Science.gov

Sample records for anatomical variation effect

  1. Anatomical variations of the proximal radius and their effects on osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Giannicola, Giuseppe; Manauzzi, Erica; Sacchetti, Federico M; Greco, Alessandro; Bullitta, Gianluca; Vestri, Annarita; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2012-05-01

    In fractures of the radial head and neck requiring open reduction and internal fixation, osteosynthesis may be safely applied in a limited zone. We conducted a morphometric study of the proximal radius at the level of the safe zone to identify different morphologic types of this anatomical region. We analyzed 44 dried cadaveric radii. We measured the whole length of the radius, the length of the neck and head, and the minimum and maximum diameter of the radial head. The morphologic aspect of the neck-head curvature of the safe zone was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The proximal radius at the level of the safe zone exhibited different radii of bending. In particular, we identified a morphologic type A, which showed a flat profile (25% of cases), morphologic types B and C, which showed a low concave curvature (64%), and a marked concave curvature (11%), respectively, of the safe zone. The profile of the proximal radius in the safe zone shows substantial morphologic variations that should be taken into account when operating on fractures of the proximal radius, to avoid malunions, pain, and stiffness of the elbow joint. A preoperative radiograph of the contralateral uninjured radius may be helpful in selecting the most appropriate internal fixation device to reconstruct the proximal radius after comminuted fractures. Knowledge of the proper bending radius of the safe zone allows the surgeon to select the most appropriate plate, and to achieve good fracture reduction and anatomical restoration of the proximal radius. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of anatomical variation on trainee performance in a virtual reality temporal bone surgery simulator.

    PubMed

    Piromchai, P; Ioannou, I; Wijewickrema, S; Kasemsiri, P; Lodge, J; Kennedy, G; O'Leary, S

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the importance of anatomical variation in acquiring skills in virtual reality cochlear implant surgery. Eleven otolaryngology residents participated in this study. They were randomly allocated to practice cochlear implant surgery on the same specimen or on different specimens for four weeks. They were then tested on two new specimens, one standard and one challenging. Videos of their performance were de-identified and reviewed independently, by two blinded consultant otolaryngologists, using a validated assessment scale. The scores were compared between groups. On the standard specimen, the round window preparation score was 2.7 ± 0.4 for the experimental group and 1.7 ± 0.6 for the control group (p = 0.01). On the challenging specimen, instrument handling and facial nerve preservation scores of the experimental group were 3.0 ± 0.4 and 3.5 ± 0.7 respectively, while the control group received scores of 2.1 ± 0.8 and 2.4 ± 0.9 respectively (p < 0.05). Training on temporal bones with differing anatomies is beneficial in the development of expertise.

  3. Anatomical variations in human carotid bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Q; Heath, D; Smith, P

    1988-01-01

    The variations in anatomical structure and position of both carotid bodies were noted in 100 consecutive subjects who came to necropsy. Considerable variations in form were found. Although most carotid bodies (83% on the right and 86% on the left) were of the classic ovoid type, an appreciable minority was bilobed (9% on the right and 7% on the left) or double (7% on the right and 6% on the left); 1% were leaf shaped. All these anatomical variants have to be distinguished from the pathologically enlarged carotid body that may have a smooth or finely nodular surface. Anatomical variants (such as the bilobed) may themselves enlarge as a consequence of carotid body hyperplasia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3209707

  4. Anatomical Variation of Human Collector Channel Orifices

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Michael D.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the anatomical variation of normal human collector channel orifices and their relationship with Schlemm's canal. Methods Ten human anterior segments fixed by immersion or perfusion were dissected radially and further divided by fine dissection into corresponding inner and outer wall segments. The tissues were dehydrated, critical-point dried, sputter coated, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Images were obtained at magnifications from ×200 to ×10,000. Selected radial collector channel regions were processed for plastic embedding. Results Two classes of collector channel orifices were identified. Simple oval orifices (54.7 ± 4.6–μm diameter) were lined with endothelial cells and most often occurred on a planar region of Schlemm's canal outer wall. Complex orifices (62.7 ± 3.4–μm diameter) were often found associated with septal columns and bridges, and typically covered with flap-like structures (10–40 μm) that extended between the inner and outer wall and over the collector channel orifices. Both simple and complex orifices had complete or partial lip-like rims. In orifices with partial rims, a trough-like groove was often visible on the outer wall surface opposite the lip. Transected septa and inner and outer wall adhesion sites were often found in association with complex collector channel orifices. Conclusions Collector channel orifice structure varied from simple ovals to complex tethered flaps and bridges. Collector channel orifices with complex flaps connect the inner and outer walls of Schlemm's canal, and may serve to enhance and regulate aqueous outflow in these regions. PMID:26975026

  5. Anatomical variations of the second thoracic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Ramsaroop, L; Partab, P; Moodley, J; Satyapal, K S

    2005-04-01

    In recent years the second thoracic ganglion has gained anatomical significance as an important conduit for sympathetic innervation of the upper extremity. Thoracoscopic excision of the second thoracic ganglion is now widely recognized as affording the most effective treatment option for palmar hyperhidrosis. This study recorded the incidence, location and associated additional neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion. Bilateral dissection of 20 adult cadavers was undertaken, and all neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion were recorded. Nineteen cadavers (95%) demonstrated additional neural connections between the first thoracic ventral ramus and second intercostal nerve. These were classified as either type A (47.5%) or type B (45%) using the intrathoracic ramus (nerve of Kuntz) between the second intercostal nerve and the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve as a basis on both right and left sides. The second thoracic ganglion was commonly located (92.5%) in the second intercostal space at the level of the intervertebral disc between the second and third thoracic vertebrae. Fused ganglia between the second thoracic and first thoracic (5%) and stellate (5%) ganglia were noted. These findings should assist the operating surgeon with a clear knowledge of the anatomy of the second thoracic ganglion during thoracoscopic sympathectomy with a view to improving the success rate for upper limb sympathectomy.

  6. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  7. Anatomical variations of the hand extensors.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, G A; El-Beshbishy, R A; Abdel Aal, I H

    2013-08-01

    This study was performed to investigate the anatomy and variations of the human extensor tendons of the fingers and their intertendinous connections. Ninetyfive upper limbs of adult cadavers were dissected. The variations in the extensor tendons of the fingers, both proximal and distal to the extensor retinaculum, and their mode of insertion were observed. Also, the intertendinous connections were explored and the obtained data were analysed. The extensor pollicis longus and brevis tendons were found to be single, doubled or, rarely, absent. Their insertion could be traced to either the proximal phalanx, or through the extensor expansion to both phalanges, or rarely to the distal phalanx of thumb. The extensor indicis had a single tendon in all specimens. In the majority of specimens, extensor digitorum had no independent slip to the little finger; it gave off a single tendon to the index, double tendons to the middle finger and triple tendons to the ring finger. Extensor digiti minimi muscle often had double or triple tendons distal to the extensor retinaculum. Three types of juncturae tendinum (JT) were identified between the tendons of extensor digitorum in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th intermetacarpal spaces (IMS) of hands. Types 1 and 2 JT were seen in the three IMS. Type 3 JT was the most frequently identified of all juncturae and was always absent in the 2nd IMS. The percentages of the present data were compared with other researchers'data.

  8. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App.

    PubMed

    Hong, Trudy; Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application.

  9. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App

    PubMed Central

    Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application. PMID:26793410

  10. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  11. Anatomic variation of the common palmar digital nerves and arteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong; Fu, Maoyong

    2015-03-01

    Variations in the course and distribution of common palmar digital nerves and arteries are rare. A classic common palmar digital nerves and arteries are defined as concomitant. During routine dissection classes to undergraduate medical students we observed formation of each common palmar digital nerve divided into 2 or 3 branches and formed a ring enclosing the corresponding common palmar digital artery. Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the common palmar digital nerves and arteries is crucial for safe and successful hand surgery.

  12. Anatomical variations in the human testicular blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Asala, S; Chaudhary, S C; Masumbuko-Kahamba, N; Bidmos, M

    2001-11-01

    The testis is an important organ upon which the survival of the human species depends. The testicular arteries and veins play major roles in the thermo-regulation that is essential for the efficient functioning of this organ. However, very little is found in the literature about the veins and their anatomical variations. Therefore the testicular veins and arteries in 150 dissection room cadavers at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and University of Zimbabwe, Harare were examined for anatomical variations from the usual descriptions in textbooks of Anatomy. Variations were found more frequently in the testicular veins than in the accompanying arteries. The variations, which were more common on the left side, were seen in 32 (21.3%) of the cadavers. In 6 (18.8%) of these cases, the variations were present bilaterally. The veins were either completely or partially duplicated, with or without beading. The duplicated veins terminated in the corresponding renal veins either separately or after combining into one vein. In two cases, the right testicular vein terminated in the right renal vein, rather than in the inferior vena cava. Anatomical variations of the testicular artery were present in 4.7% of cases and were associated with their origin, which were either from unusually high levels of the abdominal aorta or from the renal artery.

  13. [Influence of anatomic variations of the structures of the middle nasal meatus on sinonasal diseases].

    PubMed

    Buljcik-Cupić, Maja M; Savović, Slobodan N; Jovićević, Jasna S

    2008-01-01

    in 50% patients. Eives's correlation coefficient i.e. the degree of correlation between sinonasal disorders and the presence of anatomic variation statistically significantly correlate at r > or = 0.05 of anatomic variation of the middle nasal chonha (r = 0.23) and the presence of deviation/deformation of nasal septum (r = 0.6) with sinonasal disorders. Anatomic variations of the structures of the middle nasal meatus can additionally complicate the anatomy of the lateral nasal wall and the conditions of the ostiomeatal unit. Therefore we must view these variations as factors predisposing to more rapid and frequent appearance and persistence of chronic inflammations. Also, familiary with the variations in sinonasal anatomy is a prerequisite to safe and effective surgical treatment of sinonasal disease. Recognition of this anatomic variation should minimize catastrophic violation of vital structures such as orbit or skull base.

  14. Bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle: a rare anatomical variation.

    PubMed

    Salgado, G; Cantín, M; Inzunza, O; Muñoz, A; Saez, J; Macuer, M

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle (PLM). The muscle was tendinous in its upper portion and muscular in its lower portion in both arms. This rare variation has been mentioned only once in the literature as a surgical finding. According to the literature, a reversed PLM may cause a compartment syndrome in the wrist area, carpal tunnel, and Guyon's syndrome. The described variation is also useful to the hand surgeon as a tendon graft, a tendon for transfer, or as an anatomical landmark for operations at this area.

  15. Variations in the anatomical dimensions of the mandibular ramus and the presence of third molars: its effect on the sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Beukes, J; Reyneke, J P; Becker, P J

    2013-03-01

    The authors undertook a prospective study to evaluate the influence that the anatomical dimensions of the ramus of the mandible and the presence of lower third molar teeth may have on the sagittal split ramus osteotomy. The anatomical dimensions measured included the width of the anterior mandibular ramus, the height of the corpus posterior to the second mandibular molar and the antero-posterior anatomical position of the lingual. The influence that these dimensions of the mandible may have on the successful splitting of the mandibular ramus was investigated. The effect that the presence of wisdom teeth had on the difficulty of the procedure was also investigated. This study found that, unlike the presence of third molars, there was no single anatomical measurement that contributed to the level of difficulty of the sagittal split osteotomy. For descriptive purposes the authors proposes a classification of the four typical patterns of unfavourable splits. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of catheter displacement and anatomical variations on the dose distribution in MRI-guided focal HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maenhout, Metha; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N; Borot de Battisti, Maxence; Peters, Max; van Vulpen, Marco; van den Bosch, Maurice; Moerland, Marinus A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of catheter displacement and anatomical variations of prostate and organs at risk on dose distribution in MRI-guided 19 Gy single fraction focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) of the prostate. Seventeen patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled in a prospective trial investigating focal HDR-BT in a 1.5 T MRI-HDR-BT facility. The diagnostic MRI delineations were registered with intraoperative MR scan, and a single fraction of 19 Gy was applied to the visible tumor. Self-anchoring umbrella catheters were used for HDR-BT delivery. A 1.5 T MRI was performed directly after ultrasound (US)-guided catheter placement for treatment planning. After treatment and before removal of catheters, a posttreatment 1.5 T MRI was performed. Regions of interest were also delineated on the posttreatment MR images and the catheters of 17 patients were reconstructed. The dose plan was constructed for the posttreatment MRI scan to assess the influence of catheter migration and anatomical variation on the dose delivered to the target and the organs at risk. Also on the posttreatment MRI, the complete catheter reconstruction was reassessed, to correct for, for example, bending of the catheters. The displacement of catheters between the MRI scans was determined by comparing the catheter tip positions on the treatment planning and posttreatment 1.5 T MRI scans. The displacements of 241 catheters were investigated. Average (range) displacements of the umbrella catheters are 0.6 (0-2.9) mm in the x-direction, 0.5 (0-2.1) mm in the y-direction, and 0.9 (0-5.5) mm in the z-direction. In 3 patients, the displacement was >4 mm and up to 5.5 mm. This occurred in respectively 1/13, 1/16, and 1/18 catheters in these patients. The dosimetric differences between the intraoperative treatment and the posttreatment plans were in most patients less than 1.5 Gy. In 4 patients, a dose difference in clinical target volume D95 of >2

  17. Rare anatomical variation of the musculocutaneous nerve - case report.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina; Pereira, Eduardo; Andrades, Lilian; de Souza, Cristiano Cirqueira

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and surgical importance of anatomical knowledge of the musculocutaneous nerve and its variations is due to the fact that one of the complications in many upper-limb surgical procedures involves injury to this nerve. During routine dissection of the right upper limb of a male cadaver, we observed an anatomical variation of this nerve. The musculocutaneous nerve originated in the lateral cord and continued laterally, passing under the coracobrachialis muscle and then continuing until its first branch to the biceps brachialis muscle. Just after this, it supplied another two branches, i.e. the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm and a branch to the brachialis muscle, and then it joined the median nerve. The median nerve followed the arm medially to the region of the cubital fossa and then gave rise to the anterior intermediate nerve of the forearm. The union between the musculocutaneous nerve and the median nerve occurred approximately at the midpoint of the arm and the median nerve. Given that either our example is not covered by the classifications found in the literature or that it fits into more than one variation proposed, without us finding something truly similar, we consider this variation to be rare.

  18. Anatomical Variations of the Circulus Arteriosus in Cadaveric Human Brains

    PubMed Central

    Gunnal, S. A.; Farooqui, M. S.; Wabale, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Circulus arteriosus/circle of Willis (CW) is a polygonal anastomotic channel at the base of the brain which unites the internal carotid and vertebrobasilar system. It maintains the steady and constant supply to the brain. The variations of CW are seen often. The Aim of the present work is to find out the percentage of normal pattern of CW, and the frequency of variations of the CW and to study the morphological and morphometric aspects of all components of CW. Methods. Circulus arteriosus of 150 formalin preserved brains were dissected. Dimensions of all the components forming circles were measured. Variations of all the segments were noted and well photographed. The variations such as aplasia, hypoplasia, duplication, fenestrations, and difference in dimensions with opposite segments were noted. The data collected in the study was analyzed. Results. Twenty-one different types of CW were found in the present study. Normal and complete CW was found in 60%. CW with gross morphological variations was seen in 40%. Maximum variations were seen in the PCoA followed by the ACoA in 50% and 40%, respectively. Conclusion. As it confirms high percentage of variations, all surgical interventions should be preceded by angiography. Awareness of these anatomical variations is important in neurovascular procedures. PMID:24891951

  19. Anatomic variation and orgasm: Could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success?

    PubMed

    Emhardt, E; Siegel, J; Hoffman, L

    2016-07-01

    Though the public consciousness is typically focused on factors such as psychology, penis size, and the presence of the "G-spot," there are other anatomical and neuro-anatomic differences that could play an equal, or more important, role in the frequency and intensity of orgasms. Discovering these variations could direct further medical or procedural management to improve sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study is to review the available literature of anatomical sexual variation and to explain why this variation may predispose some patients toward a particular sexual experience. In this review, we explored the available literature on sexual anatomy and neuro-anatomy. We used PubMed and OVID Medline for search terms, including orgasm, penile size variation, clitoral variation, Grafenberg spot, and benefits of orgasm. First we review the basic anatomy and innervation of the reproductive organs. Then we describe several anatomical variations that likely play a superior role to popular known variation (penis size, presence of g-spot, etc). For males, the delicate play between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems is vital to achieve orgasm. For females, the autonomic component is more complex. The clitoris is the primary anatomical feature for female orgasm, including its migration toward the anterior vaginal wall. In conclusions, orgasms are complex phenomena involving psychological, physiological, and anatomic variation. While these variations predispose people to certain sexual function, future research should explore how to surgically or medically alter these. Clin. Anat. 29:665-672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of Anatomic variations of Uncinate Process in Frontal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mohit; Tyagi, Sushant

    2016-12-01

    The osteomeatal complex plays an important role in the development of Chronic rhinosinusitis. The ethmoidal infundibulum is bordered medially by the uncinate process, and the anatomic relationship between the ethmoidal infundibulum and the frontal recess may depend upon the types of attachment of the uncinate process. The osteomeatal complex is the main area targeted in chronic rhinosinusitis and within it uncinate process is the first anatomical structure encountered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the types of attachment of the uncinate process and its implications in the development of sinus inflammation. The significance of anatomical variations of uncinate process in chronic sinusitis were evaluated. A prospective CT scan study on 64 patients of chronic sinusitis (128 uncinate processes) was done. The results were tabulated and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science 16.0. Type I superior attachment of uncinate process into the lamina papyracea was the most common variety in all ages and both sexes and a statistically significant association between Type 1 Uncinate process and frontal sinusitis was found. (P < 0.05). The superior attachment of uncinate process alters the frontal sinus drainage and causes the frontal sinusitis.

  1. Anatomical Study of Variations in the Blood Supply of Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Aristotle, Sharmila; Sundarapandian; Felicia, Christilda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery and a single renal vein, which accounts for about 20% of the cardiac output. However, variations in the form of level of origin and arrangement of renal arteries are so frequent. Aim: The present study aimed to note the vascular anatomy of kidneys with respect to the variations in their origin, course and any aberrant vessels which were present. Materials and Methods: The study material comprised of 15 formalin fixed human cadavers. During routine abdominal dissection for undergraduate students, the kidneys were exposed and the blood supply, along with its variations, were noted. Results: The following anatomical findings are observed in this study: (i) Accessory renal arteries (ii) Presegmental arteries (iii) Upper polar arteries (iv) Lower polar arteries (v) Inferior suprarenal artery from accessory renal artery and (vi) Accessory renal vein. Conclusion: Awareness of the normal as well variational anatomy is mandatory for the surgeons, radiologists and urologists, for doing any uroradiological procedures or angiographic studies. Hence, this study will serve a useful guideline for the above mentioned procedures. PMID:24086837

  2. Anatomical study of variations in the blood supply of kidneys.

    PubMed

    Aristotle, Sharmila; Sundarapandian; Felicia, Christilda

    2013-08-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery and a single renal vein, which accounts for about 20% of the cardiac output. However, variations in the form of level of origin and arrangement of renal arteries are so frequent. The present study aimed to note the vascular anatomy of kidneys with respect to the variations in their origin, course and any aberrant vessels which were present. The study material comprised of 15 formalin fixed human cadavers. During routine abdominal dissection for undergraduate students, the kidneys were exposed and the blood supply, along with its variations, were noted. The following anatomical findings are observed in this study: (i) Accessory renal arteries (ii) Presegmental arteries (iii) Upper polar arteries (iv) Lower polar arteries (v) Inferior suprarenal artery from accessory renal artery and (vi) Accessory renal vein. Awareness of the normal as well variational anatomy is mandatory for the surgeons, radiologists and urologists, for doing any uroradiological procedures or angiographic studies. Hence, this study will serve a useful guideline for the above mentioned procedures.

  3. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit spleen

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAMI, Reona; TANIMOTO, Yoshimasa; KISHIMOTO, Miori; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit, which is widely used as an experimental animal and is also popular as a companion animal, has a flat and elongated spleen with the longitudinal hilus running along its visceral surface. The spleen receives via the hilus an arterial supply that is essential for splenic nutrition and normal functioning. However, the distribution and variation of the arteries to the spleen have not been studied in detail. This study investigated anatomical variations of splenic arterial supply in 33 New Zealand White rabbits with a colored latex injection into arteries. We also examined whether the length of the spleen correlated with the number of the splenic branches of the splenic artery. The splenic artery always arose as the first independent branch of the celiac artery and ran along the splenic hilus to usually provide 6 (range, 3 to 10) splenic branches to the spleen. There was a moderate correlation (R=0.6) between the number of splenic branches and the longitudinal length of the spleen. The splenic branches often arose as a trunk or trunks in common with short gastric arteries. The number of common trunk(s) was usually 1 (range, 0 to 4). The data showed that the pattern and number of arterial branches to the spleen varied according to the individual animal, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing experimental and veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26369291

  4. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAMI, Reona; TANIMOTO, Yoshimasa; KISHIMOTO, Miori; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1–3 parietal and 1–3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1–4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2–7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26615866

  5. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Reona; Tanimoto, Yoshimasa; Kishimoto, Miori; Shibata, Hideshi

    2016-05-03

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1-3 parietal and 1-3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1-4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2-7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits.

  6. Generating anatomical variation through mutations in networks – implications for evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bard, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutation leads to anatomical variation only indirectly because many proteins involved in generating anatomical structures in embryos operate cooperatively within molecular networks. These include gene-regulatory or control networks (CNs) for timing, signaling and patterning together with the process networks (PNs) for proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and morphogenesis that they control. This paper argues that anatomical variation is achieved through a two-stage process: mutation alters the outputs of CNs and perhaps the proliferation network, and such changed outputs alter the ways that PNs construct tissues. This systems-biology approach has several implications: first, because networks contain many cooperating proteins, they amplify the effects of genetic variation so enabling mutation to generate a wider range of phenotypes than a single changed protein acting alone could. Second, this amplification helps explain how novel phenotypes can be produced relatively rapidly. Third, because even organisms with novel anatomical phenotypes derive from variants in standard networks, there is no genetic barrier to their producing viable offspring. This approach also clarifies a terminological difficulty: classical evolutionary genetics views genes in terms of phenotype heritability rather than as DNA sequences. This paper suggests that the molecular phenotype of the classical concept of a gene is often a protein network, with a mutation leading to an alteration in that network's dynamics. PMID:24934180

  7. The anatomical variations of sylvian veins and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Aydin, I H; Tüzün, Y; Takçi, E; Kadioğlu, H H; Kayaoğlu, C R; Barlas, E

    1997-06-01

    The anatomical variations of sylvian vein and cistern were investigated during the pterional approach in 750 operative cases with different pathologies. All patients were operated on at the Neurosurgical Department of Ataturk University Medical School, Erzurum, Turkiye. The patients underwent surgery for the lesions necessitating the right or left pterional approach. The findings were recorded during surgical intervention and observed through the operative sketches of the pathologies, the slides, and videotapes of the operations. In our study, we surgically classified the variations of sylvian vein, according to its branching and draining patterns. Type I: The fronto-orbital (frontosylvian), fronto-parietal (parietosylvian) and anterior temporal (temporosylvian) veins drain into one sylvian vein. Type II: Two superficial sylvian veins with separated basal vein draining into the sphenoparietal and Rosenthal's basal vein. Type III: Two superficial sylvian veins draining into the sphenoparietal and the superior petrosal veins. Type IV: Hypoplastic superficial sylvian vein and the deep one. Four types of sylvian vein variations were defined as follows. The type I was seen in 52.8% (n = 396), the type II was found in 19.2% (n = 144), type III was recorded in 18.2% (n = 137), and type IV, or hypoplastic and deep form was discovered in 9.8% (n = 73) of patients. The coursing of sylvian vein was in the temporal side (Temporal Coursing) in 62.4 percent of the cases (n = 469), in the frontal side (Frontal Coursing) in 25 % of the patients (n = 187) and in 9 percent of the cases (n = 67) in the deep localization (Deep Coursing). Only 3.6% of the cases (n = 27) showed Mixed Coursing. The variations of the sylvian cisterns were classified into three types, according to the relationships between the lateral fronto-orbital gyrus and the superior temporal gyrus. In Sylvian type, the frontal and temporal lobes are loosely (Sylvian Type A, wide and large) or tightly (Sylvian Type B

  8. Variation in Stem Anatomical Characteristics of Campanuloideae Species in Relation to Evolutionary History and Ecological Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Schweingruber, Fritz Hans; Říha, Pavel; Doležal, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Background The detailed knowledge of plant anatomical characters and their variation among closely related taxa is key to understanding their evolution and function. We examined anatomical variation in 46 herbaceous taxa from the subfamily Campanuloideae (Campanulaceae) to link this information with their phylogeny, ecology and comparative material of 56 woody tropical taxa from the subfamily Lobelioideae. The species studied covered major environmental gradients from Mediterranean to Arctic zones, allowing us to test hypotheses on the evolution of anatomical structure in relation to plant competitive ability and ecological preferences. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the evolution of anatomical diversity, we reconstructed the phylogeny of studied species from nucleotide sequences and examined the distribution of anatomical characters on the resulting phylogenetic tree. Redundancy analysis, with phylogenetic corrections, was used to separate the evolutionary inertia from the adaptation to the environment. A large anatomical diversity exists within the Campanuloideae. Traits connected with the quality of fibres were the most congruent with phylogeny, and the Rapunculus 2 (“phyteumoid”) clade was especially distinguished by a number of characters (absence of fibres, pervasive parenchyma, type of rays) from two other clades (Campanula s. str. and Rapunculus 1) characterized by the dominance of fibres and the absence of parenchyma. Septate fibres are an exclusive trait in the Lobelioideae, separating it clearly from the Campanuloideae where annual rings, pervasive parenchyma and crystals in the phellem are characteristic features. Conclusions/Significance Despite clear phylogenetic inertia in the anatomical features studied, the ecological attributes and plant height had a significant effect on anatomical divergence. From all three evolutionary clades, the taller species converged towards similar anatomical structure, characterized by a smaller number

  9. Sensitivity of Noninvasive Cardiac Electrophysiological Imaging to Variations in Personalized Anatomical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Noninvasive cardiac electrophysiological (EP) imaging techniques rely on anatomically-detailed heart-torso models derived from high-quality tomographic images of individual subjects. However, anatomical modeling involves variations that lead to unresolved uncertainties in the outcome of EP imaging, bringing questions to the robustness of these methods in clinical practice. In this study, we design a systematic statistical approach to assess the sensitivity of EP imaging methods to the variations in personalized anatomical modeling. Methods We first quantify the variations in personalized anatomical models by a novel application of statistical shape modeling. Given the statistical distribution of the variation in personalized anatomical models, we then employ unscented transform to determine the sensitivity of EP imaging outputs to the variation in input personalized anatomical modeling. Results We test the feasibility of our proposed approach using two of the existing EP imaging methods: epicardial-based electrocardiographic imaging and transmural electrophysiological imaging. Both phantom and real-data experiments show that variations in personalized anatomical models have negligible impact on the outcome of EP imaging. Conclusion This study verifies the robustness of EP imaging methods to the errors in personalized anatomical modeling and suggests the possibility to simplify the process of anatomical modeling in future clinical practice. Significance This study proposes a systematic statistical approach to quantify anatomical modeling variations and assess their impact on EP imaging, which can be extended to find a balance between the quality of personalized anatomical models and the accuracy of EP imaging that may improve the clinical feasibility of EP imaging. PMID:25615906

  10. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  11. The role of the ostiomeatal unit anatomic variations in inflammatory disease of the maxillary sinuses.

    PubMed

    Scribano, E; Ascenti, G; Loria, G; Cascio, F; Gaeta, M

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the correlation between bony anatomic variations of the ostiomeatal unit (OMU) and chronic maxillary sinusitis. The study was based on the hypothesis that the mucosal contact caused by the variations represents the critical factor in increasing the risk of maxillary sinusitis. Thin section high resolution computerised tomography (CT) examinations of the paranasal sinuses in 73 consecutive patients with 113 anatomic variations of the OMU were retrospectively reviewed. The following CT features were assessed: (1) Type of anatomic variations, (2) presence of a mucosal contact in the OMU and (3) presence of maxillary disease. Statistical evaluation was carried out using chi 2-test. The following bony anatomic variations were found: Concha bullosa (67 cases), abnormalities of the uncinate process (18 cases), Haller's cells (24 cases) and large ethmoidal bulla (four cases). Only 52 of the 113 anatomic variations were associated with ipsilateral maxillary disease (mucosal thickening, mucous retention cysts, polyps, retained secretions). Of 113 variations, 44 caused a mucosal contact, 35 of these were associated with maxillary abnormalities, while in nine cases there were no pathologic changes. Of 69 variations, 17 did not cause mucosal contact (P < 0.05). Our data shows that, in the presence of anatomic bony variations, a contact between the mucosal surface of the OMU is valuable in predicting the likelihood of a maxillary inflammatory disease.

  12. Anatomical variations affect radial artery spasm and procedural achievement of transradial cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Numasawa, Yohei; Kawamura, Akio; Kohsaka, Shun; Takahashi, Masashi; Endo, Ayaka; Arai, Takahide; Ohno, Yohei; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Transradial cardiac catheterization (TRCC) has unique technical challenges such as access difficulty related to anatomical variations and/or radial artery (RA) spasm. We sought to evaluate the incidence of anatomical variations of the RA and whether they would affect RA spasm and procedural achievement of TRCC. A total of 744 consecutive patients who underwent TRCC were analyzed by routine radial arteriography. Anatomical variations were defined as abnormal origin of the RA and/or radioulnar loop and/or tortuous configuration. RA spasm was defined as >75 % stenosis at first radial arteriography. Overall, anatomical variations were noted in 68 patients (9.1 %), including 39 cases of abnormal origin (5.2 %), 11 cases of radioulnar loop (1.5 %), and 42 cases of tortuous configuration (5.6 %). Transradial procedures failed in 26 patients (3.5 %), and more frequently in patients with anatomical variation than in those with normal anatomy (23.5 % vs 1.5 %, P < 0.001). Importantly, on multivariate analysis the presence of anatomical variation was a distinct predictor of transradial procedure failure (odds ratio (OR) 17.80; 95 % CI 7.55-43.73; P < 0.001). RA spasm was observed in 83 patients (11.2 %), and more frequently in patients with anatomical variation than in those with normal anatomy (35.3 % vs 8.7 %, P < 0.001). Anatomical variation (OR 4.74; 95 % CI 2.61-8.47; P < 0.001) and female gender (OR 2.23; 95 % CI 1.01-4.73; P = 0.041) were distinct predictors of RA spasm. Anatomical variations were observed in 9.1 % of the patients, and strongly correlated with RA spasm and procedural achievement of TRCC.

  13. Beyond Taphonomy: Exploring Craniometric Variation Among Anatomical Material.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Joseph T; Spatola, Brian F; Passalacqua, Nicholas V; Gocha, Timothy P

    2016-11-01

    Anatomical crania are occasionally encountered in forensic anthropology laboratories when that material is mistaken for forensically significant human remains. Using craniometric analyses and statistical measures of sample homogeneity, we determine whether anatomical material can be described as a single, homogenous group or as a diverse mix of populations. Twenty-one interlandmark distances were collected from 85 anatomical preparations. Distance measures were calculated between all pairs using a pooled within-sample variance/covariance matrix and then subjected to a Defrise-Gussenhoven test between each paired distance to test whether each pair was drawn randomly from the same population. In the Defrise-Gussenhoven analysis, twenty-two percent (n = 66) of the 300 pairwise combinations were significant at the 0.05 level or below. The level of homogeneity suggests a majority of that material originated from the subcontinent of India or West Asia. Therefore, anatomical material can be viewed as a moderately homogenous group, but with a shared taphonomic history. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  15. Contribution to the anatomical nomenclature concerning general anatomy and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Musil, Vladimir; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-09-01

    Nomenclature of the general and variant anatomy belongs to the most neglected parts of the Latin anatomical nomenclature in Terminologia Anatomica. Although many important small structures are included in Terminologia Anatomica, when describing and teaching particular anatomy of any part of the human body, the general terms are necessary, such as planes, lines and flexion grooves. Moreover, Terminologia Anatomica contains only 149 terms of variant structures, enlisted in the parentheses to differentiate them from constant ones. They are only a rather representative selection and some more should be added, both from the educational and clinical point of view. The authors present some terms, completed with their definitions or explanations concerning the general and variant anatomy to evoke broader discussion on this topic which should issue in incorporation of proposed terms (or their equivalents) into the Terminologia Anatomica.

  16. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  17. Variations of the tracheobronchial tree: anatomical and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Candace; Patel, Swetal; Cassidy, Lindsey; Watanabe, Koichi; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    Tracheobronchial variations can be found during routine bronchoscopy or computed tomography. Previous sources estimate an incidence of 1-12%; however, these variations are often asymptomatic. Symptomatic patients present typically with cough and lower respiratory tract infection. Knowledge and understanding of tracheobronchial variations have important implications for diagnosis of symptomatic patients and performing certain procedures, including bronchoscopy and endotracheal intubation. In this review, we describe the most commonly encountered variations, tracheal bronchus and accessory cardiac bronchus, along with three minor abnormalities of this region. We also review the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  18. Investigations of Anatomical Variations of the Thorax and Heart, and Anatomical Knowledge for First Year Medical Dental and Podiatry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenna, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The universal presence of anatomy in healthcare professions is undeniable. It is a cornerstone to each of the clinical and basic sciences. Therefore, further expansion of current anatomical knowledge and effective methods to teach anatomy is essential. In this work, the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery with the trunks of the brachial…

  19. Investigations of Anatomical Variations of the Thorax and Heart, and Anatomical Knowledge for First Year Medical Dental and Podiatry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenna, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The universal presence of anatomy in healthcare professions is undeniable. It is a cornerstone to each of the clinical and basic sciences. Therefore, further expansion of current anatomical knowledge and effective methods to teach anatomy is essential. In this work, the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery with the trunks of the brachial…

  20. Absence of Flexor Carpi Radialis during an Elective Carpometacarpal Arthroplasty of the Thumb: A Rare Anatomical Variation.

    PubMed

    Sofos, Stratos S; Riaz, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We present an extremely rare anatomical variation of unilateral flexor carpi radialis (FCR) absence. This rare anatomical variation posed a clinical dilemma to us and we highlight the importance of the surgeon being aware of this anatomical variation of an important structure both as a reconstruction tool and as an anatomical landmark. Methods. This anatomical variation of the unilaterally absent FCR was found upon dissection during a carpometacarpal arthroplasty of the thumb. Results. Upon the discovery of an absent FCR tendon, we proceeded with a simple trapeziectomy. Conclusions. We present an extremely rare anatomical variation of unilateral FCR absence. This rare anatomical variation may pose clinical dilemmas to the operating surgeon who aims to utilise the FCR either for tendon transfer, for tendon graft, or, as seen in our case, in the reconstruction of a carpometacarpal excision at the thumb. We highlight this diagnosis of suspicion, which may influence the clinical procedure.

  1. The palmaris longus muscle: its anatomic variations and functional morphology.

    PubMed

    Pai, Mangala M; Prabhu, Latha V; Nayak, S R; Madhyastha, S; Vadgaonkar, Rajanigandha; Krishnamurthy, A; Kumar, A

    2008-01-01

    The functional morphology and evolution of the superficial forearm flexor, the palmaris longus, have long fascinated kinesiologists, physical anthropologists and anatomists alike. The anomalies, agenesis, variations and polymorphic presentation of the muscle, coupled with its biomechanical role in the performance of flexion and supination through distal articulations in the upper limb, have formed the base for many studies found in medical literature. We present data from published sources, along with our observations on the kinetics of palmaris longus, drawn from a series of dissections done on 30 cadavers. Complete agenesis was seen in four limbs. Reversal in the muscle-tendon orientation was seen in two limbs and duplication in one limb. The functional dynamics of the muscle and the clinical implication of its modifications in humans are discussed. We believe that every surgeon must be aware of the variations, since this, otherwise unimportant muscle, provides a very useful graft in tendon surgery.

  2. Quantification and Visualization of Variation in Anatomical Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Amenta, Nina; Datar, Manasi; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruihne, Marleen; Feragen, Aasa; Ge, Xiaoyin; Holst Pedersen, Jesper; Howard, Marylesa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens; Shi, Jie; Xu, Qiuping

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents two approaches to quantifying and visualizing variation in datasets of trees. The first approach localizes subtrees in which significant population differences are found through hypothesis testing and sparse classifiers on subtree features. The second approach visualizes the global metric structure of datasets through low-distortion embedding into hyperbolic planes in the style of multidimensional scaling. A case study is made on a dataset of airway trees in relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

  3. Anatomic variation of the abducens nerve in a single cadaver dissection: the "petrobasilar canal".

    PubMed

    Pizzolorusso, Felice; Cirotti, Andrea; Pizzolorusso, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    Anatomic variations of the petrosphenoid ligament, Dorello's canal and the course of the abducens nerve have been extensively described over the past years. In the present report of a single cadaver dissection, we describe an unusual course of the abducens nerve at the level of the petrous bone. The right abducens nerve did not enter Dorello's canal, but ran below the petrous bone through a narrow canal in the petrobasilar suture, which we called the "petrobasilar canal". No anatomic variations of the left abducens nerve were noted.

  4. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. PMID:25653931

  5. Anatomical variations of flexor hallucis longus tendon increase safety in hindfoot endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Redó, David; Savín, Gabriela; Malagelada, Francesc; Dalmau-Pastor, Miki

    2017-06-01

    The flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is the main anatomical landmark during hindfoot endoscopy, and anatomical variations related to the FHL can pose a risk to the tibial nerve and posterior tibial vessels during hindfoot endoscopy. The aim of this study was to determine the distance between the FHL tendon and the tibial neurovascular bundle in the posterior ankle joint when an anatomical variant of the FHL is present. The hypothesis was that the shortest distance between the tibial neurovascular bundle and the FHL tendon in the working area of the hindfoot endoscopy is increased when an anatomical variant of the FHL is present. A retrospective review was performed using consecutive ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans obtained during 1 year. All scans with anatomical variations related to the FHL were included in the study. A control group including scans without anatomical variations was obtained for comparison. The shortest distance between the FHL tendon and the neurovascular tibial bundle was measured in both groups. Three-hundred and fifty-five ankle MRIs were reviewed. 35 scans with anatomical variants of the FHL (9.8%) were found and comprised the study group that was compared to 35 scans without variants (control group). The mean distance from FHL to the neurovascular tibial bundle in the control group was 0.9 mm. The study group consisted of 18 cases with distal muscle belly insertion (5.1%), and 17 cases with an accessory tendon corresponding to a flexor digitorum accessorius longus (4.5%). In these subgroups, the mean distance from FHL to the neurovascular tibial bundle was 1.1 and 1.5 mm respectively. Overall this distance was found to be higher in the group with anatomical variants (1.3 mm) when compared to the control group (0.9 mm) (p < 0.05). During hindfoot endoscopy, the presence of an anatomical variant related to the FHL tendon has proven safer anatomically than in its absence, due to the increased distance between the FHL

  6. Variation in anatomical characteristics in leaves of pecan seedstocks from Mexico and the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf anatomical traits of Mexican and U.S. pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] seedstocks grown in a single location were studied to determine patterns of ecogeographic variation within the natural range. Stomatal density (SD) was uniform among open-pollinated seedlings of a common mater...

  7. Anatomic variations in the anterior circulation of the circle of Willis in cadaveric human brains.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuhui; Xu, Tao; Chen, Jiong; Tian, Hengli; Cao, Heli

    2015-01-01

    The Cycle of Willis unites the internal carotid and vertebrobasilar system and maintains the stability of blood supply to the brain. This present study aims to analyze the anatomic variations in the anterior part of the Cycle of Willis. Forty five formalin-preserved human brains (90 cerebral hemispheres) with intact dura mater from Chinese adults were dissected under the surgical microscope. The anterior components of the Circle of Willis were observed and measured. Anatomic variations of this segment were observed and photographed. The data collected in this investigation was statistically analyzed. In approximately 13.3% (6/45) of all cerebral samples, a caliber difference of ≥ 0.5 mm was noted between the left A1 and the right segments. The A2 segments of left and right hemispheres were derived from the contralateral A1 segment in 6.7% (3/45) of the brain specimens. Simple anterior communicating artery (ACoA) was observed in 37.8% (17/45) whereas complex ACoA was noted in 60% (27/45) of cerebral samples. As it demonstrates the anatomic variations of ACAC, all surgical approaches should be performed after angiographic demonstrations. Understanding of these anatomic variations plays a pivotal role in neurovascular procedures.

  8. Frequency of radial artery anatomic variations in patients undergoing transradial heart catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Zvonimir; Bulum, Joško; Ernst, Aleksander; Strozzi, Maja; Marić-Bešić, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Over the last ten years, transradial cardiac catheterization has been increasingly applied, primarily because of its lower incidence of complications compared to the femoral approach. However, one of the greatest flaws of the transradial approach is a relatively high incidence of catheterization failure (1%-5%). Anatomic variations of radial artery are ranked second among the reasons for this. Previous studies have not provided unambiguous data on the frequency of these anomalies. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine the frequency of anatomic variations using routine angiographies of radial artery during left heart catheterization. This was a retrospective study involving examination of 602 images of routine angiographies of radial artery performed during cardiac catheterization. The frequency of anatomic variations of radial artery was 8.8%, exclusive of tortuosities with a frequency of 12.7%. The most frequent anatomic variation was the high origin of radial artery, found in 31 (5.1%) subjects. Radioulnar loops, being one of the potential contraindications for the procedure, were reported in 2% of cases. Regression analysis revealed that age (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.015) and high origin (p = 0.034) considerably contributed to the development of tortuosity. The results indicated the incidence of tortuosity to increase linearly with age. Although it is not a contraindication for continuing with the procedure, we recommend that elderly patients have angiography of radial artery performed at the beginning of the procedure due to the higher frequency of tortuosity.

  9. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Won; Yoo, Ji Yong; Paek, Seung Jae; Park, Won-Jong; Choi, Eun Joo; Choi, Moon-Gi; Kwon, Kyung-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis.

  10. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  11. Numerical variation of the celiac trunk and anatomical variation in origin and course of the dorsal pancreatic artery.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mustafa; Peker, Tuncay; Gulekon, Nadir; Yucel, Deniz; Oktem, Hale

    2006-08-01

    A numerical anomaly of the celiac trunk and anatomical variation in origin, and course of the dorsal pancreatic artery were encountered during a routine upper abdomen dissection of a 62-year-old male cadaver. The aim of this study was to describe a rare celiac trunk and dorsal pancreatic artery variation in detail, which can be a guide and precaution during operative procedures in this region. The abdominal aorta, its branches and the pancreas were cut and removed just above the celiac trunk and below the superior mesenteric artery to investigate the vascular distribution of the pancreas in detail. The celiac trunk divided into the left gastric, hepatic, splenic, and dorsal pancreatic arteries. The anatomical variation of the celiac trunk and splenic artery makes it vulnerable to iatrogenic surgery. Knowledge of the existing aberrations is important in planning and conducting surgical procedures.

  12. QTL mapping and phenotypic variation of root anatomical traits in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Burton, Amy L; Johnson, James; Foerster, Jillian; Hanlon, Meredith T; Kaeppler, Shawn M; Lynch, Jonathan P; Brown, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Root anatomical trait variation is described for three maize RIL populations. Six quantitative trait loci (QTL) are presented for anatomical traits: root cross-sectional area, % living cortical area, aerenchyma area, and stele area. Root anatomy is directly related to plant performance, influencing resource acquisition and transport, the metabolic cost of growth, and the mechanical strength of the root system. Ten root anatomical traits were measured in greenhouse-grown plants from three recombinant inbred populations of maize [intermated B73 × Mo17 (IBM), Oh43 × W64a (OhW), and Ny821 × H99 (NyH)]. Traits included areas of cross section, stele, cortex, aerenchyma, and cortical cells, percentages of the cortex occupied by aerenchyma, and cortical cell file number. Significant phenotypic variation was observed for each of the traits, with maximum values typically seven to ten times greater than minimum values. Means and ranges were similar for the OhW and NyH populations for all traits, while the IBM population had lower mean values for the majority of traits, but a 50% greater range of variation for aerenchyma area. A principal component analysis showed a similar trait structure for the three families, with clustering of area and count traits. Strong correlations were observed among area traits in the cortex, stele, and cross-section. The aerenchyma and percent living cortical area traits were independent of other traits. Six QTL were identified for four of the traits. The phenotypic variation explained by the QTL ranged from 4.7% (root cross-sectional area, OhW population) to 12.0% (percent living cortical area, IBM population). Genetic variation for root anatomical traits can be harnessed to increase abiotic stress tolerance and provide insights into mechanisms controlling phenotypic variation for root anatomy.

  13. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  14. [Anatomic variations and references of the sphenopalatine foramen in cadaveric specimens: a Mexican study].

    PubMed

    Morales-Cadena, Mauricio; González-Juárez, Fernando; Tapia-Álvarez, Liliana; Fernando-Macías Valle, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The sphenopalatine foramen is located on the lateral nasal wall and has multiple variants and anatomic landmarks that are important to know to optimize RESULTS in the surgical management of posterior epistaxis. This study describes the endoscopic anatomy of the sphenopalatine foramen, related structures and anatomic variations in a Mexican population. We performed a prospective, observational, and experimental study. Five cadaveric specimens were included. Dissections were performed to identify the anatomy of the sphenopalatine foramen and anatomic variants. Measurements were obtained from different anatomic references to the columella. Of a total of ten dissections, in 100% of cases ethmoid crests were identified anterior to the sphenopalatine foramen. Localization of the sphenopalatine foramen in the lateral nasal wall in 60% cases was in the transition from middle meatus with superior meatus. The vidian nerve in 90% of cases was located superior and posterior to the sphenopalatine foramen. For the measurements, no significant differences between the two sides of each specimen were noticed. The sphenopalatine foramen presents multiple anatomic variants and numerous landmarks, which are important to comprehend in order to perform a successful and safe endoscopic sinus surgery.

  15. Anatomical variations in the human paranasal sinus region studied by CT

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-PIÑAS, I.; SABATÉ, J.; CARMONA, A.; CATALINA-HERRERA, C. J.; JIMÉNEZ-CASTELLANOS, J.

    2000-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the anatomy of the paranasal sinuses is essential for the clinician. Conventional radiology does not permit a detailed study of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, and has now largely been replaced by computerised tomographic (CT) imaging. This gives an applied anatomical view of the region and the anatomical variants that are very often found. The detection of these variants to prevent potential hazards is essential for the use of current of endoscopic surgery on the sinuses. In the present work, we have studied the anatomical variants observed in the nasal fossae and paranasal sinuses in 110 Spanish subjects, using CT in the coronal plane, complemented by horizontal views. We have concentrated on the variants of the nasal septum, middle nasal concha, ethmoid unciform process and ethmoid bulla, together with others of lesser frequency. The population studied showed great anatomical variability, and a high percentage (67%) presented one or more anatomical variants. Discounting agger nasi air cells and asymmetry of both cavities of the sphenoidal sinus, which were present in all our cases, the variations most often observed were, in order, deviation of the nasal septum, the presence of a concha bullosa, bony spurs of the nasal septum and Onodi air cells. PMID:11005714

  16. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  17. Three-dimensional CT angiography of anatomic variations in the pulmonary arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Fourdrain, Alex; De Dominicis, Florence; Blanchard, Chloé; Iquille, Jules; Lafitte, Sophie; Beuvry, Pierre-Louis; Michel, David; Merlusca, Geoni; Havet, Eric; Berna, Pascal

    2017-08-30

    Anatomic variations of the pulmonary arterial tree can cause technical difficulties during pulmonary lobectomy in general and video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Using CT angiography and 3D reconstruction, we sought to identify anatomic variations of the pulmonary arterial tree and assess their respective frequencies. We retrospectively studied 88 pulmonary arterial trees in 44 patients having undergone VATS lobectomy for lung cancer over an 18-month period in Amiens University Hospital's Department of Thoracic Surgery. Each CT angiography with 3D reconstruction of the pulmonary arterial tree was performed by two experienced operators, according to a standardized procedure. On the right side, the upper lobe was supplied with blood by a mediastinal artery in 100% of cases and by one or more fissural arteries in 88.6%. The middle lobe was usually supplied by two arteries (54.5%). The upper segment of the right lower lobe was usually supplied by a single artery (90.9%). We identified 11 variations in the vasculature of the basal segments. On the left side, the upper lobe was supplied by four arteries in 50% of cases, three culminal arteries (50%), and a fissural lingular artery (77.3%). The upper segment of the left lower lobe was usually supplied by a single artery (65.9%). We identified 15 anatomic variations in the vasculature of the basal segments. We observed that the origin of the apical artery of the right lower lobe was proximal to the origin of the middle lobe artery in 38.6% of cases. The origin of the apical artery of the left lower lobe artery was proximal to the origin of the lingular fissural artery in 65.9% of cases. The findings of the present CT angiography/3D reconstruction study agreed with the reference works on the anatomy of the pulmonary arterial tree and defined the frequency of anatomic variations. It is essential to assess the anatomy of the pulmonary arterial tree before VATS lobectomy.

  18. Effect of lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur and its clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Emara, Khaled M; Mahmoud, Ahmed Nageeb; Emara, Ahmed K; Emara, Mariam K

    2017-05-18

    To review and study the effect of lengthening along the anatomical axis of long bones and its relation to the mechanical axis deviation. We try in this review to calculate and discuss the exact clinical impact of lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur on affecting the limb alignment. Also we used a trigonometric formula to predict the change of the femoral distal anatomical mechanical angle (AMA) after lengthening along the anatomical axis. Lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur by 10% of its original length results in reduction in the distal femoral AMA by 0.57 degrees. There is no objective experimental scientific data to prove that the Mechanical axis is passing via the center of the hip to the center of the knee. There is wide variation in normal anatomical axis for different populations. In deformity correction, surgeons try to reproduce the normal usual bone shape to regain normal function, which is mainly anatomical axis. Lengthening of the femur along its anatomical axis results in mild reduction of the distal femoral AMA. This may partially compensate for the expected mechanical axis lateralisation and hence justify its minimal clinical impact.

  19. Anatomic variation in the elastic anisotropy of cortical bone tissue in the human femur

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Deuerling, Justin M.; Landrigan, Matthew D.; Renaud, John E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations for anatomic variation in the magnitude and anisotropy of elastic constants in human femoral cortical bone tissue have typically focused on a limited number of convenient sites near the mid-diaphysis. However, the proximal and distal ends of the diaphysis are more clinically relevant to common orthopaedic procedures and interesting mechanobiology. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure anatomic variation in the elastic anisotropy and inhomogeneity of human cortical bone tissue along the entire length (15-85% of the total femur length) and around the periphery (anterior, medial, posterior and lateral quadrants) of the femoral diaphysis using ultrasonic wave propagation in the three orthogonal specimen axes. The elastic symmetry of tissue in the distal and extreme proximal portions of the diaphysis (15-45% and 75-85% of the total femur length, respectively) was, at most, orthotropic. In contrast, the elastic symmetry of tissue near the mid- and proximal mid-diaphysis (50-70% of the total femur length) was reasonably approximated as transversely isotropic. The magnitudes of elastic constants generally reached maxima near the mid- and proximal mid-diaphysis in the lateral and medial quadrants, and decreased toward the epiphyses, as well as the posterior and anterior quadrants. The elastic anisotropy ratio in the longitudinal and radial anatomic axes showed the opposite trends. These variations were significantly correlated with the apparent tissue density, as expected. In summary, the human femur exhibited statistically significant anatomic variation in elastic anisotropy, which may have important implications for whole bone numerical models and mechanobiology. PMID:19627830

  20. Interfractional Variations in Patient Setup and Anatomic Change Assessed by Daily Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. Allen . E-mail: ali@radonc.mcw.edu; Qi, X. Sharon; Pitterle, Marissa; Kalakota, Kapila; Mueller, Kevin; Erickson, Beth A.; Wang Dian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Firat, Selim Y.; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the interfractional variations in patient setup and anatomic changes at seven anatomic sites observed in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 152 patients treated at seven anatomic sites using a Hi-Art helical tomotherapy system were analyzed. Daily tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography images acquired before each treatment were fused to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images to determine the daily setup errors and organ motions and deformations. The setup errors were corrected before treatment and were used, along with the organ motions, to determine the clinical target volume/planning target volume margins. The organ motions and deformations for 3 representative patient cases (pancreas, uterus, and soft-tissue sarcoma) and for 14 kidneys of 7 patients are presented. Results: Interfractional setup errors in the skull, brain, and head and neck are significantly smaller than those in the chest, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. These site-specific relationships are statistically significant. The margins required to account for these setup errors range from 3 to 8 mm for the seven sites. The margin to account for both setup errors and organ motions for kidney is 16 mm. Substantial interfractional anatomic changes were observed. For example, the pancreas moved up to {+-}20 mm and volumes of the uterus and sarcoma varied {<=}30% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The interfractional variations in patient setup and in shapes, sizes, and positions of both targets and normal structures are site specific and may be used to determine the site-specific margins. The data presented in this work dealing with seven anatomic sites may be useful in developing adaptive radiotherapy.

  1. Anatomical variations: How do surgical and radiology training programs teach and assess them in their training curricula?

    PubMed

    Raikos, Athanasios; Smith, Janie Dade

    2015-09-01

    Sound knowledge of anatomy and Anatomical variations plays an integral role in surgical and radiology specialties. This study investigated the current teaching and assessment trends on Anatomical variations in various surgical and radiology specialty training curricula in Canada and Australia. A survey was sent to 122 Program Directors and Chairs of specialty committees in Canada and Directors of Training/Education in Australia of selected surgical and radiology specialties. A total of 80.7% of respondents report that their training curricula include Anatomical variations. The highest rated classes of variations included in the curriculum are arterial (76%), venous (68%), followed by organs (64%). All trainees learn about Anatomical variations from surgeons and radiologists (100%) and via suggested textbooks of the specialty (87.1%). A total of 54.8% report that specialty training curricula do not suggest specific anatomical variation classifications for the trainees to learn, and 16.1% are uncertain if the colleges provide such kind of instruction. Trainees typically communicated findings of variations in case presentations and clinic's meetings. About 32.3% of respondents report that Anatomical variations are not assessed in their training curriculum. About 39.3% of experienced clinicians in the study report they encounter variations on a monthly basis and 25 and 21.4% on a weekly and daily basis, respectively. Surgical and radiology colleges need to investigate for hidden curriculum in their specialty training programs to ensure there are no gaps in knowledge and training related to Anatomical variations. Most educational leaders surveyed believe more teaching on Anatomical variations in the first 4 years of training would benefit resident doctors.

  2. Anatomic Variations of the Lacunar-Canalicular System Influence Solute Transport in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaozhou; Novotny, John E.; Wang, Liyun

    2009-01-01

    Solute transport in the lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is essential for bone metabolism and mechanotransduction. Using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) we have been quantifying solute transport in the LCS of murine long bone as a function of loading parameters and molecular size. However, the influence of LCS anatomy, which varies among animal species, bone type and location, age and health condition, is not well understood. In this study, we developed a mathematical model to simulate solute convection in the LCS during a FRAP experiment under a physiological cyclic flow. We found that the transport rate (the reciprocal time constant for refilling the photobleached lacuna) increased linearly with canalicular number and decreased with canalicular length for both diffusion and convection. As a result, the transport enhancement of convection over diffusion was much less sensitive to the variations associated with chick, mouse, rabbit, bovine, dog, horse, and human LCS anatomy, when compared with the rates of diffusion or convection alone. Canalicular density did not affect transport enhancement, while solute size and the lacunar density had more complicated, nonlinear effects. This parametric study suggests that solute transport could be altered by varying LCS parameters, and that the anatomical details of the LCS need systemic examination to further understand the etiology of aged and osteoporotic bones. PMID:19576310

  3. Anatomical variations of the lateral nasal wall: The secondary and accessory middle turbinates.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, A E; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Cabay, J; Lefebvre, P P

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the current anatomical and clinical study was to audit our cases of patients who presented with secondary and/or accessory middle turbinates during a two-year period. We investigated the incidence and the clinical impact of these variations. Twenty-eight patients, 19 males and 9 females with a mean age of 41.5 years, representing different ethnic origins, were diagnosed with double middle turbinates based on endoscopic examination. Of those, 92.8% had a main symptom of refractory frontal headache. A secondary nasal symptom was sensation of blocked nose. Patients who underwent endoscopic surgery (n = 13) for reduction of the extra turbinate, reported significant symptom scores improvement (P < 0.0001) of frontal headache and blocked nose, from means of 9.07 ± 0.26 and 8.57 ± 1.39 to 1 ± 0.31, and 1.42 ± 0.35, respectively. Our results indicate that double middle turbinates may be encountered in rhinology practice (2%). Clinically they may present with refractory headache and blocked nose. Endoscopic surgical approach seems to be an effective way of improving the symptoms.

