983

  5. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  6. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  7. Lymph transport in rat mesenteric lymphatics experiencing edemagenic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Akl, Tony; Coté, Gerard L.; Moore, James E.; Zawieja, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess lymphatic flow adaptations to edema, we evaluated lymph transport function in rat mesenteric lymphatics under normal and edemagenic conditions in situ. Methods Twelve rats were infused with saline (intravenous infusion, 0.2 ml/min/100g body weight) to induce edema. We intravitally measured mesenteric lymphatic diameter and contraction frequency, as well as immune cell velocity and density before, during and after infusion. Results A 10-fold increase in lymph velocity (0.1–1 mm/s) and a 6-fold increase in flow rate (0.1–0.6 μL/min), were observed post-infusion, respectively. There were also increases in contraction frequency and fractional pump flow 1-minute post-infusion. Time-averaged wall shear stress increased 10 fold post-infusion to nearly 1.5 dynes/cm2. Similarly, maximum shear stress rose from 5 dynes/cm2 to 40 dynes/cm2. Conclusions Lymphatic vessels adapted to edemagenic stress by increasing lymph transport. Specifically, the increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity, and shear stress were significant. Lymph pumping increased post-infusion, though changes in lymphatic diameter were not statistically significant. These results indicate that edemagenic conditions stimulate lymph transport via increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity and flow. These changes, consequently, resulted in large increases in wall shear stress, which could then activate NO pathways and modulate lymphatic transport function. PMID:24397756

  8. Quantitative imaging of lymphatic function with liposomal indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Steven T; Luciani, Paola; Derzsi, Stefanie; Rinderknecht, Matthias; Mumprecht, Viviane; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2010-09-15

    Lymphatic vessels play a major role in cancer progression and in postsurgical lymphedema, and several new therapeutic approaches targeting lymphatics are currently being developed. Thus, there is a critical need for quantitative imaging methods to measure lymphatic flow. Indocyanine green (ICG) has been used for optical imaging of the lymphatic system, but it is unstable in solution and may rapidly enter venous capillaries after local injection. We developed a novel liposomal formulation of ICG (LP-ICG), resulting in vastly improved stability in solution and an increased fluorescence signal with a shift toward longer wavelength absorption and emission. When injected intradermally to mice, LP-ICG was specifically taken up by lymphatic vessels and allowed improved visualization of deep lymph nodes. In a genetic mouse model of lymphatic dysfunction, injection of LP-ICG showed no enhancement of draining lymph nodes and slower clearance from the injection site. In mice bearing B16 luciferase-expressing melanomas expressing vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), sequential near-IR imaging of intradermally injected LP-ICG enabled quantification of lymphatic flow. Increased flow through draining lymph nodes was observed in mice bearing VEGF-C-expressing tumors without metastases, whereas a decreased flow pattern was seen in mice with a higher lymph node tumor burden. This new method will likely facilitate quantitative studies of lymphatic function in preclinical investigations and may also have potential for imaging of lymphedema or improved sentinel lymph detection in cancer. PMID:20823159

  9. Communication between lymphatic and venous systems in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lenan; Takeda, Kazu; Kato, Shigeki; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    The lymphatic system in mice consists of lymphatic vessels and 22 types of lymph nodes. Metastatic tumor cells in the lymphatic system spread to distant organs through the venous system. However, the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems have not been fully elucidated. Here, we identify the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr inbred mice, which develop systemic swelling of lymph nodes up to 10mm in diameter, allowing investigation of the topography of the lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels. Using a gross anatomy dissection approach, the efferent lymphatic vessels of the proper axillary lymph node were shown to communicate with the subclavian vein. Furthermore, we found that the thoracoepigastric vein, which connects the subclavian vein and inferior vena cava, runs adjacent to the subiliac and proper axillary lymph nodes, and receives venous blood from these lymph nodes routed through small branches. The direction of blood flow in the thoracoepigastric vein occurred in two directions in the intermediate region between the proper axillary lymph node and subiliac lymph node; one to the subclavian vein, the other to the inferior vena cava. This paper reveals the anatomy of the communication between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of the mouse, and provides new insights relevant to the investigation of the mechanisms of lymph node metastasis and cancer immunology, and the development of diagnostic and treatment methods for lymph node metastasis, including drug delivery systems.

  10. Lymphatic vessels: new targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Seidel, Catharina D; Detmar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the physiological control of the tissue fluid balance and in the initiation of immune responses. Recent studies have shown that lymphangiogenesis, the growth of new lymphatic vessels and/or the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, is a characteristic feature of acute inflammatory reactions and of chronic inflammatory diseases. In these conditions, lymphatic vessel expansion occurs at the tissue level but also within the draining lymph nodes. Surprisingly, activation of lymphatic vessel function by delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor-C exerts anti-inflammatory effects in several models of cutaneous and joint inflammation. These effects are likely mediated by enhanced drainage of extravasated fluid and inflammatory cells, but also by lymphatic vessel-mediated modulation of immune responses. Although some of the underlying mechanisms are just beginning to be identified, lymphatic vessels have emerged as important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory conditions. In this context, it is of great interest that some of the currently used anti-inflammatory drugs also potently activate lymphatic vessels.

  11. Heterogeneity in the lymphatic vascular system and its origin.

    PubMed

    Ulvmar, Maria H; Mäkinen, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic vessels have historically been viewed as passive conduits for fluid and immune cells, but this perspective is increasingly being revised as new functions of lymphatic vessels are revealed. Emerging evidence shows that lymphatic endothelium takes an active part in immune regulation both by antigen presentation and expression of immunomodulatory genes. In addition, lymphatic vessels play an important role in uptake of dietary fat and clearance of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, and they have been implicated in obesity and arteriosclerosis. Lymphatic vessels within different organs and in different physiological and pathological processes show a remarkable plasticity and heterogeneity, reflecting their functional specialization. In addition, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of different organs were recently shown to have alternative developmental origins, which may contribute to the development of the diverse lymphatic vessel and endothelial functions seen in the adult. Here, we discuss recent developments in the understanding of heterogeneity within the lymphatic system considering the organ-specific functional and molecular specialization of LECs and their developmental origin. PMID:27357637

  12. Consensus statement on the immunohistochemical detection of ocular lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Schroedl, Falk; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schlereth, Simona L; Bock, Felix; Regenfuss, Birgit; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Lutty, Gerard A; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Chen, Lu; Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke; Dana, Reza; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Alitalo, Kari; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Junghans, Barbara M; Heindl, Ludwig M; Cursiefen, Claus

    2014-10-01

    There is currently considerable controversy about existence and classification of "lymphatic vessels" in the eye. Some of the confusion is certainly caused by inappropriate use (or nonuse) of the correct immunohistochemical markers. Many experts in the field expressed the need for a consensus statement, and, in this perspective, authors offer arguments and solutions to reliably continue with immunohistochemical ocular lymphatic research.

  13. Heterogeneity in the lymphatic vascular system and its origin.

    PubMed

    Ulvmar, Maria H; Mäkinen, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic vessels have historically been viewed as passive conduits for fluid and immune cells, but this perspective is increasingly being revised as new functions of lymphatic vessels are revealed. Emerging evidence shows that lymphatic endothelium takes an active part in immune regulation both by antigen presentation and expression of immunomodulatory genes. In addition, lymphatic vessels play an important role in uptake of dietary fat and clearance of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, and they have been implicated in obesity and arteriosclerosis. Lymphatic vessels within different organs and in different physiological and pathological processes show a remarkable plasticity and heterogeneity, reflecting their functional specialization. In addition, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of different organs were recently shown to have alternative developmental origins, which may contribute to the development of the diverse lymphatic vessel and endothelial functions seen in the adult. Here, we discuss recent developments in the understanding of heterogeneity within the lymphatic system considering the organ-specific functional and molecular specialization of LECs and their developmental origin.

  14. Lymphatic drug delivery using engineered liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuang; Zhang, Qiuhong; Bagby, Taryn; Forrest, M. Laird

    2011-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays a crucial role in the immune system’s recognition and response to disease, and most solid cancers initially spread from the primary site via the tumor’s surrounding lymphatics before hematological dissemination. Hence, the lymphatic system is an important target for developing new vaccines, cancer treatments, and diagnostic agents. Targeting the lymphatic system by subcutaneous, intestinal, and pulmonary routes has been evaluated and subsequently utilized to improve lymphatic penetration and retention of drug molecules, reduce drug-related systemic toxicities, and enhance bioavailability of poorly soluble and unstable drugs. Lymphatic imaging is an essential tool for the detection and staging of cancer. New nano-based technologies offer improved detection and characterization of the nodal diseases, while new delivery devices can better target and confine treatments to tumors within the nodal space while sparing healthy tissues. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the field of lymphatic drug delivery and imaging and focuses specifically on the development ofliposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles for lymphatic introduction via the subcutaneous, intestinal, and pulmonary routes. PMID:21712055

  15. Heterogeneity in the lymphatic vascular system and its origin

    PubMed Central

    Ulvmar, Maria H.; Mäkinen, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels have historically been viewed as passive conduits for fluid and immune cells, but this perspective is increasingly being revised as new functions of lymphatic vessels are revealed. Emerging evidence shows that lymphatic endothelium takes an active part in immune regulation both by antigen presentation and expression of immunomodulatory genes. In addition, lymphatic vessels play an important role in uptake of dietary fat and clearance of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, and they have been implicated in obesity and arteriosclerosis. Lymphatic vessels within different organs and in different physiological and pathological processes show a remarkable plasticity and heterogeneity, reflecting their functional specialization. In addition, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of different organs were recently shown to have alternative developmental origins, which may contribute to the development of the diverse lymphatic vessel and endothelial functions seen in the adult. Here, we discuss recent developments in the understanding of heterogeneity within the lymphatic system considering the organ-specific functional and molecular specialization of LECs and their developmental origin. PMID:27357637

  16. Effects of LDL Receptor Modulation on Lymphatic Function

    PubMed Central

    Milasan, Andreea; Dallaire, François; Mayer, Gaétan; Martel, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is driven by the accumulation of immune cells and cholesterol in the arterial wall. Although recent studies have shown that lymphatic vessels play an important role in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport, the specific underlying mechanisms of this physiological feature remain unknown. In the current report, we sought to better characterize the lymphatic dysfunction that is associated with atherosclerosis by studying the physiological and temporal origins of this impairment. First, we assessed that athero-protected Pcsk9−/− mice exhibited improved collecting lymphatic vessel function throughout age when compared to WT mice for up to six months, while displaying enhanced expression of LDLR on lymphatic endothelial cells. Lymphatic dysfunction was present before the atherosclerotic lesion formation in a mouse model that is predisposed to develop atherosclerosis (Ldlr−/−; hApoB100+/+). This dysfunction was presumably associated with a defect in the collecting lymphatic vessels in a non-specific cholesterol- but LDLR-dependent manner. Treatment with a selective VEGFR-3 agonist rescued this impairment observed early in the onset of this arterial disease. We suggest that LDLR modulation is associated with early atherosclerosis-related lymphatic dysfunction, and bring forth a pleiotropic role for PCSK9 in lymphatic function. Our study unveils new potential therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27279328

  17. Osteopathic lymphatic pump techniques to enhance immunity and treat pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While antibiotics are generally effective for the treatment of infection, the emergence of resistant strains of bacteria threatens their success. The osteopathic medical profession has designed a set of manipulative techniques called lymphatic pump techniques (LPT), to enhance the flow of lymph through the lymphatic system. Clinically, LPT is used to treat infection and oedemaand might be an effective adjuvant therapy in patients with pneumonia.The immune system uses the lymphatic and blood systems to survey to rid the body of pathogens; however, only recently have the effects of LPT on the lymphatic and immune systems been investigated. This short review highlightsclinical and basic science research studies that support the use of LPT to enhance the lymphatic and immune systems and treat pneumonia, and discusses the potential mechanisms by which LPT benefits patients with pneumonia. PMID:22977459

  18. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow. PMID:27460561

  19. Tissue contribution to the mechanical features of diaphragmatic initial lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Moriondo, Andrea; Boschetti, Federica; Bianchin, Francesca; Lattanzio, Simone; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Negrini, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The role of the mechanical properties of the initial lymphatic wall and of the surrounding tissue in supporting lymph formation and/or progression was studied in six anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked and mechanically ventilated rats. After mid-sternal thoracotomy, submesothelial initial lymphatics were identified on the pleural diaphragmatic surface through stereomicroscopy. An ‘in vivo’ lymphatic segment was prepared by securing two surgical threads around the vessel at a distance of ∼2.5 mm leaving the vessel in place. Two glass micropipettes were inserted into the lumen, one for intraluminar injections of 4.6 nl saline boluses and one for hydraulic pressure (Plymph) recording. The compliance of the vessel wall (Clymph) was calculated as the slope of the plot describing the change in segment volume as a function of the post-injection Plymph changes. Two superficial lymphatic vessel populations with a significantly different Clymph (6.7 ± 1.6 and 1.5 ± 0.4 nl mmHg−1 (mean ± s.e.m.), P < 0.001) were identified. In seven additional rats, the average elastic modulus of diaphragmatic tissue strips was determined by uniaxial tension tests to be 1.7 ± 0.3 MPa. Clymph calculated for an initial lymphatic completely surrounded by isotropic tissue was 0.068 nl mmHg−1, i.e. two orders of magnitude lower than in submesothelial lymphatics. Modelling of stress distribution in the lymphatic wall suggests that compliant vessels may act as reservoirs accommodating large absorbed fluid volumes, while lymphatics with stiffer walls serve to propel fluid through the lumen of the lymphatic vessel by taking advantage of the more efficient mechanical transmission of tissue stresses to the lymphatic lumen. PMID:20724369

  20. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-12-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with /sup 125/I or /sup 131/I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return.

  1. Anatomic Posterolateral Corner Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Serra Cruz, Raphael; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterolateral corner injuries represent a complex injury pattern, with damage to important coronal and rotatory stabilizers of the knee. These lesions commonly occur in association with other ligament injuries, making decisions regarding treatment challenging. Grade III posterolateral corner injuries result in significant instability and have poor outcomes when treated nonoperatively. As a result, reconstruction is advocated. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential for surgical treatment of this pathology. The following technical note provides a diagnostic approach, postoperative management, and details of a technique for anatomic reconstruction of the 3 main static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee. PMID:27656379

  2. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation.

  3. Stress-driven lymphatic dissemination: An unanticipated consequence of communication between the sympathetic nervous system and lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Le, Caroline P; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic stress drives cancer progression, but the routes of metastasis are unclear. We recently demonstrated that chronic stress activates a neural-inflammatory signaling axis to remodel lymphatic vasculature and increase lymph flow. This unanticipated crosstalk between stress and the lymphatic system provides pathways of tumor cell dissemination and accelerates metastasis. PMID:27652324

  4. Rho Kinase Enhances Contractions of Rat Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Moor, Andrea N.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1–10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5–50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1–10 μM H1152 or 25–50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose

  5. Rho kinase enhances contractions of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Kristine H; Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Moor, Andrea N; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1-10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5-50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1-10 μM H1152 or 25-50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose that

  6. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-12-15

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction.

  7. Underlying anatomy for CTV contouring and lymphatic drainage in rectal cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Valentini, Vincenzo; Nori, Stefania L; Fares, Claudia; Dinapoli, Nicola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonierrta

    2003-01-01

    Despite the low local recurrence rate that can be achieved by adequate surgery (total mesorectal excision--TME), radiation therapy was shown to play a significant role in reducing this risk. The widespread use of TME in many European Centers has introduced a new terminology and the need to identify the area at major risk for local failure using this surgical procedure. In the surgical series where extended extra-mesorectal surgery was performed, the role of lymphatic spread was evidenced, especially for low rectal cancer, through the pelvic parietal fascia and lateral pelvic spaces. The aim of this study was to better define some anatomic concepts and the main risk factors which impact on CTV contouring and field conformation in rectal cancer treatment. This information helps formulating guidelines for CTV contouring in daily radiotherapy practice, in order to define the best therapy, according to the tumor stage and location. PMID:15018321

  8. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  9. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S; Broggi, Maria A; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P; Wiig, Helge; Swartz, Melody A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  10. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-01

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders.

  11. Lymphangion coordination minimally affects mean flow in lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Arun M; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Quick, Christopher M

    2007-08-01

    The lymphatic system returns interstitial fluid to the central venous circulation, in part, by the cyclical contraction of a series of "lymphangion pumps" in a lymphatic vessel. The dynamics of individual lymphangions have been well characterized in vitro; their frequencies and strengths of contraction are sensitive to both preload and afterload. However, lymphangion interaction within a lymphatic vessel has been poorly characterized because it is difficult to experimentally alter properties of individual lymphangions and because the afterload of one lymphangion is coupled to the preload of another. To determine the effects of lymphangion interaction on lymph flow, we adapted an existing mathematical model of a lymphangion (characterizing lymphangion contractility, lymph viscosity, and inertia) to create a new lymphatic vessel model consisting of several lymphangions in series. The lymphatic vessel model was validated with focused experiments on bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels in vitro. The model was then used to predict changes in lymph flow with different time delays between onset of contraction of adjacent lymphangions (coordinated case) and with different relative lymphangion contraction frequencies (noncoordinated case). Coordination of contraction had little impact on mean flow. Furthermore, orthograde and retrograde propagations of contractile waves had similar effects on flow. Model results explain why neither retrograde propagation of contractile waves nor the lack of electrical continuity between lymphangions adversely impacts flow. Because lymphangion coordination minimally affects mean flow in lymphatic vessels, lymphangions have flexibility to independently adapt to local conditions.

  12. Interaction of tumor cells and lymphatic vessels in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, A; Detmar, M

    2012-10-18

    Metastatic spread of cancer through the lymphatic system affects hundreds of thousands of patients yearly. Growth of new lymphatic vessels, lymphangiogenesis, is activated in cancer and inflammation, but is largely inactive in normal physiology, and therefore offers therapeutic potential. Key mediators of lymphangiogenesis have been identified in developmental studies. During embryonic development, lymphatic endothelial cells derive from the blood vascular endothelium and differentiate under the guidance of lymphatic-specific regulators, such as the prospero homeobox 1 transcription factor. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF receptor 3 signaling are essential for the further development of lymphatic vessels and therefore they provide a promising target for inhibition of tumor lymphangiogenesis. Lymphangiogenesis is important for the progression of solid tumors as shown for melanoma and breast cancer. Tumor cells may use chemokine gradients as guidance cues and enter lymphatic vessels through intercellular openings between endothelial cell junctions or, possibly, by inducing larger discontinuities in the endothelial cell layer. Tumor-draining sentinel lymph nodes show enhanced lymphangiogenesis even before cancer metastasis and they may function as a permissive 'lymphovascular niche' for the survival of metastatic cells. Although our current knowledge indicates that the development of anti-lymphangiogenic therapies may be beneficial for the treatment of cancer patients, several open questions remain with regard to the frequency, mechanisms and biological importance of lymphatic metastases.

  13. Pkd1 regulates lymphatic vascular morphogenesis during development

    PubMed Central

    Coxam, Baptiste; Sabine, Amélie; Bower, Neil I.; Smith, Kelly A.; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Skoczylas, Renae; Astin, Jonathan W.; Frampton, Emmanuelle; Jaquet, Muriel; Crosier, Philip S.; Parton, Robert G.; Harvey, Natasha L.; Petrova, Tatiana V.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Francois, Mathias; Hogan, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels arise during development through sprouting of precursor cells from veins, which is regulated by well-studied signaling and transcriptional mechanisms. Less well understood is the ongoing elaboration of vessels to form a network. This involves cell polarisation, coordinated migration, adhesion, mixing, regression and cell shape rearrangements. We identified a zebrafish mutant, lymphatic and cardiac defects 1 (lyc1), with reduced lymphatic vessel development. We found a mutation in polycystic kidney disease 1a to be responsible for the phenotype. PKD1 is the most frequently mutated gene in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Initial sprouting of lymphatic precursors is normal in lyc1 mutants, but ongoing migration fails. Loss of Pkd1 in mice also has no effect on sprouting of precursors but leads to failed morphogenesis of the subcutaneous lymphatic network. Individual lymphatic endothelial cells display defective polarity, elongation and adherens junctions. This work identifies a highly selective and unexpected role for Pkd1 in lymphatic vessel morphogenesis during development. PMID:24767999

  14. Itching for answers: how histamine relaxes lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    In the current issue of Microcirculation, studies by Kurtz et al. and Nizamutdinova et al. together provide new evidence supporting a role for histamine as an endothelial-derived molecule that inhibits lymphatic muscle contraction. In particular, Nizamutdinova et al. show that the effects of flow-induced shear stress on lymphatic endothelium are mediated by both nitric oxide and histamine, since only blockade of both prevents contraction strength and frequency from being altered by flow. Separately, Kurtz et al. used confocal microscopy to determine a preferential expression of histamine receptors on the lymphatic endothelium and demonstrated that histamine applied to spontaneously contracting collecting lymphatics inhibits contractions. Previous studies disagreed on whether histamine stimulates or inhibits lymphatic contractions, but also used differing concentrations, species, and preparations. Together these new reports shed light on how histamine acts within the lymphatic vasculature, but also raise important questions about the cell type on which histamine exerts its effects and the signaling pathways involved. This editorial briefly discusses the contribution of each study and its relevance to lymphatic biology.

  15. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia.

  16. Cdk5 controls lymphatic vessel development and function by phosphorylation of Foxc2.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Johanna; Zhang, Siwei; Moser, Markus; Agalarov, Yan; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Hager, Bianca; Bibb, James A; Adams, Ralf H; Kiefer, Friedemann; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V; Vollmar, Angelika M; Zahler, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic system maintains tissue fluid balance, and dysfunction of lymphatic vessels and valves causes human lymphedema syndromes. Yet, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vessel development is still limited. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an essential regulator of lymphatic vessel development. Endothelial-specific Cdk5 knockdown causes congenital lymphatic dysfunction and lymphedema due to defective lymphatic vessel patterning and valve formation. We identify the transcription factor Foxc2 as a key substrate of Cdk5 in the lymphatic vasculature, mechanistically linking Cdk5 to lymphatic development and valve morphogenesis. Collectively, our findings show that Cdk5-Foxc2 interaction represents a critical regulator of lymphatic vessel development and the transcriptional network underlying lymphatic vascular remodeling. PMID:26027726

  17. Cdk5 controls lymphatic vessel development and function by phosphorylation of Foxc2.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Johanna; Zhang, Siwei; Moser, Markus; Agalarov, Yan; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Hager, Bianca; Bibb, James A; Adams, Ralf H; Kiefer, Friedemann; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V; Vollmar, Angelika M; Zahler, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The lymphatic system maintains tissue fluid balance, and dysfunction of lymphatic vessels and valves causes human lymphedema syndromes. Yet, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vessel development is still limited. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an essential regulator of lymphatic vessel development. Endothelial-specific Cdk5 knockdown causes congenital lymphatic dysfunction and lymphedema due to defective lymphatic vessel patterning and valve formation. We identify the transcription factor Foxc2 as a key substrate of Cdk5 in the lymphatic vasculature, mechanistically linking Cdk5 to lymphatic development and valve morphogenesis. Collectively, our findings show that Cdk5-Foxc2 interaction represents a critical regulator of lymphatic vessel development and the transcriptional network underlying lymphatic vascular remodeling.

  18. Autoimmune antibodies in chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D

    1978-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukaemia a factor in patients' serum enhances the in vitro viability of the abnormal cells and this has been identified as an antibody. The activity of this factor can be removed by interaction with anti-immunoglobulin and by ammonium sulphate precipitation with a degree of saturation in excess of 46%. Cohn fractionation and chromatography with A-50 Sephadex show that the factor is not a complex but an immunoglobulin. No activity is removed after reaction of sera with 2-mercapto-ethanol and di-thiothreitol. The evidence therefore suggests that a gamma-G immunoglobulin is involved. Concentrated washings from the leukaemic cells behave in exactly the same way as patients' sera and activity is retained in the same fraction during precipitation and purification procedure. The extensive cross-reactivity of the sera suggests a common chronic lymphatic leukaemic antibody and it is considered that an active autoimmune response may be an integral part of the disease.

  19. Lymphatic Vessels, Inflammation, and Immunity in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Amanda W.; Medler, Terry R.; Leachman, Sancy A.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Skin is a highly ordered immune organ that coordinates rapid responses to external insult while maintaining self-tolerance. In healthy tissue, lymphatic vessels drain fluid and coordinate local immune responses; however, environmental factors induce lymphatic vessel dysfunction, leading to lymph stasis and perturbed regional immunity. These same environmental factors drive the formation of local malignancies, which are also influenced by local inflammation. Herein, we discuss clinical and experimental evidence supporting the tenet that lymphatic vessels participate in regulation of cutaneous inflammation and immunity, are important contributors to malignancy and potential biomarkers and targets for immunotherapy. PMID:26552413

  20. Lymphatic vascular morphogenesis in development, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Sabine, Amélie; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2011-05-16

    The lymphatic vasculature constitutes a highly specialized part of the vascular system that is essential for the maintenance of interstitial fluid balance, uptake of dietary fat, and immune response. Recently, there has been an increased awareness of the importance of lymphatic vessels in many common pathological conditions, such as tumor cell dissemination and chronic inflammation. Studies of embryonic development and genetically engineered animal models coupled with the discovery of mutations underlying human lymphedema syndromes have contributed to our understanding of mechanisms regulating normal and pathological lymphatic morphogenesis. It is now crucial to use this knowledge for the development of novel therapies for human diseases.

  1. Laparoscopic excision of a retroperitoneal lymphatic malformation in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Solari, Valeria; Mullassery, Dhanya; Lansdale, Nick; Jesudason, Edwin C

    2011-02-01

    Abdominal lymphatic malformations may be challenging to eradicate. Retroperitoneal lesions may more difficult to resect than mesenteric ones; however, the latter may predispose to intestinal volvulus, leading to calls for their prompt excision. Such lesions identified perinatally may pose particular challenges: in one case, respiratory failure caused by abdominal distension required emergency drainage followed by later laparoscopic excision; laparoscopy has also been used promptly to diagnose and resect neonatal mesenteric lymphatic malformations with their inherent volvulus risk. We illustrate that even if neonatal laparoscopy identifies a retroperitoneal rather than mesenteric lymphatic malformation, curative endosurgical excision remains feasible.

  2. Measurement of cytosolic Ca2+ in isolated contractile lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Kurtz, Kristine M; Breslin, Jerome W

    2011-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels comprise a multifunctional transport system that maintains fluid homeostasis, delivers lipids to the central circulation, and acts as a surveillance system for potentially harmful antigens, optimizing mucosal immunity and adaptive immune responses. Lymph is formed from interstitial fluid that enters blind-ended initial lymphatics, and then is transported against a pressure gradient in larger collecting lymphatics. Each collecting lymphatic is made up of a series of segments called lymphangions, separated by bicuspid valves that prevent backflow. Each lymphangion possesses a contractile cycle that propels lymph against a pressure gradient toward the central circulation. This phasic contractile pattern is analogous to the cardiac cycle, with systolic and diastolic phases, and with a lower contraction frequency. In addition, lymphatic smooth muscle generates tone and displays myogenic constriction and dilation in response to increases and decreases in luminal pressure, respectively. A hybrid of molecular mechanisms that support both the phasic and tonic contractility of lymphatics are thus proposed. Contraction of smooth muscle is generally regulated by the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) plus sensitivity to Ca(2+) of the contractile elements in response to changes in the environment surrounding the cell. [Ca(2+)](i) is determined by the combination of the movement of Ca(2+) through plasma membrane ligand or voltage gated Ca(2+) channels and the release and uptake of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Cytosolic Ca(2+) binds to calmodulin and activates enzymes such as myosin light chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK), which in turn phosphorylates MLC leading to actin-myosin-mediated contraction. However, the sensitivity of this pathway to Ca(2+) can be regulated by the MLC phosphatase (MLCP). MLCP activity is regulated by Rho kinase (ROCK) and the myosin phosphatase inhibitor protein CPI-17. Here, we present a method to evaluate changes in [Ca(2+)](i

  3. An investigation of the topography of the lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). 1. The superficial lymphatic system.

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, P R

    1988-01-01

    The superficial lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus is described. The description is based on dissections of 130 eastern grey kangaroos. The most significant difference found between the superficial lymphatic drainage pattern of kangaroos and that of the domestic species was the existence of large inguino-axillary lymphatic trunks in the kangaroo. Thus in the kangaroo, instead of lymph passing from the inguinal lymphocentre to the lumbar lymphatic trunks as is the situation in the domestic animals, lymph passes from the inguinal lymphocentre to the axillary lymphocentre. Apart from the lymph draining from the head and ventral neck (which passes to the superficial cervical lymphocentre) and lymph which may pass from the superficial lymphatic vessels to deeper lymphatic vessels, all the superficial lymphatic drainage of the kangaroo passes through the axillary lymphocentre. From the viewpoint of the meat inspection of the carcasses of kangaroos taken as game meat animals, pathology of the axillary lymphocentre may reflect disease in a much wider range of body regions than it would in a domestic animal. PMID:3198478

  4. THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUM PEDRO ARA.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Carlos Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    The contribute is aimed to shed light on the history of the Anatomical Museum Pedro Ara since his foundation in 1878. Particularly, it describes the activity of Pedro Ara in preparing the anatomical specimens, which constitute the original collection of the Museum.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M.; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  7. Roles of transcriptional network during the formation of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Tetsuro

    2012-09-01

    The lymphatic vascular system, also known as the second vascular system in vertebrates, plays crucial roles in various physiological and pathological processes. It participates in the maintenance of normal tissue fluid balance, trafficking of the immune cells and absorption of fatty acids in the gut. Furthermore, lymphatic system is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including lymphedema, inflammatory diseases and tumour metastasis. Lymphatic vessels are comprised of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional control of LEC fate determination and reflects on efforts to understand the roles of transcriptional networks during this discrete developmental process.

  8. Lymphatic dysfunction after ligation surgery for varicose vein

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hisako; Mihara, Makoto; Hasegawa, Kyoko; Yamanaka, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although the lymphatic complications such as lymphocele sometimes occur after surgery for varicose veins, the lymphatic function of such patients has not been evaluated. In this case report, we present a case of lymphocele after ligation surgery for varicose vein. We also detected subclinical dysfunction in lower limb using indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography. Case report: A 76 year- old female underwent ligation surgery for right lower leg varicose vein, and she noticed the squashy lesion in the medial side of the right knee. Three years later, she consulted our clinic and we performed ICG lymphography. We observed dermal backflow around the mass, which indicated lymphatic dysfunction. After injecting additional ICG around the knee, we punctured and drained the clear, yellow fluid from the mass and it was contrasted with ICG during the examination and the involvement of the lymphatic system was proven. PMID:27757234

  9. An Immunological Fingerprint Differentiates Muscular Lymphatics from Arteries and Veins

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Wang, Wei; Srimushnam, Maya; Cromer, Walter E.; Zawieja, Scott D.; Schmidt, Susan E.; Jupiter, Daniel C.; Huang, Hung-Chung; Van Buren, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The principal function of the lymphatic system is to transport lymph from the interstitium to the nodes and then from the nodes to the blood. In doing so lymphatics play important roles in fluid homeostasis, macromolecular/antigen transport and immune cell trafficking. To better understand the genes that contribute to their unique physiology, we compared the transcriptional profile of muscular lymphatics (prenodal mesenteric microlymphatics and large, postnodal thoracic duct) to axillary and mesenteric arteries and veins isolated from rats. Clustering of the differentially expressed genes demonstrated that the lymph versus blood vessel differences were more profound than between blood vessels, particularly the microvessels. Gene ontology functional category analysis indicated that microlymphatics were enriched in antigen processing/presentation, IgE receptor signaling, catabolic processes, translation and ribosome; while they were diminished in oxygen transport, regulation of cell proliferation, glycolysis and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by G-proteins. We evaluated the differentially expressed microarray genes/products by qPCR and/or immunofluorescence. Immunofluorescence documented that multiple MHC class II antigen presentation proteins were highly expressed by an antigen-presenting cell (APC) type found resident within the lymphatic wall. These APCs also expressed CD86, a co-stimulatory protein necessary for T-cell activation. We evaluated the distribution and phenotype of APCs within the pre and postnodal lymphatic network. This study documents a novel population of APCs resident within the walls of muscular, prenodal lymphatics that indicates novel roles in antigen sampling and immune responses. In conclusion, these prenodal lymphatics exhibit a unique profile that distinguishes them from blood vessels and highlights the role of the lymphatic system as an immunovascular system linking the parenchymal interstitium, lymph nodes and the

  10. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  11. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Human Dermal Lymphatic Collectors

    PubMed Central

    Buttler, Kerstin; Ströbel, Philipp; Becker, Jürgen; Aung, Thiha; Felmerer, Gunther; Wilting, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients suffer from lymphedema worldwide. Supporting the contractility of lymphatic collectors is an attractive target for pharmacological therapy of lymphedema. However, lymphatics have mostly been studied in animals, while the cellular and molecular characteristics of human lymphatic collectors are largely unknown. We studied epifascial lymphatic collectors of the thigh, which were isolated for autologous transplantations. Our immunohistological studies identify additional markers for LECs (vimentin, CCBE1). We show and confirm differences between initial and collecting lymphatics concerning the markers ESAM1, D2-40 and LYVE-1. Our transmission electron microscopic studies reveal two types of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of the collectors with dark and light cytoplasm. We observed vasa vasorum in the media of the largest collectors, as well as interstitial Cajal-like cells, which are highly ramified cells with long processes, caveolae, and lacking a basal lamina. They are in close contact with SMCs, which possess multiple caveolae at the contact sites. Immunohistologically we identified such cells with antibodies against vimentin and PDGFRα, but not CD34 and cKIT. With Next Generation Sequencing we searched for highly expressed genes in the media of lymphatic collectors, and found therapeutic targets, suitable for acceleration of lymphatic contractility, such as neuropeptide Y receptors 1, and 5; tachykinin receptors 1, and 2; purinergic receptors P2RX1, and 6, P2RY12, 13, and 14; 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors HTR2B, and 3C; and adrenoceptors α2A,B,C. Our studies represent the first comprehensive characterization of human epifascial lymphatic collectors, as a prerequisite for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27764183

  12. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    Background - Near-infrared (NIR) imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, offering better spatial and temporal resolution than competing imaging modalities. While NIR lymphatic imaging has begun to be reported in the literature, the technology is still in its infancy and its imaging capabilities have yet to be quantitatively characterized. The objective of this study, therefore, was to characterize the parameters of NIR lymphatic imaging to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for evaluating lymphatic disease. Methods - An NIR imaging system was developed using a laser diode for excitation, ICG as a fluorescent agent, and a CCD camera to detect emission. A tissue phantom with mock lymphatic vessels of known depths and diameters was used as an alternative to in vivo lymphatic vessels due to the greater degree of control with the phantom. Results and Conclusions - When dissolved in an albumin physiological salt solution (APSS) to mimic interstitial fluid, ICG experiences shifts in the excitation/emission wavelengths such that it is maximally excited at 805nm and produces peak fluorescence at 840nm. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being: 900μM (60g/L) albumin and 193.5μM (150μg/mL) ICG. ICG fluorescence can be detected as deep as 6mm, but spatial resolution deteriorates severely below 3mm, thus skewing vessel geometry measurements. ICG packet travel, a common measure of lymphatic transport, can be detected as deep as 5mm.

  13. The complexity of anatomical systems

    PubMed Central

    Grizzi, Fabio; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3) Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture) or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4) Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system) each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5) Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural) to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation. PMID:16029490

  14. [Anatomic pitfalls of vagotomies].

    PubMed

    Dia, A; Ouedraogo, T; Zida, M; Sow, M L

    1994-01-01

    In order to minimise relapses and functional problems after vagotomies, an anatomic study of the vagus nerve at the base of the esophagus and stomach was carried out. Fifty stomachs of adult black African corpses were collected, placed in a formaldehyde solution and then dissected. At the level of the esophageal hiatus, the trunks of the vagus nerve were found in 46% of the cases for the anterior vagus and 24% for the posterior. At the level of the abdominal esophagus there was a single anterior vagus in 68% of cases and single posterior vagus in 64% of cases. At the level of the greater curvature, a recurrent anterior branch was found. At the level of the lesser curvature, the main nerves had a plexiform appearance in 8% of cases for the anterior nerve and 6% of cases for the posterior nerve. The classical arrangement was found in 60% of cases for the main anterior nerve and 64% of the cases for the posterior nerve. At the level of the angulus, the classical crowsfeet was found in 20% of cases for the anterior vagus and in 32% of cases for the posterior vagus. The anterior vagus was plexiform in 54% of cases and 46% of cases for the posterior. This study confirms the extreme variability of the vagus in the stomach. A better knowledge of the variations should lead to more successful vagotomy regardless of its forms.

  15. Quantum dots trace lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Alex L. C.; Gupta, Neeru; Zhang, Zhexue; Yücel, Yeni H.

    2011-10-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, often associated with elevated eye pressure. Currently, all glaucoma treatments aim to lower eye pressure by improving fluid exit from the eye. We recently reported the presence of lymphatics in the human eye. The lymphatic circulation is known to drain fluid from organ tissues and, as such, lymphatics may also play a role in draining fluid from the eye. We investigated whether lymphatic drainage from the eye is present in mice by visualizing the trajectory of quantum dots once injected into the eye. Whole-body hyperspectral fluorescence imaging was performed in 17 live mice. In vivo imaging was conducted prior to injection, and 5, 20, 40 and 70 min, and 2, 6 and 24 h after injection. A quantum dot signal was observed in the left neck region at 6 h after tracer injection into the eye. Examination of immunofluorescence-labelled sections using confocal microscopy showed the presence of a quantum dot signal in the left submandibular lymph node. This is the first direct evidence of lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye. The use of quantum dots to image this lymphatic pathway in vivo is a novel tool to stimulate new treatments to reduce eye pressure and prevent blindness from glaucoma.

  16. The association of adult Onchocerca volvulus with lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, C D; Huntington, M K; Wanji, S; Lovato, R V; Eversole, R R; Geary, T G

    2010-02-01

    Immunocytochemical examination of onchocercal nodule tissues containing adult Onchocerca volvulus using immuno-markers for blood and lymphatic vessels (vWF, D2-40, podoplanin, Prox-1, and Lyve1) shows a distinct pattern of distribution of these vessels within nodules. Blood vessels were commonly seen associated with organized lymphoid cellular aggregates in the both the outer and inner areas of the nodules. In contrast, the majority of the lymphatic vessel positivity was seen in the central zone in close apposition to the adult parasites, and the remainder usually associated with microfilariae in the outer areas of the nodule. These findings suggest an intimate relationship between adult O. volvulus and lymphatic vessels, including the likely proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells (lymphangectasia) akin to that seen with other filariae. These findings indicate that adult O. volvulus may migrate via the lymphatic system, and that clinical manifestations of this disease that involve tissue edema may be the result of the location of these worms in the lymphatic system.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150 μg/mL ICG and 60 g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150 μg/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time.

  18. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  19. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2015-10-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease.

  20. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  1. Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth

    PubMed Central

    Jakus, Zoltán; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Enis, David R.; Sen, Aslihan; Chia, Stephanie; Liu, Xi; Rawnsley, David R.; Yang, Yiqing; Hess, Paul R.; Zou, Zhiying; Yang, Jisheng; Guttentag, Susan H.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants. PMID:24733830

  2. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P.; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R.; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J.; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease. PMID:26389677

  3. Lymphatics at the crossroads of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scavelli, Claudio; Weber, Elisabetta; Aglianò, Margherita; Cirulli, Teresa; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    The lymphatic system is implicated in interstitial fluid balance regulation, immune cell trafficking, oedema and cancer metastasis. However, the sequence of events that initiate and coordinate lymphatic vessel development (lymphangiogenesis) remains obscure. In effect, the understanding of physiological regulation of lymphatic vasculature has been overshadowed by the greater emphasis focused on angiogenesis, and delayed by a lack of specific markers, thereby limiting this field to no more than a descriptive characterization. Recently, new insights into lymphangiogenesis research have been due to the discovery of lymphatic-specific markers and growth factors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family, such as VEGF-C and VEGF-D. Studies using transgenic mice overexpressing VEGF-C and VEGF-D have demonstrated a crucial role for these factors in tumour lymphangiogenesis. Knowledge of lymphatic development has now been redefined at the molecular level, providing an interesting target for innovative therapies. This review highlights the recent insights and advances into the field of lymphatic vascular research, outlining the most important aspects of the embryo development, structure, specific markers and methods applied for studying lymphangiogenesis. Finally, molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis are described. PMID:15198686

  4. Mechanotransduction activates canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote lymphatic vascular patterning and the development of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boksik; Geng, Xin; Mahamud, Md Riaj; Fu, Jianxin; Mukherjee, Anish; Kim, Yeunhee; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kahn, Mark L; Xia, Lijun; Dixon, J Brandon; Chen, Hong; Srinivasan, R Sathish

    2016-06-15

    Lymphatic vasculature regulates fluid homeostasis by returning interstitial fluid to blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are the building blocks of the entire lymphatic vasculature. LECs originate as a homogeneous population of cells predominantly from the embryonic veins and undergo stepwise morphogenesis to become the lymphatic capillaries, collecting vessels or valves. The molecular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature remain to be fully understood. Here we show that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for lymphatic vascular morphogenesis. Lymphatic vascular-specific ablation of β-catenin in mice prevents the formation of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves. Additionally, lymphatic vessel patterning is defective in these mice, with abnormal recruitment of mural cells. We found that oscillatory shear stress (OSS), which promotes lymphatic vessel maturation, triggers Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LECs. In turn, Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls the expression of several molecules, including the lymphedema-associated transcription factor FOXC2. Importantly, FOXC2 completely rescues the lymphatic vessel patterning defects in mice lacking β-catenin. Thus, our work reveals that mechanical stimulation is a critical regulator of lymphatic vascular development via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and, in turn, FOXC2.

  5. Mechanotransduction activates canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote lymphatic vascular patterning and the development of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Boksik; Geng, Xin; Mahamud, Md. Riaj; Fu, Jianxin; Mukherjee, Anish; Kim, Yeunhee; Jho, Eek-hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kahn, Mark L.; Xia, Lijun; Dixon, J. Brandon; Chen, Hong; Srinivasan, R. Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vasculature regulates fluid homeostasis by returning interstitial fluid to blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are the building blocks of the entire lymphatic vasculature. LECs originate as a homogeneous population of cells predominantly from the embryonic veins and undergo stepwise morphogenesis to become the lymphatic capillaries, collecting vessels or valves. The molecular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature remain to be fully understood. Here we show that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for lymphatic vascular morphogenesis. Lymphatic vascular-specific ablation of β-catenin in mice prevents the formation of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves. Additionally, lymphatic vessel patterning is defective in these mice, with abnormal recruitment of mural cells. We found that oscillatory shear stress (OSS), which promotes lymphatic vessel maturation, triggers Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LECs. In turn, Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls the expression of several molecules, including the lymphedema-associated transcription factor FOXC2. Importantly, FOXC2 completely rescues the lymphatic vessel patterning defects in mice lacking β-catenin. Thus, our work reveals that mechanical stimulation is a critical regulator of lymphatic vascular development via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and, in turn, FOXC2. PMID:27313318

  6. Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, Joy S

    2007-06-01

    This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores many of the anatomical adaptations exhibited by aquatic mammals that enable life in the water. Anatomical observations on a range of fossil and living marine and freshwater mammals are presented, including sirenians (manatees and dugongs), cetaceans (both baleen whales and toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), the sea otter, and the pygmy hippopotamus. A range of anatomical systems are covered in this issue, including the external form (integument, tail shape), nervous system (eye, ear, brain), musculoskeletal systems (cranium, mandible, hyoid, vertebral column, flipper/forelimb), digestive tract (teeth/tusks/baleen, tongue, stomach), and respiratory tract (larynx). Emphasis is placed on exploring anatomical function in the context of aquatic life. The following topics are addressed: evolution, sound production, sound reception, feeding, locomotion, buoyancy control, thermoregulation, cognition, and behavior. A variety of approaches and techniques are used to examine and characterize these adaptations, ranging from dissection, to histology, to electron microscopy, to two-dimensional (2D) and 3D computerized tomography, to experimental field tests of function. The articles in this issue are a blend of literature review and new, hypothesis-driven anatomical research, which highlight the special nature of anatomical form and function in aquatic mammals that enables their exquisite adaptation for life in such a challenging environment. PMID:17516440

  7. Tie1 is required for lymphatic valve and collecting vessel development

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xianghu; Zhou, Bin; Baldwin, H. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Tie1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase with broad expression in embryonic endothelium. Reduction of Tie1 levels in mouse embryos with a hypomorphic Tie1 allele resulted in abnormal lymphatic patterning and architecture, decreased lymphatic draining efficiency, and ultimately, embryonic demise. Here we report that Tie1 is present uniformly throughout the lymphatics and from late embryonic/early postnatal stages, becomes more restricted to lymphatic valve regions. To investigate later events of lymphatic development, we employed Cre-loxP recombination utilizing a floxed Tie1 allele and an Nfatc1Cre line, to provide loxP excision predominantly in lymphatic endothelium and developing valves. Interestingly, unlike the early prenatal defects previously described by ubiquitous endothelial deletion, excision of Tie1 with Nfatc1Cre resulted in abnormal lymphatic defects in postnatal mice and was characterized by agenesis of lymphatic valves and a deficiency of collecting lymphatic vessels. Attenuation of Tie1 signaling in lymphatic endothelium prevented initiation of lymphatic valve specification by Prox1 high expression lymphatic endothelial cells that is associated with the onset of turbulent flow in the lymphatic circulation. Our findings reveal a fundamental role for Tie signaling during lymphatic vessel remodeling and valve morphogenesis and implicate it as a candidate gene involved in primary lymphedema. PMID:25576926

  8. Mechanisms of VIP-induced inhibition of the lymphatic vessel pump.

    PubMed

    von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Rehal, Sonia; Dyrda, Peter; Lee, Stewart; Mathias, Ryan; Rahman, Mozibur; Roizes, Simon; Imtiaz, Mohammad S

    2012-06-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as a route by which interstitial fluid, protein and other macromolecules are returned to the blood circulation and immune cells and antigens gain access to lymph nodes. Lymph flow is an active process promoted by rhythmical contraction-relaxation events occurring in the collecting lymphatic vessels. This lymphatic pumping is an intrinsic property of the lymphatic muscles in the vessel wall and consequent to action potentials. Compromised lymphatic pumping may affect lymph and immune cell transport, an action which could be particularly detrimental during inflammation. Importantly, many inflammatory mediators alter lymphatic pumping. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuro- and immuno-modulator thought to be released by nerve terminals and immune cells in close proximity to lymphatic vessels. We demonstrated the presence of the peptide in lymphatic vessels and in the lymph and examined the effects of VIP on mesenteric collecting lymphatic vessels of the guinea pig using pharmacological bioassays, intracellular microelectrode electrophysiology, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time PCR. We showed that VIP alters lymphatic pumping by decreasing the frequency of lymphatic contractions and hyperpolarizing the lymphatic muscle membrane potential in a concentration-dependent manner. Our data further suggest that these effects are mainly mediated by stimulation of the VIP receptor VPAC2 located on the lymphatic muscle and the downstream involvement of protein kinase A (PKA) and ATP-sensitive K⁺ (KATP) channels. Inhibition of lymphatic pumping by VIP may compromise lymph drainage, oedema resolution and immune cell trafficking to the draining lymph nodes.

  9. Tie1 is required for lymphatic valve and collecting vessel development.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xianghu; Zhou, Bin; Scott Baldwin, H

    2015-03-01

    Tie1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase with broad expression in embryonic endothelium. Reduction of Tie1 levels in mouse embryos with a hypomorphic Tie1 allele resulted in abnormal lymphatic patterning and architecture, decreased lymphatic draining efficiency, and ultimately, embryonic demise. Here we report that Tie1 is present uniformly throughout the lymphatics and from late embryonic/early postnatal stages, becomes more restricted to lymphatic valve regions. To investigate later events of lymphatic development, we employed Cre-loxP recombination utilizing a floxed Tie1 allele and an Nfatc1Cre line, to provide loxP excision predominantly in lymphatic endothelium and developing valves. Interestingly, unlike the early prenatal defects previously described by ubiquitous endothelial deletion, excision of Tie1 with Nfatc1Cre resulted in abnormal lymphatic defects in postnatal mice and was characterized by agenesis of lymphatic valves and a deficiency of collecting lymphatic vessels. Attenuation of Tie1 signaling in lymphatic endothelium prevented initiation of lymphatic valve specification by Prox1 high expression lymphatic endothelial cells that is associated with the onset of turbulent flow in the lymphatic circulation. Our findings reveal a fundamental role for Tie1 signaling during lymphatic vessel remodeling and valve morphogenesis and implicate it as a candidate gene involved in primary lymphedema.

  10. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  11. Anatomy and physiology of lymphatic drainage of the breast from the perspective of sentinel node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tanis, P J; Nieweg, O E; Valdés Olmos, R A; Kroon, B B

    2001-03-01

    best sentinel node identification rate with the lowest possible false-negative rate would require a large randomized trial with all patients undergoing a complete lymph node dissection and evaluation of all other axillary lymph nodes with serial sections and immunohistochemistry. Current knowledge about sensitivity is based on examination of the other axillary nodes with hematoxylin and eosin staining and not with immunohistochemistry, with the exception of two studies. (33,76) In addition, a complete level I to III dissection may not have been done in all patients, and it is not certain that pathologists removed and examined all the nodes from the specimens. The proposed study seems impossible now that routine axillary node dissection has been abandoned by the larger centers around the world. Choosing the most attractive approach requires determining the aim of lymphatic mapping. A superficial injection technique may be adequate when the purpose is to spare patients without lymph node metastases in the axilla an unnecessary axillary node dissection. An intraparenchymal injection technique should be used when the additional purpose is to determine the stage as accurately as possible and to identify sentinel nodes elsewhere. PMID:11245383

  12. Lymphatic filariasis: Treatment, control and elimination.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Eric A

    2006-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a disease not just treatable or controllable; it is a disease that can be eliminated. Indeed, LF is currently the target of a major global initiative to do just that; a few visionaries of the past 50 years did hypothesize that LF elimination was feasible. However, for most of the scientific and global health communities, the elimination of such a broadly disseminated, mosquito-borne disease has seemed highly unlikely. During the past decade, however, both the treatment strategies and the control strategies for LF have undergone profound paradigm shifts-all because of a rapid increase in knowledge and understanding of LF that derived directly from a series of remarkable achievements by the scientific and medical research communities. As a result, a public health dimension with a focus on affected populations, now supplements the earlier, predominantly patient-oriented clinical approach to LF. The early uncertainties, then the essential steps leading to this change in outlook are outlined below, followed by descriptions of the new strategy for LF elimination, the Global Programme created to attain this goal and the successes achieved to date.

  13. The history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer: From visualization of lymphatic vessels to sentinel nodes.

    PubMed

    de Bree, Remco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer. Sentinel node biopsy is a minimally invasive technique to select patients for treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Although this procedure has only recently been accepted for early oral cancer, the first studies on visualization of the cervical lymphatic vessels were reported in the 1960s. In the 1980s mapping of lymphatic drainage from specific head and neck sites was introduced. Sentinel node biopsy was further developed in the 1990s and after validation in this century the procedure is routinely performed in early oral cancer in several head and neck centers. New techniques may improve the accuracy of sentinel node biopsy further, particularly in difficult subsites like the floor of mouth.

  14. Lymphatic vessels in the developing diaphragm of the rat.

    PubMed

    Poggi, P; Marchetti, C; Calligaro, A; Casasco, A; Scelsi, R

    1991-01-01

    Diaphragms of fetal, neonatal and young albino rats have been observed both under light and electron microscopes to examine the presence and distribution of lymphatic vessels and their morphological features. In fetal diaphragms of between 18 and 22 days of gestation, no normal lymphatic vessels can be seen; only after birth, specifically in neonatal and 2-day-old rats, small lymphatic vessels appear; they are in close proximity to the blood vessels in the inner areas of the muscle. As the rats get older, lymphatic vessels are also observed in the subserosa where an abundant connective tissue is present. The fine structure of diaphragmatic lymphatic vessels is different at different ages. In neonatal rats of up to 2 days, the endothelial wall is very thin and often holed. The relationships between contiguous endothelial cells are characterized by simple end-to-end or overlapping structures. The basement membrane is virtually absent. Within the first week of life, the endothelial wall becomes more complex; along the wall, complex interdigitations between two contiguous endothelial cells often touch. A discontinuous basement membrane and collagen and elastic fibers surround the vessels. In the older rats (from 14 to 25 to 140 days), next to the complex interdigitations which characterize the junction between two contiguous endothelial cells, cellular flaps interdigitate forming a channel which opens out either to the exterior or the interior of the vessel. Dense bundles of elastic and collagen fibers are closely apposed to the endothelial wall.

  15. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction.

  16. [Lymphatic vascular system, development and lymph formation. Review].

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, J-F; Kambouchner, M; Lacave, R

    2013-04-01

    The lymphatic vascular system is widely developed among vertebrates. Lymphatic vessels provide the interstitial fluid (20% of the body weight) drainage through interstitial prelymphatic channels, capillaries, precollectors and collectors flowing into the venous blood. Endothelial cells of capillaries are overlapped and fixed to interstitial collagen and elastic fibres by anchoring filaments facilitating the fluid transfer. Precollectors and collectors have valves controlling the lymph flux direction. In addition to external mechanisms, the lymphangions of collectors have contracting muscle cells driving the flow. Lymphatic endothelial cells are routinely identified by the expression of podoplanin, LYVE-1 and VEGFR3. In the embryo, prelymphatic endothelial cells emerge from the cardinal veins and migrate into the mesenchyma forming embryonic lymphatic sacs. Prox1, Sox18 and COUP-TFII play a major role in the endothelial speciation, VEGFC as VEGFD combined to VEGFR3 in cell migration and proliferation and FoxC2 in valves development. In cancer or inflammation, various factors secreted by cancer cells and/or inflammatory cells induce a neolymphangiogenesis. Recently it has been shown that cells from the bone marrow could be potential precursors for lymphatic endothelial cells.

  17. FOXC2 and FLT4 Gene Variants in Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Sheik, Yasmeen; Qureshi, Sameera Fatima; Mohhammed, Basheeruddin; Nallari, Pratibha

    2015-06-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is the leading cause of secondary lymphedema wherein lymph transport is impaired due to lymphatic damage. FLT4 signaling and transcription factors such as FOXC2 play an important role in this type of lymphangiogenesis process induced by filarial parasites. The present study aims to assess the association of FLT4 and FOXC2 genes in lymphatic development/remodeling in lymphatic filariasis. A total of 118 lymphatic filariasis patients and 100 non-endemic and 50 endemic healthy subjects were enrolled for the present study. Allele-specific PCR and PCR-RFLP were adopted for the genotyping, and screening of FLT4 and FOXC2 genes was carried out by PCR-SSCP, followed by in-silico and statistical analysis. A novel variation (G357A SNP) was identified on FOXC2 gene screening that may have an effect on codon usage frequency during translational process. In FLT4, A3123G mutation was found in 3.39% of the case subjects but the functional role of this mutation, along with subject's clinical presentations and patient's age, emphasize its pathogenic role in lymphedema development. Two of the subjects exhibit compound heterozygosity (A3123G FLT4 mutation and G357A SNP of FOXC2 gene). As these two genes share a common pathway, we hypothesise a synergistic interaction of these two SNPs in inhibiting the downstream signaling resulting in lymphedema progression.

  18. Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Maria P.; Sambou, Sana Malang; Thomas, Brent; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Jaye, Momodou C.; Kelly-Hope, Louise; Escalada, Alba Gonzalez; Molyneux, David H.; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti, which causes lymphatic filariasis (LF) in The Gambia was among the highest in Africa in the 1950s. However, surveys conducted in 1975 and 1976 revealed a dramatic decline in LF endemicity in the absence of mass drug administration (MDA). The decline in prevalence was partly attributed to a significant reduction in mosquito density through the widespread use of insecticidal nets. Based on findings elsewhere that vector control alone can interrupt LF, we asked the question in 2013 whether the rapid scale up in the use of insecticidal nets in The Gambia had interrupted LF transmission. Methodology/Principal Finding We present here the results of three independently designed filariasis surveys conducted over a period of 17 years (1997–2013), and involving over 6000 subjects in 21 districts across all administrative divisions in The Gambia. An immunochromatographic (ICT) test was used to detect W. bancrofti antigen during all three surveys. In 2001, tests performed on stored samples collected between 1997 and 2000, in three divisions, failed to show positive individuals from two divisions that were previously highly endemic for LF, suggesting a decline towards extinction in some areas. Results of the second survey conducted in 2003 showed that LF was no longer endemic in 16 of 21 districts surveyed. The 2013 survey used a WHO recommended LF transmission verification tool involving 3180 6–7 year-olds attending 60 schools across the country. We demonstrated that transmission of W. bancrofti has been interrupted in all 21 districts. Conclusions We conclude that LF transmission may have been interrupted in The Gambia through the extensive use of insecticidal nets for malaria control for decades. The growing evidence for the impact of malaria vector control activities on parasite transmission has been endorsed by WHO through a position statement in 2011 on integrated vector management to control malaria and LF. PMID

  19. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Flügel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid are the two major components that drain from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains via lymphatic vessels and appears to carry antigen-presenting cells. Interstitial fluid from the CNS parenchyma, on the other hand, drains to lymph nodes via narrow and restricted basement membrane pathways within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that do not allow traffic of antigen-presenting cells. Lymphocytes targeting the CNS enter by a two-step process entailing receptor-mediated crossing of vascular endothelium and enzyme-mediated penetration of the glia limitans that covers the CNS. The contribution of the pathways into and out of the CNS as initiators or contributors to neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, will be discussed. Furthermore, we propose a clear nomenclature allowing improved precision when describing the CNS-specific communication pathways with the immune system.

  20. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Flügel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid are the two major components that drain from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains via lymphatic vessels and appears to carry antigen-presenting cells. Interstitial fluid from the CNS parenchyma, on the other hand, drains to lymph nodes via narrow and restricted basement membrane pathways within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that do not allow traffic of antigen-presenting cells. Lymphocytes targeting the CNS enter by a two-step process entailing receptor-mediated crossing of vascular endothelium and enzyme-mediated penetration of the glia limitans that covers the CNS. The contribution of the pathways into and out of the CNS as initiators or contributors to neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, will be discussed. Furthermore, we propose a clear nomenclature allowing improved precision when describing the CNS-specific communication pathways with the immune system. PMID:27522506

  1. Anatomy and development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature: Its role in injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sophie; Riley, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic vessels are present throughout the entire body in all mammals and function to regulate tissue fluid balance, lipid transport and survey the immune system. Despite the presence of an extensive lymphatic plexus within the heart, until recently the importance of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and its origins were unknown. Several studies have described the basic anatomy of the developing cardiac lymphatic vasculature and more recently the detailed development of the murine cardiac lymphatics has been documented, with important insight into their cellular sources during embryogenesis. In this review we initially describe the development of systemic lymphatic vasculature, to provide the background for a comparative description of the spatiotemporal development of the cardiac lymphatic vessels, including detail of both canonical, typically venous, and noncanonical (hemogenic endothelium) cellular sources. Subsequently, we address the response of the cardiac lymphatic network to myocardial infarction (heart attack) and the therapeutic potential of targeting cardiac lymphangiogenesis.

  2. From sewer to saviour - targeting the lymphatic system to promote drug exposure and activity.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system serves an integral role in fluid homeostasis, lipid metabolism and immune control. In cancer, the lymph nodes that drain solid tumours are a primary site of metastasis, and recent studies have suggested intrinsic links between lymphatic function, lipid deposition, obesity and atherosclerosis. Advances in the current understanding of the role of the lymphatics in pathological change and immunity have driven the recognition that lymph-targeted delivery has the potential to transform disease treatment and vaccination. In addition, the design of lymphatic delivery systems has progressed from simple systems that rely on passive lymphatic access to sophisticated structures that use nanotechnology to mimic endogenous macromolecules and lipid conjugates that 'hitchhike' onto lipid transport processes. Here, we briefly summarize the lymphatic system in health and disease and the varying mechanisms of lymphatic entry and transport, as well as discussing examples of lymphatic delivery that have enhanced therapeutic utility. We also outline future challenges to effective lymph-directed therapy.

  3. Anatomy and development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature: Its role in injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sophie; Riley, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic vessels are present throughout the entire body in all mammals and function to regulate tissue fluid balance, lipid transport and survey the immune system. Despite the presence of an extensive lymphatic plexus within the heart, until recently the importance of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and its origins were unknown. Several studies have described the basic anatomy of the developing cardiac lymphatic vasculature and more recently the detailed development of the murine cardiac lymphatics has been documented, with important insight into their cellular sources during embryogenesis. In this review we initially describe the development of systemic lymphatic vasculature, to provide the background for a comparative description of the spatiotemporal development of the cardiac lymphatic vessels, including detail of both canonical, typically venous, and noncanonical (hemogenic endothelium) cellular sources. Subsequently, we address the response of the cardiac lymphatic network to myocardial infarction (heart attack) and the therapeutic potential of targeting cardiac lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26443964

  4. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  5. The Lymphatic Endothelial mCLCA1 Antibody Induces Proliferation and Growth of Lymph Node Lymphatic Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Jordan-Williams, Kimberly L; Ramanujam, Neela; Farr, Andrew G; Ruddell, Alanna

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte- and leukocyte-mediated lymph node (LN) lymphatic sinus growth (lymphangiogenesis) is involved in immune responses and in diseases including cancer and arthritis. We previously discovered a 10.1.1 Ab that recognizes the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) surface protein mCLCA1, which is an interacting partner for LFA1 and Mac-1 that mediates lymphocyte adhesion to LECs. Here, we show that 10.1.1 Ab treatment specifically induces LEC proliferation, and influences migration and adhesion in vitro. Functional testing by injection of mice with 10.1.1 Ab but not control hamster Abs identified rapid induction of LN LEC proliferation and extensive lymphangiogenesis within 23 h. BrdU pulse-chase analysis demonstrated incorporation of proliferating LYVE-1-positive LEC into the growing medullary lymphatic sinuses. The 10.1.1 Ab-induced LN remodeling involved coordinate increases in LECs and also blood endothelial cells, fibroblastic reticular cells, and double negative stroma, as is observed during the LN response to inflammation. 10.1.1 Ab-induced lymphangiogenesis was restricted to LNs, as mCLCA1-expressing lymphatic vessels of the jejunum and dermis were unaffected by 23 h 10.1.1 Ab treatment. These findings demonstrate that 10.1.1 Ab rapidly and specifically induces proliferation and growth of LN lymphatic sinuses and stroma, suggesting a key role of mCLCA1 in coordinating LN remodeling during immune responses. PMID:27224029

  6. The Lymphatic Endothelial mCLCA1 Antibody Induces Proliferation and Growth of Lymph Node Lymphatic Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Jordan-Williams, Kimberly L.; Ramanujam, Neela; Farr, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte- and leukocyte-mediated lymph node (LN) lymphatic sinus growth (lymphangiogenesis) is involved in immune responses and in diseases including cancer and arthritis. We previously discovered a 10.1.1 Ab that recognizes the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) surface protein mCLCA1, which is an interacting partner for LFA1 and Mac-1 that mediates lymphocyte adhesion to LECs. Here, we show that 10.1.1 Ab treatment specifically induces LEC proliferation, and influences migration and adhesion in vitro. Functional testing by injection of mice with 10.1.1 Ab but not control hamster Abs identified rapid induction of LN LEC proliferation and extensive lymphangiogenesis within 23 h. BrdU pulse-chase analysis demonstrated incorporation of proliferating LYVE-1-positive LEC into the growing medullary lymphatic sinuses. The 10.1.1 Ab-induced LN remodeling involved coordinate increases in LECs and also blood endothelial cells, fibroblastic reticular cells, and double negative stroma, as is observed during the LN response to inflammation. 10.1.1 Ab-induced lymphangiogenesis was restricted to LNs, as mCLCA1-expressing lymphatic vessels of the jejunum and dermis were unaffected by 23 h 10.1.1 Ab treatment. These findings demonstrate that 10.1.1 Ab rapidly and specifically induces proliferation and growth of LN lymphatic sinuses and stroma, suggesting a key role of mCLCA1 in coordinating LN remodeling during immune responses. PMID:27224029

  7. Search for lymphatic drainage of the monkey orbit

    SciTech Connect

    McGetrick, J.J.; Wilson, D.G.; Dortzbach, R.K.; Kaufman, P.L.; Lemke, B.N.

    1989-02-01

    Colloid solutions of technetium Tc-99m and india ink injected into the retrobulbar space of the cynomolgus monkey outside the extraocular muscle cone were removed from the orbit by the lymphatic vessels of the conjunctiva and eyelids and were then concentrated within the lymph nodes that drained the conjunctival and eyelid areas. Colloid solutions injected into the retrobulbar space inside the extraocular muscle cone did not reach the conjunctiva and did not collect in any lymph nodes over a 24-hour period. Within the orbit, the injected colloids spread along the planes of the connective-tissue septa. No lymphatic vessels were identified within the orbits posterior to the conjunctiva. Small amounts of india ink left the posterior orbit and ultimately entered the contralateral orbit. This posterior pathway did not lead to lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes and therefore does not appear to represent a prelymphatic pathway.

  8. Emerging lymphatic imaging technologies for mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Kwon, Sunkuk; Rasmussen, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic circulatory system has diverse functions in lipid absorption, fluid homeostasis, and immune surveillance and responds dynamically when presented with infection, inflammation, altered hemodynamics, and cancer. Visualization of these dynamic processes in human disease and animal models of disease is key to understanding the contributory role of the lymphatic circulatory system in disease and to devising effective therapeutic strategies. Longitudinal, non-destructive, and repeated imaging is necessary to expand our understanding of disease progression and regression in basic science and clinical investigations. Herein we summarize recent advances in in vivo lymphatic imaging employing magnetic resonance, computed tomography, lymphoscintigraphy, and emerging optical techniques with respect to their contributory roles in both basic science and clinical research investigations. PMID:24590275

  9. Mechanosensitive β-catenin signaling regulates lymphatic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boksik; Srinivasan, R Sathish

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays a pivotal role in embryonic development and adult homeostasis. However, we have limited information about the involvement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the lymphatic vascular system that regulates fluid homeostasis by absorbing interstitial fluid and returning it to blood circulation. In this recent publication we report that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is highly active and critical for the formation of lymphovenus valves (LVVs) and lymphatic valves (LVs). β-catenin directly associates with the regulatory elements of the lymphedema-associated transcription factor, FOXC2 and activates its expression in an oscillatory shear stress (OSS)-dependent manner. The phenotype of β-catenin null embryos was rescued by FOXC2 overexpression. These results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a mechanotransducer that links fluid force with lymphatic vascular development. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 403-404]. PMID:27418286

  10. Disorders of the lymphatic system of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Patil, A R; Nandikoor, S; De Marco, J; Bhat, R; Shivakumar, S; Mallrajapatna, G

    2016-10-01

    The lymphatic system of the abdomen comprises of the cisterna chyli, its major and minor lymphatic tributaries, and lymph nodes. Disorders of the lymphatic system of the abdomen are rarely encountered and consist of primary and secondary types. Abdominal lymphangiomas constitute the majority and have characteristic imaging features. Complicated lymphangiomas may pose a diagnostic dilemma. Generalised systemic lymphangiomatosis is a rare condition and affects major organs with a poor prognosis. Retroperitoneal lymphangiectasia in the appropriate setting might predict underlying infection, such as filariasis. Other acquired conditions include iatrogenic or treatment-induced chylocoele. Chylous ascites can be secondary to multiple causes and can be confirmed by biochemical testing and lymphangiogram in appropriate settings. PMID:27450410

  11. [Simultaneous occurrence of hemophilia A and acute lymphatic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Schmid, L; Schafroth, U; Osterwalder, B; Senn, H J

    1987-11-14

    In this paper the case of a man with haemophilia A is presented. At the age of 18 years an acute lymphatic leukaemia was observed. The case report demonstrates that even in the presence of a severe plasmatic coagulopathy an acute lymphatic leukaemia can be successfully treated with intensive chemotherapy, if the monitoring of the coagulation values and the substitution of antihaemophilic globulin and thrombocytes are guaranteed. Only 4 cases of haemophilia and acute leukaemia in the same patient are described in the literature. So we believe that the association of these two rare disorders is merely accidental.

  12. Renal peripelvic lymphatic cysts (lymphangiomas) associated with generalized lymphangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Younathan, C M; Kaude, J V

    1992-01-01

    Renal peripelvic lymphatic cysts (lymphangiomas) are usually seen as an isolated finding. They appear as multiple mass lesions with low attenuation on computed tomography (CT), and show no contrast enhancement. We present a case of renal peripelvic lymphatic cysts associated with generalized lymphangiomatosis, and examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT, and lymphangiography. Multiplanar MRI demonstrated the extent of disease, including retroperitoneal lesions. The lesions had low-signal intensity on T1-weighted and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The diagnosis of generalized lymphangiomatosis was verified by renal sinus cyst puncture, lymphangiography, and tissue biopsy.

  13. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Luigia; Terribile, Daniela; Belli, Paolo; Aristei, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy has improved the technique and favored the solution of the problem of limiting cardiac and pulmonary irradiation. However new uncertainties have arisen especially with regard to treatment reproducibility. Passing from the clinical concept of CTV to the geometric concept of PTV, the anatomic identification of the different structure becomes of major importance together with the knowledge of the clinical evolution of breast cancer. The irradiation of breast lymph nodes now requires, if possible, 3D conformal processing of the treatment. Treatment parameters should be selected as to ensure adequate irradiation of target volumes while sparing healthy tissues as much as possible. In a near future, IMRT should be able to markedly improve the dose homogeneity to target with consequent lower cardiopulmonary toxicity. PMID:15018318

  14. Lymphatic disorders after renal transplantation: new insights for an old complication

    PubMed Central

    Ranghino, Andrea; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Lasaponara, Fedele; Biancone, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    In renal transplanted patients, lymphoceles and lymphorrhea are well-known lymphatic complications. Surgical damage of the lymphatics of the graft during the procurement and of the lymphatic around the iliac vessels of the recipients has been associated with development of lymphatic complications. However, lymphatic complications may be related to medical factors such as diabetes, obesity, blood coagulation abnormalities, anticoagulation prophylaxis, high dose of diuretics, delay in graft function and immunosuppressive drugs. Consistently, immunosuppression regimens based on the use of mTOR inhibitors, especially in association with steroids and immediately after transplantation, has been associated with a high risk to develop lymphocele or lymphorrhea. In addition, several studies have demonstrated the association between rejection episodes and lymphatic complications. However, before the discovery of reliable markers of lymphatic vessels, the pathogenic mechanisms underlining the development of lymphatic complications during rejection and the influence of mTOR inhibitors remained not fully understood. The recent findings on the lymphatic systems of either native or transplanted kidneys together with the advances achieved on lymphangiogenesis shared some lights on the pathogenesis of lymphatic complications after renal transplantation. In this review, we describe the surgical and medical causes of lymphatic complications focusing on the rejection and immunosuppressive drugs as causes of lymphatic complications. PMID:26413290

  15. Lack of functioning intratumoral lymphatics in colon and pancreas cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stanczyk, Marek; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Domaszewska-Szostek, Anna; Durlik, Marek

    2012-09-01

    There are controversial views as to whether intratumoral or peritumoral lymphatics play a dominant role in the metastatic process. Most clinical observations originate from studies of colon cancer. Colon contains mucosa and submucosa rich in lymphatics and with high lymph formation rate. This seems to be a prerequisite for easy metastasis of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes. However, there are other tissues as pancreas with a rudimentary lymphatic network where cancer metastasis formation is as intensive as in colon cancer. This contradicts the common notion that intratumor lymphatics play major role in metastases. We visualized interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of colon and pancreas tumors using the color stereoscopic lymphography and simultaneously immunohistochemical performed stainings specific for lymphatic and blood endothelial cells. The density of open and compressed lymphatic and blood vessels was measured in the tumor core and edge. There were very few lymphatics in the colon and pancreas tumor core but numerous minor fluid "lakes" with no visible connection to the peritumoral lymphatics. Lining of "lakes" did not express molecular markers specific for lymphatic endothelial cells. Dense connective tissue surrounding tumor foci did not contain lymphatics. Peritumoral lymphatics were irregularly distributed in both types of tumor and only sporadically contained cells that might be tumor cells. Similar lymphoscintigraphic and histological pictures were seen in colon and pancreas cancer despite of different structure of both tissues. This suggests a uniform reaction of tissues to the growing cancer irrespective of the affected organ.