  4. Anatomical variations of mandibular canal detected by panoramic radiography and CT: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Kamile; Porporatti, André Luís; Mezzomo, Luis A; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Corrêa, Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the anatomical variations of the mandibular canal through assessment in situ, panoramic radiography, CT or CBCT and assess their frequency. Methods: Articles were selected from databases (Cochrane Library, LILACS, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar), articles without limitations of language, in which the main objective was to evaluate the frequency of bifurcation of the mandibular canal through assessment in situ, panoramic radiography, CT or CBCT were selected. A meta-analysis of prevalence using random effects was performed. Results: Using a selection process in two phases, 15 articles were identified, and a meta-analysis was conducted. The results from these meta-analyses showed that the overall prevalence of anatomical variations for in situ studies was 6.46%, and through assessment of panoramic radiography and CT or CBCT the overall prevalence shown was 4.20% and 16.25%, respectively. Conclusions: There are two types of variations of the mandibular canal: the retromolar canal and bifid mandibular canal. The frequency variations through assessing in situ, panoramic radiography and CT or CBCT were 6.46%, 4.20% and 16.25%, respectively. PMID:26576624

  5. Anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the adrenal gland in the rat

    PubMed Central

    KIGATA, Tetsuhito; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is an essential endocrine organ for the stress response. The functions of this organ may be studied by ligation of the adrenal artery or adrenalectomy. However, in prior studies, descriptions of the anatomical variations of the adrenal artery were insufficient and inconsistent. Therefore, anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the adrenal gland were studied in 18 male and 18 female Wistar rats by colored latex injection into the arteries. The vascularization pattern was categorized into 4 types based on the origin of each adrenal artery. The cranial and middle adrenal arteries arose from the caudal phrenic artery in Types 1–3, but the caudal adrenal artery emerged from the caudal phrenic artery in Type 1, from the renal artery in Type 2 and from the abdominal aorta in Type 3. In Type 4, the cranial and middle adrenal arteries stemmed from the cranial phrenic artery, and the caudal adrenal artery arose from the caudal phrenic artery. The number of adrenal arteries varied from 3 to 11 on the left side and from 4 to 12 on the right side, and the total varied from 9 to 20 (predominantly 14) in each individual. There was no sex difference in the vascularization pattern. The results show that more individual variations occur in the adrenal arteries of rats than was previously reported. Such variations should always be considered when experimental treatments of the rat adrenal gland are performed. PMID:27867163

  6. CT imaging-based determination and classification of anatomic variations of left gastric vein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongyou; Chen, Guangqiang; Wu, Pengfei; Zhu, Jianbin; Peng, Wei; Xing, Chungen

    2017-03-01

    Precise determination and classification of left gastric vein (LGV) anatomy are helpful in planning for gastric surgery, in particular, for resection of gastric cancer. However, the anatomy of LGV is highly variable. A systematic classification of its variations is still to be proposed. We aimed to investigate the anatomical variations in LGV using CT imaging and develop a new nomenclature system. We reviewed CT images and tracked the course of LGV in 825 adults. The frequencies of common and variable LGV anatomical courses were recorded. Anatomic variations of LGV were proposed and classified into different types mainly based on its courses. The inflow sites of LGV into the portal system were also considered if common hepatic artery (CHA) or splenic artery (SA) could not be used as a frame of reference due to variations. Detailed anatomy and courses of LGV were depicted on CT images. Using CHA and SA as the frames of reference, the routes of LGV were divided into six types (i.e., PreS, RetroS, Mid, PreCH, RetroCH, and Supra). The inflow sites were classified into four types (i.e., PV, SV, PSV, and LPV). The new classification was mainly based on the courses of LGV, which was validated with MDCT in the 805 cases with an identifiable LGV, namely type I, RetroCH, 49.8 % (401/805); type II, PreS, 20.6 % (166/805); type III, Mid, 20.0 % (161/805); type IV, RetroS, 7.3 % (59/805); type V, Supra, 1.5 % (12/805); and type VI, PreCH, 0.7 % (6/805). Type VII, designated to the cases in which SA and CHA could not be used as frames of reference, was not observed in this series. Detailed depiction of the anatomy and courses of LGV on CT images allowed us to evaluate and develop a new classification and nomenclature system for the anatomical variations of LGV.

  7. Anatomic Variations of the First Extensor Compartment and Abductor Pollicis Longus Tendon in Trapeziometacarpal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Opreanu, Razvan C.; Wechter, John; Tabbaa, Hazem; Kepros, John P.; Baulch, Michelle; Xie, Yan; Lackey, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Anatomic variation of the trapeziometacarpal joint stabilizing structures is one of the concepts proposed to explain the pathogenesis of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that septation of the first extensor compartment or variation of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon (supernumerary insertions) are more frequently associated with the progression or severity of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. Septation within the first extensor compartment was significantly associated with trapeziometacarpal arthritis (p = 0.013), whereas supernumerary APL insertions (trapezium or thenar) did not reveal a significant association (p = 0.811 and p = 0.937, respectively). The results of this study do not support a role for variations of APL tendon insertions in trapeziometacarpal arthritis. Yet, the presence of septation within the first extensor compartment may play an important role in the pathogenesis of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. PMID:19834771

  8. Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in Chinese patients: a prospective study of 2,404 patients.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tanglei; Qiu, Weihua; Yang, Weiping

    2016-05-05

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) shows some anatomical variations that can potentially compromise the safety of thyroid surgery. The purpose of this prospective study was to identify the anatomical variations of the RLN in Chinese patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 2,404 Chinese patients were hospitalized for thyroid surgery with dissecting of the RLN unilaterally or bilaterally. The patients consisted of 510 men and 1,894 women, with a median age of 45.0 years. Overall 3,275 RLNs, including 1,576 left- and 1,699 right-side nerves, were dissected. The anatomical variations were identified in 690 RLNs, including 305 left- and 385 right-side nerves. We identified as many as seven RLN anatomical variations in Chinese patients. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the RLN are common, and the identification of these anatomical variations of the RLN can help to minimize the risk of post-operative RLN paralysis.

  9. Anatomical variations and morphometric study of the optic strut and the anterior clinoid process.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Eldan; Mehić, Amina

    2012-05-01

    The optic strut and the anterior clinoid process represent bony structures that are closely related to anatomically and clinically significant elements such as the cavernous sinus, the internal carotid artery, the optic nerve and the pituitary gland. The objective of our study was to quantify dimensions of the optic strut and anterior clinoid process, and to determine variations in positions and forms of these structures. A descriptive anatomical study was performed on 200 dry human skulls. We analyzed dimensions and variations in position of the optic strut, dimensions of the anterior clinoid process as well as the incidence and forms of the caroticoclinoid foramen. The average thickness of the optic strut on skulls belonging to males was 3 mm and 2.8 mm on those belonging to females. The optic strut was most commonly attached to the anterior two fifths on the lower side of the anterior clinoid process. On the male skulls the average width of the anterior clinoid process was 9.4 mm (right) and 9.1 mm (left). Its length was 9.9 and 9.3 mm. On female skulls the average width of the process was 8.7 mm (right) and 8.3 mm (left), while the length measured 9.3 mm on the right and 8.9 mm on the opposite side. In our sample, a complete caroticoclinoid foramen appeared in 4.25%, a contact form in 2.75%. At last, an incomplete form of the foramen was observed in 9.75%. The anatomic variations of the investigated structures must be considered during the approaches to the cavernous sinus and neurovascular elements of the sellar region.

  10. Anatomical variations and morphometric study of the optic strut and the anterior clinoid process

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Eldan; Mehić, Amina

    2012-01-01

    The optic strut and the anterior clinoid process represent bony structures that are closely related to anatomically and clinically significant elements such as the cavernous sinus, the internal carotid artery, the optic nerve and the pituitary gland. The objective of our study was to quantify dimensions of the optic strut and anterior clinoid process, and to determine variations in positions and forms of these structures. A descriptive anatomical study was performed on 200 dry human skulls. We analyzed dimensions and variations in position of the optic strut, dimensions of the anterior clinoid process as well as the incidence and forms of the caroticoclinoid foramen. The average thickness of the optic strut on skulls belonging to males was 3 mm and 2.8 mm on those belonging to females. The optic strut was most commonly attached to the anterior two fifths on the lower side of the anterior clinoid process. On the male skulls the average width of the anterior clinoid process was 9.4 mm (right) and 9.1 mm (left). Its length was 9.9 and 9.3 mm. On female skulls the average width of the process was 8.7 mm (right) and 8.3 mm (left), while the length measured 9.3 mm on the right and 8.9 mm on the opposite side. In our sample, a complete caroticoclinoid foramen appeared in 4.25%, a contact form in 2.75%. At last, an incomplete form of the foramen was observed in 9.75%. The anatomic variations of the investigated structures must be considered during the approaches to the cavernous sinus and neurovascular elements of the sellar region. PMID:22642592

  11. Anatomic variation of the extensor tendons to the ring and little fingers: a cadaver dissection study.

    PubMed

    Seradge, H; Tian, W; Baer, C

    1999-07-01

    We found an anatomic variation of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) in a cadaveric dissection. The EDM had three tendon slips; two slips to the little finger and one to the ring finger metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint. The ring finger slip inserted in the extensor hood with the EDC. The EDC had a separate tendon to the little finger extensor hood. The EDM had an additional pulley distal to the extensor retinaculum. The MP joints of the little and ring fingers extended simultaneously upon pulling the EDM or the EDC. The third slip of the EDM could provide an extra donor site and possibly poses a unique clinical presentation.

  12. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  13. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Samini, Fariborz; Alijani, Babak; Behzadnia, Hamid; Firozabadi, Fariborz Ayati; Reihanian, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers. Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females) consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons. PMID:27517072

  14. Anatomic variation of the 5th extensor tendon compartment and extensor digiti minimi tendon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    Anatomic variation within the 5th extensor compartment may contribute to the development of tenosynovitis and limit the usefulness of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) for tendon transfer. The purpose of this study was to assess the anatomic variation of the EDM tendon and its surrounding retinaculum, with particular attention to anatomical variation between specimens. Forty-one fresh cadaver hands were dissected. The length of the 5th compartment retinaculum was noted. The incidence of an intercompartmental septum was noted in each specimen as well as the type of tendinous attachments present between the EDM and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendons. The presence and length of any accessory retinacular bands distal to the edge of proper extensor retinaculum was also noted. Only one specimen contained a single EDM tendon, while 71% (n = 29) of specimens contained two slips and 23% (n = 9) had three slips; 24% (n = 10) of EDC tendons had no slip to the small finger, while 61% (n = 25) of specimens had a single slip to the small finger. The EDC's contribution to the small finger was found to be an independent tendon in 42% of cases (n = 17), while 34% (n = 14) of specimens were found to have a common EDC slip, which branched to both the ring and small finger. Three EDM tendons divided distal to the extensor retinaculum, while the remaining EDM tendons divided beneath or proximal to the extensor retinaculum. Seventy-three percent (n = 30) of the specimens had an accessory retinacular band surrounding the EDM tendon identified at the base of the 5th metacarpal. Eighty-eight percent (n = 36) of hands had a septum between the EDM slips. The surgeon should be aware of variability within the 5th dorsal compartment in cases of trauma and in cases of tendon transfer. In our series 30 of 41 specimens were noted to contain an accessory dorsal retinacular band surrounding the EDM and 36 specimens were noted to contain a septum within the 5th compartment. The presence of an

  15. Preserving and sharing examples of anatomical variation and developmental anomalies via photorealistic virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Gary L; Nagy, Frank; Wagner, Lynn A

    2004-01-01

    Computer graphics technology has made it possible to create photographic-quality virtual specimens from real anatomical material. One technique for doing this, QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR), results in virtual specimens that are easily shared on the Internet and displayed as standalone entities or incorporated into complex programs or Web sites. A compelling use of this technology is the sharing of rare specimens such as unusual variations, developmental anomalies or gross pathology. These types of specimens have traditionally been confined to anatomical museums, but could serve a much more useful existence as freely shared virtual specimens. An example presented here is a relatively rare developmental defect in the embryonic aortic arches that results in a right-sided aortic arch coursing posterior to the trachea and esophagus. In a time of ever increasing restraints on the practical side of anatomy education, an Internet-based library of human variation and other rare specimens would be a useful supplement to students' limited exposure to the human body. Since the discovery and preparation of specimens would be the rate-limiting step in producing such a collection, we propose the establishment of a center for virtual specimen creation and preservation through a cooperative effort by gross anatomists and pathologists in contributing the source material. This collection, a work in progress, is available at www.anatomy.wright.edu/qtvr. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Anatomical variations within the deep posterior compartment of the leg and important clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Hislop, M; Tierney, P

    2004-09-01

    The management of musculoskeletal conditions makes up a large part of a sports medicine practitioner's practice. A thorough knowledge of anatomy is an essential component of the armament necessary to decipher the large number of potential conditions that may confront these practitioners. To cloud the issue further, anatomical variations may be present, such as supernumerary muscles, thickened fascial bands or variant courses of nerves and blood vessels, which can themselves manifest as acute or chronic conditions that lead to significant morbidity or limitation of activity. There are a number of contentious areas within the literature surrounding the anatomy of the leg, particularly involving the deep posterior compartment. Conditions such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial periostitis (shin splints), peripheral nerve entrapment and tarsal tunnel syndrome may all be affected by subtle anatomical variations. This paper primarily focuses on the deep posterior compartment of the leg and uses the gross dissection of cadaveric specimens to describe definitively the anatomy of the deep posterior compartment. Variant fascial attachments of flexor digitorum longus are documented and potential clinical sequelae such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome and tarsal tunnel syndrome are discussed.

  17. An Analysis of the Anatomic Variations of the Paranasal Sinuses and Ethmoid Roof Using Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Hatice; Kaplanoglu, Veysel; Dilli, Alper; Toprak, Ugur; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the Keros classification and asymmetrical distribution rates of the ethmoid roof and the frequency of anatomic variations of the paranasal sinuses. Materials and Methods: Paranasal sinus scans of 500 patients obtained using computed tomography were evaluated retrospectively. Measurements were performed using a coronal plan with right-left comparison and with distance measurement techniques. The depth of the lateral lamella was calculated by subtracting the depth of the cribriform plate from the depth of the medial ethmoid roof. The results were classified according to their Keros classification. Any asymmetries in the ethmoid roof depth and fovea ethmoidalis configuration were examined. The anatomic variations frequently encountered in paranasal sinuses (pneumatized middle concha, paradoxical middle concha, agger nasi cells, Haller cells, Onodi cells, etc.) were defined. Results: The mean height of the lateral lamella cribriform plate (LLCP) was 4.92±1.70 mm. The cases were classified as 13.4% Keros Type I, 76.1% Keros Type II, and 10.5% Keros Type III. There was asymmetry in the LLCP depths of 80% of the cases, and a configuration asymmetry in the fovea in 35% of the cases. In 32% of the cases with fovea configuration asymmetry, there was also asymmetry in the height of the right and left LLCP. The most frequent variations were nasal septum deviation (81.8%), agger nasi cells (63.8%), intralamellar air cells (45%), and concha bullosa (30%). Conclusion: Using the Keros classification for LLCP height, higher rates of Keros Type I were found in other studies than in our study. The most frequent classification was Keros Type II. The paranasal sinus variations in each patient should be carefully evaluated. The data obtained from these evaluations can prevent probable complications by informing rhinologists performing endoscopic sinus surgery about preoperative and intraoperative processes. PMID:25610263

  18. Variations in the Anatomic Relations of the Posterior Interosseous Nerve Associated with Proximal Forearm Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Wilson, Joyce M.; Wong, Ambrose H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The posterior interosseous nerve is at risk for iatrogenic injury during surgery involving the proximal aspect of the radius. Anatomic relationships of this nerve in skeletally intact cadavers have been defined, but variations associated with osseous and soft-tissue trauma have not been examined. This study quantifies the effect of a simulated diaphyseal fracture of the proximal aspect of the radius and of a radial neck fracture with an Essex-Lopresti injury on the posterior interosseous nerve. Methods: In twenty unembalmed cadaveric upper extremities, the distance from the radiocapitellar joint to the point where the posterior interosseous nerve crosses the midpoint of the axis of the radius (Thompson approach) was recorded in three forearm positions (supination, neutral, and pronation). Specimens were then treated with either proximal diaphyseal osteotomy (n = 10) or radial head excision with simulated Essex-Lopresti injury (n = 10), and the position of the nerve in each forearm position was remeasured. We evaluated the effect of the simulated trauma on nerve position and correlated baseline measurements with radial length. Results: In neutral rotation, the posterior interosseous nerve crossed the radius at a mean of 4.2 cm (range, 2.5 to 6.2 cm) distal to the radiocapitellar joint. In pronation, the distance increased to 5.6 cm (range, 3.1 to 7.4 cm) (p < 0.01). Supination decreased that distance to 3.2 cm (range, 1.7 to 4.5 cm) (p < 0.01). Radial length correlated with each of these measurements (r > 0.50, p = 0.01). Diaphyseal osteotomy of the radius markedly decreased the effect of forearm rotation, as the change in nerve position from supination to pronation decreased from 2.13 ± 0.8 cm to 0.24 ± 0.2 cm (p = 0.001). Proximal migration of the radius following radial head excision was accompanied by similar magnitudes of proximal nerve migration in all forearm positions. Conclusions: Forearm pronation has minimal effect on posterior interosseous

  19. A Comprehensive Study of the Anatomical Variations of the Circle of Willis in Adult Human Brains

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, aneurysms and arterio-venous malformations are very much prevalent in our country. Circle of Willis, as an anastomotic polygon at the base of the brain forms an important collateral network to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. Changes in the normal morphology of the circle may condition the appearance and severity of symptoms of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms, infarctions and other vascular anomalies. A possible link between abnormalities of the circle of Willis and the mentally ill patients has been observed. Aim and Objectives: The aim of the present study is to have an intimate knowledge of the variations in the cerebral arterial circle and to clarify the clinical importance of these variations in certain forms of cerebrovascular diseases. So an attempt was made to analyse the anatomical variations of the circle in a random population. Material and Methods: The work was based on fifty adult brains from persons died of diverse causes. The materials were obtained during routine autopsy studies. The base of the brain including the brain stem with intact arterial circle was preserved in 10% formalin for 10 days. The circle of Willis and its major branches were carefully dissected under water using a magnifying lens. The variations were recorded and photographed. Results: Majority of the circles (52%) showed anomalies. Hypoplasia was the most frequent anomaly and was found in 24% of the brains. Accessory vessels in the form of duplications/triplications of anterior communicating artery were seen in 12% of the circles. The embryonic origin of the posterior cerebral artery from the internal carotid persisted in 10% of the circles. An incomplete circle due to the absence of one or other posterior communicating artery was found in 6% of the specimens.Variations are more frequent in posterior half of the circle. Conclusion: The anatomical variations of the circle of Willis were probably genetically

  20. A comprehensive study of the anatomical variations of the circle of willis in adult human brains.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, S

    2013-11-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, aneurysms and arterio-venous malformations are very much prevalent in our country. Circle of Willis, as an anastomotic polygon at the base of the brain forms an important collateral network to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. Changes in the normal morphology of the circle may condition the appearance and severity of symptoms of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms, infarctions and other vascular anomalies. A possible link between abnormalities of the circle of Willis and the mentally ill patients has been observed. The aim of the present study is to have an intimate knowledge of the variations in the cerebral arterial circle and to clarify the clinical importance of these variations in certain forms of cerebrovascular diseases. So an attempt was made to analyse the anatomical variations of the circle in a random population. The work was based on fifty adult brains from persons died of diverse causes. The materials were obtained during routine autopsy studies. The base of the brain including the brain stem with intact arterial circle was preserved in 10% formalin for 10 days. The circle of Willis and its major branches were carefully dissected under water using a magnifying lens. The variations were recorded and photographed. Majority of the circles (52%) showed anomalies. Hypoplasia was the most frequent anomaly and was found in 24% of the brains. Accessory vessels in the form of duplications/triplications of anterior communicating artery were seen in 12% of the circles. The embryonic origin of the posterior cerebral artery from the internal carotid persisted in 10% of the circles. An incomplete circle due to the absence of one or other posterior communicating artery was found in 6% of the specimens.Variations are more frequent in posterior half of the circle. The anatomical variations of the circle of Willis were probably genetically determined, develop in early embryonic stage and persist in post natal life

  1. The Prevalence of Persistent Petrosquamosal Sinus and Other Temporal Bone Anatomical Variations on High-Resolution Temporal Bone Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bożek, Paweł; Kluczewska, Ewa; Misiołek, Maciej; Ścierski, Wojciech; Lisowska, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of petrosquamosal sinus (PSS) and other temporal bone (TB) anatomical variations in various patients using high-resolution computed tomography (CT). Material/Methods We reviewed clinical and consecutively obtained CT data for 276 TBs of 138 patients. The incidence of TB anatomical variations was compared among patients with radiological markers of chronic otitis media (RCOM) and non-RCOM. Results The PSS incidence in our sample was 6.9%, and it was significantly higher in TBs with RCOM (14.6%). Selected anatomical variations of RCOM TBs were observed: lateral sigmoid sinus (14.5%), prominent sigmoid sinus (23.6%), PSS (14.6%), and high jugular bulb (17.3%). Lateral sigmoid sinus and prominent sigmoid sinus (p<0.01), high jugular bulb (p<0.05), and PSS (p<0.01) were observed more often in RCOM than in non-RCOM TBs. Conclusions The TB vascular and anatomical variations, including PSS, a high jugular bulb, and a laterally and prominent placed sigmoid sinus, were more often observed in TBs with RCOM. Presurgical imaging and CT-based navigation techniques for TB surgery can offer remarkable value for understanding the altered anatomy of this complex structure and can localize rare anatomical variations. PMID:27811834

  2. Visualization of Anatomic Variation of the Anterior Septal Vein on Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengzhen; Qiao, Huihuang; Guo, Yu; Li, Jiance; Miao, Huizhong; Wen, Caiyun; Wen, Xindong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Yang, Xindong; Chen, Chengchun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Understanding the anatomy of the anterior septal vein (ASV) is critical for minimally invasive procedures to the third ventricle and for assessing lesion size and venous drainage in the anterior cranial fossa. Accordingly, this study evaluated topographic anatomy and anatomic variation of the ASV using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods Sixty volunteers were examined using a 3.0T MR system. The diameter of the ASV and distance between bilateral septal points were measured. ASVs were divided into types 1 (only drains frontal lobe) and 2 (drains both frontal lobe and head of the caudate nucleus). We evaluated the ASV-internal cerebral vein (ICV) junction based on its positional relationship with the appearance of a venous angle or a false venous angle and the foramen of Monro. Fused SW and T1-weighted images were used to observe positional relationships between the course of the ASV and the surrounding brain structures. Results The ASV and its small tributaries were clearly visualized in 120 hemispheres (100%). The average diameter of ASVs was 1.05±0.17 mm (range 0.9–1.6 mm). The average distance between bilateral septal points was 2.23±1.03 mm (range 1.3–6.6 mm). The ASV types 1 and 2 were in 77 (64.2%) and 43 (35.8%) hemispheres, respectively. In 83 (69.2%) hemispheres, the ASV-ICV junction was situated at the venous angle and the posterior margin of the foramen of Monro. In 37 (30.8%) hemispheres, the ASV-ICV junction was situated beyond the posterior margin of the foramen of Monro. The average distance between the posteriorly located ASV-ICV junction and the posterior margin of the foramen of Monro was 6.41±3.95 mm (range 2.4–15.9 mm). Conclusion Using SWI, the topographic anatomy and anatomic variation of the ASV were clearly demonstrated. Preoperative assessment of anatomic variation of the ASV may be advantageous for minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures. PMID:27716782

  3. Hormonal and anatomical effects of apple rootstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In greenhouse experiments, two-year-old 'Fuji' apple scions (Malus ×domestica, 'Fuji') on size-controlling rootstocks (dwarfing to vigorous), were grown for one season and shoot growth was measured to confirm size-controlling effects. In the next season, xylem sap was collected to determine hydraul...

  4. Anatomic variations of the coracoacromial ligament in neonatal cadavers: a neonatal cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Kopuz, Cem; Baris, Sancar; Yildirim, Mehmet; Gülman, Birol

    2002-10-01

    One of the most common causes of pain and disability in the upper limb is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons. When no significant bony abnormality exists in the surrounding structures, the coracoacromial ligament has been implicated as a possible cause of impingement on the cuff tendons and various morphological variants of the ligament have so far been claimed to be either the cause or the result of impingement. In this study, 110 shoulders from 60 neonatal cadavers that were preserved in a preparation of formaldehyde were dissected. Anatomic variations of coracoacromial ligaments were investigated with metric and histologic analysis. Three main ligament types were identified: quadrangular, broad band and U-shaped. The multiple banded ligament was not found. Histologic analysis showed that in U-shaped ligaments a thin tissue existed in the central part of the ligament close to the coracoid. Comparing our data with the adult measurements of a previous study we suggest that the primordial ligament is broad shaped, but assumes a quadrangular shape due to the different growth rates of the coracoid and acromial ends. We also suggest that broad and U-shaped ligaments account for the primordial and quadrangular and Y-shaped ligaments account for the adult types of the single or double banded anatomic variants respectively. Our results show that various types of the coracoacromial ligament are present at the neonatal period and that the final shape of the ligament should be defined by developmental factors, rather than degenerative changes.

  5. [Pyrimidal syndrome and anatomical variations as a cause of insidious sciatic pain].

    PubMed

    Ortiz Sánchez, V E; Charco Roca, L M; Soria Quiles, A; Zafrilla Disla, E; Hernandez Mira, F

    2014-11-01

    The case is presented of a 42 year old woman who had been suffering a loss of strength in her left leg for six years. After an extensive diagnostic study, the pain was classified as of functional origin by a diagnosis of exclusion. Since then, the patient has tried all kind of drug treatments and conservative techniques without improvement. After an exhaustive study with inconclusive results, the case was discussed with the Orthopaedics Department, who performed an exploratory surgery, in which compression of the sciatic nerve due to an anatomical variation of the piriformis muscle was observed. Part of the muscle was resected during surgery and the sciatic nerve was freed, after which the patient experienced a great improvement. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Sinus pericranii, petrosquamosal sinus and extracranial sigmoid sinus: Anatomical variations to consider during a retroauricular approach.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Lopes, Paula Tardim; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    2017-06-01

    Lateral and sigmoid sinus malformations are uncommon and dangerous anatomical variations that surgeons may encounter when performing a retroauricular approach. We report three cases of rare temporal bone venous sinus anomalies seen in patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. The first patient had a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome and presented a bilateral persistent petrosquamosal sinus with sigmoid sinus agenesis, which made mastoidectomy for cochlear implantation difficult. The second patient presented an anomalous venous lake in the occipital region, which communicated the left dural venous sinuses with a conglomerate of pericranial vessels in the left nuchal region, also consistent with left sinus pericranii. The third patient presented with an extracranial sigmoid sinus that produced a troublesome bleeding immediately after the muscular-periosteal flap incision was performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomic variation of the optic strut: classification schema, radiologic evaluation, and surgical relevance.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert G; Tobler, William D; Leach, James L; Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Kocaeli, Hasan; Zimmer, Lee A; Keller, Jeffrey T

    2012-12-01

    Objective Anatomic variability of the optic strut in location, orientation, and dimensions is relevant in approaching ophthalmic artery aneurysms and tumors of the anterior cavernous sinus, medial sphenoid wing, and optic canal. Methods In 84 dry human skulls, imaging studies were performed (64-slice computed tomography [CT] scanner, axial view, aligned with the zygomatic arch). Optic strut location related to the prechiasmatic sulcus was classified as presulcal, sulcal, postsulcal, and asymmetric. Morphometric analysis was performed. Results The optic strut was presulcal in 11.9% specimens (posteromedial margin bilaterally anterior to limbus sphenoidale), sulcal in 44% (posteromedial part adjacent to the sulcus's anterior two thirds bilaterally), postsulcal in 29.8% (posteromedial margin posterior to the sulcus's anterior two thirds), and asymmetric (left/right) in 14.3%. Optic strut length, width, and thickness measured 6.54 ± 1.69 mm, 4.23 ± 0.69 mm, and 3.01 ± 0.79 mm, respectively. Optic canal diameter was 5.14 ± 0.47 mm anteriorly and 4.79 ± 0.64 mm posteriorly. Angulation was flat (>45 degrees) in 13% or acute (<45 degrees) in 87% specimens. Conclusions Anatomical variations in the optic strut are significant in planning for anterior clinoidectomy and optic-canal decompression. Our optic strut classification considers these variations relative to the prechiasmatic sulcus on preoperative imaging.

  8. Anatomic Variation of the Optic Strut: Classification Schema, Radiologic Evaluation, and Surgical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert G.; Tobler, William D.; Leach, James L.; Theodosopoulos, Philip V.; Kocaeli, Hasan; Zimmer, Lee A.; Keller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anatomic variability of the optic strut in location, orientation, and dimensions is relevant in approaching ophthalmic artery aneurysms and tumors of the anterior cavernous sinus, medial sphenoid wing, and optic canal. Methods In 84 dry human skulls, imaging studies were performed (64-slice computed tomography [CT] scanner, axial view, aligned with the zygomatic arch). Optic strut location related to the prechiasmatic sulcus was classified as presulcal, sulcal, postsulcal, and asymmetric. Morphometric analysis was performed. Results The optic strut was presulcal in 11.9% specimens (posteromedial margin bilaterally anterior to limbus sphenoidale), sulcal in 44% (posteromedial part adjacent to the sulcus's anterior two thirds bilaterally), postsulcal in 29.8% (posteromedial margin posterior to the sulcus's anterior two thirds), and asymmetric (left/right) in 14.3%. Optic strut length, width, and thickness measured 6.54 ± 1.69 mm, 4.23 ± 0.69 mm, and 3.01 ± 0.79 mm, respectively. Optic canal diameter was 5.14 ± 0.47 mm anteriorly and 4.79 ± 0.64 mm posteriorly. Angulation was flat (>45 degrees) in 13% or acute (<45 degrees) in 87% specimens. Conclusions Anatomical variations in the optic strut are significant in planning for anterior clinoidectomy and optic-canal decompression. Our optic strut classification considers these variations relative to the prechiasmatic sulcus on preoperative imaging. PMID:24294561

  9. Anatomical variations of pronator teres muscle: predispositional role for nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Sprovieri, Fábio Antonio Anversa; Petta, Guilherme Camargo; Nakasone, Maurício Tadeu; Serafim, Bárbara Lívia Correa

    2017-01-01

    To assess the anatomical variations of the pronator teres muscle (PTM) and its implication in the compression of the median nerve, which passes through the humeral and ulnar heads of the PTM. For the present study, 100 upper limbs from human cadavers from the anatomy laboratory were dissected. Forty-six specimens were male and four, female, whose aged ranged from 28 to 77 years; 27 were white and 23, non-white. A pilot study consisting of six hands from three fresh cadaver dissections was conducted to familiarize the authors with the local anatomy; these were not included in the present study. The humeral and ulnar heads of PTM were present in 86 limbs. In 72 out of the 86 limbs, the median nerve was positioned between the two heads of the PTM; in 11, it passed through the muscle belly of ulnar head of the PTM, and in three, posteriorly to both heads of the PTM. When both heads were present, the median nerve was not observed as passing through the muscle belly of the humeral head of PTM. In 14 out of the 100 dissected limbs, the ulnar head of the PTM was not observed; in this situation, the median nerve was positioned posteriorly to the humeral head in 11 limbs, and passed through the humeral head in three. In 17 limbs, the ulnar head of PTM was little developed, with a fibrous band originating from the ulnar coronoid process, associated with a distal muscle component near the union with the humeral head. In four limbs, the ulnar head of the MPR was represented by a fibrous band. In both limbs of one cadaver, a fibrous band was observed between the supinator muscle and the humeral head of the PTM, passing over median nerve. The results suggest that these anatomical variations in relationship median nerve and PTM are potential factors for median nerve compression, as they narrow the space through which the median nerve passes.

  10. Anatomic variations of the renal vessels: focus on the precaval right renal artery.

    PubMed

    Bouali, Ourdia; Labarre, David; Molinier, François; Lopez, Raphaël; Benouaich, Vincent; Lauwers, Frédéric; Moscovici, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of precaval right renal artery and to investigate the distribution of renal arteries and veins. We discuss a theory of development of renal vascular variants. We retrospectively reviewed 120 arterial phase contrast material-enhanced spiral computerized tomography scans of the abdomen (1- to 2-mm section thickness) performed during a two-month period. Forty percent of the study group (48 patients) had one artery and one vein on each side, with typical course. There was a 9.17% prevalence of precaval right renal artery: 10 patients had a lower pole accessory artery in precaval position and one patient had the main and the accessory arteries that pass anterior to the inferior vena cava. In these cases, associated variations of renal vessels were higher than in the patients without precaval artery variant. There were multiple arteries in 28.3% of the right kidneys and in 26.7% of the left ones. Variants of the right renal vein consisted in multiple veins in 20% (24 cases). We detected no case of multiple left renal veins, but we described variations of its course (circum- or retroaortic vein) in 9.17% (11 cases). Twenty-six patients (21.7%) had associated variations of the renal pedicle. The current technical support allows for a minimally invasive study of vessels anatomy. In our study the prevalence of a precaval right renal artery appears to be higher than previously reported (9.17%). Knowledge on anatomical variations of right renal artery and associated renal vessels variations has major clinical implications.

  11. Aberrant Anatomical Variation of Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Periapical Cyst: A Report of Two Cases and Role of CBCT in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Sisman, Yildiray; Etoz, Meryem; Bulut, Duygu Goller

    2013-01-01

    Most periapical lesions are associated with microorganisms from infected root canal systems. Maxillary sinus can pose a diagnostic dilemma radiographically because of its anatomical variation which can mimic a periapical pathosis. The aim of this study was to describe two cases of aberrant anatomical variation of the maxillary sinus that presented radiographic similarities to a periapical cyst in order to call the attention of clinicians to the fact that several different diseases are able to mimic endodontic periapical lesions. An accurate assessment of this morphology was made with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

  12. Aberrant Anatomical Variation of Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Periapical Cyst: A Report of Two Cases and Role of CBCT in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Sisman, Yildiray; Etoz, Meryem; Bulut, Duygu Goller

    2013-01-01

    Most periapical lesions are associated with microorganisms from infected root canal systems. Maxillary sinus can pose a diagnostic dilemma radiographically because of its anatomical variation which can mimic a periapical pathosis. The aim of this study was to describe two cases of aberrant anatomical variation of the maxillary sinus that presented radiographic similarities to a periapical cyst in order to call the attention of clinicians to the fact that several different diseases are able to mimic endodontic periapical lesions. An accurate assessment of this morphology was made with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). PMID:23710374

  13. Anatomical basis of variation in mesophyll resistance in eastern Australian sclerophylls: news of a long and winding path

    PubMed Central

    Tosens, Tiina

    2012-01-01

    In sclerophylls, photosynthesis is particularly strongly limited by mesophyll diffusion resistance from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts (r m), but the controls on diffusion limits by integral leaf variables such as leaf thickness, density, and dry mass per unit area and by the individual steps along the diffusion pathway are imperfectly understood. To gain insight into the determinants of r m in leaves with varying structure, the full CO2 physical diffusion pathway was analysed in 32 Australian species sampled from sites contrasting in soil nutrients and rainfall, and having leaf structures from mesophytic to strongly sclerophyllous. r m was estimated based on combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence. In addition, r m was modelled on the basis of detailed anatomical measurements to separate the importance of different serial resistances affecting CO2 diffusion into chloroplasts. The strongest sources of variation in r m were S c/S, the exposed surface area of chloroplasts per unit leaf area, and mesophyll cell wall thickness, t cw. The strong correlation of r m with t cw could not be explained by cell wall thickness alone, and most likely arose from a further effect of cell wall porosity. The CO2 drawdown from intercellular spaces to chloroplasts was positively correlated with t cw, suggesting enhanced diffusional limitations in leaves with thicker cell walls. Leaf thickness and density were poorly correlated with S c/S, indicating that widely varying combinations of leaf anatomical traits occur at given values of leaf integrated traits, and suggesting that detailed anatomical studies are needed to predict r m for any given species. PMID:22888123

  14. Anatomical and morphological spine variation in Gymnocalycium kieslingii subsp. castaneum (Cactaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Roman; Řepka, Radomír; Šmudla, Radek; Mamoňová, Miroslava; Ďurkovič, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although spine variation within cacti species or populations is assumed to be large, the minimum sample size of different spine anatomical and morphological traits required for species description is less studied. There are studies where only 2 spines were used for taxonomical comparison amnog species. Therefore, the spine structure variation within areoles and individuals of one population of Gymnocalycium kieslingii subsp. castaneum (Ferrari) Slaba was analyzed. Fifteen plants were selected and from each plant one areole from the basal, middle and upper part of the plant body was sampled. A scanning electron microscopy was used for spine surface description and a light microscopy for measurements of spine width, thickness, cross-section area, fiber diameter and fiber cell wall thickness. The spine surface was more visible and damaged less in the upper part of the plant body than in the basal part. Large spine and fiber differences were found between upper and lower parts of the plant body, but also within single areoles. In general, the examined traits in the upper part had by 8–17% higher values than in the lower parts. The variation of spine and fiber traits within areoles was lower than the differences between individuals. The minimum sample size was largely influenced by the studied spine and fiber traits, ranging from 1 to 70 spines. The results provide pioneer information useful in spine sample collection in the field for taxonomical, biomechanical and structural studies. Nevertheless, similar studies should be carried out for other cacti species to make generalizations. The large spine and fiber variation within areoles observed in our study indicates a very complex spine morphogenesis. PMID:27698579

  15. Facilitating appreciation of anatomical variation and development of teamwork skills in the gross anatomy laboratory using a cadaver reassignment system.

    PubMed

    Sprunger, Leslie K

    2008-01-01

    Developing a mental map of the body in three dimensions incorporating normal anatomical variations is a challenge for students of gross anatomy. Acquisition of this ability is facilitated by frequently reassigning students to work on different specimens in gross anatomy laboratories, a significant departure from traditional teaching strategies. This article analyzes student and faculty experiences with a reassignment system over a six-year period, including effects on early professional development and students' attitudes toward the cadavers. Students were strongly supportive of the method, noting that specimen reassignments facilitated learning, encouraged dissection skill building, and fostered collaborative interactions. Students' perception of the value of the contribution of each cadaver to their education was preserved and, for many, enhanced. Frequent specimen reassignments offer an opportunity to model public accountability for work and some aspects of the relationships between multiple health care teams caring for a patient.

  16. Anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth with special regard to the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Lanzer, Martin; Pejicic, Rada; Kruse, Astrid L; Schneider, Thomas; Grätz, Klaus W; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-01-01

    The removal of wisdom teeth is one of the most common interventions in oral surgery. In order to avoid complications, a profound knowledge of the anatomy of teeth and adjacent tissues is crucial. In the case of maxillary wisdom teeth, their relationship to the maxillary sinus, to the pterygoid fossa, to the maxillary tuber and the adjacent venous plexus is particularly important. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging, for example by means of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), is increasingly utilized in practice. However, the necessity of CBCT imaging is still a matter of intensive debate. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth and, based on these findings, to elucidate the additional benefit of such imaging. A retrospective case study was performed using patients examined by means of CBCT imaging in the Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology during the period from 2008 to 2013. Primary study variables comprised the spatial relationship of the teeth to the maxillary sinus, the degree of retention and root development, the covering of the root with bone and mucosa, the root configuration, and the developmental stage of the tooth. In addition, the association of the inclination of teeth in the transversal and sagittal plane with the above variables was evaluated. Descriptive statistical parameters were calculated for all results of the examination. In total, CBCT recordings of 713 maxillary wisdom teeth from 430 patients were evaluated. Their mean age was 29.8 years, and the proportion of male patients slightly prevailed (54.4%). Most teeth exhibited fully developed roots (64.1%). Overall 22.9% of third molars were impacted, 32.3% were retained, and 6.5% were erupting. In more than a third of the patients, wisdom teeth were in occlusion. The inclination of the third molars both in the transversal and sagittal plane was significantly associated with the distance of the root from the maxillary sinus as well

  17. Variations in the anatomical positioning of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth and their practical implications.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Filo, Katharina; Kruse, Astrid L; Locher, Michael; Grätz, Klaus W; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo

    2014-01-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars is one of the most frequent procedures in oral surgery. Here, three-dimensional (3D) imaging is often used, yet its necessity is still being heavily debated. The aim of the study was to describe the variation in the anatomical positioning of third mandibular molars, and, by doing so, examine the necessity of 3D imaging. A retrospective case study was performed with the patients from an oral surgery department from January 2009 to February 2013. The primary focus of the study was on the spatial relationship to the mandibular canal, as well as angulation, root configuration, and developmental stage of the wisdom tooth. Descriptive statistics were calculated for these variables. A total of 1197 wisdom teeth in 699 patients were evaluated. 46.7% exhibited direct contact to the mandibular canal, another 28.7% showed close proximity and 24.6% a measurable distance. In 29.0%, the mandibular canal was vestibular and in 23.8% lingual to the wisdom tooth. In 7.4%, it was interradicular and in 0.6% intraradicular. Most teeth had one (21.3%) or two (55.3%) roots. Others had three (17.6%), four (2.0%) or five (0.2%) roots. In 31.4% of the teeth, the root perforated the lingual compact bone, and in 4.3% the vestibular compact bone. 44.4% of the teeth had mesial angulation, 9.7% distal angulation, 35.3% lingual and 2.9% buccal angulation. Due to the anatomical variety, the use of 3D imaging is recommended before surgical removal of mandibular third molars if conventional imaging cannot exclude complicated conditions.

  18. Anatomical root variations in response to water deficit: wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L).

    PubMed

    Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; Sánchez-Urdaneta, Adriana B; Rangel, Joel Meza; Muñoz, Juana Juárez; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Velázquez, Raquel Celis

    2010-01-01

    Root anatomical responses to water deficit are diverse and regulation of water uptake strongly depends on plant anatomy. The ancestors of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars are the wild common beans. Because wild beans adapt and survive well in the natural environment, it is hypothesized that wild common bean roots are less affected than those of domesticated beans at low substrate water potential (ψW). A wild common bean accession from Chihuahua Mexico and cv. Bayomex were studied. Seedlings with a mean root length between 3 and 4 cm were maintained for 24 h in vermiculite at ψW of -0.03 (well hydrated), -0.65, -1.48 and -2.35 MPa (partially dry). Ten anatomical characteristics of differentiation and cell division in root regions were evaluated. Thickness of epidermis and protoderm diminished similarly in wild and domesticated beans growing at low substrate ψW (between -0.65 and -2.35 MPa). At the same time, parenchymatic cell area diminished by 71 % in the domesticated variety, but by only 32 % in the wild bean at -2.35 MPa. The number of cells in the cortex and the thickness of the xylem wall increased in both wild and domesticated beans at low substrate ψW; nevertheless, the effect was significantly lower in the wild bean. The number of xylem vessels increased in the cultivar (up to 40 %) while in the wild bean it decreased (up to 33 %). The diameter of xylem vessels and transverse root area diminished (15 and 57 %, respectively) in the cultivar, but in the wild common bean were not affected. Anatomical root characteristics and their modifications in both differentiation and cell division in root regions demonstrated that the wild bean reacted quite differently to substrate ψW than the domesticated common bean.

  19. Digital preservation of anatomical variation: 3D-modeling of embalmed and plastinated cadaveric specimens using uCT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, Colin W; Wilson, Timothy D; Rice, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy educators have an opportunity to teach anatomical variations as a part of medical and allied health curricula using both cadaveric and three-dimensional (3D) digital models of these specimens. Beyond published cadaveric case reports, anatomical variations identified during routine gross anatomy dissection can be powerful teaching tools and a medium to discuss several anatomical sub-disciplines from embryology to medical imaging. The purpose of this study is to document how cadaveric anatomical variation identified during routine dissection can be scanned using medical imaging techniques to create two-dimensional axial images and interactive 3D models for teaching and learning of anatomical variations. Three cadaveric specimens (2 formalin embalmed, 1 plastinated) depicting anatomical variations and an embryological malformation were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography (μCT) for visualization in cross-section and for creation of 3D volumetric models. Results provide educational options to enable visualization and facilitate learning of anatomical variations from cross-sectional scans. Furthermore, the variations can be highlighted, digitized, modeled and manipulated using 3D imaging software and viewed in the anatomy laboratory in conjunction with traditional anatomical dissection. This study provides an example for anatomy educators to teach and describe anatomical variations in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Are the patients with anatomic variation of the sublingual/Wharton's duct system predisposed to ranula formation?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Zongfan; Zhang, Ricardo M; Liu, Li; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Jingjing; Zhang, Ke

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate ranula development according to anatomic variation of the ductal system of sublingual gland (SLG), especially the presence of Bartholin's duct. The anatomic variation of SLG duct was prospectively investigated and compared between 55 consecutive patients with ranulas treated by SLG excision (group 1) and another 15 consecutive patients undergoing similar surgeries for other conditions (group 2). The ductal structures of SLGs and submandibular glands (SMG) were also compared between the pediatric patients and adult patients with ranulas. In 32 of 55 patients with ranulas (58.2%) and 1 of 15 patients without ranulas (6.7%), the SLG showed an anatomic variation of the main duct called Bartholin's duct structure (P<0.01). Seventeen of 22 (77.3%) pediatric patients with ranulas had Bartholin's ducts and 15 of 33 (45.5%) adult patients with ranulas had Bartholin's ducts (0.01anatomic variation of the ductal system of the SLG might be a possible cause of ranulas in the patients with simple ranulas, especially in pediatric patients. Surgical resection of the SLG is a better treatment choice for ranulas than other conservative treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ANATOMIC VARIATIONS OF HEPATIC ARTERY: A STUDY IN 479 LIVER TRANSPLANTATIONS.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Neto, Olival Cirilo Lucena da; Lima, Heloise Caroline de Souza; Rabelo, Priscylla; Melo, Paulo Sérgio Vieira de; Amorim, Américo Gusmão; Lacerda, Cláudio Moura

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of anatomic variations of hepatic artery ranges from 20-50% in different series. Variations are especially important in the context of liver orthotopic transplantation, since, besides being an ideal opportunity for surgical anatomical study, their precise identification is crucial to the success of the procedure. To identify the anatomical variations in the hepatic arterial system in hepatic transplantation. 479 medical records of transplanted adult patients in the 13-year period were retrospectively analyzed, and collected data on hepatic arterial anatomy of the deceased donor. It was identified normal hepatic arterial anatomy in 416 donors (86.84%). The other 63 patients (13.15%) showed some variation. According to the Michels classification, the most frequently observed abnormalities were: right hepatic artery branch of superior mesenteric artery (Type III, n=27, 5.63%); left hepatic artery branch of the left gastric artery (Type II, n=13, 2.71%); right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery associated with the left hepatic artery arising from the left gastric artery (Type IV, n=4, 0.83%). Similarly, in relation to Hiatt classification, the most prevalent changes were: right hepatic accessory artery or substitute of the superior mesenteric artery (Type III, n=28, 6.05%)), followed by liver ancillary left artery or replacement of gastric artery left (Type II, n=16, 3.34. Fourteen donors (2.92%) showed no anatomical abnormalities defined in classifications, the highest frequency being hepatomesenteric trunk identified in five (01.04%). Detailed knowledge of the variations of hepatic arterial anatomy is of utmost importance to surgeons who perform approaches in this area, particularly in liver transplantation, since their identification and proper management are critical to the success of the procedure. A incidência das variações anatômicas da artéria hepática varia de 20-50% em diferentes casuísticas. Elas s

  2. Anatomical variations between the sciatic nerve and the piriformis muscle: a contribution to surgical anatomy in piriformis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Konstantinidis, George A; Paraskevas, George; Piagkou, Maria; Koebke, Juergen

    2014-04-01

    To detect the variable relationship between sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle and make surgeons aware of certain anatomical features of each variation that may be useful for the surgical treatment of the piriformis syndrome. The gluteal region of 147 Caucasian cadavers (294 limbs) was dissected. The anatomical relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriformis muscle was recorded and classified according to the Beaton and Anson classification. The literature was reviewed to summarize the incidence of each variation. The sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle relationship followed the typical anatomical pattern in 275 limbs (93.6 %). In 12 limbs (4.1 %) the common peroneal nerve passed through and the tibial nerve below a double piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) the common peroneal nerve coursed superior and the tibial nerve below the piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) both nerves penetrated the piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) both nerves passed above the piriformis. Four limbs (1.4 %) presented non-classified anatomical variations. When a double piriformis muscle was present, two different arrangements of the two heads were observed. Anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve around the piriformis muscle were present in 6.4 % of the limbs examined. When dissection of the entire piriformis is necessary for adequate sciatic nerve decompression, the surgeon should explore for the possible existence of a second tendon, which may be found either inferior or deep to the first one. Some rare, unclassified variations of the sciatic nerve should be expected during surgical intervention of the region.

  3. Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan G; Hacke, Uwe G; Hamann, Andreas; Thomas, Barb R

    2011-04-01

    Intensive forestry systems and breeding programs often include either native aspen or hybrid poplar clones, and performance and trait evaluations are mostly made within these two groups. Here, we assessed how traits with potential adaptive value varied within and across these two plant groups. Variation in nine hydraulic and wood anatomical traits as well as growth were measured in selected aspen and hybrid poplar genotypes grown at a boreal planting site in Alberta, Canada. Variability in these traits was statistically evaluated based on a blocked experimental design. We found that genotypes of trembling aspen were more resistant to cavitation, exhibited more negative water potentials, and were more water-use-efficient than hybrid poplars. Under the boreal field test conditions, which included major regional droughts, height growth was negatively correlated with branch vessel diameter (Dv ) in both aspen and hybrid poplars and differences in Dv were highly conserved in aspen trees from different provenances. Differences between the hybrid poplars and aspen provenances suggest that these two groups employ different water-use strategies. The data also suggest that vessel diameter may be a key trait in evaluating growth performance in a boreal environment.

  4. What Is Expected of the Facial Nerve in Michel Aplasia? Anatomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Zarandy, Masoud Motasaddi; Kouhi, Ali; Kashany, Shervin Sharif; Rabiei, Sohrab; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Rabbani-Anari, Mahtab

    2010-01-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial nerve anatomies were encountered. The first patient had normal-looking mastoid cells, normal middle ear ossicles, and a completely formed facial nerve canal through the middle ear. The second patient had pneumatized mastoid air cells despite an anomalous ossicular chain. This patient also had a facial nerve canal but not through the middle ear. In the third patient, although mastoid cells were present, neither ossicles nor a definite facial nerve canal could be detected. With guidance provided by the anatomy of the other parts of the ear, such as air cells and the ossicular chain, the danger zones posing a high probability of facial nerve injury can be predicted. Although all Michel aplasias may have aplastic petrous bone in common, there are some degrees of variation. PMID:21772803

  5. Qualitative and Quantitative Radio-Anatomical Variation of the Posterior Clinoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Salma, Asem; Baidya, Nishanta B.; Wendt, Benjamin; Aguila, Francisco; Sammet, Steffen; Ammirati, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the radiological anatomy of the posterior clinoid process (PCP) to highlight preoperative awareness of its variations and its relationships to other skull base landmarks. The PCPs of 36, three-dimensional computed tomographic cadaveric heads were evaluated by studying the gross anatomy of the PCP and by measuring the distances between the PCP and other skull base anatomical landmarks relevant to transnasal or transcranial skull base approaches. PCP variations were found in five specimens (14%): in two the dorsum sellae was absent, in one the PCP and the anterior clinoid process (ACP) were connected unilaterally and in two bilaterally. The mean distance between the right/left PCP and the crista galli was 45.14 ± 4.0 standard deviation (SD_/46.24 ± 4.5 SD, respectively, while the distance to the middle point of the basion at the level of the foramen magnum was 40.41 ± 5.1 SD/41.0 ± 5.2 SD, respectively. The mean distance between the PCP and the ACP was 12.03 ± 3.18 SD on the right side and 12.11 ± 2.77 SD on the left. The data provided highlights the importance of careful preoperative evaluation of the PCP and of its relationships to other commonly encountered skull base landmarks. This information may give an idea of the exposure achievable through different transcranial and transnasal approaches. This is especially relevant when neuronavigation is not available. PMID:22547963

  6. Qualitative and quantitative radio-anatomical variation of the posterior clinoid process.

    PubMed

    Salma, Asem; Baidya, Nishanta B; Wendt, Benjamin; Aguila, Francisco; Sammet, Steffen; Ammirati, Mario

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the radiological anatomy of the posterior clinoid process (PCP) to highlight preoperative awareness of its variations and its relationships to other skull base landmarks. The PCPs of 36, three-dimensional computed tomographic cadaveric heads were evaluated by studying the gross anatomy of the PCP and by measuring the distances between the PCP and other skull base anatomical landmarks relevant to transnasal or transcranial skull base approaches. PCP variations were found in five specimens (14%): in two the dorsum sellae was absent, in one the PCP and the anterior clinoid process (ACP) were connected unilaterally and in two bilaterally. The mean distance between the right/left PCP and the crista galli was 45.14 ± 4.0 standard deviation (SD_/46.24 ± 4.5 SD, respectively, while the distance to the middle point of the basion at the level of the foramen magnum was 40.41 ± 5.1 SD/41.0 ± 5.2 SD, respectively. The mean distance between the PCP and the ACP was 12.03 ± 3.18 SD on the right side and 12.11 ± 2.77 SD on the left. The data provided highlights the importance of careful preoperative evaluation of the PCP and of its relationships to other commonly encountered skull base landmarks. This information may give an idea of the exposure achievable through different transcranial and transnasal approaches. This is especially relevant when neuronavigation is not available.

  7. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  8. Variation in the wood anatomical structure of Gmelina arborea (Verbenaceae) trees at different ecological conditions in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Tomazello Fo, Mario

    2008-06-01

    The tree Gmelina arborea has been widely introduced in Costa Rica for commercial purposes. This new conditions for melina cause variations on anatomy in secondary xylem of the trees growing in plantations. The objective of the present research was to determine the variation in the anatomy of xylem caused by the ecological conduction variation. Dimensions of fiber, axial parenchyma percentage of cross sections, parameters of vessels and the ray were measured. The results showed that some anatomical characteristics remained stable despite variations of ecological conditions, especially radial parenchyma and anatomical features which were less affected by the altitude. On the other hand, the vessels, axial parenchyma and fiber were less stable because they were affected significantly by the longitude, latitude, altitude and precipitation. Latitude significantly affected vessel percentage, length and diameter of the fiber and lumen. Longitude affected vessel percentage and fiber diameter. Altitude had a significant correlation with the amount of cells at ray height. Annual average precipitation affected vessel percentage and diameter, not only of the fiber, but also of the lumen. These results suggest that the new growth conditions of G. arborea trees in Costa Rica have produced an anatomic adaptation.

  9. Anatomical variations of the recurrent artery of Heubner: number, origin, and course.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Wakoto; Sonomura, Takahiro; Honma, Satoru; Ohno, Sachi; Goto, Tetsuya; Hirai, Shuichi; Itoh, Masahiro; Honda, Yoshiko; Fujieda, Hiroki; Udagawa, Jun; Ueda, Shuichi

    2017-09-25

    The clinical anatomy of the recurrent artery of Heubner (RAH) was examined, focusing on its number, origin, and course, in a large number of brain specimens. We studied 724 RAH in total from 357 brain specimens (714 hemispheres). In 98.74 % of 714 cases there were one or more RAHs, while it was absent in 1.26 % of cases. There was a single RAH in 96.22 % of cases, double in 2.38 % of cases, and triple in 0.14 % of cases. In this study, three origin types of the RAH were defined. We defined A1 and A2 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) as the artery from the origin of the ACA to the junction of the anterior communicating artery (AComA) and the artery from the junction of the AComA to the anterior border of the corpus callosum, respectively. In 76.2 % of 724 arteries, the RAH originated from the junction of the A1 and A2 segment of the ACA. In 16.3 %, the RAH originated from the A2 segment of the ACA. In 7.5 %, the RAH originated from the A1 segment of the ACA. The course of the RAH was superior to the A1 segment of the ACA in 30.1 % of 724 arteries, anterior in 62.2 %, and posterior in 7.7 %. It is of great importance for neurosurgeons to understand the detailed anatomical variations of the RAH before operating to prevent operative complications resulting in neurological deficits.

  10. Coronary anatomy, anatomic variations and anomalies: a retrospective coronary angiography study

    PubMed Central

    Altin, Cihan; Kanyilmaz, Suleyman; Koc, Sahbender; Gursoy, Yusuf Cemil; Bal, Uğur; Aydinalp, Alp; Yildirir, Aylin; Muderrisoglu, Haldun

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The incidence of coronary artery anomalies (CAAs) varies from 0.2% to 8.4%. Knowledge of such anatomical variations is important as coronary procedures are regularly performed these days. We aimed to find the coronary dominance pattern, intermediate artery (IMA) frequency and CAA incidence in our clinic, and compare them to those in the literature. METHODS The medical reports of 5,548 patients who had undergone coronary angiography (CAG) between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively investigated. Dominance pattern and presence of IMA and CAA were recorded. CAAs were described using two different classifications: Angelini and Khatami’s classification, and a new modified classification that was derived from Angelini and Khatami’s classification. Some procedural details and clinical features of the patients with CAA were also investigated. RESULTS Coronary dominance pattern was: 81.6% right coronary artery, 12.2% circumflex artery and 6.2% co-dominant. IMA was present in 613 (11.0%) patients. The incidences of overall anomaly were 2.7% and 1.4%, according to the different classifications. Absent left main coronary artery, which was the most common anomaly in the present study, was found in 51 (0.9%) patients. Incidences of myocardial bridge, coronary arteriovenous fistulae and aneurysms were 1.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION CAAs are generally asymptomatic, isolated lesions. Some may lead to anginal symptoms, myocardial infarction or sudden death. We found that CAA was associated with increased radiation and contrast exposure in patients who underwent CAG. This risk could be reduced if appropriate catheters were designed and training programmes on ostial cannulation were developed. PMID:25502334

  11. Anatomic variations in the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve among adults in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mofikoya, Bolaji O; Ugburo, Andrew O

    2012-01-01

    Dysesthesias due to palmar cutaneous branch of median nerve injuries infrequently follow carpal tunnel release surgeries. Objective: To determine the course of palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve in wrist of adult Nigerians, identify the common variations, determine its relations to the palmaris longus (PL) in the region of the distal wrist crease. And on these basis, suggest a safe incision for carpal tunnel surgery in Nigerians. Materials and Methods: Detailed anatomic dissection of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve was carried out with the aid of a loupe magnification on 40 Nigerian cadaver wrists. The origin, course in the distal forearm, wrist and proximal palm was traced. Measurements of the distances between the radial and ulnar branches of the nerve and the PL were made. The distance between origin of the nerve and the distal wrist crease was measured as well. The common branching pattern of the nerve was noted. Results: The palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve was present in all dissected wrists. The mean distance of the radial branch to PL was 0.81 cm (SD ± 0.3 cm), while the ulnar branch was 0.3 cm (SD ± 0.1 cm). from same structure. The mean distance from the origin to the distal wrist crease is 4.5 cm (SD ± 2.1 cm). We noted the terminal distal branching pattern of the nerve to be highly variable. Conclusion: The Palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve is safe with an incision made at least 0.5 cm ulnar to the PL in carpal tunnel surgeries in Nigerians. PMID:24027400

  12. A novel classification of the anatomical variations of the first extensor compartment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zheng-Yu; Tao, Hao; Xu, Hao; Xue, Jun-Qiang; Ou-Yang, Yao; Wu, Ji-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The presence of a septum in the first extensor compartment is closely associated with the pathophysiology of de Quervain disease, and affects the efficacy of corticosteroid injection and surgical release. This study aimed to examine the incidence and length of the first extensor compartment septum. Forty sides of the wrists in 20 cadavers were used. The presence of a septum in the first extensor compartment was examined. The septum length was recorded with the radial styloid process as the reference point. The anatomical variations of the first extensor compartment were classified into 3 types. Type I compartment was found in 7 sides in males (29.2%) versus 6 sides in females (37.5%, P = .733), type II was found in 6 sides in males (25%) versus 1 side in females (6.25%, P = .21), and type III was found in 11 sides in males (45.8%) versus 9 sides in females (56.25%, P = .56). There was no significant difference in the septum length between males and females (5.3 ± 2.3 vs 4.8 ± 1.1 mm, P = .54). The incidence of a septum in the first extensor compartment is approximately 50%. The mean septum length is 5 mm. Injection at 5 mm proximal to the radial styloid process has a great chance of delivering the steroids into both subcompartments. Exposure to 5 mm proximal to the radial styloid process can avoid the overlook of subcompartment and achieve adequate decompression of the first extensor compartment. PMID:28858099

  13. Anatomical variation of celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, and hepatic artery: Evaluation with multidetector computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Farghadani, Maryam; Momeni, Mohammad; Hekmatnia, Ali; Momeni, Fateme; Baradaran Mahdavi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and hepatic artery are the most important branches of abdominal aorta due to their vascularization field. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of different anatomical variation of celiac axis, SMA, hepatic artery, and its branches with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of upper abdomen arteries. Materials and Methods: MDCT of 607 kidney donor and traumatic patients that referred to MDCT unit at Al Zahra Hospital in Isfahan from 2012 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. We excluded patients with history of abdominal vascular surgery and hepatic or pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography images of the patient were obtained with 64-row MDCT scanner and anatomical variations were analyzed. Results: Three hundred and eighty-eight (63.9%) of the 607 patients had classic arterial anatomy and 219 (36.1%) patients had variant types. The most common type of variation was the origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from SMA (9.6%), and the next common variation was the origin of the left hepatic artery (LHA) from the left gastric artery (6.9%). Variations in the origin of the common hepatic artery (CHA) were seen in 16 (2.6%) patients. Buhler arc was identified in two patients. The RHA originated from the celiac axis in 11 (1.8%) patients and from the aorta in 8 (1.3%) patients. Trifurcation of CHA into gastroduodenal artery, RHA, and LHA was detected in 11 (1.8%) patients. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that anatomical variation occurs in a high percentage of patients. Detection of these variations can guide surgical and radiological interventional planning.

  14. Aberrant origin of the inferior thyroid artery from the common carotid artery: a rare anatomical variation

    PubMed Central

    Ngo Nyeki, Adèle-Rose; Peloni, Giuseppe; Karenovics, Wolfram; Triponez, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a rare anatomical variant of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) taking its origin directly from the common carotid artery (CCA) instead of the thyrocervical trunk (TCT). This anatomical feature exposes to risks of perioperative bleeding and nerve injuries when it is unrecognized by the surgeons. Knowledge of its existence may be helpful to reduce risks for the patient. PMID:28149813

  15. Effects of interfractional motion and anatomic changes on proton therapy dose distribution in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhouguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Starkschall, George; Li, Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Chang, Joe Y

    2008-12-01

    Proton doses are sensitive to intra- and interfractional anatomic changes. We analyzed the effects of interfractional anatomic changes in doses to lung tumors treated with proton therapy. Weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans were acquired for 8 patients with mobile Stage III non-small cell lung cancer who were actually treated with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy. A conformal proton therapy passive scattering plan was designed for each patient. Dose distributions were recalculated at end-inspiration and end-expiration breathing phases on each weekly 4D-CT data set using the same plans with alignment based on bone registration. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was compromised (from 99% to 90.9%) in 1 patient because of anatomic changes and motion pattern variation. For the rest of the patients, the mean CTV coverage on the repeated weekly 4D-CT data sets was 98.4%, compared with 99% for the original plans. For all 8 patients, however, a mean 4% increase in the volume of the contralateral lung receiving a dose of at least 5 Gy (V5) and a mean 4.4-Gy increase in the spinal cord maximum dose was observed in the repeated 4D-CT data sets. A strong correlation between the CTV density change resulting from tumor shrinkage or anatomic variations and mean contralateral lung dose was observed. Adaptive re-planning during proton therapy may be indicated in selected patients with non-small cell lung cancer. For most patients, however, CTV coverage is adequate if tumor motion is taken into consideration in the original simulation and planning processes.

  16. Effects of Interfractional Motion and Anatomic Changes on Proton Therapy Dose Distribution in Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Zhang Xiaodong; Starkschall, George; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Proton doses are sensitive to intra- and interfractional anatomic changes. We analyzed the effects of interfractional anatomic changes in doses to lung tumors treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans were acquired for 8 patients with mobile Stage III non-small cell lung cancer who were actually treated with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy. A conformal proton therapy passive scattering plan was designed for each patient. Dose distributions were recalculated at end-inspiration and end-expiration breathing phases on each weekly 4D-CT data set using the same plans with alignment based on bone registration. Results: Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was compromised (from 99% to 90.9%) in 1 patient because of anatomic changes and motion pattern variation. For the rest of the patients, the mean CTV coverage on the repeated weekly 4D-CT data sets was 98.4%, compared with 99% for the original plans. For all 8 patients, however, a mean 4% increase in the volume of the contralateral lung receiving a dose of at least 5 Gy (V5) and a mean 4.4-Gy increase in the spinal cord maximum dose was observed in the repeated 4D-CT data sets. A strong correlation between the CTV density change resulting from tumor shrinkage or anatomic variations and mean contralateral lung dose was observed. Conclusions: Adaptive re-planning during proton therapy may be indicated in selected patients with non-small cell lung cancer. For most patients, however, CTV coverage is adequate if tumor motion is taken into consideration in the original simulation and planning processes.

  17. EFFECTS OF INTERFRACTIONAL MOTION AND ANATOMIC CHANGES ON PROTON THERAPY DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Zhouguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Starkschall, George; Li, Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Proton doses are sensitive to intra- and interfractional anatomic changes. We analyzed the effects of interfractional anatomic changes in doses to lung tumors treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials Weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans were acquired for 8 patients with mobile Stage III non–small cell lung cancer who were actually treated with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy. A conformal proton therapy passive scattering plan was designed for each patient. Dose distributions were recalculated at end-inspiration and end-expiration breathing phases on each weekly 4D-CT data set using the same plans with alignment based on bone registration. Results Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was compromised (from 99% to 90.9%) in 1 patient because of anatomic changes and motion pattern variation. For the rest of the patients, the mean CTV coverage on the repeated weekly 4D-CT data sets was 98.4%, compared with 99% for the original plans. For all 8 patients, however, a mean 4% increase in the volume of the contralateral lung receiving a dose of at least 5 Gy (V5) and a mean 4.4-Gy increase in the spinal cord maximum dose was observed in the repeated 4D-CT data sets. A strong correlation between the CTV density change resulting from tumor shrinkage or anatomic variations and mean contralateral lung dose was observed. Conclusions Adaptive re-planning during proton therapy may be indicated in selected patients with non–small cell lung cancer. For most patients, however, CTV coverage is adequate if tumor motion is taken into consideration in the original simulation and planning processes. PMID:18486357

  18. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  19. Anatomic variations of pudendal nerve within pelvis and pudendal canal: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Pedro A; Chin, Kathleen; Garcia, Alyson A; Corton, Marlene M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the anatomic variation of the pudendal nerve in the pelvis, on the dorsal surface of the sacrospinous ligament, and in the pudendal canal. Detailed dissections of the pudendal nerve were performed in unembalmed female cadavers. Pelvic measurements included the distance from the origin of the pudendal nerve to the tip of ischial spine and the nerve width at its origin. The length of the pudendal canal was measured. The inferior rectal nerve was identified in the ischioanal fossa and its course documented. Lastly, the relationship of the pudendal nerve to the dorsal surface of the sacrospinous ligament was examined after transecting the lateral surface of the sacrospinous ligament. Descriptive statistics were used for data analyses and reporting. Thirteen female cadavers (26 hemipelvises) were examined. A single pudendal nerve trunk was identified in 61.5% of hemipelvises. The median distance from the point of the pudendal nerve formation to the ischial spine was 27.5 mm (range, 14.5-37 mm). The width of the pudendal nerve in the pelvis was 4.5 mm (range, 2.5-6.3 mm). The length of the pudendal canal was 40.5 mm (range, 20.5-54.5 mm). The inferior rectal nerve was noted to enter the pudendal canal in 42.3% of hemipelvises; in these cases, the nerve exited the canal at a distance of 32.5 mm (range, 16-45 mm) from the ischial spine. In the remaining specimens, the inferior rectal nerve passed behind the sacrospinous ligament and entered the ischioanal fossa without entering the pudendal canal. In all specimens, the pudendal nerve was fixed by connective tissue to the dorsal surface of the sacrospinous ligament. Great variability exists in pudendal nerve anatomy. Fixation of the pudendal nerve to the dorsal surface of the sacrospinous ligament is a consistent finding; thus, pudendal neuralgia attributed to nerve entrapment may be overestimated. The path of the inferior rectal nerve relative to the pudendal canal may have

  20. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  1. The Main Anatomic Variations of the Hepatic Artery and Their Importance in Surgical Practice: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Noussios, George; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Chatzis, Iosif; Katsourakis, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery are important in the planning and performance of abdominal surgical procedures. Normal hepatic anatomy occurs in approximately 80% of cases, for the remaining 20% multiple variations have been described. The purpose of this study was to review the existing literature on the hepatic anatomy and to stress out its importance in surgical practice. Two main databases were searched for eligible articles during the period 2000 - 2015, and results concerning more than 19,000 patients were included in the study. The most common variation was the replaced right hepatic artery (type III according to Michels classification) which is the chief source of blood supply to the bile duct. PMID:28270883

  2. The Main Anatomic Variations of the Hepatic Artery and Their Importance in Surgical Practice: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Noussios, George; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Chatzis, Iosif; Katsourakis, Anastasios

    2017-04-01

    Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery are important in the planning and performance of abdominal surgical procedures. Normal hepatic anatomy occurs in approximately 80% of cases, for the remaining 20% multiple variations have been described. The purpose of this study was to review the existing literature on the hepatic anatomy and to stress out its importance in surgical practice. Two main databases were searched for eligible articles during the period 2000 - 2015, and results concerning more than 19,000 patients were included in the study. The most common variation was the replaced right hepatic artery (type III according to Michels classification) which is the chief source of blood supply to the bile duct.

  3. Angiographic analysis of the lateral intercostal artery perforator of the posterior intercostal artery: anatomic variation and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eui-Yong; Cho, Young Kwon; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Yun, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Knowledge of the anatomic variations of the posterior intercostal artery (PICA) and its major branches is important during transthoracic procedures and surgery. We aimed to identify the anatomic features and variations of the lateral intercostal artery perforator (LICAP) of the PICA with selective PICA arteriography. METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 353 PICAs in 75 patients with selective PICA arteriography for the following characteristics: incidence, length (as number of traversed intercostal spaces), distribution at the hemithorax (medial half vs. lateral half), and size as compared to the collateral intercostal artery of the PICA. RESULTS The incidence of LICAPs was 35.9% (127/353). LICAPs were most commonly observed in the right 8th–11th intercostal spaces (33%, 42/127) and in the medial half of the hemithorax (85%, 108/127). Most LICAPs were as long as two (35.4%, 45/127) or three intercostal spaces (60.6%, 77/127). Compared to the collateral intercostal artery, 42.5% of LICAPs were larger (54/127), with most of these observed in the right 4th–7th intercostal spaces (48.8%, 22/54). CONCLUSION We propose the clinical significance of the LICAP as a potential risk factor for iatrogenic injury during posterior transthoracic intervention and thoracic surgery. For example, skin incisions must be as superficial as possible and directed vertically at the right 4th–7th intercostal spaces and the medial half of the thorax. Awareness of the anatomical variations of the LICAPs of the PICA will allow surgeons and interventional radiologists to avoid iatrogenic arterial injuries during posterior transthoracic procedures and surgery. PMID:26268302

  4. Angiographic analysis of the lateral intercostal artery perforator of the posterior intercostal artery: anatomic variation and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eui Yong; Cho, Young Kwon; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Yun, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomic variations of the posterior intercostal artery (PICA) and its major branches is important during transthoracic procedures and surgery. We aimed to identify the anatomic features and variations of the lateral intercostal artery perforator (LICAP) of the PICA with selective PICA arteriography. We retrospectively evaluated 353 PICAs in 75 patients with selective PICA arteriography for the following characteristics: incidence, length (as number of traversed intercostal spaces), distribution at the hemithorax (medial half vs. lateral half), and size as compared to the collateral intercostal artery of the PICA. The incidence of LICAPs was 35.9% (127/353). LICAPs were most commonly observed in the right 8th-11th intercostal spaces (33%, 42/127) and in the medial half of the hemithorax (85%, 108/127). Most LICAPs were as long as two (35.4%, 45/127) or three intercostal spaces (60.6%, 77/127). Compared to the collateral intercostal artery, 42.5% of LICAPs were larger (54/127), with most of these observed in the right 4th-7th intercostal spaces (48.8%, 22/54). We propose the clinical significance of the LICAP as a potential risk factor for iatrogenic injury during posterior transthoracic intervention and thoracic surgery. For example, skin incisions must be as superficial as possible and directed vertically at the right 4th-7th intercostal spaces and the medial half of the thorax. Awareness of the anatomical variations of the LICAPs of the PICA will allow surgeons and interventional radiologists to avoid iatrogenic arterial injuries during posterior transthoracic procedures and surgery.

  5. Broad Anatomical Variation within a Narrow Wood Density Range--A Study of Twig Wood across 69 Australian Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Ziemińska, Kasia; Westoby, Mark; Wright, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Just as people with the same weight can have different body builds, woods with the same wood density can have different anatomies. Here, our aim was to assess the magnitude of anatomical variation within a restricted range of wood density and explore its potential ecological implications. Twig wood of 69 angiosperm tree and shrub species was analyzed. Species were selected so that wood density varied within a relatively narrow range (0.38-0.62 g cm-3). Anatomical traits quantified included wood tissue fractions (fibres, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, vessels, and conduits with maximum lumen diameter below 15 μm), vessel properties, and pith area. To search for potential ecological correlates of anatomical variation the species were sampled across rainfall and temperature contrasts, and several other ecologically-relevant traits were measured (plant height, leaf area to sapwood area ratio, and modulus of elasticity). Despite the limited range in wood density, substantial anatomical variation was observed. Total parenchyma fraction varied from 0.12 to 0.66 and fibre fraction from 0.20 to 0.74, and these two traits were strongly inversely correlated (r = -0.86, P < 0.001). Parenchyma was weakly (0.24 ≤|r|≤ 0.35, P < 0.05) or not associated with vessel properties nor with height, leaf area to sapwood area ratio, and modulus of elasticity (0.24 ≤|r|≤ 0.41, P < 0.05). However, vessel traits were fairly well correlated with height and leaf area to sapwood area ratio (0.47 ≤|r|≤ 0.65, all P < 0.001). Modulus of elasticity was mainly driven by fibre wall plus vessel wall fraction rather than by the parenchyma component. Overall, there seem to be at least three axes of variation in xylem, substantially independent of each other: a wood density spectrum, a fibre-parenchyma spectrum, and a vessel area spectrum. The fibre-parenchyma spectrum does not yet have any clear or convincing ecological interpretation.

  6. Rare Anatomical Variation of Dual IVC with Left Sided IVC Draining into Hemiazygous Vein- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Shruti P; Modi, Pranjal; Sutariya, Harsh; Patel, Kajal

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) result from the persistence of the embryonic venous system. Knowledge of such anomaly is of great importance during abdominal surgery, liver and kidney transplantation, renal venous sampling and in the treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Here, we report a rare anatomical variation of dual IVC with normal course of right sided IVC and hemiazygous continuation of left sided IVC with interiliac communication in potential renal donor. Congenital abnormalities of the inferior vena cava are easily identified on Computed Tomography (CT) and should be considered when interpreting any CT of the abdomen or chest.

  7. Broad Anatomical Variation within a Narrow Wood Density Range—A Study of Twig Wood across 69 Australian Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Ziemińska, Kasia; Westoby, Mark; Wright, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Just as people with the same weight can have different body builds, woods with the same wood density can have different anatomies. Here, our aim was to assess the magnitude of anatomical variation within a restricted range of wood density and explore its potential ecological implications. Methods Twig wood of 69 angiosperm tree and shrub species was analyzed. Species were selected so that wood density varied within a relatively narrow range (0.38–0.62 g cm-3). Anatomical traits quantified included wood tissue fractions (fibres, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, vessels, and conduits with maximum lumen diameter below 15 μm), vessel properties, and pith area. To search for potential ecological correlates of anatomical variation the species were sampled across rainfall and temperature contrasts, and several other ecologically-relevant traits were measured (plant height, leaf area to sapwood area ratio, and modulus of elasticity). Results Despite the limited range in wood density, substantial anatomical variation was observed. Total parenchyma fraction varied from 0.12 to 0.66 and fibre fraction from 0.20 to 0.74, and these two traits were strongly inversely correlated (r = -0.86, P < 0.001). Parenchyma was weakly (0.24 ≤|r|≤ 0.35, P < 0.05) or not associated with vessel properties nor with height, leaf area to sapwood area ratio, and modulus of elasticity (0.24 ≤|r|≤ 0.41, P < 0.05). However, vessel traits were fairly well correlated with height and leaf area to sapwood area ratio (0.47 ≤|r|≤ 0.65, all P < 0.001). Modulus of elasticity was mainly driven by fibre wall plus vessel wall fraction rather than by the parenchyma component. Conclusions Overall, there seem to be at least three axes of variation in xylem, substantially independent of each other: a wood density spectrum, a fibre-parenchyma spectrum, and a vessel area spectrum. The fibre-parenchyma spectrum does not yet have any clear or convincing ecological interpretation. PMID

  8. Efficient Variational Approach to Multimodal Registration of Anatomical and Functional Intra-Patient Tumorous Brain Data.

    PubMed

    Legaz-Aparicio, Alvar-Ginés; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; López-Mir, Fernando; Naranjo, Valery; Bernabéu, Ángela

    2016-11-29

    This paper addresses the functional localization of intra-patient images of the brain. Functional images of the brain (fMRI and PET) provide information about brain function and metabolism whereas anatomical images (MRI and CT) supply the localization of structures with high spatial resolution. The goal is to find the geometric correspondence between functional and anatomical images in order to complement and fuse the information provided by each imaging modality. The proposed approach is based on a variational formulation of the image registration problem in the frequency domain. It has been implemented as a C/C[Formula: see text] library which is invoked from a GUI. This interface is routinely used in the clinical setting by physicians for research purposes (Inscanner, Alicante, Spain), and may be used as well for diagnosis and surgical planning. The registration of anatomic and functional intra-patient images of the brain makes it possible to obtain a geometric correspondence which allows for the localization of the functional processes that occur in the brain. Through 18 clinical experiments, it has been demonstrated how the proposed approach outperforms popular state-of-the-art registration methods in terms of efficiency, information theory-based measures (such as mutual information) and actual registration error (distance in space of corresponding landmarks).

  9. Magnetic Resonance Angiographic Study of Anatomic Variations of the Circle of Willis in a Population in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Jalali Kondori, Bahman; Azemati, Fateme; Dadseresht, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    The circle of Willis, an anastomotic polygon at the base of the brain, forms an important collateral network to maintain cerebral blood perfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate different anatomic variations of the circle of Willis and their prevalence. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 525 healthy participants including 205 men and 320 women. The mean age of the patients was 51.5 years. Three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) technique was used. Vascular variations in the anterior and posterior parts of the circle were evaluated. The findings show that the complete circle of Willis was visible in a small number of patients. The circle of Willis had a complete vascular structure in 20.9% of the patients. The anterior part of the circle of Willis had a complete structure in 80.95% of the cases, while the posterior part had a complete structure in 20.95% of the cases. We observed wide variations in the circle of Willis configuration in our study. Similar to other studies, most variations are related to the posterior part of the circle of Willis. Absence of bilateral posterior communicating artery variation is more common than other types of variations in this population.

  10. The Guyon's canal in perspective: 3-T MRI assessment of the normal anatomy, the anatomical variations and the Guyon's canal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R

    2011-12-01

    (1) To revisit the anatomical boundaries of the canal, its contents and its two channels, (2) to describe the anatomical variations of the canal's borders and the variations of its contents, and (3) to discuss the clinical relevance of the Guyon's canal syndrome. Two hundred and fifty MR wrists examinations were reviewed. MR spin echo T1-weighted axial slices were used to analyze the Guyon's canal. The anatomical boundaries, the cross-sectional area and length of the canal were calculated. The anatomical variations of the canal's walls and contents and their prevalence were sought. Changes related to Guyon's canal syndrome were also evaluated. From the 250 wrists, the anatomy of the Guyon's canal was normal in 168 (67.2%) wrists; 73 (29.2%) wrists presented with anatomical variations; and 9 (3.6%) wrists had derangements causing Guyon's canal syndrome. The cross-sectional area of the canal was 33 ± 11 mm² proximally and 45 ± 19 mm² distally. The canal's length was approximately 40 ± 4 mm. Among the 73 wrists with anatomical variations, there were aberrant muscles in 39 (53.4%) wrists, multiple ulnar nerve branching in 22 (30%) cases, increased amount of fat tissue inside the canal in 9 (12.3%) cases and hypoplastic hamulus in 3 (4.1%) cases. There were 9 (3.6%) symptomatic wrists with clinical and radiological features attributed to Guyon's canal syndrome. MRI is an excellent modality for the evaluation of the Guyon's canal.

  11. Lateral displacement of the right kidney by the colon: an anatomic variation demonstrated by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Kelvin, F.M.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-02-01

    Lateral displacement of the kidney on a urogram can be caused by a variety of retroperitoneal abnormalities, including enlarged lymph nodes, primary or metastatic neoplasm, aortic aneurysm, hematoma, abscess, or even benign accumulations of fat. CT commonly is used to evaluate the cause of renal displacement and often suggests the correct etiology. An unusual case is reported in which CT demonstrated that lateral displacement of the right kidney was caused by insinuation of an otherwise normal right colon between the kidney and the right psoas muscle. The authors are not aware of any previous report of this benign anatomic variant.

  12. The incidence of concha bullosa, unusual anatomic variation and its relationship to nasal septal deviation: A retrospective radiologic study.

    PubMed

    Koo, Soo Kweon; Kim, Jong Deok; Moon, Ji Seung; Jung, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2017-10-01

    Identifying anatomical variations associated with pathological findings is very useful for diagnoses and therapeutics. We conducted a study to detect various anatomical variations (superior, middle, inferior turbinate concha bullosa, uncinate bulla and nasal swell body [NSB]) in connection with nasal septal deviation. This study used a retrospective radiological design to analyze 594 (1188 sides) osteomeatal computed tomography scans from 494 male patients and 100 female patients aged between 17 and 75 years. We randomly selected 100 male and 100 female patients as controls; we compared the groups and performed a statistical analysis. All patients in the control group had sinusitis only (i.e., they lacked nasal septal deviations). Left-sided septal deviation was found to be slightly more prevalent than right-sided deviation (43.9% and 36.4%, respectively). The incidence of S-curved septal deviation was 18.5%, that of dorso-ventral deviation was 10.9%, and that of caudal-rostral deviation was 7.6%. The incidence of only septal spur was 1.2%. In the case of middle turbinate concha bullosa, the incidence of the unilateral type was 17.3% and that of the bilateral type was 36.4%. In superior turbinate concha bullosa, the incidence of the unilateral type was 11.3% and that of the bilateral type was 27.4%. The incidence of inferior turbinate concha bullosa was 1.0% and that of uncinate bulla was 1.7%. NSB was found in 25.1% of patients, 24.7% of males and 27.0% of females. The frequencies of middle and superior concha bullosa were about 10-12 fold higher on the concave side. The nasal septal deviation group exhibited a higher incidence of most anatomical variants than the non-deviated group; differences in the middle turbinate concha bullosa attained statistical significance. The radiologist must focus on anatomical variants in the preoperative evaluation. It is important for surgeons to be aware of these variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric field due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  14. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric fields due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  15. de Quervain disease: US identification of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment with an emphasis on subcompartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Lee, Young-Jun; Ryu, Dae Sik; Lee, Jong Hyeog; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Ki Won

    2011-08-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of ultrasonography (US) in the detection of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment of the wrist in patients with de Quervain disease. The institutional review board approved this study protocol and waived the informed consent requirement. Fifteen wrists in 13 women (age range, 41-62 years) in whom de Quervain disease was clinically diagnosed and who underwent surgery for intractable pain were included. A musculoskeletal radiologist performed US before surgery. The absence or presence and extent of subcompartmentalization within the first extensor compartment and the number of abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tendon slips were evaluated and recorded. Preoperative US findings were compared with surgical records and photographs. Subcompartmentalization within the first extensor compartment was observed during surgery in 11 of the 15 wrists (73%), including four (27%) that had subcompartmentalization only in the distal portion of this compartment. US was used to identify all 11 wrists showing subcompartmentalization within this compartment (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 74%, 100%), as well as three of the four wrists with distal incomplete subcompartmentalization. There was one wrist with false-positive distal incomplete subcompartmentalization. US had a positive predictive value in the detection of subcompartmentalization of 73% (95% CI: 47%, 91%). The number of tendon slips in this compartment detected with US was identical to that identified at surgery with one exception. US can be used to depict various types of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment in patients with de Quervain disease. © RSNA, 2011.

  16. Anterior ethmoidal artery emerging anterior to bulla ethmoidalis: An abnormal anatomical variation in Waardenburg's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Danny K. C.; Shao, Angus; Campbell, Raewyn

    2014-01-01

    In endoscopic sinus surgery, the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is usually identified as it traverses obliquely across the fovea ethmoidalis, posterior to the bulla ethmoidalis and anterior to or within the ground lamella's attachment to the skull base. Injury to the AEA may result in hemorrhage, retraction of the AEA into the orbit, and a retrobulbar hematoma. The resulting increase in intraorbital pressure may threaten vision. Waardenburg's syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder, distinguished by characteristic facial features, pigmentation abnormalities, and profound, congenital, sensorineural hearing loss. We present a case of AEAs located anterior to the bulla ethmoidalis in a 36-year-old male with WS and chronic rhinosinusitis. The anatomic abnormality was not obvious on a preoperative computed tomography scan and was discovered intraoperatively when the left AEA was injured, resulting in a retrobulbar hematoma. The hematoma was immediately identified and decompressed endoscopically without lasting complications. The AEA on the right was identified intraoperatively and preserved. The characteristic craniofacial features in WS were probably associated with the abnormal vascular anatomy. Endoscopic sinus surgeons should be aware of these potential anatomic anomalies in patients with abnormal craniofacial development. PMID:25565054

  17. Anatomic variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system: MRCP findings of 1158 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Adibelli, Zehra Hilal; Adatepe, Mustafa; Imamoglu, Cetin; Esen, Ozgur Sipahi; Erkan, Nazif; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the frequencies of the anatomic variations and the gender distributions of these variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system as morphological sign of chronic pancreatitis using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). We retrospectively reviewed 1312 consecutive patients who referred to our department for MRCP between January 2013 and August 2015. We excluded 154 patients from the study because of less than optimal results due to imaging limitations or a history of surgery on pancreas. Finally a total of 1158 patients were included in the study. Among the 1158 patients included in the study, 54 (4.6%) patients showed pancreas divisum, 13 patients (1.2%) were defined as ansa pancreatica. When we evaluated the course of the pancreatic duct, we found the prevalence 62.5% for descending, 30% for sigmoid, 5.5% for vertical and 2% for loop. The most commonly observed pancreatic duct configuration was Type 3 in 528 patients (45.6%) where 521 patients (45%) had Type 1 configuration. Vertical course (p = 0.004) and Type 2 (p = 0.03) configuration of pancreatic duct were more frequent in females than males. There were no statistically significant differences between the gender for the other pancreatic duct variations such as pancreas divisium, ansa pancreatica and course types other than vertical course (p > 0.05 for all). Variants of pancreas divisum and normal pancreatic duct variants were not associated with morphologic findings of chronic pancreatitis by using the Cambridge classification system. The ansa pancreatica is a rare type of anatomical variation of the pancreatic duct, which might be considered as a predisposing factor to the onset of idiopathic pancreatitis.

  18. Anatomic variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system: MRCP findings of 1158 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Adatepe, Mustafa; Imamoglu, Cetin; Esen, Ozgur Sipahi; Erkan, Nazif; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The study was conducted to evaluate the frequencies of the anatomic variations and the gender distributions of these variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system as morphological sign of chronic pancreatitis using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 1312 consecutive patients who referred to our department for MRCP between January 2013 and August 2015. We excluded 154 patients from the study because of less than optimal results due to imaging limitations or a history of surgery on pancreas. Finally a total of 1158 patients were included in the study. Results Among the 1158 patients included in the study, 54 (4.6%) patients showed pancreas divisum, 13 patients (1.2%) were defined as ansa pancreatica. When we evaluated the course of the pancreatic duct, we found the prevalence 62.5% for descending, 30% for sigmoid, 5.5% for vertical and 2% for loop. The most commonly observed pancreatic duct configuration was Type 3 in 528 patients (45.6%) where 521 patients (45%) had Type 1 configuration. Conclusions Vertical course (p = 0.004) and Type 2 (p = 0.03) configuration of pancreatic duct were more frequent in females than males. There were no statistically significant differences between the gender for the other pancreatic duct variations such as pancreas divisium, ansa pancreatica and course types other than vertical course (p > 0.05 for all). Variants of pancreas divisum and normal pancreatic duct variants were not associated with morphologic findings of chronic pancreatitis by using the Cambridge classification system. The ansa pancreatica is a rare type of anatomical variation of the pancreatic duct, which might be considered as a predisposing factor to the onset of idiopathic pancreatitis. PMID:27904444

  19. Effect of anatomical backgrounds on detectability in volumetric cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-03-01

    As anatomical noise is often a dominating factor affecting signal detection in medical imaging, we investigate the effects of anatomical backgrounds on signal detection in volumetric cone beam CT images. Signal detection performances are compared between transverse and longitudinal planes with either uniform or anatomical backgrounds. Sphere objects with diameters of 1mm, 5mm, 8mm, and 11mm are used as the signals. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomical backgrounds are generated using an anatomical noise power spectrum, 1/fβ, with β=3, equivalent to mammographic background [1]. The mean voxel value of the 3D anatomical backgrounds is used as an attenuation coefficient of the uniform background. Noisy projection data are acquired by the forward projection of the uniform and anatomical 3D backgrounds with/without sphere lesions and by the addition of quantum noise. Then, images are reconstructed by an FDK algorithm [2]. For each signal size, signal detection performances in transverse and longitudinal planes are measured by calculating the task SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels. In the uniform background case, transverse planes yield higher task SNR values for all sphere diameters but 1mm. In the anatomical background case, longitudinal planes yield higher task SNR values for all signal diameters. The results indicate that it is beneficial to use longitudinal planes to detect spherical signals in anatomical backgrounds.

  20. Effects of plantation density on wood density and anatomical properties of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)

    Treesearch

    J. Y. Zhu; C. Tim Scott; Karen L. Scallon; Gary C. Myers

    2007-01-01

    This study demonstrated that average ring width (or average annual radial growth rate) is a reliable parameter to quantify the effects of tree plantation density (growth suppression) on wood density and tracheid anatomical properties. The average ring width successfully correlated wood density and tracheid anatomical properties of red pines (Pinus resinosa Ait.) from a...

  1. Anatomical Variations in the Branching Pattern of Human Aortic Arch: A Cadaveric Study from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Virendra; Rastogi, Rakhi; Jain, Vaishali; Bankwar, Vishal; Raghuwanshi, Shiv

    2013-01-01

    Variations of the branches of aortic arch are due to alteration in the development of certain branchial arch arteries during embryonic period. Knowledge of these variations is important during aortic instrumentation, thoracic, and neck surgeries. In the present study we observed these variations in fifty-two cadavers from Indian populations. In thirty-three (63.5%) cadavers, the aortic arch showed classical branching pattern which includes brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and left subclavian artery. In nineteen (36.5%) cadavers it showed variations in the branching pattern, which include the two branches, namely, left subclavian artery and a common trunk in 19.2% cases, four branches, namely, brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 15.3% cases, and the three branches, namely, common trunk, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 1.9% cases. PMID:25938106

  2. The Prevalence of Anatomical Variations of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The course and branches of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist vary widely among the population. Due to significant differences in the reported prevalence of such variations, extensive knowledge on the anatomy of the MN is essential to avoid iatrogenic nerve injury. Our aim was to determine the prevalence rates of anatomical variations of the MN in the carpal tunnel and the most common course patterns and variations in its thenar motor branch (TMB). Study Design A systematic search of all major databases was performed to identify articles that studied the prevalence of MN variations in the carpal tunnel and the TMB. No date or language restrictions were set. Extracted data was classified according to Lanz's classification system: variations in the course of the single TMB—extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous (type 1); accessory branches of the MN at the distal carpal tunnel (type 2); high division of the MN (type 3); and the MN and its accessory branches proximal to the carpal tunnel (type 4). Pooled prevalence rates were calculated using MetaXL 2.0. Results Thirty-one studies (n = 3918 hands) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence rates of the extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous courses were 75.2% (95%CI:55.4%-84.7%), 13.5% (95%CI:3.6%-25.7%), and 11.3% (95%CI:2.4%-23.0%), respectively. The prevalence of Lanz group 2, 3, and 4 were 4.6% (95%CI:1.6%-9.1%), 2.6% (95%CI:0.1%-2.8%), and 2.3% (95%CI:0.3%-5.6%), respectively. Ulnar side of branching of the TMB was found in 2.1% (95%CI:0.9%-3.6%) of hands. The prevalence of hypertrophic thenar muscles over the transverse carpal ligament was 18.2% (95%CI:6.8%-33.0%). A transligamentous course of the TMB was more commonly found in hands with hypertrophic thenar muscles (23.4%, 95%CI:5.0%-43.4%) compared to those without hypertrophic musculature (1.7%, 95%CI:0%-100%). In four studies (n = 423 hands), identical bilateral course of the TMB was

  3. SEM characterization of anatomical variation in chitin organization in insect and arthropod cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Williams, Lee; Hung, Albert; Nowlin, Kyle; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    The cuticles of insects and arthropods have some of the most diverse material properties observed in nature, so much so that it is difficult to imagine that all cutciles are primarily composed of the same two materials: a fibrous chitin network and a matrix composed of cuticle proteins. Various factors contribute to the mechanical and optical properties of an insect or arthropod cuticle including the thickness and composition. In this paper, we also identified another factor that may contribute to the optical, surface, and mechanical properties of a cuticle, i.e. the organization of chitin nanofibers and chitin fiber bundles. Self-assembled chitin nanofibers serve as the foundation for all higher order chitin structures in the cuticles of insects and other arthropods via interactions with structural cuticle proteins. Using a technique that enables the characterization of chitin organization in the cuticle of intact insects and arthropod exoskeletons, we demonstrate a structure/function correlation of chitin organization with larger scale anatomical structures. The chitin scaffolds in cuticles display an extraordinarily diverse set of morphologies that may reflect specific mechanical or physical properties. After removal of the proteinaceous and mineral matrix of a cuticle, we observe using SEM diverse nanoscale and micro scale organization of in-situ chitin in the wing, head, eye, leg, and dorsal and ventral thoracic regions of the periodical cicada Magicicada septendecim and in other insects and arthropods. The organization of chitin also appears to have a significant role in the organization of nanoscale surface structures. While microscale bristles and hairs have long been known to be chitin based materials formed as cellular extensions, we have found a nanostructured layer of chitin in the cuticle of the wing of the dog day annual cicada Tibicen tibicens, which may be the scaffold for the nanocone arrays found on the wing. We also use this process to examine

  4. [AICA anatomic variation as a factor of worse prognosis for the surgical treatment of hemi-facial spasm].

    PubMed

    Reizinho, Carla; Casimiro, Miguel; Luís, Ana; Dominguez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm is a neurovascular compression syndrome. These consist in a contacting vessel (most often an artery) to a cranial nerve in cerebelar-pontine angle. The most common is trigeminal neuralgia caused by contact between the superior cerebellar artery and the trigeminal nerve, and less commonly hemifacial spasm, vertiginous syndrome by contact of the antero inferior cerebelar artery with the eighth cranial nerve, glossopharyngeal neuralgia by contact of the postero inferior cerebelar artery and the IX cranial nerve, etc. These syndromes typically occur after the fifth decade of life, when the arterial tortuosity increases due to the arteriosclerosis process. They are however associated anatomical variations of the origin and course of the arteries, which facilitate contact with the nerves of the cerebellar-pontine angle. In hemifacial spasm, the vessel most often related is antero inferior cerebelar and the authors describe a case of a rare anatomical variant in the course of the artery that motivated the development of the disease, which was identified intraoperatively on a surgical approach to the cerebellar-pontine for vascular microdescompression.

  5. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), m-SPINK1(+), or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG(+) was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, p<0.001). AA men were more likely to be m-SPINK1(+) (13% vs 7%; p=0.069) and triple-negative (50% vs 37%; p=0.043). Racial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Farzana A.; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E.; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG+, m-ETS+, m-SPINK1+, or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG+ was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, p < 0.001). AA men were more likely to be m-SPINK1+ (13% vs 7%; p = 0.069) and triple-negative (50% vs 37%; p = 0.043). Racial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. Patient summary This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. PMID:26443432

  7. Intraspecific Variation in Wood Anatomical, Hydraulic, and Foliar Traits in Ten European Beech Provenances Differing in Growth Yield.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Peter; Kurjak, Daniel; von Wühlisch, Georg; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, many studies have described the inter-specific variability of hydraulic-related traits and little is known at the intra-specific level. This information is however mandatory to assess the adaptive capacities of tree populations in the context of increasing drought frequency and severity. Ten 20-year old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances representing the entire distribution range throughout Europe and differing significantly in aboveground biomass increment (ABI) by a factor of up to four were investigated for branch wood anatomical, hydraulic, and foliar traits in a provenance trial located in Northern Europe. We quantified to which extend xylem hydraulic and leaf traits are under genetic control and tested whether the xylem hydraulic properties (hydraulic efficiency and safety) trades off with yield and wood anatomical and leaf traits. Our results showed that only three out of 22 investigated ecophysiological traits showed significant genetic differentiations between provenances, namely vessel density (VD), the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductance and mean leaf size. Depending of the ecophysiological traits measured, genetic differentiation between populations explained 0-14% of total phenotypic variation, while intra-population variability was higher than inter-population variability. Most wood anatomical traits and some foliar traits were additionally related to the climate of provenance origin. The lumen to sapwood area ratio, vessel diameter, theoretical specific conductivity and theoretical leaf-specific conductivity as well as the C:N-ratio increased with climatic aridity at the place of origin while the carbon isotope signature (δ(13)C) decreased. Contrary to our assumption, none of the wood anatomical traits were related to embolism resistance but were strong determinants of hydraulic efficiency. Although ABI was associated with both VD and δ(13)C, both hydraulic efficiency and embolism resistance were

  8. Intraspecific Variation in Wood Anatomical, Hydraulic, and Foliar Traits in Ten European Beech Provenances Differing in Growth Yield

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Peter; Kurjak, Daniel; von Wühlisch, Georg; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, many studies have described the inter-specific variability of hydraulic-related traits and little is known at the intra-specific level. This information is however mandatory to assess the adaptive capacities of tree populations in the context of increasing drought frequency and severity. Ten 20-year old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances representing the entire distribution range throughout Europe and differing significantly in aboveground biomass increment (ABI) by a factor of up to four were investigated for branch wood anatomical, hydraulic, and foliar traits in a provenance trial located in Northern Europe. We quantified to which extend xylem hydraulic and leaf traits are under genetic control and tested whether the xylem hydraulic properties (hydraulic efficiency and safety) trades off with yield and wood anatomical and leaf traits. Our results showed that only three out of 22 investigated ecophysiological traits showed significant genetic differentiations between provenances, namely vessel density (VD), the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductance and mean leaf size. Depending of the ecophysiological traits measured, genetic differentiation between populations explained 0–14% of total phenotypic variation, while intra-population variability was higher than inter-population variability. Most wood anatomical traits and some foliar traits were additionally related to the climate of provenance origin. The lumen to sapwood area ratio, vessel diameter, theoretical specific conductivity and theoretical leaf-specific conductivity as well as the C:N-ratio increased with climatic aridity at the place of origin while the carbon isotope signature (δ13C) decreased. Contrary to our assumption, none of the wood anatomical traits were related to embolism resistance but were strong determinants of hydraulic efficiency. Although ABI was associated with both VD and δ13C, both hydraulic efficiency and embolism resistance were

  9. Anatomical Variations of the Popliteal Artery and its Tibial Branches: Analysis in 1242 Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Kil, Sung-Won; Jung, Gyoo-Sik

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the variations in branching of the popliteal artery by reviewing femoral arteriograms. Between 2004 and 2006, digital subtraction angiographies of both lower extremities were performed in 621 patients. We reviewed these 1242 arteriograms retrospectively in order to analyze the branching pattern of the popliteal artery. Of the 1242 extremities, 1108 extremities (89.2%) had normal branching pattern of the popliteal artery. The remaining 134 extremities (10.8%; 65 right, 69 left) in 105 patients (66 men, 39 women; 76 unilateral, 29 bilateral) showed seven variant branching patterns: hypoplastic or aplastic posterior tibial artery (PT) (n = 63, 5.1%); hypoplastic or aplastic anterior tibial artery (AT) (n = 21, 1.7%); trifurcation (n = 19, 1.5%); high origin of AT (n = 15, 1.2%); hypoplastic or aplastic PT and AT (n = 10, 0.8%); high origin of PT (n = 5, 0.4%); and anterior tibioperoneal trunk (n = 1, 0.1%). When the branching pattern of the popliteal artery is normal in one extremity, there is a 13% probability the other side will be a variant pattern. When the branching pattern is variant in one extremity, there is a 28% probability the opposite side will also contain a variation. Variations in branching of the popliteal artery are not uncommon. Awareness of these variations is important for evaluation of the lower extremity arteriograms and has clinical implications for vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists.

  10. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography*

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Silva Neto, Eulâmpio José; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. PMID:26811552

  11. Racial/ethnic variation in the anatomic subsite location of in situ and invasive cancers of the colon.

    PubMed Central

    Shavers, Vickie L.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Approximately 145,000 Americans were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 56,000 died from colorectal cancer in 2006. Although colorectal screening can reduce mortality and incidence, U.S. screening rates are particularly low for racial/ethnic minorities. Racial differences in the subsite location of colon cancers could have implications for colorectal screening. This study examines the anatomic subsite distribution of tumors among African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American/Pacific-Islander and non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients with colon cancer. METHODS: Surveillance and End Results program data for 254,469 primary in situ and invasive colon cancers for patients from 1973-2002 are included in this analysis. Descriptive analyses and logistic regression are used to describe and examine variations in the proportion of colon cancers diagnosed at sites proximal to the sigmoid colon or proximal to the splenic flexure over three successive time periods. RESULTS: The proportion of colon cancers diagnosed at the sigmoid colon was 15.6-21.3% lower, while diagnoses at the descending colon were 40.5.0-45.3.0% higher for African Americans than NHWs over the three time periods. In logistic regression analyses adjusted for gender, age group and year of diagnosis, the odds of a diagnosis of cancer proximal to the sigmoid colon or proximal to the splenic flexure was significantly higher for African Americans but lower for Hispanics and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders compared to NHWs. DISCUSSION: The higher proportion of cancers among African Americans diagnosed at sites that are generally attempted but not always reached with a sigmoidscope suggest that African Americans may benefit from screening colonoscopy. They also highlight the need for systems that collect data that would allow a direct examination of the role that the differential use of specific colon screening tests and polypectomy play in racial/ethnic variation in colon cancer incidence and in the

  12. Anatomical variation of the spinous and transverse processes in the caudal cervical vertebrae and the first thoracic vertebra in horses.

    PubMed

    Santinelli, I; Beccati, F; Arcelli, R; Pepe, M

    2016-01-01

    There are scant data on the incidence of different anatomical variants of the equine caudal cervical spine, despite interest in cervical pathology. To identify morphological radiographic variation in the 6th and 7th cervical vertebrae and the first thoracic vertebra in horses of different breeds and to determine whether there are breed- and sex-related differences. Retrospective descriptive study. Radiographs of the cervical spine of 270 horses were assessed retrospectively. The Chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test when appropriate, was used to test for associations between radiographic findings and sex or breed, and residual analysis was performed to localise differences. Chi-square tests and calculation of phi coefficient (φ) were used to test for associations between different types of radiological variation. Three variants were identified in the spinous process of the 7th cervical vertebra, and 2 variants were identified in the spinous process of the first thoracic vertebra. The presence of the spinous process of the 7th cervical vertebra was associated with breed, and transposition of the ventral process of the 6th cervical vertebra onto the ventral aspect of the 7th cervical vertebra was associated with sex. The shape of the spinous process of first thoracic vertebra was associated with the shape of the spinous process of the 7th cervical vertebra and with the presence of transposition of the ventral process of the 6th cervical vertebra onto the ventral aspect of the 7th. A large number of anatomical variants can be detected radiographically in the caudal cervical area; some of these have a higher frequency, depending on sex and breed. Knowledge of the different shapes is very important in avoiding misdiagnosis of periarticular new bone formation. The spinous process of the first thoracic vertebra has 2 morphological variants. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Assessment and Evaluation of Anatomic Variations of Retromolar Pad: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Anchal; Siwach, Amit; Singh, Manas; Bhargava, Akshay; Siwach, Reenu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The retromolar pad also called piriformis papilla is a mucosal elevation located in the retromolar area covering the retromolar triangle. After molar loss, the bony alveolar process and surrounding soft periodontal tissue remodel, mainly resorb and blend with retromolar pad. It is a key intraoral landmark in prosthodontics. Aim The aim of this in-vitro study was to analyze the various anatomical shapes and sizes of retromolar pad in 150 completely edentulous patients between 55 to 70 years of age group. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 150 completely edentulous patients. The shapes of retromolar pad on the left and right side were seen and divided into pear, triangular and round shape. The comparison of the mean longitudinal diameter and transverse diameter on the right and left sides was done. The data was evaluated statistically. The chi-square test was used for the comparison between the proportions with the help of standard deviation, t-test was used for comparison between the left and the right side and ANOVA test was used for comparison between the various shapes of the retromolar pads. Results The result showed that there was statistically significant difference among different shapes of retromolar pad and there was significant difference in mean transverse and longitudinal diameter on right and left side, the mean value of the longitudinal diameter on left and right side was 8.81 and 8.69 whereas the mean value of the transverse diameter on left and right side was 6.79 and 6.82 respectively and p-value obtained for both was 0.550 and 0.814 respectively. Conclusion The study conclude that there are three different shapes of retromolar pad among which pear and triangular shaped retomolar pad provides more stability in lower denture because of increase surface area. PMID:27437350

  14. [An ischemic syndrome of the oculumotor nucleus: associated clinical and anatomical variations on a theme].

    PubMed

    Bonnaud, I; Salama, J

    2003-09-01

    Nuclear syndrome of the oculomotor nerve was first described in 1981, it is characterized by the association of an ipsilateral third nerve palsy with a paresis of elevation in the contralateral eye. This syndrome can be caused by vascular or tumoral lesions in the upper midbrain. It is rarely due to ischemic unilateral mesencephalic lesions, because ischemic lesions of the midbrain are usually integrated in a diffuse involvement of the brainstem and the thalamo-sub-thalamic region. In case of nuclear syndrome of the third nerve due to isolated upper midbrain infarct in the paramedian territory, dependent on branches of the basilar artery, oculomotor symptoms are frequently isolated. On the contrary, in fascicular syndromes of the third nerve, resulting from stroke in more lateral territories upon branches of the posterior cerebral artery, many neurological symptoms are associated with the oculomotor signs. We describe 3 patients presenting with a characteristic nuclear syndrome of the third nerve, resulting from a unilateral paramedian ischemic stroke in the upper midbrain, confirmed by cerebral CT scan or MRI examination. Clinical presentation differed in each case, and marked contralateral hemiparesia, cerebellar syndrome and focal asterixis were associated in various ways with the stereotyped oculomotor disorders. In the 3 cases, the nuclear syndrome of the third nerve was associated with fascicular involvement of the nerve, in an unusual clinical picture. The theoretical distinction between nuclear and fascicular syndromes is supported by the anatomical description of the arterial segmentation in the upper midbrain, which remains debated since the first description. According to the variability of clinical presentations, it seems that the arterial territories may be more variable than initially described. Therefore, ischemic lesions of the upper midbrain may involve some vascular borderzones with a high inter-individual variability. Upper midbrain strokes may

  15. Anatomic variations of neck vessels and the course of pediatric internal jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai-Ming; Liu, En-Ci; Li, Ping; Shangguan, Wang-Ning; Li, Jun; Lian, Qing-Quan

    2017-10-01

    Landmark-guided internal jugular vein cannulation is difficult for pediatric patients but useful, especially when ultrasound equipment is unavailable. Therefore, it is important to define the adjacent anatomic characteristics of the pediatric internal jugular vein. In 210 children the course of the internal jugular vein, and common carotid and vertebral arteries was measured from the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area using ultrasound. From the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area, vessel diameter increased with internal jugular vein increasing by 12%, and common carotid and vertebral arteries increasing by 5% each. From the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area, the number of patients with a medial common carotid artery position relative to the internal jugular vein increased, whereas those with a lateral position decreased; the number of patients with nonoverlapped common carotid artery-internal jugular vein increased, and those with totally overlapped decreased. In contrast, the overlapping status of vertebral artery-internal jugular vein changes oppositely. More than 97.14% of the vertebral artery lies lateral to the internal jugular vein at these levels. The minimal vertebral artery-internal jugular vein depth decreased from 0.46±0.20 to 0.37±0.19 cm. The angle from the internal jugular vein line to the horizontal line of the body was 83.35±9.04 degrees. The common carotid artery and internal jugular vein are farther apart as one moves down the neck, whereas the vertebral artery and internal jugular vein are getting together. Additionally, the diameter of the internal jugular vein increased. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  17. [Variations in the parathyroid glands. Number, situation and arterial vascularization. Anatomical study and surgical application].

    PubMed

    Delattre, J F; Flament, J B; Palot, J P; Pluot, M

    1982-11-01

    The authors have made a study of the variations in the parathyroid glands, basing their report on 100 block dissections of the neck injected with latex. The results allow a better understanding of certain types of parathyroid insufficiency following surgery to the thyroid gland. In almost half the cases the vascular arrangement was sufficient to explain how hypoparathyroidism might come about following surgery to the thyroid gland.

  18. Anatomical variations of the anterior talofibular ligament of the human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    MILNER, C. E.; SOAMES, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Compared with other joints, the ligaments of the ankle have not been studied in great detail; consequently relatively little literature exists. The positions of the 3 major bands of the lateral collateral ligament are well known and documented (Schafer et al. 1915; Sarrafian, 1983; McMinn, 1994; Palastanga et al. 1994; Williams et al. 1995). The detailed anatomy of the ligaments is, however, relatively complex with variations of the major bands and several minor additional bands being reported (Sarrafian, 1993; Burks & Morgan, 1994; Rosenberg et al. 1995). PMID:9419003

  19. Interindividual anatomical variations affect the plate-to-bone fit during osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hidemasa; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Hara, Tatsuya; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual variations in the teardrop, which represents the volar projection of the lunate facet of the distal radius, cause unsatisfactory fitting of the volar locking plate to the bone. This can cause flexor tendon ruptures. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study and measured the ratio of teardrop height and the teardrop inclination angle as parameters of teardrop configuration for 200 standardized lateral radiographs (average age of the patients, 51 years). We also quantified the influence of the teardrop morphology by analyzing the fit of three locking plates to three radii with differing teardrop inclination angles using a three-dimensional computer-aided design system. The average ratios of the teardrop height and teardrop inclination angle were 0.42° (0.30-0.56°) and 28.8° (9.9-44.9°), respectively. The teardrop inclination angle was moderately correlated with age in men but not in women. In the plate-to-bone fit analyses, the fit of all the plates was significantly different between bones, with the configuration of the radius with the lowest teardrop inclination angle being the closest approximation to that of each plate. We demonstrated the interindividual variation in the shape of the teardrop and its influence on the fit of the volar plate, highlighting the importance of careful plate selection for achieving osteosynthesis of bones with a high teardrop inclination angle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:953-960, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anatomical variation of posterior slope of tibial plateau in adult Eastern Indian population.

    PubMed

    Medda, Shyamalendu; Kundu, Rajib; Sengupta, Sohini; Pal, Ananda Kisor

    2017-01-01

    Upper surface of the proximal tibial end, tibial plateau, has a slope directed posteroinferiorly relative to the long axis of the middle of the shaft. It has important consideration in surgeries such as knee arthroplasty, high tibial osteotomy, and medical imaging of the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to estimate the tibial plateau angle (TPA) by plain radiograph in the adult Eastern Indian population as during literature review, we were unable to find any study, except one (without specific reference axis), on this variable among the Indian population. A sample was taken from adult patients attending the outpatient department of orthopedics of the institute with minor knee problems. Measurement of the TPA was done in the true lateral radiographs of the knee joints of the selected subjects by a standardized method. TPA varied widely from 6° to 24°, with the mean ± standard deviation value 13.6° ±3.5°. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference of TPA between left and right knees, both in male (P = 0.748) and female (P = 0.917) separately and in the entire study population irrespective of gender (P = 0.768). Comparison of TPA between male (13.3° ± 3.3°) and female (13.9° ± 3.4°) by Student's unpaired t-test showed no sexual dimorphism (P = 0.248). There were poor correlations of TPA with age and body mass index. The present study described the variations of the TPA in the adult Eastern Indian population (range 6°-24°, mean ± SD 13.6° ± 3.5°, no laterality, no sexual dimorphism, poor correlation with age and BMI). Knowledge of this study could be used in different orthopedic surgeries and imaging technique in or around the knee joint.

  1. Anatomical variation of posterior slope of tibial plateau in adult Eastern Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Shyamalendu; Kundu, Rajib; Sengupta, Sohini; Pal, Ananda Kisor

    2017-01-01

    Background: Upper surface of the proximal tibial end, tibial plateau, has a slope directed posteroinferiorly relative to the long axis of the middle of the shaft. It has important consideration in surgeries such as knee arthroplasty, high tibial osteotomy, and medical imaging of the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to estimate the tibial plateau angle (TPA) by plain radiograph in the adult Eastern Indian population as during literature review, we were unable to find any study, except one (without specific reference axis), on this variable among the Indian population. Materials and Methods: A sample was taken from adult patients attending the outpatient department of orthopedics of the institute with minor knee problems. Measurement of the TPA was done in the true lateral radiographs of the knee joints of the selected subjects by a standardized method. Results: TPA varied widely from 6° to 24°, with the mean ± standard deviation value 13.6° ±3.5°. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference of TPA between left and right knees, both in male (P = 0.748) and female (P = 0.917) separately and in the entire study population irrespective of gender (P = 0.768). Comparison of TPA between male (13.3° ± 3.3°) and female (13.9° ± 3.4°) by Student's unpaired t-test showed no sexual dimorphism (P = 0.248). There were poor correlations of TPA with age and body mass index. Conclusion: The present study described the variations of the TPA in the adult Eastern Indian population (range 6°–24°, mean ± SD 13.6° ± 3.5°, no laterality, no sexual dimorphism, poor correlation with age and BMI). Knowledge of this study could be used in different orthopedic surgeries and imaging technique in or around the knee joint. PMID:28216753

  2. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance diagnosis of variations in the anatomical location of the major salivary glands in 1680 dogs and 187 cats.

    PubMed

    Durand, A; Finck, M; Sullivan, M; Hammond, G

    2016-03-01

    During assessment of routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heads of dogs, variations in the location of mandibular and zygomatic salivary glands (SGs) were observed incidentally. The aims of this retrospective study were to describe anatomical variations of the major SGs found on MRI and computed tomography (CT) studies of the head in dogs and cats and to investigate possible clinical relevancy. No anatomical variation of the SGs was seen in cats, but in dogs, although variation of the parotid SG was not identified, that of the mandibular SG was found in 33/1680 animals (2%), either unilaterally (6/33 right-sided, 13/33 left-sided) or bilaterally (14/33). The Border terrier breed (19/33, 58%) was over-represented. Each atypically located mandibular SG was positioned medial to the digastric muscle and rostral to the retropharyngeal lymph node. The sublingual glands were difficult to delineate from the mandibular glands. Anatomical variation of one zygomatic gland (3/4 left-sided) was identified in four small-breed dogs (0.2%). Each atypically located zygomatic gland was tilted at the ventrorostral aspect of the masseter muscle underneath the skin surface. MRI and CT characteristics were not different between typically and atypically located SGs. None of the dogs had clinical signs related with SG disease. It was concluded that, with suspected breed predispositions, incidental unilateral or bilateral anatomical variations of mandibular and zygomatic SGs can be encountered in dogs and an awareness of these possible variations may be important in pre-surgical planning.