  16. Development of diaphragmatic lymphatics: the process of their direct connection to the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Shao, X J; Ohtani, O; Saitoh, M; Ohtani, Y

    1998-05-01

    The development of the lymphatic system in the rat diaphragm was studied from embryonic day 16 to 25 weeks after birth by histochemistry for 5'-nucleotidase, scanning electron microscopy of KOH-treated or intact tissues, and transmission electron microscopy of thin sections. On embryonic day 16, distinct lymphatics were noted in the subpleural space of the diaphragm periphery. The endothelial cells at this stage contained an abundance of rough endoplasmic reticulum, a developed Golgi apparatus and mitochondria, and fewer pinocytotic vesicles than those in adults. The subpleural lymphatics subsequently increased and formed a polygonal network. They possessed many valves, and by postnatal week 6, some thick collecting lymphatics became endowed with smooth muscle cells. On embryonic day 19, some lymphatics appeared in the subperitoneal space. They extended centripetally and had many lateral projections that subsequently became elongated and connected with those from adjacent lymphatics, thus forming a lattice-like network. During the early postnatal days, the subperitoneal lymphatics projected many bulges that subsequently became elongated, and came into contact with the pores among the mesothelial cells, thus forming lymphatic stomata connecting the lymphatic lacunae to the peritoneal cavity. The lymphatic stomata increased until postnatal week 10. The results show that lymphatics appear as early as embryonic day 16 in the subpleural space of the diaphragm periphery, and develop with age by sprouting to form networks in both the subpleural and the subperitoneal spaces, and that the direct connection of the lymphatic lacunae to the peritoneal cavity is formed after birth.

  17. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  18. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  19. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  20. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  1. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  2. Enzyme-histochemical study on postnatal development of rat stomach lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Ji, R C; Kato, S

    1997-07-01

    Postnatal development of rat gastric lymphatics was studied by an enzyme-histochemical method to elucidate the morphological changes of lymphatics and their relationship to maturation and function, especially in the glandular portion. The significant features of 5'-Nase-positive lymphatics in distribution and structure were examined in different stages (within 24 hr, 4-21 days, and 2 months). Lymphatics in the greater curvature and anterior wall grew much slower than those in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach in newborn and infant rats. Lymphatic islands isolated from the primary lymphatic networks in the submucosa and subserosa underwent a morphological change during this early period. This is considered one of the basic steps in lymphatic development. Occurrence of lymphatic networks in the deep lamina propria indicates that development in the gastric wall is well characterized from Day 10. With further growth and modification of lymphatics, the networks in the different layers formed an extensive communication network and many lymphatic valves were found in the submucosa and subserosa. Pinocytotic vesicles, open junctions, and intraendothelial channels were frequently detected in the mucosal and submucosal lymphatic networks of the corpus-antrum and antrum-duodenum divisional zones in the adult rats. These findings suggest that developing lymphatics in the rat stomach may represent rapidly growing tissue not only with high 5'-Nase activity but also with high adaptability for future physiological demands.

  3. Anatomic imaging of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Anil; Verma, Sadhna

    2014-01-01

    The important role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomic evaluation, detection, and staging of prostate cancer is well established. This paper focuses on the pertinent embryologic, anatomic, and imaging facts regarding both the normal prostate and the several examples of prostate cancers as well as staging implications. The discussion primarily includes findings related to T2-weighted imaging as opposed to the other functional sequences, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) or dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging, respectively. PMID:25243174

  4. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    PubMed Central

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  5. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    PubMed Central

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort. PMID:25309338

  6. Improved computer-assisted analysis of the global lymphatic network in human cervical tissues.

    PubMed

    Balsat, Cédric; Signolle, Nicolas; Goffin, Frédéric; Delbecque, Katty; Plancoulaine, Benoit; Sauthier, Philippe; Samouëlian, Vanessa; Béliard, Aude; Munaut, Carine; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Blacher, Silvia; Noël, Agnès; Kridelka, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters requires an objective characterization of the lymphatic vasculature. Here, we performed a global analysis of the lymphatic network using a new computerized method applied on whole uterine cervical digital images. Sixty-eight cases of cervical neoplasia (12 CIN3, 10 FIGO stage 1A and 46 stage IB1) and 10 cases of normal cervical tissue were reacted with antibodies raised against D2-40, D2-40/p16 and D2-40/Ki67. Immunostained structures were automatically detected on whole slides. The lymphatic vessel density (D2-40), proliferating lymphatic vessel density (D2-40/ki67) and spatial lymphatic distribution in respect to the adjacent epithelium were assessed from normal cervix to early cervical cancer and correlated with lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node status. Prominent lymphatic vessel density and proliferating lymphatic vessel density are detected under the transformation zone of benign cervix and no further increase is noted during cancer progression. Notably, a shift of lymphatic vessel distribution toward the neoplastic edges is detected. In IB1 cervical cancer, although intra- and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density are neither correlated with lymphovascular space invasion nor with lymph node metastasis, a specific spatial distribution with more lymphatic vessels in the vicinity of tumor edges is predictive of lymphatic dissemination. Herein, we provide a new computerized method suitable for an innovative detailed analysis of the lymphatic network. We show that the transformation zone of the benign cervix acts as a baseline lymphangiogenic niche before the initiation of neoplastic process. During cancer progression, this specific microenvironment is maintained with lymphatic vessels even in closer vicinity to tumor cells. PMID:24309324

  7. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development.

    PubMed

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  8. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  9. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development

    PubMed Central

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W.; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  10. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development

    PubMed Central

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W.; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:27622039

  11. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development.

    PubMed

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:27622039

  12. The Socioeconomic Impact of Lymphatic Filariasis in Tropical Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwoke, Bertram Ekejiuba Bright; Nwoke, Eunice Anyalewechi; Dozie, Ikechukwu Nosike Simplicius

    2007-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is an endemic parasitic disease and a major cause of acute and chronic morbidity and incapacitation with devastating public health and socio-economic consequences. It exacerbates poor conditions of afflicted persons and endemic communities through reduced or lost labour supply and productivity. Stigmatisation and…

  13. Lymphatic vessels in the development of tissue and organ rejection.

    PubMed

    Hos, Deniz; Cursiefen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system-amongst other tasks-is critically involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses as it provides an important route for APC trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs. In this context, the cornea, which is the transparent and physiologically avascular "windscreen" of the eye, has served as an excellent in vivo model to study the role of the blood and lymphatic vasculature in mediating allogenic immune responses after transplantation. Especially the mouse model of high-risk corneal transplantation, where corneal avascularity is abolished by a severe inflammatory stimulus prior to keratoplasty, allows for comparison to other transplantations performed in primarily vascularized tissues and solid organs. Using this model, we recently demonstrated that especially lymphatic vessels, but not blood vessels, define the high-risk status of vascularized corneas and that anti(lymph)angiogenic treatment significantly promotes corneal allograft survival. Since evidence for lymphangiogenesis and its potential association with graft rejection is nowadays also present in solid organ transplantation, studies are currently addressing the potential benefits of anti(lymph)angiogenic treatment as a novel therapeutic concept also in solid organ grafting with promising initial results.

  14. Lymphatic function in the liver after hepatic venous pressure elevation.

    PubMed

    Elk, J R; Drake, R E; Williams, J P; Gabel, J C; Laine, G A

    1988-05-01

    The liver lymphatic system plays an important role in removing excess fluid from the hepatic tissue. A complete analysis of the liver lymphatic system would be difficult. However, we used a simple circuit-analysis technique to represent the intrahepatic portion of the lymph system as a single pressure source (PL) pushing lymph through a single resistance (RL). Liver lymphatic vessels were cannulated in nine halothane-anesthetized dogs. The lymphatic vessel outflow pressure (PO) was varied by raising the outflow end of the cannula. Lymph flow from the cannula (QL) decreased linearly with PO, and we calculated RL as -delta PO/delta QL and PL as the extrapolated PO at which QL = 0. At base line, PL = 8.5 +/- 2.9 cmH2O, and RL = 0.05 +/- 0.03 cmH2O.min/microliter. After we increased inferior vena caval pressure from 5.8 +/- 2.7 to 15.2 +/- 2.5 cmH2O, PL increased significantly to 13.7 +/- 3.4 cmH2O, and RL decreased to 0.02 +/- 0.02 cmH2O.min/microliter (P less than 0.05). The results indicate that increases in QL occur because the effective pressure pushing lymph from the liver (PL) increases, and the effective resistance of the intrahepatic lymph vessels (RL) decreases.

  15. Monitoring contractile dermal lymphatic activity following uniaxial mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Worsley, P R; Voegeli, D; Bader, D L

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that direct mechanical loading can impair dermal lymphatic function, contributing to the causal pathway of pressure ulcers. The present study aims to investigate the effects of loading on human dermal lymphatic vessels. Ten participants were recruited with ages ranging from 24 to 61 years. Participants had intradermal Indocyanine Green injections administrated between left finger digits. Fluorescence was imaged for 5min sequences with an infra-red camera prior to lymph vessel loading, immediately after axial loading (60mmHg) and following a recovery period. Image processing was employed to defined transient lymph packets and compare lymph function between each test phase. The results revealed that between 1-8 transient events (median=4) occurred at baseline, with a median velocity of 8.1mm/sec (range 4.1-20.1mm/sec). Immediately post-loading, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in velocity (median=6.4, range 2.2-13.5mm/sec), although the number of transient lymph packages varied between participants. During the recovery period the number (range 1-7) and velocity (recovery median=9.6mm/sec) of transient packets were largely restored to basal values. The present study revealed that some individuals present with impaired dermal lymphatic function immediately after uniaxial mechanical loading. More research is needed to investigate the effects of pressure and shear on lymphatic vessel patency. PMID:27245749

  16. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. The meningeal lymphatic system: a route for HIV brain migration?

    PubMed

    Lamers, Susanna L; Rose, Rebecca; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nolan, David J; Salemi, Marco; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McGrath, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Two innovative studies recently identified functional lymphatic structures in the meninges that may influence the development of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND). Until now, blood vessels were assumed to be the sole transport system by which HIV-infected monocytes entered the brain by bypassing a potentially hostile blood-brain barrier through inflammatory-mediated semi-permeability. A cascade of specific chemokine signals promote monocyte migration from blood vessels to surrounding brain tissues via a well-supported endothelium, where the cells differentiate into tissue macrophages capable of productive HIV infection. Lymphatic vessels on the other hand are more loosely organized than blood vessels. They absorb interstitial fluid from bodily tissues where HIV may persist and exchange a variety of immune cells (CD4(+) T cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) with surrounding tissues through discontinuous endothelial junctions. We propose that the newly discovered meningeal lymphatics are key to HIV migration among viral reservoirs and brain tissue during periods of undetectable plasma viral loads due to suppressive combinational antiretroviral therapy, thus redefining the migration process in terms of a blood-lymphatic transport system.

  18. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26960166

  19. In vivo dual-modality imaging of lymphatic systems using indocyanine green in rats: three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and planar fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Song, Kwang Hyun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to map non-invasively sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) and lymphatic vessels of rats in vivo using FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG) and two non-ionizing imaging modalities: volumetric spectroscopic photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which measures optical absorption, and planar fluorescence imaging, which measures fluorescent emission. SLNs and lymphatic vessels were clearly visible after a 0.2 ml-intradermal-injection of 1 mM ICG in both imaging systems. We also imaged deeply positioned lymph nodes in vivo by layering biological tissues on top of rats. These two modalities, when used together with ICG, have the potential to map SLNs in axillary staging and to study tumor metastasis in breast cancer patients.

  20. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  1. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  2. Molecular and functional analyses of the contractile apparatus in lymphatic muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Gashev, Anatoliy; Boswell, Niven; Dawson, Nancy; Zawieja, David; Delp, Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatics are necessary for the generation and regulation of lymph flow. Lymphatics use phasic contractions and extrinsic compressions to generate flow; tonic contractions alter resistance. Lymphatic muscle exhibits important differences from typical vascular smooth muscle. In this study, the thoracic duct exhibited significant functional differences from mesenteric lymphatics. To understand the molecular basis for these differences, we examined the profiles of contractile proteins and their messages in mesenteric lymphatics, thoracic duct, and arterioles. Results demonstrated that mesenteric lymphatics express only SMB smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), whereas thoracic duct and arterioles expressed both SMA and SMB isoforms. Both SM1 and SM2 isoforms of SM-MHC were detected in arterioles and mesenteric and thoracic lymphatics. In addition, the fetal cardiac/skeletal slow-twitch muscle-specific beta-MHC message was detected only in mesenteric lymphatics. All four actin messages, cardiac alpha-actin, vascular alpha-actin, enteric gamma-actin, and skeletal alpha-actin, were present in both mesenteric lymphatics and arterioles. However, in thoracic duct, predominantly cardiac alpha-actin and vascular alpha-actin were found. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses corroborated the mRNA studies. However, in arterioles only vascular alpha-actin protein was detected. These data indicate that lymphatics display genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of vascular, cardiac, and visceral myocytes, which are needed to fulfill the unique roles of the lymphatic system.

  3. Smooth muscle–endothelial cell communication activates Reelin signaling and regulates lymphatic vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, Sophie; Xie, Sherry; Tatin, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Active lymph transport relies on smooth muscle cell (SMC) contractions around collecting lymphatic vessels, yet regulation of lymphatic vessel wall assembly and lymphatic pumping are poorly understood. Here, we identify Reelin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein previously implicated in central nervous system development, as an important regulator of lymphatic vascular development. Reelin-deficient mice showed abnormal collecting lymphatic vessels, characterized by a reduced number of SMCs, abnormal expression of lymphatic capillary marker lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), and impaired function. Furthermore, we show that SMC recruitment to lymphatic vessels stimulated release and proteolytic processing of endothelium-derived Reelin. Lymphatic endothelial cells in turn responded to Reelin by up-regulating monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) expression, which suggests an autocrine mechanism for Reelin-mediated control of endothelial factor expression upstream of SMC recruitment. These results uncover a mechanism by which Reelin signaling is activated by communication between the two cell types of the collecting lymphatic vessels—smooth muscle and endothelial cells—and highlight a hitherto unrecognized and important function for SMCs in lymphatic vessel morphogenesis and function. PMID:22665518

  4. Decline of lymphatic vessel density and function in murine skin during aging.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Sinem; Buschle, Dorina; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Proulx, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic vessels play important roles in the pathogenesis of many conditions that have an increased prevalence in the elderly population. However, the effects of the aging process on the lymphatic system are still relatively unknown. We have applied non-invasive imaging and whole-mount staining techniques to assess the lymphatic vessel function and morphology in three different age groups of mice: 2 months (young), 7 months (middle-aged), and 18 months (aged). We first developed and validated a new method to quantify lymphatic clearance from mouse ear skin, using a lymphatic-specific near-infrared tracer. Using this method, we found that there is a prominent decrease in lymphatic vessel function during aging since the lymphatic clearance was significantly delayed in aged mice. This loss of function correlated with a decreased lymphatic vessel density and a reduced lymphatic network complexity in the skin of aged mice as compared to younger controls. The blood vascular leakage in the skin was slightly increased in the aged mice, indicating that the decreased lymphatic function was not caused by a reduced capillary filtration in aged skin. The decreased function of lymphatic vessels with aging might have implications for the pathogenesis of a number of aging-related diseases.

  5. Laparoscopic lymphatic roadmapping with blue dye and radioisotope in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, P P; Petz, W; Casali, L

    2011-11-01

    Lymphatic mapping (LM) and sentinel lymph node (SLN) identification by blue dye in colon cancer is a procedure feasible during minimally invasive surgery, with good specificity, but still a low sensitivity (78% in our series). These results are in accordance with the literature and have limited more widespread diffusion of the method, both as a tool for upstaging and more controversially, as a potential roadmap to a tailored lymphadenectomy. It is possible to improve the results of LM with careful selection of patients and by the use of an intraoperative gamma camera. The preliminary results of intra-operative lymphoscintigraphy are promising in a well-selected small group of patients, with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. If these results are confirmed in further prospective analyses, it may be possible to undertake selected, tailored lymphadenectomy. PMID:22098523

  6. Platelet interaction with lymphatics aggravates intestinal inflammation by suppressing lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirokazu; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Hozumi, Hideaki; Sato, Shingo; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Takajo, Takeshi; Maruta, Koji; Yasutake, Yuichi; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Kurihara, Chie; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Tomita, Kengo; Nagao, Shigeaki; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic failure is a histopathological feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent studies show that interaction between platelets and podoplanin on lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) suppresses lymphangiogenesis. We aimed to investigate the role of platelets in the inflammatory process of colitis, which is likely to be through modulation of lymphangiogenesis. Lymphangiogenesis in colonic mucosal specimens from patients with IBD was investigated by studying mRNA expression of lymphangiogenic factors and histologically by examining lymphatic vessel (LV) densities. Involvement of lymphangiogenesis in intestinal inflammation was studied by administering VEGF-receptor 3 (VEGF-R3) inhibitors to the mouse model of colitis using dextran sulfate sodium and evaluating platelet migration to LVs. The inhibitory effect of platelets on lymphangiogenesis was investigated in vivo by administering antiplatelet antibody to the colitis mouse model and in vitro by coculturing platelets with lymphatic endothelial cells. Although mRNA expressions of lymphangiogenic factors such as VEGF-R3 and podoplanin were significantly increased in the inflamed mucosa of patients with IBD compared with those with quiescent mucosa, there was no difference in LV density between them. In the colitis model, VEGF-R3 inhibition resulted in aggravated colitis, decreased lymphatic density, and increased platelet migration to LVs. Administration of an antiplatelet antibody increased LV densities and significantly ameliorated colitis. Coculture with platelets inhibited proliferation of LECs in vitro. Our data suggest that despite elevated lymphangiogenic factors during colonic inflammation, platelet migration to LVs resulted in suppressed lymphangiogenesis, leading to aggravation of colitis by blocking the clearance of inflammatory cells. Modulating the interaction between platelets and LVs could be a new therapeutic means for treating IBD.

  7. Primary and secondary lymphatic valve development: molecular, functional and mechanical insights.

    PubMed

    Bazigou, Eleni; Wilson, John T; Moore, James E

    2014-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis in vertebrates critically relies on the lymphatic system forming a hierarchical network of lymphatic capillaries and collecting lymphatics, for the efficient drainage and transport of extravasated fluid back to the cardiovascular system. Blind-ended lymphatic capillaries employ specialized junctions and anchoring filaments to encourage a unidirectional flow of the interstitial fluid into the initial lymphatic vessels, whereas collecting lymphatics are responsible for the active propulsion of the lymph to the venous circulation via the combined action of lymphatic muscle cells and intraluminal valves. Here we describe recent findings on molecular and physical factors regulating the development and maturation of these two types of valves and examine their role in tissue-fluid homeostasis.

  8. Characterizing brain anatomical connections using diffusion weighted MRI and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Y; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Melie-García, L; Valdés-Hernández, P A; Martínez-Montes, E; Alemán-Gómez, Y; Sánchez-Bornot, J M

    2007-07-01

    A new methodology based on Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) and Graph Theory is presented for characterizing the anatomical connections between brain gray matter areas. In a first step, brain voxels are modeled as nodes of a non-directed graph in which the weight of an arc linking two neighbor nodes is assumed to be proportional to the probability of being connected by nervous fibers. This probability is estimated by means of probabilistic tissue segmentation and intravoxel white matter orientational distribution function, obtained from anatomical MRI and DW-MRI, respectively. A new tractography algorithm for finding white matter routes is also introduced. This algorithm solves the most probable path problem between any two nodes, leading to the assessment of probabilistic brain anatomical connection maps. In a second step, for assessing anatomical connectivity between K gray matter structures, the previous graph is redefined as a K+1 partite graph by partitioning the initial nodes set in K non-overlapped gray matter subsets and one subset clustering the remaining nodes. Three different measures are proposed for quantifying anatomical connections between any pair of gray matter subsets: Anatomical Connection Strength (ACS), Anatomical Connection Density (ACD) and Anatomical Connection Probability (ACP). This methodology was applied to both artificial and actual human data. Results show that nervous fiber pathways between some regions of interest were reconstructed correctly. Additionally, mean connectivity maps of ACS, ACD and ACP between 71 gray matter structures for five healthy subjects are presented.

  9. Efficient Assessment of Developmental, Surgical and Pathological Lymphangiogenesis Using a Lymphatic Reporter Mouse and Its Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Wonhyuek; Seong, Young Jin; Park, Eunkyung; Bramos, Athanasios; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Daghlian, George; Seo, Jung In; Choi, Inho; Choi, In-Seon; Koh, Chester J.; Kobielak, Agnieszka; Ying, Qi-Long; Johnson, Maxwell; Gardner, Daniel; Wong, Alex K.; Choi, Dongwon; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Several lymphatic reporter mouse lines have recently been developed to significantly improve imaging of lymphatic vessels. Nonetheless, the usage of direct visualization of lymphatic vessels has not been fully explored and documented. Here, we characterized a new Prox1-tdTomato transgenic lymphatic reporter mouse line, and demonstrated how this animal tool enables the researchers to efficiently assess developmental, surgical and pathological lymphangiogenesis by direct visualization of lymphatic vessels. Moreover, we have derived embryonic stem cells from this reporter line, and successfully differentiated them into lymphatic vessels in vivo. In conclusion, these experimental tools and techniques will help advance lymphatic research. PMID:27280889

  10. Low-invasive lymphatic surgery and lymphatic imaging for completely healed intractable pudendal lymphorrhea after gynecologic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Makoto; Hara, Hisako; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mitsui, Kito; Murai, Noriyuki; Koshima, Isao

    2012-01-01

    Lower limb lymphedema and an accompanying lymphatic fistula (lymphorrhea) occur as complications after gynecologic surgery to treat cancer. Herein, we report the case of a 68-year-old woman who underwent resection and radiotherapy because of uterine cervical cancer (stage 2a) 20 years previously. Left lower limb and pudendal lymphedema and continuous lymphorrhea developed soon after surgery. Conservative treatment was administered; however, the edema increased, and a pudendal lymphatic fistula and cellulitis developed repeatedly. Lymphovascular anastomosis (LVA) and lymph vessel ligation were performed after preoperative evaluation via lymphoscintigraphy and indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography. A radioisotope injected into the first interdigit pedal region flowed into the pudendal region via the inguinal lymph nodes at preoperative lymphoscintigraphy. Linear patterns were observed up to the half level of the crus, and stardust patterns occurred over the lower abdominal and pudendal regions at ICG lymphography. During surgery, ICG lymphography was also used to identify the site of the fistula. With the patient under local anesthesia, LVA was applied in the half crus and left inguinal regions, followed by ligation and division of lymph vessels flowing into the fistula. The region around the fistula was excised as a 1 × 3-cm tissue block. As of 5 months after surgery, no recurrence of lymphatic fistula or exacerbation of lymphedema has occurred. This case shows the effectiveness of preoperative ICG lymphography and lymphoscintigraphy followed by treatment via lymph vessel ligation and LVA for curative resolution of a lymphatic fistula.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 promotes the development of the lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Michael T; Meadows, Stryder M; Wynne, Katherine; Cleaver, Ondine; Brekken, Rolf A

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is highly expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells and has been shown to stimulate lymphangiogenesis in adult mice. However, the role VEGFR2 serves in the development of the lymphatic vascular system has not been defined. Here we use the Cre-lox system to show that the proper development of the lymphatic vasculature requires VEGFR2 expression by lymphatic endothelium. We show that Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice possess significantly fewer dermal lymphatic vessels than Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice. Although Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice exhibit lymphatic hypoplasia, the lymphatic network is functional and contains all of the key features of a normal lymphatic network (initial lymphatic vessels and valved collecting vessels surrounded by smooth muscle cells (SMCs)). We also show that Lyve-1(Cre) mice display robust Cre activity in macrophages and in blood vessels in the yolk sac, liver and lung. This activity dramatically impairs the development of blood vessels in these tissues in Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) embryos, most of which die after embryonic day14.5. Lastly, we show that inactivation of Vegfr2 in the myeloid lineage does not affect the development of the lymphatic vasculature. Therefore, the abnormal lymphatic phenotype of Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice is due to the deletion of Vegfr2 in the lymphatic vasculature not macrophages. Together, this work demonstrates that VEGFR2 directly promotes the expansion of the lymphatic network and further defines the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of the lymphatic vascular system.

  12. Automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue: linking imaging mass spectrometry to curated atlases.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Yang, Junhai; De Moor, Bart; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Van de Plas, Raf

    2014-09-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments.

  13. The ITMIG/IASLC Thymic Epithelial Tumors Staging Project: A Proposed Lymph Node Map for Thymic Epithelial Tumors in the Forthcoming 8th Edition of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bhora, Faiz Y; Chen, David J; Detterbeck, Frank C; Asamura, Hisao; Falkson, Conrad; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Huang, James; Kim, Jhingook; Kondo, Kazuya; Lucchi, Marco; Marino, Mirella; Marom, Edith M; Nicholson, Andrew G; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ruffini, Enrico; Van Schil, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Although the presence of nodal disease is prognostic in thymic malignancy, the significance of the extent of nodal disease has yet to be defined. Lymph node dissection has not been routinely performed, and there is currently no node map defined for thymic malignancy. To establish a universal language for reporting as well as characterize the staging of this disease more accurately, an empiric node map is proposed here. This was developed using prior classification systems, series reporting specifics of nodal involvement, anatomical studies of lymphatic drainage, and preexisting node maps of the chest as defined by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and the neck as defined by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the American Society for Head and Neck Surgery. The development of this node map was a joint effort by the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group and the Thymic Domain of the IASLC Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee. It was reviewed and subsequently approved by the members of ITMIG. This map will be used as an adjunct to define node staging as part of a universal stage classification for thymic malignancy. As more data are gathered using definitions set forth by this node map, a revision may be undertaken in the future.

  14. Anatomic study of infrapopliteal vessels.

    PubMed

    Lappas, D; Stavropoulos, N A; Noussios, G; Sakellariou, V; Skandalakis, P

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to study and analyse the anatomical variations of the infrapopliteal vessels concerning their branching pattern. A reliable sample of one hundred formalin-fixed adult cadavers was dissected by the Anatomical Laboratory of Athens University. The variations can be classified in the following way: the normal branching of the popliteal artery was present in 90%. The remainder revealed variant branching patterns: hypoplastic or aplastic posterior tibial artery and the pedis arteries arising from the peroneal (3%); hypoplastic or aplastic anterior tibial artery (1.5%); and the dorsalis pedis formed by two equal branches, arising from the peroneal and the anterior tibial artery (2%). The variations were more frequent in females and in short-height individuals. Knowledge of these variations is rather important for any invasive technic concerning lower extremities.

  15. The anatomical basis of prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that patients with prosopagnosia have right anterior inferior occipital lesions in the region of the occipital temporal junction. Many if not all cases have an additional lesion in the left hemisphere; this is often but apparently not always symmetrical with the right hemisphere lesion. This evidence is discussed in relation to the anatomical connections of these regions and the results of experiments in animals. Images PMID:4209556

  16. The anatomical resources on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Paternostro, F; Orlandini, S Z

    2001-01-01

    The main anatomical resources found on the Internet are listed and discussed here, concerning the topics of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, microscopic anatomy and anatomical museums. The search is updated to September 2000, and all the listed Web sites can be used to build a multimedial anatomical lab. PMID:11410999

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid does not cause blood/lymphatic vessel plasticity in the rat mesentery culture model.

    PubMed

    Sweat, Richard S; Azimi, Mohammad S; Suarez-Martinez, Ariana D; Katakam, Prasad; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind endothelial cell identity is crucial for the goal of manipulating microvascular networks. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and serum stimulation have been suggested to induce a lymphatic identity in blood endothelial cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine if LPA or serum induces blood-to-lymphatic vessel phenotypic transition in microvascular networks. The rat mesentery culture model was used to observe the effect of stimulation on blood and lymphatic microvascular networks ex vivo. Vascularized mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult Wistar rats and cultured with LPA or 10% serum for up to 5 days. Tissues were then immunolabeled with PECAM to identify blood vessels and LYVE-1 or Prox1 to identify lymphatic vessels. We show that while LPA caused capillary sprouting and increased vascular length density in adult microvascular networks, LPA did not cause a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. The results suggest that LPA is not sufficient to cause blood endothelial cells to adopt a lymphatic identity in adult microvascular networks. Similarly, serum stimulation caused robust angiogenesis and increased lymphatic/blood vessel connections, yet did not induce a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. Our study highlights an understudied area of lymphatic research and warrants future investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of blood and lymphatic vessel identity. PMID:27401461

  18. Angiopoietin 2 regulates the transformation and integrity of lymphatic endothelial cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Nurmi, Harri; Appak, Sila; Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Korhonen, Emilia A.; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Lohela, Marja; D’Amico, Gabriela; Holopainen, Tanja; Leow, Ching Ching; Dejana, Elisabetta; Petrova, Tatiana V.; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Alitalo, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Primitive lymphatic vessels are remodeled into functionally specialized initial and collecting lymphatics during development. Lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) junctions in initial lymphatics transform from a zipper-like to a button-like pattern during collecting vessel development, but what regulates this process is largely unknown. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) deficiency leads to abnormal lymphatic vessels. Here we found that an ANG2-blocking antibody inhibited embryonic lymphangiogenesis, whereas endothelium-specific ANG2 overexpression induced lymphatic hyperplasia. ANG2 inhibition blocked VE-cadherin phosphorylation at tyrosine residue 685 and the concomitant formation of button-like junctions in initial lymphatics. The defective junctions were associated with impaired lymph uptake. In collecting lymphatics, adherens junctions were disrupted, and the vessels leaked upon ANG2 blockade or gene deletion. ANG2 inhibition also suppressed the onset of lymphatic valve formation and subsequent valve maturation. These data identify ANG2 as the first essential regulator of the functionally important interendothelial cell–cell junctions that form during lymphatic development. PMID:25030698

  19. Angiopoietin 2 regulates the transformation and integrity of lymphatic endothelial cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Nurmi, Harri; Appak, Sila; Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Korhonen, Emilia A; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Lohela, Marja; D'Amico, Gabriela; Holopainen, Tanja; Leow, Ching Ching; Dejana, Elisabetta; Petrova, Tatiana V; Augustin, Hellmut G; Alitalo, Kari

    2014-07-15

    Primitive lymphatic vessels are remodeled into functionally specialized initial and collecting lymphatics during development. Lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) junctions in initial lymphatics transform from a zipper-like to a button-like pattern during collecting vessel development, but what regulates this process is largely unknown. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) deficiency leads to abnormal lymphatic vessels. Here we found that an ANG2-blocking antibody inhibited embryonic lymphangiogenesis, whereas endothelium-specific ANG2 overexpression induced lymphatic hyperplasia. ANG2 inhibition blocked VE-cadherin phosphorylation at tyrosine residue 685 and the concomitant formation of button-like junctions in initial lymphatics. The defective junctions were associated with impaired lymph uptake. In collecting lymphatics, adherens junctions were disrupted, and the vessels leaked upon ANG2 blockade or gene deletion. ANG2 inhibition also suppressed the onset of lymphatic valve formation and subsequent valve maturation. These data identify ANG2 as the first essential regulator of the functionally important interendothelial cell-cell junctions that form during lymphatic development. PMID:25030698

  20. Angiopoietin 2 regulates the transformation and integrity of lymphatic endothelial cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Nurmi, Harri; Appak, Sila; Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Korhonen, Emilia A; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Lohela, Marja; D'Amico, Gabriela; Holopainen, Tanja; Leow, Ching Ching; Dejana, Elisabetta; Petrova, Tatiana V; Augustin, Hellmut G; Alitalo, Kari

    2014-07-15

    Primitive lymphatic vessels are remodeled into functionally specialized initial and collecting lymphatics during development. Lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) junctions in initial lymphatics transform from a zipper-like to a button-like pattern during collecting vessel development, but what regulates this process is largely unknown. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) deficiency leads to abnormal lymphatic vessels. Here we found that an ANG2-blocking antibody inhibited embryonic lymphangiogenesis, whereas endothelium-specific ANG2 overexpression induced lymphatic hyperplasia. ANG2 inhibition blocked VE-cadherin phosphorylation at tyrosine residue 685 and the concomitant formation of button-like junctions in initial lymphatics. The defective junctions were associated with impaired lymph uptake. In collecting lymphatics, adherens junctions were disrupted, and the vessels leaked upon ANG2 blockade or gene deletion. ANG2 inhibition also suppressed the onset of lymphatic valve formation and subsequent valve maturation. These data identify ANG2 as the first essential regulator of the functionally important interendothelial cell-cell junctions that form during lymphatic development.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid does not cause blood/lymphatic vessel plasticity in the rat mesentery culture model.

    PubMed

    Sweat, Richard S; Azimi, Mohammad S; Suarez-Martinez, Ariana D; Katakam, Prasad; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind endothelial cell identity is crucial for the goal of manipulating microvascular networks. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and serum stimulation have been suggested to induce a lymphatic identity in blood endothelial cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine if LPA or serum induces blood-to-lymphatic vessel phenotypic transition in microvascular networks. The rat mesentery culture model was used to observe the effect of stimulation on blood and lymphatic microvascular networks ex vivo. Vascularized mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult Wistar rats and cultured with LPA or 10% serum for up to 5 days. Tissues were then immunolabeled with PECAM to identify blood vessels and LYVE-1 or Prox1 to identify lymphatic vessels. We show that while LPA caused capillary sprouting and increased vascular length density in adult microvascular networks, LPA did not cause a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. The results suggest that LPA is not sufficient to cause blood endothelial cells to adopt a lymphatic identity in adult microvascular networks. Similarly, serum stimulation caused robust angiogenesis and increased lymphatic/blood vessel connections, yet did not induce a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. Our study highlights an understudied area of lymphatic research and warrants future investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of blood and lymphatic vessel identity.

  2. LyP-1-conjugated doxorubicin-loaded liposomes suppress lymphatic metastasis by inhibiting lymph node metastases and destroying tumor lymphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Changyou; Wen, Ziyi; Feng, Linglin; Wang, Fei; Liu, Yu; Yang, Xiangkun; Dong, Qing; Liu, Min; Lu, Weiyue

    2011-10-01

    Lymphatic metastasis can be greatly promoted by metastases growth and lymphangiogenesis in lymph nodes (LNs). LyP-1, a cyclic peptide, is able to specifically bind with tumor cells and tumor lymphatics in metastatic LNs. This work aimed to use LyP-1-conjugated liposomes (L-LS) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (L-LS/DOX) to suppress lymphatic metastasis by inhibiting both metastases and tumor lymphatics in LNs. L-LS were prepared and exhibited sizes around 90 nm and spherical morphology as characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro cellular studies showed that LyP-1 modification obviously increased liposome uptake by MDA-MB-435 tumor cells and enhanced the cytotoxicity of liposomal DOX. A popliteal and iliac LN metastases model was successfully established by subcutaneous inoculation of tumor cells to nude mice. The immunofluorescence staining analysis indicated that LyP-1 modification enabled specific binding of liposome with tumor lymphatics and enhanced the destroying effect of liposomal DOX on tumor lymphatics. The in vivo fluorescence imaging and pharmacodynamic studies showed that LyP-1 modification increased liposome uptake by metastatic LNs and that L-LS/DOX significantly decreased metastatic LN growth and LN metastasis rate. These results suggested that L-LS/DOX were an effective delivery system for suppressing lymphatic metastasis by simultaneously inhibiting LN metastases and tumor lymphatics.