  3. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization: A review of the relevant anatomy, technique, complications, and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Taryn; Du Plessis, Maira; Prekupec, Matthew P; Gielecki, Jerzy; Zurada, Anna; Shane Tubbs, R; Loukas, Marios

    2017-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a commonly used and important intervention. Despite its regular use it is still associated with a high incidence of complications especially infection and catheter tip embolization. Addition of ultrasound guidance to the technique has shown great improvement to the time and number of attempts for successful catheterization. The preference of vein depends greatly on the situation; subclavian vein is the preferred method overall but internal jugular vein is preferred in patients undergoing cardiac or thoracic surgery. This is especially true for pediatric patients in whom femoral vein catheterization is still preferred despite it carrying a higher risk than other locales. Addition of ultrasound guidance greatly reduces the incidence of arterial puncture and subsequent hematoma formation regardless of location. This is because it allows for visualization of anatomical variation prior to intervention and continual visualization of the needle during the placement. It is noteworthy however, that addition of ultrasound does not prevent complications such as catheter tip embolization as this may occur even with perfect placement. The value of ultrasound usage is undisputable since all studies assessing the difference between it and landmark based methods showed preferable outcome. Reduction of time and number of attempts is sufficient argument to make ultrasound guidance standard practice. Clin. Anat. 30:237-250, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Incidence and anatomical variations of accessory navicular bone in patients with foot pain: A retrospective radiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalbouneh, Heba; Alajoulin, Omar; Alsalem, Mohammad; Humoud, Noor; Shawaqfeh, Jamil; Alkhoujah, Mohammad; Abu-Hassan, Hana; Mahafza, Waleed; Badran, Darwish

    2017-05-01

    The accessory navicular (AN) is an accessory ossicle anatomically located on the medial side of the foot, proximal to the navicular and continuous with the tibialis posterior tendon. It is occasionally a source of pain and local tenderness. Knowledge of the AN and its morphological variations can help identify the source of a patient's symptoms and prevent misinterpreting them as fractures. Foot radiographs from 1,240 patients who presented in two centers with chronic foot pain, or persistent pain developed after trauma, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and variations of the AN in relation to gender. The AN was found in 20.9% (259/1240). Among 259 feet with AN, Type 1 was identified in 25.4% (66/259), Type 2 in 42.4% (110/259) (20.0% (52/259) Type 2 A and 22.4% (58/259) Type 2B), and Type 3 in 32.0% (83/259). After 13 patients with incomplete medical records had been excluded, the remaining records showed that foot pain was associated with an AN in 10.6% of patients (26/246). In 1.2% of cases, two additional ossicles were found proximal to the navicular, possibly the result of multiple ossification centers that did not unite at the time of development. Patient symptomatology was related to the presence of an AN in 2% of patients with chronic foot pain. The AN could vary morphologically. Our data can enhance our diagnostic skills in detecting these ossicles. Clin. Anat. 30:436-444, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical variations on prostate proton therapy using daily in-room CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Frank Ciernik, I.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomical variations and their dosimetric impact during the course of fractionated proton therapy (PT) of prostate cancer and to assess the robustness of the current treatment planning techniques. Methods: Simulation and daily in-room CT scans from ten prostate carcinoma patients were analyzed. PT treatment plans (78 Gy in 39 fractions of 2 Gy) were created on the simulation CT, delivering 25 fractions to PTV1 (expanded from prostate and seminal vesicles), followed by 14 boost fractions to PTV2 (expanded from prostate). Plans were subsequently applied to daily CT, with beams aligned to the prostate center in the sagittal plane. For five patients having a sufficiently large daily imaging volume, structure contours were manually drawn, and plans were evaluated for all CT sets. For the other five patients, the plans were evaluated for six selected fractions. The daily CT was matched to the simulation CT through deformable registration. The registration accuracy was validated for each fraction, and the three patients with a large number of accurately registered fractions were used for dose accumulation. Results: In individual fractions, the coverage of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and PTV1 was generally maintained at the corresponding prescription dose. For PTV2, the volume covered by the fractional prescription dose of 2 Gy (i.e., V2) was, on average, reduced by less than 3% compared to the simulation plan. Among the 225 (39 x 5 + 6 x 5) fractions examined, 15 showed a V2 reduction larger than 5%, of which ten were caused by a large variation in rectal gas, and five were due to a prostate shift in the craniocaudal direction. The fractional dose to the anterior rectal wall was found to increase for one patient who had large rectal gas volume in 25 of the 39 fractions, and another who experienced significant prostate volume reduction during the treatment. The fractional bladder dose generally increased with decreasing fullness

  6. Effects of Anatomical Differences on Electromagnetic Fields, SAR, and Temperature Change.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Deniz, Cem Murat; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K; Collins, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic field simulations are increasingly used to assure RF safety of patients during MRI exams. In practice, however, tissue property distribution of the patient being imaged is not known, but may be represented with a pre-existing model. Repeatedly, agreement in transmit magnetic (B1(+)) field distributions between two geometries has been used to suggest agreement in heating distributions. Here we examine relative effects of anatomical differences on B1(+) distribution, Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and temperature change (ΔT). Numerical simulations were performed for a single surface coil positioned adjacent a homogeneous phantom and bovine phantom, each with slight geometric variations, and adjacent two different human body models. Experimental demonstration was performed on a bovine phantom using MR thermometry and B1(+) mapping. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that B1(+) distributions in different samples can be well correlated, while notable difference in maximum SAR and ΔT occur. This work illustrates challenges associated with utilizing simulations or experiments for RF safety assurance purposes. Reliance on B1(+) distributions alone for validation of simulations and/or experiments with a sample or subject for assurance of safety in another should be performed with caution.

  7. A multicentre comparison of the dosimetric impact of inter- and intra-fractional anatomical variations in fractionated cervix cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran P.; De Leeuw, Astrid; Lang, Stefan; Mohamed, Sandy; Jamema, Swamidas V.; Anderson, Clare; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the dosimetric impact of organ and target variations relative to the applicator for intracavitary brachytherapy by a multicentre analysis with different application techniques and fractionation schemes. Material and methods DVH data from 363 image/contour sets (120 patients, 6 institutions) were included for 1–6 fractions per patient, with imaging intervals ranging from several hours to ∼20 days. Variations between images acquired within one (intra-application) or between consecutive applicator insertions (inter-application) were evaluated. Dose plans based on a reference MR or CT image series were superimposed onto subsequent image sets and D2cm3 for the bladder, rectum and sigmoid and D90 for HR CTV were recorded. Results For the whole sample, the systematic dosimetric variations for all organs at risk, i.e. mean variations of D2cm3, were found to be minor (<5%), while random variations, i.e. standard deviations were found to be high due to large variations in individual cases. The D2cm3 variations (mean ± 1SD) were 0.6 ± 19.5%, 4.1 ± 21.7% and 1.6 ± 26.8%, for the bladder, rectum and sigmoid. For HR CTV, the variations of D90 were found to be −1.1 ± 13.1% for the whole sample. Grouping of the results by intra- and inter-application variations showed that random uncertainties for bladder and sigmoid were 3–7% larger when re-implanting the applicator for individual fractions. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were detected in dosimetric variations for the HR CTV. Using 20% uncertainty of physical dose for OAR and 10% for HR CTV, the effects on total treatment dose for a 4 fraction HDR schedule at clinically relevant dose levels were found to be 4–8 Gy EQD2 for OAR and 3 Gy EQD2 for HR CTV. Conclusions Substantial variations occur in fractionated cervix cancer BT with higher impact close to clinical threshold levels. The treatment approach has to balance uncertainties for

  8. Evaluation of Anatomic Variations in Maxillary Sinus with the Aid of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in a Population in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zamiri, Barbad; Momeni Danaei, Shahla; Salehi, Setareh; Hamedani, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus can be detected in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and may assist to locate the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and define the maxillary sinus morphology more accurately for a more strict surgical treatment plan. Purpose The study aimed to determine normal variations of the maxillary sinus with the aid of CBCT in a sample population in south of Iran. Materials and Method This cross-sectional prevalence study was based on evaluation of 198 projection data of CBCT scans of some Iranian patients aged 18-45 who referred to a private oral and maxillofacial radiology center in Shiraz from 2011 to 2013. CBCT scans were taken and analyzed with NewTom VGi device and software. The anatomic variations which were evaluated in the axial images included the presence of alveolar pneumatization, anterior pneumatization, exostosis, and hypoplasia. Moreover the location and height of sinus septa, and the location of PSAA were assessed. SPSS software (version 17.0) was used to analyze the data. Results In a total of 396 examined sinuses, maxillary sinus alveolar pneumatization was the most common anatomic variation detected. Anterior pneumatization was detected in 96 sinuses (24.2%). Antral septa were found in 180 sinuses (45.4%) and were mostly located in the anterior region. Meanwhile, PSAA was mostly detected intra-osseous in 242 sinuses (65.7%). Conclusion Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus were common findings in CBCT of the maxilla. Preoperative imaging with CBCT seems to be very helpful for assessing the location of PSAA and the maxillary sinus morphology, which may be used to adjust the surgical treatment plan to yield more successful treatments. PMID:26966702

  9. Evaluation of Intrahepatic Perfusion on Fusion Imaging Using a Combined CT/SPECT System: Influence of Anatomic Variations on Hemodynamic Modification Before Installation of Implantable Port Systems for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Background. In some patients with hepatic tumors, anatomic variations in the hepatic arteries may require hemodynamic modification to render effective hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy delivered via implantable port systems. We used a combined CT/SPECT system to obtain fused images of the intrahepatic perfusion patterns in patients with such anatomic variations and assessed their effects on the treatment response of hepatic tumors. Methods. Using a combined SPECT/CT system, we obtained fused images in 110 patients with malignant liver tumors (n = 75) or liver metastasis from unresectable pancreatic cancer (n = 35). Patients with anatomic hepatic arteries variations underwent hemodynamic modification before the placement of implantable port systems for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. We evaluated their intrahepatic perfusion patterns and the initial treatment response of their liver tumors. The perfusion patterns on the fused images were classified as homogeneous, local hypoperfusion, and/or perfusion defect. Using the WHO criteria of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), no change (NC), and progressive disease (PD), we evaluated the patients' tumor responses after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. The treatment was regarded as effective in patients who achieved a complete response or partial response. Results. Anatomic hepatic artery variations were present in 15 of the 110 patients (13.6%); 5 manifested replacement of the left hepatic artery (LHA), 8 of the right hepatic artery (RHA), and 1 each had replacement of the RHA and LHA, and replacement of the LHA plus an accessory RHA. In 13 of these 15 patients (87%), occlusion with metallic coils was successful. On fusion imaging, the perfusion patterns were recorded as homogeneous in 6 patients (43%), as hypoperfusion in 7 (50%), and 1 patient had a perfusion defect (7.1%) in the embolized arterial region. Of the 8 patients with RHA replacement, 4 manifested a homogeneous distribution and

  10. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method: We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy…

  11. Effectiveness of Plastinated Anatomical Specimens Depicting Common Sports Injuries to Enhance Musculoskeletal Injury Evaluation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamura, Kaori; Stickley, Christopher D.; Labrash, Steven J.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Context: Plastination techniques have emerged as effective methods for preserving human tissue and enabling human specimens to be utilized in a fashion similar to anatomical models with much greater accuracy. Opportunities to observe and experience human specimens in classroom settings should be beneficial to undergraduate and graduate students in…

  12. Effectiveness of Plastinated Anatomical Specimens Depicting Common Sports Injuries to Enhance Musculoskeletal Injury Evaluation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamura, Kaori; Stickley, Christopher D.; Labrash, Steven J.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Context: Plastination techniques have emerged as effective methods for preserving human tissue and enabling human specimens to be utilized in a fashion similar to anatomical models with much greater accuracy. Opportunities to observe and experience human specimens in classroom settings should be beneficial to undergraduate and graduate students in…

  13. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method: We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy…

  14. Estimating anatomical trajectories with Bayesian mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, G; Penny, W D; Ridgway, G R; Ourselin, S; Friston, K J

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a mass-univariate framework for the analysis of whole-brain structural trajectories using longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry data and Bayesian inference. Our approach to developmental and aging longitudinal studies characterizes heterogeneous structural growth/decline between and within groups. In particular, we propose a probabilistic generative model that parameterizes individual and ensemble average changes in brain structure using linear mixed-effects models of age and subject-specific covariates. Model inversion uses Expectation Maximization (EM), while voxelwise (empirical) priors on the size of individual differences are estimated from the data. Bayesian inference on individual and group trajectories is realized using Posterior Probability Maps (PPM). In addition to parameter inference, the framework affords comparisons of models with varying combinations of model order for fixed and random effects using model evidence. We validate the model in simulations and real MRI data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. We further demonstrate how subject specific characteristics contribute to individual differences in longitudinal volume changes in healthy subjects, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Estimating anatomical trajectories with Bayesian mixed-effects modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, G.; Penny, W.D.; Ridgway, G.R.; Ourselin, S.; Friston, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a mass-univariate framework for the analysis of whole-brain structural trajectories using longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry data and Bayesian inference. Our approach to developmental and aging longitudinal studies characterizes heterogeneous structural growth/decline between and within groups. In particular, we propose a probabilistic generative model that parameterizes individual and ensemble average changes in brain structure using linear mixed-effects models of age and subject-specific covariates. Model inversion uses Expectation Maximization (EM), while voxelwise (empirical) priors on the size of individual differences are estimated from the data. Bayesian inference on individual and group trajectories is realized using Posterior Probability Maps (PPM). In addition to parameter inference, the framework affords comparisons of models with varying combinations of model order for fixed and random effects using model evidence. We validate the model in simulations and real MRI data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. We further demonstrate how subject specific characteristics contribute to individual differences in longitudinal volume changes in healthy subjects, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). PMID:26190405

  16. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    PubMed Central

    Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa, Modesto; Wiechers, Carlos; la Roca-Chiapas, Jose Maria De; Moreles, Alejandro Maldonado; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Huerta-Franco, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT) and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright, fowler, and supine positions; 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively). RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions. The ETT means were 5.2 ± 1.1 s, 6.1 ± 1.5 s, and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively. Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects’ anatomical position, and r = -0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject’s BMI. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique, it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT. PMID:18837088

  17. Effects of prescribed burning on ecophysiological, anatomical and stem hydraulic properties in Pinus pinea L.

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Savi, Tadeja; Ascoli, Davide; Castagneri, Daniele; Esposito, Assunta; Mayr, Stefan; Nardini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Prescribed burning (PB) is a widespread management technique for wildfire hazard abatement. Understanding PB effects on tree ecophysiology is key to defining burn prescriptions aimed at reducing fire hazard in Mediterranean pine plantations, such as Pinus pinea L. stands. We assessed physiological responses of adult P. pinea trees to PB using a combination of dendroecological, anatomical, hydraulic and isotopic analyses. Tree-ring widths, xylem cell wall thickness, lumen area, hydraulic diameter and tree-ring δ(13)C and δ(18)O were measured in trees on burned and control sites. Vulnerability curves were elaborated to assess tree hydraulic efficiency or safety. Despite the relatively intense thermal treatment (the residence time of temperatures above 50 °C at the stem surface ranged between 242 and 2239 s), burned trees did not suffer mechanical damage to stems, nor significant reduction in radial growth. Moreover, the PB did not affect xylem structure and tree hydraulics. No variations in (13)C-derived water use efficiency were recorded. This confirmed the high resistance of P. pinea to surface fire at the stem base. However, burned trees showed consistently lower δ(18)O values in the PB year, as a likely consequence of reduced competition for water and nutrients due to the understory burning, which increased both photosynthetic activity and stomatal conductance. Our multi-approach analysis offers new perspectives on post-fire survival strategies of P. pinea in an environment where fires are predicted to increase in frequency and severity during the 21st century.

  18. Effects of Instructional Strategies Using Cross Sections on the Recognition of Anatomical Structures in Correlated CT and MR Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Paas, Fred; Johnson, Tristan E.; Su, Yung K.; Payer, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    This research is an effort to best utilize the interactive anatomical images for instructional purposes based on cognitive load theory. Three studies explored the differential effects of three computer-based instructional strategies that use anatomical cross-sections to enhance the interpretation of radiological images. These strategies include:…

  19. A comparison of anatomical and dosimetric variations in the first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haihua; Tu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei; Ding, Weijun; Yu, Changhui; Zhou, Chao

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this study was to compare anatomical and dosimetric variations in first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled. Each patient had two repeat computed tomography (CT) scans before the 16th and 25th fraction. Hybrid IMRT plans were generated to evaluate the dosimetric changes. There was a significant decrease of the transverse diameter of nasopharyngeal and neck as well as gross tumor volume (GTV) in the primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (GTVnx) and involved lymph nodes (GTVnd) during the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Consequently, there was a significant reduction of the percentage of the volume receiving the prescribed dose (V100) of CTV1 and GTVnd, which was more prominent after the first 15 fractions treatment compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant increase in the mean dose (Dmean) and percentage of volume receiving ≥ 30 Gy (V30) to the bilateral parotid in the first 15 fractions (p < 0.05), but not between fraction 16 and 25. While the maximum dose to the spinal cord was significantly increased both in the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05), the increase of the percent of spinal cord volume receiving ≥ 40 Gy (V40) was significantly higher in the first 15 fractions compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p < 0.05). Based on the dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, a total 39.1% (9/23) of phantom plan 1 (generated by applying the beam configurations of the original IMRT treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan) and 17.4% (4/23) of phantom 2 (generated by applying the beam configurations of the replan 1 to the anatomy of the third CT scan) were out of limit for the dose to the normal critical structures. In conclusion, our data indicated that

  20. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke; Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason; Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P.; Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael; Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  1. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit-based Dose Deformation Framework.

    PubMed

    Qi, X Sharon; Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke; Staton, Robert J; Pukala, Jason; Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A; Lee, Steve P; Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael; Chen, Allen M; Kupelian, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real-time assessment of anatomic and dosimetric variations is

  2. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy adults. The model components included the levator veli palatini (LVP), the velum, and the posterior pharyngeal wall, and the simulations were based on material parameters from the literature. The outcome metrics were the VP closure force and LVP muscle activation required to achieve VP closure. Results Our average model compared favorably with experimental data from the literature. Simulations of 1,000 random anatomies reflected the large variability in closure forces observed experimentally. VP distance had the greatest effect on both outcome metrics when considering the observed anatomic variability. Other anatomical parameters were ranked by their predicted influences on the outcome metrics. Conclusions Our results support the implication that interventions for VP dysfunction that decrease anterior to posterior VP portal distance, increase velar length, and/or increase LVP cross-sectional area may be very effective. Future modeling studies will help to further our understanding of speech mechanics and optimize treatment of speech disorders. PMID:26049120

  3. What is the frequency of anatomical variations and pathological findings in maxillary sinuses among patients subjected to maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Diago-Vilalta, Jose-Vicente; Melo, María; Bagán, Leticia; Soldini, Maria-Costanza; Di-Nardo, Chiara; Ata-Ali, Fadi; Mañes-Ferrer, José-Félix

    2017-01-01

    Background When considering dental implant rehabilitation in atrophic posterior sectors, the maxillary sinuses must be evaluated in detail. Knowledge of the anatomical variations and of the potential lesions found in these structures conditions the outcome of sinus lift procedures and therefore of the dental implants. A systematic review is made to determine the frequency of anatomical variations and pathological findings in maxillary sinuses among patients subjected to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) literature search was made of articles published up until 20 December 2015. The systematic review was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). The quality of the studies included in the review was assessed using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies (MINORS). Results The combinations of search terms resulted in a list of 3482 titles. Twenty-three studies finally met the inclusion criteria and were entered in the systematic review, comprising a total of 11,971 patients. The most common anatomical variations were pneumatization and sinus septa. The prevalence of maxillary sinus disease ranged from 7.5% to 66%. The most common pathological findings of the maxillary sinus were mucosal thickening, sinusitis and sinus opacification. Conclusions Although the main indication of CBCT of the maxillary sinus in dentistry is sinus floor elevation/treatment planning and evaluation prior to dental implant placement, this imaging modality is increasingly also used for endodontic and periodontal purposes. There is no consensus regarding the cutoff point beyond which mucosal thickening of the maxillary sinus should be regarded as pathological, and the definition of maxillary sinusitis moreover varies greatly in the scientific literature. In this regard, international consensus is required in relation to these concepts, with a clear distinction between healthy and

  4. The Effect of Electrode Designs Based on the Anatomical Heart Location for the Non-Contact Heart Activity Measurement.

    PubMed

    Gi, Sun Ok; Lee, Young-Jae; Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Seung Pyo; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeng-Nam; Kang, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2015-12-01

    This research is an extension of a previous research [1] on the different effects of sensor location that is relatively suitable for heart rate sensing. This research aimed to elucidate the causes of wide variations in heart rate measurements from the same sensor position among subjects, as observed in previous research [1], and to enhance designs of the inductive textile electrode to overcome these variations. To achieve this, this study comprised two parts: In part 1, X-ray examinations were performed to determine the cause of the wide variations noted in the findings from previous research [1], and we found that at the same sensor position, the heart activity signal differed with slight differences in the positions of the heart of each subject owing to individual differences in the anatomical heart location. In part 2, three types of dual-loop-type textile electrodes were devised to overcome variations in heart location that were confirmed in part 1 of the study. The variations with three types of sensor designs were compared with that with a single-round type of electrode design, by using computer simulation and by performing a t-test on the data obtained from the experiments. We found that the oval-oval shaped, dual-loop-type textile electrode was more suitable than the single round type for determining morphological characteristics as well as for measuring appropriate heart activity signals. Based on these results, the oval-oval, dual-loop-type was a better inductive textile electrode that more effectively overcomes individual differences in heart location during heart activity sensing based on the magnetic-induced conductivity principle.

  5. Computed Tomography- and Magnetic Resonance Image-based Analysis of the Anatomical Variations of the Sylvian Fissure and Characteristics of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Maslehaty, Homajoun; Deuschl, Cornelius; Kleist, Bernadette; Göricke, Sophia; Sure, Ulrich; Müller, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this cross sectional anatomical study is to determine the distribution of the defined anatomical variations of the Sylvian fissure (SF) in a normal population and to analyze its bilateral superposable presentation. Furthermore, we examined the course of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the division of the MCA branches in relation to the SF types. A total of 300 cranial CT scans - 100 CT angiography datasets and 86 MRIs of patients without intracranial pathologies - were reviewed. The SF was categorized in five types based on Yasargils description and our previous publication. The length, diameter and branches of the MCA were measured and compared to the SF types. SPSS 23.0 for Windows® was used for statistical analysis. We analyzed data of 300 patients (171 male, 129 female; mean age 51.6years). Symmetric and mirror-imaged coherence of the SF was found in 266 patients (88.7%, χ2(8)=3.04, p=0.932). The distribution of the SF types showed significant differences in patients younger than 60 years compared to older patients. A bifurcation was observed in 72.0%. A trifurcation was observed in 12.0% and a false bifurcation in 16.0% of patients. There was no significant difference of the measured diameters or length of the M1 segments according to the SF types. In this CT and MRI based anatomical study we could show that a twisted and narrow SF occurred more frequently in patients younger than 60 years of age. The SF has a high congruence intra-individually. The anatomical condition might influence the size and configuration of the proximal MCA, which in turn might influence the surgeon’s choice of the approach to the SF. Preoperative evaluation on the basis of the presented data, may help to decide for an appropriate approach to the SF. PMID:28243427

  6. Computed Tomography- and Magnetic Resonance Image-based Analysis of the Anatomical Variations of the Sylvian Fissure and Characteristics of the Middle Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Maslehaty, Homajoun; Deuschl, Cornelius; Kleist, Bernadette; Göricke, Sophia; Sure, Ulrich; Müller, Oliver

    2017-01-11

    The aim of this cross sectional anatomical study is to determine the distribution of the defined anatomical variations of the Sylvian fissure (SF) in a normal population and to analyze its bilateral superposable presentation. Furthermore, we examined the course of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the division of the MCA branches in relation to the SF types. A total of 300 cranial CT scans - 100 CT angiography datasets and 86 MRIs of patients without intracranial pathologies - were reviewed. The SF was categorized in five types based on Yasargils description and our previous publication. The length, diameter and branches of the MCA were measured and compared to the SF types. SPSS 23.0 for Windows® was used for statistical analysis. We analyzed data of 300 patients (171 male, 129 female; mean age 51.6years). Symmetric and mirror-imaged coherence of the SF was found in 266 patients (88.7%, χ(2)(8)=3.04, p=0.932). The distribution of the SF types showed significant differences in patients younger than 60 years compared to older patients. A bifurcation was observed in 72.0%. A trifurcation was observed in 12.0% and a false bifurcation in 16.0% of patients. There was no significant difference of the measured diameters or length of the M1 segments according to the SF types. In this CT and MRI based anatomical study we could show that a twisted and narrow SF occurred more frequently in patients younger than 60 years of age. The SF has a high congruence intra-individually. The anatomical condition might influence the size and configuration of the proximal MCA, which in turn might influence the surgeon's choice of the approach to the SF. Preoperative evaluation on the basis of the presented data, may help to decide for an appropriate approach to the SF.

  7. Common anatomical variation in patients with idiopathic meralgia paresthetica: a high resolution ultrasound case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Thomas; Prosch, Helmut; Berzaczy, Dominik; Happak, Wolfgang; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Bernathova, Maria; Auff, Eduard; Bodner, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is a mononeuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) characterized by pain, numbness or paresthesia on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. Though several contributing factors have been identified, the cause of its idiopathic form still remains unclear. Anatomic and clinical studies have demonstrated a variable course for the LFCN and have suggested a contribution to the pathogenesis of MP. It was the aim of the present case-control study to assess the anatomical course and compression site of the LFCN using high resolution ultrasound (HRUS) in patients suffering from idiopathic MP, and compare the anatomical course in these patients to an asymptomatic control group. Case-control study. Nerve imaging center at a large university hospital in Austria. Twenty-eight patients with a diagnosis of MP were included in this study (20 men, 8 women; mean age 54 years). The diagnosis was established by clinical history, physical examination, and diagnostic anesthetic block. Fifteen age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers served as the control group. Standardized HRUS examinations were performed by one experienced radiologist from June 2004 through April 2012. Two experienced radiologists reviewed the patients' standardized HRUS examinations and performed examinations in the control group to measure the minimal distance between the LFCN and the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). The minimal distance between the ASIS and the LFCN was measured using HRUS. The LFCN could be seen in all patients and volunteers. In MP patients, the mean distance between the LFCN and the ASIS was 0.52 cm (SD 0.46 cm), compared to a mean distance of 1.79 cm (SD 1.48 cm) in the control group (P < 0.001). Limited sample size, retrospective design. The results of this study demonstrate a significantly different course of the LFCN, closer to the ASIS in patients with idiopathic MP.

  8. Variations of the accessory nerve: anatomical study including previously undocumented findings-expanding our misunderstanding of this nerve.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Ajayi, Olaide O; Fries, Fabian N; Spinner, Robert J; Oskouian, Rod J

    2017-02-01

    The anatomy of the accessory nerve has been well described but continued new clinical and anatomical findings exemplify our lack of a full understanding of the course of this nerve. Therefore, this study aimed to expand on our knowledge of the course of the 11th cranial nerve via anatomical dissections. Fifty-six cadavers (112 sides) underwent dissection of the accessory nerve from its cranial and spinal origins to its emergence into the posterior cervical triangle. Immunohistochemistry was performed when appropriate. Our findings included two cases (1.8%) where the nerve was duplicated, one intracranially and one extracranially. One accessory nerve (0.9%) was found to enter its own dural compartment within the jugular foramen. The majority of sides (80%) were found to have a cranial root of the accessory nerve. Thirty-one sides (28%) had connections to cervical dorsal roots medially and three sides (2.7%) laterally. Medial connections were most common with the C1 nerve. Medial components of these dorsal root connections were all sensory in nature. However, lateral components were motor on two sides (1.8%). Nerves traveled anterior to the internal jugular vein on 88% of sides. One (0.9%) left side nerve joined an interneural anastomosis between the dorsal rootlets. Macroganglia were found on the spinal part of the intracranial nerve on 13% of sides. The lesser occipital nerve arose directly from the accessory nerve on two sides (1.8%) and communicated with the accessory nerve on 5.4% of sides. One side (0.9%) was found to communicate with the facial nerve with both nerves innervating the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Additional anatomical knowledge of the variants of the accessory nerve may benefit patient care when this nerve is pathologically involved.

  9. The effect of an anatomically classified procedure on antiemetic administration in the postanesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Joseph R; Kee, Spencer S; Frenzel, John C; Ensor, Joe E; Selvan, Mano; Riedel, Bernhard J; Apfel, Christian

    2010-02-01

    The effect of the type of surgical procedure on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) rate has been debated in the literature. Our goal in this retrospective database study was to investigate the effect the type of surgical procedure (categorized and compared anatomically) has on antiemetic therapy within 2 h of admission to the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). We retrospectively analyzed data for oncology surgeries (n = 18,109), from our automated anesthesia information system database. We classified the types of surgical procedures anatomically into seven categories, with the integumentary musculoskeletal and the superficial surgeries chosen as the referent group. Our analysis included nine other risk factors for each patient, such as gender, smoking status, history of PONV or motion sickness, duration of anesthesia, number of prophylactic antiemetics administered, intraoperative opioids, ketorolac, epidural use, and postoperative opioids. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the effect of the type of surgery on antiemetic administration within the first 2 h of PACU admission, while adjusting for the other risk factors. Compared with integumentary musculoskeletal and superficial surgeries, patients undergoing neurological (P < 0.0001), head or neck (P < 0.0001), and abdominal (P < 0.0001) surgeries were administered PACU antiemetic significantly more often, whereas patients undergoing thoracic surgeries were administered PACU antiemetic significantly less often (P = 0.02). Breast or axilla (P = 0.74) and endoscopic (P = 0.28) procedures did not differ from the referent category. Female, nonsmoker, history of PONV or motion sickness, anesthesia duration, and intraoperative and postoperative opioid administration were significantly associated with antiemetic administration during early PACU admission. Using our automated anesthesia information system database, we found that the type of surgery, when categorized anatomically, was associated with an

  10. Anatomical considerations of the superior thyroid artery: its origins, variations, and position relative to the hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide accurate anatomical descriptions of the overall anatomy of the superior thyroid artery (STA), its relationship to other structures, and its driving patterns. Detailed dissection was performed on thirty specimens of adult's cadaveric neck specimens and each dissected specimen was carefully measured the following patterns and distances using digital and ruler. The superior thyroid, lingual, and facial arteries arise independently from the external carotid artery (ECA), but can also arise together, as the thyrolingual or linguofacial trunk. We observed that 83.3% of STAs arose independently from the major artery, while 16.7% of the cases arose from thyrolingual or linguofacial trunk. We also measured the distance of STA from its major artery. The origin of the STA from the ECA was 0.9±0.4 mm below the hyoid bone. The STA was 4.4±0.5 mm distal to the midline at the level of the laryngeal prominence and 3.1±0.6 mm distal to the midline at the level of the inferior border of thyroid cartilage. The distance between STA and the midline was similar at the level of the hyoid bone and the thyroid cartilage. Also, when the STA is near the inferior border of the thyroid cartilage, it travels at a steep angle to the midline. This latter point may be particularly important in thyroidectomies. We hope that anatomical information provided here will enhance the success of, and minimize complications in, surgeries that involve STA. PMID:27382516

  11. An anatomical study and ontogenetic explanation of 23 cases with variations in the main pattern of the human brachio-antebrachial arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Nebot, J; Ferreira, B; Reina, F; Pérez, J; Sañudo, J R; Roig, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three cases with variations in the brachio-antebrachial arterial pattern of the human upper limb are reported. According to the artery which showed a variation, 4 groups were recognised: (1) isolated persistence of the median artery; (2) high origin of the ulnar artery; (3) high origin of the radial artery; and (4) duplication of the brachial artery, either with or without anastomosis at the cubital fossa. In addition, in groups 2, 3 and 4 the median artery may have persisted. Based on these arterial variations an anatomical and embryological correlation was established from a morphogenetic pattern which is proposed as being normal. Thus the terminal branches of the superficial brachial artery take part in the development of the radial, ulnar and median arteries, joining with the trunks of deep origin of these arteries in the primitive axial artery. Regression of the superficial arterial segments located proximal to this anastomosis gives rise to the definitive arterial pattern. Either the total or partial persistence of the superficial arterial segments explains those cases of high origin of either the radial or ulnar arteries as well as the duplications of the brachial artery. We postulate that the persistence of the median artery is independent of the presence or absence of any other variation in the arterial pattern. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7592009

  12. Quantification of anatomical variation at the atlanto-occipital articulation: morphometric resolution of commingled human remains within the repatriation documentation process.

    PubMed

    Dudar, J Christopher; Castillo, Eric R

    2016-12-15

    Within many institutional collections are skeletal and mummified human remains representing a part of our species' adaptation and evolution to various biocultural environments. Archaeologically recovered individuals come from deep into our past, and possess information that provides insight into population history, genetics, diet, health and other questions relevant to all living peoples. Academic concerns have been raised regarding the reinterment of these collections due to the rise of the international repatriation movement, the passage of various laws and implementation of institutional policies. While all potential research questions cannot be anticipated, the proactive documentation of collections is one way to ensure primary data are maintained for future study. This paper explores developments in digitization technology that allow the archive of virtual copies of human remains, and an example of how anatomical and archaeological collections can be digitized towards pragmatic research goals. The anatomical variability of the human atlanto-occipital (AO) articular surfaces was studied using non-metric categorical shape, 2D measurement and 3D morphometric analyses to provide reference standards for the reassociation of individuals from commingled skeletal remains, such as found in some archaeological sites or forensic investigations including mass grave or mass disaster recovery scenes. Results suggest that qualitative shape observations and caliper-derived measurements of the articulating AO condyles tend to display significant sexual dimorphism and biological ancestry-related size and shape differences. Variables derived from a scanned 3D mesh, such as condylar angle and articular surface curvature, quantify biomechanical variation and display a stronger congruency within individuals. It is recommended that a two-stage approach involving initial screening and identification of possible reassociation candidates is accomplished with a linear osteometric

  13. The effect of anatomical factors on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ay, D; Erdolu, B; Yumun, G; Demir, A; Aydin, U; Ozkan, H; Erkoc, K; Tiryakioglu, O

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of anatomical characteristics on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). We investigated 56 EVAR procedures for infrarenal aortic aneurysms performed between January 2010 and December 2013, and the data were supplemented with a prospective review. The patients were divided into two groups according to the diameter of the aneurysm. Group I (n = 30): patients with aneurysm diameters less than 6 cm, group II (n = 26): patients with aneurysm diameters larger than 6 cm. The pre-operative anatomical data of the aneurysms were noted and the groups were compared with regard to postoperative results. There were no correlations between diameter of aneurysm (p > 0.05), aneurysm neck angle (p > 0.05) and mortality rate. The long-term mortality rate was found to be high in patients in whom an endoleak occurred. We found that aneurysm diameter did not have an effect on postoperative mortality rates. An increased EuroSCORE value and the development of endoleaks had an effect on long-term mortality rates.

  14. The anatomical variation of the circulus arteriosus cerebri in a cadaver cohort representing the population dynamics of the Western Cape.

    PubMed

    Cilliers, Karen; Vorster, Willie; Page, Benedict John

    2017-09-05

    The literature revealed a connection between the variations of the Circulus arteriosus cerebri (CAC) and cerebrovascular disease, ischemia, stroke, aneurysms and atherosclerosis. The diameters of the vessels forming the CAC have been classified into 22 types by previous authors. The aim of this study was to assess the variation of the CAC (diameter, length and anomalies) in a cadaver cohort representing the population of the Western Cape. Thirty-nine subjects (female n = 11, male n = 28) who had died of causes unrelated to brain trauma, were obtained from Stellenbosch University. Additionally, a pilot study was done on 20 specimens. The CAC were removed and fixed for three weeks in 10% buffered formaldehyde. Digital images were taken and the vessels were measured using Adobe Creative Suite 5: Extended edition (Photoshop). The normal diameter (type 1) was observed in 41% of specimens and type 4 (hypoplastic posterior communicating artery) was observed in 23.1%. One case (bilateral hypoplastic posterior communicating arteries and a hypoplastic right posterior cerebral artery) was classified as "other", since it could not be classified into the 22 types. Additional variations included duplication (17.9%) and one point fusion (15.4%) of the anterior communicating artery. Studies have shown that about half of a healthy population have a typical CAC (normal diameter and no anomalies). In the present study the prevalence of a typical CAC was only 15.4%. Studies can only be compared if the same definitions for variations are used. The knowledge of these variations is important in endarterectomy, stenting head and neck surgery and angiography.

  15. A 3D numerical study of the collateral capacity of the Circle of Willis with anatomical variation in the posterior circulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Chen, Qiang; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The Circle of Willis (CoW) is the most important collateral pathway of the cerebral artery. The present study aims to investigate the collateral capacity of CoW with anatomical variation when unilateral internalcarotid artery (ICA) is occluded. Basing on MRI data, we have reconstructed eight 3D models with variations in the posterior circulation of the CoW and set four different degrees of stenosis in the right ICA, namely 24%, 43%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Finally, a total of 40 models are performed with computational fluid dynamics simulations. All of the simulations share the same boundary condition with static pressure and the volume flow rate (VFR) are obtained to evaluate their collateral capacity. As for the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the transitional-type model possesses the best collateral capacity. But for the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), unilateral stenosis of ICA has the weakest influence on the unilateral posterior communicating artery (PCoA) absent model. We also find that the full fetal-type posterior circle of Willis is an utmost dangerous variation which must be paid more attention. The results demonstrate that different models have different collateral capacities in coping stenosis of unilateral ICA and these differences can be reflected by different outlets. The study could be used as a reference for neurosurgeon in choosing the best treatment strategy.

  16. The right vertebral artery originating from the right occipital artery and the absence of the transverse foramen: a rare anatomical variation.

    PubMed

    Öner, Zülal; Öner, Serkan; Kahraman, Ayşegül Sağır

    2017-06-05

    Variations in the origin of the vertebral artery (VA) is a congenital anomaly that occurs during embryological development. Multiple variations related to VA origin have been reported in the literature. Abnormal VA origin is usually determined as incidental findings during angiographic or postmortem anatomical studies. Although most of the cases are asymptomatic, in patients with VA anomaly symptoms such as dizziness have been described. The anomalous variation in the origin of the right VA is rare and separated into three categories: (1) originating from the aorta, (2) originating from the carotid arteries, (3) duplicated origin. In this case, we aimed to present the right VA originating from the right occipital artery and concomitant anomalies of the transverse foramen that have not been reported previously according to our knowledge in literature. In a 32-year-old female patient referred to our hospital because of dizziness, the right VA was not observed on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography angiography (CTA) examination was performed. CTA showed hypoplasia of the right transverse foramen at the levels of the C1, C5 and C6 vertebrae and aplasia of the right transverse foramen at the levels of the C2, C3 and C4 vertebrae. The right VA originating from the right occipital artery continues to its normal course by entering the cranium through the foramen magnum at the level of the atlantooccipital junction.

  17. [Ultrasound-guided axillary block: anatomical variations of terminal branches of the brachial plexus in relation to the brachial artery].

    PubMed

    Silva, M G; Sala-Blanch, X; Marín, R; Espinoza, X; Arauz, A; Morros, C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the distribution of the terminal branches of the brachial plexus at the axillary level and define distribution patterns after ultrasound evaluation. Fifty volunteers underwent ultrasound bilateral axillary brachial plexus scanning exploration. Nerve distribution around the humeral artery was described and the distance between each nerve and the center of the artery was measured. The distance and relationship between the ulnar nerve and the humeral vein were also recorded. The median nerve was located in the anterolateral quadrant (-29±40°) and at a mean distance of 2.1±0.9mm from the artery (85%). The ulnar nerve was found at 53±26° and at 4.2±2.1mm from the artery in the anteromedial quadrant (90%), anterolateral to the vein in 46% of cases, and deep to it in 54%. The radial nerve was at 122±38° and at 3.3±1.7mm from the artery in the posteromedial quadrant (86%). The musculocutaneous nerve was found at -103±22° and 9.3±5.6mm from the artery in the posterolateral quadrant (90%) and in the anterolateral quadrant (-55±16°) at 4.8±2.7mm (10%). There were no differences regarding laterality, gender or overweight patients. Our results allow defining four different anatomical patterns, two based in the position of the musculocutaneous nerve and two based on the disposition of the ulnar nerve with respect to the humeral vein. These patterns were not related to laterality, gender or body weight. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Regional variation in histopathologic features of tumor specimens from treatment-naive glioblastoma correlates with anatomic and physiologic MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Parvataneni, Rupa; Molinaro, Annette; Essock-Burns, Emma; Bourne, Gabriela; Parsa, Andrew T.; Aghi, Manish K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Cha, Soonmee; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at initial diagnosis is typically performed on tissue obtained from regions of contrast enhancement (CE) as depicted on gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted images. The non-enhancing (NE) portion of the lesion, which contains both reactive edema and infiltrative tumor, is only partially removed due to concerns about damaging functioning brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate histopathologic and physiologic MRI features of image-guided tissue specimens from CE and NE regions to investigate correlations between imaging and histopathologic parameters. One hundred nineteen tissue specimens (93 CE and 26 NE regions) were acquired from 51 patients with newly diagnosed GBM by utilizing stereotactic image-guided sampling. Variables of anatomic, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic susceptibility–weighted, contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging (DSC) from each tissue sample location were obtained and compared with histopathologic features such as tumor score, cell density, proliferation, architectural disruption, hypoxia, and microvascular hyperplasia. Tissue samples from CE regions had increased tumor score, cellular density, proliferation, and architectural disruption compared with NE regions. DSC variables such as relative cerebral blood volume, peak height, and recovery factor were significantly higher, and the percentage of signal intensity recovery was significantly lower in the CE compared with the NE regions. DWI variables were correlated with histopathologic features of GBM within NE regions. Image-guided tissue acquisition and assessment of residual tumor from treatment-naive GBM should be guided by DSC in CE regions and by DWI in NE regions. PMID:22711606

  19. An effective manual deboning method to prepare intact mouse nasal tissue with preserved anatomical organization.

    PubMed

    Dunston, David; Ashby, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2013-08-10

    The mammalian nose is a multi-functional organ with intricate internal structures. The nasal cavity is lined with various epithelia such as olfactory, respiratory, and squamous epithelia which differ markedly in anatomical locations, morphology, and functions. In adult mice, the nose is covered with various skull bones, limiting experimental access to internal structures, especially those in the posterior such as the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). Here we describe an effective method for obtaining almost the entire and intact nasal tissues with preserved anatomical organization. Using surgical tools under a dissecting microscope, we sequentially remove the skull bones surrounding the nasal tissue. This procedure can be performed on both paraformaldehyde-fixed and freshly dissected, skinned mouse heads. The entire deboning procedure takes about 20-30 min, which is significantly shorter than the experimental time required for conventional chemical-based decalcification. In addition, we present an easy method to remove air bubbles trapped between turbinates, which is critical for obtaining intact thin horizontal or coronal or sagittal sections from the nasal tissue preparation. Nasal tissue prepared using our method can be used for whole mount observation of the entire epithelia, as well as morphological, immunocytochemical, RNA in situ hybridization, and physiological studies, especially in studies where region-specific examination and comparison are of interest.

  20. Bilateral variations of brachial plexus involving the median nerve and lateral cord: An anatomical case study with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Butz, James J; Shiwlochan, Devina G; Brown, Kevin C; Prasad, Alathady M; Murlimanju, Bukkambudhi V; Viswanath, Srikanteswara

    2014-01-01

    During the routine dissection of upper limbs of a Caucasian male cadaver, variations were observed in the brachial plexus. In the right extremity, the lateral cord was piercing the coracobrachialis muscle. The musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the median nerve were observed to be branching inferior to the lower attachment of coracobrachialis muscle. The left extremity exhibited the passage of the median nerve through the flat tendon of the coracobrachialis muscle near its distal insertion into the medial surface of the body of humerus. A variation in the course and branching of the nerve might lead to variant or dual innervation of a muscle and, if inappropriately compressed, could result in a distal neuropathy. Identification of these variants of brachial plexus plays an especially important role in both clinical diagnosis and surgical practice.

  1. Anatomical variation in the anterolateral ligament of the knee and a new dissection technique for embalmed cadaveric specimens.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew; Smith, Heather F

    2016-12-18

    Claes et al. recently documented and described the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee, demonstrating its existence in 97% of their samples. Here, we further examined the anatomy of this ligament, documented its morphological variation, and assessed the feasibility of its dissection in preserved cadaveric specimens. To achieve this, we dissected 53 preserved cadaveric knees and documented their morphological variation in the anterolateral ligament. The originally described dissection technique for identifying and following the ALL requires flexion of the knee, a state which is often not possible in stiff, preserved cadavers. Here, we describe and confirm the feasibility of an alternate dissection technique in which the quadriceps femoris tendon is incised, for use on specimens in which flexion of the undissected knee is not possible. We also identify a novel technique for assessing whether the anterolateral ligament is absent from a specimen or has simply been obliterated or overlooked, using the lateral inferior genicular vasculature. These dissection techniques have great potential for the dissection of preserved cadavers used in gross anatomy laboratories, and we discuss the applications of such an approach in student-led dissections. Our dissections also uncovered noticeable variation in the anterolateral ligament course and position. Most notably, it often inserts significantly more laterally than the classical presentation (30.2%), or originates more proximally with superficial fibers extending superiorly and laterally over the distal femur (7.5%).

  2. Development of the arterial pattern in the upper limb of staged human embryos: normal development and anatomic variations

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; BURTON, G. J.; DEU, J.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 112 human embryos (224 upper limbs) between stages 12 and 23 of development were examined. It was observed that formation of the arterial system in the upper limb takes place as a dual process. An initial capillary plexus appears from the dorsal aorta during stage 12 and develops at the same rate as the limb. At stage 13, the capillary plexus begins a maturation process involving the enlargement and differentiation of selected parts. This remodelling process starts in the aorta and continues in a proximal to distal sequence. By stage 15 the differentiation has reached the subclavian and axillary arteries, by stage 17 it has reached the brachial artery as far as the elbow, by stage 18 it has reached the forearm arteries except for the distal part of the radial, and finally by stage 21 the whole arterial pattern is present in its definitive morphology. This differentiation process parallels the development of the skeletal system chronologically. A number of arterial variations were observed, and classified as follows: superficial brachial (7.7%), accessory brachial (0.6%), brachioradial (14%), superficial brachioulnar (4.7%), superficial brachioulnoradial (0.7%), palmar pattern of the median (18.7%) and superficial brachiomedian (0.7%) arteries. They were observed in embryos belonging to stages 17–23 and were not related to a specific stage of development. Statistical comparison with the rates of variations reported in adults did not show significant differences. It is suggested that the variations arise through the persistence, enlargement and differentiation of parts of the initial network which would normally remain as capillaries or even regress. PMID:11693301

  3. The effects of organic chromium on adipose anatomical parts, using pig as experimental model.

    PubMed

    Untea, A E; Varzaru, I; Ropota, M; Panaite, T D; Cornescu, G M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chromium supplements on the quality of protein and lipids of adipose anatomical parts using pig as experimental modelfor humans. An experiment was conducted on 18 fattening castrated TOPIGS male pigs, for 4 weeks, under experimental farm conditions. The source of Cr(III) was chromium . picolinate, a food supplement used in human nutrition, 200 µg.Cr per kg diet (El) and 400 µg.Cr per kg diet (E2). The analytic.data showed an improvement of the amino acids profile in belly and in ham samples. A significant decrease of fatty acids concentrations in belly samples was noticed. In conclusion, we observed a positive effect associated with the essential amino acids deposition and decreasing of fatty acids concentrations in tissues with high content offat, thus in human nutrition, chromium is used as a nutritional supplement most recommended in impaired carbohydrate metabolism.

  4. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p <0.001). The extensor pollicis brevis was a single tendon in 80 (98%) and 62 (94%) of cadavers and patients, respectively. There was division with the septum that made a fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment in 30/82 (37%) cadavers and in 38/66 (58%) patients with de Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome.

  5. Age-Dependent Effects of Haptoglobin Deletion in Neurobehavioral and Anatomical Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Arias, Rodrigo A.; Tolosano, Emanuela; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages are common features of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their presence is associated with chronic disabilities. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that haptoglobin (Hp), an endogenous hemoglobin-binding protein most abundant in blood plasma, is involved in the intrinsic molecular defensive mechanism, though its role in TBI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hp deletion on the anatomical and behavioral outcomes in the controlled cortical impact model using wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 mice and genetically modified mice lacking the Hp gene (Hp−∕−) in two age cohorts [2–4 mo-old (young adult) and 7–8 mo-old (older adult)]. The data obtained suggest age-dependent significant effects on behavioral and anatomical TBI outcomes and recovery from injury. Moreover, in the adult cohort, neurological deficits in Hp−∕− mice at 24 h were significantly improved compared to WT, whereas there were no significant differences in brain pathology between these genotypes. In contrast, in the older adult cohort, Hp−∕− mice had significantly larger lesion volumes compared to WT, but neurological deficits were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed significant differences in microglial and astrocytic reactivity between Hp−∕− and WT in selected brain regions of the adult but not the older adult-aged cohort. In conclusion, the data obtained in the study provide clarification on the age-dependent aspects of the intrinsic defensive mechanisms involving Hp that might be involved in complex pathways differentially affecting acute brain trauma outcomes. PMID:27486583

  6. Characterizing biochemical and morphological variations of clinically relevant anatomical locations of oral tissue in vivo with hybrid Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-10-06

    This study aims to characterize biochemical and morphological variations of the clinically relevant anatomical locations of in vivo oral tissue (i.e., alveolar process, lateral tongue, and floor of the mouth) by using hybrid Raman spectroscopy (RS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. A total of 1049 in vivo fingerprint (FP: 800-1800 cm(-1) ) and high wavenumber (HW: 2800-3600 cm(-1) ) Raman spectra were acquired from different oral tissue (alveolar process=331; lateral tongue=339, and floor of mouth=379) of 26 normal subjects in the oral cavity under the OCT imaging guidance. The total Raman dataset were split into two parts: 80% for training; while 20% for testing. Tissue optical attenuation coefficients of alveolar process, lateral tongue, and the floor of the mouth were derived from OCT images, revealing the inter-anatomical morphological differences; while Raman spectroscopy uncovers subtle FP/HW Raman spectral differences among different oral tissues that can be attributed to the differences in inter- and intra-cellular proteins, lipids, DNA and water structures and conformations, enlightening biochemical variability of different oral tissues at the molecular level. Partial least squares (PLS) - discriminant analysis (DA) implemented on the training dataset show that the integrated tissue optical attenuation coefficients and FP/HW Raman spectra provide diagnostic sensitivities of 99.6%, 82.3%, 50.2%, and specificities of 97.0%, 75.1%, 92.1%, respectively, which are superior to using either Raman spectroscopy (sensitivities of 90.2%, 77.5%, 48.8%, and specificities of 95.8%, 72.1%, 88.8%) or optical attenuation coefficients derived from OCT (sensitivities of 75.0%, 78.2%, 47.2%, and specificities of 96.2%, 67.7%, 85.0%) for the differentiation among alveolar process, lateral tongue and the floor of the mouth. Further, the diagnostic algorithms applied to the independent testing dataset based on hybrid RS-OCT technique gives predictive diagnostic

  7. An Analysis of Visibility and Anatomic Variations of Mandibular Canal in Digital Panoramic Radiographs of Dentulous and Edentulous Patients in Northern Iran Populations

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Somayeh; Ashouri Moghadam, Anahita; Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Mohtavipour, Seyedeh Tahereh; Amouzad, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Insufficient information about the anatomical positions and structure of mandibular canal provokes unwanted damage to this important structure of mandible. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the visibility and anatomical variations of mandibular canal in digital panoramic radiographs of dentulous and edentulous patients in a sample of Iranian population. Materials and Method In this retrospective-analytical research, 249 digital panoramic radiographs in dentulous group and 126 in edentulous group were studied by an expert oral and maxillofacial radiologist. In both groups, the visibility of canal borders in anterior, middle, and posterior areas were examined. In dentulous group, the distance between the canal and apex of the first and second molars were measured. Canal-to-alveolar crest distance and lower mandibular border was measured in three different points for both groups. Finally, the upper-lower positions of canals were determined. Results In both groups, most visibility occurred in 1/3 of posterior and the least visibility was detected in 1/3 of anterior, with the intermediate being the most visible part (Type 2). There was no significant difference between the left and right sides in all cases. In dentulous group, no correlation was found between the visibility, age, and gender (p> 0.05); however, canal position was related to gender (p= 0.03 and p= 0.04 in right and left sides, respectively). High position was more frequent in females and intermediate position was more common in males. In edentulous group, no correlation was found between age, gender, and canal position (p> 0.05). Conclusion The most visibility of mandibular canal was in its third posterior and the least was in its third anterior part. Although the middle position of canal was more frequently visible than the high position in this study, it does not refute the possibility of damaging the mandibular canal in critical surgeries. PMID:27284556

  8. Error detection in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, Richard J; Meier, Frederick A; Raab, Stephen S

    2005-10-01

    To define the magnitude of error occurring in anatomic pathology, to propose a scheme to classify such errors so their influence on clinical outcomes can be evaluated, and to identify quality assurance procedures able to reduce the frequency of errors. (a) Peer-reviewed literature search via PubMed for studies from single institutions and multi-institutional College of American Pathologists Q-Probes studies of anatomic pathology error detection and prevention practices; (b) structured evaluation of defects in surgical pathology reports uncovered in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of the Henry Ford Health System in 2001-2003, using a newly validated error taxonomy scheme; and (c) comparative review of anatomic pathology quality assurance procedures proposed to reduce error. Marked differences in both definitions of error and pathology practice make comparison of error detection and prevention procedures among publications from individual institutions impossible. Q-Probes studies further suggest that observer redundancy reduces diagnostic variation and interpretive error, which ranges from 1.2 to 50 errors per 1000 cases; however, it is unclear which forms of such redundancy are the most efficient in uncovering diagnostic error. The proposed error taxonomy tested has shown a very good interobserver agreement of 91.4% (kappa = 0.8780; 95% confidence limit, 0.8416-0.9144), when applied to amended reports, and suggests a distribution of errors among identification, specimen, interpretation, and reporting variables. Presently, there are no standardized tools for defining error in anatomic pathology, so it cannot be reliably measured nor can its clinical impact be assessed. The authors propose a standardized error classification that would permit measurement of error frequencies, clinical impact of errors, and the effect of error reduction and prevention efforts. In particular, the value of double-reading, case conferences, and consultations (the

  9. Surgical Microanatomy of the Posterior Condylar Emissary Vein and its Anatomical Variations for the Transcondylar Fossa Approach.

    PubMed

    Ota, Nakao; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Yoshikane, Tsutomu; Miyama, Masataka; Miyazaki, Takanori; Kinoshita, Yu; Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Yanagisawa, Takeshi; Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Go; Saito, Norihiro; Miyata, Shiro; Noda, Kosumo; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Takeda, Rihei; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2017-06-01

    It is essential to identify and be aware of the anatomy of the posterior condylar emissary vein (PCEV) for achieving an adequate operative field for the transcondylar fossa approach (TCFA). To describe the variations in the drainage patterns of PCEVs and the technical issues encountered in such cases. This was a retrospective analysis of the anatomy of PCEVs in 104 sides in 52 cases treated by the TCFA. Preoperative findings of multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) and CT venography (CTV) were compared with the intraoperative findings. The drainage patterns were classified as 5 types: the sigmoid sinus (SS), jugular bulb (JB), occipital sinus (OS), anterior condylar emissary vein (ACEV), and marginal sinus (MS). The SS, JB, ACEV, and OS types were observed in 33 (31.7%), 42 (40.3%), 8 (7.7%), and 1 (1.0%) side(s), respectively. One side (1.0%) each had combined drainage from MS and JB, and ACEV and JB, respectively. In 17 sides (16.3%), the PCEVs and posterior condylar canals could not be identified on CT and CTV. Preoperative CT and CTV findings correlated well with the intraoperative findings. To make a sufficient operative field for TCFA, PCEVs should be appropriately dealt with based on the preoperative knowledge of their running course, pattern, and origin.

  10. The effect of aging on the anatomic position of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Bann, Darrin V; Kim, Yesul; Zacharia, Thomas; Goldenberg, David

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid disease is common among elderly patients, frequently necessitating thyroid gland examination, imaging, and surgery. However, no prior studies have determined the effect of age on the anatomic position of the thyroid gland in the anterior neck. We hypothesized that the thyroid gland resides at a more caudal position in the neck in elderly patients as compared to younger patients. Head and neck CT scans were collected from 122 atraumatic patients without thyroid disease aged 18-39 years, 40-59 years, 60-79 years, and 80+ years. Measurements of thyroid gland position and other aspects of head and neck anatomy were conducted in the mid-sagittal plane. The distance between the thyroid gland and the sternal notch decreased from 45 ± 10.4 mm in the 18-39 age group to 30.8 ± 9 mm in the 80+ age group (P < 0.001). The position of the gland did not change significantly relative to anatomic landmarks in the head or neck, although the trachea was angled more closely to the horizontal plane in elderly patients (P < 0.001). Cervical spine height was also lower among patients ≥60 years of age compared to those <60 years of age (P < 0.001). Multivariate linear modeling suggested that thyroid gland position was dependent on changes in cervical spine height, hyoid bone to hard palate distance, and tracheal angle (P = 1.7 × 10(-11) ; r(2)  = 0.37). Clinicians should be aware of the more caudad positioning of the gland when planning surgery or screening for thyroid disease in the elderly. Clin. Anat. 30:205-212, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Anatomical Variations in the Pattern of the Right Hepatic Veins Draining the Posterior Segment of the Right Lobe of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pattern of drainage in the right posterior lobe of liver varies considerably. The knowledge of this variation is very important while performing various surgeries on the right posterior lobe. Aim: A study was conducted to see the variations in the pattern of drainage of posterior segment of the right lobe of liver. The aim was to see the variations of right hepatic vein and small accessory hepatic veins draining the posterior segment, the presence of which led to modifications in drainage of posterior segment. Material and Methods: Sixty formalin fixed adult human liver specimens were dissected manually. Results: According to the pattern of drainage of tributaries of right hepatic vein, the right hepatic vein was classified into type I, type II, type III and type IV. According to presence of inferior right hepatic vein, three types of drainage of posterior lobe were seen: Type I, (76.36%) right hepatic vein was large, draining wide area of posterior segment. A small inferior right hepatic vein drained the small area of posterior segment. In Type II, (19.92%) both right hepatic and inferior right hepatic veins were medium sized draining the posteroinferior segment of the right lobe concomitantly. In Type III, (32%) accessory veins, the middle right hepatic vein drained the posterosuperior (VII) as well as the posteroinferior (VI) segment. In one specimen, there were numerous middle right hepatic veins draining the right posterior segment. The knowledge of anatomic relationship of veins draining right lobe, is important in performing right posterior segmentectomy. Conclusion: For safe resection of the liver, the complex anatomy of the distribution of the tributaries of the right hepatic vein and the accessory veins have to be studied prior to any surgery done on liver. PMID:25954610

  12. The Use of Micro-Computed Tomography to Determine the Accuracy of 2 Electronic Apex Locators and Anatomic Variations Affecting Their Precision.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Lucila; Carneiro, Everdan; da Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel; Brandão, Christian Giampietro; Gambarini, Gianluca; Azim, Adham A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of 2 electronic apex locators (EALs), Apex ID (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA) and Root ZX (J. Morita, Tokyo, Japan), by means of micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging and to determine anatomic variations that may affect their accuracy. The root canal length (RCL) and working length (WL) of 33 single-rooted premolars were measured using a visual method, 3-dimensional micro-CT reconstructions, and 2 different EALs. Two different measurements were recorded for each EAL: at the "APEX/0.0" mark and at the "0.5" mark. The WL was determined using 2 different methods: method 1: at the "0.5 mark" of the apex locator and method 2: subtracting 0.5 mm from the "APEX/0.0" mark. The precision of measurements was compared with those recorded by micro-CT imaging. Apical foramen (AF) position and diameter, apical constriction (AC) diameter, distance between the AC and the AF, and the presence/absence of accessory canals were recorded from the micro-CT scans, and their correlation to the accuracy of EALs was determined. There was no statistically significant difference in the RCL measurements by any of the different methods. There was a statistically significant difference in the WL recorded by micro-CT imaging compared with those by the visual method and at the "APEX/0.0 mark" - 0.5 mm (P = .031). There was no difference in the measurements acquired by any of the EALs. The "APEX/0.0 mark" - 0.5 mm was less accurate than the "0.5" mark. However, the results were not statistically significant (P > .05). The position of the AF and the AC-AF distance affected the accuracy of the RCL (P = .003) and the "0.5" mark (P = .013). Root ZX and Apex ID are equally precise in determining the RCL and WL. The "0.5" mark can be used to determine the WL with high precision. Some anatomic variations may influence the accuracy of EALs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effects of instructional strategies using cross sections on the recognition of anatomical structures in correlated CT and MR images.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Paas, Fred; Johnson, Tristan E; Su, Yung K; Payer, Andrew F

    2008-01-01

    This research is an effort to best utilize the interactive anatomical images for instructional purposes based on cognitive load theory. Three studies explored the differential effects of three computer-based instructional strategies that use anatomical cross-sections to enhance the interpretation of radiological images. These strategies include: (1) cross-sectional images of the head that can be superimposed on radiological images, (2) transparent highlighting of anatomical structures in radiological images, and (3) cross-sectional images of the head with radiological images presented side-by-side. Data collected included: (1) time spent on instruction and on solving test questions, (2) mental effort during instruction and test, and (3) students' performance to identify anatomical structures in radiological images. Participants were 28 freshmen medical students (15 males and 13 females) and 208 biology students (190 females and 18 males). All studies used posttest-only control group design, and the collected data were analyzed by either t test or ANOVA. In self-directed computer-based environments, the strategies that used cross sections to improve students' ability to recognize anatomic structures in radiological images showed no significant positive effects. However, when increasing the complexity of the instructional materials, cross-sectional images imposed a higher cognitive load, as indicated by higher investment of mental effort. There is not enough evidence to claim that the simultaneous combination of cross sections and radiological images has no effect on the identification of anatomical structures in radiological images for novices. Further research that control for students' learning and cognitive style is needed to reach an informative conclusion.

  14. A multivariate morphometric analysis of hippocampal anatomical variation in C57BL/6 in equilibrium BALB/c chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Crusio, W E; Bär, I M; Schwegler, H; Buselmaier, W

    1990-12-10

    We investigated hippocampal anatomy in artificially-produced chimeras derived by the aggregation of embryos from two widely-studied inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ. Contrary to expectations, the chimeras were not always intermediate between the parental strains. For a number of characters, the chimeras exceeded qualitatively as well as quantitatively the phenotypical range displayed by both inbred parental strains. These findings imply that if only one parent is available for comparison, for instance, in studies involving a normally inviable genotype, separating effects of this genotype from idiosyncratic effects inherent to the chimeric model will be very difficult, if not impossible.

  15. Restraining forces in various designs of knee ankle orthoses: their placement and effect on the anatomical knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J F; Warren, C G

    1976-09-01

    A biochemical evaluation was conducted on double upright knee ankle orthoses, which were instrumented with strain gauge transducers to determine the magnitudes of the restraining forces exerted on the leg. Measurements were made on six commonly used designs of orthoses worn by spinal cord injured persons ambulating with a swing-through gait. The measurements were used to determine distribution of forces on the limb as well as their effect on anatomical knee shear. Based on the experimental data, the following basic principles of optimal orthosis design were identified: The forces required to stabilize the knee should be minimized by applying the stabilizing force as close as possible to the knee center, and by maintaining the anatomical knee as straight as possible. When the major portion of the knee stabilizing force is applied below the knee, the shear on the anatomical knee structures is markedly reduced. Further, the stabilizing forces should be well distributed over tolerant areas.

  16. Anatomical variations of the anterior atlanto-dental joint and relations to the apical and alar ligaments in a geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Iwanaga, Joe; Sardi, Juan P; Alonso, Fernando; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-17

    Degenerative changes in the upper cervical spine may be age related degeneration or a pathological process such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, to our knowledge, the relationship between the apical and alar ligaments and these anomalies has not been discussed. We present anatomical variations of the anterior atlanto-dental joint observed during cadaveric dissection of adult craniovertebral junctions, the relationship with the alar and apical ligaments and discuss possible origins and clinical implications. The upper cervical spine including part of the occiput was dissected from cadavers whose mean age at death was 78.9 years-old. The anterior atlanto-dental joint and apical and alar ligaments were observed and any atypical findings were noted. In eleven specimens, seven had a dens corona, three had an os odontoideum and one had a dens aureola, which arose from the upper part of the anterior arch of the atlas. Only four specimens had an apical ligament. The possible etiologies and the clinical applications of these craniovertebral anomalies in a geriatric population should be appreciated by the clinician treating patients with disease in this area or interpreting imaging in the region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Population effects of increased climate variation.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2005-09-07

    Global circulation models predict and numerous observations confirm that anthropogenic climate change has altered high-frequency climate variability. However, it is not yet well understood how changing patterns of environmental variation will affect wildlife population dynamics and other ecological processes. Theory predicts that a population's long-run growth rate is diminished and the chance of population extinction is increased as environmental variation increases. This results from the fact that population growth is a multiplicative process and that long-run population growth rate is the geometric mean of growth rates over time, which is always less than the arithmetic mean. However, when population growth rates for unstructured populations are related nonlinearly to environmental drivers, increasing environmental variation can increase a population's long-run growth rate. This suggests that patterns of environmental variation associated with different aspects of climate change may affect population dynamics in different ways. Specifically, increasing variation in rainfall might result in diminished long-run growth rates for many animal species while increasing variation in temperature might result in increased long-run growth rates. While the effect of rainfall is theoretically well understood and supported by data, the hypothesized effect of temperature is not. Here, I analyse two datasets to study the effect of fluctuating temperatures on growth rates of zooplankton. Results are consistent with the prediction that fluctuating temperatures should increase long-run growth rates and the frequency of extreme demographic events.

  18. Anatomic variations of inferior mesenteric artery and left colic artery evaluated by 3-dimensional CT angiography: Insights into rectal cancer surgery - A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jia; Cai, Jiawei; Wen, Xiaofeng; Wu, Xianrui; He, Zhen; Zou, Yifeng; Qiu, Jianping; He, Xiaowen; He, Xiaosheng; Lian, Lei; Wu, Xiaojian; Zhou, Zhiyang; Lan, Ping

    2017-05-01

    To demonstrate the clinical applicability of 3-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) in evaluating the anatomic variations of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and left colic artery (LCA), to help make pre-operative strategies of rectal cancer surgery. 188 patients with abdominal and pelvic contrast-enhanced CT scan were retrospectively enrolled and 3D-CTA was reconstructed. The origin and branching patterns of IMA, tracking patterns of LCA, intersectional patterns among IMA, LCA and inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) were examined, and their associations with clinical features were analyzed. The origin of IMA was located 42.1 ± 7.7 mm above iliac artery bifurcation, 64.4% within the area of the 3rd lumbar vertebra. 47.3% of LCA arose independently from IMA, 27.1% arose at the root of sigmoid artery (SA), 20.7% shared a common trunk with SA while 4.8% of LCA was absent. As for track of LCA before anastomosis with marginal artery, 53.2% went straight upward while medial to the inner border of left kidney (Type A), 27.1% traveled diagonally across left kidney (Type B) and14.9% went infero-laterally to the lower border of left kidney (Type C). Short IMA trunk was independently associated with type A LCA and lower site of IMA origin. At the horizontal level of IMA origin, 29% of the LCA went distant from IMV, while 71% (21% medial, 50% lateral) were mutually close, and the close type was independently associated with type A LCA. Preoperative understanding of the vascular variations and the mutual relationship among LCA, IMA and IMV could be obtained by 3D-CTA, which would further help surgeons to set detailed plans for laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of salinity on anatomical features and physiology of a semi-mangrove plant Myoporum bontioides.

    PubMed

    Xu, H M; Tam, N F Y; Zan, Q J; Bai, M; Shin, P K S; Vrijmoed, L L P; Cheung, S G; Liao, W B

    2014-08-30

    The effect of different concentrations of NaCl, 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mM, on the anatomical features and physiology of Myoporum bontioides was investigated. The photosynthetic rates (Pn) were significantly reduced by salt stress, with the lowest values at 400 mM NaCl. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA), proline and soluble sugar, as well as the activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased at the beginning, but became similar to the control as the experiment proceeded. The NaCl effect on superoxide dismutase (SOD) was different from the other parameters, with a significant reduction at 400 mM NaCl at Day 7. Salt glands were found in both upper and lower epidermis, and the ratios of the thickness of palisade to spongy mesophyll tissues increased with NaCl concentrations. The medullary ray was clearly damaged by NaCl at levels of 200 and 300 mM. These results demonstrated that M. bontioides could adapt to a relatively low salinity, and was not a halophilous species.

  20. Interrelating anatomical, effective, and functional brain connectivity using propagators and neural field theory.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P A

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how to compute effective and functional connection matrices (eCMs and fCMs) from anatomical CMs (aCMs) and corresponding strength-of-connection matrices (sCMs) using propagator methods in which neural interactions play the role of scatterings. This analysis demonstrates how network effects dress the bare propagators (the sCMs) to yield effective propagators (the eCMs) that can be used to compute the covariances customarily used to define fCMs. The results incorporate excitatory and inhibitory connections, multiple structures and populations, asymmetries, time delays, and measurement effects. They can also be postprocessed in the same manner as experimental measurements for direct comparison with data and thereby give insights into the role of coarse-graining, thresholding, and other effects in determining the structure of CMs. The spatiotemporal results show how to generalize CMs to include time delays and how natural network modes give rise to long-range coherence at resonant frequencies. The results are demonstrated using tractable analytic cases via neural field theory of cortical and corticothalamic systems. These also demonstrate close connections between the structure of CMs and proximity to critical points of the system, highlight the importance of indirect links between brain regions and raise the possibility of imaging specific levels of indirect connectivity. Aside from the results presented explicitly here, the expression of the connections among aCMs, sCMs, eCMs, and fCMs in terms of propagators opens the way for propagator theory to be further applied to analysis of connectivity. © 2012 American Physical Society

  1. Interrelating anatomical, effective, and functional brain connectivity using propagators and neural field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how to compute effective and functional connection matrices (eCMs and fCMs) from anatomical CMs (aCMs) and corresponding strength-of-connection matrices (sCMs) using propagator methods in which neural interactions play the role of scatterings. This analysis demonstrates how network effects dress the bare propagators (the sCMs) to yield effective propagators (the eCMs) that can be used to compute the covariances customarily used to define fCMs. The results incorporate excitatory and inhibitory connections, multiple structures and populations, asymmetries, time delays, and measurement effects. They can also be postprocessed in the same manner as experimental measurements for direct comparison with data and thereby give insights into the role of coarse-graining, thresholding, and other effects in determining the structure of CMs. The spatiotemporal results show how to generalize CMs to include time delays and how natural network modes give rise to long-range coherence at resonant frequencies. The results are demonstrated using tractable analytic cases via neural field theory of cortical and corticothalamic systems. These also demonstrate close connections between the structure of CMs and proximity to critical points of the system, highlight the importance of indirect links between brain regions and raise the possibility of imaging specific levels of indirect connectivity. Aside from the results presented explicitly here, the expression of the connections among aCMs, sCMs, eCMs, and fCMs in terms of propagators opens the way for propagator theory to be further applied to analysis of connectivity.

  2. Effects of stimulation technique, anatomical region, and time on human sweat lipid mediator profiles.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Karan; Waller, Justin D; Pedersen, Theresa L; Newman, John W

    2017-09-20

    Few studies compare sampling protocol effect on sweat composition. Here we evaluate the impact of sweat stimulation mode and site of collection on lipid mediator composition. Sweat from healthy males (n=7) was collected weekly for three weeks from the volar forearm following either pilocarpine iontophoresis or exercise, and from the forearm, back and thigh following pilocarpine iontophoresis only. Sweat content of over 150 lipid mediators were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Seventy lipid mediators were routinely detected, including prostanoids, alcohols, diols, epoxides, ketones, nitrolipids, N-acylethanolamides, monoacylglycerols, and ceramides. Detected lipid mediators appeared unaffected by sampling site, though the forearm was the most consistent source of sweat. Pilocarpine-induced sweat showed increased concentrations of most detected compounds. Moreover, lipid mediator concentrations and profiles were temporally stable over the study duration. Sweat therefore appears to be a consistent and anatomically-stable source of lipid mediators, but care must be taken in comparing results obtained from different stimulation techniques. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Physiological, anatomical, biochemical, and cytogenetic effects of thiamethoxam treatment on Allium cepa (amaryllidaceae) L.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Kültiğin; Yalçin, Emine; Türkmen, Zafer; Yapar, Kürşad; Sağir, Saffet

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, toxic effects of active substance thiamethoxam of the insecticide Eforia were investigated on Allium cepa L. For this aim, we used the germination percentage, root length, weight gain, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, frequency of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and mitotic index (MI) as indicators of toxicity. Also, the changes in the root anatomy of A. cepa seeds treated with thiamethoxam were examined. The seeds in all the treatment groups were treated with three different doses (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) of thiamethoxam for 72 h. The results showed that there were significant alterations in the germination percentage, root length, weight gain, MDA level, MN, CAs, and MI frequency depending on application dose in the seeds exposed to thiamethoxam compared to control group. Thiamethoxam treatments significantly reduced the germination percentage, root length, and weight gain in all the treatment groups (P < 0.05). But, it caused an increase in MN and CAs formation (P < 0.05). It was also found that thiamethoxam has a mito-depressive action on mitosis, and the MI was decreased depending on the dose of applied-thiamethoxam (P < 0.05). About 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg doses of thiamethoxam significantly enhanced the lipid peroxidation and caused an increase in MDA levels at each dose treatment (P < 0.05). Some anatomical damages such as necrotic cell death, unclear vascular tissue, unclear epidermis layer, cell deformation, and unusual form of cell nucleus were observed by using light micrographs. Each dose of thiamethoxam caused severe toxic effects on A. cepa cells, and the maximum toxic effect was observed at the dose level of 500 mg/kg.

  4. The effect of increased ambient lighting on detection accuracy in uniform and anatomical backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-03-01

    Under typical dark conditions found in reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance monitor and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, minimize these visual adjustments and potentially improve reader comfort and accuracy. This paper details results from two psychophysical studies designed to determine the effect of a controlled ambient lighting increase on observer detection of subtle objects and lesions viewed on a DICOM-calibrated medical-grade LCD. The first study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on detection of subtle objects embedded within a uniform background, while the second study examined observer detection performance of subtle cancerous lesions in mammograms and chest radiographs. In both studies, observers were presented with images under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased room illuminance level (50 lux) for which the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to that of the displayed image. The display was calibrated to an effective luminance ratio of 409 for both lighting conditions. Observer detection performance under each room illuminance condition was then compared. Identification of subtle objects embedded within the uniform background improved from 59% to 67%, while detection time decreased slightly with additional illuminance. An ROC analysis of the anatomical image results revealed that observer AUC values remained constant while detection time decreased under increased illuminance. The results provide evidence that an ambient lighting increase may be possible without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

  5. The use of exit detector sinograms to detect anatomical variations for patients extending beyond the TomoTherapy field of view: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Goddu, S Murty; Rodriguez, Vivian; Cates, Jeremy; Grigsby, Perry; Low, Daniel A

    2012-10-01

    This work describes an independent method to use the TomoTherapy Hi-ART megavoltage CT imaging system for daily monitoring of anatomical changes of cancer patients whose anatomy extends beyond the imaging field of view. The imaging detector response to changes in attenuating media was measured using water-equivalent plastic. Weight loss was simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom and determining the system's ability to detect the weight loss. Layers of tissue-equivalent bolus were added to an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom and CT simulations of the phantom were conducted, one in which the phantom and bolus were both within the TomoTherapy imaging field of view, and another in which the couch was raised so that the bolus was outside the field of view. Gynecological treatment plans were developed using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system, and successive fractions of the plan were then delivered to the phantom. Weight loss was simulated by removing a 0.5 cm layer of bolus following each fraction. The exit detector sinograms were obtained from each fraction, and ratios of sinograms were calculated relative to a reference sinogram for which all bolus was in place. Histograms of ratio sinograms were determined and used to correlate with simulated weight loss. Exit detector sinograms and ratio histograms were also retrospectively analyzed for five patients all of whose anatomies extended beyond the imaging field of view and all of whom experienced weight variations exceeding 10% during treatment. Exit detector signal is well correlated to changes in attenuator thickness as demonstrated in both slab and anthropomorphic phantom geometries. Measured and expected signal increases agreed to within less than 2% for simulated weight loss on the anthropomorphic phantom. Exit detector signals for pelvic patients with significant weight loss variations were consistent with phantom measurements. The analysis of the ratio sinograms for the phantom measurements and real

  6. Using ring width correlations to study the effects of plantation density on wood density and anatomical properties of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)

    Treesearch

    J. Y. Zhu; C. T. Scott; K. L. Scallon; G. C. Myers

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrated that average ring width (or average annual radial growth rate) is a reliable parameter to quantify the effects of tree plantation ndensity (growth suppression) on wood density and tracheid anatomical properties. The average ring width successfully correlated wood density and tracheid anatomical properties of red pines (Pinus resinosa Ait.) from...

  7. The effect of stretch rate and activation state on skeletal muscle force in the anatomical range.

    PubMed

    Grover, Joel P; Corr, David T; Toumi, Hechmi; Manthei, David M; Oza, Ashish L; Vanderby, Ray; Best, Thomas M

    2007-03-01

    The effects of stretch rate and activation state on muscle mechanics require further clarification. This subject is of particular interest because of the role of skeletal muscle undergoing eccentric contractions in musculoskeletal injuries. The present study investigated the force-displacement behavior of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle at three stretch rates (2.5, 10, 25 cm/s) and three activation states (passive, tetanic, denervated). A phenomenological power law model and a dynamic systems model were used to describe the mechanical responses. The power law model showed excellent agreement with the passive and denervated responses to stretch (R(mean)=0.97). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a difference (P=0.042) in peak force between the passive and denervated states at a stretch rate of 2.5 cm/s. The dynamic systems model closely fit the tetanized muscle responses (R(mean)=0.95). There was no difference in the displacement at yield (P=0.83) for the three stretch rates of the tetanized muscle undergoing stretch. Differences between the passive and denervated responses suggest that mechanoreceptors may play a role in stimulating the muscle as it is stretched through the anatomical range. The displacement at yield did not change significantly over a decade range of stretch velocities, suggesting that a strain threshold exists beyond which cross bridges cannot remain bound. The power law and dynamic systems models presented offer mathematically tractable approaches to interpret the response of lengthening skeletal muscle. These findings on active, passive, and denervated muscle point to a possible role of the muscle spindle to tissue mechanical behavior that should be accounted for in future studies of force-elongation behavior of skeletal muscle.

  8. Effects of air pollution on morphological and anatomical characteristics of Pinus Eldarica Wood

    Treesearch

    Vahidreza Safdari; Moinuddin Ahmed; Margaret S. Devall; Vilma Bayramzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution, including automobile exhaust pollution, can affect anatomical and morphological characteristics of wood. In order to evaluate this subject, the Pinus eldarica trees of Chitgar Park in Tehran, which extends from a crowded highway in the south (polluted site) to the semi polluted midsection and to Alborz Mountain in the north (unpolluted...

  9. Effect of anatomical characteristics and chemical components on microwave-assisted liquefaction of bamboo wastes

    Treesearch

    JiuLong Xie; XingYan Huang; JinQiu Qi; Chung Hse; Todd Shupe

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis layer waste (ELW) and the inner layer waste (ILW) were removed from Phyllostachys pubescens bamboo, and the anatomical characteristics and chemical components of these wastes were comparatively investigated. Both the ELW and the ILW were subjected to a microwave-assisted liquefaction process to evaluate the relationship between bamboo...

  10. Anatomical basis of LMA variations drive to different photosynthetic and water storage strategies in two Sesleria species from mountain dry grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglielli, Giacomo; Fiore Crescente, Maria; Frattaroli, Anna Rita; Gratani, Loretta

    2016-04-01

    Plant and leaf traits directly affect ecosystem processes ensuring carbon, nutrient and water exchanges between soil and atmosphere through the photosynthetic activity. Nevertheless, a great within sites variation in plant and leaf traits can be found resulting in different adaptive strategies in coexisting species. Leaf mass per unit of leaf area (LMA) is an important trait to understand plant functional ecology being the outcome of leaf anatomy and related to photosynthesis. We hypothesized that LMA was the main predictor of the adaptive strategies of Sesleria nitida (S1) and Sesleria juncifolia (S2), growing on the screes and on the crests of the summit area, respectively, on Mount Terminillo (Central Apennines, Loc. Sella di Leonessa, 1895 m a.s.l.). To test our hypothesis we broke LMA down into anatomical components, leaf tissue density (LTD) and thickness (LT) and then relating them to gas exchange parameters on twenty plants per species cultivated ex situ. LTD explained 69% of LMA variations in S1 while the relationship with LT was not significant. Moreover, LTD was negatively correlated with LT in S1 driving to a 17% higher volume of the intercellular air spaces, which increases the CO2 partial pressure at the carboxylation sites. This result was also attested by the significant relationship between LTD and both net photosynthesis per unit leaf area (Aa) and mass (Am) (R= 0.56 and -0.49, respectively), highlighting the role of LTD in determining the photosynthetic process in S1. LMA scaled with both LTD and LT explaining 82% and 70% of LMA variations in S2. Moreover, the positive relationship between LTD and LT (R2 = 0.52) highlighted a coordination between the variables in controlling the photosynthetic process. In particular, LTD and LT controlled the transactions of carbon and water through the leaf surface, being positively related to Aa (R= 0.93 and 0.79 for LTD and LT, respectively). Nevertheless, an increase in LT and LTD decreased Am (R = -0.9 and

  11. Endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation for acute idiopathic epistaxis. Do anatomical variation and a limited evidence base raise questions regarding its place in management?

    PubMed

    Ellinas, A; Jervis, P; Kenyon, G; Flood, L M

    2017-04-01

    Endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation is widely accepted as effective and safe for acute spontaneous epistaxis that is unresponsive to conservative management. As with many new procedures, it has been progressively adopted as common practice, despite a limited evidence base for its efficacy. Early reviews called for comparative trials to support its adoption, but subsequent literature largely consists of case series and narrative reviews. These have attempted to derive an algorithm to establish its place in management, but consensus is still lacking. Intuitively, although there are theoretical objections, an operation regarded as relatively simple, fast and safe hardly seems to demand high-level evidence of efficacy. Rhinologists may be influenced by years of personal experience and success with the technique. However, estimates of the effect size and the added contribution to traditional surgical management are lacking. If the procedure could be shown to dramatically influence outcome, it should be standard practice and indispensable for all patients requiring operative intervention. This paper systematically examined the literature, appraising the anatomical basis for such an approach and evidence for its efficacy. It questions whether any units unable to consistently offer endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation should be undertaking surgical management of acute epistaxis.

  12. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  13. Anatomical and genetic variation of western Oxyloma (Pulmonata: Succineidae) concerning the endangered Kanab ambersnail (Oxyloma haydeni kanabense) in Arizona and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culver, Melanie; Herrmann, Hans-Werner; Miller, Mark; Roth, Barry; Sorenson, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    more closely related to other, non-endangered ambersnail populations across the Southwest. In contrast, the Kanab ambersnail population at Vaseys Paradise appeared to be genetically distinct from all other ambersnail populations studied. Management options for the ambersnail population at Vaseys Paradise, at the time of this study, conflict with ecosystem-wide measures proposed to benefit other natural resources in the Grand Canyon. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will not revise the 1995 Kanab Ambersnail Recovery Plan until further genetic and anatomical analyses provide more fine-scale taxonomic resolution of the identity of Oxyloma populations on the Colorado Plateau and elsewhere in the American Southwest. Likewise, interagency cooperators cannot revise down-listing criteria for the Kanab ambersnail until substantial evidence is provided identifying distinct Oxyloma taxa or a larger group of conspecifics that reasonably could be managed as one species. Therefore, given the current controversy about the taxonomy of Oxyloma and the endangered Kanab ambersnail, new detailed analyses were completed of morphological and genetic variation from many Oxyloma specimens collected at 12 western North American locations. These new data have allowed us to evaluate many issues related to Kanab ambersnail taxonomy. Using this dataset, the study of shells and anatomy indicates that the holotype of Oxyloma haydeni kanabense plausibly can be regarded as a member of the same species as the populations of Oxyloma analyzed in this study. Additionally, the presence of gene flow among all populations is evidence that they are members of the same species. Almost all the observed genetic diversity can be accounted for by short-distance or long-distance dispersal events between populations in this study. Our major taxonomic conclusion is that all samples collected for this study were drawn from populations of the same species.

  14. On distance variation effects on graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, S.; Bhihi, M.; Labrim, H.; Belhaj, A.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.; Loulidi, M.

    2014-06-01

    The opening of the energy gap and the total energy of the graphene-like bilayers are investigated using ab initio calculations. The studied model consists of a static single layer of graphene interacting with an extra dynamic one placed at a varying vertical distance d in the (AB) stacking arrangement. The effects of the vertical distance variation on the energy gap and the total energy of the system are discussed first. Starting from a distance around the van der Waals length, the energy gap does not depend on the vertical distance variation and the system exhibits graphene-like properties with minor deformations in the lattice size parameter and the energy dispersion behaviour around K points. However, it has been shown that the diagonal distance variation of the graphene-like bilayer modifies the electronic structure properties. This modification depends on an intermediate stacking arrangement between the (AA) and the (AB) configurations. It has been shown that the diagonal distance variation has an influence on the states of pz electrons in the (AB) arrangement and it can be explored to open the energy gap.

  15. Effects of two surface finishes on the color of cemented and colored anatomic-contour zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Fang; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Lu, Yi-Jie; Wu, Hsin-Jui; Peng, Pei-Wen

    2016-08-01

    The esthetic appearance of anatomic-contour zirconia restorations is influenced by the shade of the coloring liquid and the optical properties of the luting cements. However, few studies are available on the effects of surface-finishing methods and luting cements on colored anatomic-contour zirconia restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of surface finishing methods on the color distribution of colored anatomic-contour zirconia crowns before and after being cemented onto abutments. Implant-supported anatomic-contour zirconia premolar crowns were fabricated and immersed in A3-coloring liquid for 30 seconds. The colored zirconia crowns were separated into 3 groups according to the method of surface treatment: no treatment (N), polishing (P), and glazing (G). The zirconia crowns without coloring liquid application served as the control group. CIELab color coordinates were obtained, and color differences (ΔE) between shaded crowns were calculated with a spectrophotometer. The color stability of the crown before and after cement application was also investigated. Before cement application, the mean color difference between groups N and P was 2.85 ΔE units, whereas the mean ΔE value between groups N and G was 3.27. Mean ΔE values with and without cement application among groups ranged from 2.75 to 3.45 ΔE units. The color appearance of the colored zirconia crowns was strongly influenced by the surface-finishing methods and luting cement application. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of anatomical characteristics as factors in abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture: CT aortography analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Min Uk; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Kyung Ah; Park, Sanghui

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical characteristics of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) using computed tomography (CT) aortography in order to determine the risk factors for rupture.We retrospectively reviewed the CT aortography findings and medical records of patients with ruptured AAAs who underwent CT aortography between February 2002 and December 2014. Age, sex, blood pressure at the time of rupture, treatment methods used for the ruptured AAAs, and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between the maximum aneurysm diameter, which is considered the standard predictor of aneurysm rupture, and anatomical characteristics such as proximal neck diameter, angle between the suprarenal aorta and the aneurysm neck (α angle), angle between the aneurysm neck and aneurysm sac (β angle), and angles between the abdominal aorta and both iliac arteries.Data were reviewed for a total of 36 patients. The mean maximum diameter of AAAs was 76.84 ± 21.08 mm. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex indicated statistical correlations between the α and β angles and maximum aneurysm diameter and between the β angle and iliac artery involvement.Our results suggest that the tortuosity of the aorta tends to be associated with the diameter of AAAs and iliac artery involvement. Investigation of the anatomical characteristics of individual patients using CT aortography is expected to aid in predicting the risk of AAA rupture.

  17. Effects of anatomical characteristics as factors in abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Min Uk; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Kyung Ah; Park, Sanghui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical characteristics of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) using computed tomography (CT) aortography in order to determine the risk factors for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed the CT aortography findings and medical records of patients with ruptured AAAs who underwent CT aortography between February 2002 and December 2014. Age, sex, blood pressure at the time of rupture, treatment methods used for the ruptured AAAs, and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between the maximum aneurysm diameter, which is considered the standard predictor of aneurysm rupture, and anatomical characteristics such as proximal neck diameter, angle between the suprarenal aorta and the aneurysm neck (α angle), angle between the aneurysm neck and aneurysm sac (β angle), and angles between the abdominal aorta and both iliac arteries. Data were reviewed for a total of 36 patients. The mean maximum diameter of AAAs was 76.84 ± 21.08 mm. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex indicated statistical correlations between the α and β angles and maximum aneurysm diameter and between the β angle and iliac artery involvement. Our results suggest that the tortuosity of the aorta tends to be associated with the diameter of AAAs and iliac artery involvement. Investigation of the anatomical characteristics of individual patients using CT aortography is expected to aid in predicting the risk of AAA rupture. PMID:28640121

  18. The effect of ancient population bottlenecks on human phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Manica, Andrea; Amos, William; Balloux, François; Hanihara, Tsunehiko

    2007-07-19

    The origin and patterns of dispersal of anatomically modern humans are the focus of considerable debate. Global genetic analyses have argued for one single origin, placed somewhere in Africa. This scenario implies a rapid expansion, with a series of bottlenecks of small amplitude, which would have led to the observed smooth loss of genetic diversity with increasing distance from Africa. Analyses of cranial data, on the other hand, have given mixed results, and have been argued to support multiple origins of modern humans. Using a large data set of skull measurements and an analytical framework equivalent to that used for genetic data, we show that the loss in genetic diversity has been mirrored by a loss in phenotypic variability. We find evidence for an African origin, placed somewhere in the central/southern part of the continent, which harbours the highest intra-population diversity in phenotypic measurements. We failed to find evidence for a second origin, and we confirm these results on a large genetic data set. Distance from Africa accounts for an average 19-25% of heritable variation in craniometric measurements-a remarkably strong effect for phenotypic measurements known to be under selection.

  19. Demonstration of the Effect of Generic Anatomical Divisions versus Clinical Protocols on Computed Tomography Dose Estimates and Risk Burden

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Choosing to undertake a CT scan relies on balancing risk versus benefit, however risks associated with CT scanning have generally been limited to broad anatomical locations, which do not provided adequate information to evaluate risk against benefit. Our study aimed to determine differences in radiation dose and risk estimates associated with modern CT scanning examinations when computed for clinical protocols compared with those using anatomical area. Methods Technical data were extracted from a tertiary hospital Picture Archiving Communication System for random samples of 20–40 CT examinations per adult clinical CT protocol. Organ and whole body radiation dose were calculated using ImPACT Monte Carlo simulation software and cancer incidence and mortality estimated using BEIR VII age and gender specific lifetime attributable risk weights. Results Thirty four unique CT protocols were identified by our study. When grouped according to anatomic area the radiation dose varied substantially, particularly for abdominal protocols. The total estimated number of incident cancers and cancer related deaths using the mean dose of anatomical area were 86 and 69 respectively. Using more specific protocol doses the estimates rose to 214 and 138 incident cancers and cancer related deaths, at least doubling the burden estimated. Conclusions Modern CT scanning produces a greater diversity of effective doses than much of the literature describes; where a lack of focus on actual scanning protocols has produced estimates that do not reflect the range and complexity of modern CT practice. To allow clinicians, patients and policy makers to make informed risk versus benefit decisions the individual and population level risks associated with modern CT practices are essential. PMID:24878841

  20. The complexity of anatomical systems

    PubMed Central

    Grizzi, Fabio; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3) Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture) or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4) Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system) each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5) Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural) to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation. PMID:16029490

  1. Effect of head shape variations among individuals on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Wagner, Michael; Nehorai, Arye

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG) forward and inverse problems. We build a random head model such that each sample represents the head shape of a different individual and solve the forward problem assuming this random head model, using a polynomial chaos expansion. The random solution of the forward problem is then used to quantify the effect of the geometry when the inverse problem is solved with a standard head model. The results derived with this approach are valid for a continuous family of head models, rather than just for a set of cases. The random model consists of three random surfaces that define layers of different electric conductivity, and we built an example based on a set of 30 deterministic models from adults. Our results show that for a dipolar source model, the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/MEG inverse problem due to the random head model is slightly larger than the effect of the electronic noise present in the sensors. The variations in the EEG inverse problem solutions are due to the variations in the shape of the volume conductor, while the variations in the MEG inverse problem solutions, larger than the EEG ones, are caused mainly by the variations of the absolute position of the sources in a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks, in which the magnetometers have a fixed position.

  2. Observed seasonal variations in exospheric effective temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    High spectral resolution line profile observations indicate a reproducible semi-annual variation in the geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α effective temperature. These observations were made between 08 January 2000 and 21 November 2001 from Pine Bluff Observatory (WI) with a second generation double etalon Fabry-Perot annular summing spectrometer operating at a resolving power of 80,000. This data set spans sixty-four nights of observations (1404 spectra in total) over 20 dark-moon periods. A two cluster Gaussian model fitting procedure is used to determine Doppler line widths, accounting for fine structure contributions to the line, including those due to cascade; cascade contributions at Balmer α are found to be 5 ± 3%. An observed decrease in effective temperature with increasing shadow altitude is found to be a persistent feature for every night in which a wide range of shadow altitudes were sampled. A semiannual variation is observed in the column exospheric effective temperature with maxima near day numbers 100 and 300 and minima near day numbers 1 and 200. Temperatures ranged from ˜710 to 975 K. Average MSIS model exobase temperatures for similar conditions are approximately 1.5× higher than those derived from the Balmer α observations, a difference likely due to contributions to the observed Balmer α column emission from higher, cooler regions of the exosphere.

  3. Effect of anatomical variability in brain on transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syeda, F.; Magsood, H.; Lee, E. G.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Jiles, D. C.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is a non-invasive clinical therapy used to treat depression and migraine, and shows further promise as treatment for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological disorders. However, it is yet unclear as to how anatomical differences may affect stimulation from this treatment. We use finite element analysis to model and analyze the results of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in various head models. A number of heterogeneous head models have been developed using MRI data of real patients, including healthy individuals as well as patients of Parkinson's disease. Simulations of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation performed on 22 anatomically different models highlight the differences in induced stimulation. A standard Figure of 8 coil is used with frequency 2.5 kHz, placed 5 mm above the head. We compare cortical stimulation, volume of brain tissue stimulated, specificity, and maximum E-field induced in the brain for models ranging from ages 20 to 60. Results show that stimulation varies drastically between patients of the same age and health status depending upon brain-scalp distance, which is not necessarily a linear progression with age.

  4. Effect of anatomical landmark perturbation on mean helical axis parameters of in vivo upper costovertebral joints.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Benoît; Sholukha, Victor; Salvia, Patrick; Rooze, Marcel; Feipel, Véronique; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2015-02-05

    The literature concerning quantification of costovertebral joint (CVJ) motion under in vivo conditions is scarce. Most papers concerning this topic are related to ex vivo loading conditions. In vivo protocols are available from the literature to determine rib and vertebra kinematics but new developments are needed to improve data processing concerning CVJ behaviour obtained from discrete breathing positions showing limiting ranges-of-motion and sensitive to noise. Data from previous work were used to implement a method analyzing mean helical axis (MHA) and pivot point parameters of the CVJ complexes. Several levels of noises were estimated within Monte-Carlo simulations to optimize MHA results. MHA parameters were then used to transform and define a CVJ-specific local coordinate system. This study proposes an improvement for CVJ kinematics processing and description from in vivo data obtained from computed tomography. This methodology emphasizes the possibility to work with variability of MHA parameters using Monte-Carlo procedures on anatomical landmark coordinates and to define a local coordinate system from this particular joint behaviour. Results from the CVJ joint model are closer to a hinge joint (secondary motions inferior to 3°) when anatomical frames are expressed from MHA orientation. MHA orientation and position data obtained from the proposed method are relevant according to angular dispersion obtained (from 7.5° to 13.9°) and therefore relevant to define behaviour of CVJ.

  5. Effect of Salinity on Biomass Yield and Physiological and Stem-Root Anatomical Characteristics of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, M. Y.; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2015-01-01

    13 selected purslane accessions were subjected to five salinity levels 0, 8, 16, 24, and 32 dS m−1. Salinity effect was evaluated on the basis of biomass yield reduction, physiological attributes, and stem-root anatomical changes. Aggravated salinity stress caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction in all measured parameters and the highest salinity showed more detrimental effect compared to control as well as lower salinity levels. The fresh and dry matter production was found to increase in Ac1, Ac9, and Ac13 from lower to higher salinity levels but others were badly affected. Considering salinity effect on purslane physiology, increase in chlorophyll content was seen in Ac2, Ac4, Ac6, and Ac8 at 16 dS m−1 salinity, whereas Ac4, Ac9, and Ac12 showed increased photosynthesis at the same salinity levels compared to control. Anatomically, stem cortical tissues of Ac5, Ac9, and Ac12 were unaffected at control and 8 dS m−1 salinity but root cortical tissues did not show any significant damage except a bit enlargement in Ac12 and Ac13. A dendrogram was constructed by UPGMA based on biomass yield and physiological traits where all 13 accessions were grouped into 5 clusters proving greater diversity among them. The 3-dimensional principal component analysis (PCA) has also confirmed the output of grouping from cluster analysis. Overall, salinity stressed among all 13 purslane accessions considering biomass production, physiological growth, and anatomical development Ac9 was the best salt-tolerant purslane accession and Ac13 was the most affected accession. PMID:25802833

  6. Effect of salinity on biomass yield and physiological and stem-root anatomical characteristics of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) accessions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Amirul; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, M Y; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2015-01-01

    13 selected purslane accessions were subjected to five salinity levels 0, 8, 16, 24, and 32 dS m(-1). Salinity effect was evaluated on the basis of biomass yield reduction, physiological attributes, and stem-root anatomical changes. Aggravated salinity stress caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction in all measured parameters and the highest salinity showed more detrimental effect compared to control as well as lower salinity levels. The fresh and dry matter production was found to increase in Ac1, Ac9, and Ac13 from lower to higher salinity levels but others were badly affected. Considering salinity effect on purslane physiology, increase in chlorophyll content was seen in Ac2, Ac4, Ac6, and Ac8 at 16 dS m(-1) salinity, whereas Ac4, Ac9, and Ac12 showed increased photosynthesis at the same salinity levels compared to control. Anatomically, stem cortical tissues of Ac5, Ac9, and Ac12 were unaffected at control and 8 dS m(-1) salinity but root cortical tissues did not show any significant damage except a bit enlargement in Ac12 and Ac13. A dendrogram was constructed by UPGMA based on biomass yield and physiological traits where all 13 accessions were grouped into 5 clusters proving greater diversity among them. The 3-dimensional principal component analysis (PCA) has also confirmed the output of grouping from cluster analysis. Overall, salinity stressed among all 13 purslane accessions considering biomass production, physiological growth, and anatomical development Ac9 was the best salt-tolerant purslane accession and Ac13 was the most affected accession.

  7. Biomechanical effect of isolated capitate shortening in Kienbock's disease: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Werber, K-D; Schmelz, R; Peimer, C A; Wagenpfeil, S; Machens, H-G; Lohmeyer, J A

    2013-06-01

    Multiple operations have been proposed to slow the progression of osteonecrosis and secondary carpal damage in Kienböck's disease. To assess the biomechanical changes after capitate shorting, we inserted pressure-testing devices into the carpal and radiocarpal joints in an anatomical study. Pressure sensors were placed into eight thawed non-fixated human cadaver arms to measure the forces transmitted in physiological loading. Longitudinal 9.8 N and 19.6 N forces were applied before and after capitate shortening. After capitate shortening, significant load reduction on the lunate was evident in all specimens. An average decrease of 49% was seen under a 9.8 N load and 56% under a 19.6 N load. The load was transferred to the radial and ulnar intercarpal joints. More relief of pressure on the lunate after isolated capitate shortening is achieved with a shallow angle between the scaphoid and capitate in the posteroanterior radiograph.

  8. The significance of cone beam computed tomography for the visualization of anatomical variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus for patients hoping to have dental implant-supported maxillary restorations in a private dental office in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the significance of cone bean computed tomography (CBCT) for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla. Therefore, two studies were planned. One was to compare the prevalence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus on CBCT of patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla with that in patients with other chief complaints in a private dental office in Japan. The other study was to elucidate the limitations of panoramic radiographs in the detection of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus. Study design Sixty-one pairs of panoramic radiographs and CBCT were retrospectively analyzed in two groups of patients, those who hoped to undergo implant-supported restorations in the maxilla (Implant group) and those who did not (Non-implant group). The presence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus were analyzed. Results The detection rate of mucosal thickening was significantly higher in the Implant group than in the Non-implant group. The detection rates for the features analyzed were significantly lower on panoramic radiographs. In particular, the detection rates of internal and anterior locations of some features were noticeably lower on panoramic radiographs. A significant relationship was found between the change in the detection rate on panoramic radiographs and the widths of mucosal thickening or the lengths of the major axis of SOLs in the maxillary sinus. If the width of mucosal thickening or the length of the major axis of SOLs was <3 mm or <4 mm, respectively, the detection rate on panoramic radiographs was significantly decreased. Conclusion CBCT is important for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla because of the mucosal thickening in the maxillary sinus in such patients and their lower detection rates on panoramic radiographs. PMID:24884983

  9. Effect of anatomic motion on proton therapy dose distributions in prostate cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong . E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org; Dong, Lei; Lee, Andrew K.; Cox, James D.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Zhu, Ron X.; Wang Xiaochun; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of interfraction anatomic movements in prostate cancer patients receiving proton therapy. Methods and Materials: For each of the 10 patients studied, 8 computed tomography (CT) scans were selected from sets of daily setup CT images that were acquired from a cohort of prostate cancer patients. The images were acquired in the treatment room using the CT-on-rails system. First, standard proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were designed for each patient using standard modality-specific methods. The images, the proton plan, and the IMRT plan were then aligned to the eight CT images based on skin marks. The doses were recalculated on these eight CT images using beam from the standard plans. Second, the plans were redesigned and evaluated assuming a smaller clinical target volume to planning target volume margin (3 mm). The images and the corresponding plans were then realigned based on the center of volume of the prostate. Dose distributions were evaluated using isodose displays, dose-volume histograms, and target coverage. Results: For the skin-marker alignment method, 4 of the 10 IMRT plans were deficient, whereas 3 of 10 proton plans were compromised. For the alignment method based on the center of volume of the prostate, only the proton plan for 1 patient was deficient, whereas 3 of the 10 IMRT plans were suboptimal. Conclusion: A comparison of passively scattered proton therapy and highly conformal IMRT plans for prostate cancer revealed that the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomic motions was similar for both modalities.

  10. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  11. Validation of semi-quantitative methods for DAT SPECT: influence of anatomical variability and partial volume effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Niñerola-Baizán, A.; Cot, A.; Aguiar, P.; Crespo, C.; Falcón, C.; Lomeña, F.; Sempau, J.; Pavía, J.; Ros, D.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of anatomical variability between subjects and of the partial volume effect (PVE) on the standardized Specific Uptake Ratio (SUR) in [123I]FP-bib SPECT studies. To this end, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 subjects with differences in the striatal volume of up to 44% were segmented and used to generate a database of 138 Monte Carlo simulated SPECT studies. Data included normal uptakes and pathological cases. Studies were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm. Quantification was carried out by applying a reference method based on regions of interest (ROIs) derived from the MR images and ROIs derived from the Automated Anatomical Labelling map. Our results showed that, regardless of anatomical variability, the relationship between calculated and true SUR values for caudate and putamen could be described by a multiple linear model which took into account the spill-over phenomenon caused by PVE ({{R}2}≥slant 0.963 for caudate and ≥0.980 for putamen) and also by a simple linear model (R2 ≥ 0.952 for caudate and ≥0.973 for putamen). Calculated values were standardized by inverting both linear systems. Differences between standardized and true values showed that, although the multiple linear model was the best approach in terms of variability ({χ2}  ≥ 11.79 for caudate and  ≤7.36 for putamen), standardization based on a simple linear model was also suitable ({χ2}  ≥ 12.44 for caudate and  ≤12.57 for putamen).

  12. SU-C-210-05: Evaluation of Robustness: Dosimetric Effects of Anatomical Changes During Fractionated Radiation Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, A van der; Houweling, A C; Bijveld, M M C; Visser, J; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic tumors show large interfractional position variations. In addition, changes in gastrointestinal air volume and body contour take place during treatment. We aim to investigate the robustness of the clinical treatment plans by quantifying the dosimetric effects of these anatomical changes. Methods: Calculations were performed for up to now 3 pancreatic cancer patients who had intratumoral fiducials for daily CBCT-based positioning during their 3-week treatment. For each patient, deformable image registration of the planning CT was used to assign Hounsfield Units to each of the 13—15 CBCTs; air volumes and body contour were copied from CBCT. The clinical treatment plan was used (CTV-PTV margin = 10 mm; 36Gy; 10MV; 1 arc VMAT). Fraction dose distributions were calculated and accumulated. The V95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed, as well as the dose to stomach, duodenum and liver. Dose accumulation was done for patient positioning based on the fiducials (as clinically used) as well as for positioning based on bony anatomy. Results: For all three patients, the V95% of the CTV remained 100%, for both fiducial- and bony anatomy-based positioning. For fiducial-based positioning, dose to duodenum en stomach showed no discernable differences with planned dose. For bony anatomy-based positioning, the PTV V95% of the patient with the largest systematic difference in tumor position (patient 1) decreased to 85%; the liver Dmax increased from 33.5Gy (planned) to 35.5Gy. Conclusion: When using intratumoral fiducials, CTV dose coverage was only mildly affected by the daily anatomical changes. When using bony anatomy for patient positioning, we found a decline in PTV dose coverage due to the interfractional tumor position variations. Photon irradiation treatment plans for pancreatic tumors are robust to variations in body contour and gastrointestinal gas, but the use of fiducial-based daily position verification

  13. The effects of anatomical information and observer expertise on abnormality detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cavaro-Ménard, C.; Le Callet, P.; Cooper, L. H. K.; Hunault, G.; Tanguy, J.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel study investigating the influences of Magnetic Resonance (MR) image anatomical information and observer expertise on an abnormality detection task. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for detecting brain abnormalities, particularly in the evaluation of white matter diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, MS lesions are simulated as the target stimuli for detection in the present study. Two different image backgrounds are used in the following experiments: a) homogeneous region of white matter tissue, and b) one slice of a healthy brain MR image. One expert radiologist (more than 10 years' experience), three radiologists (less than 5 years' experience) and eight naïve observers (without any prior medical knowledge) have performed these experiments, during which they have been asked different questions dependent upon level of experience; the three radiologists and eight naïve observers were asked if they were aware of any hyper-signal, likely to represent an MS lesion, while the most experienced consultant was asked if a clinically significant sign was present. With the percentages of response "yes" displayed on the y-axis and the lesion intensity contrasts on the x-axis, psychometric function is generated from the observer' responses. Results of psychometric functions and calculated thresholds indicate that radiologists have better hyper-signal detection ability than naïve observers, which is intuitively shown by the lower simple visibility thresholds of radiologists. However, when radiologists perform a task with clinical implications, e.g. to detect a clinically significant sign, their detection thresholds are elevated. Moreover, the study indicates that for the radiologists, the simple visibility thresholds remain the same with and without the anatomical information, which reduces the threshold for the clinically significant sign detection task. Findings provide further insight into human visual system processing for this

  14. Effects of an oil spill on the leaf anatomical characteristics of a beach plant (Terminalia catappa L.).

    PubMed

    Punwong, Paramita; Juprasong, Yotin; Traiperm, Paweena

    2017-08-03

    This study investigated the short-term impacts of an oil spill on the leaf anatomical structures of Terminalia catappa L. from crude oil leakage in Rayong province, Thailand, in 2013. Approximately 3 weeks after the oil spill, leaves of T. catappa were collected along the coastline of Rayong from one affected site, five adjacent sites, and a control site. Slides of the leaf epidermis were prepared by the peeling method, while leaf and petiole transverse sections were prepared by paraffin embedding. Cell walls of adaxial epidermal cell on leaves in the affected site were straight instead of the jigsaw shape found in leaves from the adjacent and control sites. In addition, the stomatal index of the abaxial leaf surface was significantly lower in the affected site. Leaf and petiole transverse sections collected from the affected site showed increased cuticle thickness, epidermal cell diameter on both sides, and palisade mesophyll thickness; in contrast, vessel diameter and spongy mesophyll thickness were reduced. These significant changes in the leaf anatomy of T. catappa correspond with previous research and demonstrate the negative effects of oil spill pollution on plants. The anatomical changes of T. catappa in response to crude oil pollution are discussed as a possible indicator of pollution and may be used in monitoring crude oil pollution.

  15. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  16. Variation of Photosynthesis, Fatty Acid Composition, ATPase and Acid Phosphatase Activities, and Anatomical Structure of Two Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) Cultivars in Response to Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L. X.; Tang, J. H.; Xiao, B.; Yang, Y. J.; Liu, J.

    2013-01-01

    The changes of photosynthetic parameters, water use efficiency (WUE), fatty acid composition, chlorophyll (Chl) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, ATPase and acid phosphatase activities, fluoride (F) content, and leaf anatomical structure of two tea cultivars, “Pingyangtezao” (PY) and “Fudingdabai” (FD), after F treatments were investigated. The results show that net photosynthetic rate (P n), stomatal conductance (g s), and transpiration rate (E) significantly decreased in both cultivars after 0.3 mM F treatment, but FD had higher P n, g s, and WUE and lower E than PY. Chl content in PY significantly decreased after 0.2 and 0.3 mM F treatments, while no significant changes were observed in FD. The proportions of shorter chain and saturated fatty acids increased and those of longer chain and unsaturated fatty acids decreased in both cultivars under F treatments. The contents of MDA increased after F treatments but were higher in PY than in FD. In addition, F treatments decreased the activities of ATPase and acid phosphatase and increased F content in both cultivars; however, compared with PY, FD showed higher enzymatic activities and lower F content in roots and leaves. Leaf anatomical structure in FD indicated that cells in leaf midrib region were less injured by F than in PY. PMID:24023526

  17. Effect of positional changes of anatomic structures on upper airway dilating muscle shortening during electro- and chemostimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliven, A; Odeh, M

    2006-09-01

    Positional changes of anatomic structures surrounding the upper airway are known to affect pharyngeal mechanics and collapsibility. We hypothesized that these alterations also affect the ability of the upper airway dilator muscles to enlarge the pharynx by altering their ability to shorten when activated. Using sonomicrometry, we evaluated in seven anesthetized dogs the effects of changes in tracheal and head position on the length of the genioglossus (GG) and the geniohyoid (GH) and the effects of these positional changes on the magnitude of shortening of the two muscles in response to electro- (ES) and chemostimulation (CS). Caudal traction of the trachea lengthened the GG and GH in all dogs, whereas cranial displacement of the trachea and flexion of the head to a vertical position shortened the muscles. Compared with the magnitude of ES-induced shortening in the neutral position, ES-induced shortening of the GG was 144.7 +/- 14.6, 49.3 +/- 4.3, and 33.5 +/- 11.6% during caudal and cranial displacement of the trachea and during head flexion, respectively. Similar effects of the positional changes were found for the GH, as well as for both muscles during respiratory stimulation with P(CO2) of 90 Torr at the end of CO(2) rebreathing, although inspiratory muscle shortening during CS reached only one-quarter to one-third of the magnitude observed during ES. We conclude that positional alterations of anatomic structures in the neck have a dramatic effect on the magnitude of shortening of the activated GG and GH, which may reduce substantially their ability to protect pharyngeal patency.

  18. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  19. Dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning depend on anatomical connections between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala.

    PubMed

    van der Schaaf, Marieke E; Zwiers, Marcel P; van Schouwenburg, Martine R; Geurts, Dirk E M; Schellekens, Arnt F A; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine in the striatum is known to be important for reversal learning. However, the striatum does not act in isolation and reversal learning is also well-accepted to depend on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala. Here we assessed whether dopaminergic drug effects on human striatal BOLD signaling during reversal learning is associated with anatomical connectivity in an orbitofrontal-limbic-striatal network, as measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). By using a fiber-based approach, we demonstrate that dopaminergic drug effects on striatal BOLD signal varied as a function of fractional anisotropy (FA) in a pathway connecting the OFC with the amygdala. Moreover, our experimental design allowed us to establish that these white-matter dependent drug effects were mediated via D2 receptors. Thus, white matter dependent effects of the D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine on striatal BOLD signal were abolished by co-administration with the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride. These data provide fundamental insight into the mechanism of action of dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning. In addition, they may have important clinical implications by suggesting that white matter integrity can help predict dopaminergic drug effects on brain function, ultimately contributing to individual tailoring of dopaminergic drug treatment strategies in psychiatry.

  20. Dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning depend on anatomical connections between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    van der Schaaf, Marieke E.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; van Schouwenburg, Martine R.; Geurts, Dirk E. M.; Schellekens, Arnt F. A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine in the striatum is known to be important for reversal learning. However, the striatum does not act in isolation and reversal learning is also well-accepted to depend on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala. Here we assessed whether dopaminergic drug effects on human striatal BOLD signaling during reversal learning is associated with anatomical connectivity in an orbitofrontal-limbic-striatal network, as measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). By using a fiber-based approach, we demonstrate that dopaminergic drug effects on striatal BOLD signal varied as a function of fractional anisotropy (FA) in a pathway connecting the OFC with the amygdala. Moreover, our experimental design allowed us to establish that these white-matter dependent drug effects were mediated via D2 receptors. Thus, white matter dependent effects of the D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine on striatal BOLD signal were abolished by co-administration with the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride. These data provide fundamental insight into the mechanism of action of dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning. In addition, they may have important clinical implications by suggesting that white matter integrity can help predict dopaminergic drug effects on brain function, ultimately contributing to individual tailoring of dopaminergic drug treatment strategies in psychiatry. PMID:23966907

  1. Clinical Effect of Acute Complete Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Treated with Micro-Movable and Anatomical Acromioclavicular Plate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingjun; Miao, Jianyun; Lin, Bin; Guo, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate. Methods: Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range16 to 63 years) with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months). Results: The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100). The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%), good in 3 patients (18.8%) and satisfactory in 1patient (6.2%). Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients. Conclusion: We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique. PMID:23091410

  2. Clinical effect of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Miao, Jianyun; Lin, Bin; Guo, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range 16 to 63 years) with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months). The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100). The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%), good in 3 patients (18.8%) and satisfactory in 1 patient (6.2%). Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients. We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of Corticosteroid Nasal Spray vs Surgical Therapy in Patients With Severe to Extreme Anatomical Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Teti, Virginia P; Akdagli, Seden; Most, Sam P

    2016-05-01

    Health insurance companies commonly require a trial of corticosteroid nasal spray prior to authorizing nasal surgery, even in patients with severe to extreme anatomical nasal obstruction, despite lack of data supporting such medical therapy. To provide a model for the comparative analysis of medical vs surgical treatment for nasal obstruction to help maximize health care benefit per dollar spent and to explore the cost-effectiveness of corticosteroid nasal spray in patients with severe to extreme nasal airway obstruction on Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scores. A cost-efficiency frontier economic evaluation was performed. The economic perspective was that of the health care third-party payer. Effectiveness data were obtained from NOSE score questionnaires in 179 patients. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was determined from the cost and efficacy data. Comparative treatment groups were medical therapy with corticosteroid nasal spray vs surgical therapy for nasal airway obstruction. The study was conducted between January 1, 2011, and December 30, 2013. The time horizon included 1, 2, and 5 years. Data analysis was completed June 1, 2015. The primary outcome was cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A modified Markov decision tree model was used. Costs were obtained from the Medicare 2015 physician fee schedule, and the mean was determined (owing to geographic disparity) along with wholesale and generic pharmaceutical pricing. Among 100 men and 79 women evaluated (mean [SD] age, 37.9 [12.9] years), surgical repair of severe nasal airway obstruction cost $6537 and produced a total of 1.15 QALYs at 1 year. Medical treatment involved a trial of corticosteroid nasal sprays, which cost $520 and produced a total of 1.03 QALYs. The surgical approach was markedly more effective but at greater short-term cost. In cases of extreme nasal obstruction, medical treatment cost $520.73 with 1.004 QALYs, demonstrating an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio

  4. A cadaveric study showing the anatomical variations in the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint and its clinical implication in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S; Dawe, E; Lee, C; Whitehead-Clarke, T; Smith, C; Bendall, S

    2016-09-23

    Introduction Pseudoaneurysm formation following ankle arthroscopy is a rare but potentially catastrophic complication. The placement of anterior ankle portals carries inherent risk to the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, as well as to the dorsalis pedis artery. Anatomical variations in the dorsalis pedis and the presence of branches at the joint line may increase the risk of vascular injury and pseudoaneurysm formation during arthroscopy. There is limited anatomical evidence available regarding the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery, which occur at the point at which they cross the ankle joint. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the frequency and direction of branches of the dorsalis pedis crossing the ankle joint. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadaveric feet were carefully dissected to explore the course of the dorsalis pedis artery, noting in particular the branching pattern at the joint line. Results Eleven of the nineteen feet had a branch of the dorsalis pedis artery that crossed the level of the ankle joint. Out of these, six were lateral, four medial and one bilateral. Eight of the eleven specimens had one branch at, or just before, the level of the joint. Two specimens had two branches and one had three branches crossing the ankle, which were all in the same direction, crossing laterally to the main trunk of the dorsalis pedis. Conclusions Our study demonstrated high rates of branching of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint. The role of these branches in pseudoaneurysm formation during anterior hindfoot surgery remains unclear.