  3. Quantitative study of the topographic distribution of conjunctival lymphatic vessels in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenyi; Zhu, Yuanfang; Yu, Paula K; Yu, Xiaobo; Sun, Xinghuai; Cringle, Stephen J; Su, Er-Ning; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the topographic distribution of bulbar conjunctival microlymphatic vessels in the monkey. Sixteen eyes from 8 rhesus monkeys were used. Full thickness pieces of globe wall were excised from each quadrant. Cryosections were stained for 5'-nucleotidase, an enzyme histochemical staining for lymphatic vessels, or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, an immunohistochemical marker for the identification of lymphatic endothelial cells, and then counterstained by hematoxylin. The remaining bulbar conjunctiva was dissected and flat mounted. The tissue was then processed with 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme histochemical stain with higher activity in blood vessels. Microscope images were further analysed by image processing. The density of lymphatics, diameter of lymphatic vessels, and the size of the drainage zone of each blind end of the initial lymphatics were studied. Conjunctival lymphatics consisted of initial lymphatics and pre-collectors. The initial lymphatics with blind ends were predominately distributed just under the epithelium. The density of these lymphatics (∼50%) and the drainage zone area (∼0.81 mm(2)) was similar in each quadrant, with no difference in the limbus and fornix regions. The average diameter of lymphatic vessels in each quadrant ranged from 82 to 111 μm, and was greater in the superior and nasal regions. Larger calibre pre-collectors with valve-like structures were mostly located sub Tenon's membrane and predominantly located in the region mid-way between the limbus and fornix. There was a marked depth difference in initial lymphatic distribution, with the initial lymphatics mostly confined to the region between Tenon's membrane and the conjunctival epithelium. Detailed knowledge of the topographic distribution of conjunctival lymphatics have significant relevance to a better understanding of immunology, drug delivery, glaucoma filtration surgery, and tumour

  4. Axillary Reverse Mapping: Five Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Daniela; Korourian, Soheila; Boneti, Cristiano; Adkins, Laura; Badgwell, Brian; Klimberg, V. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesize that mapping the lymphatic drainage of the arm with blue dye (axillary reverse mapping, ARM) during axillary lymphadenectomy decreases the likelihood of disruption of lymphatics and subsequent lymphedema. METHODS This institutional review board-approved study from May 2006 to October 2011 involved 360 patients undergoing SLNB and/or ALND. Technetium sulfur colloid (4 mL) was injected subareolarly and 5 mL of blue dye was injected subcutaneously in the volar surface ipsilateral upper extremity (ARM). Data were collected on variations in lymphatic drainage, successful identification and protection of arm lymphatics, crossover, and occurrence of lymphedema. RESULTS A group of 360 patients underwent SLNB and/or ALND. A total of 348 patients underwent a SLNB. Of those, 237/348(68.1%) had a SLNB only and 111/348(31.9%) went on to an ALND due to a positive axilla. An additional 12/360(3.3%) axilla had ALND due to a clinically positive axilla/preoperative core needle biopsy. In 96%(334/348) of patients with SLNB, breast SLNs were hot but not blue; crossover (SLN hot and blue) was seen in 14/348(4%). Blue lymphatics were identified in 80/237(33.7%) of SLN incisions and in 93/123(75.4%) ALND. Average follow-up was 12 months (range 3 to 48 months) and resulted in a SLNB lymphedema rate of 1.7%(4/237) and ALND of 2.4%(3/123). CONCLUSIONS ARM identified significant lymphatic variations draining the upper extremities and facilitated preservation. Metastases in ARM-identified lymph nodes were acceptably low indicating that ARM is safe. ARM added to present-day ALND and SLNB may be useful to lower lymphedema rates. PMID:25444319

  5. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. PMID:25059735

  6. Exploring local immune responses to vaccines using efferent lymphatic cannulation.

    PubMed

    Mahakapuge, Thilini An; Every, Alison L; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2015-04-01

    The early stages of the induction of a primary immune response to a vaccine can shape the overall quality of the immune memory generated and hence affect the success of the vaccine. This early interaction between a vaccine and the immune system occurs first at the site of vaccination and can be explored using afferent cannulation. Subsequently, the vaccine and adjuvant activates the local draining lymph node. These interactions can be studied in real time in vivo using efferent lymphatic duct cannulation in large animal models and are the subject of this review. Depending on how the vaccine is delivered, the draining lymph nodes of different organs can be accessed, facilitating the testing of tissue-specific vaccinations. The efferent lymphatic cannulation model provides an avenue to study the effect of both adjuvants and antigen on the local immune system, and hence opens a pathway toward developing more effective ways of inducing immunity.

  7. Imaging blood vessels and lymphatic vessels in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jung, H M; Isogai, S; Kamei, M; Castranova, D; Gore, A V; Weinstein, B M

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels supply tissues and organs with oxygen, nutrients, cellular, and humoral factors, while lymphatic vessels regulate tissue fluid homeostasis, immune trafficking, and dietary fat absorption. Understanding the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis has become a subject of intense clinical interest because of the close association of both types of vessels with pathogenesis of a broad spectrum of human diseases. The zebrafish provides a powerful animal model to study vascular morphogenesis because of their small, accessible, and transparent embryos. These unique features of zebrafish embryos permit sophisticated high-resolution live imaging of even deeply localized vessels during embryonic development and even in adult tissues. In this chapter, we summarize various methods for blood and lymphatic vessel imaging in zebrafish, including nonvital resin injection-based or dye injection-based vessel visualization, and alkaline phosphatase staining. We also provide protocols for vital imaging of vessels using microangiography or transgenic fluorescent reporter zebrafish lines. PMID:27263409

  8. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  9. The role of the lymphatic system in cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Hao; Elvington, Andrew; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the pathway for removal of peripheral tissue cholesterol and involves transport of cholesterol back to liver for excretion, starting from cellular cholesterol efflux facilitated by lipid-free apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) or other lipidated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles within the interstitial space. Extracellular cholesterol then is picked up and transported through the lymphatic vasculature before entering into bloodstream. There is increasing evidence supporting a role for enhanced macrophage cholesterol efflux and RCT in ameliorating atherosclerosis, and recent data suggest that these processes may serve as better diagnostic biomarkers than plasma HDL levels. Hence, it is important to better understand the processes governing ApoA1 and HDL influx into peripheral tissues from the bloodstream, modification and facilitation of cellular cholesterol removal within the interstitial space, and transport through the lymphatic vasculature. New findings will complement therapeutic strategies for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:26388772

  10. The Brain Atlas Concordance Problem: Quantitative Comparison of Anatomical Parcellations

    PubMed Central

    Bohland, Jason W.; Bokil, Hemant; Allen, Cara B.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2009-01-01

    Many neuroscientific reports reference discrete macro-anatomical regions of the brain which were delineated according to a brain atlas or parcellation protocol. Currently, however, no widely accepted standards exist for partitioning the cortex and subcortical structures, or for assigning labels to the resulting regions, and many procedures are being actively used. Previous attempts to reconcile neuroanatomical nomenclatures have been largely qualitative, focusing on the development of thesauri or simple semantic mappings between terms. Here we take a fundamentally different approach, discounting the names of regions and instead comparing their definitions as spatial entities in an effort to provide more precise quantitative mappings between anatomical entities as defined by different atlases. We develop an analytical framework for studying this brain atlas concordance problem, and apply these methods in a comparison of eight diverse labeling methods used by the neuroimaging community. These analyses result in conditional probabilities that enable mapping between regions across atlases, which also form the input to graph-based methods for extracting higher-order relationships between sets of regions and to procedures for assessing the global similarity between different parcellations of the same brain. At a global scale, the overall results demonstrate a considerable lack of concordance between available parcellation schemes, falling within chance levels for some atlas pairs. At a finer level, this study reveals spatial relationships between sets of defined regions that are not obviously apparent; these are of high potential interest to researchers faced with the challenge of comparing results that were based on these different anatomical models, particularly when coordinate-based data are not available. The complexity of the spatial overlap patterns revealed points to problems for attempts to reconcile anatomical parcellations and nomenclatures using strictly

  11. Setaria digitata in advancing our knowledge of human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Perumal, A N I; Gunawardene, Y I N S; Dassanayake, R S

    2016-03-01

    Setaria digitata is a filarial parasite that causes fatal cerebrospinal nematodiasis in goats, sheep and horses, resulting in substantial economic losses in animal husbandry in the tropics. Due to its close resemblance to Wuchereria bancrofti, this nematode is also frequently used as a model organism to study human lymphatic filariasis. This review highlights numerous insights into the morphological, histological, biochemical, immunological and genetic aspects of S. digitata that have broadened our understanding towards the control and eradication of filarial diseases. PMID:25924635

  12. Imported lymphatic filariasis in an Indian immigrant to iran.

    PubMed

    Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Sharifdini, Meysam; Hajjaran, Homa; Shahbazi, Ali Ehsan; Sayyad Talaie, Zahra

    2014-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF), a nematode disease transmitted by arthropod vectors, is repeatedly reported in immigrant population. This disease is not endemic in Iran; however, different species of mosquitoes, capable of transmission of parasite microfilaria, are distributed in the country. Hereby, incidental detection of an imported case of LF due to Wuchereria bancrofti in an Indian worker in Iran is reported. Identification of the case was performed based on morphological and morphometrical characteristics of microfilaria and PCR sequencing. PMID:25642273

  13. [Lymphatic cyst of the retroperitoneal space (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    De Blasi, P; Scavelli, V; Martino, D

    1979-10-01

    The authors describe an enormous lymphatic cyst, occupying cephalad and of the retroperitoneal space on the left side, half of it filled with a liquid collection and the other half being solid, displacing and compressing the stomach, spleen, and left kidney and adrenal gland (the later showing evidence of athrophy as a result of compression), Witlial, the patient had no subjective complaints and gave no objective signs of illness beyond the mere evidence of a space-occupying mass.

  14. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  15. Visualisation and stereological assessment of blood and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Lokmic, Zerina; Mitchell, Geraldine M

    2011-06-01

    The physiological processes involved in tissue development and regeneration also include the parallel formation of blood and lymphatic vessel circulations which involves their growth, maturation and remodelling. Both vascular systems are also frequently involved in the development and progression of pathological conditions in tissues and organs. The blood vascular system circulates oxygenated blood and nutrients at appropriate physiological levels for tissue survival, and efficiently removes all waste products including carbon dioxide. This continuous network consists of the heart, aorta, arteries, arterioles, capillaries, post-capillary venules, venules, veins and vena cava. This system exists in an interstitial environment together with the lymphatic vascular system, including lymph nodes, which aids maintenance of body fluid balance and immune surveillance. To understand the process of vascular development, vascular network stability, remodelling and/or regression in any research model under any experimental conditions, it is necessary to clearly and unequivocally identify and quantify all elements of the vascular network. By utilising stereological methods in combination with cellular markers for different vascular cell components, it is possible to estimate parameters such as surface density and surface area of blood vessels, length density and length of blood vessels as well as absolute vascular volume. This review examines the current strategies used to visualise blood vessels and lymphatic vessels in two- and three-dimensions and the basic principles of vascular stereology used to quantify vascular network parameters.

  16. Regulation of lymphatic capillary regeneration by interstitial flow in skin.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jeremy; Conley, Kelly A; Raehl, Alisha; Bondy, Dona M; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Swartz, Melody A; Rutkowski, Joseph M; Jaroch, David B; Ongstad, Emily L

    2007-05-01

    Decreased interstitial flow (IF) in secondary lymphedema is coincident with poor physiological lymphatic regeneration. However, both the existence and direction of causality between IF and lymphangiogenesis remain unclear. This is primarily because the role of IF and its importance relative to the action of the prolymphangiogenic growth factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C (which signals primarily through its receptor VEGFR-3) are poorly understood. To clarify this, we explored the cooperative roles of VEGFR-3 and IF in a mouse model of lymphangiogenesis in regenerating skin. Specifically, a region of lymphangiogenesis was created by substituting a portion of mouse tail skin with a collagen gel within which lymphatic capillaries completely regenerate over a period of 60 days. The relative importance of IF and VEGF-C signaling were evaluated by either inhibiting VEGFR-3 signaling with antagonistic antibodies or by reducing IF. In some cases, VEGF-C signaling was then increased with exogenous protein. To clarify the role of IF, the distribution of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and VEGF-C within the regenerating region was determined. It was found that inhibition of either VEGFR-3 or IF suppressed endogenous lymphangiogenesis. Reduction of IF was found to decrease lymphatic migration and transport of endogenous MMP and VEGF-C through the regenerating region. Therapeutic VEGF-C administration restored lymphangiogenesis following inhibition of VEGFR-3 but did not increase lymphangiogenesis following inhibition of IF. These results identify IF as an important regulator of the pro-lymphangiogenic action of VEGF-C.

  17. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Thomas R; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R G; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-03-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes.

  18. Regional differences in pleural lymphatic albumin concentration in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Schultz, E.L.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Staub, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    We used quantitative reflectance autoradiography to compare the concentration of albumin in visceral pleural lymphatics at the cranial and caudal ends of the sheep's lung in the vertical (60 degrees head-up) and horizontal (supine) positions. Twelve to fourteen hours after injecting 125I-albumin intravenously we placed four anesthetized sheep in the vertical position to establish a microvascular hydrostatic pressure gradient along the vertical height of the lung. We placed two anesthetized sheep in the horizontal position. Four hours later, we fixed the left lung and removed visceral pleural tissue blocks from the cranial and caudal ends, separated by a 15-cm distance, along the costovertebral margin. We measured the silver grain density in the pleural lymphatic autoradiograms by dark-field reflectance microspectrophotometry. In the vertical position, the lymph albumin concentration at the cranial end (top) of the lung averaged 2.5 +/- 0.4 g/dl compared with the caudal end (bottom), which averaged 1.8 +/- 0.3 g/dl. The difference (42% greater at the top than the bottom) is significant (P less than 0.05). The computed gradient in perimicrovascular interstitial albumin osmotic pressure was 0.26 +/- 0.13 cmH2O/cm lung height. There were no differences between the cranial and caudal lymphatic groups in the two horizontal sheep. We conclude that in the sheep lung there is a gradient in perimicrovascular albumin concentration due to the vertical gradient in microvascular hydrostatic pressure.

  19. [Immunologic significance of lymphatic drainage of the brain].

    PubMed

    Weller, R O; Phillips, M J; Kida, S; Zhang, E T

    1997-04-01

    Despite the evidence for immunological reactions in the human CNS, in viral encephalitis and in multiple sclerosis, connections between the brain and the immune system are poorly understood. In rodents, tracers injected into the interstitial fluid of the brain drain to the cervical lymph nodes by perivascular pathways in the brain and nasal lymphatics. Similar pathways could serve as lymphatics in the human brain. In the present study, we test the hypothesis that lymphatic drainage of the brain and cervical lymph nodes play a key role in T-cell mediated immunity of the brain. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in Lewis rats by the injection of guinea pig spinal cord homogenate in complete Freund's adjuvant into the foot pads. This resulted in paralysis of the hind limbs and infiltration of lymphocytes and microglial activation centred mainly on the spinal cord; little inflammation was seen in the cerebrum. When a brain wound, in the form of cryolesion, was inflicted on one cerebral hemisphere, 8 days after the induction of EAE, there was a 6-fold enhancement of EAE lesions in the brain. This enhancement was reduced by 40% cervical lymphadenectomy at the time of the cryolesion. These results suggest that cervical lymph nodes play a pivotal role in cerebral EAE and may be a major source of brain-directed lymphocytes. If similar mechanisms apply in man, study of cervical lymphocytes and their manipulation could open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  20. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids

    PubMed Central

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  1. Vegfc Regulates Bipotential Precursor Division and Prox1 Expression to Promote Lymphatic Identity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Fischer, Johanna C; Francois, Mathias; Ober, Elke A; Yap, Alpha S; Hogan, Benjamin M

    2015-12-01

    Lymphatic vessels arise chiefly from preexisting embryonic veins. Genetic regulators of lymphatic fate are known, but how dynamic cellular changes contribute during the acquisition of lymphatic identity is not understood. We report the visualization of zebrafish lymphatic precursor cell dynamics during fate restriction. In the cardinal vein, cellular commitment is linked with the division of bipotential Prox1-positive precursor cells, which occurs immediately prior to sprouting angiogenesis. Following precursor division, identities are established asymmetrically in daughter cells; one daughter cell becomes lymphatic and progressively upregulates Prox1, and the other downregulates Prox1 and remains in the vein. Vegfc drives cell division and Prox1 expression in lymphatic daughter cells, coupling signaling dynamics with daughter cell fate restriction and precursor division. PMID:26655899

  2. The lymphatic vascular system in liver diseases: its role in ascites formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chuhan; Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    The lymphatic system is part of the circulatory system and plays a key role in normal vascular function. Its failure plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of various diseases including liver diseases. Lymphangiogenesis (the growth of lymphatic vessels) and changes in the properties of lymphatic vessels are associated with pathogenesis of tumor metastases, ascites formation, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Despite its significant role in liver diseases and its importance as a potential therapeutic target for those diseases, the lymphatic vascular system of the liver is poorly understood. Therefore, how the lymphatic vascular system in general and lymphangiogenesis in particular are mechanistically related to the pathogenesis and maintenance of liver diseases are largely unknown. This article summarizes: 1) the lymphatic vascular system; 2) its role in liver tumors, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension; and 3) its role in ascites formation.

  3. Immunohistochemical study of the lymphatic vessels in major salivary glands of the rat.

    PubMed

    Aiyama, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Kenichiro; Takada, Kiyomi; Ikeda, Rie; Sato, Sumie; Kuroki, Jyunya

    2011-02-01

    This study was designed to examine whether lymphatic vessels are present in the lobules of major salivary glands in the rat. Immunostaining with an antibody against podoplanin, a lymphatic endothelial cell marker, was performed on sections of the submandibular, sublingual and parotid glands. Light microscopy demonstrated podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels around the interlobular ducts and the interlobular arteries and veins in the interlobular connective tissue in all of the major salivary glands. No podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels were found in the lobules. Electron microscopy also demonstrated lymphatic endothelial cells showing podoplanin expression only in the interlobular connective tissue. These findings suggest that the lymphatic system of the rat major salivary glands originates in the interlobular connective tissue, and not in the lobules.

  4. Recent Advance in Lymph Dynamic Analysis in Lymphatics and Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatics are a unidirectional transport system that carries fluid from the interstitial space and back into the blood stream. Initial lymphatics take up not only fluid but also high-molecular-weight substances, such as plasma proteins and hyaluronan; immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells; and colloidal particles, such as carbon particles, bacteria, and tattoo dye. Interstitially injected colloidal particles are known to accumulate in the regional lymph nodes. This phenomenon is applied to find sentinel lymph nodes in cancer patients. Lymph flow rate and composition are influenced by interstitial fluid, lymphatic pump activity, and intra-lymphatic pressure. Lymph composition is changed during its flow downstream. In this review, the main focus is on the mechanisms of lymph formation at the initial lymphatics and lymph transport through the collecting lymphatics and lymph nodes. (*English Translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol, 2008, 48: 113-123.) PMID:23555523

  5. Lymphatics in Neurological Disorders: A Neuro-Lympho-Vascular Component of Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Da Mesquita, Sandro; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic vasculature drains interstitial fluids, which contain the tissue's waste products, and ensures immune surveillance of the tissues, allowing immune cell recirculation. Until recently, the CNS was considered to be devoid of a conventional lymphatic vasculature. The recent discovery in the meninges of a lymphatic network that drains the CNS calls into question classic models for the drainage of macromolecules and immune cells from the CNS. In the context of neurological disorders, the presence of a lymphatic system draining the CNS potentially offers a new player and a new avenue for therapy. In this review, we will attempt to integrate the known primary functions of the tissue lymphatic vasculature that exists in peripheral organs with the proposed function of meningeal lymphatic vessels in neurological disorders, specifically multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We propose that these (and potentially other) neurological afflictions can be viewed as diseases with a neuro-lympho-vascular component and should be therapeutically targeted as such. PMID:27608759

  6. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids.

    PubMed

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  7. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  8. Basement membrane protein distribution in LYVE-1-immunoreactive lymphatic vessels of normal tissues and ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vainionpää, Noora; Bützow, Ralf; Hukkanen, Mika; Jackson, David G; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Sakai, Lynn Y; Virtanen, Ismo

    2007-05-01

    The endothelial cells of blood vessels assemble basement membranes that play a role in vessel formation, maintenance and function, and in the migration of inflammatory cells. However, little is known about the distribution of basement membrane constituents in lymphatic vessels. We studied the distribution of basement membrane proteins in lymphatic vessels of normal human skin, digestive tract, ovary and, as an example of tumours with abundant lymphatics, ovarian carcinomas. Basement membrane proteins were localized by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies, whereas lymphatic capillaries were detected with antibodies to the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, LYVE-1. In skin and ovary, fibrillar immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1 was found in the basement membrane region of the lymphatic endothelium, whereas also heterogeneous reactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain was detected in the digestive tract. Among ovarian carcinomas, intratumoural lymphatic vessels were found especially in endometrioid carcinomas. In addition to the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1, carcinoma lymphatics showed immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein, a receptor for the laminin alpha5 chain. In normal lymphatic capillaries, the presence of primarily alpha4 chain laminins may therefore compromise the formation of endothelial basement membrane, as these truncated laminins lack one of the three arms required for efficient network assembly. The localization of basement membrane proteins adjacent to lymphatic endothelia suggests a role for these proteins in lymphatic vessels. The distribution of the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein proposes a difference between normal and carcinoma lymphatic capillaries.

  9. [Ultrasonic dissection and coagulation by attachment ("Harmonic Focus" in anatomic resection of the lung].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Karlson, A

    2014-01-01

    The authors aimed to evaluate the efficacy of application of ultrasound dissection technology and coagulation by using "Harmonic Focus" (HF) instrument, while performing anatomical resection of the lung in open thoracic surgery. The method was carried out in serial 20 patients with lung cancer, whom the lung anatomical resection was performed. A long attachment (17 cm) with curved branches was applied. There were 11 lobectomies and 9 pneumoectomies. The application of HF allowed the dissection of pleural adhesions, pulmonary ligament, a separation of roots of the lung elements, lymphatic nodes of roots of the lung and mediastinum, in spite of being very close to vessels. A fatty tissue of the mediastinum was removed quickly and practically without blood. The HF considerably accelerated the process of vessel treatment, especially, while performing the lobectomy. At the same time, the attempts of application of HF instrument for separation of interlobal fissure resulted in not quite satisfactory aerostasis and hemostasis. The duration of the lobectomy was 127 +/- 35 minutes at the average and in the case of pneumoectomy, it consisted of 120 +/- 45 minutes. An intraoperative hemorrhage was 300 +/- 145 ml. A quantity of exudates was 440 +/- 280 ml by drainage on the first day. The pleural cavity drainage was used during 3 +/- 1 days. The HF instrument, which was applied for ultrasonic dissection and coagulation, was characterized by multifunctionality and simplicity of usage. It was recommended for a wide application in the thoracic surgery for performing the anatomical lung resections by thoracotomy method. PMID:25055517

  10. Restoration of lymphatic function rescues obesity in Prox1-haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Steven T.; Dillard, Miriam E.; Johnson, Nicole; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prox1 heterozygous mice have a defective lymphatic vasculature and develop late-onset obesity. Chyle abnormally leaks from those vessels, accumulates in the surrounding tissues, and causes an increase in adipose tissue. We characterized the lymphatics of Prox1+/– mice to determine whether the extent of obesity correlated with the severity of lymphatic defects. The lymphatic vasculature in Prox1+/– mice exhibited reduced tracer clearance from the ear skin, dysfunctional perfusion of the lower legs, and reduced tracer uptake into the deep lymphatic collectors during mechanostimulation prior to the onset of obesity. Ear lymphatic vessels and leg collectors in Prox1+/– mice were disorganized and irregular, further confirming that defective lymphatic vessels are associated with obesity in Prox1+/– mice. We now provide conclusive in vivo evidence that demonstrates that leaky lymphatics mediate obesity in Prox1+/– mice, as restoration of lymphatic vasculature function was sufficient to rescue the obesity features in Prox1+/– mice. Finally, depth-lipomic profiling of lymph contents showed that free fatty acids induce adipogenesis in vitro. PMID:26973883

  11. A tale of two models: mouse and zebrafish as complementary models for lymphatic studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2014-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels provide essential roles in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. Dysfunctions of the lymphatic vessels lead to debilitating pathological conditions, collectively known as lymphedema. In addition, lymphatic vessels are a critical moderator for the onset and progression of diverse human diseases including metastatic cancer and obesity. Despite their clinical importance, there is no currently effective pharmacological therapy to regulate functions of lymphatic vessels. Recent efforts to manipulate the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C (VEGFC) pathway, which is arguably the most important signaling pathway regulating lymphatic endothelial cells, to alleviate lymphedema yielded largely mixed results, necessitating identification of new targetable signaling pathways for therapeutic intervention for lymphedema. Zebrafish, a relatively new model system to investigate lymphatic biology, appears to be an ideal model to identify novel therapeutic targets for lymphatic biology. In this review, we will provide an overview of our current understanding of the lymphatic vessels in vertebrates, and discuss zebrafish as a promising in vivo model to study lymphatic vessels.

  12. Contractile activity of lymphatic vessels is altered in the TNBS model of guinea pig ileitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Theresa F; Carati, Colin J; Macnaughton, Wallace K; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    The ability of the lymphatic system to actively remove fluid from the interstitium is critical to the resolution of edema. The response of the lymphatics to inflammatory situations is poorly studied, so we examined mesenteric lymphatic contractile activity in the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of guinea pig ileitis, a well-accepted animal model of intestinal inflammation, by videomicroscopy in vivo and in vitro 1, 3, and 6 days after induction of ileitis. Lymphatic function (diameter, constriction frequency, amplitude of constrictions, and calculated stroke volume and lymph flow rate) of isolated vessels from TNBS-treated guinea pigs were impaired compared with sham-treated controls. The dysfunction was well correlated with the degree of inflammation, with differences reaching significance (P < 0.05) at the highest inflammation-induced damage observed at day 3. In vivo, significantly fewer lymphatics exhibited spontaneous constrictions in TNBS-treated than sham-treated animals. Cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites were suggested to be involved in this lymphatic dysfunction, since application of nonselective COX inhibitor (10 microM indomethacin) or a combination of COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors (1 microM SC-560 and 10 microM celecoxib) markedly increased constriction frequency or induced them in lymphatics from TNBS-treated animals in vivo and in vitro. The present results demonstrate that lymphatic contractile function is altered in TNBS-induced ileitis and suggest a role for prostanoids in the lymphatic dysfunction.

  13. Advanced drug delivery to the lymphatic system: lipid-based nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Ali Khan, Arshad; Mudassir, Jahanzeb; Mohtar, Noratiqah; Darwis, Yusrida

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of drugs and bioactive compounds via the lymphatic system is complex and dependent on the physiological uniqueness of the system. The lymphatic route plays an important role in transporting extracellular fluid to maintain homeostasis and in transferring immune cells to injury sites, and is able to avoid first-pass metabolism, thus acting as a bypass route for compounds with lower bioavailability, ie, those undergoing more hepatic metabolism. The lymphatic route also provides an option for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, such as drugs to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus, which can travel through the lymphatic system. Lymphatic imaging is useful in evaluating disease states and treatment plans for progressive diseases of the lymph system. Novel lipid-based nanoformulations, such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have unique characteristics that make them promising candidates for lymphatic delivery. These formulations are superior to colloidal carrier systems because they have controlled release properties and provide better chemical stability for drug molecules. However, multiple factors regulate the lymphatic delivery of drugs. Prior to lymphatic uptake, lipid-based nanoformulations are required to undergo interstitial hindrance that modulates drug delivery. Therefore, uptake and distribution of lipid-based nanoformulations by the lymphatic system depends on factors such as particle size, surface charge, molecular weight, and hydrophobicity. Types of lipid and concentration of the emulsifier are also important factors affecting drug delivery via the lymphatic system. All of these factors can cause changes in intermolecular interactions between the lipid nanoparticle matrix and the incorporated drug, which in turn affects uptake of drug into the lymphatic system. Two lipid-based nanoformulations, ie, solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have been administered via multiple routes

  14. Lymphatic transport of exosomes as a rapid route of information dissemination to the lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Swetha; Vannberg, Fredrik O.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that cells secrete exosomes, which can transfer biomolecules that impact recipient cells’ functionality in a variety of physiologic and disease processes. The role of lymphatic drainage and transport of exosomes is as yet unknown, although the lymphatics play critical roles in immunity and exosomes are in the ideal size-range for lymphatic transport. Through in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging we have shown that exosomes are rapidly transported within minutes from the periphery to the lymph node by lymphatics. Using an in vitro model of lymphatic uptake, we have shown that lymphatic endothelial cells actively enhanced lymphatic uptake and transport of exosomes to the luminal side of the vessel. Furthermore, we have demonstrated a differential distribution of exosomes in the draining lymph nodes that is dependent on the lymphatic flow. Lastly, through endpoint analysis of cellular distribution of exosomes in the node, we identified macrophages and B-cells as key players in exosome uptake. Together these results suggest that exosome transfer by lymphatic flow from the periphery to the lymph node could provide a mechanism for rapid exchange of infection-specific information that precedes the arrival of migrating cells, thus priming the node for a more effective immune response. PMID:27087234

  15. Advanced drug delivery to the lymphatic system: lipid-based nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad Ali; Mudassir, Jahanzeb; Mohtar, Noratiqah; Darwis, Yusrida

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of drugs and bioactive compounds via the lymphatic system is complex and dependent on the physiological uniqueness of the system. The lymphatic route plays an important role in transporting extracellular fluid to maintain homeostasis and in transferring immune cells to injury sites, and is able to avoid first-pass metabolism, thus acting as a bypass route for compounds with lower bioavailability, ie, those undergoing more hepatic metabolism. The lymphatic route also provides an option for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, such as drugs to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus, which can travel through the lymphatic system. Lymphatic imaging is useful in evaluating disease states and treatment plans for progressive diseases of the lymph system. Novel lipid-based nanoformulations, such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have unique characteristics that make them promising candidates for lymphatic delivery. These formulations are superior to colloidal carrier systems because they have controlled release properties and provide better chemical stability for drug molecules. However, multiple factors regulate the lymphatic delivery of drugs. Prior to lymphatic uptake, lipid-based nanoformulations are required to undergo interstitial hindrance that modulates drug delivery. Therefore, uptake and distribution of lipid-based nanoformulations by the lymphatic system depends on factors such as particle size, surface charge, molecular weight, and hydrophobicity. Types of lipid and concentration of the emulsifier are also important factors affecting drug delivery via the lymphatic system. All of these factors can cause changes in intermolecular interactions between the lipid nanoparticle matrix and the incorporated drug, which in turn affects uptake of drug into the lymphatic system. Two lipid-based nanoformulations, ie, solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have been administered via multiple routes

  16. The role of the lymphatic system in endometriosis: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jerman, Laila F; Hey-Cunningham, Alison J

    2015-03-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological disorder characterized by the presence of tissue resembling the endometrium in locations outside the uterus. The pathogenesis of endometriosis is still unknown; however, it is believed that the lymphatic system plays major roles in the development and progression of the disease. The lymphatic dissemination theory has been proposed to explain the presence of endometrial and/or endometriotic tissue in lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and rare sites, as well as high reoccurrence rates following treatment. Despite the importance of the lymphatic system in many aspects of endometriosis, there has been no previous thorough scientific update on its role in the disease. A review of scientific literature on the lymphatic system, lymphangiogenesis, and immunological changes associated with endometriosis was conducted. Lymphangiogenic potential is disturbed and lymphatic vessel density increased in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis, likely promoting the entry of endometrial tissues into the lymphatic circulation. Endometriotic lesions and endometrial-like cells are present in uterine-draining nodes and various other pelvic lymph nodes. Immune responses are impaired in uterine-draining nodes, likely favoring the survival of endometrial cells and lesion establishment. In addition, lymphangiogenesis in endometriotic lesions may contribute to lesion growth and persistence, and promote the spread of endometrial cells to draining lymph nodes. The evidence reviewed in this paper supports the theory of lymphatic dissemination of endometriosis and highlights the roles of the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis and persistence of endometriosis. Understanding these roles is crucial for establishment of novel therapeutic approaches.

  17. A transgenic Prox1-Cre-tdTomato reporter mouse for lymphatic vessel research.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Roberta; Teijeira, Alvaro; Proulx, Steven T; Christiansen, Ailsa J; Seidel, Catharina D; Rülicke, Thomas; Mäkinen, Taija; Hägerling, René; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an active role in immune cell trafficking, inflammation and cancer spread. In order to provide an in vivo tool to improve our understanding of lymphatic vessel function in physiological and pathological conditions, we generated and characterized a tdTomato reporter mouse and crossed it with a mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the lymphatic specific promoter Prox1 in an inducible fashion. We found that the tdTomato fluorescent signal recapitulates the expression pattern of Prox1 in lymphatic vessels and other known Prox1-expressing organs. Importantly, tdTomato co-localized with the lymphatic markers Prox1, LYVE-1 and podoplanin as assessed by whole-mount immunofluorescence and FACS analysis. The tdTomato reporter was brighter than a previously established red fluorescent reporter line. We confirmed the applicability of this animal model to intravital microscopy of dendritic cell migration into and within lymphatic vessels, and to fluorescence-activated single cell analysis of lymphatic endothelial cells. Additionally, we were able to describe the early morphological changes of the lymphatic vasculature upon induction of skin inflammation. The Prox1-Cre-tdTomato reporter mouse thus shows great potential for lymphatic research.

  18. Anatomical heterogeneity of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Young; Jeon, Seun; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Geon Ha; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yoon, Cindy W.; Kim, Hee Jin; Chin, Juhee; Park, Kee Hyung; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Because the signs associated with dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) can be heterogeneous, the goal of this study was to use 3-dimensional MRI to examine the various patterns of cortical atrophy that can be associated with dementia of AD type, and to investigate whether AD dementia can be categorized into anatomical subtypes. Methods: High-resolution T1-weighted volumetric MRIs were taken of 152 patients in their earlier stages of AD dementia. The images were processed to measure cortical thickness, and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed using Ward's clustering linkage. The identified clusters of patients were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group using a general linear model. Results: There were several distinct patterns of cortical atrophy and the number of patterns varied according to the level of cluster analyses. At the 3-cluster level, patients were divided into (1) bilateral medial temporal–dominant atrophy subtype (n = 52, ∼34.2%), (2) parietal-dominant subtype (n = 28, ∼18.4%) in which the bilateral parietal lobes, the precuneus, along with bilateral dorsolateral frontal lobes, were atrophic, and (3) diffuse atrophy subtype (n = 72, ∼47.4%) in which nearly all association cortices revealed atrophy. These 3 subtypes also differed in their demographic and clinical features. Conclusions: This cluster analysis of cortical thickness of the entire brain showed that AD dementia in the earlier stages can be categorized into various anatomical subtypes, with distinct clinical features. PMID:25344382

  19. Brain anatomical network and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-05-01

    Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. We constructed binary and weighted brain anatomical networks in each of 79 healthy young adults utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. Based on their IQ test scores, all subjects were divided into general and high intelligence groups and significantly higher global efficiencies were found in the networks of the latter group. Moreover, we showed significant correlations between IQ scores and network properties across all subjects while controlling for age and gender. Specifically, higher intelligence scores corresponded to a shorter characteristic path length and a higher global efficiency of the networks, indicating a more efficient parallel information transfer in the brain. The results were consistently observed not only in the binary but also in the weighted networks, which together provide convergent evidence for our hypothesis. Our findings suggest that the efficiency of brain structural organization may be an important biological basis for intelligence. PMID:19492086

  20. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  1. The Anatomical and Functional Organization of the Human Visual Pulvinar

    PubMed Central

    Pinsk, Mark A.; Kastner, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The pulvinar is the largest nucleus in the primate thalamus and contains extensive, reciprocal connections with visual cortex. Although the anatomical and functional organization of the pulvinar has been extensively studied in old and new world monkeys, little is known about the organization of the human pulvinar. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, we identified two visual field maps within the ventral pulvinar, referred to as vPul1 and vPul2. Both maps contain an inversion of contralateral visual space with the upper visual field represented ventrally and the lower visual field represented dorsally. vPul1 and vPul2 border each other at the vertical meridian and share a representation of foveal space with iso-eccentricity lines extending across areal borders. Additional, coarse representations of contralateral visual space were identified within ventral medial and dorsal lateral portions of the pulvinar. Connectivity analyses on functional and diffusion imaging data revealed a strong distinction in thalamocortical connectivity between the dorsal and ventral pulvinar. The two maps in the ventral pulvinar were most strongly connected with early and extrastriate visual areas. Given the shared eccentricity representation and similarity in cortical connectivity, we propose that these two maps form a distinct visual field map cluster and perform related functions. The dorsal pulvinar was most strongly connected with parietal and frontal areas. The functional and anatomical organization observed within the human pulvinar was similar to the organization of the pulvinar in other primate species. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The anatomical organization and basic response properties of the visual pulvinar have been extensively studied in nonhuman primates. Yet, relatively little is known about the functional and anatomical organization of the human pulvinar. Using neuroimaging, we found multiple representations of visual space within the ventral

  2. Unpredictability of lymphatic drainage patterns in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Statius Muller, Markwin G; Hennipman, Feitse A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Pijpers, Rik; Vuylsteke, Ronald J; Meijer, Sybren

    2002-02-01

    We analysed the localisations of sentinel nodes (SN) found with the SN procedure to compare these sites with those that would have been predicted by conventional clinical descriptions of cutaneous lymphatic drainage. We assessed the surplus value of performing the SN procedure in melanoma patients who underwent regional nodal surgery. The SN procedure was performed in 348 patients with melanomas who were referred to our institute between 1993 and 1999. The localisations of the melanomas with the corresponding SNs were meticulously recorded on drawings of the human body and grouped according to the conventional descriptions. Predictability of lymph drainage was defined as the percentage of melanomas whose draining pattern was to the ipsilateral nearest basin, without simultaneous drainage to other basins or to an interval node. In all patients the SN procedure visualised at least one SN. We found 410 lymphatic basins in 347 patients. These basins included basins that could not have been predicted by the conventional clinical descriptions, such as multiple basins and contralateral drainage sites. For the head/neck region, SNs could be found in any of the basins described in the literature. The trunk's drainage predictability depended strongly on the melanoma localisation, ranging from 0% in the midline to 92% in one of the upper quadrants. The lower extremities had a high predictability of almost 100%, and predictability of drainage for the upper extremities ranged from 77% to 100%. In total, 34% of the patients had a cutaneous lymphatic drainage that was unpredictable, either totally or partially. We therefore conclude that an SN procedure is indispensable if the drainage site(s) are to be accurately identified. PMID:11930886

  3. Lymphatic filariasis in Brazil: epidemiological situation and outlook for elimination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the World Health Assembly’s (Resolution WHA 50.29, 1997) call for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis by the year 2020, most of the endemic countries identified have established programmes to meet this objective. In 1997, a National Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Plan was drawn up by the Ministry of Health of Brazil, creating local programs for the elimination of Bancroftian filariasis in areas with active transmission. Based on a comprehensive bibliographic search for available studies and reports of filariasis epidemiology in Brazil, current status of this parasitic infection and the outlook for its elimination in the country were analysed. From 1951 to 1958 a nationwide epidemiological study conducted in Brazil confirmed autochthonous transmission of Bancroftian filariasis in 11 cities of the country. Control measures led to a decline in parasite rates, and in the 1980s only the cities of Belém in the Amazonian region (Northern region) and Recife (Northeastern region) were considered to be endemic. In the 1990s, foci of active transmission of LF were also described in the cities of Maceió, Olinda, Jaboatão dos Guararapes, and Paulista, all in the Northeastern coast of Brazil. Data provide evidence for the absence of microfilaremic subjects and infected mosquitoes in Belém, Salvador and Maceió in the past few years, attesting to the effectiveness of the measures adopted in these cities. Currently, lymphatic filariasis is a public health problem in Brazil only in four cities of the metropolitan Recife region (Northeastern coast). Efforts are being concentrated in these areas, with a view to eliminating the disease in the country. PMID:23181663

  4. Isolation, Characterization, and Functional Analysis of Ferret Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berendam, Stella J.; Fallert-Junecko, Beth A.; Murphy-Corb, Michael A.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Reinhart, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic endothelium (LE) serves as a conduit for transport of immune cells and soluble antigens from peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes (LNs), contributing to development of host immune responses and possibly dissemination of microbes. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are major constituents of the lymphatic endothelium. These specialized cells could play important roles in initiation of host innate immune responses through sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including toll-like receptors (TLRs). LECs secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to create local inflammatory conditions for recruitment of naïve antigen presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells (DCs) to sites of infection and/or vaccine administration. In this study, we examined the innate immune potential of primary LEC populations derived from multiple tissues of an animal model for human infectious diseases -- the ferret. We generated a total of six primary LEC populations from lung, tracheal, and mesenteric LN tissues from three different ferrets. Standard RT-PCR characterization of these primary LECs showed that they varied in their expression of LEC markers. The ferret LECs were examined for their ability to respond to poly I:C (TLR3 and RIG-1 ligand) and other known TLR ligands as measured by production of proinflammatory cytokine (IFNα, IL6, IL10, Mx1, and TNFα) and chemokine (CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10) mRNAs using real time RT-PCR. Poly I:C exposure induced robust proinflammatory responses by all of the primary ferret LECs. Chemotaxis was performed to determine the functional activity of CCL20 produced by the primary lung LECs and showed that the LEC-derived CCL20 was abundant and functional. Taken together, our results continue to reveal the innate immune potential of primary LECs during pathogen-host interactions and expand our understanding of the roles of LECs might play in health and disease in

  5. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Bernhard; Rohringer, Sabrina; Pröll, Johannes; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplanin(high) cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510) and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations.

  6. Mathematical models and lymphatic filariasis control: monitoring and evaluating interventions.

    PubMed

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela-Lazaro, Mwele N; Maegga, Bertha T A; Fischer, Peter; Kazura, James W

    2006-11-01

    Monitoring and evaluation are crucially important to the scientific management of any mass parasite control programme. Monitoring enables the effectiveness of implemented actions to be assessed and necessary adaptations to be identified; it also determines when management objectives are achieved. Parasite transmission models can provide a scientific template for informing the optimal design of such monitoring programmes. Here, we illustrate the usefulness of using a model-based approach for monitoring and evaluating anti-parasite interventions and discuss issues that need addressing. We focus on the use of such an approach for the control and/or elimination of the vector-borne parasitic disease, lymphatic filariasis. PMID:16971182

  7. ACE Inhibitor in the treatment of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kaura, Vinod; Kaura, Samantha H; Kaura, Claire S

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme is used as a marker for sarcoid activity. We describe a case of remission of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis in a patient treated with an ACE inhibitor for congestive heart failure and hypertension; the remission has continued over 4 years of follow-up. Because this is a report of only one case, there is a possibility of sampling error. Whether the patient's remission in this case was a serendipitous spontaneous remission that happened to occur during ACE inhibitor therapy or whether ACE inhibitor therapy can play a role in the treatment of sarcoidosis needs to be determined in a large clinical trial.

  8. [Retroperitoneal "lymphatic cysts" after radical operations in uterine cancer].

    PubMed

    Dekster, L I; Vasil'ev, B V

    1979-01-01

    The authors report the results of studying the complications of iliac lymphadenectomy--lymphocysts developed after radical operations in 16 of 415 operated patients with cancer of the uterus. The method of indirect radioisotope lymphography may be considered to be the most simple method of detecting lymphatic cysts. Small size lymphocysts require no special surgical intervention. Extensive incapsulated lymph accumulation renders mandatory the incision and drainage of the lymphocyst in the iliac region at the site of the involvement. The most rational prophylactic measures against lymphocysts seem to be the provision for active lymph outflow by vacuum drainage.

  9. Investigational Lymphatic Imaging at the Bedside in a Pediatric Postoperative Chylothorax Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tan, I-Chih; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Balaguru, Duraisamy; Bricker, John T.; Guilliod, Renie; Douglas, William I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chylothorax is a rare but serious complication in children who undergo heart surgery. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, and invasive surgical treatments are considered only after conservative management fails. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, which could aid decision making for earlier surgical intervention, are difficult to apply. Herein, we deployed near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) lymphatic imaging to allow the visualization of abnormal lymphatic drainage in an infant with postoperative chylothorax to guide the choice of surgical management. Methods A 5-week-old male infant, who developed chylothoraces after undergoing Norwood surgery for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, was intradermally administered trace doses of indocyanine green in both feet and the left hand. NIRF imaging was then performed at the bedside to visualize lymphatic drainage patterns. Results Imaging results indicated impeded lymphatic drainage from the feet toward the trunk with no fluorescence in the chest indicating no leakage of peripheral lymph at the thoracic duct. Instead, lymph drainage occurred from the axilla directly into the pleural cavity. As a result of imaging, left pleurodesis was performed to stop the pleural effusion with the result of temporary decrease of left chest tube drainage. Conclusion Although additional studies are required to understand normal and abnormal lymphatic drainage patterns in infants, we showed the potential of using NIRF lymphatic imaging at the bedside to visualize the lymphatic drainage pathway to guide therapy. Timely management of chylothorax may be improved by using NIRF imaging to understand lymphatic drainage pathways. PMID:24972649

  10. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Olivia J; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  11. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallotta, Olivia J.; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  12. Immunohistochemical identification of lymphatic vessels in the periodontium of equine cheek teeth.

    PubMed

    Staszyk, Carsten; Duesterdieck, Katja F; Gasse, Hagen; Bienert, Astrid

    2005-12-01

    Immunohistochemical detection of lymphatic capillaries was performed in the periodontium of maxillary and mandibular cheek teeth from 6 horses (aged 3-23 years). Tissue sections of the periodontium were taken at 4 different horizontal levels along the long axis of the tooth. The specimens were processed for immunoreaction with anti-Prox1, in order to distinguish lymphatic endothelium from blood vascular endothelium. Lymphatic vessels were detected in all periodontal tissues except for the dental cementum. Lymphatic capillaries were most densely distributed in the gingiva compared to other tissues of the periodontium. Lymphatic capillaries were found most consistently in samples taken from the gingival and subgingival regions in all horses examined. Within these levels, the gingiva as well as the spongiosa of the maxillary and mandibular bone had the greatest incidence of lymphatic vessels. Considering the distinct distribution of the lymphatic capillaries in the periodontium of the maxillary and mandibular cheek teeth, two complementary lymphatic drainage pathways are proposed: (1) superficial lymph drainage via the gingiva, emptying into the mandibular lymph nodes; (2) deep lymph drainage via the mandibular and maxillary spongiosa, emptying into the mandibular and retropharyngeal lymph nodes, respectively.

  13. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  14. Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Enhances Lymphatic Endothelial VEGFR3 and Rejection in Cardiac Allografts.

    PubMed

    Dashkevich, A; Raissadati, A; Syrjälä, S O; Zarkada, G; Keränen, M A I; Tuuminen, R; Krebs, R; Anisimov, A; Jeltsch, M; Leppänen, V-M; Alitalo, K; Nykänen, A I; Lemström, K B

    2016-04-01

    Organ damage and innate immunity during heart transplantation may evoke adaptive immunity with serious consequences. Because lymphatic vessels bridge innate and adaptive immunity, they are critical in immune surveillance; however, their role in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in allotransplantation remains unknown. We investigated whether the lymphangiogenic VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway during cardiac allograft IRI regulates organ damage and subsequent interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. We found that cardiac allograft IRI, within hours, increased graft VEGF-C expression and lymphatic vessel activation in the form of increased lymphatic VEGFR3 and adhesion protein expression. Pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 stimulation resulted in early lymphatic activation and later increase in allograft inflammation. In contrast, pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition during cardiac allograft IRI decreased early lymphatic vessel activation with subsequent dampening of acute and chronic rejection. Genetic deletion of VEGFR3 specifically in the lymphatics of the transplanted heart recapitulated the survival effect achieved by pharmacological VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition. Our results suggest that tissue damage rapidly changes lymphatic vessel phenotype, which, in turn, may shape the interplay of innate and adaptive immunity. Importantly, VEGF-C/VEGFR3 inhibition during solid organ transplant IRI could be used as lymphatic-targeted immunomodulatory therapy to prevent acute and chronic rejection. PMID:26689983

  15. An abnormal lymphatic phenotype is associated with subcutaneous adipose tissue deposits in Dercum’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John C.; Herbst, Karen L.; Aldrich, Melissa B.; Darne, Chinmay D.; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Guilliod, Renie; Fife, Caroline A.; Maus, Erik A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Investigational, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) lymphatic imaging was used to assess lymphatic architecture and contractile function in participants diagnosed with Dercum’s disease, a rare, poorly understood disorder characterized by painful lipomas in subcutaneous adipose tissues. Design and Methods After informed consent and as part of an FDA-approved feasibility study to evaluate lymphatics in diseases in which their contribution has been implicated, three women diagnosed with Dercum’s disease and four control subjects were imaged. Each participant received multiple intradermal and subcutaneous injections of indocyanine green (ICG, total dose ≤400µg) in arms, legs, and/or trunk. Immediately after injection, ICG was taken up by the lymphatics and NIRF imaging was conducted. Results The lymphatics in the participants with Dercum’s disease were intact and dilated, yet sluggishly propelled lymph when compared to control lymphatics. Palpation of regions containing fluorescent lymphatic pathways revealed tender, fibrotic, tubular structures within the subcutaneous adipose tissue that were associated with painful nodules, and, in some cases, masses of fluorescent tissue indicating that some lipomas may represent tertiary lymphoid tissues. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that Dercum’s disease may be a lymphovascular disorder and suggest a possible association between abnormal adipose tissue deposition and abnormal lymphatic structure and function. PMID:25044620

  16. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D Is Dispensable for Development of the Lymphatic System

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Megan E.; Halford, Michael M.; Roufail, Sally; Williams, Richard A.; Hibbs, Margaret L.; Grail, Dianne; Kubo, Hajime; Stacker, Steven A.; Achen, Marc G.

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (Vegfr-3) is a tyrosine kinase that is expressed on the lymphatic endothelium and that signals for the growth of the lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis). Vegf-d, a secreted glycoprotein, is one of two known activating ligands for Vegfr-3, the other being Vegf-c. Vegf-d stimulates lymphangiogenesis in tissues and tumors; however, its role in embryonic development was previously unknown. Here we report the generation and analysis of mutant mice deficient for Vegf-d. Vegf-d-deficient mice were healthy and fertile, had normal body mass, and displayed no pathologic changes consistent with a defect in lymphatic function. The lungs, sites of strong Vegf-d gene expression during embryogenesis in wild-type mice, were normal in Vegf-d-deficient mice with respect to tissue mass and morphology, except that the abundance of the lymphatics adjacent to bronchioles was slightly reduced. Dye uptake experiments indicated that large lymphatics under the skin were present in normal locations and were functional. Smaller dermal lymphatics were similar in number, location, and function to those in wild-type controls. The lack of a profound lymphatic phenotype in Vegf-d-deficient mice suggests that Vegf-d does not play a major role in lymphatic development or that Vegf-c or another, as-yet-unknown activating Vegfr-3 ligand can compensate for Vegf-d during development. PMID:15743836

  17. Regulation of lymphatic-blood vessel separation by endothelial Rac1

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Jones, Dylan T.; Nye, Emma; Sapienza, Karen; Ramjuan, Antoine R.; Reynolds, Louise E.; Robinson, Stephen D.; Kostourou, Vassiliki; Martinez, Dolores; Aubyn, Deborah; Grose, Richard; Thomas, Gareth J.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Zicha, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Tybulewicz, Victor; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M.

    2009-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis and lymphatic-blood vessel segregation both involve the migration of endothelial cells, but the precise migratory molecules that govern the decision of blood vascular endothelial cells to segregate into lymphatic vasculature are unknown. Here, we deleted endothelial Rac1 in mice (Tie1-Cre+;Rac1fl/fl) and revealed, unexpectedly, that whereas blood vessel morphology appeared normal, lymphatic-blood vessel separation was impaired, with corresponding edema, haemorrhage and embryonic lethality. Importantly, normal levels of Rac1 were essential for directed endothelial cell migratory responses to lymphatic-inductive signals. Our studies identify Rac1 as a crucial part of the migratory machinery required for endothelial cells to separate and form lymphatic vasculature. PMID:19906871

  18. The New Era of the Lymphatic System: No Longer Secondary to the Blood Vascular System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    The blood and lymphatic systems are the two major circulatory systems in our body. Although the blood system has been studied extensively, the lymphatic system has received much less scientific and medical attention because of its elusive morphology and mysterious pathophysiology. However, a series of landmark discoveries made in the past decade has begun to change the previous misconception of the lymphatic system to be secondary to the more essential blood vascular system. In this article, we review the current understanding of the development and pathology of the lymphatic system. We hope to convince readers that the lymphatic system is no less essential than the blood circulatory system for human health and well-being. PMID:22474611

  19. Role of lymphatic vessels in tumor immunity: passive conduits or active participants?

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-09-01

    Research in lymphatic biology and cancer immunology may soon intersect as emerging evidence implicates the lymphatics in the progression of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity as well as in tumor metastasis and immune escape. Like the blood vasculature, the lymphatic system comprises a highly dynamic conduit system that regulates fluid homeostasis, antigen transport and immune cell trafficking, which all play important roles in the progression and resolution of inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. This review presents emerging evidence that lymphatic vessels are active modulators of immunity, perhaps fine-tuning the response to adjust the balance between peripheral tolerance and immunity. This suggests that the tumor-associated lymphatic vessels and draining lymph node may be important in tumor immunity which in turn governs metastasis.

  20. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy. PMID:26064760

  1. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  2. Are the Genitalia of Anatomical Dolls Distorted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bays, Jan

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether the genitalia of anatomical dolls are disproportionately large and may suggest sexual activity to children who have not been abused, the genitalia and breasts of 17 sets of anatomical dolls were measured. When the measurements were extrapolated to adult human proportions, the sizes were not found to be exaggerated. (Author/JDD)

  3. Aberrant pulmonary lymphatic development in the nitrofen mouse model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Eveline; Wu, Jianfeng; Schecter, Samuel; Miniati, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Many infants develop a postsurgical chylothorax after diaphragmatic hernia repair. The pathogenesis remains elusive but may be due to dysfunctional lymphatic development. This study characterizes pulmonary lymphatic development in the nitrofen mouse model of CDH. Methods CD1 pregnant mice were fed nitrofen/bisdiamine (N/B) or olive oil at E8.5. At E14.5 and E15.5, lung buds were categorized by phenotype: normal, N/B without CDH (N/B−CDH), or N/B with CDH (N/B+CDH). Anti-CD31 was used to localize all endothelial cells, while anti-LYVE-1 was used to identify lymphatic endothelial cells in lung buds using immunofluorescence. Differential protein expression of lymphatic-specific markers was analyzed. Results Lymphatic endothelial cells localized to the mesenchyme surrounding the airway epithelium at E15.5. CD31 and LYVE-1 colocalization identified lymphatic endothelial cells. LYVE-1 expression was upregulated in N/B+CDH lung buds in comparison to N/B−CDH and normal lung buds by immunofluorescence. Western blotting shows that VEGF-D, LYVE-1, Prox-1, and VEGFR-3 expression was upregulated in N/B+CDH lung buds in comparison to N/B−CDH or control lung buds at E14.5. Conclusions Lung lymphatics are hyperplastic in N/B+CDH. Upregulation of lymphatic-specific genes suggest that lymphatic hyperplasia plays an important role in dysfunctional lung lymphatic development in the nitrofen mouse model of CDH. PMID:23845607

  4. Downregulation of FoxC2 Increased Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: Influence of Lymphatic Drainage Function?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Felix; Potepalov, Sergey; Shehzahdi, Romana; Bernas, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Abreo, Fleurette; Traylor, James; Orr, Wayne A.; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although inflammation-induced expansion of the intestinal lymphatic vasculature (lymphangiogenesis) is known to be a crucial event in limiting inflammatory processes, through clearance of interstitial fluid and immune cells, considerably less is known about the impact of an impaired lymphatic clearance function (as seen in inflammatory bowel diseases) on this cascade. We aimed to investigate whether the impaired intestinal lymphatic drainage function observed in FoxC2(+/−) mice would influence the course of disease in a model of experimental colitis. Methods: Acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in wild-type and haploinsufficient FoxC2(+/−) mice, and survival, disease activity, colonic histopathological injury, neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. Functional and structural changes in the intestinal lymphatic vessel network were analyzed, including submucosal edema, vessel morphology, and lymphatic vessel density. Results: We found that FoxC2 downregulation in FoxC2(+/−) mice significantly increased the severity and susceptibility to experimental colitis, as displayed by lower survival rates, increased disease activity, greater histopathological injury, and elevated colonic neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration. These findings were accompanied by structural (dilated torturous lymphatic vessels) and functional (greater submucosal edema, higher immune cell burden) changes in the intestinal lymphatic vasculature. Conclusions: These results indicate that sufficient lymphatic clearance plays a crucial role in limiting the initiation and perpetuation of experimental colitis and those disturbances in the integrity of the intestinal lymphatic vessel network could intensify intestinal inflammation. Future therapies might be able to exploit these processes to restore and maintain adequate lymphatic clearance function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25822012

  5. Role of lymphatics in removal of sheep lung surfactant lipid.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, M M; O'Brodovich, H M; Young, S L

    1983-04-01

    To study the role of lung lymphatics in the removal of surfactant lipid from the sheep lung, we injected [1-14C]palmitate intravenously into six animals previously fitted with a cannula draining the caudal mediastinal lymph node. Lung lymph was collected for 100 h after injection of radiolabel. We obtained alveolar lavage material through a tracheostomy in four other animals after intravenous injection of [9,10-3H]palmitate. We measured radioactivity at several time points in lipid extracts from lymph, lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Alveolar lavage disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) specific activity peaked at about 40 h and was reduced to 30% of this value by 82 h. About 2% of the injected radiolabel was incorporated into lung tissue lipids. Only 4% of the level of labeling achieved in lung tissue lipids was found in lung lymph lipid during 100 h of lymph collection. Sixty-three percent of radiolabel in lymph lipid was recovered in phospholipids, and 29% of phospholipid radiolabel was found in DSPC. The distribution of phosphorus and palmitate radiolabel in lung lymph phospholipid did not closely resemble that of surfactant lipid. No rise in lung lymph DSPC specific activity was observed following the peak in lavage specific activity. If surfactant lipid is removed from the alveolar compartment without extensive recycling, then we conclude that the lung lymphatics do not play a major role in the clearance of surfactant lipid from the alveolar surface. PMID:6687883

  6. Immune cells control skin lymphatic electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Helge; Schröder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Jantsch, Jonathan; Kopp, Christoph; Karlsen, Tine V; Boschmann, Michael; Goss, Jennifer; Bry, Maija; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Brenner, Sven; Tenstad, Olav; Nurmi, Harri; Mervaala, Eero; Wagner, Hubertus; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Müller, Dominik N; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Luft, Friedrich C; Harrison, David G; Alitalo, Kari; Titze, Jens

    2013-07-01

    The skin interstitium sequesters excess Na+ and Cl- in salt-sensitive hypertension. Mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells are recruited to the skin, sense the hypertonic electrolyte accumulation in skin, and activate the tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (TONEBP, also known as NFAT5) to initiate expression and secretion of VEGFC, which enhances electrolyte clearance via cutaneous lymph vessels and increases eNOS expression in blood vessels. It is unclear whether this local MPS response to osmotic stress is important to systemic blood pressure control. Herein, we show that deletion of TonEBP in mouse MPS cells prevents the VEGFC response to a high-salt diet (HSD) and increases blood pressure. Additionally, an antibody that blocks the lymph-endothelial VEGFC receptor, VEGFR3, selectively inhibited MPS-driven increases in cutaneous lymphatic capillary density, led to skin Cl- accumulation, and induced salt-sensitive hypertension. Mice overexpressing soluble VEGFR3 in epidermal keratinocytes exhibited hypoplastic cutaneous lymph capillaries and increased Na+, Cl-, and water retention in skin and salt-sensitive hypertension. Further, we found that HSD elevated skin osmolality above plasma levels. These results suggest that the skin contains a hypertonic interstitial fluid compartment in which MPS cells exert homeostatic and blood pressure-regulatory control by local organization of interstitial electrolyte clearance via TONEBP and VEGFC/VEGFR3-mediated modification of cutaneous lymphatic capillary function. PMID:23722907

  7. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  8. Imaging methods for the local lymphatic system of the axilla in early breast cancer in patients qualified for sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kurylcio, Andrzej; Polkowski, Wojciech; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in well-developed countries. Despite a constant increase in its incidence, the percentage of patients diagnosed with the disease in the non-invasive stage is also rising. This allows more frequently for the use of breast-preserving surgical techniques, involving the breast and the regional lymphatic system. According to current guidelines of expert panels and research societies, the recommended method of identifying the sentinel lymph node is the use of an isotope marker with a dye (a combined isotope and dye method). Cooperation with a nuclear medicine unit is essential (performing a preoperative lymphoscintigraphic scan to identify the lymphatic drainage basin and sentinel lymph node). In the case of smaller centers treating breast cancer, it can be associated with a number of difficulties, including organizational ones, and also increasing general treatment costs. A possible solution to these problems is to use alternative techniques of visualizing the sentinel lymph node, which do not require a radiotracer. In this paper we discuss the currently available methods of mapping the lymphatic system of the axillary region in patients with early breast cancer. The review is limited to reporting on methods of proven (based on clinical research) high diagnostic value. PMID:27095960

  9. Imaging methods for the local lymphatic system of the axilla in early breast cancer in patients qualified for sentinel lymph node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Kurylcio, Andrzej; Polkowski, Wojciech; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in well-developed countries. Despite a constant increase in its incidence, the percentage of patients diagnosed with the disease in the non-invasive stage is also rising. This allows more frequently for the use of breast-preserving surgical techniques, involving the breast and the regional lymphatic system. According to current guidelines of expert panels and research societies, the recommended method of identifying the sentinel lymph node is the use of an isotope marker with a dye (a combined isotope and dye method). Cooperation with a nuclear medicine unit is essential (performing a preoperative lymphoscintigraphic scan to identify the lymphatic drainage basin and sentinel lymph node). In the case of smaller centers treating breast cancer, it can be associated with a number of difficulties, including organizational ones, and also increasing general treatment costs. A possible solution to these problems is to use alternative techniques of visualizing the sentinel lymph node, which do not require a radiotracer. In this paper we discuss the currently available methods of mapping the lymphatic system of the axillary region in patients with early breast cancer. The review is limited to reporting on methods of proven (based on clinical research) high diagnostic value. PMID:27095960

  10. Singapore's anatomical future: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Ang, Eng-Tat; Sugand, Kapil; Hartman, Mikael; Seow, Choon-Sheong; Bay, Boon-Huat; Abrahams, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The disciplines of anatomy and surgery are not dichotomous since one is dependent on the other. Traditionally, surgeons predominantly taught gross and clinical anatomy. In this review, we examine the context of how human anatomy is taught nowadays. In essence, we discovered that there are certain discernable trends consistently observable between the American and British systems. In Singapore, the British Russell Group first influenced its education landscape but now more so by the American Ivy League. Singapore now has three medical schools all offering differing anatomy curricula, which serves as an opportune time for it to consider if there is a best approach given that the practice of surgery is also evolving in parallel. This review discusses the various pedagogies and issues involved, and will serve as a forum and stimulus for discussion. By tweaking the curriculum correctly and the lessons learnt, future doctors and surgeons in training will receive a better anatomical education, not just in Singapore but the world in general. Key recommendations include the use of body painting, clay, plasticine to facilitate the learning of anatomy, and the implementation of a body donation program. Furthermore, strategic mergers with key stakeholders will also ensure the survival of the discipline. PMID:22566391

  11. Anatomical and psychometric relationships of behavioral neglect in daily living.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Allart, Etienne; Bernati, Thérèse; Saj, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    Spatial neglect has been related to both cortical (predominantly at the temporal-parietal junction) and subcortical (predominantly of the superior longitudinal fasciculus) lesions. The objectives of this observational study were to specify the anatomical relationships of behavioral neglect in activities of daily living (N-ADLs), and the anatomical and psychometric relationships of N-ADLs on one hand and components of neglect (peripersonal neglect and personal neglect) and anosognosia on the other. Forty five patients were analyzed for behavioral difficulties in daily living (on the Catherine Bergego scale) and the main components of neglect (using conventional clinical assessments) during the first months post right hemisphere stroke. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify brain areas within which lesions explained the severity of bias in each assessment (non-parametric permutation test; p<0.01, one tailed). N-ADLs was associated with lesions centered on the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and extending to the temporo-parietal junction, temporo-occipital junction and subcortical white matter (including the superior longitudinal fasciculus). Peripersonal neglect resulted from extended cortical lesions centered on the superior temporal gyrus and the inferior parietal gyrus, with subcortical extension. Personal neglect resulted predominantly from lesions centered on the somatosensory cortex and at a lesser degree on the superior temporal sulcus. Anosognosia resulted from lesions of the posterior inferior temporal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. In anatomic terms, N-ADLs was strongly related to peripersonal neglect, and those relationships were also shown by the psychometric analysis. In conclusions, superior temporal gyrus and superior longitudinal fasciculus lesions have a pivotal role in N-ADLs. N-ADLs is principally related (anatomically and psychometrically) to peripersonal neglect, and at a lesser degree to anosognosia and

  12. Modulation of the spontaneous contractions of the initial lymphatics of the bat's wing by arterial and venous occlusion.

    PubMed

    Unthank, J L; Hogan, R D

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous contractions of the initial lymphatics of the bat's wing were observed to be modulated by changes in local blood flow. Lymphatic pressure and frequency of contraction were measured with the servo-null technique during the occlusion of the ulnar artery or vein. Lymphatic contractile activity was decreased during arterial occlusion but was increased during venous occlusion and postocclusion hyperemia. These changes in lymphatic activity are not consistent with the hypothesis that flow-associated changes in lymphatic contractile activity is mediated primarily by metabolic factors. PMID:3359051

  13. The anatomical school of Padua.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Parenti, Anna; De Caro, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    The University of Padua is one of the most ancient in the world, being founded in 1222, and the most important anatomists of the XVI, XVII, and XVIII centuries studied and taught here. Probably, the first professor of anatomy and surgery was Bruno da Longobucco (c. 1200-c. 1286), who had previously studied at the Salerno School of Medicine. While professor in Padua, Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) published De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543), which is considered as the birth of the modern anatomy. Following professors were Realdo Colombo (c. 1516-1559), Gabriel Fallopius (1523-1562), Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente (1533-1619), Iulius Casserius (1552-1616), Johann Wesling (1598-1649), and Johann Georg Wirsung (1589-1643). Many other foreign scholars studied in the University of Padua, such as Thomas Linacre (c. 1460-1524), the founder of the Royal College of Physicians, Werner Rolfinck (1599-1673), and Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702), who created anatomical theatres in Germany and Sweden, respectively, on the basis of the Paduan model. The anatomy of the XVII century characteristically widened the scope of its enquiry to function, as in the Exercitatio Anatomica De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus (1628) by William Harvey (1578-1657). Further evolution was then given by the anatomy in the XVIII century, which tried to correlate alterations of structure with clinical symptoms. The most important anatomist of this century is Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), whose masterpiece De Sedibus et Causis Morborum per Anatomen Indagatis (1761) is a landmark contribution that is viewed as the beginning of modern pathologic anatomy. This year falls the 300th anniversary of Morgagni's inaugural lecture on medical education, Nova Institutionum Medicarum Idea (1712), which is still relevant in its effort to stress the importance of a deep knowledge of all the preclinical and clinical aspects of medical science. PMID:22581496

  14. Cessation of Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis in Zanzibar in 2006: Was Transmission Interrupted?

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Maria P.; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Thomas, Brent; Ame, Shaali; Ali, Said Mohammed; Cano, Jorge; Escalada, Alba Gonzalez; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for elimination through annual mass drug administration (MDA) for 4–6 years. In 2006, Zanzibar stopped MDA against LF after five rounds of MDA revealed no microfilaraemic individuals during surveys at selected sentinel sites. We asked the question if LF transmission was truly interrupted in 2006 when MDA was stopped. Methodology/Principal Findings In line with ongoing efforts to shrink the LF map, we performed the WHO recommended transmission assessment surveys (TAS) in January 2012 to verify the absence of LF transmission on the main Zanzibar islands of Unguja and Pemba. Altogether, 3275 children were tested on both islands and 89 were found to be CFA positive; 70 in Pemba and 19 in Unguja. The distribution of schools with positive children was heterogeneous with pronounced spatial variation on both islands. Based on the calculated TAS cut-offs of 18 and 20 CFA positive children for Pemba and Unguja respectively, we demonstrated that transmission was still ongoing in Pemba where the cut-off was exceeded. Conclusions Our findings indicated ongoing transmission of LF on Pemba in 2012. Moreover, we presented evidence from previous studies that LF transmission was also active on Unguja shortly after stopping MDA in 2006. Based on these observations the government of Zanzibar decided to resume MDA against LF on both islands in 2013. PMID:25816287

  15. Understanding the relationship between prevalence of microfilariae and antigenaemia using a model of lymphatic filariasis infection

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Njenga, Sammy M.; Gunawardena, Shamini; Njeri Wamae, Claire; Cano, Jorge; Brooker, Simon J.; Deirdre Hollingsworth, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating neglected tropical disease that affects impoverished communities. Rapid diagnostic tests of antigenaemia are a practical alternative to parasitological tests of microfilaraemia for mapping and surveillance. However the relationship between these two methods of measuring burden has previously been difficult to interpret. Methods A statistical model of the distribution of worm burden and microfilariae (mf) and resulting antigenaemic and mf prevalence was developed and fitted to surveys of two contrasting sentinel sites undergoing interventions. The fitted model was then used to explore the relationship in various pre- and post-intervention scenarios. Results The model had good quantitative agreement with the data and provided estimates of the reduction in mf output due to treatment. When extrapolating the results to a range of prevalences there was good qualitative agreement with published data. Conclusions The observed relationship between antigenamic and mf prevalence is a natural consequence of the relationship between prevalence and intensity of adult worms and mf production. The method described here allows the estimation of key epidemiological parameters and consequently gives insight into the efficacy of an intervention programme. PMID:26822604

  16. Lymphatic filariasis in the Karonga district of northern Malawi: a prevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Ngwira, B M M; Jabu, C H; Kanyongoloka, H; Mponda, M; Crampin, A C; Branson, K; Alexander, N D E; Fine, P E M

    2002-03-01

    In Malawi, two main foci of lymphatic filariasis (LF) are known to exist: one in the south, in the Shire valley, and the other in the north, along the Songwe River, on the border with Tanzania. There have been no formal surveys in the Songwe area since the 1960s but an opportunity arose in 2000-2001 to map LF in this area, in the context of a leprosy survey that formed part of the follow-up of a large leprosy and tuberculosis vaccine trial. Overall 687 immunochromatographic (ICT) tests were carried out. Wuchereria bancrofti antigenaemia was found in > 25% of adults in each of the 12 villages sampled (four in the Songwe area and eight in the rest of the Karonga district), with village prevalences varying from 28%-58%. Of the 685 adult male residents of the Songwe area who were each given full-body clinical examinations, 80 (11.7%) were identified as cases of hydrocele. Lymphoedema was found in seven (1.0%) of these adult males and in 29 (3.7%) of the 769 adult female residents of the Songwe area who were also examined. Microfilariae were detected in 33 (30.8%) of the 107 thick smears of night-blood samples that were made from individuals with positive ICT cards. The W. bancrofti infection focus in Karonga district is therefore wider than was previously known. This has important implications for the implementation and eventual impact of LF-control activities in this area.

  17. A tissue engineered model of the intestinal lacteal for evaluating lipid transport by lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Raghunathan, Sandeep; Swartz, Melody A.