  5. Violation of Dollo's law: evidence of muscle reversions in primate phylogeny and their implications for the understanding of the ontogeny, evolution, and anatomical variations of modern humans.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Wood, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    According to Dollo's law, once a complex structure is lost it is unlikely to be reacquired. In this article, we report new data obtained from our myology-based cladistic analyses of primate phylogeny, which provide evidence of anatomical reversions violating Dollo's law: of the 220 character state changes unambiguously optimized in the most parsimonious primate tree, 28 (13%) are evolutionary reversions, and of these 28 reversions six (21%) occurred in the nodes that lead to the origin of modern humans; nine (32%) violate Dollo's law. In some of these nine cases, the structures that were lost in adults of the last common ancestor and are absent in adults of most subgroups of a clade are actually present in early ontogenetic stages of karyotypically normal individuals as well as in later ontogenetic stages of karyotypically abnormal members of those subgroups. Violations of Dollo's law may thus result from the maintenance of ancestral developmental pathways during long periods of trait absence preceding the reacquisition of the trait through paedomorphic events. For instance, the presence of contrahentes and intermetacarpales in adult chimpanzees is likely due to a prolonged/delayed development of the hand musculature, that is, in this case chimpanzees are more neotenic than modern humans.

  6. Passive vs. active virtual reality learning: the effects on short- and long-term memory of anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Andrew; Fritchle, Alicia; Hoffman, Helene

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study compares the differences in learning outcomes when students are presented with either an active (student-centered) or passive (teacher-centered) virtual reality-based anatomy lesson. The "active" lesson used UCSD's Anatomic VisualizeR and enabled students to interact with 3D models and control presentation of learning materials. The "passive" lesson used a digital recording of an anatomical expert's tour of the same VR lesson played back as a QuickTime movie. Subsequent examination of the recall and retention of the studied anatomic objects were comparable in both groups. Issues underlying these results are discussed.

  7. Anatomical localization of the effects of reproductive state, castration, and social milieu on cells immunoreactive for gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Tyler J; Ball, Gregory F

    2009-11-10

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) cells are localized primarily to the septopreoptic area (POA) and are responsible for regulating gonadotropin release from the anterior pituitary. Some songbird species exhibit dramatic seasonal variation in the number of detectable GnRH-I immunoreactive cells, with higher numbers being observed during the breeding season. Here we investigated the anatomical distribution of GnRH-I-immunoreactive cells in male starlings that varied in response to manipulations of reproductive state, social context, and gonadal condition. We housed photostimulated, intact and castrated male starlings with a female or alone. Additionally, a fifth treatment group consisted of photorefractory males (i.e., in a nonreproductive state) housed alone. All photostimulated males had significantly greater numbers of GnRH-I cells compared with photorefractory male starlings. There was a significant main effect of castration and social context. Castrated males had significantly greater numbers of GnRH-I cells compared with intact males, and males housed in male-female dyads also had greater numbers of GnRH-I cells. Furthermore, the significant main effects of castration and social context were the result of an increase in GnRH-I cell numbers specifically in the rostral and intermediate regions of the POA. These findings indicate that social context and hormonal milieu have profound effects on GnRH-I immunoreactivity in addition to the previously described effects of reproductive state. These data provide novel insight into the environmental regulation of the hypothalamopituitary axis and suggest that gonadal hormones and female presence independently regulate GnRH-I cells in specific regions of the POA in male starlings.

  8. Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  9. Variations in clinical presentation and anatomical distribution of gross lesions of African swine fever in domestic pigs in the southern highlands of Tanzania: a field experience.

    PubMed

    Kipanyula, Maulilio John; Nong'ona, Solomon Wilson

    2017-02-01

    African swine fever is a contagious viral disease responsible for up to 100% mortality among domestic pigs. A longitudinal study was carried out to determine the clinical presentation and anatomical distribution of gross lesions in affected pigs in Mbeya region, Tanzania during the 2010 to 2014 outbreaks. Data were collected during clinical and postmortem examination by field veterinarians and using a structured questionnaire. A total of 118 respondents (100%) showed awareness about African swine fever. During previous outbreaks, the mortality rate was almost 100%, while in 2014 it was estimated to be less than 50%.The clinical picture of the 2010-2012 outbreaks was characterized by high fever, depression, inappetance, mucosal congestion, hemorrhages, erythematous lesions in different body parts, and abortion. Several internal organs including the kidneys, spleen, and liver were congested and edematous. During the 2014 outbreak, a number of pigs (49.7%) were asymptomatic when brought to slaughter slabs but were found to have African swine fever gross lesions at postmortem examination as compared to 12.3% in 2010-2012. Bluish discoloration, which is normally distributed on the non-hairy parts of the body, was not apparent in some pigs except at postmortem examination. Some pigs (36.1%) presented nasal and/or oral bloody discharges which were uncommon (9.1%) during previous outbreaks. Moreover, other gross features included enlarged dark red renal lymph nodes and spleen. Clinical signs such as anorexia, diarrhea, and pyrexia were mainly observed when affected pigs reached moribund stage. The majority of pregnant sows died without presenting abortions. In some litters, suckling piglets (3-6 weeks) survived from the disease. These findings indicated that in 2014, African swine fever outbreak in Mbeya region was characterized by a different clinical picture.

  10. PREVALENCE OF ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF THE SIXTH CERVICAL VERTEBRA AND ASSOCIATION WITH VERTEBRAL CANAL STENOSIS AND ARTICULAR PROCESS OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    PubMed

    DeRouen, Anthony; Spriet, Mathieu; Aleman, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The sixth cervical vertebra (C6) has unique morphology due to a ventral extension from the transverse process known as the ventral lamina. Little information was found regarding the prevalence and clinical relevance of morphologic variations. Aims of this observational, retrospective study were to characterize C6 morphologic variations in a large sample of horses. Cervical radiographic studies of 100 horses were retrieved. Data recorded were signalment, clinical history, morphology of the C6 ventral lamina, presence of articular process osteoarthritis, and presence of static vertebral canal stenosis. Morphologic variations were found in C6 vertebrae for 24/100 horses, with symmetric absence of the ventral lamina in nine horses and asymmetric absence in 15. Anomalous C6 vertebrae were more common in Warmbloods, with 19/55 Warmbloods in the population being affected (P = 0.006). No association was found with sex. There was no significant difference in the mean of the intravertebral sagittal ratios between horses with normal or anomalous C6 vertebrae; however there was a significantly greater proportion of horses with anomalous C6 vertebrae that had an intravertebral sagittal ratio of less than 0.5 at C6 (P = 0.047). There was no association between the morphology of C6 and articular process osteoarthritis. Anomalous C6 vertebrae in our population were associated with a higher likelihood of cervical pain (P = 0.013). Authors propose that morphologic variations in the C6 ventral laminae could be linked to other developmental abnormalities such as vertebral canal stenosis, might affect regional biomechanics and should therefore be considered clinically relevant in horses. Future, controlled prospective studies are needed to test this theory.

  11. The Effect of Anatomic Factors on Tongue Position Variability during Consonants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Krista; Yunusova, Yana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to investigate the effect of palate morphology and anthropometric measures of the head on positional variability of the tongue during consonants. Method: An electromagnetic tracking system was used to record tongue movements of 21 adults. Each talker produced a series of symmetrical VCV syllables containing one of the…

  12. The Effect of Anatomic Factors on Tongue Position Variability during Consonants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Krista; Yunusova, Yana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to investigate the effect of palate morphology and anthropometric measures of the head on positional variability of the tongue during consonants. Method: An electromagnetic tracking system was used to record tongue movements of 21 adults. Each talker produced a series of symmetrical VCV syllables containing one of the…

  13. Anatomical, morphological, and phytochemical effects of inoculation with plant growth- promoting rhizobacteria on peppermint (Mentha piperita).

    PubMed

    del Rosario Cappellari, Lorena; Santoro, Maricel Valeria; Reinoso, Herminda; Travaglia, Claudia; Giordano, Walter; Banchio, Erika

    2015-02-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) generally exert their effects through enhancement of plant nutrient status and/or phytohormone production. The effects of PGPR on aromatic plant species are poorly known. We measured plant growth parameters, chlorophyll content, trichome density, stomatal density, and levels of secondary metabolites in peppermint (Mentha piperita) seedlings inoculated with PGPR strains Bacillus subtilis GB03, Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r, P. putida SJ04, or a combination of WCS417r + SJ04. The treated plants, in comparison with controls, showed increases in shoot biomass, root biomass, leaf area, node number, trichome density, and stomatal density, and marked qualitative and quantitative changes in monoterpene content. Improved knowledge of the factors that control or affect biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and monoterpene accumulation will lead to strategies for improved cultivation and productivity of aromatic plants and other agricultural crops without the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

  14. Effects of Aging and Anatomic Location on Gene Expression in Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Fields, Mark A.; Hoshino, Risa; Priore, Lucian V. Del

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression in human neural retina. Methods: Macular and peripheral neural retina RNA was isolated from human donor eyes for DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Results: Total RNA integrity from human donors was preserved. Hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrates that the gene expression profiles of young, old, macula, and peripheral retina cluster into four distinct groups. Genes which are highly expressed in macular, peripheral, young, or old retina were identified, including inhibitors of Wnt Signaling Pathway (DKK1, FZD10, and SFRP2) which are preferably expressed in the periphery. Conclusion: The transcriptome of the human retina is affected by age and topographic location. Wnt pathway inhibitors in the periphery may maintain peripheral retinal cells in an undifferentiated state. Understanding the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for age-related eye diseases. PMID:22666212

  15. Effect of anatomical fine structure on the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the spinal subarachnoid space.

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, Harlan Wheelock

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to model oscillatory flow in the spinal subarachnoid space. The effect of obstacles such as trabeculae, nerve bundles, and ligaments on fluid velocity profiles appears to be small, when the flow is averaged over the length of a vertebra. Averaged fluid flow in complex models is little different from flow in corresponding elliptical annular cavities. However, the obstacles stir the flow locally and may be more significant in studies of tracer dispersion.

  16. A Simple and Effective Technique for Anatomical Approximation of the Upper Pericardium Using Hemostatic Clips.

    PubMed

    Husain, Mubassher; Acharya, Metesh Nalin; Cummings, Ian; Raja, Shahzad Gull

    Closure of the pericardium is important to protect bypass grafts, the great vessels, and the heart from injury due to sternal dehiscence. Furthermore, it is reported to reduce the formation of pericardial adhesions and thus facilitate entry into the chest at resternotomy. We here describe a simple, reproducible, and effective technique for tension-free approximation of the upper pericardium by applying small hemostatic clips to the preserved thymic fascia overlying the pericardium.

  17. Effect of Lean method implementation in the histopathology section of an anatomical pathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Raab, S S; Grzybicki, D M; Condel, J L; Stewart, W R; Turcsanyi, B D; Mahood, L K; Becich, M J

    2008-11-01

    In the USA, the lack of processes standardisation in histopathology laboratories leads to less than optimal quality, errors, inefficiency and increased costs. The effectiveness of large-scale quality improvement initiatives has been evaluated rarely. To measure the effect of implementation of a Lean quality improvement process on the efficiency and quality of a histopathology laboratory section. A non-concurrent interventional cohort study from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2006 was performed, and the Lean process was implemented on 1 January 2004. Also compared was the productivity of the Lean histopathology section to a sister histopathology section that did not implement Lean processes. Pre- and post-Lean specimen turnaround time and productivity ratios (work units/full time equivalents) were measured. For 200 Lean interventions, a 5-part Likert scale was used to assess the impact on error, success and complexity. In the Lean laboratory, the mean monthly productivity ratio increased from 3439 to 4074 work units/full time equivalents (p<0.001) as the mean daily histopathology section specimen turnaround time decreased from 9.7 to 9.0 h (p = 0.01). The Lean histopathology section had a higher productivity ratio compared with a sister histopathology section (1598 work units/full time equivalents, p<0.001) that did not implement Lean processes. The mean impact, success and complexity of interventions were 2.4, 2.7 and 2.5, respectively. The mean number of specific error causes affected by individual interventions was 2.6. It is concluded that Lean process implementation improved efficiency and quality in the histopathology section.

  18. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  19. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation-A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-07

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  20. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  1. Effects of periodic fluctuations of photon flux density on anatomical and photosynthetic characteristics of soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Gaudillere, J P; Drevon, J J; Bernoud, J P; Jardinet, F; Euvrard, M

    1987-01-01

    The development of soybean leaves grown at fluctuating photon flux density between 100 and 1500μM m(-2)s(-1) with a period of 160 sec were compared to leaves developed under continuous light with the same mean photon flux density. Number of epidermal cells and stomata, leaf area and specific leaf weight were not affected by the periodic fluctuation of photon flux density. Chloroplastic pigment concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence reveal some photoinhibitory effects of the high photon flux density phase. Stomatal and internal CO2 conductance and the quantum yield were not affected by the light regime. In contrast ribulose 1.5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity before in vitro activation by CO2 and Mg(++) was stimulated by the periodic illumination whereas the total amount of the enzyme and the internal leaf CO2 conductance remained steady. In conclusion, there was no major difference between leaves of plant grown either under a steady or under a periodic fluctuation of the photon flux density except some photoinhibitory symptoms under fluctuating illumination, and a higher in vivo level of activation of the Rubisco.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment.

  3. The effect of near-peer tutoring on medical students' performance in anatomical and physiological sciences.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Katrina M; Northey, Emily E; Khalil, Mohammed K

    2017-10-01

    Healthcare professional schools across the world are implementing near-peer tutoring (NPT) programs owing to numerous benefits to both tutors and tutees. This study determined whether higher attendance at NPT sessions led to improvements in course grades for high and low performing students. Fourth-year medical students used the USMLE Step 1 question format to tutor first-year medical students during the second half of the Structure and Function (SF) module, i.e., SF2. Attendance was recorded and students were accordingly divided into three groups: high, moderate, and low-no attendance. Students' performances in SF1 and SF2 were compared using Student's t-test. Differences among the three groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffé post hoc test (P< 0.05). Students who earned 70-79% (C) in SF1 were further examined on the basis of their attendance rate and performance in SF2. Those who attended three or more sessions completed a survey evaluating the NPT program. Course grades were significantly higher in SF2 than SF1 for all students, regardless of attendance rate. However, students who received a C grade in SF1 and had high or moderate attendance improved significantly in their SF2 course grade. Most students agreed that the NPT program was valuable and they evaluated the tutors highly. They also agreed that NPT prepared them for course exams and Step 1, but did not reduce anxiety and stress about Step 1. The positive effect of the NPT program resulted in its expansion to include all first-year modules. Clin. Anat. 30:922-928, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anatomical dissociation of melanocortin receptor agonist effects on taste- and gut-sensitive feeding processes

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Mariana; LaRiviere, Michael; Grigg, Lindsay A.; Lim, Christopher; Matute, Eduardo; Lord, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Injections of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor (MCR) agonist melanotan II (MTII) to a variety of brain structures produces anorexia, suggesting distributed brain MCR control of food intake. We performed a detailed analysis of feeding behavior (licking microstructure analysis) after a range of MTII doses (0.005 nM to 1 nM) was targeted to the forebrain (third ventricle, 3V) or hindbrain (fourth ventricle, 4V) regions. MTII (0.1 nM and 1 nM) delivered to the 3V or 4V significantly reduced 0.8 M sucrose intake. The anorexia was mediated by reductions in the number of licking bursts in the meal, intrameal ingestion rate, and meal duration; these measures have been associated with postingestive feedback inhibition of feeding. Anorexia after 3V but not 4V MTII injection was also associated with a reduced rate of licking in the first minute (initial lick rate) and reduced mean duration of licking bursts; these measures have been associated with taste evaluation. MTII effects on taste evaluation were further explored: In experiment 2, 3V MTII (1 nM) significantly reduced intake of noncaloric 4 mM saccharin and 0.1 M and 1 M sucrose solutions, but not water. The anorexia was again associated with reduced number of licking bursts, ingestion rate, meal duration, initial lick rate, and mean burst duration. In experiments 3 and 4, brief access (20 s) licking responses for sweet sucrose (0.015 M to 0.25 M) and bitter quinine hydrochloride (0.01 mM to 1 mM) solutions were evaluated. Licking responses for sucrose were suppressed, whereas those for quinine solutions were increased after 3V MTII, but not after 4V MTII injections (0.1 nM and 1 nM). The results suggest that multiple brain MCR sites influence sensitivity to visceral feedback, whereas forebrain MCR stimulation is necessary to influence taste responsiveness, possibly through attenuation of the perceived intensity of taste stimuli. PMID:21734020

  5. Anatomical variations of the renal arteries: Cadaveric and radiologic study, review of the literature, and proposal of a new classification of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Cases, Clara; García-Zoghby, Laura; Manzorro, Paula; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Muñoz, Miguel; Vidal, María; Simón, Clara; Sanudo, Jose R; McHanwell, Stephen; Arrazola, Juan

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the variations of the renal arteries in two samples, cadaveric and computerized tomographic (CT) images, as well as to propose a simple classification of such variations based on the obtained results and an extensive review of the literature on the topic. Sixty human dissected kidneys and their vessels, and 583 abdominal CT were studied. A total of 86 arteries were described in the cadaveric sample, whereas 1223 were analysed in the radiological one. Five types (a-e) and patterns (I-V) have been stablished in the classification. Type a, aortic hilar artery, incidences were 79% in cadavers and 95% in CT; Type b, hilar upper polar artery, incidences were 10% in cadavers and 2% in CT; Type c, aortic upper polar artery, incidences were 5% in cadavers and 2% in CT; Type d, aortic lower polar artery, incidences were 3% in cadavers and 1% in CT; Type e, hilar lower polar artery, incidences were 2% in cadaver and less than 0.1% in CT. The pattern represents the number of arteries reaching one kidney. Patterns I-IV were found in cadavers (I: 78%; II: 19%; III and IV: 2%); in CT sample only patterns I (88%) and II (12%). Pattern V was added because it has been described in the reviewed literature. Type a and pattern I are the most prevalent, both in the cadaveric and the CT samples. Also in the consulted literature. There are no differences in the types and pattern incidences by side or sex. A simple, comprehensive and useful classification is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoya Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2015-08-07

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner. - Highlights: • Visceral adipose tissue express higher pref-1 mRNA than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length in visceral adipose tissue is longer than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length of adipose tissue is not associated with adipocyte size. • Pref-1 mRNA is negatively correlated with intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size.

  7. Jensen's Inequality Predicts Effects of Environmental Variation

    Treesearch

    Jonathan J. Ruel; Matthew P. Ayres

    1999-01-01

    Many biologists now recognize that environmental variance can exert important effects on patterns and processes in nature that are independent of average conditions. Jenson's inequality is a mathematical proof that is seldom mentioned in the ecological literature but which provides a powerful tool for predicting some direct effects of environmental variance in...

  8. [Anatomical basis for rejuvenation surgery].

    PubMed

    Sinna, R; Herlin, C; Garson, S; Dast, S; Delay, E

    2017-09-20

    The understanding of the face anatomy is mandatory before to be able to appreciate the different surgical techniques of face lifting. Despite numerous controversies and anatomical variations, we can find in the literature several keystone works that allows us to understand that the soft tissues of the face are not only a superposition of layers but also a tridimensionnal structure with a fibrous system that links the different layers. This structures creates a mix loose spaces, fat and retaining ligament that can be describe in a quite systematic manner. This systematisation can help the surgeon during the surgical procedure to search and find the area where there is no danger and alert him around the retaining for example, which is where we can often find a vessel or a branch of the facial nerve that we want to avoid. This article summarizes these anatomical knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracortical bone remodeling variation shows strong genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Havill, L M; Allen, M R; Harris, J A K; Levine, S M; Coan, H B; Mahaney, M C; Nicolella, D P

    2013-11-01

    Intracortical microstructure influences crack propagation and arrest within bone cortex. Genetic variation in intracortical remodeling may contribute to mechanical integrity and, therefore, fracture risk. Our aim was to determine the degree to which normal population-level variation in intracortical microstructure is due to genetic variation. We examined right femurs from 101 baboons (74 females, 27 males; aged 7-33 years) from a single, extended pedigree to determine osteon number, osteon area (On.Ar), haversian canal area, osteon population density, percent osteonal bone (%On.B), wall thickness (W.Th), and cortical porosity (Ct.Po). Through evaluation of the covariance in intracortical properties between pairs of relatives, we quantified the contribution of additive genetic effects (heritability [h (2)]) to variation in these traits using a variance decomposition approach. Significant age and sex effects account for 9 % (Ct.Po) to 21 % (W.Th) of intracortical microstructural variation. After accounting for age and sex, significant genetic effects are evident for On.Ar (h (2) = 0.79, p = 0.002), %On.B (h (2) = 0.82, p = 0.003), and W.Th (h (2) = 0.61, p = 0.013), indicating that 61-82 % of the residual variation (after accounting for age and sex effects) is due to additive genetic effects. This corresponds to 48-75 % of the total phenotypic variance. Our results demonstrate that normal, population-level variation in cortical microstructure is significantly influenced by genes. As a critical mediator of crack behavior in bone cortex, intracortical microstructural variation provides another mechanism through which genetic variation may affect fracture risk.

  10. Assessing the effectiveness of 30% sodium chloride aqueous solution for the preservation of fixed anatomical specimens: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fabrício Singaretti

    2014-07-01

    Anatomical specimens used in human or veterinary anatomy laboratories are usually prepared with formaldehyde (a cancerous and teratogenic substance), glycerin (an expensive and viscous fluid), or ethanol (which is flammable). This research aimed to verify the viability of an aqueous 30% sodium chloride solution for preservation of anatomical specimens previously fixed with formaldehyde. Anatomical specimens of ruminant, carnivorous, equine, swine and birds were used. All were previously fixed with an aqueous 20% formaldehyde solution and held for 7 days in a 10% aqueous solution of the same active ingredient. During the first phase of the experiment, small specimens of animal tissue previously fixed in formaldehyde were distributed in vials with different concentrations of formaldehyde, with or without 30% sodium chloride solution, a group containing only 30% sodium chloride, and a control group containing only water. During this phase, no contamination was observed in any specimen containing 30% sodium chloride solution, whether alone or in combination with different concentrations of formaldehyde. In the second phase of the experiment, the 30% sodium chloride solution, found to be optimal in the first phase of the experiment, was tested for its long-term preservation properties. For a period of 5 years, the preserved specimens were evaluated three times a week for visual contamination, odors, and changes in color and texture. There was no visual contamination or decay found in any specimen. Furthermore, no strange odors, or changes in color or softness were noted. The 30% sodium chloride solution was determined to be effective in the preservation of anatomic specimens previously fixed in formaldehyde. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  11. The predictive effect of anatomic femoral and tibial graft tunnel placement in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on functional and radiological outcome.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Hierzer, Doris; Krawinkel, Alessa; Hoffelner, Thomas; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanical reports have advocated anatomic graft tunnel placement for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to restore knee joint stability and facilitate optimal functional outcome. However, in vivo investigations that correlate tunnel position to functional results are lacking so far. This study evaluates the anatomic accuracy of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures on postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans and compares these findings to subjective and objective clinical outcome parameters. After single-bundle PCL reconstruction, 29 patients were stratified into several subgroups according to the anatomic accuracy of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures measured on postoperative CT scans. A threshold value for the centres of the tunnel apertures was determined using a measurement grid system as a radiographic reference. To evaluate the functional and radiological results, visual analogue scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Tegner, Lysholm, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and osteoarthritis scores were obtained. Comparison between functional outcome and tunnel position yielded a statistically significant difference for subjective IKDC score and angle segment α and for objective stability and tunnel position P3 but no statistically significant difference with respect to intercondylar depth, intercondylar height and tibial tunnel position P2. No correlation was found between anatomic tunnel position and present or progressive osteoarthritis on follow-up. Of the patients, 72 % classified their result as excellent and good and 90 % would repeat surgical treatment. Despite a small sample size and subject to the threshold values we used, our data indicate a potentially minor effect of anatomic tunnel placement on midterm functional outcome following PCL reconstruction.

  12. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-01: Investigation of the Effective Dose From Bolus Tracking Acquisitions at Different Anatomical Locations in the Chest for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Nowik, P; Bujila, R; Merzan, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stationary table acquisitions (Bolus tracking) in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) can Result in dose length products (DLP) comparable to spiral scans. It is today unclear whether or not the effective dose (E) for Bolus Tracking can be approximated using target region specific conversion factors (E/DLP). The purpose of this study was to investigate how E depends on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking in relation to Chest CT scans with the same DLP. Methods: Effective doses were approximated for the ICRP 110 adult Reference Male (AM) and adult Reference Female (FM) computational voxel phantoms using software for CT dose approximations (pre-simulated MC data). The effective dose was first approximated for a Chest CT scan using spiral technique and a CTDIvol (32 cm) of 6 mGy. The effective dose from the spiral scan was then compared to E approximated for contiguous Bolus Tracking acquisitions (1 cm separation), with a total collimation of 1 cm, over different locations of the chest of the voxel phantoms. The number of rotations used for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was adjusted to yield the same DLP (32 cm) as the spiral scan. Results: Depending on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking, E ranged by factors of 1.3 to 6.8 for the AM phantom and 1.4 to 3.3 for the AF phantom, compared to the effective dose of the spiral scans. The greatest E for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was observed for anatomical locations coinciding with breast tissue. This can be expected as breast tissue has a high tissue weighting factor in the calculation of E. Conclusion: For Chest CT scans, the effective dose from Bolus Tracking is highly dependent on the anatomical location where the scan is administered and will not always accurately be represented using target region specific conversion factors.

  13. The effect of C1 bursting fracture on comparative anatomical relationship between the internal carotid artery and the atlas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Seok; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Il Sup; Cho, Kyoung Seok; Kim, Sang Don; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Jong Tae; Hong, Jae Taek

    2016-01-01

    To describe the effect of the C1 bursting fracture on the location of the internal carotid artery (ICA) around the atlas. The authors analyzed the morphology of the atlas and the ICA in 15 patients with C1 bursting fracture and compared with control group (77 patients) without any pathology. All patients were evaluated with CT angiography for the anatomical assessment. The laterality of the ICA, the distances of the ICA from the midline, anterior tubercle, and ventral surface of the C1 lateral mass were compared between two groups. The distance between the lateral margin of the longus capitis muscle and the inner edge of the transverse foramen was also measured. Medially located ICA was more common in the C1 bursting fracture group than control group (76.7 vs 42.8 %). There were no significant differences between 2 groups for the distance from the midline, anterior tubercle, and ventral surface of the C1 lateral mass, respectively. The distance of the longus capitis muscle to transverse foramen was 2.52 ± 2.09 and 4.15 ± 3.09 mm in each group, and there was statistically significant difference (p < 0.01). Lateral displacement of the bony structure of C1 bursting fracture changes the relative location of the ICA medially, which increase the injury risk during the bicortical C1 screw insertion. These data suggest that CT angiography or enhanced CT scans can give critical information to choose the ideal fixation technique and the proper trajectory of the screws for C1 bursting fracture.

  14. The superior mesenteric artery and the variations of the colic patterns. A new anatomical and radiological classification of the colic arteries.

    PubMed

    Gamo, E; Jiménez, C; Pallares, E; Simón, C; Valderrama, F; Sañudo, J R; Arrazola, J

    2016-07-01

    is responsible of major variations.

  15. Severe Feeding Problems Secondary to Anatomical Disorders: Effectiveness of Behavioural Treatment in Three School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moor, Jan; Didden, Robert; Tolboom, Jules

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, behavioural treatment is described of three school-aged children with severe feeding problems caused by (surgically corrected) anatomical disorders of the digestive system. Two children showed food refusal and were tube-fed whereas the third child showed extreme food selectivity. During treatment, shaping, (non)verbal…

  16. The effect of anaesthesia and intermittent positive pressure ventilation with different frequencies on the anatomical and alveolar deadspace.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G; McCarthy, G

    1975-08-01

    Deadspace was measured in nine healthy subjects in the supine position, premedicated but awake and breathing spontaneously at a rate of 12 b.p.m. and subsequently under anaesthesia with artificial ventilation with frequencies of 12 and 24 b.p.m. The minute volume was kept at a relatively constant value. The physiological deadspace was calculated using the Bohr equation and the division into anatomical and alveolar deadspace was made with the aid of capnography. Physiological deadspace was increased by anaesthesia and IPPV, mainly as a consequence of increased rebreathing in the apparatus deadspace. There was no significant change in the anatomical deadspace. Thus, the expected reduction in deadspace brought about by endotracheal intubation was nullified by an increase in the anatomical deadspace distal to the carina. The VDanat/VT ratio remained constant on changing the respiratory frequency. A significant alveolar deadspace was measured during spontaneous breathing. This was unchanged by the induction of anaesthesia and the institution of artifical ventilation. On changing the frequency, the VDalv/VT ratio remained constant. It is concluded that both the anatomical and the alveolar deadspaces increasing with increasing tidal volume, but are unaffected by the breathing rate.

  17. Severe Feeding Problems Secondary to Anatomical Disorders: Effectiveness of Behavioural Treatment in Three School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moor, Jan; Didden, Robert; Tolboom, Jules

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, behavioural treatment is described of three school-aged children with severe feeding problems caused by (surgically corrected) anatomical disorders of the digestive system. Two children showed food refusal and were tube-fed whereas the third child showed extreme food selectivity. During treatment, shaping, (non)verbal…

  18. Modeling the effects of developmental variation on insect phenology.

    PubMed

    Yurk, Brian P; Powell, James A

    2010-08-01

    Phenology, the timing of developmental events such as oviposition or pupation, is highly dependent on temperature; since insects are ectotherms, the time it takes them to complete a life stage (development time) depends on the temperatures they experience. This dependence varies within and between populations due to variation among individuals that is fixed within a life stage (giving rise to what we call persistent variation) and variation from random effects within a life stage (giving rise to what we call random variation). It is important to understand how both types of variation affect phenology if we are to predict the effects of climate change on insect populations.We present three nested phenology models incorporating increasing levels of variation. First, we derive an advection equation to describe the temperature-dependent development of a population with no variation in development time. This model is extended to incorporate persistent variation by introducing a developmental phenotype that varies within a population, yielding a phenotype-dependent advection equation. This is further extended by including a diffusion term describing random variation in a phenotype-dependent Fokker-Planck development equation. These models are also novel because they are formulated in terms of development time rather than developmental rate; development time can be measured directly in the laboratory, whereas developmental rate is calculated by transforming laboratory data. We fit the phenology models to development time data for mountain pine beetles (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins [Coleoptera: Scolytidae]) held at constant temperatures in laboratory experiments. The nested models are parameterized using a maximum likelihood approach. The results of the parameterization show that the phenotype-dependent advection model provides the best fit to laboratory data, suggesting that MPB phenology may be adequately described in terms of persistent variation alone. MPB

  19. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  20. Effect of critical dimension variation on SAW correlator energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.

    2005-04-01

    The effect of critical dimension (CD) variation and metallization ratio on the efficiency of energy conversion of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator is examined. We find that a 10% variation in the width of finger electrodes predicts only a 1% decrease in the efficiency of energy conversion. Furthermore, our model predicts that a metallization ratio of 0.74 represents an optimum value for energy extraction from the SAW by the interdigitated transducer (IDT).

  1. The effect of revascularization in patients with anatomically significant atherosclerotic renovascular disease presenting with high-risk clinical features.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Diana; Ritchie, James; Green, Darren; Chrysochou, Constantina; Kalra, Philip A

    2017-03-23

    Patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) and high-risk clinical presentations have largely been excluded from randomized controlled trials comparing renal revascularization and optimal medical therapy. Here, we explore the effect of revascularization on death, progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and cardiovascular events (CVE) in a highly selected cohort of patients with ARVD. All patients with a radiological diagnosis of ARVD referred to our tertiary centre have been recruited into a single-centre cohort study between 1986 and 2014. Patients with ≥70% unilateral or bilateral ARVD together with one or more of the following putative high-risk presentations were designated 'high-risk': flash pulmonary oedema (FPE), severe hypertension, rapidly deteriorating renal function. The effect of revascularization on clinical outcomes in high-risk patients, patients with bilateral severe ARVD and those with <1 g proteinuria at baseline was compared with 'control' patients who had the same degree of renal artery stenosis (RAS) but did not exhibit these features. Median follow-up was 58.4 months [interquartile range (IQR) 25.4-97.3]. Revascularization was associated with a reduced risk of progression to ESKD, CVE and all combined events in patients with rapidly deteriorating renal function [ESKD: hazard ratio (HR) 0.47 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.25-0.85), P = 0.01; CVE: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.91), P = 0.02; Any: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.90), P = 0.02]. High-risk patients with bilateral ≥70% RAS and those with <1 g/day baseline proteinuria also had significantly better renal and cardiovascular outcomes post-revascularization when compared with controls. Our results indicate that revascularization may be of benefit in patients with anatomically significant RAS who present with rapidly deteriorating renal function, especially in the presence of severe bilateral ARVD or <1 g/day proteinuria.

  2. Anatomic versus non-anatomic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yun-Hao; Wen, Tian-Fu; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and therapeutic effects of anatomic liver resection versus non-anatomic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. Randomized controlled trials and non-randomized trials comparing the clinical effectiveness between anatomic and non-anatomic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma were identified by using a predefined search strategy. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate pooled survival and recurrence rate. No Randomized controlled trial was identified. Twelve non-randomized comparative trials (10 in English and 2 in Chinese) including total 1,829 cases, 1,005 cases in anatomic resection group and 824 cases in non-anatomic resection group, were included in this review. Meta-analysis showed that there was no significant difference between anatomic and non-anatomic liver resection in 1-year survival rate (p = 0.98), 3-year survival rate (p = 0.75), 5-year survival rate (p = 0.38) and recurrence rate (p = 0.44). The differences in post-operative morbidity (p = 0.32) and blood loss during operation (p = 0.11) were also not statistically significant. Anatomic liver resection for HCC does not provide significant benefit in 1-year/3-year/5-year survival rate, recurrence rate, post-operative morbidity and blood loss during operation compared with non-anatomic resection.

  3. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  4. Effects of Remnant Tissue Preservation on Clinical and Arthroscopic Results After Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Onodera, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasuyuki; Kitamura, Nobuto

    2015-08-01

    Clinical utility of remnant tissue preservation after single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has not been established. In addition, no studies have evaluated the clinical utility of remnant preservation after anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction. The study hypotheses were as follows: (1) Subjective and functional clinical results may be comparable between anatomic double-bundle reconstructions that preserve the remnant tissue and those that resect the remnant tissue, (2) postoperative knee stability and the second-look arthroscopic evaluation may be significantly more favorable with the remnant-preserving reconstruction, and (3) the degree of the initial graft coverage may significantly affect postoperative knee stability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 179 patients underwent anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction. Based on the Crain classification of ACL remnant tissue, 81 patients underwent the remnant-preserving procedure (group P) and the remaining 98 patients underwent the remnant-resecting procedure (group R). There were no differences between the 2 groups concerning all background factors, including preoperative knee instability and intraoperative tunnel positions. The patients were followed for 2 years or more. The subjective and functional clinical results were comparable between the 2 reconstruction procedures. Side-to-side anterior laxity was significantly less (P = .0277) in group P (0.9 mm) than in group R (1.5 mm). The pivot-shift test was negative in 89% of group P and 78% of group R patients; the result for group R was significantly lower (P = .0460). In the arthroscopic observations, results for group P were significantly better than for group R concerning postoperative laceration and fibrous tissue coverage of the grafts (P = .0479). Remnant preservation in anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction did not significantly improve subjective and functional results in the short-term evaluation, but it

  5. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2015-08-07

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner.

  6. Evaluation of Anatomical and Functional Hip Joint Center Methods: The Effects of Activity Type, Gender, and Proximal Reference Segment.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Fowler, J; Chase, S; Steeves, K; Landry, J; Mohamed, A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate hip joint center (HJC) location is critical when studying hip joint biomechanics. The HJC is often determined from anatomical methods, but functional methods are becoming increasingly popular. Several studies have examined these methods using simulations and in vivo gait data, but none has studied high-range of motion activities, such a chair rise, nor has HJC prediction been compared between males and females. Furthermore, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker visibility during chair rise can be problematic, requiring a sacral cluster as an alternative proximal segment; but functional HJC has not been explored using this approach. For this study, the quality of HJC measurement was based on the joint gap error (JGE), which is the difference in global HJC between proximal and distal reference segments. The aims of the present study were to: (1) determine if JGE varies between pelvic and sacral referenced HJC for functional and anatomical methods, (2) investigate which functional calibration motion results in the lowest JGE and if the JGE varies depending on movement type (gait versus chair rise) and gender, and (3) assess whether the functional HJC calibration results in lower JGE than commonly used anatomical approaches and if it varies with movement type and gender. Data were collected on 39 healthy adults (19 males and 20 females) aged 14-50 yr old. Participants performed four hip "calibration" tests (arc, cross, star, and star-arc), as well as gait and chair rise (activities of daily living (ADL)). Two common anatomical methods were used to estimate HJC and were compared to HJC computed using a published functional method with the calibration motions above, when using pelvis or sacral cluster as the proximal reference. For ADL trials, functional methods resulted in lower JGE (12-19 mm) compared to anatomical methods (13-34 mm). It was also found that women had significantly higher JGE compared to men and JGE was significantly higher for

  7. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  8. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters.

  9. Assessing the effectiveness of 30% sodium chloride aqueous solution for the preservation of fixed anatomical specimens: a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Fabrício Singaretti

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical specimens used in human or veterinary anatomy laboratories are usually prepared with formaldehyde (a cancerous and teratogenic substance), glycerin (an expensive and viscous fluid), or ethanol (which is flammable). This research aimed to verify the viability of an aqueous 30% sodium chloride solution for preservation of anatomical specimens previously fixed with formaldehyde. Anatomical specimens of ruminant, carnivorous, equine, swine and birds were used. All were previously fixed with an aqueous 20% formaldehyde solution and held for 7 days in a 10% aqueous solution of the same active ingredient. During the first phase of the experiment, small specimens of animal tissue previously fixed in formaldehyde were distributed in vials with different concentrations of formaldehyde, with or without 30% sodium chloride solution, a group containing only 30% sodium chloride, and a control group containing only water. During this phase, no contamination was observed in any specimen containing 30% sodium chloride solution, whether alone or in combination with different concentrations of formaldehyde. In the second phase of the experiment, the 30% sodium chloride solution, found to be optimal in the first phase of the experiment, was tested for its long-term preservation properties. For a period of 5 years, the preserved specimens were evaluated three times a week for visual contamination, odors, and changes in color and texture. There was no visual contamination or decay found in any specimen. Furthermore, no strange odors, or changes in color or softness were noted. The 30% sodium chloride solution was determined to be effective in the preservation of anatomic specimens previously fixed in formaldehyde. PMID:24762210

  10. [Anatomical variations in the hypoglossal canal].

    PubMed

    De Francisco, M; Lemos, J L; Liberti, E A; Adamo, J; Jácomo, A L; Matson, E

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, 492 human dried skulls grouped according to sex and race (White and no White) were examined and the presence of a double hypoglossal canal was observed in 97 skulls. The statistical analysis allowed us to conclude that no significative difference exists in race X canal type; sex X canal type; race X side and sex X side interations.

  11. Fiber post techniques for anatomical root variations.

    PubMed

    Boksman, Leendert; Hepburn, Alejandro Bertoldi; Kogan, Enrique; Friedman, Manny; de Rijk, Waldemar

    2011-05-01

    In contemporary dental practice, there is no remaining reason to use metallic posts, custom or prefabricated. Many cases that several years ago would have required a retentive post will not require that post today, because of the many improvements in bonding agents and composite resin restoratives. However, in cases where less than 50% of coronal tooth structure remains--or in other cases wherein the judgment of the clinician a post is indicated--there are now aesthetic, non-corrosive, fracture resistant and radiopaque alternatives for all varieties that save time and money without compromise. Their most compelling advantage, regardless of the geometry or amount of residual tooth structure, is the protection from root fracture that a low modulus restoration provides. In selecting the materials (posts, resins) for these techniques, the dentist is advised not to cut corners, and to seek the strongest and most radiopaque products available.

  12. The effect of model errors in variational assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wergen, Werner

    1992-08-01

    A linearized, one-dimensional shallow water model is used to investigate the effect of model errors in four-dimensional variational assimilation. A suitable initialization scheme for variational assimilation is proposed. Introducing deliberate phase speed errors in the model, the results from variational assimilation are compared to standard analysis/forecast cycle experiments. While the latter draws to the data and reflects the model errors only in the datavoid areas, variational assimilation with the model used as strong constraint is shown to distribute the model errors over the entire analysis domain. The implications for verification and diagnostics are discussed. Temporal weighting of the observations can reduce the errors towards the end of the assimilation period, but may deteriorate the subsequent forecasts. An extension to variational assimilation is proposed, which seeks not only to determine the initial state from the observations but also some of the tunable parameters of the model. The potentional usefulness of this approach for parameterization studies and for a separation of forecast errors into model- and analysis errors is discussed. Finally, variational assimilations with the model used as weak constraint are presented. While showing a good performance in the assimilation, forecasts can suffer severely if the extra term in the equations up to which the model is enforced are unable to compensate for the real model error. In the discussion, an overall appraisal of both assimilation methods is given.

  13. Effects of Variation in Teacher Organization on Classroom Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, C.E.; Connor, C.M.; Morrison, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined effects of variation in teacher organization on how time is spent in classrooms, focusing on time spent in transitions and instruction, including child skill by teacher organization interactions. Forty-four first-grade classrooms were observed three times over the school year. Timed narratives of each activity were recorded.…

  14. Variations in effective elastic thickness of the North American lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, Timothy D.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Grieve, Richard A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for estimating flexural rigidity that is not limited to sedimentary basins is used here to map variations in the effective elastic thickness of the North American lithosphere. The effective elastic thickness ranges from a minimum of about 4 km in the Basin and Range Province to more than 100 km in the Precambrian core of the continent. This finding supports the idea that flexural rigidity has increased with time since the last thermal event.

  15. Development of local complexity metrics to quantify the effect of anatomical noise on detectability of lung nodules in chest CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Justin; Rubin, Geoffrey; Smith, Taylor; Harrawood, Brian; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop metrics of local anatomical complexity and compare them with detectability of lung nodules in CT. Data were drawn retrospectively from a published perception experiment in which detectability was assessed in cases enriched with virtual nodules (13 radiologists x 157 total nodules = 2041 responses). A local anatomical complexity metric called the distractor index was developed, defined as the Gaussian weighted proportion (i.e., average) of distracting local voxels (50 voxels in-plane, 5 slices). A distracting voxel was classified by thresholding image data that had been selectively filtered to enhance nodule-like features. The distractor index was measured for each nodule location in the nodule-free images. The local pixel standard deviation (STD) was also measured for each nodule. Other confounding factors of search fraction (proportion of lung voxels to total voxels in the given slice) and peripheral distance (defined as the 3D distance of the nodule from the trachea bifurcation) were measured. A generalized linear mixed-effects statistical model (no interaction terms, probit link function, random reader term) was fit to the data to determine the influence of each metric on detectability. In order of decreasing effect size: distractor index, STD, and search fraction all significantly affected detectability (P < 0.001). Distance to the trachea did not have a significant effect (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that local lung complexity degrades detection of lung nodules and the distractor index could serve as a good surrogate metric to quantify anatomical complexity.

  16. Is the gravity effect of radiographic anatomic features enough to justify stone clearance or fragments retention following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL).

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mahmoud

    2012-08-01

    We determined whether the gravity effect of radiographic anatomic features on the preoperative urography (IVP) are enough to predict fragments clearance after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). A Total of 282 patients with mean age 45.8 ± 13.2 years (189 male, 93 female), who underwent SWL due to renal calculi between October 2005 and August 2009 were enrolled. The mean calculi load was 155.72 ± 127.66 mm². The patients were stratified into three groups: patients with pelvis calculi (group 1); patients with upper or middle pole calculi (group 2) and patients with lower pole calculi (group 3). Three angles on the pretreatment IVP were measured: the inner angle between the axis of the lower pole infundibular and ureteropelvic axis (angle I); the inner angle between the lower pole infundibular axis and main axis of pelvis-ureteropelvic (UP) junction point (angle II) and the inner angle between the lower pole infundibular axis and perpendicular line (angle III). Multivariate analysis was used to define the significant predictors of stone clearance. The overall success rate was 85.81%. All angles, sessions number, shock waves number and stone burden were significant predictors of success in patients in group 1. However, in group 2 only angle II and in group 3 angles I and II had significant effect on stone clearance. Radiographic anatomic features have significant role in determining the stone-free rate following satisfactory fragmentation of renal stones with SWL. The measurement of infundibulopelvic angle in different manner helps to predict the stone-free status in patients with renal calculi located not only in lower pole, but also in renal pelvis and upper or middle pole. Gravity effect is not enough to justify the significant influence of the radiographic anatomic features on the stone clearance and fragments retention after SWL.

  17. Do the skills acquired by novice surgeons using anatomic dry models transfer effectively to the task of diagnostic knee arthroscopy performed on cadaveric specimens?

    PubMed

    Butler, Aaron; Olson, Tyson; Koehler, Ryan; Nicandri, Gregg

    2013-02-06

    The use of surgical simulation in orthopaedic education is increasing; however, its ideal place within the training curriculum remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of training novice surgeons on an anatomic dry model of the knee prior to training them to perform diagnostic arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Fourteen medical students were randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental group was trained to perform diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee on anatomic dry models prior to training on cadaveric specimens. The control group was trained only on cadaveric specimens. Proficiency was assessed with use of a modified version of a previously validated objective assessment of arthroscopic skill, the Basic Arthroscopic Knee Skill Scoring System (BAKSSS). The mean number of trials required to attain minimal proficiency when performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy was compared between the groups. The cumulative transfer effectiveness ratio (CTER) was calculated to measure the transfer of skills acquired by the experimental group. The mean number of trials to demonstrate minimum proficiency was significantly lower in the experimental group (2.57) than in the control group (4.57) (p < 0.01). The mean time to demonstrate proficiency was also significantly less in the experimental group (37.51 minutes) than in the control group (60.48 minutes) (p < 0.01). The CTER of dry-model training for the task of performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens was 0.2. Previous training utilizing an anatomic dry knee model resulted in improved proficiency for novice surgeons learning to perform diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. A CTER of 0.2 suggests that dry models can serve as a useful adjunct to cadaveric training for diagnostic knee arthroscopy but cannot entirely replace it within the orthopaedic curriculum. Further work is necessary to determine the optimal amount of training on anatomic dry models

  18. Three dimensional printing as an effective method of producing anatomically accurate models for studies in thermal ecology.

    PubMed

    Watson, Charles M; Francis, Gamal R

    2015-07-01

    Hollow copper models painted to match the reflectance of the animal subject are standard in thermal ecology research. While the copper electroplating process results in accurate models, it is relatively time consuming, uses caustic chemicals, and the models are often anatomically imprecise. Although the decreasing cost of 3D printing can potentially allow the reproduction of highly accurate models, the thermal performance of 3D printed models has not been evaluated. We compared the cost, accuracy, and performance of both copper and 3D printed lizard models and found that the performance of the models were statistically identical in both open and closed habitats. We also find that 3D models are more standard, lighter, durable, and inexpensive, than the copper electroformed models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ecophysiological and Anatomical Mechanisms behind the Nurse Effect: Which Are More Important? A Multivariate Approach for Cactus Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Yáñez-Espinosa, Laura; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Chapa-Vargas, Leonardo; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background Cacti establish mostly occurs under the canopy of nurse plants which provide a less stressful micro-environment, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. The impact of the combination of light and watering treatments on Opuntia streptacantha (Cactaceae) seedlings was examined. Methods/Principal Findings Ecophysiological [titratable acidity, osmotic potential (‘solute potential’, Ψs), relative growth rate (RGR) and their components (NAR, SLA, and LWR)], anatomical (chloroplast density, chloroplast frequency, and cell area), and environmental [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and air temperature] sets of variables were analyzed, assessing relationships between them and measuring the intensity of the relationships. Three harvests were carried out at days 15, 30, and 45. Ψs and acidity content were the most important responses for seedling establishment. The main anatomical and environmental variables were chloroplast density and water availability, respectively. Opuntia streptacantha seedlings establish better in the shade-watering treatment, due to higher Ψs and acidity, unaffected chloroplasts, and lower PPFD. In addition, the chloroplasts of cells under high-light and non-watering treatment were clumped closer to the center of the cytosol than those under shade-drought, to avoid photoinhibition and/or to better distribute or utilize the penetrating light in the green plant tissue. Conclusions Opuntia seedlings grow better under the shade, although they can tolerate drought in open spaces by increasing and moving chloroplasts and avoiding drastic decreases in their Ψs. This tolerance could have important implications for predicting the impact of climate change on natural desert regeneration, as well as for planning reforestation-afforestation practices, and rural land uses. PMID:24312310

  20. Ecophysiological and anatomical mechanisms behind the nurse effect: which are more important? A multivariate approach for cactus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Yáñez-Espinosa, Laura; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Chapa-Vargas, Leonardo; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Cacti establish mostly occurs under the canopy of nurse plants which provide a less stressful micro-environment, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. The impact of the combination of light and watering treatments on Opuntia streptacantha (Cactaceae) seedlings was examined. Ecophysiological [titratable acidity, osmotic potential ('solute potential', Ψs ), relative growth rate (RGR) and their components (NAR, SLA, and LWR)], anatomical (chloroplast density, chloroplast frequency, and cell area), and environmental [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and air temperature] sets of variables were analyzed, assessing relationships between them and measuring the intensity of the relationships. Three harvests were carried out at days 15, 30, and 45. Ψs and acidity content were the most important responses for seedling establishment. The main anatomical and environmental variables were chloroplast density and water availability, respectively. Opuntia streptacantha seedlings establish better in the shade-watering treatment, due to higher Ψs and acidity, unaffected chloroplasts, and lower PPFD. In addition, the chloroplasts of cells under high-light and non-watering treatment were clumped closer to the center of the cytosol than those under shade-drought, to avoid photoinhibition and/or to better distribute or utilize the penetrating light in the green plant tissue. Opuntia seedlings grow better under the shade, although they can tolerate drought in open spaces by increasing and moving chloroplasts and avoiding drastic decreases in their Ψs . This tolerance could have important implications for predicting the impact of climate change on natural desert regeneration, as well as for planning reforestation-afforestation practices, and rural land uses.

  1. Effects of Geometric Variations on the Buckling of Arteries.

    PubMed

    Datir, Parag; Lee, Avione Y; Lamm, Shawn D; Han, Hai-Chao

    2011-10-05

    Arteries often demonstrate geometric variations such as elliptic and eccentric cross sections, stenosis, and tapering along the longitudinal axis. Effects of these variations on the mechanical stability of the arterial wall have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the buckling behavior of arteries with elliptic, eccentric, stenotic, and tapered cross sections. The arterial wall was modeled as a homogenous anisotropic nonlinear material. Finite element analysis was used to simulate the buckling process of these arteries under lumen pressure and axial stretch. Our results demonstrated that arteries with an oval cross section buckled in the short axis direction at lower critical pressures compared to circular arteries. Eccentric cross-sections, stenosis, and tapering also decreased the critical pressure. Stenosis led to dramatic pressure variations along the vessel and reduced the buckling pressure. In addition, tapering shifted the buckling deformation profile of the artery towards the distal end. We conclude that geometric variations reduce the critical pressure of arteries and thus make the arteries more prone to mechanical instability than circular cylindrical arteries. These results improve our understanding of the mechanical behavior of arteries.

  2. The Effect of Spectral Variation on Sound Localisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    broadband stimulus [Hebrank and Wright 1974; Butler & Musicant 1993; Burlinghame & Butler 1998] or when sound levels in the narrow frequency bands...of sound . Perception and Psychophysics, 60, 1374-1383. Butler, R.A., & Musicant , A.D. (1993). Binaural localization: Influence of stimulus...The Effect of Spectral Variation on Sound Localisation Russell Martin, Ken McAnally, Tavis Watt and Patrick Flanagan Air Operations

  3. The Effect of Area Variation on Wave Rotor Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack

    1997-01-01

    The effect of varying the cross-sectional flow area of the passages of a wave rotor is examined by means of the method of characteristics. An idealized expansion wave, an idealized inlet port, and an idealized compression stage are considered. It is found that area variation does not have a very significant effect on the expansion wave, nor on the compression stage. For the expansion wave, increasing the passage area in the flow direction has the same effect as a diffuser, so that the flow emerges at a lower velocity than it would for the constant area case. This could be advantageous. The inlet is strongly affected by the area variation, as it changes the strength of the hammer shock wave, thereby changing the pressure behind it. In this case, reduction in the passage area in the flow direction leads to increased pressure. However, this result is dependent on the assumption that the inlet conditions remain constant with area variation. This may not be the case.

  4. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  5. Environmental Variation and Cohort Effects in an Antarctic Predator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrott, Robert A.; Rotella, Jay J.; Siniff, Donald B.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Stauffer, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the potential influence of environmental variation experienced by animals during early stages of development on their subsequent demographic performance can contribute to our understanding of population processes and aid in predicting impacts of global climate change on ecosystem functioning. Using data from 4,178 tagged female Weddell seal pups born into 20 different cohorts, and 30 years of observations of the tagged seals, we evaluated the hypothesis that environmental conditions experienced by young seals, either indirectly through maternal effects and/or directly during the initial period of juvenile nutritional independence, have long-term effects on individual demographic performance. We documented an approximately 3-fold difference in the proportion of each cohort that returned to the pupping colonies and produced a pup within the first 10 years after birth. We found only weak evidence for a correlation between annual environmental conditions during the juvenile-independence period and cohort recruitment probability. Instead, the data strongly supported an association between cohort recruitment probability and the regional extent of sea ice experienced by the mother during the winter the pup was in utero. We suggest that inter-annual variation in winter sea-ice extent influences the foraging success of pregnant seals by moderating the regional abundance of competing predators that cannot occupy areas of consolidated sea ice, and by directly influencing the abundance of mid-trophic prey species that are sea-ice obligates. We hypothesize that this environmentally-induced variation in maternal nutrition dictates the extent of maternal energetic investment in offspring, resulting in cohort variation in mean size of pups at weaning which, in turn, contributes to an individual?s phenotype and its ultimate fitness. These linkages between sea ice and trophic dynamics, combined with demonstrated and predicted changes in the duration and extent of sea

  6. Effects of brain-stem and thalamic lesions on the corneal reflex: an electrophysiological and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Moffie, D

    1979-09-01

    In 9 patients with Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome, one patient with a midbrain lesion involving the right side of the tegmentum, and 2 patients with a thalamic lesion, corneal reflexes were investigated by a new electromyographic technique. The electrophysical results were compared with the results obtained by clinical observation. In the lateral medullary lesions the electrophysiologically obtained reflex responses showed four types of abnormality. Type A consisted of a bilateral delay and type B a bilateral absence of the corneal reflex response to stimulation on the affected side in combination with a normal reflex response on both sides when the cornea on the normal side was stimulated. Type C, which was present in one case, and type D which was seen in 3 cases, consisted of a bilateral absence of the corneal reflex upon stimulation on the affected side; stimulation on the unaffected side produced a normal reflex response on the intact side in combination with, respectively, a delay or absence of the corneal reflex response on the affected side. Comparison of the clinical observations with the electrophysiological findings revealed minor discrepancies in type A and B abnormalities. However, the electrophysiological type C and D abnormalities were not detected by clinical observation. These findings demonstrate that electrophysiological recording of the corneal reflex may reveal clinically undetectable abnormalities. From the electrophysiological findings it is concluded that the corneal reflex is conducted along medullary pathways running both ipsilaterally and contralaterally from the stimulated side before connecting, respectively, with the ipsilateral and contralateral facial nucleus. From the anatomical findings it is suggested that the ascending pathways from the spinal fifth nerve complex to the facial nuclei are located in the lateral reticular formation of the lower brain-stem. The normal corneal reflex responses in the presence of thalamic and

  7. Effects of anatomic characteristics of aneurysms on packing density in endovascular coil embolization: analysis of a single center's experience.

    PubMed

    Sadato, Akiyo; Adachi, Kazuhide; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Kato, Yoko; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    When embolizing cerebral aneurysms, dense coil packing may prevent recanalization but this may be influenced by the aneurysm morphology. We have analyzed retrospectively the relationship between anatomic features and the volumetric coil packing density. We analyzed 452 aneurysms in 434 patients treated by coil embolization without stenting, expressing packing density as volume embolization ratio (VER, volume of inserted coils/aneurysm volume). Six morphological variables (neck width, height, maximum diameter, dome to neck ratio (DNR), and aspect ratio), aneurysm location, and whether the aneurysm was ruptured or unruptured were analyzed with respect to dense (VER ≥20%) or loose (VER <20%) packing densities, using logistic regression analysis and ROC analysis. Among 452 aneurysms, VERs >20% were achieved for 272 aneurysms, with a mean VER of 24.7%. The mean VER of the remaining 180 aneurysms was 15.6%. In univariate analyses, the predictors for dense packing were having an anterior circulation, DNR, aspect ratio, and neck width. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors were smaller neck width (odds ratio (OR) 0.8735; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7635-0.9993) and larger aspect ratio (OR 1.6679; 95% CI 1.0460-2.6594). ROC analysis showed optimal cutoff values for an aspect ratio of 1.35 (sensitivity 69.5%, specificity 51.7%) and a neck width of 3.13 mm (sensitivity 51.1%, specificity 27.8%). Although dense coil packing is still difficult to achieve in wide-necked aneurysms without the use of stents, packing with VER >20% is expected to be achieved when the height is 1.35 times larger than the neck width.

  8. Anatomical Variations in the Emergence of the Cutaneous Nerves from the Nerve Point in the Neck and Identification of the Landmarks to Locate the Nerve Point with Its Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study on South Indian Human Foetuses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandni; D’souza, Antony Sylvan; Raythe, Biswabswabina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The cutaneous nerves from the cervical plexuses are anaesthetized by using local anaesthetics for pain relief or when minor surgical operations are performed. Knowing the variations in these nerves is important for anaestheticists to administer an effective anaesthesia to a particular nerve. So, the aim of this study was to look for the variations in the emerging patterns of the cervical cutaneous nerves in the neck and to locate the nerve point in the neck by using the superficial landmarks. Materials and Methods: The neck was dissected in 16 foetal cadavers (total 32). The foetuses were divided into 2 groups, depending upon their ages- group 1 (13-24wks) and group 2 (24-38wks). The cervical cutaneous nerves were dissected. Measurements for locating the nerve point, were taken in both the groups. Results: The statistical analysis of the measurements was done. In group 1, the mean distances of the nerve point from the External Acoustic Meatus (EAM), on the right and left sides, were 2.06cm and1.85cm and in group 2, the distances on the right and left sides were 2.32cm and 2.08cm. The mean distance of the nerve point from the clavicle in group 1, on both the right and the left sides was 1.85cm, and in group 2, the mean distances on the right and left sides were 2.67cm and 2.62cm. The variations in the cutaneous nerves which emerged from the nerve point were recorded and photographed. Conclusion: These landmarks will help the anaestheticists in locating the nerve point. These variations in the branches of the cervical plexus should be known to the anaestheticists while they give anaesthesia to a particular nerve during a nerve block. PMID:23634386

  9. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  10. Trocar-guided trans-vaginal mesh surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: effects on urinary continence and anatomical and functional outcomes. A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Natale, F; Costantini, E; La Penna, C; Illiano, E; Balsamo, R; Carbone, A; Cervigni, M

    2017-03-01

    Primary objective of this study was to assess the effects of trocar-guided transvaginal mesh surgery (TVM) on cure and prevention rates for incontinence, without concomitant surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). Our secondary objectives were anatomical outcomes, relief of symptoms and effect on quality of life (QoL). This prospective observational study evaluated women who underwent TVM for symptomatic stage >2 Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP). SUI was evaluated objectively using the cough stress test with prolapse reduced. SUI and urge urinary incontinence (UUI) were subjectively evaluated using ICIQ-SF. Anatomical cure was defined as stage <2 at POP-Q. McNemar chi-square test; paired t-test; Mann-Whitney test. Seventy-two patients reached final evaluation (mean follow-up 72 months). In the 40 pre-op continent patients, 34 (85%) remained continent postoperatively and 6 (15%) showed de novo SUI. Only 1 patient chose to undergo subsequent TVT. The number needed to treat was 6 to prevent 1 women developing de novo objective SUI and 39 to prevent 1 woman having to undergo SUI surgery. In the 32 pre-op incontinent patients, 18 (56.3%) became continent postoperatively. Only 1 patient chose to undergo subsequent TVT. UUI was present in 44 patients pre-operatively and 15 (20.8%) post-operatively (1 de novo). Forty-four patients (61.1%) were continent post-operatively for SUI and UUI. We observed a significant improvement in storage, voiding, post-micturition and prolapse-related symptoms. The anatomical cure rate was 87.5% for the anterior compartment and 90.3%.for the apical segment. The apical recurrence was 8.3% in the patients previously hysterectomised, 18.8% in the patients with uterus preservation and 0% in the patients with concomitant hysterectomy. QoL scores improved in all domains except sleep and personal relationships. We observed mesh exposure in 10 patients (13.9%), in 5 of whom it was associated with a concomitant hysterectomy CONCLUSIONS: TVM showed

  11. Time variation of effective climate sensitivity in GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. D.; Ingram, W. J.; Gregory, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Effective climate sensitivity is often assumed to be constant (if uncertain), but some previous studies of General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations have found it varying as the simulation progresses. This complicates the fitting of simple models to such simulations, as well as having implications for the estimation of climate sensitivity from observations. This study examines the evolution of the feedbacks determining the climate sensitivity in GCMs submitted to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Apparent centennial-timescale variations of effective climate sensitivity during stabilisation to a forcing can be considered an artefact of using conventional forcings which only allow for instantaneous effects and stratospheric adjustment. If the forcing is adjusted for processes occurring on timescales which are short compared to the climate stabilisation timescale then there is little centennial timescale evolution of effective climate sensitivity in any of the GCMs. We suggest that much of the apparent variation in effective climate sensitivity identified in previous studies is actually due to the comparatively fast forcing adjustment. Persistent differences are found in the strength of the feedbacks between the coupled atmosphere - ocean (AO) versions and their atmosphere - mixed-layer ocean (AML) counterparts, (the latter are often assumed to give the equilibrium climate sensitivity of the AOGCM). The AML model can typically only estimate the equilibrium climate sensitivity of the parallel AO version to within about 0.5K. The adjustment to the forcing to account for comparatively fast processes varies in magnitude and sign between GCMs, as well as differing between AO and AML versions of the same model. There is evidence from one AOGCM that the forcing adjustment may take a couple of decades, with implications for observationally based estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity. We suggest that at least some of the spread in 21st century global

  12. Intraspecific trait variation and its effects on food chains.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Donald L

    2013-08-01

    Traits such as skill at foraging and investment in anti-predator defense may vary among individuals within a species population. This intraspecific variation has implications for community dynamics. The implications of intraspecific variation of a consumer in the intermediate level of a tritrophic food chain are explored for the case in which two different phenotypes exist within the consumer population having tradeoffs in traits with respect to foraging for resources and resisting predation. The topology of such a web is similar to that of the diamond-shaped food web. An important result of prior studies on diamond-shaped webs is that conditions for equilibrium coexistence of two competing consumer species can be found, but the transient oscillations would make it likely for one competing species to become extinct. In the case of two phenotype subpopulations within a single consumer species, however, switching between the two subpopulations can occur, which is stabilizing. As a result, it is feasible for two distinct phenotype subpopulations of the consumer to exist between resources and predators in a tritrophic chain. The occurrence of two stably coexisting phenotype populations changes the nature of the bottom-up and top-down effects in the chain. The predator exerts a top-down effect on the resource, not the consumer subpopulations, and changes in the resource carrying capacity causes changes in the consumer subpopulations, but not the populations of the predators or the resources themselves. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Racial Variation in the Effect of Incarceration on Neighborhood Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Massoglia, Michael; Firebaugh, Glenn; Warner, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Each year, more than 700,000 convicted offenders are released from prison and reenter neighborhoods across the country. Prior studies have found that minority ex-inmates tend to reside in more disadvantaged neighborhoods than do white ex-inmates. However, because these studies do not control for pre-prison neighborhood conditions, we do not know how much (if any) of this racial variation is due to arrest and incarceration, or if these observed findings simply reflect existing racial residential inequality. Using a nationally representative dataset that tracks individuals over time, we find that only whites live in significantly more disadvantaged neighborhoods after prison than prior to prison. Blacks and Hispanics do not, nor do all groups (whites, blacks, and Hispanics) as a whole live in worse neighborhoods after prison. We attribute this racial variation in the effect of incarceration to the high degree of racial neighborhood inequality in the United States: because white offenders generally come from much better neighborhoods, they have much more to lose from a prison spell. In addition to advancing our understanding of the social consequences of the expansion of the prison population, these findings demonstrate the importance of controlling for preprison characteristics when investigating the effects of incarceration on residential outcomes. PMID:24367134

  14. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  15. [Guepar anatomical trapeziometacarpal prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Masmejean, E; Alnot, J Y; Chantelot, C; Beccari, R

    2003-02-01

    A choice of surgical techniques of treatment for trapeziometacarpal (TMC) Osteo-Arthritis (OA) have been described. Total arthroplasty is often used, especially in France. Many papers have been published, presenting various prostheses. In English literature, this device is not thoroughly used. [corrected] Guepar total arthroplasty is a cemented ball-in-socket prosthesis in metal-polyethylene. It includes an anatomical stem available in 4 sizes. After failure of the conservative treatment, total arthroplasty must be reserved to elderly patients, painful, with OA Dell stage III or IV aligned or not. The trapezial height must be sufficient. The authors reports the preliminary results of 64 Guepar prostheses, anatomical new design, implanted since 1995. Results of 63 prostheses are presented. One removal had been necessary at 9 months for metacarpal loosening (failure). Mean follow-up was 29 months. Clinical results were judged excellent or good in all cases. Regarding the radiological results, no modifications has been observed in 56 cases. Six radiolucent lines without displacement of the implants has been noted, with no incidence on clinical results. In one case, a metacarpal stem penetrated into the medullary canal in the bone axis but without any clinical modifications. Clinically, in addition to pain relief, trapeziometacarpal prosthesis allows to preserve the first column length and to obtain a better opposition of the thumb as well of a better thumb-digits pinch, compared after trapeziectomy. Radiologically, as for total hip arthroplasty, the exact adaptation of an anatomical stem (new design) to the canal has probably a better prognosis at long term follow-up.

  16. Automatic exposure control in CT: the effect of patient size, anatomical region and prescribed modulation strength on tube current and image quality.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Antonios E; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of patient size, body region and modulation strength on tube current and image quality on CT examinations that use automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Ten physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate an individual as neonate, 1-, 5-, 10-year-old and adult at various body habitus were employed. CT acquisition of head, neck, thorax and abdomen/pelvis was performed with ATCM activated at weak, average and strong modulation strength. The mean modulated mAs (mAsmod) values were recorded. Image noise was measured at selected anatomical sites. The mAsmod recorded for neonate compared to 10-year-old increased by 30 %, 14 %, 6 % and 53 % for head, neck, thorax and abdomen/pelvis, respectively, (P < 0.05). The mAsmod was lower than the preselected mAs with the exception of the 10-year-old phantom. In paediatric and adult phantoms, the mAsmod ranged from 44 and 53 for weak to 117 and 93 for strong modulation strength, respectively. At the same exposure parameters image noise increased with body size (P < 0.05). The ATCM system studied here may affect dose differently for different patient habitus. Dose may decrease for overweight adults but increase for children older than 5 years old. Care should be taken when implementing ATCM protocols to ensure that image quality is maintained. • ATCM efficiency is related to the size of the patient's body. • ATCM should be activated without caution in overweight adult individuals. • ATCM may increase radiation dose in children older than 5 years old. • ATCM efficiency depends on the protocol selected for a specific anatomical region. • Modulation strength may be appropriately tuned to enhance ATCM efficiency.

  17. The effect of variation in naturalness on phonetic perceptual identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remez, Robert E.; Yang, Cynthia Y.; Piorkowski, Rebecca L.; Wissig, Stephanie; Batchelder, Abigail; Nam, Heddy

    2002-05-01

    The relation between apparent naturalness and phonetic identification was assessed in six perceptual tests. A seven-step place-of-articulation series spanning [da] to [ga] was created with speech synthesis approximating the spectra of natural samples. The sensitivity of perceivers to this realization of a place contrast was assessed by estimating the cumulative d' across the series in identification tests. Four variants of this series differing in apparent naturalness were produced by altering the synthesis source function while preserving the center frequency and bandwidth of the formants, and by replicating the gross spectrotemporal patterns with time-varying sinusoids. In addition to calibrating perceivers' sensitivity to the place contrast over variation in naturalness, we conducted a naturalness tournament composed of items drawn from the five test series. A correlation of the findings of the naturalness tournament with the measures of phonetic sensitivity offers an index of the effect of variation in naturalness on phonetic perception. This study can resolve the dispute between the classic premise that intelligibility and naturalness are orthogonal attributes of speech perception, and the more recent premise entailed by episodically based accounts of perceptual categorization, that novel instances are identified by virtue of auditory similarity to prior exemplars. [Research supported by NIDCD.

  18. Effects of variations in recharge on groundwater quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittemore, D.O.; McGregor, K.M.; Marotz, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The predominant regional effect of recharge on municipal groundwater quality in Kansas is the dilution of mineralized water in aquifers with relatively shallow water tables. The individual dissolved constituents contributing most to the water-quality variations are sulfate and chloride, and the calcium and sodium accompanying them, which are derived from the dissolution of evaporite minerals within the aquifer or from saline formation water in bedrock underlying the aquifer. The relationship between recharge and groundwater-quality variation can be quantified by associating certain climatic indices, especially the Palmer Drought Index, with quality observations. The response time of the maximum water-quality change relative to the occurrence of drought or substantial recharge ranges from a month to 3 years depending on the aquifer characteristics, and is generally proportional to the saturated thickness and specific yield. The response time is also affected by discharge to and recharge from nearby streams and by the well construction, particularly the placement of the screened interval, and pumping stress. ?? 1989.

  19. Epidemiological effects of group size variation in social species

    PubMed Central

    Caillaud, Damien; Craft, Meggan E.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2013-01-01

    Contact patterns in group-structured populations determine the course of infectious disease outbreaks. Network-based models have revealed important connections between group-level contact patterns and the dynamics of epidemics, but these models typically ignore heterogeneities in within-group composition. Here, we analyse a flexible mathematical model of disease transmission in a hierarchically structured wildlife population, and find that increased variation in group size reduces the epidemic threshold, making social animal populations susceptible to a broader range of pathogens. Variation in group size also increases the likelihood of an epidemic for mildly transmissible diseases, but can reduce the likelihood and expected size of an epidemic for highly transmissible diseases. Further, we introduce the concept of epidemiological effective group size, which we define to be the group size of a hypothetical population containing groups of identical size that has the same epidemic threshold as an observed population. Using data from the Serengeti Lion Project, we find that pride-living Serengeti lions are epidemiologically comparable to a homogeneous population with up to 20 per cent larger prides. PMID:23576784

  20. Effects of climate variation on viticulture in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Isabel; Nieves Lorenzo, M.; Taboada, Juan J.; Ramos, Alexandre M.

    2015-04-01

    Droughts, floods and extreme weather events (heat-waves, floods and droughts) may cause higher losses to the primary sector. The crops are very dependent on meteorological conditions. In particular, the agricultural sector needs climatic and seasonal forecast that anticipates variations in crop production. Changes in climate could alter crop distribution, and policy-makers working in areas related to climate change should learn about the impact of climate change on crop yields. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of climate variation on Spanish viticulture. Spain remains the country with the largest area of vineyards of the European Union and the world. The vine is the third extension of cultivation in Spanish, after cereals and olives. The knowledge on influence of changes in temperature and rainfall in the actual context of climate change on grape of wine productivity is necessary to elaborate appropriate adaptation measures to the viticulture sector. The influence of main climate variability patterns on the grape of wine also has been analyzed. In particular, the main variability modes of the North Atlantic area (NAO, EA; EAWR and SCA) and the oscillation modes of the equatorial Pacific will be considered (SOI and NIÑO34). The choice of these modes was motivated by previous work where the influence of these modes on Iberian Peninsula was analyzed.

  1. Repeated Bout Effect in Muscle-Specific Exercise Variations.

    PubMed

    Zourdos, Michael C; Henning, Paul C; Jo, Edward; Khamoui, Andy V; Lee, Sang-Rok; Park, Young-Min; Naimo, Marshall; Panton, Lynn B; Nosaka, Kazunori; Kim, Jeong-Su

    2015-08-01

    A single bout of unaccustomed exercise confers protective effect against muscle damage from a subsequent bout of similar activity, that is, repeated bout effect (RBE). It remains unknown whether varying muscle-specific exercise between sessions alters the magnitude of the RBE. This study examined the effects of muscle-specific exercise variation between consecutive sessions on the RBE. Twenty untrained males (21 ± 2 years) were assigned to one of 2 groups (n = 10 per group): (a) 2 sessions of incline curls, Fixed Exercise or (b) 1 session of incline curls followed by 1 session of preacher curls, Varied Exercise, with 7 days between sessions. Subjects performed 5 sets of 6 repetitions at ∼50% of maximal isometric elbow flexor strength during each session. Changes in maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic torque, range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after each exercise session, and the changes were compared between bouts and between groups. There were significant time effects (p < 0.05) for isometric maximal voluntary contraction, concentric maximal voluntary contraction, range of motion, and muscle soreness during sessions 1 and 2 with no between-group differences. Both groups demonstrated a significantly faster recovery of range of motion and soreness to baseline levels after session 2 compared with session 1. Overall, our findings suggest that incline curls conferred a protective effect during subsequent preacher curls in a similar way to repeating incline curls; therefore, the RBE was not exercise specific.

  2. Sex-specific genetic effects influence variation in body composition.

    PubMed

    Zillikens, M C; Yazdanpanah, M; Pardo, L M; Rivadeneira, F; Aulchenko, Y S; Oostra, B A; Uitterlinden, A G; Pols, H A P; van Duijn, C M

    2008-12-01

    Despite well-known sex differences in body composition it is not known whether sex-specific genetic or environmental effects contribute to these differences. We assessed body composition in 2,506 individuals, from a young Dutch genetic isolate participating in the Erasmus Rucphen Family study, by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry. We used variance decomposition procedures to partition variation of body composition into genetic and environmental components common to both sexes and to men and women separately and calculated the correlation between genetic components in men and women. After accounting for age, sex and inbreeding, heritability ranged from 0.39 for fat mass index to 0.84 for height. We found sex-specific genetic effects for fat percentage (fat%), lean mass, lean mass index (LMI) and fat distribution, but not for BMI and height. Genetic correlations between sexes were significantly different from 1 for fat%, lean mass, LMI, android fat, android:gynoid fat ratio and WHR, indicating that there are sex-specific genes contributing to variation of these traits. Genetic variance was significantly higher in women for the waist, hip and thigh circumference and WHR, implying that genes account for more variance of fat distribution in women than in men. Environmental variance was significantly higher in men for the android:gynoid fat ratio. Sex-specific genetic effects underlie sexual dimorphism in several body composition traits. The findings are relevant for studies on the relationship of body composition with common diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and for genetic association studies.

  3. Anatomical influences on internally coupled ears in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Young, Bruce A

    2016-10-01

    Many reptiles, and other vertebrates, have internally coupled ears in which a patent anatomical connection allows pressure waves generated by the displacement of one tympanic membrane to propagate (internally) through the head and, ultimately, influence the displacement of the contralateral tympanic membrane. The pattern of tympanic displacement caused by this internal coupling can give rise to novel sensory cues. The auditory mechanics of reptiles exhibit more anatomical variation than in any other vertebrate group. This variation includes structural features such as diverticula and septa, as well as coverings of the tympanic membrane. Many of these anatomical features would likely influence the functional significance of the internal coupling between the tympanic membranes. Several of the anatomical components of the reptilian internally coupled ear are under active motor control, suggesting that in some reptiles the auditory system may be more dynamic than previously recognized.

  4. Micrometoric Impact Effects: Peak Pressure versus Spectral Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Elizabeth; Lederer, S. M.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have investigated the surface properties of asteroids caused by collisions in the mid-infrared (2.5 to 16 microns) by impacting forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities (as predicted by the Nice Model) and at varying temperatures. The crystal structure in these minerals can be deformed by the shock wave from the impact as well as sheared into smaller particle sizes. Our current focus is on the differing effects between 2.3 and 2.6 km/sec, as well as the differences between a cold sample at -20C and a room temperature sample at 25C. We find that the spectral variation and crystal deformation varies non-linearly with the peak shock pressure.

  5. Effects of Environmental Parameters On Height and Gravity Variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, B.; Zerbini, S.; Romagnoli, C.; Lago, L.; Domenichini, F.; Simon, D.

    Continuous GPS and gravity measurements by means of a cryogenic gravimeter started in mid 1996 at Medicina, in Italy. The time variability of gravity and GPS heights in relation to variations of several environmental parameters has been investi- gated. A marked seasonal signal, of comparable amplitude and phase, has been iden- tified in both data series. It has been interpreted as the sum of different loading and Newtonian attraction effects. Seasonal loading effects induced by air pressure, the ocean and surficial water table were estimated and modeled for both data sets. Mass effects due to the surficial water table and the ocean were also estimated and accounted for. For the gravity series, 12-hour data of balloon radio sounding launches have been used to estimate the attraction effect of the seasonal vertical density distribution of the air pressure column above the station. It is demonstrated the importance of collecting continuous, high-accuracy, multi-parameter data series for an appropriate interpreta- tion of signals related to environmental variability. The results of the study have shed light on impacts relevant to the deformation of the Earth's crust due to the interactions between different components of the Earth's system.

  6. Characterization of Surface Reflectance Variation Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes to simulate the effects on remote sensing in visible and infrared wavelengths of variables which affect classification is examined. These variables include detector viewing angle, atmospheric aerosol size distribution, aerosol vertical and horizontal distribution (e.g., finite clouds), the form of the bidirectional ground reflectance function, and horizontal variability of reflectance type and reflectivity (albedo). These simulations are used to characterize the sensitivity of observables (intensity and polarization) to variations in the underlying physical parameters both to improve algorithms for the removal of atmospheric effects and to identify techniques which can improve classification accuracy. It was necessary to revise and validate the simulation codes (CTRANS, ARTRAN, and the Mie scattering code) to improve efficiency and accommodate a new operational environment, and to build the basic software tools for acquisition and off-line manipulation of simulation results. Initial calculations compare cases in which increasing amounts of aerosol are shifted into the stratosphere, maintaining a constant optical depth. In the case of moderate aerosol optical depth, the effect on the spread function is to scale it linearly as would be expected from a single scattering model. Varying the viewing angle appears to provide the same qualitative effect as modifying the vertical optical depth (for Lambertian ground reflectance).

  7. Anatomic hemispherectomy: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Robinson, Shenandoah; Nair, Ajith Rajappan; Sivanandapanicker, Jyothish L; Cohen, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The history of surgical treatment for hemispheric epilepsy is rich with colorful twists and turns. The authors trace the evolution of the surgical treatment of hemispheric epilepsy from radical anatomic resections to current less invasive disconnection procedures. Anatomic hemispherectomy (AH) was first described by Dandy in 1928 as a treatment for gliomas. The first report of this technique to control seizures was by McKenzie in 1938. AH gained wide popularity but began to fall out of favor after the description of superficial cerebral hemosiderosis in 1966. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with AH, Rasmussen introduced functional hemispherectomy in 1974. The technique of hemispherotomy was introduced in the 1990 s to minimize the extent of brain removal while maximizing the white matter disconnections. Thus, surgery for hemispheric epilepsy has undergone dramatic transformation since the technique was first introduced. Less invasive techniques have been developed to reduce surgical morbidity. Although optimal seizure control is best achieved with radical AH, the newer less invasive disconnection techniques appear to achieve near-comparable postoperative seizure control with a significantly lower rate of complications.

  8. Combination of a model-deformation method and a positional MRI to quantify the effects of posture on the anatomical structures of the trunk.

    PubMed

    Lafon, Y; Smith, F W; Beillas, P

    2010-05-07

    Understanding the postural effects on organs and skeleton could be crucial for several applications. This paper reports on a methodology to quantify the three-dimensional effects of postures on deformable anatomical structures. A positional MRI scanner was used to image the full trunk in four postures: supine, standing, seated and forward-flexed. The MRI stacks were processed with a custom toolbox, implemented using open source software. The semi-automated segmentation was based on the deformation of generic models of the pelvis, sternum, femoral heads, spine, liver, kidneys, spleen, skin, thoracic and abdominal cavities. The toolbox was designed to be easily extended by additional image filters, deformation schemes, or new generic models. Results obtained on one subject demonstrate that the method can be used to quantify the effects of postures on skeleton and organs. The spinal curvature, the pelvic parameters and the volume of the thoracic cavity were affected by the four postures. The volumes of the kidneys, spleen, liver and abdominal object were mostly unaffected. The movement of organs was coherent with the effect of gravity. The deformation of organs between postures was expressed using geometrical transformations. Investigations should be pursued on a larger population to confirm the patterns observed on the first subject. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Hayashi, Naoto; Miyati, Tosiaki; Takao, Hidemasa; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: "Frontal Lobe," "Hippocampus," "Occipital Lobe," "Orbital Gyrus," "Parietal Lobe," "Putamen," and "Temporal Lobe." Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies.

  10. Clinical and anatomic pathology effects of serial blood sampling in rat toxicology studies, using conventional or microsampling methods.

    PubMed

    Caron, Alexis; Lelong, Christine; Bartels, T; Dorchies, O; Gury, T; Chalier, Catherine; Benning, Véronique

    2015-08-01

    As a general practice in rodent toxicology studies, satellite animals are used for toxicokinetic determinations, because of the potential impact of serial blood sampling on toxicological endpoints. Besides toxicological and toxicokinetic determinations, blood samples obtained longitudinally from a same animal may be used for the assessment of additional parameters (e.g., metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety biomarkers) to maximize information that can be deduced from rodents. We investigated whether removal of up to 6 × 200 μL of blood over 24h can be applied in GLP rat toxicology studies without affecting the scientific outcome. 8 week-old female rats (200-300 g) were dosed for up to 1 month with a standard vehicle and subjected or not (controls) to serial blood sampling for sham toxicokinetic/ancillary determinations, using miniaturized methods allowing collection of 6 × 50, 100 or 200 μL over 24h. In-life endpoints, clinical pathology parameters and histopathology of organs sensitive to blood volume reduction were evaluated at several time points after completion of sampling. In sampled rats, minimal and reversible changes in red blood cell mass (maximally 15%) and subtle variations in liver enzymes, fibrinogen and neutrophils were not associated with any organ/tissue macroscopic or microscopic correlate. Serial blood sampling (up to 6 × 200 μL over 24h) is compatible with the assessment of standard toxicity endpoints in adult rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the anatomic effect of physical therapy exercises for mobilization of lumbar spinal nerves and the dura mater in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Boos, Alois; Mouwen, Marco; Steffen, Frank

    2006-10-01

    To adapt and standardize neural tissue mobilization exercises, quantify nerve root movement, and assess the anatomic effects of lumbar spinal nerve and dural mobilization in dogs. 15 canine cadavers. 5 cadavers were used in the preliminary part of the study to adapt 3 neural tissue mobilization physical therapy exercises to canine anatomy. In the other 10 cadavers, the L4 to L7 nerve roots and the dura at the level of T13 and L1 were isolated and marked. Movements during the physical therapy exercises were standardized by means of goniometric control. Movement of the nerve roots in response to each exercise was digitally measured. The effects of body weight and crownrump length on the distance of nerve root movement achieved during each exercise were also assessed. Each exercise was divided into 4 steps, and the overall distance of neural movement achieved was compared with distances achieved between steps. Neural tissue mobilization exercises elicited visible and measurable movement of nerve roots L4 to L7 and of the dura at T13 and L1 in all cadavers. The physical therapy exercises evaluated had measurable effects on nerve roots L4 to L7 and the dura mater in the T13 and L1 segments. These exercises should be evaluated in clinical trials to validate their efficacy as primary treatments or ancillary postsurgical therapy in dogs with disorders of the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral segments of the vertebral column.

  12. Antidepressant-like behavioral, anatomical, and biochemical effects of petroleum ether extract from maca (Lepidium meyenii) in mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhong; Cheng, Ai-Fang; Yu, Yuan-Tao; Yu, Long-Jiang; Jin, Wenwen

    2014-05-01

    Maca has been consumed as a medical food in Peru for thousands of years, and exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. Our present study aimed to evaluate the behavior and anatomical and biochemical effects of petroleum ether extract from maca (ME) in the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression in mice. Three different doses of maca extract (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) were orally administrated in the six-week CUMS procedure. Fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) was used as a positive control drug. Maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly decreased the duration of immobility time in the tail suspension test. After treatment with maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg), the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus appeared thicker. Maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) also induced a significant reduction in corticosterone levels in mouse serum. In mouse brain tissue, after six weeks of treatment, noradrenaline and dopamine levels were increased by maca extract, and the activity of reactive oxygen species was significantly inhibited. Serotonin levels were not significantly altered. These results demonstrated that maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed antidepressant-like effects and was related to the activation of both noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems, as well as attenuation of oxidative stress in mouse brain.

  13. Antidepressant-Like Behavioral, Anatomical, and Biochemical Effects of Petroleum Ether Extract from Maca (Lepidium meyenii) in Mice Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zhong; Cheng, Ai-Fang; Yu, Yuan-Tao; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Maca has been consumed as a medical food in Peru for thousands of years, and exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. Our present study aimed to evaluate the behavior and anatomical and biochemical effects of petroleum ether extract from maca (ME) in the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression in mice. Three different doses of maca extract (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) were orally administrated in the six-week CUMS procedure. Fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) was used as a positive control drug. Maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly decreased the duration of immobility time in the tail suspension test. After treatment with maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg), the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus appeared thicker. Maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) also induced a significant reduction in corticosterone levels in mouse serum. In mouse brain tissue, after six weeks of treatment, noradrenaline and dopamine levels were increased by maca extract, and the activity of reactive oxygen species was significantly inhibited. Serotonin levels were not significantly altered. These results demonstrated that maca extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed antidepressant-like effects and was related to the activation of both noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems, as well as attenuation of oxidative stress in mouse brain. PMID:24730393

  14. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed

    Snell, J R; Green, R; Stott, G; Van Baerle, S

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk.

  15. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Jones Littles, Chanda; Saucedo, Omar; Lorenzen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp. PMID:27158895

  16. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies.

    PubMed

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Jones Littles, Chanda; Saucedo, Omar; Lorenzen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp.

  17. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Anatomically corrected malposition of great arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R H; Becker, A E; Losekoot, T G; Gerlis, L M

    1975-01-01

    Four anomalous hearts are described in which the great arteries arise in unusual fashion from their morphologically appropriate ventricles. This malformation, previously termed anatomically corrected transposition, is now termed anatomically corrected malposition. This is because, following the precedent of Van Praagh and his associates, we now reserve the term 'transposition' to describe the situation in which both great arteries arise from separate morphologically inappropriate ventricles. All the hearts examined exhibited atrioventricular concordance, I with viscero-atrial situs inversus, and 3 with situs solitus. However, there were considerable variations in ventricular morphology between the cases. Thus, 2 cases exhibited atresia of the right atrioventricular valve, and in the remaining 2 cases right and levt ventricular sinuses were both identified. Two of the cases also had pulmonary atresia, and coronary artery anomalies were present in all 4. The cases emphasize the fact that the term anatomically corrected malposition describes not a discrete anomaly but only a ventriculo-arterial relation, which is one of ventriculo-arterial concordance. Doubt has previously been cast upon the existence of this as an anatomical entity. It is concluded that the relation does indeed exist, and furthermore can coexist with all varieties of atrioventricular relations. It is suggested that the differing atrioventricular relations can be distinguished by usage of the terms 'concordant' or 'discordant' anatomically corrected malposition. Finally, it is emphasized that it is necessary to distinguish this anomaly, which in most cases presents with left-sided anterior aorta, from the left-sided anterior aorta more frequently encountered in classically corrected transposition'. Images PMID:1191424

  19. Effect of nurse staffing variation and hospital resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Seon-Ha; Ko, Young

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of variations in nurse staffing levels on the length of stay and medical expenses of patients who underwent hip or knee surgeries. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the National Health Insurance database and hospital surveys from 2010. Patient length of stay and medical expenses by nurse staffing level and skill mix were compared after adjusting for hospital and patient characteristics. Nurse staffing was measured based on staffing grade, the bed-to-registered nurse/nurse aid ratio, the bed-to-nursing personnel ratio, and the RN proportion. Generalized estimation models were used to analyze the associations. Decreased nurse staffing was consistently associated with increased length of stay, regardless of nurse staffing measures. The medical expenses associated with the lowest staffing level were approximately $US 1142.2 more than those associated with the highest staffing level. The study results suggest that maintaining a high nurse staffing level could be a cost-effective strategy for government and insurers, as well as for patients. We propose that policy makers implement more efficient nurse staffing strategies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Diurnal height variations in growth of children: effects of gravity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Kobayashi, M; Tanaka, T; Uchiyama, Y; Togo, M

    1999-07-01

    Many specialists in various scientific fields are interested in human growth and development of body sizes of children as a physiological phenomenon. However, our knowledge on human growth has not yet reached a solid foundation and consensus, and at present gravity potential is known to be a lasting condition that influences human lives in various ways. Therefore, more basic research is needed by examining detailed processes of human growth on the earth, with the effect of gravity in prospect. Although modern human growth study is constructed mainly on the basis of observations at one-year intervals, whether such long-interval observations can reveal a true statistical model of human growth is questionable. Togo and Togo (1982, 1989) observed growth in five siblings at one-month intervals for more than 15 years and found fluctuations observed from the start to the end of growth observations consisted of trend, regular, and irregular factors. This indicates the importance of examining human growth by short-interval observation. Thus, our study focused on diurnal variations of height, measuring twice daily, and discusses the effects of gravity on growth of children.

  1. Effects of UV-B radiation on anatomical characteristics, phenolic compounds and gene expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in highbush blueberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Arellano, Alejandro; Latsague, Mirtha; Acevedo, Patricio; Loyola, Rodrigo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Alberdi, Miren

    2014-12-01

    The effects of increased doses of UV-B radiation on anatomical, biochemical and molecular features of leaves of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Brigitta and Bluegold) genotypes were investigated. Plants were grown in a solid substrate and exposed to 0, 0.07, 0.12 and 0.19 Wm(-2) of biologically effective UV-B radiation for up to 72 h. Leaf thickness and the adaxial epidermis thickness fell more than 3-fold in both genotypes at the highest UV-B dose. Moreover, in Bluegold an evident disorganization in the different cell layers was observed at the highest UV-B radiation. A significant decrease in chlorophyll a/b after 6 h in Brigitta under the greater UV-B doses was observed. Anthocyanin and total phenolics were increased, especially at 0.19 Wm(-2), when compared to the control in both genotypes.Chlorogenic acid was the most abundant hydroxycinnamic acid in Brigitta, and was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than in Bluegold leaves. Regarding the expression of phenylpropanoid genes, only the transcription factor VcMYBPA1 showed a significant and sustained induction at higher doses of UV-B radiation in both genotypes compared to the controls. Thus, the reduction of leaf thickness concomitant with a lower lipid peroxidation and rapid enhancement of secondary metabolites, accompanied by a stable induction of the VcMYBPA1 transcription factor suggest a better performance against UV-B radiation of the Brigitta genotype.

  2. Radiation effects on moisture variation in ponderosa pine litter

    Treesearch

    Clive M. Countryman

    1977-01-01

    This exploratory study indicated that considerable variation in the moisture content of litter can occur within short horizontal distances. The variations ere found to be caused primarily by differences in the amount of solar radiation received by the litter and in the degree of cooling by radiation at night. Because actual fuel moisture lags behind equilibrium...

  3. Effective DQE (eDQE) for monoscopic and stereoscopic chest radiography imaging systems with the incorporation of anatomical noise

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Sarah J.; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Stereoscopic chest biplane correlation imaging (stereo/BCI) has been proposed as an alternative modality to single view chest x-ray (CXR). The metrics effective modulation transfer function (eMTF), effective normalized noise power spectrum (eNNPS), and effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) have been proposed as clinically relevant metrics for assessing clinical system performance taking into consideration the magnification and scatter effects. This study compared the metrics eMTF, eNNPS, eDQE, and detectability index for stereo/BCI and single view CXR under isodose conditions at two magnifications for two anthropomorphic phantoms of differing sizes.Methods: Measurements for the eMTF were taken for two phantom sizes with an opaque edge test device using established techniques. The eNNPS was measured at two isodose conditions for two phantoms using established techniques. The scatter was measured for two phantoms using an established beam stop method. All measurements were also taken at two different magnifications with two phantoms. A geometrical phantom was used for comparison with prior results for CXR although the results for an anatomy free phantom are not expected to vary for BCI.Results: Stereo/BCI resulted in improved metrics compared to single view CXR. Results indicated that magnification can potentially improve the detection performance primarily due to the air gap which reduced scatter by ∼20%. For both phantoms, at isodose, eDQE(0) for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times higher than that for CXR. Magnification at isodose improved eDQE(0) by ∼10 times for stereo/BCI. Increasing the dose did not improve eDQE. The detectability index for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times better than single view CXR for all conditions. The detectability index was also not improved with increased dose.Conclusions: The findings indicate that stereo/BCI with magnification may improve detectability of subtle lung nodules compared to single view CXR. Results were improved

  4. The effect of formulation variables and breathing patterns on the site of nasal deposition in an anatomically correct model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Laube, Beth; Dalby, Richard

    2005-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of formulation variables and breathing patterns on aerosol distribution in the nasal cavity. Placebo nasal spray formulations containing 0.25% w/v Avicel CL611 (viscosity = 4 cP) and 2% w/v methylcellulose (MC; viscosity = 18.2 cP) were radiolabeled with (99m)Technicium. Following spraying into a silicone nose model, through which air was drawn at one of three constant rates (0, 10, and 20 L/min) or one of two breathing profiles (representing fast and slow inhalations), aerosol deposition in the model was quantified by gamma scintigraphy. Regional deposition was expressed as horizontal[inner, middle (h), outer] and vertical distribution [upper, middle (v), lower] in the nose model. Compared to 2% MC, Avicel CL611 significantly increased aerosol deposition in the middle (h) region of the nasal cavity under all breathing conditions, and in the inner region at 0 and 20 L/min and with a slow inhalation. The different breathing rates showed no effect on deposition of 2% MC. However, 10 L/min significantly increased the upper deposition of Avicel compared to 0 and 20 L/min. Nasal sprays with a low viscosity provided greater surface coverage of the nasal mucosa than higher viscosity formulations. Changes in breathing profiles did not affect aerosol deposition in this nose model.

  5. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  6. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction of Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W K; Ougouag, A M; Rahnema, F; Mckinley, M S

    2003-06-11

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fission density distribution.

  7. Effects of Angle Variations in Suspension Push-up Exercise.

    PubMed

    Gulmez, Irfan

    2017-04-01

    Gulmez, I. Effects of angle variations in suspension push-up exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1017-1023, 2017-This study aimed to determine and compare the amount of loads on the TRX Suspension Trainer (TRX) straps and ground reaction forces at 4 different angles during TRX push-ups. Twenty-eight male (mean age, 24.1 ± 2.9 years; height, 179.4 ± 8.0 m; weight, 78.8 ± 9.8 kg) physical education and sports university students participated in this study. The subjects were tested at TRX angles (0, 15, 30, 45°) during the TRX push-ups. Force data were recorded by a force platform and load cells integrated into the TRX straps. The results show that as the TRX angle was reduced, the load applied to the TRX straps increased and simultaneously the load measured by the force platform decreased. This was true for both the elbow joint changing from flexion to extension and vice versa. When the TRX angle was set at 0° and subjects' elbows were at extension during TRX push-up, 50.4% of the subjects' body weight, and when the elbows were at flexion, 75.3% of the body weight was registered by the sensors on the TRX straps. The results of this study can be used in the calculation of the training load and volume (resistance training programming) during TRX push-up exercises at varying angles.

  8. Independent evaluation of the anatomical and behavioral effects of Taxol in rat models of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Phillip G; Tovar, C Amy; Lemeshow, Stanley; Yin, Qin; Jakeman, Lyn B

    2014-11-01

    The goal of the current manuscript was to replicate published data that show intrathecal infusions of Taxol® (paclitaxel), an anti-neoplastic microtubule stabilizing agent, reduce fibrogliotic scarring caused by a dorsal spinal hemisection (DHx) injury and increase functional recovery and growth of serotonergic axons after moderate spinal contusion injury. These experiments were completed as part of an NIH-NINDS contract entitled "Facilities of Research Excellence in Spinal Cord Injury (FORE-SCI) - Replication". Here, data are presented that confirm the anti-scarring effects of Taxol after DHx injury; however, Taxol did not confer neuroprotection or promote serotonergic axon growth nor did it improve functional recovery in a model of moderate spinal contusion injury. Thus, only partial replication was achieved. Possible explanations for disparate results in our studies and published data are discussed.

  9. Independent evaluation of the anatomical and behavioral effects of Taxol in rat models of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Phillip G.; Tovar, C. Amy; Lemeshow, Stanley; Yin, Qin; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current manuscript was to replicate published data that show intrathecal infusions of Taxol ® (paclitaxel), an anti-neoplastic microtubule stabilizing agent, reduce fibrogliotic scarring caused by a dorsal spinal hemisection (DHx) injury and increase functional recovery and growth of serotonergic axons after moderate spinal contusion injury. These experiments were completed as part of an NIH-NINDS contract entitled “Facilities of Research Excellence – Spinal Cord Injury (FORE-SCI) – Replication”. Here, data are presented that confirm the anti-scarring effects of Taxol after DHx injury; however, Taxol did not confer neuroprotection or promote serotonergic axon growth nor did it improve functional recovery in a model of moderate spinal contusion injury. Thus, only partial replication was achieved. Possible explanations for disparate results in our studies and published data are discussed. PMID:24999028

  10. Evaluation of the effect of respiratory and anatomical variables on a Fourier technique for markerless, self-sorted 4D-CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergalasova, I.; Cai, J.; Giles, W.; Segars, W. P.; Yin, F. F.

    2013-10-01

    A novel technique based on Fourier transform theory has been developed that directly extracts respiratory information from projections without the use of external surrogates. While the feasibility has been demonstrated with three patients, a more extensive validation is necessary. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of a variety of respiratory and anatomical scenarios on the performance of the technique with the 4D digital extended cardiac torso phantom. FT-phase and FT-magnitude methods were each applied to identify peak-inspiration projections and quantitatively compared to the gold standard of visual identification. Both methods proved to be robust across the studied scenarios with average differences in respiratory phase <10% and percentage of projections assigned within 10% of the gold standard >90%, when incorporating minor modifications to region-of-interest (ROI) selection and/or low-frequency location for select cases of DA and lung percentage in the field of view of the projection. Nevertheless, in the instance where one method initially faltered, the other method prevailed and successfully identified peak-inspiration projections. This is promising because it suggests that the two methods provide complementary information to each other. To ensure appropriate clinical adaptation of markerless, self-sorted four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), perhaps an optimal integration of the two methods can be developed.

  11. Effectiveness of CT assists for intraarterial chemotherapy: therapeutic outcome of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer extending across the anatomical midline.

    PubMed

    Yunaiyama, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuhiro; Funatsu, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Shimizu, Akira; Ito, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Akata, Soichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CT assist for intraarterial chemotherapy in relation to the therapeutic outcomes of intraarterial chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer with extension across the anatomical midline (EAM). This retrospective study evaluated 64 consecutive patients. In total, 26 and 38 patients had cancer with or without EAM, respectively. These patients underwent an intraarterial cisplatin infusion (200 mg/m(2), days 1 and 35) and intravenous 5-FU infusion (800 mg/m(2), days 1-5 and 36-39) concomitantly with radiotherapy. Angiography-assisted CT was performed to confirm complete coverage during the intraarterial chemotherapy. The accuracy of diagnosing tumor vessels by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was evaluated using receiver-operating characteristic analysis by two radiologists. The overall survival and locoregional control rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. DSA was not useful for diagnosing tumor vessels. The 2-year overall survival rates for the patients with cancer with or without EAM were 83 and 90 %, while the 2-year locoregional control rates were 95 and 82 %, respectively. Locoregional control or the overall survival rates showed no significant differences. Intraarterial chemotherapy using angiography-assisted CT during chemoradiation therapy can achieve comparable therapeutic outcomes for cancer with and without EAM.

  12. [Graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces in a virtual 3D setting. Scanning technologies and soft provides a greater flexibility in the digitization of surfaces and a higher resolution and accuracy. An alternative cheap method for the reconstruction of 3D anatomic surfaces is presented in connection with some studies and international projects developed by Medical Design research team.

  13. Numerical simulation of pharyngeal airflow applied to obstructive sleep apnea: effect of the nasal cavity in anatomically accurate airway models.

    PubMed

    Cisonni, Julien; Lucey, Anthony D; King, Andrew J C; Islam, Syed Mohammed Shamsul; Lewis, Richard; Goonewardene, Mithran S

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive brief episodes of soft-tissue collapse within the upper airway during sleep characterize obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), an extremely common and disabling disorder. Failure to maintain the patency of the upper airway is caused by the combination of sleep-related loss of compensatory dilator muscle activity and aerodynamic forces promoting closure. The prediction of soft-tissue movement in patient-specific airway 3D mechanical models is emerging as a useful contribution to clinical understanding and decision making. Such modeling requires reliable estimations of the pharyngeal wall pressure forces. While nasal obstruction has been recognized as a risk factor for OSA, the need to include the nasal cavity in upper-airway models for OSA studies requires consideration, as it is most often omitted because of its complex shape. A quantitative analysis of the flow conditions generated by the nasal cavity and the sinuses during inspiration upstream of the pharynx is presented. Results show that adequate velocity boundary conditions and simple artificial extensions of the flow domain can reproduce the essential effects of the nasal cavity on the pharyngeal flow field. Therefore, the overall complexity and computational cost of accurate flow predictions can be reduced.

  14. Defining error in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Ronald L

    2006-05-01

    Although much has been said and written about medical error and about error in pathology since the publication of the Institute of Medicine's report on medical error in 1999, precise definitions of what constitutes error in anatomic pathology do not exist for the specialty. Without better definitions, it is impossible to accurately judge errors in pathology. The lack of standardized definitions has implications for patient care and for the legal judgment of malpractice. To review the goals of anatomic pathology, to discuss the problems inherent in applying these goals to the judgment of error in pathology, to offer definitions of major and minor errors in pathology, and to discuss error in anatomic pathology in relation to the classic laboratory test cycle. Existing literature. Definitions for major and minor error in anatomic pathology are proffered, and anatomic pathology error is characterized in the classic test cycle.

  15. Variations in target volume definition and dose to normal tissue using anatomic versus biological imaging ((18) F-FDG-PET) in the treatment of bone metastases: results from a 3-arm randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Berwouts, Dieter; De Wolf, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Olteanu, Luiza Am; Lambert, Bieke; Speleers, Bruno; Goethals, Ingeborg; Madani, Indira; Ost, Piet

    2017-02-01

    To report the impact on target volume delineation and dose to normal tissue using anatomic versus biological imaging ((18) F-FDG-PET) for bone metastases. Patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases were randomized (1:1:1) and blinded to receive either 8 Gy in a single fraction with conventionally planned radiotherapy (ConvRT-8 Gy) or 8 Gy in a single fraction with dose-painting-by-numbers (DPBN) dose range between 6 and 10 Gy) (DPBN-8 Gy) or 16 Gy in a single fraction with DPBN (dose range between 14 and 18 Gy) (DPBN-16 Gy). The primary endpoint was overall pain response at 1 month. Volumes of the gross tumour volume (GTV) - both biological (GTVPET ) and anatomical (GTVCT ) -, planning target volume (PTV), dose to the normal tissue and maximum standardized-uptake values (SUVMAX ) were analysed (secondary endpoint). Sixty-three percent of the GTVCT volume did not show (18) F-FDG-uptake. On average, 20% of the GTVPET volume was outside GTVCT . The volume of normal tissue receiving 4 Gy, 6 Gy and 8 Gy was at least 3×, 6× and 13× smaller in DPBN-8 Gy compared to ConvRT-8 Gy and DPBN-16 Gy (P < 0.05). Positron emitting tomography-information potentially changes the target volume for bone metastases. DPBN between 6 and 10 Gy significantly decreases dose to the normal tissue compared to conventional radiotherapy. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Effect of scapular external rotation on the axillary nerve during the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: an anatomical investigation.

    PubMed

    Reinares, Felipe; Werthel, Jean-David; Moraiti, Constantina; Valenti, Philippe

    2016-06-24

    The first purpose of this study is to measure the distance between the axillary nerve and the exit point of K-wires placed retrograde through the glenoid in the setting of an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The second objective is to evaluate whether manual external rotation of the scapula alters that distance. In seven fresh-frozen specimens, two 2.0-mm K-wires were drilled through the glenoid using an arthroscopic Latarjet retrograde glenoid guide. These were drilled into the glenoid at the 7- and 8-o'clock positions (right shoulders) and at the 4- and 5-o'clock positions (left). K-wires were oriented parallel to the glenoid articular surface and perpendicular to the long superoinferior axis of the glenoid, 7 mm medial to the joint surface. Two independent evaluators measured the distances between the axillary nerve and the exit point of the K-wires in the horizontal plane (AKHS for the superior K-wire and AKHI for the inferior K-wire) and in the vertical plane (AKV). Measurements were taken with the scapula left free and were repeated with the scapula placed at 15° and 30° of external rotation. With the scapula left free, scapular external rotation was 34° ± 2.3°. In this position, the AKHS was 2.5 ± 1.6, 6.3 ± 1.2 mm at 15° of external rotation (ER) and 11.4 ± 1.4 mm at 30° ER. The AKHI distance was 0.37 ± 1.6, 3.4 ± 1.4 and 10.6 ± 2.1 mm, respectively, for the scapula left free, at 15° ER and 30° of ER. The AKV distances were, respectively, 0.12 ± 0.2, 4.9 ± 1.6 and 9.9 ± 1.7 mm. The increase in all distances was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Increasing scapular external rotation significantly increases the distance between the axillary nerve and the exit point of the K-wires, increasing the margin of safety during this procedure. Therefore, increased external rotation of the scapula could be an effective tool to decrease the risk of iatrogenic axillary nerve injury. Cadaveric study, Level V.

  17. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory.

  18. Understanding the effect of carbon status on stem diameter variations

    PubMed Central

    De Swaef, Tom; Driever, Steven M.; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Marcelis, Leo F. M.; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon assimilation and leaf-to-fruit sugar transport are, along with plant water status, the driving mechanisms for fruit growth. An integrated comprehension of the plant water and carbon relationships is therefore essential to better understand water and dry matter accumulation. Variations in stem diameter result from an integrated response to plant water and carbon status and are as such a valuable source of information. Methods A mechanistic water flow and storage model was used to relate variations in stem diameter to phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration dynamics in tomato. The simulation results were compared with an independent model, simulating phloem sucrose loading at the leaf level based on photosynthesis and sugar metabolism kinetics and enabled a mechanistic interpretation of the ‘one common assimilate pool’ concept for tomato. Key Results Combining stem diameter variation measurements and mechanistic modelling allowed us to distinguish instantaneous dynamics in the plant water relations and gradual variations in plant carbon status. Additionally, the model combined with stem diameter measurements enabled prediction of dynamic variables which are difficult to measure in a continuous and non-destructive way, such as xylem water potential and phloem hydrostatic potential. Finally, dynamics in phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration were distilled from stem diameter variations. Conclusions Stem diameter variations, when used in mechanistic models, have great potential to continuously monitor and interpret plant water and carbon relations under natural growing conditions. PMID:23186836

  19. Reflective journals: unmasking student perceptions of anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, L; Sookrajh, R; Satyapal, K S

    2017-01-01

    In medical education, reflection has been considered to be a core skill in professional competence. The anatomy laboratory is an ideal setting for faculty/ student interaction and provides invaluable opportunities for active learning and reflection on anatomical knowledge. This study was designed to record student attitudes regarding human cadaveric dissection, explore their experiences of anatomy through an analysis of their journal-reflective writings and determine whether this type of creative writing had a beneficial effect on those students who chose to complete them. A total of 75 journals from Medical and Allied Health Science students were collected and analysed. Results were categorised according to the following themes: (i) Dissecting room stressors (27.6%); (ii) Educational value of dissection (26.3%); (iii) Appreciation, Gratitude, Respect and Curiosity for the cadaver (18.9%); (iv) Positive and negative sentiments expressed in the dissecting room (25.8%); (v) Benefit of alternate teaching modalities (4.6%); (vi) Spirituality/Religious Beliefs (3.7%); (vii) Shared humanity and emotional bonds (3.69%); (viii) Acknowledgement of human anatomical variations (3.2%); (ix) Beauty and complexity of the human body (1.8%) and (x) Psychological detachment (0.9%). Students appreciated the opportunity to share their emotions and reflect on the humanistic dimension of anatomy as a subject. Student reflections illustrated clearly their thoughts and some of the difficult issues with which they wrestled. The anatomy laboratory is seen as the budding clinician's first encounter with a patient, albeit a cadaver. This was the first time that reflective journals were given to students in the discipline. Reflective journals allow students to express themselves in an open-ended and creative fashion. It also assists students to integrate anatomy and clinical medicine and assists in applying their basic anatomical knowledge in an authentic, yet safe environment.

  20. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R.; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  1. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J; Bolch, Wesley E

    2011-03-21

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  2. Anatomical facial nerve findings in 209 consecutive atresia cases.

    PubMed

    Goldsztein, Hernan; Roberson, Joseph B

    2013-04-01

    Describe intraoperative facial nerve findings in 209 consecutive atresia cases. Identify preoperative and intraoperative anatomical variants that should alert the surgeon to potential high-risk facial nerve anatomy. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care subspecialty private practice. Retrospective review of 209 consecutive atresia cases treated between 2007 and 2011. Descriptive analysis of intraoperative findings. Logistical regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine the effect of preoperative variables over the operative findings. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients (ages 2-48) underwent atresia repair between 2007 and 2011. Preoperative Jahrsdoerfer Scale was 9 (23%), 8 (42%), 7 (19%), 6 (2%), 5 or less (2%). The facial nerve was found to have an abnormal course in 39% of the cases and not identified in 1%. It was congenitally dehiscent in 53% of cases and was surgically exposed in 10%. The most common site of congenital dehiscence was in the tympanic segment (57%). Facial-stapes contact was found in 11% of cases. The stapedius tendon was absent in 30% of cases. A single patient had a mild transient postoperative paresis (House-Brackmann 2). Atresia repair remains one of the most challenging procedures in otology. In spite of modern preoperative imaging, the facial nerve remains at risk. When performing surgery on patients with preoperative facial nerve paresis and/or lower Jahrsdoerfer scores, the surgeon should be aware of a higher incidence of facial nerve abnormalities. Thorough knowledge of anatomical variations and meticulous surgical technique are mandatory to safely perform these surgeries.

  3. The Effects of FreeSurfer Version, Workstation Type, and Macintosh Operating System Version on Anatomical Volume and Cortical Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Habets, Petra; Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Mengelers, Ron; Rozendaal, Nico; van Os, Jim; Marcelis, Machteld

    2012-01-01

    FreeSurfer is a popular software package to measure cortical thickness and volume of neuroanatomical structures. However, little if any is known about measurement reliability across various data processing conditions. Using a set of 30 anatomical T1-weighted 3T MRI scans, we investigated the effects of data processing variables such as FreeSurfer version (v4.3.1, v4.5.0, and v5.0.0), workstation (Macintosh and Hewlett-Packard), and Macintosh operating system version (OSX 10.5 and OSX 10.6). Significant differences were revealed between FreeSurfer version v5.0.0 and the two earlier versions. These differences were on average 8.8±6.6% (range 1.3–64.0%) (volume) and 2.8±1.3% (1.1–7.7%) (cortical thickness). About a factor two smaller differences were detected between Macintosh and Hewlett-Packard workstations and between OSX 10.5 and OSX 10.6. The observed differences are similar in magnitude as effect sizes reported in accuracy evaluations and neurodegenerative studies. The main conclusion is that in the context of an ongoing study, users are discouraged to update to a new major release of either FreeSurfer or operating system or to switch to a different type of workstation without repeating the analysis; results thus give a quantitative support to successive recommendations stated by FreeSurfer developers over the years. Moreover, in view of the large and significant cross-version differences, it is concluded that formal assessment of the accuracy of FreeSurfer is desirable. PMID:22675527

  4. The effects of FreeSurfer version, workstation type, and Macintosh operating system version on anatomical volume and cortical thickness measurements.

    PubMed

    Gronenschild, Ed H B M; Habets, Petra; Jacobs, Heidi I L; Mengelers, Ron; Rozendaal, Nico; van Os, Jim; Marcelis, Machteld

    2012-01-01

    FreeSurfer is a popular software package to measure cortical thickness and volume of neuroanatomical structures. However, little if any is known about measurement reliability across various data processing conditions. Using a set of 30 anatomical T1-weighted 3T MRI scans, we investigated the effects of data processing variables such as FreeSurfer version (v4.3.1, v4.5.0, and v5.0.0), workstation (Macintosh and Hewlett-Packard), and Macintosh operating system version (OSX 10.5 and OSX 10.6). Significant differences were revealed between FreeSurfer version v5.0.0 and the two earlier versions. These differences were on average 8.8 ± 6.6% (range 1.3-64.0%) (volume) and 2.8 ± 1.3% (1.1-7.7%) (cortical thickness). About a factor two smaller differences were detected between Macintosh and Hewlett-Packard workstations and between OSX 10.5 and OSX 10.6. The observed differences are similar in magnitude as effect sizes reported in accuracy evaluations and neurodegenerative studies.The main conclusion is that in the context of an ongoing study, users are discouraged to update to a new major release of either FreeSurfer or operating system or to switch to a different type of workstation without repeating the analysis; results thus give a quantitative support to successive recommendations stated by FreeSurfer developers over the years. Moreover, in view of the large and significant cross-version differences, it is concluded that formal assessment of the accuracy of FreeSurfer is desirable.