    2010-01-01

    Lacteals are the entry point of all dietary lipids into the circulation, yet little is known about the active regulation of lipid uptake by these lymphatic vessels, and there lacks in vitro models to study the lacteal – enterocyte interface. We describe an in vitro model of the human intestinal microenvironment containing differentiated Caco-2 cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). We characterize the model for fatty acid, lipoprotein, albumin, and dextran transport, and compare to qualitative uptake of fatty acids into lacteals in vivo. We demonstrate relevant morphological features of both cell types and strongly polarized transport of fatty acid in the intestinal-to-lymphatic direction. We found much higher transport rates of lipid than of dextran or albumin across the lymphatic endothelial monolayer, suggesting most lipid transport is active and intracellular. This was confirmed with confocal imaging of Bodipy, a fluorescent fatty acid, along with transmission electron microscopy. Since our model recapitulates crucial aspects of the in vivo lymphatic-enterocyte interface, it is useful for studying the biology of lipid transport by lymphatics and as a tool for screening drugs and nanoparticles that target intestinal lymphatics. PMID:19396808

  18. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-06-29

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease.

  19. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T.; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. PMID:26077718

  20. Adaptation of Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatic Pump Function Following Acute Alcohol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Kurtz, Kristine M.; Molina, Patricia E.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Acute alcohol intoxication increases intestinal lymph flow by unknown mechanisms, potentially impacting mucosal immunity. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced intrinsic pump function of mesenteric lymphatics contributes to increased intestinal lymph flow during alcohol intoxication. Methods Acute alcohol intoxication was produced by intragastric administration of 30% alcohol to concious, unrestrained rats through surgically-implanted catheters. Time-matched controls received either no bolus, vehicle, or isocaloric dextrose. Thirty minutes after alcohol administration, rats were anesthetized and mesenteric collecting lymphatics were isolated and cannulated to study intrinsic pumping parameters. In separate experiments, mesenteric lymphatics were isolated to examine direct effects of alcohol on intrinsic pump activity. Results Lymphatics isolated from alcohol-intoxicated animals displayed slgnificantly decreased contraction frequency (CF) than the dextrose group, elevated stroke volume index (SVI) versus all other groups, and decreased myogenic responsiveness compared to sham. Elevating pressure from 2 to 4 cm H2O increased the volume flow index 2.4-fold in the alcohol group versus 1.4-fold for shams. Isolated lymphatics exposed to 20 mM alcohol had reduced myogenic tone, without changes in CF or SVI. Conclusions Alcohol intoxication enhances intrinsic pumping by mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Alcohol directly decreases lymphatic myogenic tone, but effects on phasic contractions occur by an unidentified mechanism. PMID:21040117

  1. Microneedles for the Noninvasive Structural and Functional Assessment of Dermal Lymphatic Vessels.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Davide; Proulx, Steven T; Marschalkova, Patrizia; Detmar, Michael; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-02-24

    The medical and scientific communities' interest in the lymphatic system has been growing rapidly in recent years. It has become evident that the lymphatic system is much more than simply a homeostasis controller and that it plays key roles in several pathological conditions. This work describes the identification of the optimal combination of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and a near-infrared dye (indocyanine green) for the manufacturing of soluble microneedles and their application to the imaging of the lymphatic system. Upon application to the skin, the microneedle-bearing indocyanine green is delivered in the dermal layer, where the lymphatic vessels are abundant. The draining lymphatics can then be visualized and the clearance kinetics from the administration site simply determined using a near-infrared camera. This painless functional "tattooing" procedure can be used for quantitative assessment of the dermal lymphatic function in several dermal conditions and treatment-response evaluations. The two components of these microneedles are extensively used in routine medical care, potentially leading to rapid clinical translation. Moreover, this procedure may have a significant impact on preclinical lymphatic studies.

  2. Lymphatic trafficking kinetics and near-infrared imaging using star polymer architectures with controlled anionic character.

    PubMed

    Bagby, Taryn R; Duan, Shaofeng; Cai, Shuang; Yang, Qiuhong; Thati, Sharadvi; Berkland, Cory; Aires, Daniel J; Forrest, M Laird

    2012-08-30

    Targeted lymphatic delivery of nanoparticles for drug delivery and imaging is primarily dependent on size and charge. Prior studies have observed increased lymphatic uptake and retentions of over 48 h for negatively charged particles compared to neutral and positively charged particles. We have developed new polymeric materials that extend retention over a more pharmaceutically relevant 7-day period. We used whole body fluorescence imaging to observe in mice the lymphatic trafficking of a series of anionic star poly-(6-O-methacryloyl-D-galactose) polymer-NIR dye (IR820) conjugates. The anionic charge of polymers was increased by modifying galactose moieties in the star polymers with succinic anhydride. Increasing anionic nature was associated with enhanced lymphatic uptake up to a zeta potential of ca.-40 mV; further negative charge did not affect lymphatic uptake. Compared to the 20% acid-conjugate, the 40-90% acid-star-polymer conjugates exhibited a 2.5- to 3.5-fold increase in lymphatic uptake in both the popliteal and iliac nodes. The polymer conjugates exhibited node half-lives of 2-20 h in the popliteal nodes and 19-114 h in the deeper iliac nodes. These polymer conjugates can deliver drugs or imaging agents with rapid lymphatic uptake and prolonged deep-nodal retention; thus they may provide a useful vehicle for sustained intralymphatic drug delivery with low toxicity.

  3. In vivo visualization and quantification of collecting lymphatic vessel contractility using near-infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Chloé; Scholkmann, Felix; Bachmann, Samia B.; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Proulx, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to image lymphatic vessel function in either animal models or in the clinic are limited. In particular, imaging methods that can provide robust outcome measures for collecting lymphatic vessel function are sorely needed. In this study, we aimed to develop a method to visualize and quantify collecting lymphatic vessel function in mice, and to establish an in vivo system for evaluation of contractile agonists and antagonists using near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The flank collecting lymphatic vessel in mice was exposed using a surgical technique and a near-infrared tracer was infused into the inguinal lymph node. Collecting lymphatic vessel contractility and valve function could be easily visualized after the infusion. A diameter tracking method was established and the diameter of the vessel was found to closely correlate to near-infrared fluorescence signal. Phasic contractility measures of frequency and amplitude were established using an automated algorithm. The methods were validated by tracking the vessel response to topical application of a contractile agonist, prostaglandin F2α, and by demonstrating the potential of the technique for non-invasive evaluation of modifiers of lymphatic function. These new methods will enable high-resolution imaging and quantification of collecting lymphatic vessel function in animal models and may have future clinical applications. PMID:26960708

  4. Lymphatic dysregulation in intestinal inflammation: new insights into inflammatory bowel disease pathomechanisms.

    PubMed

    Becker, F; Yi, P; Al-Kofahi, M; Ganta, V C; Morris, J; Alexander, J S

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the intestinal lymphatic network are well-established features of human and experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Such lymphangiogenic expansion might enhance classic intestinal lymphatic transport, eliminating excess accumulations of fluid, inflammatory cells and mediators, and could therefore be interpreted as an 'adaptive' response to acute and chronic inflammatory processes. However, whether these new lymphatic vessels are functional, unregulated or immature (and what factors may promote 'maturation' of these vessels) is currently an area under intense investigation. It is still controversial whether impaired lymphatic function in IBD is a direct consequence of the intestinal inflammation, or a preceding lymphangitis-like event. Current research has uncovered novel regulatory factors as well as new roles for familiar signaling pathways, which appear to be linked to inflammation-induced lymphatic alterations. The current review summarizes mechanisms amplifying lymphatic dysregulation and remodeling in intestinal inflammation at the organ, cell and molecular levels and discusses the influence of lymphangiogenesis and intestinal lymphatic transport function as they relate to IBD pathophysiology.

  5. The chemokine receptors ACKR2 and CCR2 reciprocally regulate lymphatic vessel density

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kit M; Danuser, Renzo; Stein, Jens V; Graham, Delyth; Nibbs, Robert JB; Graham, Gerard J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate lymphatic vasculature development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating their recruitment to developing, and adult, lymphatic vascular sites are not known. Here, we report that resting mice deficient for the inflammatory chemokine-scavenging receptor, ACKR2, display increased lymphatic vessel density in a range of tissues under resting and regenerating conditions. This appears not to alter dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes but is associated with enhanced fluid drainage from peripheral tissues and thus with a hypotensive phenotype. Examination of embryonic skin revealed that this lymphatic vessel density phenotype is developmentally established. Further studies indicated that macrophages and the inflammatory CC-chemokine CCL2, which is scavenged by ACKR2, are associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, mice deficient for the CCL2 signalling receptor, CCR2, displayed a reciprocal phenotype of reduced lymphatic vessel density. Further examination revealed that proximity of pro-lymphangiogenic macrophages to developing lymphatic vessel surfaces is increased in ACKR2-deficient mice and reduced in CCR2-deficient mice. Therefore, these receptors regulate vessel density by reciprocally modulating pro-lymphangiogenic macrophage recruitment, and proximity, to developing, resting and regenerating lymphatic vessels. PMID:25271254

  6. PEGylation of interferon α2 improves lymphatic exposure after subcutaneous and intravenous administration and improves antitumour efficacy against lymphatic breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kaminskas, Lisa M; Ascher, David B; McLeod, Victoria M; Herold, Marco J; Le, Caroline P; Sloan, Erica K; Porter, Christopher JH

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of protein-based therapeutics with indications in the treatment of lymphatic diseases is expected to be improved by enhancing lymphatic disposition. This study was therefore aimed at examining whether PEGylation can usefully be applied to improve the lymphatic uptake of interferon α2 and whether this ultimately translates into improved therapeutic efficacy against lymph-resident cancer. The lymphatic pharmacokinetics of interferon α2b (IFN, 19 kDa) and PEGylated interferon α2b (IFN-PEG12, 31 kDa) or α2a (IFN-PEG40, 60 kDa) was examined in thoracic lymph duct cannulated rats. IFN was poorly absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 36%) and showed little uptake into lymph after SC or IV administration (≤1%). In contrast, IFN-PEG12 was efficiently absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 82%) and approximately 20% and 8% of the injected dose was recovered in thoracic lymph over 30 hours after SC or IV administration respectively. IFN-PEG40, however, was incompletely absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 23%) and showed similar lymphatic access after SC administration to IFN-PEG12 (21%). The recovery of IFN-PEG40 in thoracic lymph after IV administration, however, was significantly greater (29%) when compared to IV IFN-PEG12. The anti-tumour efficacy of interferon against axillary metastases of a highly lymph-metastatic variant of human breast MDA-MB-231 carcinoma was significantly increased by SC administration of lymph-targeted IFN-PEG12 when compared to the administration of IFN on the ipsilateral side to the axillary metastasis. Optimal PEGylation may therefore represent a viable approach to improving the lymphatic disposition and efficacy of therapeutic proteins against lymphatic diseases. PMID:23499718

  7. Expansion of the lymphatic vasculature in cancer and inflammation: new opportunities for in vivo imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Steven T; Luciani, Paola; Dieterich, Lothar C; Karaman, Sinem; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2013-12-10

    Over the last 15 years, discovery of key growth factors and specific molecular markers for lymphatic vessels has enabled a new era of molecular research on the lymphatic vascular system. As a result, it has been found that lymphangiogenesis, the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, plays an important role in tumor progression and in the control of chronic inflammation. At the same time, technical advancements have been made to improve the visualization of the lymphatic system. We have recently developed liposomal and polymer-based formulations of near-infrared lymphatic-specific imaging tracers for the non-invasive quantitative in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessel function. Using these tracers, a near-infrared stereomicroscope system allows imaging of initial and collecting lymphatic vessels with high spatial and temporal resolution in mice. In addition, we have developed a new method, using antibodies to a lymphatic specific marker and positron emission tomography, to sensitively detect lymphatic expansion in lymph nodes as the earliest sign of cancer metastasis. These imaging methods have great potential to provide non-invasive measures to assess the functionality of the lymphatic system and to assess the efficiency of lymphatic drug delivery.

  8. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow. PMID:27283070

  9. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow.

  10. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels at the implant interface in a rat model of osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Lips, Katrin Susanne; Kauschke, Vivien; Hartmann, Sonja; Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Kampschulte, Marian; Langheinrich, Alexander; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Kautz, Armin R; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian; Alt, Volker; Kilian, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of lymphocytes, macrophages

  11. Altered lymphatics in an ovine model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Johnson, Eric G; Oishi, Peter E; Johengen, Michael; Tang, Eric; Aramburo, Angela; Barton, Jubilee; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Bennett, Stephen; Xoinis, Konstantine; Reel, Bhupinder; Kalkan, Gokhan; Sajti, Eniko; Osorio, Oscar; Raff, Gary W; Matthay, Michael A; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2012-03-15

    Abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well recognized in patients with congenital heart defects. However, it is not known how the associated abnormal blood flow patterns, such as increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF), might affect pulmonary lymphatic function and structure. Using well-established ovine models of acute and chronic increases in PBF, we cannulated the efferent lymphatic duct of the caudal mediastinal node and collected and analyzed lymph effluent from the lungs of lambs with acutely increased PBF (n = 6), chronically increased PBF (n = 6), and age-matched normal lambs (n = 8). When normalized to PBF, we found that lymph flow was unchanged following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. The lymph:plasma protein ratio decreased with both acute and chronic increases in PBF. Lymph bioavailable nitric oxide increased following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. In addition, we found perturbations in the transit kinetics of contrast material through the pleural lymphatics of lambs with chronic increases in PBF. Finally, there were structural changes in the pulmonary lymphatic system in lambs with chronic increases in PBF: lymphatics from these lambs were larger and more dilated, and there were alterations in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C, lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, and Angiopoietin-2, proteins known to be important for lymphatic growth, development, and remodeling. Taken together these data suggest that chronic increases in PBF lead to both functional and structural aberrations of lung lymphatics. These findings have important therapeutic implications that warrant further study.

  12. Podoplanin Immunopositive Lymphatic Vessels at the Implant Interface in a Rat Model of Osteoporotic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lips, Katrin Susanne; Kauschke, Vivien; Hartmann, Sonja; Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Kampschulte, Marian; Langheinrich, Alexander; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Kautz, Armin R.; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian; Alt, Volker; Kilian, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of lymphocytes, macrophages

  13. Nitric Oxide Regulates The Lymphatic Reactivity Following Hemorrhagic Shock Through Atp-Sensitive Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Qin, Li-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Zi-Gang; Niu, Chun-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Lymphatic reactivity has been shown to exhibit a biphasic change following hemorrhagic shock, and nitric oxide (NO) is involved in this process. However, the precise mechanism responsible for NO regulation of the lymphatic reactivity along with the progression of hemorrhagic shock is unclear. Therefore, the present study was to investigate how NO participates in regulating the shock-induced biphasic changes in lymphatic reactivity and its underlying mechanisms. First, the expressions or contents of inducible NO synthase, nitrite plus nitrate, and elements of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway in thoracic ducts tissue were assessed. The results revealed that levels of nitrite plus nitrate, cAMP, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), p-PKA, and p-PKG were increased gradually along with the process of shock. Second, the roles of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP in NO regulating lymphatic response to gradient substance P were evaluated with an isolated lymphatic perfusion system. The results showed that the NOS substrate (L-Arg), PKA donor (8-Br-cAMP) decreased the reactivity of shock 0.5 h-lymphatics, and that the PKA inhibitor (H-89) and KATP inhibitor (glibenclamide) restrained the effects of L-Arg while glibenclamide abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. Meanwhile, NOS antagonist (L-NAME), protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor (KT-5823), and soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) increased the reactivity of shock 2 h-lymphatics, whereas KATP opener (pinacidil) inhibited these elevated effects induced by either L-NAME, ODQ, or KT-5823. Taken together, these results indicate that NO regulation of lymphatic reactivity during shock involves both cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathways. These findings have potential significance for the treatment of hemorrhagic shock through regulating lymphatic reactivity. PMID:26796572

  14. Successful control of lymphatic filariasis in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Cheun, Hyeng-Il; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Soo; Chai, Jong-Yil; Lee, Joo-Shil; Lee, Jong-Koo; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2009-12-01

    A successful experience of lymphatic filariasis control in the Republic of Korea is briefly reviewed. Filariasis in the Republic of Korea was exclusively caused by infection with Brugia malayi. Over the past several decades from the 1950s to 2006, many investigators exerted their efforts to detection, treatment, and follow-up of filariasis patients in endemic areas, and to control filariasis. Mass, combined with selective, treatments with diethylcarbamazine to microfilaria positive persons had been made them free from microfilaremia and contributed to significant decrease of the microfilarial density in previously endemic areas. Significant decrease of microfilaria positive cases in an area influenced eventually to the endemicity of filariasis in the relevant locality. Together with remarkable economic growth followed by improvement of environmental and personal hygiene and living standards, the factors stated above have contributed to blocking the transmission cycle of B. malayi and led to disappearance of this mosquito-borne ancient disease in the Republic of Korea. PMID:19967079

  15. Network development in biological gels: role in lymphatic vessel development.

    PubMed

    Roose, Tiina; Fowler, Andrew C

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we present a model that explains the prepatterning of lymphatic vessel morphology in collagen gels. This model is derived using the theory of two phase rubber material due to Flory and coworkers and it consists of two coupled fourth order partial differential equations describing the evolution of the collagen volume fraction, and the evolution of the proton concentration in a collagen implant; as described in experiments of Boardman and Swartz (Circ. Res. 92, 801-808, 2003). Using linear stability analysis, we find that above a critical level of proton concentration, spatial patterns form due to small perturbations in the initially uniform steady state. Using a long wavelength reduction, we can reduce the two coupled partial differential equations to one fourth order equation that is very similar to the Cahn-Hilliard equation; however, it has more complex nonlinearities and degeneracies. We present the results of numerical simulations and discuss the biological implications of our model. PMID:18622650

  16. Lymphatic drainage in patients after replantation of extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.R.; van Alphen, W.A.; van der Pompe, W.B.

    1987-02-01

    Lymph drainage was studied by means of lymph scintigraphy in eight patients in whom successful replantation of a totally or subtotally amputated extremity had been performed. Scintigrams were made after subcutaneous injection of technetium-99m in the replanted part of the patient and the contralateral, normal extremity. In all scintigrams, axillary or inguinal lymph node activity is seen, implying drainage of lymph by means of the lymph vessels. Retention of colloid in the replanted part (79 to 94 percent) shows no significant difference with the contralateral, normal side (86 to 94 percent). Unquestionable evidence of regeneration of lymphatics in humans is delivered in the three patients, in whom lymph node activity and normal retention percentages are seen on the scintigrams after total amputation of an extremity followed by replantation without anastomosing of interrupted lymph vessels.

  17. Successful Control of Lymphatic Filariasis in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cheun, Hyeng-Il; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Soo; Chai, Jong-Yil; Lee, Joo-Shil; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2009-01-01

    A successful experience of lymphatic filariasis control in the Republic of Korea is briefly reviewed. Filariasis in the Republic of Korea was exclusively caused by infection with Brugia malayi. Over the past several decades from the 1950s to 2006, many investigators exerted their efforts to detection, treatment, and follow-up of filariasis patients in endemic areas, and to control filariasis. Mass, combined with selective, treatments with diethylcarbamazine to microfilaria positive persons had been made them free from microfilaremia and contributed to significant decrease of the microfilarial density in previously endemic areas. Significant decrease of microfilaria positive cases in an area influenced eventually to the endemicity of filariasis in the relevant locality. Together with remarkable economic growth followed by improvement of environmental and personal hygiene and living standards, the factors stated above have contributed to blocking the transmission cycle of B. malayi and led to disappearance of this mosquito-borne ancient disease in the Republic of Korea. PMID:19967079

  18. Temporal Space Lymphatic Malformation in a 15-Year-Old Adolescent: An Extraordinary Case.

    PubMed

    Igoumenakis, Dimosthenis; Logothetis, Ioannis; Barmpagadaki, Alina; Ieromonachou, Panayotis; Mastorakis, George

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic malformations-previously called lymphangiomas or cystic hygromas-are regarded as non-malignant primary disorders of the lymphatic system. They appear predominantly in infants and children, with 90 % of cases being diagnosed by the age of 2 years. Also, they constitute an infrequent entity, accounting for 5 % of all benign tumors in infants and children. In adults they are extremely rare. In the present article we present an extraordinary case of a lymphatic malformation that ensued in the temporal area of a 15-year old adolescent.

  19. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino) in association with jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence.

    PubMed

    Wenstrom, K D; Williamson, R A; Hoover, W W; Grant, S S

    1989-07-01

    The prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis in association with cystic hygroma is described. Ultrasound findings of severe short-limbed dwarfism, decreased vertebral ossification, and normal ossification of the calvarium were all consistent with achondrogenesis type II. Although the unusual finding of associated cystic hygroma raised the suspicion of a concurrent chromosome abnormality, the karyotype of both fetal lymphocytes and fetal fibroblasts was normal. Autopsy confirmed dilated lymphatic channels in the basal endothelial layer of the skin, cystic hygroma, and coarctation of the aorta. Although previously unreported, we suggest that the features of this case of achondrogenesis indicate an association with lymphatic stasis and jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence in this syndrome. PMID:2671977

  20. Temporal Space Lymphatic Malformation in a 15-Year-Old Adolescent: An Extraordinary Case.

    PubMed

    Igoumenakis, Dimosthenis; Logothetis, Ioannis; Barmpagadaki, Alina; Ieromonachou, Panayotis; Mastorakis, George

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic malformations-previously called lymphangiomas or cystic hygromas-are regarded as non-malignant primary disorders of the lymphatic system. They appear predominantly in infants and children, with 90 % of cases being diagnosed by the age of 2 years. Also, they constitute an infrequent entity, accounting for 5 % of all benign tumors in infants and children. In adults they are extremely rare. In the present article we present an extraordinary case of a lymphatic malformation that ensued in the temporal area of a 15-year old adolescent. PMID:27408452

  1. Prevention of induced atherosclerosis by diversion of bile or blockade of intestinal lymphatics in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, P J; Karipineni, R C; Pertsemlidis, D; Danese, C A

    1976-01-01

    The prevention of induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis was studied by means of intestinal lymphatic blockade and of bile diversion in the dog. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were produced by high cholesterol feeding after induction of hypothyroidism with radio-iodine plus thiouracil. Complete diversion of bile, by shunting all bile into the urinary bladder, effectively prevented hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis; in contrast, blockade of the intestinal lymphatics failed to prevent the consequences of the atherogenic regimen, because of the development of collateral lymphatic channels. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:817679

  2. Complex anatomic variation in the brachial region.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Th; Michalinos, A; Protogerou, V; Mazarakis, A; Skandalakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Authors describe a case of a complex anatomic variation discovered during dissection of the humeral region. On the right side, brachial artery followed a superficial course. Musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce coracobrachialis muscle but instead passed below the muscle before continuing in the forearm. On the left side, a communication between musculocutaneous and median nerve was dissected. Those variations are analytically presented with a brief review on their anatomic and clinical implications. Considerations on their embryological origin are attempted.

  3. Anatomic Considerations in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Folbe, Adam J; Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Comprehension of the complex anatomic variants comprising the frontal sinus outflow tract is essential for successful surgical intervention. Deviation from sound technique increases the potential for a variety of deleterious sequelae, including recurrent disease as well as catastrophic intracranial and orbital injury. Furthermore, incomplete removal of elements occluding the frontal recess can result in severe stenosis that can increase the difficulty of further interventions. This review covers anatomic considerations that should be kept in mind when performing frontal sinus surgery. PMID:27329978

  4. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  5. Distribution of Prostate Sentinel Nodes: A SPECT-Derived Anatomic Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Ganswindt, Ute; Schilling, David; Mueller, Arndt-Christian; Bares, Roland; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The randomized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-13 trial revealed that coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in high-risk prostate cancer confers an advantage (progression-free survival and biochemical failure) in patients with {>=}15% risk of lymph node involvement. To facilitate an improved definition of the adjuvant target volume, precise knowledge regarding the location of the relevant lymph nodes is necessary. Therefore, we generated a three-dimensional sentinel lymph node atlas. Methods and Materials: In 61 patients with high-risk prostate cancer, a three-dimensional visualization of sentinel lymph nodes was performed using a single photon emission computed tomography system after transrectal intraprostatic injection of 150 to 362 (median 295) mega becquerel (MBq) {sup 99m}Technetium-nanocolloid (1.5-3h after injection) followed by an anatomic functional image fusion. Results: In all, 324 sentinel nodes in 59 of 61 patients (96.7%) were detected, with 0 to 13 nodes per patient (median 5, mean 5.3). The anatomic distribution of the sentinel nodes was as follows: external iliac 34.3%, internal iliac 17.9%, common iliac 12.7%, sacral 8.6%, perirectal 6.2%, left paraaortic 5.3%, right paraaortic 5.3%, seminal vesicle lymphatic plexus 3.1%, deep inguinal 1.5%, superior rectal 1.2%, internal pudendal 1.2%, perivesical 0.9%, inferior rectal 0.9%, retroaortic 0.3%, superficial inguinal 0.3%, and periprostatic 0.3%. Conclusions: The distribution of sentinel nodes as detected by single photon emission computed tomography imaging correlates well with the distribution determined by intraoperative gamma probe detection. A lower detection rate of sentinels in close proximity to the bladder and seminal vesicles is probably caused by the radionuclide accumulation in the bladder. In regard to intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques, the presented anatomic atlas may allow optimized target volume definitions.

  6. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, John C.; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Laine, Glen A.; Stewart, Randolph H.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min−1; Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min−1) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min−1; Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min−1) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  7. Lymphatic fatty acids from rats fed human milk and formula containing coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Roche, M E; Clark, R M

    1994-06-01

    Human milk and infant formula containing coconut/soy oil were infused into the duodenum of rats to determine the incorporation of capric, lauric, myristic and palmitic acids into lymphatic triacylglycerol (TAG). The proportion of capric and lauric acids in the lymphatic TAG reflected the fatty acid composition of the diet. Based on positional analysis, it appears that more than 50% of the capric and lauric acids could have been absorbed from the intestine as sn-2 monoacylglycerols. In the rats fed human milk, 50% of palmitic acid in lymphatic TAG was in the sn-2 position. Because of the nonrandom distribution of palmitic acid in the lymphatic TAG, the nonspecific lipase in human milk, i.e., bile salt-stimulated lipase, did not appear to be a factor in milk lipid digestion. PMID:8090066

  8. Absence of lymphatic vessels in the dog dental pulp: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anna; Gasse, Hagen; Staszyk, Carsten

    2010-11-01

    In spite of numerous investigations it has not been precisely determined whether lymphatic vessels are present in the dental pulp of dogs. Therefore, this study attempted a specific immunohistochemical detection of lymphatic endothelium. The canine teeth of 19 healthy beagle dogs were dissected into three segments (apical, intermediate and occlusal). After decalcification, specimens were embedded in paraffin wax and histologic cross-sections were stained immunohistochemically using a reliable antibody (anti-Prox-1) against the homeobox transcription factor Prox-1, which is located within the nucleus of lymphatic endothelium. Anti-Prox-1 reacted positively with canine control tissues (lymph nodes, gingiva, nasal mucosa), but showed no staining in tissue sections of the dental pulp. The dog dental pulp contained no vascular structures lined with lymphatic endothelium. This suggests that drainage of interstitial fluid makes use of other routes, i.e. extravascular pathways.

  9. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quick, Christopher M; Criscione, John C; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H

    2014-06-15

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min(-1); Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min(-1)) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min(-1); Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min(-1)) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity.

  10. Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lower lip in a child.

    PubMed

    Bombeccari, Gian Paolo; Guzzi, Gianpaolo; Ruffoni, Diego; Gianatti, Andrea; Mariani, Umberto; Spadari, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lip in a child is a very rare clinical entity whose cause is poorly understood. We describe an 11-year-old boy who presented with a 5-month history of an asymptomatic nodule on the lower lip with the clinical appearance of a benign mucocele. After surgical excision of the lower lip lesion, lymphocyte phenotypic analysis and histologic examination of the specimen disclosed an extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue type of the buccal minor salivary glands. Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lip may clinically resemble a large mucocele. To prevent a delayed detection of lip mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma, an incisional biopsy of large mucous cysts of the oral mucosa before marsupialization is recommended. PMID:22152894

  11. Surgical management of a dermal lymphatic malformation of the lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lisa F; Chen, Constance M; Zurada, Joanna M; Walther, Robert; Grant, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Dermal lymphatic malformations are rare congenital hamartomas of superficial lymphatics characterized by high recurrence rates after excision. The standard therapy for a single lesion is surgical excision with wide margins, which reduces recurrence but can have a potentially unacceptable aesthetic outcome. A case of a 24-year-old woman with a 6 cm × 5 cm dermal lymphatic malformation on her right thigh, diagnosed by clinical history, physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings, is reported. The patient underwent wide local excision with split-thickness skin grafting. After pathological examination revealed negative margins, the patient underwent tissue expander placement and excision of the skin graft with primary closure. The lesion did not recur, and the patient achieved a satisfactory aesthetic result. The present case represents the first report of the use of tissue expanders to treat dermal lymphatic malformations in the lower extremity and demonstrates a safe, staged approach to successful treatment. PMID:19949506

  12. Interplay of mechanotransduction, FOXC2, connexins, and calcineurin signaling in lymphatic valve formation.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Amélie; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2014-01-01

    The directional flow of lymph is maintained by hundreds of intraluminal lymphatic valves. Lymphatic valves are crucial to prevent lymphedema, accumulation of fluid in the tissues, and to ensure immune surveillance; yet, the mechanisms of valve formation are only beginning to be elucidated. In this chapter, we will discuss the main steps of lymphatic valve morphogenesis, the important role of mechanotransduction in this process, and the genetic program regulated by the transcription factor Foxc2, which is indispensable for all steps of valve development. Failure to form mature collecting lymphatic vessels and valves causes the majority of postsurgical lymphedema, e.g., in breast cancer patients. Therefore, this knowledge will be useful for diagnostics and development of better treatments of secondary lymphedema.

  13. [Lymphatic cysts arising after extended surgery for cervical and endometrial tumors].

    PubMed

    Oleĭnik, V V; Maksimov, S Ia; Simonov, N N; Gulo, E I; Bokhman, Ia V

    1997-01-01

    Retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts account for 10.0-15.0% of complications of extended hysterectomy for tumors of the cervix uteri and endometrium. The data on 1,093 cases treated at the Institute Clinic in 1980-1994 have been analyzed to establish retroperitoneal lymphatic cyst frequency, factors of its development, criteria of diagnosis and procedures of therapy and prevention. Age over 50 years, low differentiation of tumor cells, deep invasion and considerable local extent of tumor have been identified as factors of risk for lymphatic dissemination. Ultrasonic examination proved the most effective diagnostic procedure with a credibility of 85.5%. Depending on cyst size and condition of adjacent organs, treatment of postsurgical lymphatic cysts may be palliative or radical. In the present study, surgery was used in 28.8% of cases. Frequency of complications can be lowered by timely detection of early forms of cancer of the cervix uteri and endometrium which do not require lymphadenectomy.

  14. Markers for the lymphatic endothelium: in search of the holy grail?

    PubMed

    Sleeman, J P; Krishnan, J; Kirkin, V; Baumann, P

    2001-10-15

    The ability to discriminate reliably at the histological level between blood and lymphatic microcapillaries would greatly assist the study of a number of biological and pathological questions and may also be of clinical utility. A structure-function comparison of these types of microcapillary suggests that differences which could function as markers to allow discrimination between blood and lymphatic endothelium should exist. Indeed, to date a variety of such markers have been proposed, including basement membrane components, constituents of junctional complexes such as desmoplakin and enzymes such as 5'-nucleotidase. Additionally, a variety of cell surface molecules are thought to be differentially expressed, including PAL-E, VEGFR-3, podoplanin, and LYVE-1. Several of the lymphatic markers proposed in the literature require further characterization to demonstrate fully their lymphatic specificity and some have proven not to be reliable. The relative merits and drawbacks of each of the proposed markers is discussed. PMID:11596151

  15. Surveillance of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after stopping mass drug administration in Menoufiya Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, M A; Thabet, H S; Saad, G A; El-Setouhy, M; Mehrez, M; Hamdy, D M

    2014-05-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that before lymphatic filariasis elimination in an area can be confirmed, an additional survey should be performed at least 5 years after stopping mass drug administration. The current study aimed to determine the status of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after cessation ofthe mass drug administration in 3 sentinel Egyptian villages in Menoufiya Governorate. The rapid immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and a new commercial antibody detection kit (CELISA®) were used. All 1321 primary-school children aged 6-7 years old were ICT negative but 27 children were antibody positive. All households surveyed in one village with the highest antibody prevalence were ICT negative, indicating an absence of lymphatic filariasis. The CELISA antibody kit needs more standardization and development to be useful under field conditions. We conclude that lymphatic filariasis is no longer a public health problem in these villages and other villages with similar epidemiological conditions.

  16. Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lower lip in a child.

    PubMed

    Bombeccari, Gian Paolo; Guzzi, Gianpaolo; Ruffoni, Diego; Gianatti, Andrea; Mariani, Umberto; Spadari, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lip in a child is a very rare clinical entity whose cause is poorly understood. We describe an 11-year-old boy who presented with a 5-month history of an asymptomatic nodule on the lower lip with the clinical appearance of a benign mucocele. After surgical excision of the lower lip lesion, lymphocyte phenotypic analysis and histologic examination of the specimen disclosed an extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue type of the buccal minor salivary glands. Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma of the lip may clinically resemble a large mucocele. To prevent a delayed detection of lip mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma, an incisional biopsy of large mucous cysts of the oral mucosa before marsupialization is recommended.

  17. Surveillance of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after stopping mass drug administration in Menoufiya Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, M A; Thabet, H S; Saad, G A; El-Setouhy, M; Mehrez, M; Hamdy, D M

    2014-05-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that before lymphatic filariasis elimination in an area can be confirmed, an additional survey should be performed at least 5 years after stopping mass drug administration. The current study aimed to determine the status of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after cessation ofthe mass drug administration in 3 sentinel Egyptian villages in Menoufiya Governorate. The rapid immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and a new commercial antibody detection kit (CELISA®) were used. All 1321 primary-school children aged 6-7 years old were ICT negative but 27 children were antibody positive. All households surveyed in one village with the highest antibody prevalence were ICT negative, indicating an absence of lymphatic filariasis. The CELISA antibody kit needs more standardization and development to be useful under field conditions. We conclude that lymphatic filariasis is no longer a public health problem in these villages and other villages with similar epidemiological conditions. PMID:24952286

  18. A High-Salt Diet Differentially Modulates Mechanical Activity of Afferent and Efferent Collecting Lymphatics in Murine Iliac Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Risuke; Ono, Nobuyuki; Nishimoto, Mitsuhiro; Fujita, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The lymphatic system contributes to fluid homeostasis in various tissues. Recent evidence suggests that lymphangiogenesis induced by a high-salt diet (HSD) is associated with blood pressure regulation. Lymph nodes, located along lymphatic pathways, are not only important secondary lymphoid tissues for cancer metastasis, inflammation, and immune responses, but are also important for fluid homeostasis. Afferent lymphatics collect lymph from the pre-nodal area and efferent lymphatics drain lymph out of the lymph nodes. However, the difference in mechanical activity between afferent and efferent lymphatics and the effect of a HSD on these vessels have not been shown. Methods and Results: Changes in mechanical activity of isolated afferent and efferent lymphatics in normal salt diet (NSD) and 4-week HSD mice in response to increases in intraluminal pressures from 3 to 7 cmH2O were measured using video-microscopy. The higher intramural pressure equivalently decreased pumping activity of afferent and efferent lymphatics in NSD mice. A HSD suppressed the amplitude, ejection fraction, and stroke volume of afferent lymphatics, leading to marked reductions in pumping activity. In contrast, the pumping activities of efferent lymphatics were resistant to a HSD and were preserved by enhancing the contraction frequency. Conclusions: A HSD differentially modulated the mechanical activity of afferent and efferent collecting lymphatics in murine iliac lymph nodes. PMID:26091404

  19. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  20. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  1. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  2. Objective assessment of blood and lymphatic vessel invasion and association with macrophage infiltration in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Storr, Sarah J; Safuan, Sabreena; Mitra, Angana; Elliott, Faye; Walker, Christopher; Vasko, Mark J; Ho, Bernard; Cook, Martin; Mohammed, Rabab A A; Patel, Poulam M; Ellis, Ian O; Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Martin, Stewart G

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the role of vascular invasion (blood and lymphatic), vessel density and the presence of tumour-associated macrophages as prognostic markers in 202 cutaneous melanoma patients. Sections of primary melanoma were stained with lymphatic-specific antibody D2-40 to assess lymphatic vessel invasion and density in intratumoural and peritumoural areas; an antibody against endothelial marker CD34 was used to determine blood vessel invasion and density, and an antibody against CD68 was used to determine macrophage counts. Immunohistochemically determined vascular invasion (combined blood and lymphatic) was compared with that determined using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The use of immunohistochemistry increased detection of vascular invasion from 8-30% of patients, and histological exam of H&E-stained tissue was associated with a false positive rate of 64%. Lymphatic vessel invasion occurred at a much higher frequency than blood vessel invasion (27 and 4% of patients, respectively). Although immunohistochemically detected vessel invasion was significantly associated with histological markers of adverse prognosis, such as increased Breslow thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate (all P<0.001), no associations with relapse-free or overall survival were observed. High macrophage counts were significantly associated with markers of aggressive disease, such as Breslow thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate (P<0.001, P<0.001, P=0.005, respectively), and lymphatic vessel invasion and high microvessel density (P=0.002 and P=0.003, respectively). These results suggest that vascular invasion is more accurately detected using immunohistochemistry and occurs predominantly via lymphatic vessels. The association of vessel characteristics with histological characteristics of the primary melanoma provides evidence for their biological importance in melanoma, but that they were not associated with clinical outcome attests to the value of

  3. Current Status of Optical Imaging for Evaluating Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques use visual and near infrared rays. Despite their considerably poor penetration depth, they are widely used due to their safe and intuitive properties and potential for intraoperative usage. Optical imaging techniques have been actively investigated for clinical imaging of lymph nodes and lymphatic system. This article summarizes a variety of optical tracers and techniques used for lymph node and lymphatic imaging, and reviews their clinical applications. Emerging new optical imaging techniques and their potential are also described. PMID:25598672

  4. Principles of electroanatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Deepak; Miller, John M

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiologic testing and radiofrequency ablation have evolved as curative measures for a variety of rhythm disturbances. As experience in this field has grown, ablation is progressively being used to address more complex rhythm disturbances. Paralleling this trend are technological advancements to facilitate these efforts, including electroanatomic mapping (EAM). At present, several different EAM systems utilizing various technologies are available to facilitate mapping and ablation. Use of these systems has been shown to reduce fluoroscopic exposure and radiation dose, with less significant effects on procedural duration and success rates. Among the data provided by EAM are chamber reconstruction, tagging of important anatomic landmarks and ablation lesions, display of diagnostic and mapping catheters without using fluoroscopy, activation mapping, and voltage (or scar) mapping. Several EAM systems have specialized features, such as enhanced ability to map non-sustained or hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias, ability to display diagnostic as well as mapping catheter positions, and wide compatibility with a variety of catheters. Each EAM system has its strengths and weaknesses, and the system chosen must depend upon what data is required for procedural success (activation mapping, substrate mapping, cardiac geometry), the anticipated arrhythmia, the compatibility of the system with adjunctive tools (i.e. diagnostic and ablation catheters), and the operator's familiarity with the selected system. While EAM can offer significant assistance during an EP procedure, their incorrect or inappropriate application can substantially hamper mapping efforts and procedural success, and should not replace careful interpretation of data and strict adherence to electrophysiologic principles.

  5. Label-free optical imaging of lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siavash; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are a part of circulatory system in vertebrates that maintain tissue fluid homeostasis and drain excess fluid and large cells that cannot easily find their way back into venous system. Due to the lack of non-invasive monitoring tools, lymphatic vessels are known as forgotten circulation. However, lymphatic system plays an important role in diseases such as cancer and inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we start to briefly review the current existing methods for imaging lymphatic vessels, mostly involving dye/targeting cell injection. We then show the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for label-free non-invasive in vivo imaging of lymph vessels and nodes. One of the advantages of using OCT over other imaging modalities is its ability to assess label-free blood flow perfusion that can be simultaneously observed along with lymphatic vessels for imaging the microcirculatory system within tissue beds. Imaging the microcirculatory system including blood and lymphatic vessels can be utilized for imaging and better understanding pathologic mechanisms and treatment technique development in some critical diseases such as inflammation, malignant cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25642129

  6. Lymphoedema: Pathophysiology and management in resource-poor settings - relevance for lymphatic filariasis control programmes

    PubMed Central

    Vaqas, Babar; Ryan, Terence J

    2003-01-01

    Low cost reduction of morbidity in lymphoedema is an essential goal in the management of lymphatic filariasis. This review emphasises the role of movement and elevation, and refers to the literature on the effects of these on the venous and lymphatic system. The patient with lymphoedema becomes increasingly immobile and the affected limb is often in a permanently dependent position causing venous hypertension and resultant overloading of the failing lymphatics. The evidence that breathing exercises are important for reducing venous hypertension and inducing lymphatic flow is discussed. The contribution of a damaged epidermis to lymphatic failure is emphasised. Loss of barrier function encourages penetration of bacteria and stimulates repair mechanisms that generate cytokines, which, in turn lead to inflammation. Management programmes that improve the health of the epidermis play a part in reducing lymphatic load. In taking morbidity management of lymphoedema into the general health services there are benefits in promoting skin hygiene and self-help regimes that can ameliorate many diseases along with lymphoedema. PMID:12685942

  7. Absence of lymphatic vessels in human dental pulp: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Renato; Secciani, Ilaria; Sozio, Francesca; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta; Lorenzini, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Few and controversial data are available in the literature regarding the presence of lymphatic vessels in the human dental pulp. The present study was designed to examine morphologically the existence of a lymph drainage system in human dental pulp. Human dental pulp and skin sections were immunohistochemically stained with specific antibodies for lymphatic endothelium (D2-40, LYVE-1, VEGFR-3 [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3], and Prox-1), with the pan-endothelial markers CD31 and von Willebrand factor (vWF), and with the blood-specific marker CD34. Several blood vessels were identified in human pulps and skin. Lymphatic vessels were found in all human skin samples but in none of the pulps examined. Western blotting performed on human dermis and on pulps treated with collagenase (to remove odontoblasts) confirmed these results. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that vessels which, by light microscopy, appeared to be initial lymphatic vessels had no anchoring filaments or discontinuous basement membrane, both of which are typical ultrastructural characteristics of lymphatic vessels. These results suggest that under normal conditions human dental pulp does not contain true lymphatic vessels. The various theories about dental pulp interstitial fluid circulation should be revised accordingly.

  8. Diphtheria toxin–mediated ablation of lymphatic endothelial cells results in progressive lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Gardenier, Jason C.; Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nores, Gabriela D. García; Dayan, Joseph J.; Chang, David; Zampell, Jamie; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel treatments for lymphedema has been limited by the fact that the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. It remains unknown, for example, why limb swelling resulting from surgical injury resolves initially, but recurs in some cases months or years later. Finding answers for these basic questions has been hampered by the lack of adequate animal models. In the current study, we used Cre-lox mice that expressed the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) driven by a lymphatic-specific promoter in order to noninvasively ablate the lymphatic system of the hind limb. Animals treated in this manner developed lymphedema that was indistinguishable from clinical lymphedema temporally, radiographically, and histologically. Using this model and clinical biopsy specimens, we show that the initial resolution of edema after injury is dependent on the formation of collateral capillary lymphatics and that this process is regulated by M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, we show that despite these initial improvements in lymphatic function, persistent accumulation of CD4+ cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis and promotes sclerosis of collecting lymphatics, resulting in late onset of edema and fibrosis. Our findings therefore provide strong evidence that inflammatory changes after lymphatic injury play a key role in the pathophysiology of lymphedema.

  9. Disrupted NOS signaling in lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to chronically increased pulmonary lymph flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Gong, Wenhui; He, Youping; Johengen, Michael; Kameny, Rebecca J; Raff, Gary W; Maltepe, Emin; Oishi, Peter E; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Associated abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well described in congenital heart disease. However, their mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Using a clinically relevant ovine model of a congenital cardiac defect with chronically increased pulmonary blood flow (shunt), we previously demonstrated that exposure to chronically elevated pulmonary lymph flow is associated with: 1) decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary lymph; and 2) attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of thoracic duct rings, suggesting disrupted lymphatic endothelial NO signaling in shunt lambs. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this altered NO signaling, primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were isolated from the efferent lymphatic of the caudal mediastinal node in 4-wk-old control and shunt lambs. We found that shunt LECs (n = 3) had decreased bioavailable NO and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein expression compared with control LECs (n = 3). eNOS activity was also low in shunt LECs, but, interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and activity were increased in shunt LECs, as were total cellular nitration, including eNOS-specific nitration, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pharmacological inhibition of iNOS reduced ROS in shunt LECs to levels measured in control LECs. These data support the conclusion that NOS signaling is disrupted in the lymphatic endothelium of lambs exposed to chronically increased pulmonary blood and lymph flow and may contribute to decreased pulmonary lymphatic bioavailable NO.

  10. Blocking development of a CD8+ T cell response by targeting lymphatic recruitment of APC.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Denise; Johnson, Louise A; Hanke, Tomas; McMichael, Andrew J; Jackson, David G

    2009-02-15

    Generating a protective immune response to viral infection is known to depend upon the priming and clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells by Ag-loaded dendritic cells (DC) within secondary lymphoid tissue. However, the actual initiation of the response involves critical upstream events that control the recruitment of mature Ag-charged DC from the periphery via afferent lymphatics, events that are still only partly understood. Recent evidence has revealed that transmigration of lymphatic endothelium by DC is regulated by the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 both in vitro and in vivo. These findings imply that lymphatic entry may be an important rate-limiting step in primary immunity and a possible target for immune intervention. In this study, we have explored such possibilities using an F(5) TCR-transgenic mouse model to assess the contribution of lymphatic cell adhesion molecules in the CD8(+) T cell response to influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP). We show for the first time that immunization with ICAM-1- and VCAM-1-blocking mAbs can impair the T cell response in lymph node-draining sites of dermally administered nucleoprotein vaccine (MVA.HIVA.NP) by targeting lymphatic uptake of Ag-loaded DC ahead of other cell adhesion molecule-dependent events. These results reveal lymphatic entry as an important step that may be rate limiting in the development of immunity and reconfirm its potential as a target for localized immunotherapy in inflammation and tissue rejection.

  11. Integration of CD45-positive leukocytes into newly forming lymphatics of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Buttler, K; Lohrberg, M; Gross, G; Weich, H A; Wilting, J

    2016-06-01

    The embryonic origin of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) has been a matter of controversy since more than a century. However, recent studies in mice have supported the concept that embryonic lymphangiogenesis is a complex process consisting of growth of lymphatics from specific venous segments as well as the integration of lymphangioblasts into the lymphatic networks. Similarly, the mechanisms of adult lymphangiogenesis are poorly understood and have rarely been studied. We have recently shown that endothelial progenitor cells isolated from the lung of adult mice have the capacity to form both blood vessels and lymphatics when grafted with Matrigel plugs into the skin of syngeneic mice. Here, we followed up on these experiments and studied the behavior of host leukocytes during lymphangiogenesis in the Matrigel plugs. We observed a striking co-localization of CD45(+) leukocytes with the developing lymphatics. Numerous CD45(+) cells expressed the LEC marker podoplanin and were obviously integrated into the lining of lymphatic capillaries. This indicates that, similar to inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis in man, circulating CD45(+) cells of adult mice are capable of initiating lymphangiogenesis and of adopting a lymphvasculogenic cellular differentiation program. The data are discussed in the context of embryonic and inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26748643

  12. Diphtheria toxin–mediated ablation of lymphatic endothelial cells results in progressive lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Gardenier, Jason C.; Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nores, Gabriela D. García; Dayan, Joseph J.; Chang, David; Zampell, Jamie; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel treatments for lymphedema has been limited by the fact that the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. It remains unknown, for example, why limb swelling resulting from surgical injury resolves initially, but recurs in some cases months or years later. Finding answers for these basic questions has been hampered by the lack of adequate animal models. In the current study, we used Cre-lox mice that expressed the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) driven by a lymphatic-specific promoter in order to noninvasively ablate the lymphatic system of the hind limb. Animals treated in this manner developed lymphedema that was indistinguishable from clinical lymphedema temporally, radiographically, and histologically. Using this model and clinical biopsy specimens, we show that the initial resolution of edema after injury is dependent on the formation of collateral capillary lymphatics and that this process is regulated by M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, we show that despite these initial improvements in lymphatic function, persistent accumulation of CD4+ cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis and promotes sclerosis of collecting lymphatics, resulting in late onset of edema and fibrosis. Our findings therefore provide strong evidence that inflammatory changes after lymphatic injury play a key role in the pathophysiology of lymphedema. PMID:27699240

  13. Integrin Alpha 9 Blockade Suppresses Lymphatic Valve Formation and Promotes Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gyeong Jin; Truong, Tan; Huang, Eric; Su, Valerie; Ge, Shaokui; Chen, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The lymphatic pathway mediates transplant rejection. We recently reported that lymphatic vessels develop luminal valves in the cornea during lymphangiogenesis, and these valves express integrin alpha 9 (Itga-9) and play a critical role in directing lymph flow. In this study, we used an allogeneic corneal transplantation model to investigate whether Itga-9 blockade could suppress valvulogenesis after transplantation, and how this effect would influence the outcomes of the transplants. Methods Orthotopic corneal transplantation was performed between fully mismatched C57BL/6 (donor) and BALB/c (recipient) mice. The recipients were randomized to receive subconjunctival injections of either Itga-9 blocking antibody or isotype control twice a week for 8 weeks. Corneal grafts were assessed in vivo by ophthalmic slit-lamp biomicroscopy and analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Additionally, whole-mount full-thickness corneas were evaluated ex vivo by immunofluorescent microscopy on both lymphatic vessels and valves. Results Anti–Itga-9 treatment suppressed lymphatic valvulogenesis after transplantation. Our treatment did not affect lymphatic vessel formation or their nasal polarized distribution in the cornea. More importantly, Itga-9 blockade led to a significant promotion of graft survival. Conclusions Lymphatic valvulogenesis is critically involved in transplant rejection. Itga-9 targeting may offer a new and effective strategy to interfere with the immune responses and promote graft survival. PMID:27806381

  14. [ Bancroftian lymphatic filariasis: toward its elimination from the Pacific?].

    PubMed

    Chanteau, S; Roux, J F

    2008-06-01

    The region of the Pacific is historically affected by lymphatic filariasis (LF). Following the World Health Assembly resolution in 1997, the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) was launched. In the Pacific, the World Health Organization (WHO) has implemented from 1999, the Pacific Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (PacELF) bringing together the 22 countries and territories, in a common effort to eliminate the disease. The strategy is based on Mass Drug Administration (MDA); in annual single dose during 5 years of a Diethycarbamazine/Albendazole association distributed to all the population at risk. Among the 22 countries and territories of the Pacific, 16 are endemic and 6 are non endemic. The classification is based according to the filarian antigen prevalence upper or lower than 1%. MDA are decided when the rate of the filarian antigen prevalence is > 1%. The objective of PacELF is to reduce this rate down to < 1%, threshold under which the transmission is supposed to be stopped. From 1999 to 2007, 14 of the 16 endemic countries organized MDA. Eleven of them completed the cycle of 5 treatments and even beyond. But, these MDA reached only 19% of the at risk population, because of logistic difficulties in Papua New Guinea, the most populated country in the Pacific. The investigations carried out in sentinel sites showed a public health impact, by the fall of the number of microfilaria carriers, often down to a rate < 1%. However the rate of circulating antigen prevalence remains often above the required threshold of 1%. Prevalence surveys carried out in 2007, in different endemic countries, revealed the necessity to intensify efforts and to refine strategy for elimination of FL from the Pacific. A lot of progress were obtained, but few problems were identified. Reflexions are imperative and in progress about: the MDA coverage rates while at the same time a certain lassitude appears in the populations and among health staff, the methods

  15. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  16. Mechanotransduction, PROX1, and FOXC2 cooperate to control connexin37 and calcineurin during lymphatic-valve formation.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Amélie; Agalarov, Yan; Maby-El Hajjami, Hélène; Jaquet, Muriel; Hägerling, René; Pollmann, Cathrin; Bebber, Damien; Pfenniger, Anna; Miura, Naoyuki; Dormond, Olivier; Calmes, Jean-Marie; Adams, Ralf H; Mäkinen, Taija; Kiefer, Friedemann; Kwak, Brenda R; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2012-02-14

    Lymphatic valves are essential for efficient lymphatic transport, but the mechanisms of early lymphatic-valve morphogenesis and the role of biomechanical forces are not well understood. We found that the transcription factors PROX1 and FOXC2, highly expressed from the onset of valve formation, mediate segregation of lymphatic-valve-forming cells and cell mechanosensory responses to shear stress in vitro. Mechanistically, PROX1, FOXC2, and flow coordinately control expression of the gap junction protein connexin37 and activation of calcineurin/NFAT signaling. Connexin37 and calcineurin are required for the assembly and delimitation of lymphatic valve territory during development and for its postnatal maintenance. We propose a model in which regionally increased levels/activation states of transcription factors cooperate with mechanotransduction to induce a discrete cell-signaling pattern and morphogenetic event, such as formation of lymphatic valves. Our results also provide molecular insights into the role of endothelial cell identity in the regulation of vascular mechanotransduction.

  17. A procedure to average 3D anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Subramanya, K; Dean, D

    2000-12-01

    Creating a feature-preserving average of three dimensional anatomical surfaces extracted from volume image data is a complex task. Unlike individual images, averages present right-left symmetry and smooth surfaces which give insight into typical proportions. Averaging multiple biological surface images requires careful superimposition and sampling of homologous regions. Our approach to biological surface image averaging grows out of a wireframe surface tessellation approach by Cutting et al. (1993). The surface delineating wires represent high curvature crestlines. By adding tile boundaries in flatter areas the 3D image surface is parametrized into anatomically labeled (homology mapped) grids. We extend the Cutting et al. wireframe approach by encoding the entire surface as a series of B-spline space curves. The crestline averaging algorithm developed by Cutting et al. may then be used for the entire surface. Shape preserving averaging of multiple surfaces requires careful positioning of homologous surface regions such as these B-spline space curves. We test the precision of this new procedure and its ability to appropriately position groups of surfaces in order to produce a shape-preserving average. Our result provides an average that well represents the source images and may be useful clinically as a deformable model or for animation.

  18. Artificial lymphatic drainage systems for vascularized microfluidic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith H K; Truslow, James G; Khankhel, Aimal H; Chan, Kelvin L S; Tien, Joe

    2013-08-01

    The formation of a stably perfused microvasculature continues to be a major challenge in tissue engineering. Previous work has suggested the importance of a sufficiently large transmural pressure in maintaining vascular stability and perfusion. Here we show that a system of empty channels that provides a drainage function analogous to that of lymphatic microvasculature in vivo can stabilize vascular adhesion and maintain perfusion rate in dense, hydraulically resistive fibrin scaffolds in vitro. In the absence of drainage, endothelial delamination increased as scaffold density increased from 6 to 30 mg/mL and scaffold hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor of 20. Single drainage channels exerted only localized vascular stabilization, the extent of which depended on the distance between vessel and drainage as well as scaffold density. Computational modeling of these experiments yielded an estimate of 0.40-1.36 cm H2O for the minimum transmural pressure required for vascular stability. We further designed and constructed fibrin patches (0.8 × 0.9 cm(2)) that were perfused by a parallel array of vessels and drained by an orthogonal array of drainage channels; only with the drainage did the vessels display long-term stability and perfusion. This work underscores the importance of drainage in vascularization, especially when a dense, hydraulically resistive scaffold is used. PMID:23281125

  19. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:26179420

  20. A Systemic Route for Drug Loading to Lymphatic Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Papisov, M. I.; Yurkovetskiy, A.; Syed, S.; Koshkina, N.; Yin, M.; Hiller, A.; Fischman, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Lymph nodes are primary germination and proliferation sites for many types of pathogens. Maintaining therapeutic levels of appropriate chemotherapeutic agents in the lymph node tissue is critical for the treatment of both infection and cancer. This study was intended to develop a systemic route for loading lymph node phagocytes with drugs, using a lymph node specific nanocarrier. The latter is assembled as a 10–15 nm particle with a drug-carrying core and a phagocyte-homing poly(1→6)-α-d-glucose based interface. Biokinetics and microdistribution of the model carrier were investigated in vivo. Nanocarrier accumulation in lymph nodes reached 30–35% dose/g in central lymph nodes, with deposition in various phagocytic cell populations. The latter included cells harboring inhaled microparticles translocated to lymph nodes from the lungs. In view of the nanocarrier ability to transport and release significant amounts of various drug substances, the data suggests feasibility of systemic drug loading to lymphatic phagocytes and, through drug release, to the neighboring cells. PMID:15804177

  1. Pump function curve shape for a model lymphatic vessel.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Macaskill, C; Moore, J E

    2016-07-01

    The transport capacity of a contractile segment of lymphatic vessel is defined by its pump function curve relating mean flow-rate and adverse pressure difference. Numerous system characteristics affect curve shape and the magnitude of the generated flow-rates and pressures. Some cannot be varied experimentally, but their separate and interacting effects can be systematically revealed numerically. This paper explores variations in the rate of change of active tension and the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length, factors not known from experiment to functional precision. Whether the pump function curve bends toward or away from the origin depends partly on the curvature of the passive pressure-diameter relation near zero transmural pressure, but rather more on the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length. A pump function curve bending away from the origin defines a well-performing pump by maximum steady output power. This behaviour is favoured by a length/active-tension relationship which sustains tension at smaller lengths. Such a relationship also favours high peak mechanical efficiency, defined as output power divided by the input power obtained from the lymphangion diameter changes and active-tension time-course. The results highlight the need to pin down experimentally the form of the length/active-tension relationship. PMID:27185045

  2. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Numa; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Morganti, Alessio G; Digesù, Cinzia; Bavasso, Antonella; Deodato, Francesco; Smaniotto, Daniela; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The prostate lymphatics drain into the periprostatic subcapsular network, from which 3 groups of ducts originate: the ascending ducts from the cranial prostate draining into the external iliac lymph nodes, the lateral ducts running to the hypogastric lymph nodes and the posterior ducts draining from the caudal prostate to the subaortic sacral lymph nodes of the promontory. Internal, external iliac and obturator lymph nodes are the most frequently involved by prostate carcinoma. Metastases to presacral and common iliac lymph nodes are rare. For the limited staging accuracy, present indications for seminal vesicle irradiation and pelvic node prohylactic irradiation are essentially based on risk categories and estimation algorithms; the latter while are widely used in international studies are not free of limitations as stressed since they were introduced. A method to deliver high doses to the tumor while limiting the irradiation of critical organs might be the delivery of a boost to the tumor only. This approach could become increasingly feasible with the diffusion of imaging procedures able to better define tumor extension. PMID:15018322

  3. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate.

  4. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  5. Anatomic factors in recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Devi Wold, Anne S; Pham, Norma; Arici, Aydin

    2006-02-01

    Anatomic uterine defects are present in 15% of women evaluated for three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions. These anatomic abnormalities can be classified as congenital or acquired. In addition to pregnancy loss, uterine malformations appear to predispose women to other reproductive difficulties including infertility, preterm labor, and abnormal presentation. These poor reproductive outcomes resulting from uterine septum, intrauterine adhesions, polyps, and fibroids are amenable to surgical correction. Therefore, it is essential to make an accurate diagnosis to offer an adequate treatment. In this article, we review the common congenital and acquired uterine anomalies associated with recurrent pregnancy losses, and discuss contemporary diagnosis and treatment options.

  6. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks.

  7. Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Wang, Danhong; Golland, Polina; Mueller, Sophia; Pan, Ruiqi; Sabuncu, Mert R; Sun, Wei; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-10-01

    The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks. PMID:26334050

  8. Essential role of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in development of the lymphatic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Momina; Pang, Mei-Fong; Zaini, Mohamad Amr; Haiko, Paula; Tammela, Tuomas; Alitalo, Kari; Philipson, Lennart; Fuxe, Jonas; Sollerbrant, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule predominantly associated with epithelial tight junctions in adult tissues. CAR is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and essential for heart development up to embryonic day 11.5, but not thereafter. CAR is not expressed in vascular endothelial cells but was recently detected in neonatal lymphatic vessels, suggesting that CAR could play a role in the development of the lymphatic system. To address this, we generated mice carrying a conditional deletion of the CAR gene (Cxadr) and knocked out CAR in the mouse embryo at different time points during post-cardiac development. Deletion of Cxadr from E12.5, but not from E13.5, resulted in subcutaneous edema, hemorrhage and embryonic death. Subcutaneous lymphatic vessels were dilated and structurally abnormal with gaps and holes present at lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions. Furthermore, lymphatic vessels were filled with erythrocytes showing a defect in the separation between the blood and lymphatic systems. Regionally, erythrocytes leaked out into the interstitium from leaky lymphatic vessels explaining the hemorrhage detected in CAR-deficient mouse embryos. The results show that CAR plays an essential role in development of the lymphatic vasculature in the mouse embryo by promoting appropriate formation of lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions.

  9. Role of CD11b+ Macrophages in Intraperitoneal Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Aberrant Lymphangiogenesis and Lymphatic Function in the Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Koh, Young-Jun; Jeon, Bong-Hyun; Jang, Cholsoon; Han, Jinah; Kataru, Raghu P.; Schwendener, Reto A.; Kim, Jin-Man; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels in the diaphragm are essential for draining peritoneal fluid, but little is known about their pathological changes during inflammation. Here we characterized diaphragmatic lymphatic vessels in a peritonitis model generated by daily i.p. administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. Intraperitoneal LPS increased lymphatic density, branching, sprouts, connections, and network formation in the diaphragm in time- and dose-dependent manners. These changes were reversible on discontinuation of LPS administration. The LPS-induced lymphatic density and remodeling occur mainly through proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells. CD11b+ macrophages were massively accumulated and closely associated with the lymphatic vessels changed by i.p. LPS. Both RT-PCR assays and experiments with vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D blockade and macrophage-depletion indicated that the CD11b+ macrophage-derived lymphangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D could be major mediators of LPS-induced lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic remodeling through paracrine activity. Functional assays with India ink and fluorescein isothiocyanate-microspheres indicated that impaired peritoneal fluid drainage in diaphragm of LPS-induced peritonitis mice was due to inflammatory fibrosis and massive attachment of CD11b+ macrophages on the peritoneal side of the diaphragmatic lymphatic vessels. These findings reveal that CD11b+ macrophages play an important role in i.p. LPS-induced aberrant lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic dysfunction in the diaphragm. PMID:19762711

  10. Evidence for SH2 Domain-Containing 5′-Inositol Phosphatase-2 (SHIP2) Contributing to a Lymphatic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Agollah, Germaine D.; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Rasmussen, John C.; Tan, I-Chih; Aldrich, Melissa B.; Darne, Chinmay; Fife, Caroline E.; Guilliod, Renie; Maus, Erik A.; King, Philip D.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature plays a critical role in a number of disease conditions of increasing prevalence, such as autoimmune disorders, obesity, blood vascular diseases, and cancer metastases. Yet, unlike the blood vasculature, the tools available to interrogate the molecular basis of lymphatic dysfunction/disease have been lacking. More recently, investigators have reported that dysregulation of the PI3K pathway is involved in syndromic human diseases that involve abnormal lymphatic vasculatures, but there have been few compelling results that show the direct association of this molecular pathway with lymphatic dysfunction in humans. Using near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging (NIRFLI) to phenotype and next generation sequencing (NGS) for unbiased genetic discovery in a family with non-syndromic lymphatic disease, we discovered a rare, novel mutation in INPPL1 that encodes the protein SHIP2, which is a negative regulator of the PI3K pathway, to be associated with lymphatic dysfunction in the family. In vitro interrogation shows that SHIP2 is directly associated with impairment of normal lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) behavior and that SHIP2 associates with receptors that are associated in lymphedema, implicating its direct involvement in the lymphatic vasculature. PMID:25383712

  11. Lymphatic response to depilation-induced inflammation assessed with label-free optical lymphangiography

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a noninvasive technique capable of imaging 3D microvasculature. OMAG-based optical lymphangiography has been developed for 3D visualization of lymphatic vessels without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this study, we utilize the optical lymphangiography to investigate dynamic changes in lymphatic response within skin tissue to depilation-induced inflammation by using mouse ear as a simple tissue model. Materials and Methods A spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is used in this study to acquire volumetric images of mouse ear. The system operates under the ultrahigh-sensitive OMAG scanning protocol with 5 repetitions for each B frame. An improved adaptive-threshold-based method is proposed to segment lymphatic vessels from OCT microstructure images. Depilation is achieved by placing hair removal lotion on mouse ear pinna for 5 minutes. 3 acquisitions are made before depilation, 3-minute and 30-minute post-depilation, respectively. Results Right after the application of depilation lotion on the skin, we observe that the blind-ended sacs of initial lymphatics are mainly visible in a specific area of the normal tissue. At 5 minutes, more collecting lymphatic vessels start to form, evidenced by their valve structure that only exists in collecting lymphatic vessels. The lymphangiogenesis is almost completed within 8 minutes in the inflammatory tissue. Conclusions Our experimental results demonstrate that the OMAG-based optical lymphangiography has great potential to improve the understanding of lymphatic system in response to various physiological conditions, thus would benefit the development of effective therapeutics. PMID:26224650

  12. Initial Afferent Lymphatic Vessels Controlling Outbound Leukocyte Traffic from Skin to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Teijeira, Alvaro; Rouzaut, Ana; Melero, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Tissue drains fluid and macromolecules through lymphatic vessels (LVs), which are lined by a specialized endothelium that expresses peculiar differentiation proteins, not found in blood vessels (i.e., LYVE-1, Podoplanin, PROX-1, and VEGFR-3). Lymphatic capillaries are characteristically devoid of a continuous basal membrane and are anchored to the ECM by elastic fibers that act as pulling ropes which open the vessel to avoid edema if tissue volume increases, as it occurs upon inflammation. LVs are also crucial for the transit of T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells from tissue to draining lymph nodes (LN). Importantly, cell traffic control across lymphatic endothelium is differently regulated under resting and inflammatory conditions. Under steady-state non-inflammatory conditions, leukocytes enter into the lymphatic capillaries through basal membrane gaps (portals). This entrance is integrin-independent and seems to be mainly guided by CCL21 chemokine gradients acting on leukocytes expressing CCR7. In contrast, inflammatory processes in lymphatic capillaries involve a plethora of cytokines, chemokines, leukocyte integrins, and other adhesion molecules. Importantly, under inflammation a role for integrins and their ligands becomes apparent and, as a consequence, the number of leukocytes entering the lymphatic capillaries multiplies several-fold. Enhancing transmigration of dendritic cells en route to LN is conceivably useful for vaccination and cancer immunotherapy, whereas interference with such key mechanisms may ameliorate autoimmunity or excessive inflammation. Recent findings illustrate how, transient cell-to-cell interactions between lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes contribute to shape the subsequent behavior of leukocytes and condition the LV for subsequent trans-migratory events. PMID:24368908

  13. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels.

  14. Is lymphatic status related to regression of inflammation in Crohn's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Liscia, Gadiel

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the status of the lymphatic vessels in the small bowel affected by Crohn’s disease (CD) at the moment of surgery. METHODS: During the period January 2011-June 2011, 25 consecutive patients affected by CD were operated on in our Institution. During surgery, Patent Blue V was injected subserosally and the way it spread along the subserosa of the intestinal wall, through the mesenterial layers towards the main lymphatic collectors and eventually to the lymph nodes was observed and recorded. Since some patients had been undergone strictureplasty at previous surgery, we also examined the status of intestinal lymph vessels after previous strictureplasties. The same procedure was performed in a control group of 5 patients affected by colorectal cancer. Length of lesions, caliber, maximal thickness of the diseased intestinal wall, thickness of the wall at injection site and thickness of the mesentery were evaluated at surgery. RESULTS: We observed three features after the injection of Patent Blue V in the intestinal loops: (1) Macroscopically healthy terminal ileum of patients with CD or colon cancer showed thin lymphatic vessels linearly directed toward the mesentery; (2) In mild lesions in which the intestinal wall did not reach 8 mm of thickness, we observed short, wide and tortuous lymphatic vessels directed longitudinally along the intestinal axis toward disease-free areas and then transversally toward the mesentery; and (3) Injection in the severely affected lesions, that had a thickness of the intestinal wall over 10 mm, did not show any feature of lymphatic vessels at least on the subserosal surface. There was a correlation between the thickness of the parietal wall and the severity of the lymphatic alterations. Normal lymphatic vessels were observed at previous strictureplasties in the presence of complete regression of the inflammation. CONCLUSION: Injection of Patent Blue V in the intestinal wall could help distinguish healthy tracts of the

  15. Blue angioedema of eyelip after patent blue injection for lymphatic mapping procedure.

    PubMed

    Weng, P-W; Hsu, H-M; Chen, T-W; Hsieh, C-B; Chang, T-M; Chen, V T K; Yu, J-C

    2007-07-01

    Sentinel node biopsy using patent blue dye in breast cancer is a well-documented procedure to assess the axillary status. We presented an unusual and previously unreported complication of simple blue angioedema over bilaterally periorbital tissue after blue dye injection.

  16. Anatomical variation and its management in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Watson, C J E; Harper, S J F

    2015-06-01

    Variant anatomy may be challenging at retrieval, with failure to identify variance being associated with organ damage, particularly vascular damage. On implantation, some variants demand nonstandard techniques of reconstruction or implantation. This review covers the common and less common anatomical variants of the liver, kidney and pancreas, and gives guidance as to how they may be managed during organ retrieval and implantation.

  17. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location.

    PubMed

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-07-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 x 1 x 1-cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II-III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain.

  18. Giving Ourselves: The Ethics of Anatomical Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical…

  19. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  20. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  1. Anatomical Data for Analyzing Human Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plagenhoef, Stanley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Anatomical data obtained from cadavers and from water displacement studies with living subjects were used to determine the weight, center of gravity, and radius of gyration for 16 body segments. A lead model was used to study movement patterns of the trunk section of the body. (Authors/PP)

  2. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  3. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  4. Lymphatic diamine oxidase secretion stimulated by fat absorption is linked with histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Yasuhisa; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Qing; Xu, Min; Wollin, Armin; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) is abundantly expressed in mammalian small intestine catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of polyamines and histamine. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between stimulation of intestinal diamine oxidase secretion with intestinal fat absorption and histamine release. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated and intraduodenal tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic DAO activity and protein secretion were analyzed by radiometric assay and Western blot, respectively. Lymphatic histamine concentration was measured by ELISA. Infusion of Liposyn II (4.43 kcal/3 ml) resulted in a ∼3.5-fold increase in lymphatic DAO protein secretion and DAO activity, peaking at 1 h and lasting for 3 h. Liposyn II infusion also increased the lymphatic histamine release, a substrate for DAO. To determine the relationship of DAO release with histamine release, histamine was administered intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg) in fasting rats and resulted in a significant doubling in lymphatic DAO activity, supporting a link between histamine and DAO. In addition, ip administration of the histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 significantly reduced the Liposyn II-induced DAO output by 65.9%, whereas H1 (pyrilamine maleate), H2 (ranitidine), and H3 (thioperamide maleate) receptor antagonists had little effect. We conclude that DAO secretion may contribute to the catabolism of histamine released during fat absorption and this is probably mediated through the histamine H4 receptor. PMID:23413254

  5. Effects of renal lymphatic occlusion and venous constriction on renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, J.; Carone, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of renal lymphatic occlusion or increased lymph flow due to renal vein constriction on renal function were investigated in rats. In each experiment, the renal lymphatics or vein of the left kidney were occluded or constricted and the right kidney served as a control. Occlusion of renal lymphatics caused renal enlargement, no change in glomerular filtration rate, a marked increase in urine flow and solute excretion without any change in urine osmolality, and enhanced urinary loss of urea, potassium, sodium and ammonium. Urea concentrations in medullary and papillary tissues were significantly elevated. Renal vein constriction caused renal enlargement and a marked drop in glomerular filtration rate, urine volume, urine osmolality and solute excretion. tissue concentrations of urea and potassium were decreased in the medulla and papilla and total tissue solute was significantly decreased in the papilla. The data indicate that in the rat, renal lymphatic occlusion traps urea in the medulla and induces a urea diuresis resulting in a large flow of normally concentrated urine. On the other hand, increased lymph flow secondary to renal vein constriction decreases medullary urea and potassium concentrations and papillary osmolality. These changes and the reduced glomerular filtration rate result in a small flow if dilute urine. Thus both renal lymphatic occlusion and enhanced lymph flow have a significant effect on renal function. Images Fig 1 PMID:1122006

  6. VEGFR signaling during lymphatic vascular development: From progenitor cells to functional vessels.

    PubMed

    Secker, Genevieve A; Harvey, Natasha L

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic vessels are an integral component of the cardiovascular system, serving important roles in fluid homeostasis, lipid absorption, and immune cell trafficking. Defining the mechanisms by which the lymphatic vasculature is constructed and remodeled into a functional vascular network not only provides answers to fascinating biological questions, but is fundamental to understanding how lymphatic vessel growth and development goes awry in human pathologies. While long recognized as dysfunctional in lymphedema and exploited as a route of tumor metastasis, recent work has highlighted important roles for lymphatic vessels in modulating immune responses, regulating salt-sensitive hypertension and important for lung inflation at birth. Substantial progress in our understanding of the signaling pathways important for development and morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature has been made in recent years. Here, we review advances in our knowledge of the best characterized of these signaling pathways, that involving the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with their receptors VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. Recent work has defined multiple levels at which signal transduction by means of this key axis is regulated; these include control of ligand processing and bioavailability, modulation of receptor activation by interacting proteins, and regulation of receptor endocytosis and trafficking.