  5. Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, Joy S

    2007-06-01

    This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores many of the anatomical adaptations exhibited by aquatic mammals that enable life in the water. Anatomical observations on a range of fossil and living marine and freshwater mammals are presented, including sirenians (manatees and dugongs), cetaceans (both baleen whales and toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), the sea otter, and the pygmy hippopotamus. A range of anatomical systems are covered in this issue, including the external form (integument, tail shape), nervous system (eye, ear, brain), musculoskeletal systems (cranium, mandible, hyoid, vertebral column, flipper/forelimb), digestive tract (teeth/tusks/baleen, tongue, stomach), and respiratory tract (larynx). Emphasis is placed on exploring anatomical function in the context of aquatic life. The following topics are addressed: evolution, sound production, sound reception, feeding, locomotion, buoyancy control, thermoregulation, cognition, and behavior. A variety of approaches and techniques are used to examine and characterize these adaptations, ranging from dissection, to histology, to electron microscopy, to two-dimensional (2D) and 3D computerized tomography, to experimental field tests of function. The articles in this issue are a blend of literature review and new, hypothesis-driven anatomical research, which highlight the special nature of anatomical form and function in aquatic mammals that enables their exquisite adaptation for life in such a challenging environment. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Disruption of antigenic variation is crucial for effective parasite vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Fernando D; Saura, Alicia; Prucca, Cesar G; Carranza, Pedro G; Torri, Alessandro; Lujan, Hugo D

    2010-05-01

    Giardia lamblia is a human intestinal pathogen. Like many protozoan microorganisms, Giardia undergoes antigenic variation, a mechanism assumed to allow parasites to evade the host's immune response, producing chronic and/or recurrent infections. Recently, we found that the mechanism controlling variant-specific surface protein (VSP) switching in Giardia involves components of the RNA interference machinery and that disruption of this pathway generates trophozoites simultaneously expressing many VSPs. Here we use these altered trophozoites to determine the role of antigenic variation in a gerbil model of giardiasis. Our results show that either primary infection with trophozoites simultaneously expressing many VSPs or immunization with purified VSPs from the transgenic cells protects gerbils from subsequent Giardia infections. These results constitute, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that antigenic variation is essential for parasite survival within hosts and that artificial disruption of this mechanism might be useful in generating vaccines against major pathogens that show similar behavior.

  7. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  8. Global Biomass Variation and its Geodynamic Effects, 1982-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Chao, B. F.; Au, A. Y.; Kimball, J. S.; McDonald, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    Redistribution of mass near Earth's surface alters its rotation, gravity field, and geocenter location. Advanced techniques for measuring these geodetic variations now exist, but the ability to attribute the observed modes to individual Earth system processes has been hampered by a shortage of reliable global data on such processes, especially hydrospheric processes. To address one aspect of this deficiency, 17 yrs of monthly, global maps of vegetation biomass were produced by applying field-based relationships to satellite-derived vegetation type and leaf area index. The seasonal variability of biomass was estimated to be as large as 5 kg m(exp -2). Of this amount, approximately 4 kg m(exp -2) is due to vegetation water storage variations. The time series of maps was used to compute geodetic anomalies, which were then compared with existing geodetic observations as well as the estimated measurement sensitivity of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). For gravity, the seasonal amplitude of biomass variations may be just within GRACE'S limits of detectability, but it is still an order of magnitude smaller than current observation uncertainty using the satellite-laser-ranging technique. The contribution of total biomass variations to seasonal polar motion amplitude is detectable in today's measurement, but it is obscured by contributions from various other sources, some of which are two orders of magnitude larger. The influence on the length of day is below current limits of detectability. Although the nonseasonal geodynamic signals show clear interannual variability, they are too small to be detected.

  9. Heredity vs. Environment: The Effects of Genetic Variation with Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourlay, N.

    1978-01-01

    Major problems in the field are presented through a brief review of Burt's work and a critical account of the Hawaiian and British schools of biometrical genetics. The merits and demerits of Christopher Jencks' study are also discussed. There follows an account of the principle of genetic variation with age, a new concept to the…

  10. Global Biomass Variation and its Geodynamic Effects, 1982-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Chao, B. F.; Au, A. Y.; Kimball, J. S.; McDonald, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    Redistribution of mass near Earth's surface alters its rotation, gravity field, and geocenter location. Advanced techniques for measuring these geodetic variations now exist, but the ability to attribute the observed modes to individual Earth system processes has been hampered by a shortage of reliable global data on such processes, especially hydrospheric processes. To address one aspect of this deficiency, 17 yrs of monthly, global maps of vegetation biomass were produced by applying field-based relationships to satellite-derived vegetation type and leaf area index. The seasonal variability of biomass was estimated to be as large as 5 kg m(exp -2). Of this amount, approximately 4 kg m(exp -2) is due to vegetation water storage variations. The time series of maps was used to compute geodetic anomalies, which were then compared with existing geodetic observations as well as the estimated measurement sensitivity of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). For gravity, the seasonal amplitude of biomass variations may be just within GRACE'S limits of detectability, but it is still an order of magnitude smaller than current observation uncertainty using the satellite-laser-ranging technique. The contribution of total biomass variations to seasonal polar motion amplitude is detectable in today's measurement, but it is obscured by contributions from various other sources, some of which are two orders of magnitude larger. The influence on the length of day is below current limits of detectability. Although the nonseasonal geodynamic signals show clear interannual variability, they are too small to be detected.

  11. Heredity vs. Environment: The Effects of Genetic Variation with Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourlay, N.

    1978-01-01

    Major problems in the field are presented through a brief review of Burt's work and a critical account of the Hawaiian and British schools of biometrical genetics. The merits and demerits of Christopher Jencks' study are also discussed. There follows an account of the principle of genetic variation with age, a new concept to the…

  12. Pluto's Insolation History: Latitudinal Variations and Effects on Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    Since previous insolation modeling in the early 1990’s, new atmospheric pressure data, increased computational power, and the upcoming flyby of the Pluto system by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft have generated new motivation and increased capabilities for the study of Pluto’s complex long-term (million-years) insolation history. The two primary topics of interest in studying Pluto’s insolation history are the variations in insolation patterns when integrated over different intervals and the evolution of diurnal insolation patterns over the last several decades. We find latitudinal dichotomies when comparing average insolation over timescales of days, decades, centuries, and millennia. Depending on the timescales of volatile migration, some consequences of these insolation patterns may be manifested in the surface features revealed by New Horizons. For any single rotation of Pluto there is a latitude that receives more insolation relative to the others. Often this is the sub-subsolar latitude but it can also be an arctic circle latitude when near-polar regions of Pluto experience the "midnight sun". We define the amount of that greatest insolation value over the course of one rotation as the "maximum diurnal insolation" (MDI). We find that MDI is driven to its highest values when Pluto’s obliquity creates a long arctic summer (or “midnight sun”) beginning just after perihelion. Pluto’s atmospheric pressure, as measured through stellar occultation observations during the past three decades, appears to correlate with Pluto's currently occurring midnight sun as quantified by the MDI parameter. If insolation (as parameterized by the MDI value) is the single dominant factor driving Pluto's atmospheric pressure, this “Midnight Sun Model” predicts that Pluto's maximum atmospheric pressure will be reached in 2017 followed by a steady decline. Pluto's maximum diurnal insolation value begins dropping after 2017 due to two factors: Pluto’s sub-solar point

  13. Characterization and Management of Interfractional Anatomic Changes for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Erickson, Beth; Peng Cheng; Li, X. Allen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize interfractional anatomic variations in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy (RT) and to study dosimetric advantages for using an online adaptive replanning scheme to account for these variations. Methods and Materials: Targets and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated by autosegmentation based on daily computed tomography (CT) images acquired using a respiration-gated in-room CT during daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for 10 pancreatic cancer patients. Various parameters, including the maximum overlap ratio (MOR) between the volumes based on planning and daily CTs for a structure, while the overlapping volumes were maximized, were used to quantify the interfractional organ deformation with the intrafractional variations largely excluded. An online adaptive RT (ART) was applied to these daily CTs. To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of ART, the dose distributions from the online ART were compared to those from the repositioning in the current standard IGRT practice. Results: The interfractional anatomic variations, particularly the organ deformation, are significant during pancreas irradiation. For the patients studied, the average MORs of all daily CTs were 80.2%, 61.7%, and 72.2% for pancreatic head, duodenum, and stomach, respectively. The online ART leads to improved dosimetric plan with better target coverage and/or OAR sparing than IGRT repositioning. For the patients studied, the mean V{sub 50.4Gy} (volume covered by 50.4 Gy) for the duodenum was reduced from 43.4% for IGRT to 15.6% for the online ART scheme. Conclusions: The online adaptive RT scheme can effectively account for the significant interfractional anatomic variations observed in pancreas irradiation. The dosimetric advantages with the online ART may enable safe dose escalation in radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Developmental Dyslexia: Current Anatomical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert

    1983-01-01

    Findings from anatomical research are highlighted in a discussion of the role of anomalous lateralization and asymmetry in the dyslexic brain. Studies of animal asymmetry are cited along with studies of humans. (CL)

  15. Quantitation of maxillary remodeling. 2. Masking of remodeling effects when an "anatomical" method of superimposition is used in the absence of metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Ben-Bassat, Y; West, E E

    1987-06-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying the differences in the perceived pattern of maxillary remodeling that are observed when different methods are used to superimpose maxillary images in roentgenographic cephalometrics. In a previous article, we reported cumulative changes in the positions of anterior nasal spine (ANS), posterior nasal spine (PNS), and Point A for a sample of 31 subjects with maxillary metallic implants. Measurements had been made on lateral cephalograms taken at annual intervals relative to superimposition on the implants. In the present article, we quantify the differences in the perceived displacement of the same landmarks in the same sample when a standard "anatomical best bit" rule was used in lieu of superimposition on the implants. The anatomical best fit superimposition as herein defined was found in this sample to lose important information on the downward remodeling of the superior surface of the maxilla that had been detected when the implant superimposition was used. In fact, we observed a small artifactual upward displacement of the ANS-PNS line. In the anteroposterior direction, the tendency toward backward displacement of skeletal landmarks through time that had been detected with the implant superimposition was replaced by a small forward displacement of ANS and Point A together with reduced backward displacement of PNS. To the extent that the implant superimposition is to be considered the true and correct one, the anatomical best fit superimposition appears to understate the true downward remodeling of the palate by an average of about 0.3 and 0.4 mm per year, although this value differs at different ages and timepoints. The anatomical best fit superimposition also misses entirely the small mean tendency toward backward remodeling that was observed when the implant superimposition was used. In situations in which there are no implants, clinicians and research workers must necessarily continue to use anatomically

  16. Effects of drain bias on the statistical variation of double-gate tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo Young

    2017-04-01

    The effects of drain bias on the statistical variation of double-gate (DG) tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) are discussed in comparison with DG metal–oxide–semiconductor FETs (MOSFETs). Statistical variation corresponds to the variation of threshold voltage (V th), subthreshold swing (SS), and drain-induced barrier thinning (DIBT). The unique statistical variation characteristics of DG TFETs and DG MOSFETs with the variation of drain bias are analyzed by using full three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation in terms of the three dominant variation sources: line-edge roughness (LER), random dopant fluctuation (RDF) and workfunction variation (WFV). It is observed than DG TFETs suffer from less severe statistical variation as drain voltage increases unlike DG MOSFETs.

  17. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed Central

    Snell, J. R.; Green, R.; Stott, G.; Van Baerle, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk. Images Figure 1 PMID:1807707

  18. Tectorial Membrane Morphological Variation: Effects upon Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Bergevin, Christopher; Velenovsky, David S.; Bonine, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) is widely believed to play an important role in determining the ear's ability to detect and resolve incoming acoustic information. While it is still unclear precisely what that role is, the TM has been hypothesized to help overcome viscous forces and thereby sharpen mechanical tuning of the sensory cells. Lizards present a unique opportunity to further study the role of the TM given the diverse inner-ear morphological differences across species. Furthermore, stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs), sounds emitted by the ear in response to a tone, noninvasively probe the frequency selectivity of the ear. We report estimates of auditory tuning derived from SFOAEs for 12 different species of lizards with widely varying TM morphology. Despite gross anatomical differences across the species examined herein, low-level SFOAEs were readily measurable in all ears tested, even in non-TM species whose basilar papilla contained as few as 50–60 hair cells. Our measurements generally support theoretical predictions: longer delays/sharper tuning features are found in species with a TM relative to those without. However, SFOAEs from at least one non-TM species (Anolis) with long delays suggest there are likely additional micromechanical factors at play that can directly affect tuning. Additionally, in the one species examined with a continuous TM (Aspidoscelis) where cell-to-cell coupling is presumably relatively stronger, delays were intermediate. This observation appears consistent with recent reports that suggest the TM may play a more complex macromechanical role in the mammalian cochlea via longitudinal energy distribution (and thereby affect tuning). Although significant differences exist between reptilian and mammalian auditory biophysics, understanding lizard OAE generation mechanisms yields significant insight into fundamental principles at work in all vertebrate ears. PMID:20712989

  19. Anatomic pathology databases and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stephen S; Grzybicki, Dana M; Zarbo, Richard J; Meier, Frederick A; Geyer, Stanley J; Jensen, Chris

    2005-10-01

    The utility of anatomic pathology discrepancies has not been rigorously studied. To outline how databases may be used to study anatomic pathology patient safety. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funded the creation of a national anatomic pathology errors database to establish benchmarks for error frequency. The database is used to track more frequent errors and errors that result in more serious harm, in order to design quality improvement interventions intended to reduce these types of errors. In the first year of funding, 4 institutions (University of Pittsburgh, Henry Ford Hospital, University of Iowa, and Western Pennsylvania Hospital) reported cytologic-histologic correlation error data after standardizing correlation methods. Root cause analysis was performed to determine sources of error, and error reduction plans were implemented. Four institutions self-reported anatomic pathology error data. Frequency of cytologic-histologic correlation error, case type, cause of error (sampling or interpretation), and effect of error on patient outcome (ie, no harm, near miss, and harm). The institutional gynecologic cytologic-histologic correlation error frequency ranged from 0.17% to 0.63%, using the denominator of all Papanicolaou tests. Based on the nongynecologic cytologic-histologic correlation data, the specimen sites with the highest discrepancy frequency (by project site) were lung (ranging from 16.5% to 62.3% of all errors) and urinary bladder (ranging from 4.4% to 25.0%). Most errors detected by the gynecologic cytologic-histologic correlation process were no-harm events (ranging from 10.7% to 43.2% by project site). Root cause analysis identified sources of error on both the clinical and pathology sides of the process, and error intervention programs are currently being implemented to improve patient safety. A multi-institutional anatomic pathology error database may be used to benchmark practices and target specific high-frequency errors or

  20. Effects of temporal variation in temperature and density dependence on insect population dynamics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding effects of environmental variation on insect populations is important in light of predictions about increasing future climatic variability. In order to understand the effects of changing environmental variation on population dynamics and life history evolution in insects one would need...

  1. Planning tiger recovery: Understanding intraspecific variation for effective conservation

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Andreas; Courtiol, Alexandre; Christiansen, Per; Niedballa, Jürgen; Scharf, Anne K.; Orlando, Ludovic; Balkenhol, Niko; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Fickel, Jörns; Kitchener, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Although significantly more money is spent on the conservation of tigers than on any other threatened species, today only 3200 to 3600 tigers roam the forests of Asia, occupying only 7% of their historical range. Despite the global significance of and interest in tiger conservation, global approaches to plan tiger recovery are partly impeded by the lack of a consensus on the number of tiger subspecies or management units, because a comprehensive analysis of tiger variation is lacking. We analyzed variation among all nine putative tiger subspecies, using extensive data sets of several traits [morphological (craniodental and pelage), ecological, molecular]. Our analyses revealed little variation and large overlaps in each trait among putative subspecies, and molecular data showed extremely low diversity because of a severe Late Pleistocene population decline. Our results support recognition of only two subspecies: the Sunda tiger, Panthera tigris sondaica, and the continental tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, which consists of two (northern and southern) management units. Conservation management programs, such as captive breeding, reintroduction initiatives, or trans-boundary projects, rely on a durable, consistent characterization of subspecies as taxonomic units, defined by robust multiple lines of scientific evidence rather than single traits or ad hoc descriptions of one or few specimens. Our multiple-trait data set supports a fundamental rethinking of the conventional tiger taxonomy paradigm, which will have profound implications for the management of in situ and ex situ tiger populations and boost conservation efforts by facilitating a pragmatic approach to tiger conservation management worldwide. PMID:26601191

  2. Planning tiger recovery: Understanding intraspecific variation for effective conservation.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Andreas; Courtiol, Alexandre; Christiansen, Per; Niedballa, Jürgen; Scharf, Anne K; Orlando, Ludovic; Balkenhol, Niko; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Fickel, Jörns; Kitchener, Andrew C

    2015-06-01

    Although significantly more money is spent on the conservation of tigers than on any other threatened species, today only 3200 to 3600 tigers roam the forests of Asia, occupying only 7% of their historical range. Despite the global significance of and interest in tiger conservation, global approaches to plan tiger recovery are partly impeded by the lack of a consensus on the number of tiger subspecies or management units, because a comprehensive analysis of tiger variation is lacking. We analyzed variation among all nine putative tiger subspecies, using extensive data sets of several traits [morphological (craniodental and pelage), ecological, molecular]. Our analyses revealed little variation and large overlaps in each trait among putative subspecies, and molecular data showed extremely low diversity because of a severe Late Pleistocene population decline. Our results support recognition of only two subspecies: the Sunda tiger, Panthera tigris sondaica, and the continental tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, which consists of two (northern and southern) management units. Conservation management programs, such as captive breeding, reintroduction initiatives, or trans-boundary projects, rely on a durable, consistent characterization of subspecies as taxonomic units, defined by robust multiple lines of scientific evidence rather than single traits or ad hoc descriptions of one or few specimens. Our multiple-trait data set supports a fundamental rethinking of the conventional tiger taxonomy paradigm, which will have profound implications for the management of in situ and ex situ tiger populations and boost conservation efforts by facilitating a pragmatic approach to tiger conservation management worldwide.

  3. Variation in compound eye structure: effects of diet and family.

    PubMed

    Merry, Justin W; Kemp, Darrell J; Rutowski, Ronald L

    2011-07-01

    Studies of compound eyes have revealed that variation in eye structure can substantially affect visual performance. Here, we investigate the degree to which a stressful rearing environment, which decreases body size, affects the eye phenotype. Full siblings of the Orange Sulphur butterfly, Colias eurytheme, were collected from known parents and split within families among two diet treatments that varied in quality. In both sexes, individuals reared on the high-quality diet had larger eye height and anterior facet diameter, and therefore, by inference, superior vision. However, relative to their reduced body size, individuals reared on low-quality diet had proportionally larger eyes and facets than individuals reared on high-quality diet. We interpret this finding as evidence that butterflies encountering nutritional stress increased proportional investment in eye development to reduce loss of visual performance. We also found significant broad-sense genetic variation underlying eye structure in both males and females, and report novel heritability estimates for eye height and facet diameter. Surprisingly, there was greater genetic variation in eye height among males than among females, despite apparently stronger directional selection on male vision. We discuss the implications of these data for our understanding of eye development and evolution.

  4. Variation of Soil Moisture from Rainfall Effects in Hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the variation of soil moisture with respect to rainfall patterns. Thus, we analyze the data that are measured in selected sites of sloped region. The observation was performed in 10 minute-interval, from June 14th 2016 to July 20th 2016. A monitoring station was designed and installed on the hillslope, which is located on the Haean-basin in Korea. We observed four different locations (YMSL1, YMSL2, YMSL3, and YMSL4) and in which each location was sampled as three depths (30, 60, and 100 cm). The profile of this monitored region shows concave shape. In other words, the slope is decreasing when its altitude is decreasing. The data from the sites were measured by Soil Moisture Loggers (SMLs). In addition, Automatic Weather System was installed in the area adjacent to the site that has SMLs. The rainfall was 493.8 mm over 18 days during the observation period. In particular, the maximum rainfall showed 247 mm, from July 4 to 6 in 2016. Heavy rain occurred twice. We could determine how rainfalls at this site affect to the change of soil moisture by comparing these two key factors in terms of geometrical slope of region and the depth of each sampled site. Delayed variations of soil moisture on YMSL1, the sensor located at the 30 cm depth recorded a 0.3 h response delay to the rainfall event, and the 100 cm sensor recorded a 24 h delay. Delayed variations of soil moisture on YMSL2, the sensor located at the 30, and 60 cm depth recorded a 0.8 h response delay to the rainfall event, and the 100 cm sensor recorded a 32 h delay. Delayed variations of soil moisture on YMSL3, the sensor located at the 30 cm depth recorded a 0.8 h response delay to the rainfall event, the 60 cm sensor recorded a 88 h delay, and the 100 cm sensor recorded a 44 h delay. Delayed variations of soil moisture on YMSL4, the sensor located at the 30, and 60 cm depth recorded a 4 h response delay to the rainfall event. From these results, it is concluded that the

  5. The Effect of Geographic Units of Analysis on Measuring Geographic Variation in Medical Services Utilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Agnus M; Park, Jong Heon; Kang, Sungchan; Hwang, Kyosang; Lee, Taesik; Kim, Yoon

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of geographic units of analysis on measuring geographic variation in medical services utilization. For this purpose, we compared geographic variations in the rates of eight major procedures in administrative units (districts) and new areal units organized based on the actual health care use of the population in Korea. To compare geographic variation in geographic units of analysis, we calculated the age-sex standardized rates of eight major procedures (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, surgery after hip fracture, knee-replacement surgery, caesarean section, hysterectomy, computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging scan) from the National Health Insurance database in Korea for the 2013 period. Using the coefficient of variation, the extremal quotient, and the systematic component of variation, we measured geographic variation for these eight procedures in districts and new areal units. Compared with districts, new areal units showed a reduction in geographic variation. Extremal quotients and inter-decile ratios for the eight procedures were lower in new areal units. While the coefficient of variation was lower for most procedures in new areal units, the pattern of change of the systematic component of variation between districts and new areal units differed among procedures. Geographic variation in medical service utilization could vary according to the geographic unit of analysis. To determine how geographic characteristics such as population size and number of geographic units affect geographic variation, further studies are needed.

  6. The Effect of Geographic Units of Analysis on Measuring Geographic Variation in Medical Services Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Heon; Hwang, Kyosang; Lee, Taesik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of geographic units of analysis on measuring geographic variation in medical services utilization. For this purpose, we compared geographic variations in the rates of eight major procedures in administrative units (districts) and new areal units organized based on the actual health care use of the population in Korea. Methods: To compare geographic variation in geographic units of analysis, we calculated the age–sex standardized rates of eight major procedures (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, surgery after hip fracture, knee-replacement surgery, caesarean section, hysterectomy, computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging scan) from the National Health Insurance database in Korea for the 2013 period. Using the coefficient of variation, the extremal quotient, and the systematic component of variation, we measured geographic variation for these eight procedures in districts and new areal units. Results: Compared with districts, new areal units showed a reduction in geographic variation. Extremal quotients and inter-decile ratios for the eight procedures were lower in new areal units. While the coefficient of variation was lower for most procedures in new areal units, the pattern of change of the systematic component of variation between districts and new areal units differed among procedures. Conclusions: Geographic variation in medical service utilization could vary according to the geographic unit of analysis. To determine how geographic characteristics such as population size and number of geographic units affect geographic variation, further studies are needed. PMID:27499165

  7. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Breiner, J.; Quinn, T.R.; Meadows, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 108 years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes. Key Words: Exoplanets—Habitable zone—Energy balance models. Astrobiology 14, 277–291. PMID:24611714

  8. Effects of extreme obliquity variations on the habitability of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J C; Barnes, R; Domagal-Goldman, S; Breiner, J; Quinn, T R; Meadows, V S

    2014-04-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 10(8) years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes.

  9. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Barnes, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Breiner, J.; Quinn, T. R.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 108 years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes.

  10. Consensus statement on effective communication of urgent diagnoses and significant, unexpected diagnoses in surgical pathology and cytopathology from the College of American Pathologists and Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology.

    PubMed

    Nakhleh, Raouf E; Myers, Jeffrey L; Allen, Timothy C; DeYoung, Barry R; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Funkhouser, William K; Mody, Dina R; Lynn, Amy; Fatheree, Lisa A; Smith, Anthony T; Lal, Avtar; Silverman, Jan F

    2012-02-01

    Recognizing the difficulty in applying the concept of critical values to anatomic pathology diagnoses, the College of American Pathologists and the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology have chosen to reevaluate the concept of critical diagnoses. To promote effective communication of urgent and significant, unexpected diagnoses in surgical pathology and cytology. A comprehensive literature search was conducted and reviewed by an expert panel. A policy of effective communication of important results in surgical pathology and cytology is desirable to enhance patient safety and to address multiple regulatory requirements. Each institution should create its own policy regarding urgent diagnoses and significant, unexpected diagnoses in anatomic pathology. This policy should be separate from critical results or panic-value policies in clinical pathology, with the expectation of a different time frame for communication. Urgent diagnosis is defined as a medical condition that, in most cases, should be addressed as soon as possible. Significant, unexpected diagnosis is defined as a medical condition that is clinically unusual or unforeseen and should be addressed at some point in the patient's course. Further details of this statement are provided.

  11. Effects of Microstructure Variations on Macroscopic Terahertz Metafilm Properties

    DOE PAGES

    O'Hara, John F.; Smirnova, Evgenya; Azad, Abul K.; ...

    2007-01-01

    The properties of planar, single-layer metamaterials, or metafilms, are studied by varying the structural components of the split-ring resonators used to comprise the overall medium. Measurements and simulations reveal how minor design variations in split-ring resonator structures can result in significant changes in the macroscopic properties of the metafilm. A transmission-line/circuit model is also used to clarify some of the behavior and design limitations of the metafilms. Though our results are illustrated in the terahertz frequency range, the work has broader implications, particularly with respect to filtering, modulation, and switching devices.

  12. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information.

  13. Interfacial geometry and D-variation effects in two-phase systems. [binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing diffusion equation for two-phase concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are examined. Solutions were also calculated for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries to compare the effect of interface geometries with those caused by concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients, and two methods of averaging D were considered to determine the best averaging method for different types of D-variations. The effects of interface-location criteria on mass conservation and convergence of interface location, diffusion coefficient variation in the alpha and beta-phases of a two-phase binary alloy system, effect of D(alpha) variation in a cylindrical couple on beta-phase thickness, and geometry and D-variation effects on the degree of homogenization were determined. It is concluded that typical D(alpha)-variations can have a greater influence on the kinetics of interdiffusion than the geometry.

  14. The Effect of Diurnal Variations on Ionospheric Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Withers, Paul; Schinder, Paul J.; Moses, Julianne I.; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radio occultations are a powerful technique for the study of atmospheres and ionospheres by planetary spacecraft. For missions to the outer solar system, the occultations always probe the terminator region of the planet. The analysis of radio occultations typically assumes symmetry along the ray path in the horizontal direction about the tangent point. While this is an excellent assumption for the neutral atmosphere where the scale length of horizontal gradients is large, it is suspect for the ionosphere where electron densities decrease rapidly from day to night. Diurnal variations in peak electron density are often several orders of magnitude and may occur over a region of a few degrees. We investigate the consequences of diurnal variations on ionospheric occultations with a ray tracing calculation for the angular deflection and frequency residual of the radio wave. The calculations are based on photochemical/diffusion models for the ionospheres of Saturn and Titan. Differences from analysis based on the assumption of horizontal symmetry are most pronounced in the bottom side ionosphere where chemical time constants are short.

  15. Release method and anatomical hook location: effects on short-term mortality of angler-caught Acanthopagrus australis and Argyrosomus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Paul A; Broadhurst, Matt K; Reynolds, Darren; Reid, Dennis D; Gray, Charles A

    2007-02-08

    One field and 3 aquaria experiments were done to quantify the short-term mortality of yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis and mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus after being angled and subjected to 3 general handling treatments. Anglers were supplied with identical J-type hooks and asked to handle hooked fish by either (1) physically removing the hook or (2) cutting the line (5 cm from the mouth of the fish) and leaving the hook in. Some hooked A. japonicus were subjected to a third handling treatment where the line was cut underwater without exposing the fish to air. Technical and biological data were collected before all fish were released into sea cages and monitored for 5 d. Control fish were seined and similarly caged and monitored. Concentrations of plasma glucose and cortisol were collected from a sample of fish on the first and last day of the experiments. Significant predictors of mortality for both species involved the presence of blood at the mouth and an interaction between anatomical hook location and hook removal. A. australis and A. japonicus that had their ingested hooks removed experienced the greatest mortalities (87.5 and 72.7%, respectively). Typically, these fish suffered damage to their oesophagus, stomach wall and vital organs. Mortality rates of A. australis and A. japonicus were significantly decreased to 1.7 and 16%, respectively, when they were released with their lines cut, with some of these fish free of hooks after 5 d. In contrast, few mortalities occurred in either species when the hooks were removed or the lines cut on mouth-hooked fish or in A. japonicus when it was released with no air exposure. For A. australis, the field- and aquaria-based experiments provided comparable results in terms of identifying treatment-specific effects, but there were potential biases in rates of hook ingestion. Irrespective of the treatment of fish, all experiments caused physiological changes measured as elevations in either plasma cortisol or glucose

  16. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  17. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  18. Diurnal variation in the effect of the weekend in global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.; Chertoprud, V. E.; Ivanov-Kholodnyi, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the earthquake probability diurnal variation on specific features in the weekend effect in global seismic activity is revealed. The dependence of the global earthquake number on the local time and its possible relation to a quiet solar diurnal variation ( Sq) in the geomagnetic field have been considered in detail. It has been indicated that a stable diurnal effect, which has a maximum near midnight and a minimum near local noon, exists in the global seismicity of the Earth. The diurnal variation amplitude changes insignificantly during days of week and substantially decreases (by a factor of almost 3) on Saturday and Sunday. The weekend effect is not revealed during "local nights." Since the daily effect of a quiet solar diurnal variation ( Sq) should not depend on days of week, we arrive at the conclusion that the diurnal variation in global seismicity evidently contains the anthropogenic activity product. The Sunday effect in the earthquake number decreases over the course of time and is most probably real but weak and not stationary since weekly variations occur against a background (or under the action) of stronger variations, i.e., an increase in the earthquake number and diurnal variations.

  19. The Effect of Genetic and Environmental Variation on Metabolic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Cinda P.; Williams, Dean A.; Crawford, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relationship between genetic or environmental variation and the variation in mRNA expression? To address this, microarrays were used to examine the effect of genetic and environmental variation on cardiac mRNA expression for metabolic genes in three groups of Fundulus heteroclitus: (1) individuals sampled in the field (field), (2) field individuals acclimated for six months to laboratory conditions (acclimated) or (3) individuals bred for ten successive generations in a laboratory environment (G10). The G10 individuals have significantly less genetic variation than individuals obtained in the field and had a significantly lower variation in mRNA expression across all genes in comparison to the other two groups (p ≤ 0.001). When examining the gene specific variation, twenty-two genes had variation in expression that was significantly different among groups with lower variation in G10 individuals than in acclimated individuals. Additionally, there were fewer genes with significant differences in expression among G10 individuals versus either acclimated or field individuals: 66 genes have statistically different levels of expression versus 107 or 97 for Acclimated or Field groups. Based on the permutation of the data, these differences in the number of genes with significant differences among individuals within a group are unlikely to occur by chance (p < 0.01). Surprisingly, variation in mRNA expression in field individuals is lower than in acclimated individuals. Relative to the variation among individual within a group, few genes have significant differences in expression among groups (seven, 2.3%) and none of these are different between acclimated and field individuals. The results support the concept that genetic variation affects variation in mRNA expression and also suggests that temporal environmental variation associated with estuarine environments does not increase the variation among individuals or add to the differences among groups. PMID

  20. In vivo posterior cruciate ligament elongation in running activity after anatomic and non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Bowman, Karl; Fu, Freddie H; Tashman, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) investigate the in vivo elongation behaviour of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) during running in the uninjured knee and (2) evaluate changes in PCL elongation during running after anatomic or non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventeen unilateral ACL-injured subjects were recruited after undergoing anatomic (n = 9) or non-anatomic (n = 8) ACL reconstruction. Bilateral high-resolution CT scans were obtained to produce 3D models. Anterolateral (AL) and posteromedial (PM) bundles insertion sites of the PCL were identified on the 3D CT scan reconstructions. Dynamic knee function was assessed during running using a dynamic stereo X-ray (DSX) system. The lengths of the AL and PM bundles were estimated from late swing through mid-stance. The contralateral knees served as normal controls. Control knees demonstrated a slight decrease in AL bundle and a significant decrease in PM bundle length following foot strike. Length and elongation patterns of the both bundles of the PCL in the anatomic ACL reconstruction group were similar to the controls. However, the change in dynamic PCL length was significantly greater in the non-anatomic group than in the anatomic reconstruction group after foot strike (p < 0.05). The AL bundle length decreased slightly, and the PM bundle length significantly decreased after foot strike during running in uninjured knees. Anatomic ACL reconstruction maintained normal PCL elongation patterns more effectively than non-anatomic ACL reconstruction during high-demand, functional loading. These results support the use of anatomic ACL reconstruction to achieve normal knee function in high-demand activities. Case-control study, Level III.

  1. Anatomic pathology laboratory information systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Lyung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-03-01

    The modern anatomic pathology laboratory depends on a reliable information infrastructure to register specimens, record gross and microscopic findings, regulate laboratory workflow, formulate and sign out report(s), disseminate them to the intended recipients across the whole health system, and support quality assurance measures. This infrastructure is provided by the Anatomical Pathology Laboratory Information Systems (APLIS), which have evolved over decades and now are beginning to support evolving technologies like asset tracking and digital imaging. As digital pathology transitions from "the way of the future" to "the way of the present," the APLIS continues to be one of the key effective enablers of the scope and practice of pathology. In this review, we discuss the evolution, necessary components, architecture and functionality of the APLIS that are crucial to today's practicing pathologist and address the demands of emerging trends on the future APLIS.

  2. Anatomic changes due to interspecific grafting in cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Bomfim, N; Ribeiro, D G; Nassar, N M A

    2011-05-31

    Cassava rootstocks of varieties UnB 201 and UnB 122 grafted with scions of Manihot fortalezensis were prepared for anatomic study. The roots were cut, stained with safranin and alcian blue, and examined microscopically, comparing them with sections taken from ungrafted roots. There was a significant decrease in number of pericyclic fibers, vascular vessels and tyloses in rootstocks. They exhibited significant larger vessels. These changes in anatomic structure are a consequence of genetic effects caused by transference of genetic material from scion to rootstock. The same ungrafted species was compared. This is the first report on anatomic changes due to grafting in cassava.

  3. Biomechanical effects, lithological variations, and local pedodiversity in some forest soils of Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Jonathan D. Phillips; Daniel A. Marion

    2005-01-01

    A high degree of soil variability over short distances and small areas is common, particularly in forest soils. This variability is sometimes, but not always, related to readily apparent variations in the environmental factors that control soil formation. This study examines the potential role of biomechanical effects of trees and of lithological variations within the...

  4. Effects of Wolbachia on mitochondrial DNA variation in populations of Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that infect arthropods and incompatibility among strains can affect gene flow within host insect populations, that can result in significant host mitochondrial DNA (MtD) variation. The effects of Wolbachia infection on mtDNA variation was studied in Athetis lepi...

  5. Detection of copy number variations and their effects in Chinese bulls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are a main source of genomic structural variations underlying animal evolution and production traits. Here, we describe a genome-wide analysis of CNVs in Chinese domesticated bulls and examination of their effects on gene expression and cattle growth traits. We identifi...

  6. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-04-15

    as a jumping point from which to create an unlimited number of 3D and 4D variations for imaging research. Conclusions: A population of phantoms that includes a range of anatomical variations representative of the public at large is needed to more closely mimic a clinical study or trial. The series of anatomically variable phantoms developed in this work provide a valuable resource for investigating 3D and 4D imaging devices and the effects of anatomy and motion in imaging. Combined with Monte Carlo simulation programs, the phantoms also provide a valuable tool to investigate patient-specific dose and image quality, and optimization for adults undergoing imaging procedures.

  7. Effect of gravity wave temperature variations on homogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Observations of cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) have shown various ice number concentrations (INC) (e.g., Jensen et al. 2013), which has lead to a puzzle regarding their formation. In particular, the frequently observed low numbers of ice crystals seemed hard to reconcile with homogeneous nucleation knowing the ubuquity of gravity waves with vertical velocity of the order of 0.1 m/s. Using artificial time series, Spichtinger and Krämer (2013) have illustrated that the variation of vertical velocity during a nucleation event could terminate it and limit the INC. However, their study was limited to constructed temperature time series. Here, we carry out numerical simulations of homogeneous ice nucleation forced by temperature time series data collected by isopycnic balloon flights near the tropical tropopause. The balloons collected data at high frequency (30 s), so gravity wave signals are well resolved in the temperature time series. With the observed temperature time series, the numerical simulations with homogeneous freezing show a full range of ice number concentrations (INC) as previously observed in the tropical upper troposphere. The simulations confirm that the dynamical time scale of temperature variations (as seen from observations) can be shorter than the nucleation time scale. They show the existence of two regimes for homogeneous ice nucleation : one limited by the depletion of water vapor by the nucleated ice crystals (those we name vapor events) and one limited by the reincrease of temperature after its initial decrease (temperature events). Low INC may thus be obtained for temperature events when the gravity wave perturbations produce a non-persistent cooling rate (even with large magnitude) such that the absolute change in temperature remains small during nucleation. This result for temperature events is explained analytically by a dependence of the INC on the absolute drop in temperature (and not on the cooling rate). This

  8. Are All Manikins Created Equal? A Pilot Study of Simulator Upper Airway Anatomic Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jennifer A; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Malloy, Kelly M; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the anatomic fidelity of several commercially available pediatric and adult manikins, including airway task trainers, which could be used in aerodigestive procedure training. Twenty-three experienced otolaryngologists assessed the aerodigestive anatomy of 5 adult and 5 pediatric manikins in a passive state, using rigid and flexible endoscopy. Anatomic fidelity was rated on a 5-point scale for the following: nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, trachea, esophagus, and neck. Mean scores and standard deviations were tabulated for each manikin at each anatomic site. Ratings by survey participants demonstrated variation in the anatomic fidelity of the aerodigestive tract in a range of manikins. Radar chart display of the results allows comparison of manikin fidelity by anatomic site. Differences in scores may allow instructors to select manikins with the best anatomic fidelity for specific educational purposes, and they may contribute to recommendations to improve future manikin design.

  9. Pluto's insolation history: Latitudinal variations and effects on atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-04-01

    Since previous long-term insolation modeling in the early 1990s, new atmospheric pressure data, increased computational power, and the upcoming flyby of the Pluto system by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft have generated new motivation and increased capabilities for the study of Pluto's complex long-term (million-years) insolation history. The two primary topics of interest in studying Pluto's insolation history are the variations in insolation patterns when integrated over different intervals and the evolution of diurnal insolation patterns over the last several decades. We find latitudinal dichotomies when comparing average insolation over timescales of days, decades, centuries, and millennia, where all timescales we consider are short relative to the predicted timescales for Pluto's chaotic orbit. Depending on the timescales of volatile migration, some consequences of these insolation patterns may be manifested in the surface features revealed by New Horizons. We find the Maximum Diurnal Insolation (MDI) at any latitude is driven most strongly when Pluto's obliquity creates a long arctic summer (or "midnight sun") beginning just after perihelion. Pluto's atmospheric pressure, as measured through stellar occultation observations during the past three decades, shows a circumstantial correlation with this midnight sun scenario as quantified by the MDI parameter.

  10. Trapped belt variations and their effects on human space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Donald E.; Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1993-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and its subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an 18-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within 18 months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20 percent. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  11. Anatomical modeling of the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Gerrit; Klinder, Tobias; Blaffert, Thomas; Bülow, Thomas; Wiemker, Rafael; Lorenz, Cristian

    2010-02-01

    The bronchial tree is of direct clinical importance in the context of respective diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It furthermore constitutes a reference structure for object localization in the lungs and it finally provides access to lung tissue in, e.g., bronchoscope based procedures for diagnosis and therapy. This paper presents a comprehensive anatomical model for the bronchial tree, including statistics of position, relative and absolute orientation, length, and radius of 34 bronchial segments, going beyond previously published results. The model has been built from 16 manually annotated CT scans, covering several branching variants. The model is represented as a centerline/tree structure but can also be converted in a surface representation. Possible model applications are either to anatomically label extracted bronchial trees or to improve the tree extraction itself by identifying missing segments or sub-trees, e.g., if located beyond a bronchial stenosis. Bronchial tree labeling is achieved using a naïve Bayesian classifier based on the segment properties contained in the model in combination with tree matching. The tree matching step makes use of branching variations covered by the model. An evaluation of the model has been performed in a leaveone- out manner. In total, 87% of the branches resulting from preceding airway tree segmentation could be correctly labeled. The individualized model enables the detection of missing branches, allowing a targeted search, e.g., a local rerun of the tree-segmentation segmentation.

  12. [Association of three anatomical variants of the anterior cerebral circulation].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Soto, Gervith; Pérez-Cruz, Julio; Delgado-Reyes, Luis; Ortega-Gutiérrez, César; Téllez-Palacios, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    As part of a study of the microsurgical anatomy of the pericallosal artery, we describe one brain with three unusual anatomical variants. From the autopsy of a 45 year-old female, we extracted the brain and all the arterial blood vessels were washed off with saline solution to be injected afterwards with red latex. The brain was then immersed in 10% formalin for two months. Finally, we dissected and measured the internal carotid artery segments, using a digital Vernier caliper under a Carl Zeiss OPMI surgical microscope with magnification of 6x up to 40x. The brain's weight was 1250 grams and three rare anatomical variants were found: 1) right accessory middle cerebral artery (ACMA-d), 2) right bihemispheric anterior cerebral artery (ACABihem-d), 3) median artery of the corpus callosum (AMCC). The association of the anatomical variations described previously is inconstant; furthermore, their appearance in a single case is rare.

  13. Electro-Anatomical Four-Dimensional Mapping of Ventricular Tachycardia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pulmonary vein (PV) region reported ulterior stenosis . Anatomic reconstruction by CT has helped understand the frequency of occurrence and effects of PV... stenosis [1]. Our group presented that the bi-atrial activation sequence became well understood when cardiac activity data and anatomic information...through the Aortic Valve, and of deploying the ICE catheter into the LV transseptally via the IVC, through the Fossa Ovalis and through the Mitral

  14. Using Seismic Tomography to Estimate the Magnitude of Lateral Variation in effective Mantle Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammis, C.; Ivins, E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent tomographic views of mantle are used to estimate corresponding lateral variations in effective viscosity under the assumption that temperature fluctuations about spherically symmetric mean values are the sole source of shear wave velocity anomalies.

  15. [Anatomical limits of endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Prades, J M; Veyret, C; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    Constant anatomic boundaries of the lateral mass of the ethnoid are described, based on data from microdissections, endoscopic examinations, computed tomography imaging and histology in 12 subjects. As with surgical progression, identification of these boundaries follows the lateral orbital and superior craniofrontal surfaces. The "starred groove formation", ethmoidal roof lamina and ethmoidosphenoidal recesses are the safety beacons for endonasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopic control.

  16. Methods for Modeling and Decomposing Treatment Effect Variation in Large-Scale Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Peng; Feller, Avi; Miratrix, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature has underscored the critical role of treatment effect variation in estimating and understanding causal effects. This approach, however, is in contrast to much of the foundational research on causal inference. Linear models, for example, classically rely on constant treatment effect assumptions, or treatment effects defined by…

  17. Wide variation in effectiveness of laboratory disinfectants against bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Halfhide, D E; Gannon, B W; Hayes, C M; Roe, J M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an effective disinfectant for the inactivation of the bacteriophages (phages) being used in our laboratory, as published studies on phage inactivation are far from unanimous in their conclusions. The phages studied were three closely related strains of Myoviridae and three strains of Siphoviridae. Three disinfectants which are used commonly in microbiology laboratories were evaluated: Virkon (1%), ethanol (75%) and sodium hypochlorite (2500 ppm available chlorine). The most effective of these was Virkon, which inactivated all six phages rapidly. Ethanol was effective against the Myoviridae but had little effect on the Siphoviridae. Sodium hypochlorite was the least effective of the disinfectants evaluated. The findings of this study demonstrate a wide diversity in the effectiveness of disinfectants tested for inactivation of phages. Of the disinfectants tested Virkon is the most suitable choice for those unable to carry out disinfection validation studies, or where a broad spectrum disinfectant against phages is required. All of the phages in this study showed resilience to inactivation by sodium hypochlorite, and therefore this disinfectant is an unwise choice for use against phage without first assessing its effectiveness.

  18. Variation in pollinator effectiveness in swamp milkweed, Asclepias incarnata (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Ivey, Christopher T; Martinez, Pocholo; Wyatt, Robert

    2003-02-01

    The contribution of a pollinator toward plant fitness (i.e., its "effectiveness") can determine its importance for the plant's evolutionary ecology. We compared pollinators in a population of Asclepias incarnata (Apocynaceae) for several components of pollinator effectiveness over two flowering seasons to evaluate their importance to plant reproduction. Insects of the order Hymenoptera predominate in A. incarnata pollination, but there appears to be no specialization for pollination within this order. Pollinators varied significantly in nearly every component of effectiveness that we measured, including pollen load, removal and deposition of pollen, pollination efficiency (deposition/removal), flower-handling time, and potential for geitonogamy (fractional pollen deposition). The visitation rate of pollinators also varied significantly between years and through time within years. Pollination success and percentage fruit-set of unmanipulated plants in the population also varied significantly between years, and pollination success varied among sample times within years. Most components of effectiveness were weakly correlated, suggesting that the contributions of visitor species toward pollination varied among effectiveness components. Mean flower-handling time, however, was strongly correlated with several components, including pollen removal and deposition, pollination efficiency, and fractional pollen deposition. These findings highlight the significance of pollination variability for plant reproduction and suggest that time-dependent foraging behaviors may play an important role in determining pollinator effectiveness.

  19. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  20. Effects of power variation on cycle performance during simulated hilly time-trials.

    PubMed

    Wells, Marc S; Marwood, Simon

    2016-11-01

    It has previously been shown that cyclists are unable to maintain a constant power output during cycle time-trials on hilly courses. The purpose of the present study is therefore to quantify these effects of power variation using a mathematical model of cycling performance. A hypothetical cyclist (body mass: 70 kg, bicycle mass: 10 kg) was studied using a mathematical model of cycling, which included the effects of acceleration. Performance was modelled over three hypothetical 40-km courses, comprising repeated 2.5-km sections of uphill and downhill with gradients of 1%, 3%, and 6%, respectively. Amplitude (5-15%) and distance (0.31-20.00 km) of variation were modelled over a range of mean power outputs (200-600 W) and compared to sustaining a constant power. Power variation was typically detrimental to performance; these effects were augmented as the amplitude of variation and severity of gradient increased. Varying power every 1.25 km was most detrimental to performance; at a mean power of 200 W, performance was impaired by 43.90 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient). However at the steepest gradients, the effect of power variation was relatively independent of the distance of variation. In contrast, varying power in parallel with changes in gradient improved performance by 188.89 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient) at 200 W. The present data demonstrate that during hilly time-trials, power variation that does not occur in parallel with changes in gradient is detrimental to performance, especially at steeper gradients. These adverse effects are substantially larger than those previously observed during flat, windless time-trials.

  1. [Biotropic effects of geomagnetic storms and their seasonal variations].

    PubMed

    Kuleshova, V P; Pulinets, S A; Sazanova, E A; Kharchenko, A M

    2001-01-01

    A substantial effect of geomagnetic storms on human health with a confidential probability P = 0.95 was revealed. The quantitative estimates of the biotropic effect are presented. For example, the frequency of occurrence of bursts exceeding the average number of hospitalized patients with mental and cardiovascular diseases during magnetic storms increases approximately 2 times compared with quiet periods (based on the data on 1983-84). The frequency of occurrence of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, violation of cardial rhythm, acute violation of brain blood circulation during storms increases 2.1; 1.6; 1.6; 1.5 times, respectively compared with magnetically quiet periods (based on the data of 1992-96). A similarity of the seasonal distribution of the magnitude of the biotropic effect is revealed in the case of myocardial infarction and the number of magnetic storms: a maximum in the equinox and a minimum in summer.

  2. [Medico-biological effect of natural electromagnetic variations].

    PubMed

    Oraevskiĭ, V N; Kuleshova, V P; Gurfinkel', Iu F; Guseva, A V; Rapoport, S I

    1998-01-01

    Emergency ambulance statistical data accumulated in Moscow during March 1983-October 1984 have been analyzed. Diurnal numbers of urgent hospitalization of patients in connection with suicides, mental disorders, myocardial infarction, defects of cerebrum vessels and arterial and venous diseases have been examined. Intensity and duration of planetary geomagnetic storms were used as magnetic activity indices. Comparison of geomagnetic and medical data rows has shown that at least 75% of magnetic storms caused increase in hospitalization of patients with the above-mentioned diseases on 30-80% at average. The dependence of the value of biotropic effect on the duration of effect and intensity of magnetic storm is observed.

  3. The effect of cosmic ray intensity variations and geomagnetic disturbances on the physiological state of aviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Kudela, K.; Stetiarova, J.; Dimitrova, S.; Giannaropoulou, E.

    2011-09-01

    Over the last few years various researches have reached the conclusion that cosmic ray variations and geomagnetic disturbances are related to the condition of the human physiological state. In this study medical data regarding 4018 Slovak aviators were analyzed in relation to daily variations of cosmic ray and geomagnetic activity. Specifically daily data concerning mean values of heart rate which were registered during the medical examinations of the Slovak aviators, were related to daily variations of cosmic ray intensity, as measured by the Neutron Monitor Station on Lomnicky Stit (http://neutronmonitor.ta3.sk/realtime.php3) and the high resolution neutron monitor database (http://www.nmdb.eu) and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices. All subjects were men in good health of age 18-60 yrs. This particular study refers to the time period from 1 January 1994 till 31 December 2002. Statistical methods were applied to establish a statistical significance of the effect of geomagnetic activity levels and cosmic ray intensity variations on the aforementioned physiological parameters for the whole group. The Pearson r-coefficients were calculated and the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) method was applied to establish the statistical significance levels (p-values) of the effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on heart rate up to three days before and three days after the respective events. Results show that there is an underlying effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on the cardiovascular functionality.

  4. Variation in Relevance Judgments and the Measurement of Retrieval Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Ellen M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the test collections developed in the TREC (Text REtrieval Conference) workshops for information retrieval research and describes a study by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) that verified their reliability by investigating the effect changes in the relevance assessments have on the evaluation of retrieval results.…

  5. Color Variations in Screen Text: Effects on Proofreading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szul, Linda; Berry, Louis

    As the use of computers has become more common in society, human engineering and ergonomics have lagged behind the sciences which developed the equipment. Some research has been done in the past on the effects of screen colors on computer use efficiency, but results were inconclusive. This paper describes a study of the impact of screen color…

  6. Variation in developmental time affects mating success and Allee effects

    Treesearch

    Christelle Robinet; Andrew Liebhold; David Gray

    2007-01-01

    A fundamental question in biological conservation and invasion biology is why do some populations go extinct? Allee effects, notably those caused by mate location failure, are potentially key factors leading to the extinction of sparse populations. Several previous studies have focused on the inability of males and females to locate each other in space when populations...

  7. Variation in Relevance Judgments and the Measurement of Retrieval Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Ellen M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the test collections developed in the TREC (Text REtrieval Conference) workshops for information retrieval research and describes a study by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) that verified their reliability by investigating the effect changes in the relevance assessments have on the evaluation of retrieval results.…

  8. Variations in eddy diffusion and associated transport processes. [near turbopause and effects on thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1977-01-01

    Variation in the eddy diffusion coefficient constitutes a momentum source. This variation near the turbopause affects both the composition and the wind and temperature fields of the thermosphere. Two types of calculations are carried out, for horizontal winds considered self-consistently in a three-dimensional dynamic model and horizontal winds artificially suppressed to simulate a one-dimensional model. Momentum transfer associated with variations in eddy diffusion coefficients represents the source function in the analysis presented. It is shown that for long-term variations in the thermosphere, the compositional dependence on variations in eddy diffusion coefficients can be entirely different in one and three dimensional models with horizontal winds included. Horizontal winds can greatly reduce the effects of eddy diffusion in general and the ratio between He and O amplitudes in particular.

  9. Tree growth variation in the tropical forest: understanding effects of temperature, rainfall and CO2.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Peter; Sterck, Frank; Vlam, Mart; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-28

    Tropical forest responses to climatic variability have important consequences for global carbon cycling, but are poorly understood. As empirical, correlative studies cannot disentangle the interactive effects of climatic variables on tree growth, we used a tree growth model (IBTREE) to unravel the climate effects on different physiological pathways and in turn on stem growth variation. We parameterized the model for canopy trees of Toona ciliata (Meliaceae) from a Thai monsoon forest and compared predicted and measured variation from a tree-ring study over a 30-year period. We used historical climatic variation of minimum and maximum day temperature, precipitation and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in different combinations to estimate the contribution of each climate factor in explaining the inter-annual variation in stem growth. Running the model with only variation in maximum temperature and rainfall yielded stem growth patterns that explained almost 70% of the observed inter-annual variation in stem growth. Our results show that maximum temperature had a strong negative effect on the stem growth by increasing respiration, reducing stomatal conductance and thus mitigating a higher transpiration demand, and - to a lesser extent - by directly reducing photosynthesis. Although stem growth was rather weakly sensitive to rain, stem growth variation responded strongly and positively to rainfall variation owing to the strong inter-annual fluctuations in rainfall. Minimum temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration did not significantly contribute to explaining the inter-annual variation in stem growth. Our innovative approach - combining a simulation model with historical data on tree-ring growth and climate - allowed disentangling the effects of strongly correlated climate variables on growth through different physiological pathways. Similar studies on different species and in different forest types are needed to further improve our understanding of the sensitivity of

  10. Ecological effects of aphid abundance, genotypic variation, and contemporary evolution on plants.

    PubMed

    Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-07-01

    Genetic variation and contemporary evolution within populations can shape the strength and nature of species interactions, but the relative importance of these forces compared to other ecological factors is unclear. We conducted a field experiment testing the effects of genotypic variation, abundance, and presence/absence of green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) on the growth, leaf nitrogen, and carbon of two plant species (Brassica napus and Solanum nigrum). Aphid genotype affected B. napus but not S. nigrum biomass explaining 20 and 7% of the total variation, respectively. Averaging across both plant species, the presence/absence of aphids had a 1.6× larger effect size (Cohen's d) than aphid genotype, and aphid abundance had the strongest negative effects on plant biomass explaining 29% of the total variation. On B. napus, aphid genotypes had different effects on leaf nitrogen depending on their abundance. Aphids did not influence leaf nitrogen in S. nigrum nor leaf carbon in either species. We conducted a second experiment in the field to test whether contemporary evolution could affect plant performance. Aphid populations evolved in as little as five generations, but the rate and direction of this evolution did not consistently vary between plant species. On one host species (B. napus), faster evolving populations had greater negative effects on host plant biomass, with aphid evolutionary rate explaining 23% of the variation in host plant biomass. Together, these results show that genetic variation and evolution in an insect herbivore can play important roles in shaping host plant ecology.

  11. Anatomic guide and sonography for surgical repair of leg muscle lacerations.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Hedgepeth, Krystle B; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A; Pahilan, M Elaine; Youssef, Asser M

    2013-09-01

    There were over 110,000 leg laceration cases reported in the United States in 2011. Currently, muscle laceration is repaired by suturing epimysium to epimysium. Tendon-to-tendon repair is stronger, restores the muscle's resting length, and leads to a better functional recovery. Tendons retract into the muscle belly following laceration and surgeons have a difficult time finding them. Many surgeons are unfamiliar with leg muscle anatomy and the fact that the leg muscles have long intramuscular tendons that are not visible in situ. A surgical anatomic guide exists to help surgeons locate forearm tendons; no such guide exists for tendons in the leg. The leg tendon ends of 11 cadavers were dissected, measured, and recorded as percentages of leg length. High-frequency ultrasound was used to locate tendon ends in three additional cadavers. These locations were compared with the actual tendon ends located via dissection. There was little variation in tendon end position within the cadaver group, between men and women or right and left legs. The data are presented as an anatomic guide to inform surgeons of the tendon ends' likely locations in the leg. The location of leg intramuscular tendon ends is predictable and the anatomic guide will help surgeons locate tendon ends and perform tendon-to-tendon repairs. Ultrasound is a potentially effective tool for detection of accurate location of repairable tendon ends in leg muscle lacerations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Variational bounds on the effective moduli of anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.; Kohn, Robert V.

    THE VRITIONAL inequalities of Hashin and Shtrikman are transformed to a simple and concise form. They are used to bound the effective conductivity tensor σ∗ of an anisotropic composite made from an arbitrary number of possibly anisotropic phases, and to bound the effective elasticity tensor C∗ of an anisotropic mixture of two well-ordered isotropic materials. The bounds depend on the conductivities and elastic moduli of the components and their respective volume fractions. When the components are isotropic the conductivity bounds, which constrain the eigenvalues of σ∗, include those previously obtained by Hashin and Shtrikman, Murat and Tartar, and Lurie and Cherkaev. Our approach can also be used in the context of linear elasticity to derive bounds on C∗ for composites comprised of an arbitrary number of anisotropic phases. For two-component composites our bounds are tighter than those obtained by Kantor and Bergman and by Francfort and Murat, and are attained by sequentially layered laminate materials.

  13. Effects of two variations of differential reinforcement on prompt dependency.

    PubMed

    Cividini-Motta, Catia; Ahearn, William H

    2013-01-01

    Prompt dependency is an often referenced but little studied problem. The current study evaluated 2 iterations of differential reinforcement (DR) for overcoming prompt dependency and facilitating skill acquisition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Preference and reinforcer assessments were conducted to determine moderately and highly preferred reinforcers for each participant. Three sets of word-picture relations were taught to each of the participants using 1 of 3 DR procedures. Reinforcement for independent responses entailed delivery of the highest preference stimulus across all 3 procedures. Consequences for prompted responses entailed delivery of the highest preference stimulus (no DR), delivery of the moderately preferred stimulus (DR high/moderate), or no delivery of reinforcers (DR high/extinction). Results indicated that the DR high/moderate condition was most effective for 3 of 4 participants, whereas the DR high/extinction condition was most effective for the remaining participant. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  14. Cohort variatio