  7. Development of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Embryonic and Fetal Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Botta, Albert; Nemec, Lucas; Rogojanu, Radu; Beer, Lucian; Fiala, Christian; Eppel, Wolfgang; Bauer, Wolfgang; Petzelbauer, Peter; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-09-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels provide nutrients for the skin and fulfill important homeostatic functions, such as the regulation of immunologic processes. In this study, we investigated the development of blood and lymphatic endothelial cells in prenatal human skin in situ using multicolor immunofluorescence and analyzed angiogenic molecules by protein arrays of lysates and cell culture supernatants. We found that at 8 to 10 weeks of estimated gestational age, CD144(+) vessels predominantly express the venous endothelial cell marker PAL-E, whereas CD144(+)PAL-E(-) vessels compatible with arteries only appear at the end of the first trimester. Lymphatic progenitor cells at 8 weeks of estimated gestational age express CD31, CD144, Prox1, and temporary PAL-E. At that developmental stage not all lymphatic progenitor cells express podoplanin or Lyve-1, which are acquired with advancing gestational age in a stepwise fashion. Already in second-trimester human skin, the phenotype of blood and lymphatic vessels roughly resembles the one in adult skin. The expression pattern of angiogenic molecules in lysates and cell culture supernatants of prenatal skin did not reveal the expected bent to proangiogenic molecules, indicating a complex regulation of angiogenesis during ontogeny. In summary, this study provides enticing new insights into the development and phenotypic characteristics of the vascular system in human prenatal skin.

  8. [Some recent, or claiming to be recent, data on the superficial lymphatic circulation of the limbs].

    PubMed

    Hidden, G

    1990-01-01

    Superficial collecting lymphatics of the limbs are present in much greater number than deep collecting vessels. There is practically no connexion between both networks. Although lymphatics are abundant distally, they tend to fuse toward the root of the limb. At certain "critical" points along their course, local aggression of the vessels may cause lymphedema. In the lower extremity, at the knee and thigh levels, the "critical" area takes the form of a narrow strip of adipose tissue along the path of the great saphenous vein. In the groin, danger is localized at the inferior superficial inguinal nodes, where the superficial collecting lymph vessels merge. In the upper limb, superficial lymphatics converge towards the base of the axilla, where they form three or four trunks that perforate the clavipectoral fascia, each penetrating through its own orifice. Draining lymphatics may approach the axillary space independently. Unfortunately, the inferior axillary nodes wherein they converge also drain the breast, as can be demonstrated by injecting different coloring materials concurrently in both areas. Excision of nodes draining the mammary gland unavoidably jeopardize superficial lymphatic drainage of the upper extremity.

  9. Angiopoietin-4 increases permeability of blood vessels and promotes lymphatic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Cristina T; Pereira, Ethel R; Cui, Cheryl H; Nelson, Gregory M; Masuck, David J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P

    2015-09-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang) ligands are potential therapeutic targets for lymphatic related diseases, which include lymphedema and cancer. Ang-1 and Ang-2 functions are established, but those of Ang-4 are poorly understood. We used intravital fluorescence microscopy to characterize Ang-4 actions on T241 murine fibrosarcoma-associated vessels in mice. The diameters of lymphatic vessels draining Ang-4- or VEGF-C (positive control)-expressing tumors increased to 123 and 135 μm, respectively, and parental, mock-transduced (negative controls) and tumors expressing Ang-1 or Ang-2 remained at baseline (∼60 μm). Ang-4 decreased human dermal lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer permeability by 27% while increasing human dermal blood endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer permeability by 200%. In vivo, Ang-4 stimulated a 4.5-fold increase in tumor-associated blood vessel permeability compared with control when measured using intravital quantitative multiphoton microscopy. Ang-4 activated receptor signaling in both LECs and BECs, evidenced by tyrosine kinase with Ig and endothelial growth factor homology domains-2 (TIE2) receptor, protein kinase B, and Erk1,2 phosphorylation detectable by immunoblotting. These data suggest that Ang-4 actions are mediated through cell-type-specific networks and that lymphatic vessel dilation occurs secondarily to increased vascular leakage. Ang-4 also promoted survival of LECs. Thus, blocking Ang-4 may prune the draining lymphatic vasculature and decrease interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) by reducing vascular permeability.

  10. Isolation and characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from human glossal lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    You, Lanying; Wu, Mingfu; Chen, Ying; Xu, Gang; Wei, Juncheng; Li, Qiong; Song, Anping; Zhao, Liangpin; Li, Shuang; Han, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Lu, Yunpin; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Meng, Li

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal lymphangiogenesis is associated with several diseases such as tumor metastasis and lymphangioma. Human lymphangioma originated from the transformation of lymphatic endothelium is a benign malformation of lymphatic vessels and its pathogenesis has up to date not been illuminated and its cell model has also not been established. An optimized method was used to isolate lymphatic endothelial cells from human glossal lymphangioma (GL-LECs) and GL-LECs were further primarily cultured and expanded. GL-LECs were of typical cobblestone appearance when they reached confluence. The weible-palade body was observed in the GL-LECs cytoplasm. Almost all GL-LECs were strongly positive for specific lymphatic markers FLT-4, LYVE-1 and prox-1 by immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, three-dimension tube-like capillaries of GL-LECs resembled the lymphatic system in vivo, and the GL-LECs spheroids sprouted radically out to form three-dimensional buds when embedded in the cultured BME. These results indicated that high purity GL-LECs were successfully isolated and expanded. They had the abilities of tube formation and differentiation in vitro, which provide a favorable cell model for further uncovering the pathogenesis of human lymphangiomas.

  11. CCR7 and IRF4-dependent dendritic cells regulate lymphatic collecting vessel permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Scallan, Joshua P.; Kim, Ki-Wook; Werth, Kathrin; Johnson, Michael W.; Saunders, Brian T.; Wang, Peter L.; Kuan, Emma L.; Straub, Adam C.; Ouhachi, Melissa; Weinstein, Erica G.; Williams, Jesse W.; Briseño, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Isakson, Brant E.; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Förster, Reinhold; Davis, Michael J.; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic collecting vessels direct lymph into and from lymph nodes (LNs) and can become hyperpermeable as the result of a previous infection. Enhanced permeability has been implicated in compromised immunity due to reduced flow of lymph and immune cells to LNs, which are the primary site of antigen presentation to T cells. Presently, very little is known about the molecular signals that affect lymphatic collecting vessel permeability. Here, we have shown that lymphatic collecting vessel permeability is controlled by CCR7 and that the chronic hyperpermeability of collecting vessels observed in Ccr7–/– mice is followed by vessel fibrosis. Reexpression of CCR7 in DCs, however, was sufficient to reverse the development of such fibrosis. IFN regulatory factor 4–positive (IRF4+) DCs constitutively interacted with collecting lymphatics, and selective ablation of this DC subset in Cd11c-Cre Irf4fl/fl mice also rendered lymphatic collecting vessels hyperpermeable and fibrotic. Together, our data reveal that CCR7 plays multifaceted roles in regulating collecting vessel permeability and fibrosis, with one of the key players being IRF4-dependent DCs. PMID:26999610

  12. Pelvic irradiation modulates the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in the plasma and lymphatic system

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Wang, Li-Ying; Tai, Hung-Chi; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CDDP) is employed to enhance radiotherapy’s (RT) effect for various cancers. However, the effects of local RT on chemotherapeutics in the plasma and lymphatic system remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the influence of pelvic irradiation on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of CDDP using rats as an experimental model. Methods and Materials: RT with 2 Gy and 0.5 Gy were delivered to the whole pelvis of Sprague-Dawley rats. CDDP at 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation for the plasma and lymphatic system, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of CDDP in the plasma and lymphatic system were calculated. Results: Compared with sham-irradiated controls, the whole pelvic irradiation increased the area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of CDDP (5 mg/kg) in the plasma by 80% at 0.5 Gy and 87% at 2 Gy, respectively. In contrast, the AUC of CDDP decreased in bile by 13% at both dose levels. Intriguingly, RT could also increase the AUC of CDDP (10 mg/kg) in the lymphatic fluid by 87% at 2 Gy. In addition, the AUC in CDDP without and with RT was 2.8-fold and 3.4-fold greater for the lymph system than for the plasma, respectively. Conclusions: A local pelvic RT could modulate the systemic PK of CDDP in both the plasma and lymphatic fluids of the rats. The RT-PK phenomena are worth further investigation. PMID:25901204

  13. Integrin-α9 is required for fibronectin matrix assembly during lymphatic valve morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bazigou, Eleni; Xie, Sherry; Chen, Chun; Weston, Anne; Miura, Naoyuki; Sorokin, Lydia; Adams, Ralf; Muro, Andrés F.; Sheppard, Dean; Makinen, Taija

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysfunction of lymphatic valves underlies human lymphedema, yet the process of valve morphogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that during embryogenesis lymphatic valve leaflet formation is initiated by upregulation of integrin-α9 expression and deposition of its ligand, fibronectin-EIIIA (FN-EIIIA), in the extracellular matrix. Endothelial cell specific deletion of Itga9 (encoding integrin-α9) in mouse embryos results in the development of rudimentary valve leaflets, characterized by disorganized FN matrix, short cusps and retrograde lymphatic flow. Similar morphological and functional defects are observed in mice lacking the EIIIA domain of FN. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells the integrin-α9-EIIIA interaction directly regulates FN fibril assembly, which is essential for the formation of the extracellular matrix core of valve leaflets. Our findings reveal an important role for integrin-α9 signaling during lymphatic valve morphogenesis and implicate it as a candidate gene for primary lymphedema caused by valve defects. PMID:19686679

  14. GATA2 is required for lymphatic vessel valve development and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Kazenwadel, Jan; Betterman, Kelly L.; Chong, Chan-Eng; Stokes, Philippa H.; Lee, Young K.; Secker, Genevieve A.; Agalarov, Yan; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Lawrence, David M.; Sutton, Drew L.; Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Miura, Naoyuki; Salminen, Marjo; Petrova, Tatiana V.; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Hahn, Christopher N.; Scott, Hamish S.; Harvey, Natasha L.

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in the zinc finger transcription factor GATA2 have recently been shown to underlie a range of clinical phenotypes, including Emberger syndrome, a disorder characterized by lymphedema and predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML). Despite well-defined roles in hematopoiesis, the functions of GATA2 in the lymphatic vasculature and the mechanisms by which GATA2 mutations result in lymphedema have not been characterized. Here, we have provided a molecular explanation for lymphedema predisposition in a subset of patients with germline GATA2 mutations. Specifically, we demonstrated that Emberger-associated GATA2 missense mutations result in complete loss of GATA2 function, with respect to the capacity to regulate the transcription of genes that are important for lymphatic vessel valve development. We identified a putative enhancer element upstream of the key lymphatic transcriptional regulator PROX1 that is bound by GATA2, and the transcription factors FOXC2 and NFATC1. Emberger GATA2 missense mutants had a profoundly reduced capacity to bind this element. Conditional Gata2 deletion in mice revealed that GATA2 is required for both development and maintenance of lymphovenous and lymphatic vessel valves. Together, our data unveil essential roles for GATA2 in the lymphatic vasculature and explain why a select catalogue of human GATA2 mutations results in lymphedema. PMID:26214525

  15. Interaction of rat tumor cells with blood vessels and lymphatics of the avian chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, M; Sleeman, J P; Wilting, J

    2001-10-15

    It has generally been assumed that tumors do not induce lymphangiogenesis and only very recently animal models have been presented showing tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis. We have grown two types of rat tumor cells, 10AS pancreatic carcinoma and C6 glioma cells, on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chick and quail embryos. The suspended tumor cells rapidly formed solid tumors which invaded the CAM and were vascularized by CAM vessels. When grown on the CAM of quail embryos intratumoral endothelial cells could be specifically stained with the QH1 antibody. In C6 gliomas the vascular pattern was more regular than in 10AS carcinomas. The vessels often grew radially into the glioma and many of them were invested by smooth muscle alpha-actin-positive periendothelial cells. Lymphatics, which were identified by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) in situ hybridization were absent from C6 gliomas, although a weak expression of the lymphangiogenic growth factor, VEGF-C, could be detected in the C6 cells by Northern blot analysis. In contrast, 10AS cells, which expressed high levels of VEGF-C, induced ingrowth of lymphatics into the tumors, with BrdU-labeling rates of about 9% of lymphatic endothelial cells. Our studies demonstrate the heterogeneity of interactions of tumor cells with blood vessels and lymphatics and show that sufficient quantities and/or quality of lymphangiogenic growth factors are crucial for the induction of lymphatics in tumors. PMID:11596155

  16. Modelling lymphatic filariasis transmission and control: modelling frameworks, lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Wilma A; Stone, Chris; de Vlas, Sake J

    2015-03-01

    Mathematical modelling provides a useful tool for policy making and planning in lymphatic filariasis control programmes, by providing trend forecasts based on sound scientific knowledge and principles. This is now especially true, in view of the ambitious target to eliminate lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem globally by the year 2020 and the short remaining timeline to achieve this. To meet this target, elimination programmes need to be accelerated, requiring further optimization of strategies and tailoring to local circumstances. Insights from epidemiological transmission models provide a useful basis. Two general models of lymphatic filariasis transmission and control are nowadays in use to support decision-making, namely a population-based deterministic model (EPIFIL) and an individual-based stochastic model (LYMFASIM). Model predictions confirm that lymphatic filariasis transmission can be interrupted by annual mass drug administration (MDA), but this may need to be continued much longer than the initially suggested 4-6 years in areas with high transmission intensity or poor treatment coverage. However, the models have not been validated against longitudinal data describing the impact of MDA programmes. Some critical issues remain to be incorporated in one or both of the models to make predictions on elimination more realistic, including the possible occurrence of systematic noncompliance, the risk of emerging parasite resistance to anthelmintic drugs, and spatial heterogeneities. Rapid advances are needed to maximize the utility of models in decision-making for the ongoing ambitious lymphatic filariasis elimination programmes.

  17. Lymphatic drainage of the liver and its implications in the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Paye, François; Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirolla; Herman, Paulo

    2014-12-01

    The liver is the most common site of distant metastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Surgery represents the mainstream for curative treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) with long-term survival up to 58 and 36 % at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Despite advances on diagnosis, staging and surgical strategies, 60-70 % of patients will develop recurrence of the disease even after R0 resection of CRCLM. Tumor staging, prognosis, and therapeutic approaches for cancer are most often based on the extent of involvement of regional lymph nodes (LNs) and, to a lesser extent, on the invasion of regional lymphatic vessels draining the primary tumor. For CRCLM, the presence of intra hepatic lymphatic and blood vascular dissemination has been associated with an increased risk of intra hepatic recurrence, poorer disease-free and overall survival after liver resection. Also, several studies have reviewed the role of surgery in the patient with concomitant CRCLM and liver pedicle LN metastasis. Although pedicle LN involvement is related to worst survival rates, it does not differentiate patients that will relapse from those that will not. This review aims to briefly describe the anatomy of the liver's lymphatic drainage, the incidence of intrahepatic lymphatic invasion and hilar lymph node involvement, as well as their clinical impact in CRCLM. A better understanding of the role of liver lymphatic metastasis might, in the near future, impact the strategy of systemic therapies after liver resection as for primary colorectal tumors.

  18. Transmission models and management of lymphatic filariasis elimination.

    PubMed

    Michael, Edwin; Gambhir, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    The planning and evaluation of parasitic control programmes are complicated by the many interacting population dynamic and programmatic factors that determine infection trends under different control options. A key need is quantification about the status of the parasite system state at any one given timepoint and the dynamic change brought upon that state as an intervention program proceeds. Here, we focus on the control and elimination of the vector-borne disease, lymphatic filariasis, to show how mathematical models of parasite transmission can provide a quantitative framework for aiding the design of parasite elimination and monitoring programs by their ability to support (1) conducting rational analysis and definition of endpoints for different programmatic aims or objectives, including transmission endpoints for disease elimination, (2) undertaking strategic analysis to aid the optimal design of intervention programs to meet set endpoints under different endemic settings and (3) providing support for performing informed evaluations of ongoing programs, including aiding the formation of timely adaptive management strategies to correct for any observed deficiencies in program effectiveness. The results also highlight how the use of a model-based framework will be critical to addressing the impacts of ecological complexities, heterogeneities and uncertainties on effective parasite management and thereby guiding the development of strategies to resolve and overcome such real-world complexities. In particular, we underscore how this approach can provide a link between ecological science and policy by revealing novel tools and measures to appraise and enhance the biological controllability or eradicability of parasitic diseases. We conclude by emphasizing an urgent need to develop and apply flexible adaptive management frameworks informed by mathematical models that are based on learning and reducing uncertainty using monitoring data, apply phased or sequential

  19. Phylogeography of human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti in India.

    PubMed

    Thangadurai, R; Hoti, S L; Kumar, N Pradeep; Das, P K

    2006-07-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti, a nematode parasite causing human lymphatic filariasis is widely distributed in India. The phylogeography of this parasite was studied by constructing RAPD profiles of parasite populations collected from 71 microfilaria carriers residing in different geoclimatic regions of India. The analysis showed that the phylogeography of W. bancrofti populations is complex, with a high genetic divergence and gene flow among populations. The total genetic diversity (H(T)) and genetic differentiation (G(ST)) estimated for all the parasite populations were 0.0926 and 0.5859, respectively. The gene flow (Nm) between different regions indicated that two strains of W. bancrofti were prevalent in the country, one in the eastern side and the other on the western side of the Western Ghats. A highly significant genetic differentiation (F(ST) [theta] = 0.7978) was estimated between these two strains (chi 2 = 308.2789; P < 0.001). The gene flow between these strains was very low (0.2338). These two strains appear to have drifted genetically because of their geographic isolation by this thickly forested mountain range. The strain in the eastern side was found to be monophyletic in origin and is undergoing genetic divergence as the major parasite population in the country, spanning from eastern peninsular region to the northern plains. The variable geoclimatic factors and the antifilarial chemotherapeutical pressure on the parasite, which is in place for the past half a century, might have contributed for the high genetic heterogeneity its strains/populations in the country. The route of entry of the parasite into Indian sub-continent possibly appeared to be from an ancient origin from the countries of the Southeast Asian archipelago, through the eastern coastal line of the southern peninsula.

  20. Anatomical calibration for wearable motion capture systems: Video calibrated anatomical system technique.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita; Caroselli, Alessio; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Inertial sensors are becoming widely used for the assessment of human movement in both clinical and research applications, thanks to their usability out of the laboratory. This work aims to propose a method for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame with an ease to use, portable and low cost device. An off-the-shelf camera, a stick and a pattern, attached to the inertial sensor, compose the device. The proposed technique is referred to as video Calibrated Anatomical System Technique (vCAST). The absolute orientation of a synthetic femur was tracked both using the vCAST together with an inertial sensor and using stereo-photogrammetry as reference. Anatomical landmark calibration showed mean absolute error of 0.6±0.5 mm: these errors are smaller than those affecting the in-vivo identification of anatomical landmarks. The roll, pitch and yaw anatomical frame orientations showed root mean square errors close to the accuracy limit of the wearable sensor used (1°), highlighting the reliability of the proposed technique. In conclusion, the present paper proposes and preliminarily verifies the performance of a method (vCAST) for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame: the technique is low time consuming, highly portable, easy to implement and usable outside laboratory. PMID:26077101

  1. Overcoming transport barriers for interstitial-, lymphatic-, and lymph node-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Susan N.; Schudel, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Despite drug formulation improving circulation times and targeting, efficacy is stymied by inadequate penetration into and retention within target tissues. This review highlights the barriers restricting delivery to the connective tissue interstitium, lymphatics, and lymph nodes as well as advances in engineering drug carriers to overcome these delivery challenges. Three-dimensional tissue physiology is discussed in the context of providing material design principles for delivery to these tissues; in particular the influence of interstitial and lymphatic flows as well as differential permeabilities of the blood and lymphatic capillaries. Key examples of materials with different characteristics developed to overcome these transport barriers are discussed as well as potential areas for further development. PMID:25745594

  2. Junb controls lymphatic vascular development in zebrafish via miR-182

    PubMed Central

    Kiesow, Kristin; Bennewitz, Katrin; Miranda, Laura Gutierrez; Stoll, Sandra J.; Hartenstein, Bettina; Angel, Peter; Kroll, Jens; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2015-01-01

    JUNB, a subunit of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, mediates gene regulation in response to a plethora of extracellular stimuli. Previously, JUNB was shown to act as a critical positive regulator of blood vessel development and homeostasis as well as a negative regulator of proliferation, inflammation and tumour growth. Here, we demonstrate that the oncogenic miR-182 is a novel JUNB target. Loss-of-function studies by morpholino-mediated knockdown and the CRISPR/Cas9 technology identify a novel function for both JUNB and its target miR-182 in lymphatic vascular development in zebrafish. Furthermore, we show that miR-182 attenuates foxo1 expression indicating that strictly balanced Foxo1 levels are required for proper lymphatic vascular development in zebrafish. In conclusion, our findings uncover with the Junb/miR-182/Foxo1 regulatory axis a novel key player in governing lymphatic vascular morphogenesis in zebrafish. PMID:26458334

  3. Chronic lower limb wounds evoke systemic response of the lymphatic (immune) system

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, W. L.; Jain, P.; Zaleska, M.; Stelmach, E.; Swoboda, E.

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing should not be considered as a process limited only to the damaged tissues. It is always accompanied by an intensive local immune response and in advanced stages, the systemic lymphatic (immune) structure. In this review we present evidence from our own studies as well as pertinent literature on the role of skin and subcutaneous tissue lymphatics at the wound site and of transport of antigens along with collecting afferent lymphatics to the lymph nodes. We also speculate the role of lymph nodes in raising cohorts of bacterial and own tissue antigen-specific lymphocytes and their participation in healing and not infrequently evoking uncontrolled chronic immune reaction causing a delay of healing. It is also speculated as to why there is a rapid response of lymph node cells to microbial antigens and tolerance to damaged-tissue-derived antigens occurs PMID:23162224

  4. Are we nearly there yet? Coverage and compliance of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Neal D E

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis has been targeted for elimination by 2020, and a threshold of 65% coverage of mass drug administration (MDA) has been adopted by the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). A recent review by Babu and Babu of 36 studies of MDA for lymphatic filariasis in India found that coverage, defined as receipt of tablets, ranged from 48.8 to 98.8%, while compliance, defined as actual ingestion of tablets, was 22% lower on average. Moreover, the denominator for these coverage figures is the eligible, rather than total, population. By contrast, the 65% threshold, in the original modelling study, refers to ingestion of tablets in the total population. This corresponds to GPELF's use of 'epidemiological drug coverage' as a trigger for the Transmission Assessment Surveys (TAS), which indicate whether to proceed to post-MDA surveillance. The existence of less strict definitions of 'coverage' should not lead to premature TAS that could impair MDA's sustainability.

  5. Conserved signaling through vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) receptor family members in murine lymphatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Coso, Sanja; Zeng, Yiping; Sooraj, Dhanya; Williams, Elizabeth D

    2011-10-15

    Lymphatic vessels guide interstitial fluid, modulate immune responses by regulating leukocyte and antigen trafficking to lymph nodes, and in a cancer setting enable tumor cells to track to regional lymph nodes. The aim of the study was to determine whether primary murine lymphatic endothelial cells (mLECs) show conserved vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathways with human LECs (hLECs). LECs were successfully isolated from murine dermis and prostate. Similar to hLECs, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family ligands activated MAPK and pAkt intracellular signaling pathways in mLECs. We describe a robust protocol for isolation of mLECs which, by harnessing the power of transgenic and knockout mouse models, will be a useful tool to study how LEC phenotype contributes to alterations in lymphatic vessel formation and function.

  6. Identification of Vascular Lineage-Specific Genes by Transcriptional Profiling of Isolated Blood Vascular and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Satoshi; Hong, Young-Kwon; Harvey, Natasha; Schacht, Vivien; Matsuda, Kant; Libermann, Towia; Detmar, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, the lymphatic vascular system develops by budding of lymphatic progenitor endothelial cells from embryonic veins to form a distinct network of draining vessels with important functions in the immune response and in cancer metastasis. However, the lineage-specific molecular characteristics of blood vascular versus lymphatic endothelium have remained poorly defined. We isolated lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and blood vascular endothelial cells (BVECs) by immunomagnetic isolation directly from human skin. Cultured LECs but not BVECs expressed the lymphatic markers Prox1 and LYVE-1 and formed LYVE-1-positive vascular tubes after implantation in vivo. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed increased expression of several extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in BVECs, including versican, collagens, laminin, and N-cadherin, and of the growth factor receptors endoglin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1/Flt-1. Differential immunostains of human skin confirmed the blood vessel-specific expression of these genes. During embryonic development, endoglin expression was gradually down-regulated on lymphatic endothelium whereas vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 was absent from lymphatics. We also identified several genes with specific expression in LECs. These results demonstrate that some lineage-specific genes are only expressed during distinct developmental stages and they identify new molecular markers for blood vascular and lymphatic endothelium with important implications for future studies of vascular development and function. PMID:12547715

  7. Topographic study on nerve-associated lymphatic vessels in the murine craniofacial region by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Masahide; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Kajiwara, Tooru; Kato, Seiji; Yanagisawa, Shigetaka

    2008-12-01

    The distribution and fine structure of lymphatic vessels associated with nerves was studied by immunohistochemistry in the murine craniofacial region. The tissue sections and blocks were immunostained for LYVE-1, protein gene product 9.5, CD34 and aquaporin-1 to demonstrate the lymphatic vessels, nerves, blood vessels and water channel protein, respectively. Transmission electron microscopic examination was also performed to investigate the relationship between the lymphatics and nerves. In the nasal area, the lymphatics were found in dura mater on the cribriform plate and beneath the nasal mucosa, this supposedly supplying the cerebrospinal fluid drainage route along the olfactory nerves. The proximal portions of the cranial nerves were equipped with the lymphatics in the epineurium. In the distal portions of the nerves, the lymphatics were distributed in close proximity of the perineural sheath, and thus might contribute to maintenance of microenvironment suitable for the nerves by an absorptive activity of the lymphatic endothelial cells. The present findings suggest that the lymphatic system associated with the cranial nerves provides the pathway for transport of cerebrospinal fluid, tissue fluid, and free cells involved in immune response and tumor metastasis in the craniofacial region.

  8. Altered lymphatic function and architecture in salt-induced hypertension assessed by near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Agollah, Germaine D.; Chan, Wenyaw; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-08-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in maintaining the fluid homeostasis between the blood vascular and interstitial tissue compartment and there is recent evidence that its transport capabilities may regulate blood pressure in salt-induced hypertension. Yet, there is little known how the lymphatic contractile function and architecture responds to dietary salt-intake. Thus, we longitudinally characterized lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling noninvasively using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence imaging in animal models of salt-induced hypertension. The lymphatics of mice and rats were imaged following intradermal injection of indocyanine green to the ear tip or the base of the tail before and during two weeks of either a high salt diet (HSD) or normal chow. Our noninvasive imaging data demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the skin of mice and rats on a HSD as compared to their baseline levels. In addition, our dynamic imaging results showed increased lymphatic contraction frequency in HSD-fed mice and rats. Lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling occurs in response to salt-induced hypertension suggesting a possible role for the lymphatics in the regulation of vascular blood pressure.

  9. Lymphatic fluctuation in the parenchymal remodeling stage of acute interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, E R; Araujo, C A L; Lombardi, J G; Ab'Saber, A M; Carvalho, C R R; Kairalla, R A; Capelozzi, V L

    2012-05-01

    Because the superficial lymphatics in the lungs are distributed in the subpleural, interlobular and peribroncovascular interstitium, lymphatic impairment may occur in the lungs of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) and increase their severity. We investigated the distribution of lymphatics in different remodeling stages of IIPs by immunohistochemistry using the D2-40 antibody. Pulmonary tissue was obtained from 69 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia/diffuse alveolar damage (AIP/DAD, N = 24), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/organizing pneumonia (COP/OP, N = 6), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP/NSIP, N = 20), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP, N = 19). D2-40+ lymphatic in the lesions was quantitatively determined and associated with remodeling stage score. We observed an increase in the D2-40+ percent from DAD (6.66 ± 1.11) to UIP (23.45 ± 5.24, P = 0.008) with the advanced process of remodeling stage of the lesions. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a better survival for patients with higher lymphatic D2-40+ expression than 9.3%. Lymphatic impairment occurs in the lungs of IIPs and its severity increases according to remodeling stage. The results suggest that disruption of the superficial lymphatics may impair alveolar clearance, delay organ repair and cause severe disease progress mainly in patients with AIP/DAD. Therefore, lymphatic distribution may serve as a surrogate marker for the identification of patients at greatest risk for death due to IIPs.

  10. Compact intraoperative imaging device for sentinel lymph node mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Shen, Duanwen; Berezin, Mikhail; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel real-time intraoperative fluorescence imaging device that can detect near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and map sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). In contrast to conventional imaging systems, this device is compact, portable, and battery-operated. It is also wearable and thus allows hands-free operation of clinicians. The system directly displays the fluorescence in its goggle eyepiece, eliminating the need for a remote monitor. Using this device in murine lymphatic mapping, the SLNs stained with indocyanine green (ICG) can be readily detected. Fluorescence-guided SLN resection under the new device was performed with ease. Ex vivo examination of resected tissues also revealed high fluorescence level in the SLNs. Histology further confirmed the lymphatic nature of the resected SLNs.

  11. The history of dermatome mapping.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2003-01-01

    Dermatome maps are commonly used in clinical neurology. These maps are valuable for the localization of varied sensory phenomena in patients with neurological disorders. The methods used in the construction of the classic maps by Sir Henry Head, Sir Charles Sherrington, Otfrid Foerster, and Jay Keegan and Frederic Garrett are of historical interest and are relevant to the current understanding of dermatome anatomy and physiology. In particular, the work of Derek Denny-Brown and his colleagues demonstrates that patterns of dermatomal sensory loss depend on the anatomical and physiological characteristics of large regions of nervous tissue, multiple adjacent dorsal ganglia, and the nearby caudal and rostral spinal cord.

  12. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion.

  13. Determinants of valve gating in collecting lymphatic vessels from rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Rahbar, Elaheh; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James E

    2011-07-01

    Secondary lymphatic valves are essential for minimizing backflow of lymph and are presumed to gate passively according to the instantaneous trans-valve pressure gradient. We hypothesized that valve gating is also modulated by vessel distention, which could alter leaflet stiffness and coaptation. To test this hypothesis, we devised protocols to measure the small pressure gradients required to open or close lymphatic valves and determine if the gradients varied as a function of vessel diameter. Lymphatic vessels were isolated from rat mesentery, cannulated, and pressurized using a servo-control system. Detection of valve leaflet position simultaneously with diameter and intraluminal pressure changes in two-valve segments revealed the detailed temporal relationships between these parameters during the lymphatic contraction cycle. The timing of valve movements was similar to that of cardiac valves, but only when lymphatic vessel afterload was elevated. The pressure gradients required to open or close a valve were determined in one-valve segments during slow, ramp-wise pressure elevation, either from the input or output side of the valve. Tests were conducted over a wide range of baseline pressures (and thus diameters) in passive vessels as well as in vessels with two levels of imposed tone. Surprisingly, the pressure gradient required for valve closure varied >20-fold (0.1-2.2 cmH(2)O) as a passive vessel progressively distended. Similarly, the pressure gradient required for valve opening varied sixfold with vessel distention. Finally, our functional evidence supports the concept that lymphatic muscle tone exerts an indirect effect on valve gating.

  14. Image-guided total marrow and total lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: Schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey; Liu, An; Olivera, Gustavo; Somlo, George

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique to spare normal tissue and allow dose escalation in total body irradiation (TBI). We have developed intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for the total marrow irradiation (TMI), total lymphatic irradiation, or total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: For TBI, we typically use 12 Gy in 10 fractions delivered at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD). Using helical tomotherapy, it is possible to deliver equally effective doses to the bone marrow and lymphatics while sparing normal organs to a significant degree. In the TMI patients, whole body skeletal bone, including the ribs and sternum, comprise the treatment target. In the total lymphatic irradiation, the target is expanded to include the spleen and major lymph node areas. Sanctuary sites for disease (brain and testes) are included when clinically indicated. Spared organs include the lungs, esophagus, parotid glands, eyes, oral cavity, liver, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, bladder, and ovaries. Results: With TBI, all normal organs received the TBI dose; with TMI, total lymphatic irradiation, and total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation, the visceral organs are spared. For the first 6 patients treated with TMI, the median dose to organs at risk averaged 51% lower than would be achieved with TBI. By putting greater weight on the avoidance of specific organs, greater sparing was possible. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues and dose escalation is possible using helical tomotherapy. Late effects such as radiation pneumonitis, veno-occlusive disease, cataracts, neurocognitive effects, and the development of second tumors should be diminished in severity and frequency according to the dose reduction realized for the organs at risk.

  15. Study of the mechanism by which localized preinoculation irradiation enhances the rate of lymphatic spread

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, D.S.; Brown, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    KHT sarcoma growing in the foot of C3H mice spontaneously metastasizes to the primary (popliteal) and secondary lymph nodes. Under appropriate conditions, localized preinoculation irradiation of the foot enhances lymphatic metastasis to the primary node. This enhancement could be a result of (1) a decrease in the latent period between inoculation and the initiation of lymphatic metastasis and/or (2) accelerated growth of the primary lymph node. Investigations were conducted to determine which of these factors contribute to the enhancement of lymphatic metastasis. The foot only of C3H mice was either irradiated (2400 rad) or sham-irradiated 1 or 8 days prior to tumor inoculation on Day 0. Each day after tumor inoculation a group of irradiated and sham-irradiated animals had their tumor-bearing foot amputated. The region behind the knee was palpated every 2 or 3 days for the presence of tumor. The period of time (ET/sub 50/) between inoculation and amputation necessary for 50% of the animals to present with lymphatic metastasis was used to determine the latent period between inoculation and initiation of lymphatic metastasis. The mean time to palpation was used to determine the relative growth rate of the primary lymph node. Localized preinoculation irradiation decreased the ET/sub 50/ from about 4.9 to 2.7 days. Irradiation also reduced the mean time to node palpation by about 0.9 day for each day amputation was delayed. The results indicated that irradiation both decreased the latent period between tumor inoculation and initiation of metastasis and increased the growth rate of the primary lymph node. The latter is thought to be a consequence of an increase in the rate at which tumor cells were shed into lymphatics.

  16. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.